35 Burst results for "Massa"

Dan Bongino Predicts Civil Disobedience Very Soon

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Dan Bongino Predicts Civil Disobedience Very Soon

"Maybe it's time for civil disobedience. Maybe it's time for America to give the collective middle finger to this administration, which keeps doing things that don't abide by our constitution. And don't abide by the principles of freedom and liberty. That got us right here. Maybe it's time. You know, I have to tell you I'm actually stunned. It's gone on this long. I am I mean, my my theory on it. I I echo the theory of my Senior year. AP History Teacher in high school Who said that the reason you don't see more collective action in the United States. Sometimes on the civil disobedience front is because we have a prosperous middle class. We've almost been victims of our own success in other words, said more simply, folks. People have a lot to lose. The catch is as more people start having less and less to lose. More people are then motivated to fight back. That's why I said, I don't know when the mass civil disobedience happen. I've seen some outbreaks of, but I saw a video at a school the other day, apparently bound parents got together with about 30. Their kids told their kids. You're not wearing a mask in that school. The someone of someone from the school tried to stop them didn't work. It didn't work. After about 15 minutes, the kids made their way in, and they went to school that day. What are we going to see More of this? I don't know. I wish I had an easy answer, but I suspect it's not far away. You start taking away from people's sovereignty over their bodies. Putting a compound in their bodies they may or may not want You start you start taking away multiple years of a parents and their child's education, wiping out their chance at a future. You start taking away their jobs, threatening their jobs based on taking a vaccine or not, And you just fabricate powers to do it. When are you going to see Massa? Civil disobedience? My suspicion is very, very,

America Massa
"massa" Discussed on The Win-Win Effect

The Win-Win Effect

03:38 min | 3 weeks ago

"massa" Discussed on The Win-Win Effect

"Gave me to speak first conversation and she started teasing me that you can let me talk right. It's a so so there's like stop stops and she's like i have no effing idea what you just said but whenever it was a vision and if you don't have a vision you can't articulate a vision if you can't articulate a vision you can't share it with other people if you can't share it with other people you can't ask him what to do if you can't ask him what to do. They can't do what you want. No wonder you hate your job. I would hate working for you and my response was you're hired right. Whatever you do your thank you thank you thank you. You know so good for her actually saying that to you. Yeah yeah so so what we did behind that was. We did the hard work of cleaning up the vision. We fired seventy cents on the dollar of the customers that didn't fit into what our new vision was. And this is two thousand seven going into two thousand eight and then the recession hit and took another seventy percent like ninety one percent revenue drop Which sort of set us up to to have an idea what a global pandemic would look quite frankly but that guy got data. We're good to that place and we rebuilt from there and Running into coded prior preko bid You know we grew that that that initial vision We were able to stay inside that initial vision roughly two and a half times where we were willing took part in. And that's that's that's how. I mean how i stay hungry or whatever is i remember how miserable it was to hate my job when there was no reason to hate it. I've had more than one bottom like when you are to right like that's one thing but when you're at the bottom and there's nothing wrong it just sucks that's sorta works right i can. There's no like well. If i had this or had this like when you have mostly everything you want and you're still happy that's a really crappy place and that's where i was i had you know had a life that was way better than i deserved but i did want to go to work anymore. I had also similar or so. Freaking similar is insane. That was exactly the bottom for me. As i finally got everything i could potentially ever want out of life and i was like i don't want this. Shit sucks combine physicals board. That was more the feeling that i felt wasn't like i say i hated my job. I just hated the life that i created. Well i think what i mean. There's some people that probably have some strong opinions about what i did. And they've earned him for serve. But but i think i think is best. I can peril. Is i sort of lost myself in trying to be the ceo business owner guy instead of just like showing up and being helpful and trying to figure out where people want to go and how to help them get there his. That's what i lost. Once we got plug back into that. Then i mean there were still playing stakes to me. Made and lessons learned in all sorts of stuff mistakes at full speed for sure but but that i hated my job since then like i mean i could for you. Yeah i mean they're still shows to. You wouldn't be right now. You wouldn't be where you are right. If you didn't really enjoy mean you could tell when someone as a fuzzy like vision and a just not really tapped into their true selves. They're putting on. They have too many mass even know which one they have won. Let walking through my which which color massa today you know you have no idea. They're just being reactive through time. I actually wrote down probably a good eight years ago. i need..

massa
Oregon Governor Kate Brown Issues Outdoor Mask Mandate

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:39 min | Last month

Oregon Governor Kate Brown Issues Outdoor Mask Mandate

"Here's the announcement from the oregon governor. Kate brown today. I'm announcing that effective friday. Twenty seventh mass will be required in all public. Outdoor settings or physical distancing is not possible regardless of vaccination status massa proven to be effective reducing transmission and are unnecessary measure. Right now even some outdoor settings to help us fight coveted and to protect one another alright. Riddle me this batman. How many outdoor activities prohibit social distancing. How does that work. How in the world do you. So in oregon. You must wear a mask outside. And then she adds a caveat. Where social distancing isn't permitted or possible. What does that mean if you're out in the field if you're walking down the street i mean i guess. She means outdoor concerts. Why don't you say that in other words there is unless you're a seat. It's impossible to to not be able to socially distance it's it is coded derangement syndrome. They are making crap up as they go. And every we all know it and it's only these democrat governors who sound like escapees from a mental institution. You're gonna make people wear masks outside.

Kate Brown Oregon Massa Riddle Derangement Syndrome
Hawaii LDS School Removes Student’s God-Given Agency

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:40 min | 2 months ago

Hawaii LDS School Removes Student’s God-Given Agency

"So you are. Lds and the the kind of intersection here is very interesting because in the lds community. I would imagine that having hesitancy towards massa pharmaceutical intervention is a belief a lot of. Lds families have right. So how do they not grant you that medical exemption. i. I don't understand. I find that my health is my responsibility in your health. Is your responsibility right. So my heavenly father blessed me with the gift of agency. That was something. I was worn with something. I was given. I came here. And that's what i believe. I have agency and here in america were given liberty and it's the freedom to choose for ourselves so we have our agency in our liberty and that's not anyone take away from me as my own choice so for the school to say that. Oh i should just get a different vaccine or i get an mri vaccine. Because i should be fine. What how are you allowed to say that. But it's not your government taking that away or church sponsored school and that's where it's hard because i it's not the church but the church sponsors school so it's so it's confusing. You would think. At least. I would that of all places that would at least honor that kind of liberty would be an lds institution harsher and you appeal directly the president directly to the resume. Said no take your risk. You might've right. Thanks for shaw. Yeah and that was the hard part. And i do believe that. So it's not all kirk schools. Byu provo byu. I idaho and pathway. That's not something they've mandated but it is in

Massa America Kirk Schools Byu Provo Byu Shaw Idaho
"massa" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

05:12 min | 7 months ago

"massa" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"Idea the only see ahead follow at the time was african sierra. Because you knew it was the into your receipt. And i didn't follow other tiaras processes after that so i didn't even follow when they drafted the legislation for see. I was trying to pick up the pieces of my life. Strike in my life over after i came into exile but i received a call from a student leader of a high school. One saturday he said is this System massa washington you he you journalist assists. He says sister my group. The students got together. He said the asking for for liberians to nominate people. They won't see see. He says sister with sending your name because we saw the work you did. You are fearless or you. You're smart that's what you say is not me so they say we want someone that you to represent us. The students are sending your name in and as a hawaii but anyway that was a long story an ample sister. Sending your name in a daunting i want to do this because of disillusioned with liberia time. I have the civil war in our went to a lot so i was not ready to engage their country. I was trying to pick up the pieces of my life. In the united states of america i was in looking to be bothered with liberia. Okay but then this student in say you know what. Let me think about it. It's almost almost shock. My younger brother who was a student leader for another school. He called me and said system as we. Just send your name in the students. Just send in. And then if fema call one of the market women that i work with women advocates. She called me one morning and said disabled shitless. You send name of winning and my daughter. We ascend your niimi. So cut a long story short a gut nomination phone bureau in the community from civil society members and other people who saw my work who knew my work and then it was a newspaper editor. A guy who was editor of one of the papers. Not people that. I've worked but assist paper. He called me one thing. I am sending your name in you. Need to be on tlc. Because i know you you don't compromise the choose and he said you'll stubborn. Stop good goodway. He said we need some. And that's how i got. You sound like you have this amazing range of connections and i believe even now You you were very widely across the liberian community outside of the us so taking all of that. Experience into account massa. What's your realistic view. Will there be ever a war crimes tribunal in liberia. Actually when it comes to the issue of walkouts all idea michalis have doomed me. Miss optimistic is because i'm awesome existed for several reasons one. We wanted to happen. Because i knew it will help liberia. Su i'm a community leader. A need to provide hope for my people..

civil war hawaii fema united states of america one thing One saturday one one of the papers washington african sierra one morning liberian michalis liberia massa
"massa" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

04:34 min | 7 months ago

"massa" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"The new generation liberia is reacting to that as massa said like we're weedy so shift of paradigm in liberia. It's as if the justice need to get out of liberia to combat in nigeria and this is also sang to people reported about the trials at the discussion. Reopened my by about jesse's and we saw like really started by the radio starting discussion about it with the first royal. Okay discussion about but this is possible. So if it's possible abroad why not in liberia and for us he has. He had direct impact in terms of security like at first the documentation process was really hidden a more. I'm on we have people coming forward even about crumbs that they have suffered like we can do outreach. Up any in the diplomacy adagietto troops going in a different counties of liberia to discuss the jungle. Jabba trial for example. And the fear shift from the victims to the average trader. And we can see that the changes in the political position and we had. I had no discussion about accountability. Now each change too. Well if you have just his but what about peace so it seems that now is the former perpetrators tried to kennel for trade just cease for peace and we are here to remind them that is not an option like liberia as international obligations prosecuting international crimes and can quickly what we saw so is the start of cooperation of liberia off. Trial like like for the first time alot foreign security to investigate war crimes burial so this was a few years ago started like that and now we have these groundbreaking case where does a jubilant massacre trial would be heard in liberia. This is this is. This is really incredible and we are very grateful that this change and now i think to eighteen like we have seen a different conference is being built and i think the last step was in two thousand nineteen it was like the bar association draft a bill for the sitting up of a walk from caught in liberia. And so it's talked with the covid situation and everything but there is really like a huge movement taken by by the librarians. Themselves like seeing what is happening abroad and now it's bought and maybe now it's time to do something in liberia. Can i also ask you to help us back a little bit. Because we've mentioned already that you were a commissioner on the the truth and reconciliation commission. That did a huge amounts were coming. Four years worth of intensive work hearing from all kinds of different witnesses about what happened and i know positive recommendations. Were for a war crimes tribunal which hasn't happened yet and many other different recommendations but could you just give us a bit of an insight into how that trc waugh's received the time. I mean do people actually wanted to happen or were. They a bit annoyed by what you were doing. Or how did it feel in liberia. Doing is polarized on all different fronts on the ethnic brand and says the war happened. You have liberians who us. Sunlight beers are still loyal to the former factions in the owned waller's and then have liberians being part of is on the political front. You have liberians. Who will support a particular precedent for example oil particular government for example. And then you have civil society on the other hand than wants something something else. So we operate with team that atmosphere of massive of the country and and then also who who elect at the extreme end of the poverty. Line that we didn't think a trc will served the interests because the issue was well. Our families have been killed. Our winners have been taken away from us as the irish going to help. The woman who has children feed children who husband has been killed heist..

