20 Episode results for "Mass Transit"

He fell from a parking lot

The Signal

11:28 min | 1 year ago