nigeria Four years each eighteen first time two thousand first royal few years ago massa truth and reconciliation jesse irish liberia Jabba nineteen
"massa" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

03:42 min | 7 months ago

"massa" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"From a bear today we are tackling one of the fruits of universal jurisdiction. The explosion in the number of trials. All over the world. That deal with the horace if the first liberian civil war it essentially spend the nine hundred ninety s and a quarter of a million people died. These trials are real phenomenon up until recently we'd only had the liberian president. Charles taylor this special court for sierra leone. Where he hasn't tried for anything actually did in liberia. We've got now. Finland were gabriel mccoy. Koi is on trial for murder. Rape and using child soldiers in berea while he was commander in the revolutionary united front. The he wasn't prosecuted by the special court before because he was one of the inside witnesses. Also this month in switzerland at the federal criminal court in the city of belen zona. We have the trial of allieu. Kosheh a former commander of the united liberation movement of liberia for democracy. An armed group whether we may better known by the acronym of ulimo kasha is first liberian to be put on trial for alleged war crimes committed during the first civil war and further back. We have jungled jabber. That was his toge- in the united states in philadelphia. He was convicted of lying on his asylum. Request so immigration. Ford basically about being commander in ulimo in the rebel group and how he was responsible for murder torture sexual slavery child soldiers to examine this trend of universal jurisdiction trial for liberian crimes and to give us insight in how these cases are playing back. Home we are joined by a minimum of sean from the swiss and jokes. He vetos maxima high emmanuel. Hello happy with hugely emmanuel is the head of the legal unit and senior legal counsel and that means that she's kind of the legal strategist and she'll tell us how much work goes into the research and development of these cases and bringing a suspect the attention of local governments and law enforcement and what kind of advocacy. She needs to do to push them forward. And we also have massa emilia washington. She's a former commissioner of the liberia truth commission and a former award winning journalist high buster. I guys matter observed the jungle jabber trial in her current home in philadelphia. And we're going to be asking her about that also about the results and maybe through some moves towards maybe some pressure towards war crimes tribunal in liberia. How this new rash of prosecutions is being seen by new generation. The new generation who didn't actually experience the civil war themselves but first we're going to go back to immanuel and can you explain a bit. The cases that are happening and what role is keeping us maxima playing in them. So i would say that everything started by the meeting of two persons of analogy actual director of civitas maxima and assembly with the girl for sister organization. The robot justice research project so alan was a prosecutor special could for sierra leone and emit assan told him about the leg of accountability neighborhood country liberia. And fact i've been to severe one. Nothing happen and and also in mine is experience in cambodia where it was a lawyer for the victims of the khmer rouge regime. Where in cambodia the end you are an important role in the documentation of of the war. So you had one ngo called dc cam lou yours..

Charles taylor switzerland gabriel mccoy Kosheh cambodia philadelphia belen zona today liberia truth commission berea two persons this month liberia civil war emit assan alan nine hundred ninety s liberian civil war a quarter of a million people Koi
"massa" Discussed on Impact Pricing

Impact Pricing

02:41 min | 9 months ago

"massa" Discussed on Impact Pricing

"A markup and that was okay right cell from a mere let's say theoretical perspective cost plus seems to indicate. Hey that's a fair price at the end. And i think even today in our world people look at cost plus as fair. Yeah definite so yeah because everybody understands that that was the cost. Of course the company it needs to source material needs to distribute stuff and and it's accepted. It's widely accepted by the way. I had once a really nice massa thesis from one of my students that was a question saying okay if i adjust prices and that was an online ecommerce setting so if i had just my prices and i'm not giving you the reason why i just justify prices so for example i increased cell. How would you then perceive this to be and then student kind of created like a fairness index. So you ask certain questions. And you're able to create this kind of index and you know what just giving no reason perform foul worse than giving the reason. Hey i had to increase because of cost. I had to increase because of competition so this actually scored better results with customers versus the scenario. Just saying nothing so because competition because certain market developments and cost seems to be something as a sphere for the consumers so that was quite an interesting resulted. I could easily see where blaming costs. Increasing costs is a is a reason that people would accept a price increase. Now here's a really interesting one because if you're going to think about cost plus defining fair how do you price software so the price of software is never fair because the incremental cost is always really close to zero four. Yeah mean with with software we we have seen the we have seen value again. Value based approaches perform like nicely with with customer so the very famous kind of ten x approach seems to solve the equation causing the narrative. There is hey look basically. I have fewer software. Let's assume it saves you like two hours of your daily work routine so two hours that you could like technically us. You know somewhere else so you have those opportunity costs and i am willing now to.

massa
The Basilisks Stare feat. Nabiyah Be & Evan Whitten

Circle Round

04:29 min | 11 months ago

The Basilisks Stare feat. Nabiyah Be & Evan Whitten

"Once upon a time there was an armourer named martin. Martin spent his days working with metal using it to create glistening swords sparkling shields and full suits of yes glittering armor and everyone agreed that of all the arms in the city. Martin was the greatest. Oh you should see. The sword mar made for me last week. It schumer's like moonlight on the water. Well you should see the shield he made for me. It glistened like the stars. I don't doubt it. The suit of armor he made for me is so shining so bright. It's reflects i chimera. Martin lived with his children natalia. And conrad in a tiny house at the edge of town. Martin's shop was in the basement talia and conrad loved traipsing down the steps to watch their father work i. He retired on his thick leather apron. Then he would heat up his medal into glow to fiery yellowish orange and grew soft and bendable after that he would use a heavy iron hammer to forge the metal into all different shapes. Then you would let the metal cool and he polished rubbing and scrubbing until indeed. It reflected like a mirror one summer morning. Martin told natalia conrad that he would be gone for the day on business. Listen you to. I need to deliver a full suit of armor to a customer who lives far off in the countryside. He turned to natalia natalia. You're the oldest. So i want you to look after your little brother. While i'm gone of course father i'd be happy to conrad rolled his eyes. Oh come on father. I don't need my older sister to babysit. I'm a big kid now. I know you're a big kid. Conrad and getting bigger every day. But for now you'll do. Your sister says hokey dokie. I have a long trip ahead of me. Need to skedaddle. Have fun today. My dears martin kissed his children goodbye and out the door as he disappeared down the street. Natalia turned to conrad with twinkling eyes. I have an idea little brother. The circus is in town. They're performing in the market square right in the middle of the city. Would you like to see it. Conrad's face broke into a grin. You bet i liked to see the circus. Let's go when natalia and conrad reached the market square. They were greeted by all sorts of enchanting sites. Agile walkers tiptoeing towering tightropes graceful acrobats swinging from flying trapezes plus nimble-fingered jugglers funny face clowns and hearted riders standing breath and tall on the backs of gleaming galloping horses during a break in the show. Natalia and conrad wandered around the square and saw vendors selling all sorts of goodies toys. Books candies but then. Hey natalia something else caught conrad's look over there. Look conrad pointed toward a jagged heap of stones in a shadowy narrow alley off the square. There's the old stone building to one worthy. Say the bacilus cliffs. Natalia felt her blood run. Cold everyone in town knew the legend of the basilisk. It was said that the bacilus kept the body of a dragon. The head of a rooster tail of a serpent down in the dink dark cellar of the old stone building. The bacilus stood guard over a magnificent treasure and if you stared into the bacilus glowing red eyes you would immediately turn to stone so sister conrad's mouth lifted into a mischievous smile. Are you thinking what i'm thinking. Natalia's is grew wide. Wait a minute brother. Your not thinking of actually going in there are you. What about the bassil. Ihsc bacilus sh- massa lisk don't be such a 'fraidy cat sys like dads said. I'm a big kid now. And i'm going to prove it

Conrad Martin Natalia Natalia Conrad Natalia Natalia Hokey Dokie Schumer Talia Bassil
"massa" Discussed on Question Your Answers

Question Your Answers

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"massa" Discussed on Question Your Answers

"Absolutely. Well it was. Our relationship was. Just very rocky from the beginning with my father. And of course, I came with the new language in the new way of looking at things I came to understand why my father was like that that he had a father that was like that. and. So just kind of passed down to him he didn't know any other way and but my heart wasn't in that place all the time to even look there or go there try to understand things from his perspective. Because I was so hurt and angry with some of the things my father did there was one specific incident tonight told this story in? Massa's when I was sixteen years old, I started to play the saxophone. And it was something that was really good at the music teacher was telling me that if I put time into this I could be really good and. But I told my father that I even was playing the saxophone. Might my mother secretly got the saxophone for me? And we grew up at a that was all about sports and athletics and you weren't in sports and athletics, nobody cared what you're into. But I I happen to be an athlete, my brothers also so we were o Kay in town with with sports athletics but with my father, if you wanted to show some diversity and do something else possibly it was hard for him. To really handle that or it's really understand that. And I remember the day I went to him and told him what the music teacher said and What I wanted to do, and I didn't have to give up sports I could still play sports i. just had to give up one of the sports maybe to play the saxophone. And my father went into a rage about the whole and it just shocked me as a sixteen year. Old Kid. Might Perspective of him going into a rage I could not understand that at. All I?.

Massa
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 1 year ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Happiness is Like Shopping For a New Home

The Daily Boost

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Happiness is Like Shopping For a New Home

"Now let me ask you a question. Have you ever found yourself? Meandering around had an idea. And then kind of went off after Kana sort of and it well okay. Let me get to the story here. So my daughter. Looking for a home I've been looking for a home over the past couple of years not right now on a world where I am right now but it had a couple of folks who have called me recently, they're looking for homes as well. Something to do with the interest rates the way they are being seriously low and folks are moving around. So a friend call me and she had been living in her forever home for two years that was about it. And I listen really closely about what was happening about what was going on and everything she was going through and just smiled. I. Smiled have you ever done that have you ever heard somebody and you're like? I have heard the story like ten thousand times before maybe more importantly, you've lived about ten thousand times before. and. That's exactly what I heard and this wisdom was coming to my mind. We call it Scott logic around here. The wisdom was this. I just one thing. Whether it's home. Whether it's getting happiness or just about anything else in the world, it always seems to go on way. It happens it. Why is that? I had I know the answer that I too. I thought for a minute I was going to stop myself but occasionally I surprised myself. Or human. It's a very complicated world, and if you're like me, it's very complicated. Mind that inhabits your head. or human the wind blows humidity goes up and down the rain comes down the sunshines and then we gotta go what am I gonNa do with all this stuff I got a yard demo. It's confusing. Isn't it sometimes? So, it's just human. So just accepted as being human but Scott Superhuman maximizing human potential sure yard, but you're still human. After a long week, even superhumans get tired and have a beer on Friday night. Or Two. But sometimes, you want something different, right? An idea pops into your head. And you don't WanNa sit there on the fence and drivers crazy 'cause you got three choices you know that right? Longtime ago if an idea pops into your head, you're either GonNa go do something about it. You're not going to do anything about it. Or you'RE GONNA send the middle and go what am I gonna about it. The first two are cool because either you do it or you don't the one in the middle will drive you crazy. But what happens is people get an idea how it's in my head. Now it's lingering around there right side talking to you all the time. You may not know what you mean by you want something different. You're the boss of you right. And since you're the boss you I know you said things and thought things before you really don't know what the hell you talking about. Listen I I'm like you I really don't specifically know what I mean by that. I will tell you having done what I've been for very long time when people call me and their specific about what they want. It's really cool because it's either really okay. I shouldn't say this but you know sometimes you hear people specifically like, what are you thinking? But at least we have a starting point. Or maybe sometimes it Massa great idea. Go do just like that. But when they're in the middle kind of meander around, they don't really know what they mean by that. That's Kinda hard to do. So this is the trajectory the here's what happens when when you are out there. This is why happiness is kind of like shopping for a new home. You want some different. But you don't know quite what it means. When you say that? then. What happens? You settle into. I'll I'll know when I see it mode and what do you do you start exploring? You'd out there I love that part. and. Then your search becomes all consuming it's like buying a house. If you've ever shopped for a home, you know it's like, why have no really idea what I want? I don't even know where I wanna be not really sure exactly how much I could afford I'm not sure how much space I need I. Don't Know How long I'm GonNa live. There are the schools good and everything else. I don't even know by God. There's nothing on the market those sellers they went all the money in the world I don't have that I'm giving up now. Tell me I'm not right on that one. Your search becomes so time consuming. You start to get stressed out a lot when you're going after your dreams by the way. And what do you do? Most people stop. But then something happens you're stopping you're. Not GonNa Change Darn thing I don't care what I was thinking even though I didn't know what I was thinking I'm not going anywhere I'm stopping because you know why I don't even know what I was looking for, and now it's all stressing me out. I can't do this anymore and then suddenly Tam perfectly the perfect opportunity. The fill in the blank perfect house perfect happiness perfect job perfect whatever the thing that you were looking for even though you didn't know what you're looking for. It shows up and you. Cool see I can see now that's what happens next.

Scott TAM Massa
"massa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"massa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"One of the neighborhoods hearing thought I Massa capitalize we can say and waiting for our clients to come downstairs and then I leave that it's sad to have safely without any contact with all nonessential business shops many of Susan's friends lost work after the outbreak but she says they've quickly found it elsewhere people who attacked a change for example my hairdresser is now the one labeling the packages in the local meat factory and nobody's sitting at home thinking that okay let's see what tomorrow brings people are taking actions hi I'm new here a new forest is donning into the daily crisis centimeter conference she's on the team set up by the local authority to work out how best to help islanders get through life in quarantine she says they've been through a locked down before the very first time since Soviet occupation people need permits to enter at this time it is said because of our three well to protect our people and their health another Islander Toma Vicky recalls for us as he walks around the capital Carissa all he tells us how his hometown has changed on the background is the main square grandson usually bustling around mid day like now today there are of course nobody a storm of gets into his call to leave the intensity for home he recalls hopeful feelings.

Susan Toma Vicky Massa
Life on Estonia's 'corona island'

BBC World Service

02:53 min | 1 year ago

Life on Estonia's 'corona island'

"Our European island off the coast of Estonia has been labeled as corona island after becoming the hot spot for the virus and being placed into strict quarantine the first covered nineteen cases on the island of Saaremaa and emerged a month ago after sports event was held there with the team from Italy now health officials estimate that Harvey island's population have virus it's the story of what is going on from a Europe reporter Gavin lake this is the sound of a volleyball match on the island of Saaremaa in the beginning of March one and a half thousand people packed into the island's only sports center to watch the local men's side against an away team from Milan the power volleyed Malone who scored and it was a short time after that that some of the some remote team fell ill in the island's first coronavirus cases were reported this game is widely seen as the main reason why summer mall has become a hot spot for comfort nineteen cases in Estonia and what the population of thirty three thousand have been quarantined from the mainland no one can travel in a leaf obviously we can't get to the island because of the restrictions but the islanders have been recording for us how they're coping hello Susan here from Saddam Susan Ryan who used to work in an office for cooperative selling the items produce now she's delivering food and locally made produce due to do so we are now one of the neighborhoods hearing thought I Massa capitalize we can say and waiting for our clients to come downstairs and then on the back pressure is said to have safely without any contact with all nonessential business yet many of Susan's friends lost work after the outbreak but she says they've quickly found it elsewhere people who have to change for example from my hairdresser is now the one labeling the packages in the local meat factory and nobody sitting at home thinking that okay let's see what tomorrow brings people are taking actions hi I'm new here all recipes dining into the daily crisis intermediate conference he's on the team set up by the local authority to work out how best to help islanders get through life in quarantine she says they've been through a locked down before the very first time since of interpretation people need permits to enter at this time it is said because of our free well to protect our people and their health another Islander Toma Vicky recalls for us as he walks around the capsule Carissa all he tells us how his hometown has changed in the background is the main square grandson usually bustling around mid day like now today there are of course

Estonia Corona Island Saaremaa Italy Gavin Lake Milan Malone Saddam Susan Ryan Toma Vicky Carissa Europe Reporter Volleyball Massa
Preacher to Pope Francis: Coronavirus reminds us we're all mortal

Mark Blazor

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Preacher to Pope Francis: Coronavirus reminds us we're all mortal

"Pope Francis has prostrate himself in a nearly empty St Peter's basilica in a good Friday service in a sign of obedience humility the pope heard the papal preacher Savy covert nineteen pandemic has alerted people to the danger of thinking themselves all powerful as Francis listened attentively the Reverend ready aero counselor Massa said that it took nearly the smallest and most foremost element of nature of virus to remind us that we are mortal and that military power and technology are not sufficient to save us the prayer service held without rank and file faithful as part of containment measures against the viruses spread

Pope Francis Massa St Peter's Basilica
"massa" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"massa" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Is visible so they're really on our page which they didn't used to be I mean they they absolutely clear that there is such a thing as invisible matter in fact most of the universe is invisible Massa but one particular paragraph on the NASA site really interested me and I'll just read a little bit of if I may thank you please another explanation for dark energy it says is that it is a new kind of dynamical energy flow it'll field something that fills all of space but something whose affect on the expansion of the universe is the opposite of that matter a normal energy some theorists of names this quintessence after the fifth element of the Greek philosophers now we've not mention that George is the group the fifth element of the Greek philosophers is it so I've got to also signed his name to off to that Greek word AT T. H. E. R. or where is serious that is really the basis of alchemy it's the basis even pass more importantly of yoga philosophy the concept of prong of the concept of chi and so even on the NASA site and I think this is a wonderful thing you have a move or suggestion anyway and the need to move towards these mystical spiritual concepts in order to explain matter in the universe and in terms of your foes their ability to to to disappear the concept that Helen shaman came up invisible aliens you that was a pretty lady it was interesting and unique for her to say that wasn't it really was and it really struck me and it's absolutely in line with certainly what doctor king was saying when he started our organization in nineteen fifty five but I think was a coming together I mean even you can you can look at a moral the talks organization not the Catholic Church and you'll find caught the late cardinal I'm sorry Monsignor Balducci G. who who was very close I'm sure you've covered him before yes but he he you know looked at the possibility of beings with less material substance than ourselves another key phrase my very different courts I'm not you know I know the pope was offered to baptize aliens I don't think that the queue of full that that but in a way it's a good thing they're opening up the door to this possibility and everyone needs to move I think in that direction I don't think one can own to the great spiritual all scientific questions now without addressing life in on other planets since all this has been going on the media coverage is still a little questionable with regards to your phones don't you think I couldn't agree more on may I give an example of this on Sunday this just gone two days ago and the biggest selling newspaper in in Britain and actually I once wrote a front page about an encounter between the equity of the of that you could read impress the husband of the queen with at an alien intelligence was on the front page of this type is called the sun but I noticed on Sunday they had something like nine whole pages about prince Harry in Macon all my god yeah was everywhere I don't know what she's hit the news that will they she has since she's had some of our cable outlets and stuff like that so I had to go all the way through to page fourteen having gone through the whole pages about this in and to find a tiny little article just about three inches long which actually revealed the fact that the US navy has admitted they've got secret footage of a UFO encounter and I think that illustrates you're very point George I mean no the media still haven't caught up thank goodness for programs like well you'll program I think is is is absolutely crucial and all will and we keep pushing it and all the small podcast other talking about it they all help to indeed I mean everyone is putting out the truth and it's still not always easy and you can still get some even abuse put which is amazing to think but it's not in tune with the public and I think that making a big mistake because one editor in in in what we used to call of your fleet street which is where a lot of the newspapers were plain to me when I I brought him some provable truth any didn't dispute it was provable truth about UFOs and if there is society but he said Richard he said we aren't here to publish the truth we're here to publish the truth the people want to read and that I think is is the essence of it it's it's what people want to read that they will what they think they want to read because actually I don't think there in June when you think that there was a poll which you may well of cover the Gallup poll last year last September that sixteen percent of US adults think they've seen a UFO which is over fifty million people event that's the entire adult population of Britain probably this huge Richard we're gonna take a quick break we'll come back with more on coast to coast AM never miss a detail on.

Massa
Why Words Matter in an Amazon Listing

Amazing FBA

06:09 min | 1 year ago

Why Words Matter in an Amazon Listing

"Why was actually Massa. In an Amazon listing. Have you got any evidence that they actually matter. So they matter for for a whole variety of reasons so you know obviously the words that you include are actually going to impact your indexing. So you're not using the right keywords than nobody is going to find you but they also can really impact the bottom line of your business and they do that in a way that lasts for as long as you're doing it. Obviously you want to continue to be updating. You're listening to stay relevant. But by properly optimized senior listing you can significantly impact the bottom line of business. I was actually speaking with a client recently. And they're not selling seasonal products at all We work on their lists around June. At that time they already had a really good conversion rate. They were staying at twenty five point six percents after they updated their seen their conversion rate increase and stayed increased to thirty thirty four point. Seven seven percent Thirty seven point five percent increase for just that one thing that they did. That's not even talking about driving extra traffic so that means that more people that you're already having come to your page whether they're coming organically or through any of your other marketing efforts. More of those people are going searching more than one in every three people are going to click ads ads awesome. I love your precision where it took him about before the show that I'm kind of Ebbe intimidatingly thorough as as a an interview and that's sometimes true because I've been unfocused with. UK basically. Not What do you do again. But they kind of like us and tell me a little bit about something on Amazon like really general but seven point five percent or whatever it was to the second decimal place I like it but so tell me about this. I liked you position that speaks some of my at my cheers. Pose the pretty body with thoroughness. To to put a lightly my wife would call it the former thing. But you're right these details demanded but that's not a subtle jump. Anyone twenty five percent to thirty seven accent as you say almost a quarter of people who visit the listing bind to a third a lot of extra money this as you say pretty much pure profit. Because they'll be paying for the traffic and one full more of the either because they've they've worked hard to launch their products and got organic ranking andled as to advertising so tell me about that optimization was purely a words change was that woods plus image change so that was everything including reassessing the keywords that we were using that was also creating an amazing core listing. I believe at that that one would also upgraded to ABC that time and then we created some fantastic info for graphic text. As well as what I mean by IMPO. Graphic texts is not just letting those images Dan on their own but actually creating some text to help. Make sure that the message that you want to get across is getting across with every single fixture on your this. Yeah and that's something. I want to dive into because I do think that integrates text is more to it than meets the eye because I was working with the the day and actually he puts so most Texans images I said look you know this is is going to be unreadable on mobile. It doesn't look good. It's not making a point. That has not boiling down your thoughts and then bullying them down and then boiling down again right. I know one famous copywriter use to as I understand it Charged six times as much for headline as he would for the first few paragraphs progressive copy which is interesting right because the rewriting semi sweat. Yes I would. I would argue that the fewer words more challenging the job and just the point of thumb or rule of them for IMSA graphic checks. If you're needing to zoom in to read the photo then you probably are including reading too much tax than you need to reel it back so you don't need to overload people with something. The text should really be supporting the message and helping to emphasize wine line. Or maybe a couple of key points shouldn't be bouncing all over the place giving them the full text heavy at. That's not appealing absolutely but a lot of people do thank you for flagging that up. I think it's a very good good point. That all right so coming back to this question of do words matter and it sounds like a a dumb question because obviously to some degree they do but I mean the sixty four thousand dollar question I suppose is to what extent was compared to images. I'm not the kind of impossible taste. Unless you're going to see some really weird split test where you write some really horrible listings with beautiful face cross but in your experience. Have you got some numbers or you'd have to give it to the second decimal place but some kind of experience case studies indicate the power of words as distinct from photographs for example if you have split tennis different tax but kept the photos the same so what I'm talking about with this particular client. Actually they didn't create any new images and they didn't upload any new images Obviously a updating the ABC is going going to impact things that the images were the same so that was really just looking at the power of words for that particular example. And you also. I don't WanNa be thinking about the different type of shoppers. So it's different people words matter in different degrees right and so you WanNa make sure that whatever ever kind of shopper. person is that you're going to be able to give give them what they need to make a confident choice that your or product is the correct product for their needs. And of course they're going to be the casual visuals shoppers but maybe visual shoppers also have a few key points they they really need to know about your products and so they're going to have to go to your listing and then if they get air and they're seeing weird stuff you know grammatical errors incomplete information Can't even find what they want. Then that's giving them an opportunity to go elsewhere and you really want to minimize the chance for. Somebody's mind to wander question or to do anything that might make that competitor. That's advertising in your molesting a very tempting

Amazon ABC Massa Imsa UK DAN
Analogue Pocket Portable Gaming Handheld Announced

Game Scoop!

04:09 min | 2 years ago

Analogue Pocket Portable Gaming Handheld Announced

"Analog pocket very cool hint held a new device that plays all game boy games and plus there's an adapted to play other classic handle games from game gear links neo Geo pocket color it's from the guys that brought you the into the superintendent the Mega S G S G think so so these guys make fantastic re-creations of classic consoles that don't use emulate Asian that means it's not like a retro by you have to actually supply your own cartridges but it's the best way to play classic game these today without Emulation basically thinks it's a super nintendo when it's when it's built the right so dumb doesn't no definitely not using any any kind of but they also like hook up really easily two TV's awesome excited this has that cradle because it has a doc doc just like a a switch and it's just like plug and play Your Game Boy Games on TV One of my questions this which is the whole point of the analog is that it's hard to hook up these consoles to modern televisions whereas the analog has hdmi out like remove those barriers but with a handheld did you don't have the like like why should I buy this instead of just buying like a gameboy advance S. P. to play at Jesus still have a thing with screens that plays your old yeah and also as a super resolution like and by the way I'm honestly asking what now it has incredibly high resolution screen so it's a nice screen oh it's amazing surprised that I mean the best screen of any handle device ever switch what about the ipad no what about what about the IPAD but like a dedicated gaming vice yeah it is better than the switch I think and it also plays Not Just not just game boy advance games play when you're in the game added you can feel it is it is a screen backlit yeah it's an it's a steady stream that's an upgrade from gameboy right but there's plenty of things at play Gameboy with Nice backwards screens so you're right that you know you might not need this if you have a really nice game boy ds light just like there's a lot of this and a lot of people there are probably GonNa Massa Atari Lynx Games I do want one like I'm not trying to be critical of it like I have a massive pile of Gameboy and gameboy color NBA cards and the Gameboy advance in my house somewhere but I haven't seen one in year so gameboy advance library is like it's important untapped like raising libraries of all time it's it's it's super nintendo quality at a bigger library yeah by threefold advance this love Chevalier on there you know you probably don't want did you don't WanNa play ninety percent of those game what about X. versus ever Yeah probably not that one I think we get that for twenty questions sometimes anyway I think very cool it's coming next year two hundred dollars some people are balking at that price some people are balking at that price does it come with the adapters I think I'm not sure if it comes with the adapters and it does not come with the duck the DOC is sold separately right your parents help you hook it up I think it looks really cool I like the I liked the same way Oh crap what's the name of the thing but the crank play play lady I probably up to yeah it's got a similar vibe to in it just feels this is very unscientific but just I'm drawn to the industrial design of it that very intangible beautiful yeah yeah even the DOC is beautiful like the setup event The libraries of games available for these systems is like the the shovellers cheaper them but like the games that are good are really expensive they're not they're not five dollar games anymore twenty dollar games or more than that that's unfortunate but they're really good games there it's also very easy to emulate those on many other things that have great screen so I don't know how this will do but it's four specific audience like the other analog things and for me I love having Super Nintendo and Nintendo hooked up to my TV anytime I don't have a bunch of those and my new systems and I think this would fit really nicely between now

Two Hundred Dollars Ninety Percent Twenty Dollar Five Dollar
The Vienna Woods Killer AKA the Poet of Death - Part 2

Serial Killers

06:56 min | 2 years ago

The Vienna Woods Killer AKA the Poet of Death - Part 2

"Week we covered jacqueline travers mysterious childhood and how he went from Patty criminal to murderer after receiving a life sentence in prison he was able to transform public perception about him through his memoir but once he secured his release he immediately began killing again today. We'll conclude our exploration into the poet of death. Johann Oh Han Jack wound vaguer while in prison for the murder your of eighteen year old Margaret Shaeffer Jack Vega wrote and published his nineteen eighty-four Memoir Vega Foia or purgatory in it. He largely embellishes relishes a horrendous childhood living with his grandfather due to his excessive hyperbole. The memoir helped Jack cultivate an image that garnered sympathy sympathy from Australia's literary elite and prison reform activists. He became a celebrated author writing short stories plays and and children's stories to go along with his bestselling autobiography he successively trick them all into thinking that prison had rehabilitated him in nineteen ninety ninety. Jack Otter Vicar was released upon his release. He continued his charade as a changed man he became a celebrity giving book readings things in interviews but on September Fifteenth Nineteen Ninety just four months after he regained his freedom. Jack began a whole new murder spree spree. His first victim was thirty year old. Blanca botch Gavaa in Prague this week will cover Jack's continuous murder spree throughout route nineteen ninety and nineteen ninety-one has he moved from Austria to California then we'll cover the international efforts to bring Jack to justice. Thanks in large part are to a retired detective. One of the only ones who saw through Jack's reformed literary Genius Act after Jack Murdered Blunk Bochco vow while interviewing sex workers in Prague he returned to Vienna and began production on a play the piece was entitled Dungeon and served as a sequel to purgatory instead of just staying in Vienna. Jack was taking the play on tour. He was hoping for it to become his first big literary success post-prison. Unfortunately it was neither a critical nor financial success and the lack of appraise angered Jack October twenty six one thousand nine hundred ninety while Jack was in grottes possibly with the tour thirty nine year old sex worker Brune Hilda Hilda Massa disappeared in Austria. Sex Work is legal and highly regulated women must register with the police and are not allowed to begin working until the age of nineteen. The authorities are constantly in the know when it comes to the women working on the streets so when police learned of the disappearance of Brune held Hilda Masa it gave them a great deal of concern as the police scratch their heads over Broom Hilda's disappearance Jack in the tour traveled to Dornbirn a small town four hundred miles west of Vienna near the border of Austria and Switzerland on December fifth one thousand nine hundred ninety according to biographer John Leaks while in Dornbirn Dornbirn Jack called a friend of his and complained about the tepid response dungeon was receiving throughout the tour. The friend recalled that Jack was completely arrate. She tried to calm him down but he hung up on her still in a rage that night jack room the the streets of brigands seven miles north of Dornbirn to cool down. He needed to find a way to blow off some steam. Sadly the victim of Jack's rage would be thirty one year old sex sex worker. Heidi Marie Hammer Heidemarie vanished from her usual spot of the night of December fifth on New Year's Eve a couple of hikers making their way through the woods outside the city discovered Heidemarie Body. She was partially naked exposed from the waist down wrapped around her neck was is her pantyhose which had been used to strangle her to death a few days later on January Fifth Nineteen ninety-one Brune Hilda masses partially naked body body was discovered in the woods by a couple of kids playing there there had been a year and a half gap between the murders of Meriva Horvat and Margaret Shaeffer now while Jack was only waiting a month in between kills it appeared as Jack was evolving Vanessa's going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode please I note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for the show. Thanks Greg last week. We discussed how jack suffered from narcissistic personality disorder however since his release from prison it is possible that Jackson. PD evolved into malignant narcissism malignant narcissism is a blending of NPD with antisocial personality disorder as Rhonda Freeman PhD writes in her article for psychology she today people with this condition have extremely fragile egos and self esteem they can have occurrences of unstable impulsive or aggressive aggressive behavior. It's quite possible that the poor reception of Dungeon hurt Jax Egos so much that drove him to kill while on the road and at the start of the New Year nineteen ninety-one Jackson the process of moving on from the failures of Dungeon by focusing on his next play scream of fear scream of fear was a short play about AIDS Jackass said lost friends to the disease while in prison throughout the eighties during the AIDS crisis he became increasingly worried about the rising death toll and wanted to bring awareness to it scream of fear premiered in Vienna on February February seventeenth nineteen ninety-one it then travelled to seven other cities across Australia while we don't have confirmed proof that scream of fear was met met with the same response as Dungeon. It is quite possible that it did because while the play was on Tour Jack Struck again on March seventh seventh nineteen ninety-one sex worker Alfreda shrimp disappeared from her corner in Grottes Austria about one hundred twenty miles south of Vienna Elfriede has case ace proved slightly different from Jack previous murders a few days after a free to disappeared. Jack called off Rita's parents and taunted them. What made the calls halls even more nefarious was that the families phone number was unlisted in the phone book. It's possible that check forestall free to give them the number just before he strangled her

Johann Oh Han Jack Jack Otter Vicar Margaret Shaeffer Jack Vega Nineteen Ninety Murder Vienna Brune Hilda Hilda Massa Dornbirn Broom Hilda Dornbirn Dornbirn Austria Australia Jacqueline Travers Grottes Austria Jackson Patty Prague Vienna Elfriede Antisocial Personality Disorde Heidi Marie Hammer Heidemarie
To return to the Moon, astronauts need new spacesuits

SPACE NEWS POD

07:01 min | 2 years ago

To return to the Moon, astronauts need new spacesuits

"We're going to be talking a bound an astronaut a nasa astronaut actually that is telling nasa that they need a new space suit for for their twenty twenty four artists missions now the artist mission is going to be sending the first woman in the next man. The surface of the moon in nasa is still using technology from the seventies basically and and their space suits of the they've been upgraded and you know they've been enhanced a little bit but they're basically you know the the kind of the same suits as they were back back then and sandra sandy magnus who's a flight tested former nasa astronaut let nasa know that they have a big problem during an official meeting of space flight safety experts in houston texas on friday so nasr's aerospace safety advisory panel both the ACT up which is an independent group who has represented by magnus held its quarterly meeting at johnson space center asep is tasked the valuating nasa safety performance in advising the agency on ways to improve their performance so since it's were going back to the moon really soon. It's only five years from now. We're going to need new technology. We're going to need new spacesuits. We're going to need a way for our nasa the astronauts to <hes> beyond the surface of the moon safely were using the same technology on the ISS assess that we used during the apollo program basically been enhanced like i said before but same suits this and that was the reason why we were supposed to have a <hes> all women's space walk a little while ago and because these suits didn't work properly that's why it never happened now this companies like spacex and boeing who were making their own space suits in there making them because they're sending astronauts back up to the international space station from US soil on US rockets in in the next year or so so in november of this year. If all goes well spacex will be sending the first people back to the international space station from united states on one of their rockets in one of their capsules and they'll be wearing spacex space x spacesuits now these are only built for launching from the earth to the national space station but massa. Maybe able to contract this stuff out to private. Companies like spacex or boeing boeing has a really grey suit as well. I didn't wanna just highly space x there but boeing has a really grey suit and boeing his also sending astronauts back to the international space station from US soil in the coming coming years so so there's some technology out there that they're using this new technology and you know magnus has been up to the international space station twice and she spent over five months in orbit and she knows what it takes to make safety a priority when you're in space. She said an integral system required to put boots on the moon. Are the boots basically saying hey these space suits aren't up to par with what we need as astronauts to get back to the moon and do it safely. She added that the space suits are essentially actually one person spaceships that deserves similar levels of funding and scrutiny as the rest of the optimist program 'cause we hear about the launch vehicles the s. l. s. possibly using a spacex or boeing walk rocket or rocket am using the capsules from these private companies or like i said using a ryan and s LS which is nasa's gigantic a next level rocket now they're focusing on that but they really need to be working on these spacesuits getting them up to par with new technology and the new ways as we're going to be exploring on the moon's surface. We're not just going to be digging up rock samples anymore. You know that's what the original the original apollo missions were for there for exploration. There were some science stuff but these ones these missions are different. We're going to be building a colony on the moon and we're going to be building technology that will allow us to settle human beings on the surface of our closest neighbor. The moon so magnus went on to say they're complex and they have stringent safety requirements and are a critical component of not only the lunar program but actually any potential. You'll exploration path the human spaceflight being engaged upon in the future so make a spacesuit. That's good for the moon. Make a good spacesuit. That's good for the trips and also make us base sued. That's good for anything past them looking forward lord future-proof it. If we wanna go to mars we got a spacesuit this ready to go so suit up jumping your rocket. Let's get an starship ship and we will launch ourselves to mars and we'll be fine doing it. We're not gonna be in any sort of peril because of our space suits so nasa is only operational. VA spacesuits are off planet right now on board the ISS they do attest suits here on earth but the only operational wants that are fully operational are on the international space station. They're each about forty years old. When was the last time you had any piece of clothing. That was ten years old. I don't think it happens but these space suits are so good that they're forty years old and they're still functioning but there's showing the signs of their age. They've lasted a really long time. The technology still works but it's very outdated. The painl- anal previously reported the nasa is struggling to upgrade their suits. Let alone maintain them. The problem doesn't lie simply. The fact act the suits are old. The fact the manufacturers of several critical components including the very fabric of the suits have now gone out of a business so you can't get these materials from the same companies that started making these suits to begin with so it's time to move on it.

Nasa Boeing Spacex Sandra Sandy Magnus Johnson Space Center United States Houston Texas Nasr Official VA ISS Massa Ryan Forty Years Five Months Five Years Ten Years
Crazy, Who Me? - Overcoming the 'Beast' of Depression as an Entrepreneurial Leader with John Panigas

Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Crazy, Who Me? - Overcoming the 'Beast' of Depression as an Entrepreneurial Leader with John Panigas

"Who who's ready to rock today. Fire nation j. l. d. here in ivan audio massa class that we've decided to call call crazy who me overcoming the beast of depression as an entrepreneurial leader in fire nation. This is such an important the topic and to drop the value bombs on this topic. I brought jon panel guest on the mike. He's let award winning companies with revenues in excess of one hundred million dollars while he's been struggling with crippling depression. He has a book crazy who me which chronicles his life in his journey in overcoming depression fire nation. We'll be talking about so much good stuff today specifically the restore methodology that john takes us through for those people that are suffering that are you're dealing with depression or who knows loved ones friends family members who are dealing with depression again such an important topic. That's why i brought jon on the mike today a day and we'll be diving in as soon as we get back from thinking our sponsor.

JON J. L. D. Ivan John One Hundred Million Dollars
NASA, Elon Musk And Inland Musk discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

03:24 min | 2 years ago

NASA, Elon Musk And Inland Musk discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"Welcome back to the space based news pod a daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm your host will Walden and on this episode be talking about Inland Musk's latest comments to Time magazine about SPACEX and their ability to land on the moon before Nasa we all know the NASA has plans to land the first woman in the next man on. On the surface of the Moon in twenty twenty four about five years now Elon Musk recently told time dotcom it may literally be easier to just land starship on the moon then I tried to convince NASA that we can what he's talking about here is that Massa has a bunch of red tape. You have to go through a lot of channels in order to make sure that your rocket is the one used by NASA in this article. He says if it were to take longer to convince NASA in the authorities that we do have versus just doing it the we might just do it. It may literally be easier to just land starship on the moon than try to convince NASA that we can obviously this is a decision that's out of my hands but the sheer amount of effort required to convince a large number of skeptical engineers at NASA The we can do it is very high in not unreasonably so 'cause they're like a common. How could this possibly work the skepticism SEPTA system you know they'd have good reasons for it but the for sure way to end the sketch skepticism is to just do it now? Elon Musk and SPACEX are currently working on the starship. Ship starship will be a human capable craft that will be able to send people to the moon and eventually tomorrow's they have star hopper protests going on this week. They had some static fire tests <hes> last night in the night before in within the next five or so days they're going to have a hover test of starship. starship will be able to land dozens of people. Oh on the surface of the

Nasa Elon Musk Inland Musk Spacex Massa Walden Time Hopper Five Years
NASA JPL Hacked

SPACE NEWS POD

03:09 min | 2 years ago

NASA JPL Hacked

"Hello. And welcome back to the space news pod. A daily podcast where we discuss space science and tech. space station. I'm your host And according will to Walden a report in on on Forbes this episode. dot com, Massa the GPO. deep space network The Jet DSM Propulsion array Laboratory of radio has telescopes had its computer and numerous systems hacked. other GPL Hackers systems got into were the system. affected during this hack They and Johnson enter Space the system Center, who's through responsible a raspberry for pi the international computer space station and disconnected, then. completely Hecht further from into the system, the network not just just GPO to make sure at one point, that nothing the were to international happen space to the station ISS was amongst other in programs. jeopardy And they of said being that part of of these these Johnson's attacks. attacks. officials But But were concerned the cyberattacks luckily, luckily, we we could had had move some some engineers engineers laterally from on on the board board gateway into at at their mission Massa Massa systems, that that potentially were were up up gaining access, to to and the the task task initiate to stop initiating the hackers malicious to signals stop basically to human unplug spaceflight the systems that use that were those systems. in contact So basically, what with happened the. is ISS hackers found a before way the hackers not got gonna control go into too much technical of the detail international here. But there's. Security violations. There is no ticket resolutions, and there were delays in patching security vulnerabilities that were known by auditors. So what happened was Hecker is basically targeted a system JPL, and they found backdoors into other parts of NASA systems administrators lax security certificates, no role based security training was in place, GPO, and unlike masses main security operation center, it didn't have a round, the clock incident reporting capability, so things like this are very important to security as far as NASA goes, and our people in space, as well as all the science that could be happening at NASA. And if hackers were to intrude on that and deleted information, well, that would be a sad day for science for Hugh. Humanity in Massa is a big target masses. High-profile target and Mike Thompson. Who's a security analysts said many purely associate them with space related activities, but their depth of research and development includes patents covering, cutting edge science, that nation states would literally kill for the hackers might still be in their network, without them, even knowing it.

Massa Massa Massa Nasa Jet Dsm Propulsion Array Labor Johnson ISS Mike Thompson Walden Hecht JPL Hecker Hugh
A Different Kind of Derby

In The Gate

09:46 min | 2 years ago

A Different Kind of Derby

"A different kind of derby to tell you about it's the Mongolian derby. Yes, we said Mongolian derby, it takes place in you. Guessed it Mongolia between Russia and China. So you might be asking where is there? Racetrack in Mongolia. Well, you're not approaching this right? This Turbie is not run at a track. The track is the wild landscape of the country. The Mongolian derby is a six hundred twenty mile endurance race a thousand kilometers. It's designed to recreate the pony express mail system set up by the Mongolian ruler Genghis Khan in the thirteenth century this derby takes anywhere between six and ten days to finish this coming. August will be the tenth anniversary of the Mongolian derby. It was started in two thousand nine by a British based company, but we want to talk about the two thousand thirteen edition of the race the fifth annual event just a few weeks before a nineteen year old girl named Lara. Prior. Palmer was cruising the internet from her home in the United Kingdom and came across the Mongolian derby with zero training and some but not enough money to pay even the entry Faye? Miss. Prior Palmer hit the apply button and wallah entered the race most competitors trained for years in order to endure the fatigue and hunger and horsemanship necessary to get through the race. What happened after that internet? Search is a testament to the human spirit a true tale miss. Prior Palmer, spins in the new book rough magic which comes out right about now. And we're very pleased to have Lara. Prior Palmer with us to discuss her story here on in the gate. You didn't even have the money for the entry fee? So what happened when you told your parents that you were doing this? Definitely it didn't tell them together. I think my mom is li- enticed by horse's name Massa where they are in the world and was taken with the rebound to Susan ally. Was I think my my phone is difficult gauge, he's not doesn't angle himself into reality in the same race that he said it was very dangerous and said it was too opportunistic to do it at the last minute as I was going to and sort Instead of. of just didn't imagine that was the way I should be spending my summer, I think he had ideas probably more related to have imagined his children should be funding. Nessim I'm not even going to go there. What was your goal going in to win to have a spiritual experience to find yourself? Definitely doesn't have go. I was there wins co teenager who was really excited raise money for charities. I thought it was great is in the UK. Lots of people do rap marathon running. And I thought the mobile w was quite unusual. And it would be good thing to raise the greenhouse sports who do fantastic through sports in London with kids from dysfunction communities say that was definitely a goal. And then the other goal is just to finish the race. I guess the pot for doing it and guessing the experience at least for one day before jokes out if I did because no on my age or under the twenty three I think could yet finish the race. You will get to the human suffering in a second. But before we go any further, I think we need to clarify a couple of things first of all it's not one horse that takes you through this race. It's around twenty five horses. How do the horses that you're not writing travel with you through the race? Great question. Yes. It's an insurance rates to humans. Not voices say in Mongolia. There is not a lot of forces than many families on the set have varying amounts of numbers of forces their status symbol, as they are in many, many roads. And so in the summer, the organizes travel mongo Leah us king families if they'd like to act as a horse station for the race and the families will then get together thirty five before she forces. And there's a stations a place that sort of twenty five mile into intervals say, he writes, it three or four hours between station, and he stopped and you given your tied horse and wait for its heart rate to come level. And then you look at the line of twenty horses on it depending on how many runaway in the storm the night before maybe three and then he decided you're an expert. Cindy right on. So you don't even know these horses until you literally hop aboard. And. Get going exactly because even in polo, for example, where a number of horses are on a team with a competitor their property of the competitor. He knows all those horses or she knows all those horses. This is not that. Oh my gosh. How different are Mongolian horses from horses. We're used to seeing here in the west and not just thoroughbreds. I mean. Hard to say casino, lots of British horses a vaguely similar to mongering recipients by EastWest vied, really. But for example, I've ridden some some small Arab pennies in a friend in the states like she had some Icelandic ponies, which not dissimilar from Mongolian pennies, and that they have a large head size, and they've quite stocky and actually genetically qualifies forces, even though they sort of with a height that pony. Tony's it'd be under fourteen two and the way they differed the rave going into the Ray rarely Rijn the ones that I raised. You can't get together one thousand five hundred horses for grace and make sure they will probably train lots of the Masami wild. And they'll have been backed often didn't quite understand steering, which is lucky. He's quite often describe a straight line and a buck Christ law. When he got on them co box and open the ones that bucks that hard. The best bolt is and they would get Alex for good. I'll steam so yet to take that risk. So you're traveling like six hundred miles with horses that are bucking on you. They thought behold way back in the beginning. Maybe. More failing cheeky some of them. I mean within Mongolia, the horses a difference. Some families had Jerry very nice donkeys should expect type horses out of brilliant racing champions who were like woman is no horses. They relied lions do you? Try to talk to them chirp to them. Calm them down. Yeah, you can too. That's another thing saying among Golian language said different Brad for world. In different words, instead of giddy up is more like sound, and Yeah. you You can can talk talk to to them. them as much like I signed on credit lot. I told them, but my frustration Kreidler your any if you writing Elaine, some people some people do their your any companion. You've got to make friends of no matter what the athletic ability is speaking of the other people. I mean, I imagine that most of the other competitors kind of know who each other is somewhat. Then you show up for a fischel testing out of practically nowhere. What was that? Like, it was very global many of the right is not that. And lots of people that it was there was a sense of people trying to make partnerships because we were afraid to write a load, and I never really got round to doing this electrical doing enough of a serious bond with anyone they would welcome any on the testing days with two days or something. It was tens by slightly ignored that I was let high on the excitement of this new group of people fresh out of school with less. Not a sheltered life cried say, particularly and I was just biggest take cited by the whole gyn to natures how terrified I was. Did you get any vibe that they were saying away tea with teenage girl? What is she doing here? It wasn't quite like that. Because I was some other young competitors Severo friendly with each other. There was a sense of surprise that. I wasn't so prepared for the race and as desire from some older people to help me out of the show how many competitors are there in this race varies some years. This about fifty and other years my either eight thirty two so we're talking about thirteen fourteen hours of riding day. Right. I mean, what were the conditions line conditions is in the weather. The weather was very entertaining. We had storms, but it by seat raves followed by floods where you can't cross the land 'cause it's a trap. So you weren't comfortable, and you probably had a change of claves. If you went very good at packing like me. And you're probably sue because there's no way of training for this race. There is nice setup. Like in the any. Russia. How much you've written red semi truck or train polo. Tony's no one's really done this before teen hours a day. And is title is suck on the body. And you get off

Mongolian Derby Mongolia Palmer United Kingdom Tony Genghis Khan Lara Eastwest London Masami Wild Russia Massa Susan Ally Cindy China Faye Alex
Threats Mars Colonizers Will Face In Outer Space

SPACE NEWS POD

09:29 min | 2 years ago

Threats Mars Colonizers Will Face In Outer Space

"Today, we will be discussing what things can psychologically and physically harmed, astronauts when they go to Mars, and if you find this topic interesting make sure to hit the subscribe button. So you get new stuff every single day. Thank you everybody. Who's been listening to the podcast and also to our patriot patrons patriot dot com slash space. News podcast, you can help support future podcasts. Also become a space kit at for as little as one dollar per month. And I just soft launch space news pod dot com. It's a place where you can find new ways to listen to the podcast ways to communicate with the hit me up on Twitter, Facebook, etc. So if you're gonna chance go to space news, pod dot com and check it out. So human beings are going to go to the red planet. Eventually, it's just a given. We're gonna get there and before. Before we get there. We have to figure out the things that are going to harm us and one of those things is our body temperature and our body temperature can rise and lower depending on what kind of environment we're in. Now, if we go to Mars it's really stark compared to what it's like earth like unearth. It's weakened handle low temperatures in what we think are high temperatures of around one hundred hundred twenty degrees. Then you're in a court temperature starts going up. It's normal ninety eight point six ish, and then you're fine. But after that if you go higher than that, you could die of heat exposure. And if you go lower you could die from being to cold in Mars, the equator is eighty to one hundred degrees below zero that's in the summer. Okay. So Subir eighty to one hundred degrees below zero and during the day, sometimes it can be sixty five to seventy degrees Fahrenheit. So that's not too bad. And that's why humans will always have to be in some sort of protective thing, whether it's a pod that they're traveling in or whether it's a settlement on Mars itself, or in a space suit that can handle these kinda temperatures in if we have these structures in place while that could take care of the next thing, which is a lack of oxygen. There's very little oxygen on Mars and Mars atmosphere is highly toxic. It's carbon dioxide in nitrogen mix of those two. So we'll need a survival system spacesuit or like I was saying before in a structure that we could be in at all times. We can't really be outside of something like that. With you know, like if you go to the beach can square flip flops shorts in your fine. You can't do that on Mars. So anything we do on the actual surplus of Mars will have to be in a suit. But of course, you can take the suit off when you're inside of the colony in win year on Mars, there's microgravity this a little bit of gravity. You know? It's one third of verse gravity and micro gravity bone loss. Occurs leading to ask DO Perot SIS as well. As loss of muscle mass, strengthen endurance body fluids are affected, and it could change your cardiovascular system because of this and any sort of prolonged exposure to weightlessness increases risk associated with bone, demeanor location, lowered blood volume and also immuno deficiency. So there's health risks not only on the surface of Mars, but also inside your own body when you get there. So there's going to have to be ways for us. To figure out how to neutralize these before we actually send astronauts to Mars in the famous twin study done by Massa recently on the I s will greatly help our chances to survive on the red planet. Hi, everyone. I would let you know about anchor dot FM. It's where I host podcast, and I find that. It's the easiest place to do that. And it gives you everything that you need in one place for free, which you can start podcasting from your phone or from your computer. You don't need special crazy equipment to start doing it. You can talk into your phone, you'll need editing Quinn that costs thousands of dollars to start a podcast. You can do it from anywhere in when you're done. Recording your episode anchored at FM will distribute it so it can be hard everywhere on Spotify, apple podcast, Google podcasts, Stitcher, every place podcasts can be heard, and you can make money with your podcast. It's pretty simple. There's no minimum listenership to start making money with anchor. So if you wanna make a little bit of money while having a cool podcast while. Download the crap or go to anchor F M to get started. And then we have radiation solar radiation in space, and on extraterrestrial worlds is kind of crazy, especially if they don't have magnetic fields and radiation sickness is on long term effect of offer travel, and we really not found ineffective solution to stop radiation from penetrating into the human body when you're out in space. There's numerous theories of how we do this. And some of them are really weird and wacky one of them in particular that I that I find funny is using human waste that you have in the bathroom in U Penn. The walls of the actual space station the spacecraft that you're flying tomorrow. Then just to make sure that there's an extra layer of something between the U and the. Radiation. That's going to try to kill you on your way to Mars. And it sounds disgusting. And it kind of is. But if it's going to help you survive on your way to Mars, I think, I would probably do it. I mean, where would the waste go. Anyway, you might as well use it right in the flight tomorrow is going to be really long. It's about seven months travel time in you're not gonna be a spacious beautiful space station. Like you see in the SCI fi movies. You're going to be stuck at a tin can something like crew dragon. That's going to the SS. It's about the size of sept- for some people. So something like that could be living heb module. But there could be things attached to it, of course, depending on how we send people there. So right now, we have a few solutions something a little bit bigger than crew dragon something with basically like living canister on the back of it. And then that gets jettisoned down. To the service of Mars them. When you get there. There's actually a living area when you get to the red planet, but think about this for a second as you're traveling the Mars, you can't get out if you ever been on a long car trip, when you you know, you have to take a bathroom break or you just want to stretch your legs, and you can just pull over to the side of the road or stop at a rest, stop, and you can get out of the car, and you can walk around or walk your dog or do whatever you wanna do while on the way to Mars. You cannot physically do that. You're stuck in a canister until you get to Mars seven months in this one spot. We don't really know the psychology of what's gonna happen. When people are stuck in that small of environment for that long time. And so far the longest day on a space station was four hundred thirty eight days, we didn't get a lot of research from that. Because it was you know, before we actually thought about going to Mars, and what we were actually going to compute. To need the resources to get to Mars so that data's kind of jumbled up, and we don't really have a lot of technology involved with the with the actual stay. So it can be done. Now. What happens when you spend that much time in a canister, you get to Mars, and then you stuck in another habitat with the same people that you went there with second due to your head. You know, what's the psychology of all of this? And we're not quite sure. So there's gonna be a few people that get to Mars, and then we're gonna have to study them in. We're going to have to see what actually happens to people than how to combat it. You know, because right now, we're just doing these studies the twin studies on the to figure out, you know, how biologically different people are when they're in space, and when they are on the ground, and psychologically, you know, we really haven't done a ton of tests with long duration spaceflight and also. Hesitation another planet. So it's not just the planet. It is not just space, and it's not just your body. But also your own mind is trying to fight against you for doing this. So if you can become all of that, you could go to Mars, and you can have a successful mission on Mars, and you can lead the human race into the next step

Bone Loss Twitter Facebook Subir Loss Of Muscle Mass Perot Massa Spotify Quinn U Penn Google Apple One Hundred Degrees Seven Months One Hundred Hundred Twenty Deg Four Hundred Thirty Eight Days
The Most Expensive Thing in the Universe

SPACE NEWS POD

05:02 min | 2 years ago

The Most Expensive Thing in the Universe

"Psyche sixteen is the most expensive thing that we know of in our solar system, it's made primarily of iron nickel similar to the earth's core in that respect, and it would completely crash the world's economy, if the company were to asteroid mine this thing, so if they were to take all of those materials backed out, it would absolutely be catastrophic for our economy right now, the world's economy is around seventy four trillion dollars at seventy four with twelve zeros behind it and sixteen psyche is ten Quin tilles dollars, which is a one with thirty one zeros behind it. It's very very expensive in that means that this asteroid one hundred thirty. Five thousand times more valuable than all of the money on the earth. This kind of value while you can't really wrap your head around it because we don't know anything this worth that much. This is the most expensive thing ever that we know of. So if you're kind of feeling overwhelmed thirty one zeros behind the one that's a really really big number, right? That out I'll take you a little while while it's because of all the nickel on this asteroid in the cool thing about this asteroid NASA is going to send a spacecraft to it is going to explore it. It's not going to mind it. So don't have to worry about the world's economy crashing ever. From this thing. But it's you know, they want to explore it because they want to kind of figure out if this is the core of a planet. You know, they want to they don't have the opportunity to look into the korva planet ever. So this thing is the closest that they're good get to the core of a planet that they can study because it's just for science. It's not for money. Now that being said can't another company go visit this asteroid and Mynatt while the short answer is yes, they could that surpass ability. It's in the realm of physics in engineering. Now, the other thing is it's going to cost a lot of money to get there. And they don't really know what to do with the asteroid when they get to. They put it in orbit around the moon to they take it back down to earth. Do the used these materials to build spacecrafts in space and to further explore the outer reaches of our solar system and our galaxy. Well, there's a couple companies out there that are working on asteroids mining, and if they were to be super evil if they were going to be dreadfully evil, they could grab this asteroid bring it back down to earth and crash the world's economy now. Luckily, nobody quite has that technology yet the working on it in the really do wanna start mining asteroids in the next thirty years, and in the grand scheme of things companies like, you know, planetary resources in other mining companies like them while it would only cost about two point six billion dollars. To capture Nastro it and bring it into orbit near earth. And then we could have human exploration of the asteroid. We send up robotic mining tools, and we could get all the stuff out of it in this most expensive asteroid it's named sixteen psyche. For a reason it was named after the psyche who Mary cupid in was put to death by Venus and cubits request Jupiter made psyche immortal. It's average diameter is about a hundred and thirty miles. That's one sixteenth diameter of earth's moon and about the distance between Los Angeles in San Diego. I've driven that a bunch of times actually when I lived in California that doesn't take that long to get across this whole asteroid couple hours actually in scientists think that the core of psyche. The whole thing the asteroid is possibly the core of an early planet may be as large as Mars and it lost its rocky outer layers due to a. Number of violent collisions billions and billions of years ago. Massa's mission to psyche targeted to launch in October of twenty twenty three and the psyche spacecraft would arrive at the asteroid twenty thirty following an earth gravity assist. Twenty twenty four and a Mars fly by in twenty twenty-five in over twenty one months in orbit the spacecraft will map and study sixteen psyches properties using multispectral imager again, Maria neutron spectrometer a mandatory voter and a radio instrument for gravity measurement in the mission's goal is among other things to determine whether psyche is indeed the core of a planet sized object.

Nasa Maria Neutron Massa California Mary Cupid Nastro Los Angeles San Diego Seventy Four Trillion Dollars Six Billion Dollars Twenty One Months Thirty Years
"massa" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"massa" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"I kind of looking to you fruit, which which one's the most important, but the first one I think those stay with them because because you know, what I'm exploring liquid with you here just to be transparent on the processes. Why does it Massa much to? Right. You said it's essential. You said this thing masses, and we ought to identify. Then really, you know, why maybe were as far as we need to go on that. But I sense in you, it's it's pretty deep y few, you know, whether we have woods for. It's like, no, maybe it's like this. It's. All of the books. I've done before a really preparing for this. You know that those of given a platform, you know, these millions of people literally, right? And and and you know, and well done you built your built this extraordinary platform to reach people make a difference and. And now what what what is the what is the highest deepest contribution? That can then be made. And as as you're doing it. I feel like. You know, is that quota that which smokes personal is most universal. And there's something about that here. Which is which is okay. If we get really honest enroll we find that there's a lot of unresolved a lot of unresolved trauma, and now riffing here little bit the on the process, but but I mean, this is something that's very like. This is important to me the subject were too. And so I can relate to it in this way. One of the things I've begun doing research, bounces them is into generational trauma. And how an how even if in our own lives, we go..

Massa
"massa" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"massa" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"I kind of looking to you fruit, which which one's the most important, but the first one I think those stay with them because because you know, what I'm exploring liquid with you here just to be transparent on the processes. Why does it Massa much to? Right. You said it's essential. You said this thing masses, and we ought to identify. Then really, you know, why maybe were as far as we need to go on that. But I sense in you, it's it's pretty deep y few, you know, whether we have woods for. It's like, no, maybe it's like this. It's. All of the books. I've done before a really preparing for this. You know that those of given a platform, you know, these millions of people literally, right? And and and you know, and well done you built your built this extraordinary platform to reach people make a difference and. And now what what what is the what is the highest deepest contribution? That can then be made. And as as you're doing it. I feel like. You know, is that quota that which smokes personal is most universal. And there's something about that here. Which is which is okay. If we get really honest enroll we find that there's a lot of unresolved a lot of unresolved trauma, and now riffing here little bit the on the process, but but I mean, this is something that's very like. This is important to me the subject were too. And so I can relate to it in this way. One of the things I've begun doing research, bounces them is into generational trauma. And how an how even if in our own lives, we go..

Massa
"massa" Discussed on GSMC Football Podcast

GSMC Football Podcast

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"massa" Discussed on GSMC Football Podcast

"The two megastar summer Massa the awesome iphone. On the metro PCS knit word. The I've always wanted for zero dollars so you can jam without limits. It's a hit, get an iphone SE on us when you switch metro PCS coverage, not available plus sales tax activation of number two to mobile metro PCS days to an unlimited LT plan, see store for details and terms and conditions, hey, sports fans, football season's here, and it's time to get in on the action with my bookie. My book is the industry leading sports betting website that offers real Vegas odds on football baseball, and all your favorite sporting events. You can take side the total or even fantasy points props. My bookie lets you bet online and win bay did the game already. Kickoff, don't sweat it. My bookie has in game live betting on every major league. Andy vent, even east sports. There's no better time to join my bookie. Then today go to my bookie to open an account and start winning use promo code champion when you register for your account and get a one hundred percent sign of bonus up to one. On your first deposit bet today, visit my bookies website or call eight four four eight six six twenty three eighty seven. That's eight four four eight six six twenty three eighty seven. Check them out today and use promo code champion for a one hundred percent bonus terms and conditions apply for entertainment purposes. Only void where prohibited. Are you looking for help for your fantasy football team? Check out the GSM, see fantasy football podcast. Get today's best advice to start who to sit even who you should draft from sleeper picks a red hot lineups. They got it all covered for you that GSM see podcasts dot com. Slash fantasy football dash fogcast. We'll cover traditional dynasty PR even when you need fantasy. Hope. There's just one show to hit up. Don't forget to like on Facebook and prowled them on Twitter, visit GMC podcast dot.

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"massa" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

04:39 min | 3 years ago

"massa" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"You know i hate to use the kfc quote against him but to me in great and this is this mega oh my god what a fucking fool man for white but yeah massa john's foot up again like i say the thing about it he'll be fine and is almost like he's become bigger than the brand like the brands become beginning him so and he had just within the past few months dotted reopen on them commercials 'cause you know went by goodyear you would know now see this is the true caring lows josh loved it so they had taken them out i take care of word for that one because i see really that's not bullshit she really will eat papa john's was like oh let's order some pieces she realized papa johns i don't even like john things like negative and i know she the pizza don't get me wrong but it yeah right and there's another like in it i mean you know before them all you had to do and roger no for me to be like i'm we're not on it papa john's never never never know it was serious yes so you know once the season started cameras like no no more papa john's and that was it you know i mean look almost all chain pieces going to be kinda shitty so come on and everybody calm down and chat room we talked about this doing nurses day papa john's has evolved when you look at pizza hut and you look at particularly domino's they're actually starting to cater even though it ain't always might not be the best they're starting to cater towards other things pizza 'cause you know you might be well let's or the pizza everybody not won't pizza somebody might wanna sal it somebody my own wings about pasta right they start to cater to these other groups which actually is the beneficiary took too big family it's just me and you when you got a you know keys and everything like that let's order papa john's pizza wings cheese sticks breath did i get it i'll just have to do we talk about oh got a territorial snow and no because anytime they stay sales on like they blouse money i think somebody money laws pain from that and it's never cut in the food so he lost the thing with the nfl and the thing is you got stockholders and people invest in and now you like the company that we came to clean his shit up we can't clean it up and and i i don't know what they're gonna do but if you got to go life too much money i feel differently i think the reason that they lost sales because grope hub and shit exists now and it didn't want to start it and all the everybody's loss from sales pizzas awesome sells like he's just be a time when you could be like we want you want to order food you gotta order chinese or pizza and now you could be like actually wanna order mcdonald's and somebody would drive it to my house and and give it to me like i didn't think about that this change and because now places it couldn't deliver actually deliver now like you might have like your favorite pizza place dane delivered but now got group that's what i'm saying okay yeah yeah and then you know i don't believe any of these corporations are good so i'm not i'm not really getting into the politics i'm sure whatever company you do pick to get your piece or there's a big company some going to be wrong so i really even into all that shit but you know my thing is when she's feeling good that's when i checked the fuck out i'm not really a boycott or person i'm not really a but if i can't think of your brand without thinking negative i it's hard especially if you'll product better than the thoughts you know you got to make products the only reason i think is still in business because they make the must be real nice at the drive through and so people just look past because it's like i'd rather have a good customer service and food experience than i care about boycott note and that's the only reason they still in business because everybody makes these choices with their dollars but if they're if like thinking somebody would if charges or kfc had the same policies that the owner chickfila has they'd be out of business they would they would be like fucking i don't need it bet same thing if the nfl was good.

massa john
"massa" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"massa" Discussed on Double Toasted

"I this this man has to realize and then kept the live from his family left his own few the nephew later went to kill us look bad experience he's not a shakespearean and there was a lot of assholes and shakespeare now you know something i'm leaving them on this list god damn it because he's not the worst that's why he's the third one on the list but he needs to be held accountable i like i'll talk about this like he's real his brother want an apology and that's a more sorry as our to the politics not the worst on the list but not great i'll leave it at that but you know what maybe that's a good transition he's not as bad as the others he did his job as a father massa mistakes that he made with dire dire consequences but he did what he thought was right he'd the time can't i just cannot get over there banned in your own blood like he could've brought that boy back but what closer to the move maybe a little bit too close but you know what let's move onto the great fathers out there okay not just good but great fathers and cinema twenty eighteen and a lot of these are great because they just stayed around those are set that bar said that low situations where i don't think you can blame anybody for leaving if they really had to and the first great dead on this list is john christine ski man a quiet place in a world of creatures monsters man did everything the particulars family he didn't work out a lot of system he went to haven't seen all the movie okay we'll bit well this may have worked out a system even learning son language and it's this here's a roundabout people who just fuck ups okay like i said i haven't seen much of the movie every time i would watch some of it it'd be somebody fucking up in the most obvious way i mean this man has the vibes skills he's trying his best meanwhile the rest of the family fucking the.

massa
"massa" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"massa" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Go to the math tenure lens via bike so that she can show me how to get to the mosque i asked you before all this cycling levity gets going if she told the catholics not to ring a bell on sundays no she says conceivably one of her predescessors along time ago as for the actual decision to allow cool to prayer all the ringing of a bell that's a police massa which the police confirms it's about decibels if it's one hundred ten that's okay the law has nothing to say about the nature of the noise only how much of it there is this having been said the mayor wishes the most wasn't doing this three months away from general election with the anti immigration swedish democrats already polling twenty percents it's a bit of a disaster she says i have from the beginning and said that i don't think that this is very good for integration and frayed that we will see a polarization instead of good integration there is isn't an identity issue here i mean there are many people who uneasy about hearing the cool to press because they feel this is the the muslim presence which is getting bigger and bigger and sweden is changing do you understand that malaise amongst many swedes do done that feeling chore if it's right therefore think is would be better if we had a broad dialogue if we discussed things like this and i know there are a lot of mosques in sweden that have taken the decision not to have their nouncement because it's not a part of which culture and they don't want wrong feelings arise in the city.

massa sweden three months
"massa" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"massa" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"Our produce he's not in i grew up in the grounds portions our and a little cottage randomly like completely random laima parents on this tiny cottage remove the preston and it was just amazingly it going to say it was i mean it was it was isolated hugely hugely isolated and not in any way cool or i mean as a teenager opposite hated it because overtones about smoking and drinking do whatever else was dang so as you massa stags just an older she's older she's not pension therapist so she actually has job and does things my whole family's to my dad teaches sign language mom's nurse have you seen them the quiet place no no yeah god it's amazing and they'd sign the hallway through that is phenomenal i think everybody from day one should learn sign language to learn sign language for a for a job did she how did she find that really fucking hall really it's really yeah killed a everyone should learn it because know when you get dementia if you get to ensure later on in life where you lose your hair ring or you have an accident or i think all been out to scientists such a children really respond respond to that so quickly apparently they can articulate what they won through much quicker than they can through verbalize ation i think it's a good thing anyway but anyway that's off topic so i went to school in a very as much.

massa
"massa" Discussed on What the Tech

What the Tech

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"massa" Discussed on What the Tech

"You know per se it's no big deal on a laptop where the storage might be smaller i might unsinkable a folder that's a month or two back because i'm never going to go back to that stuff anyway i can save space that way interesting so i have everything i'm using dropbox for everything and i'm using clever everything and that's about it i really don't have any other cloud storage and i delete everything we have one massa copy for all imaging that we use at work the stuff that sun casts does everything is on a server here i just access it depending if i need something but at the end of the day it's amazing how storage has become you know to fifty six is perfectly fine for most i mean honestly i could probably even get away with one twenty eight on a laptop but to fifty six as started being kind of the entry level for most premium laptops it's fine and of course sometimes i might do vm's and things those will take up more space obviously but yeah i mean i i tend to go out if i can get an upgraded sixteen gigs ram i'll try to you know the store that's more important to me than the storage i do have rare instances right do need to do things like work in virtual machines or whatever where that kind of matters but honestly you know day to day i run photoshop elements which is like the light version of outta shop light you know komo consumer version i guess but most of the stuff i do is you know web browsing and text editing and it's just not super rian resource intensive.

massa komo
"massa" Discussed on Packet Pushers - Datanauts

Packet Pushers - Datanauts

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"massa" Discussed on Packet Pushers - Datanauts

"His more about abstract massa in siri while machine learning is one hundred percent books on the application so i was they machine learning as much catching up was all the hightechnology quickly while statistic is very old fashion like like census data you were have the summer statistic of different area in which he learning can deal with structure day the whilst statistic can only deal was structure danish learning can deal was bo structured announce structured they in machine learning is focusing on prediction decisionmaking emphasizing on computation efficiency from bear beginning while statistic only concern mainly concerned about interpretation of the data not much focusing on the computation cost chill recently so based on the different perspective of two domain we do see the traditional marketing company is more focusing on the statistics side morris summer statistic but we do see a big wave marketing colmey are star to utilize machine learning for example they will have like big klein slick mercy lewis bench they want allocate certain amount of money stir different channel so how to get the best outcome utilizing this resources they were do research they were due prediction tells them what's to channel return on investment what's the timing what are the people's issue rich out to get certain response so when you have those data clocked his through prediction modeling you can't utilize the resources better i would marketing is much very much behind um all other industry was do have a lot of money to utilize end the move faster.

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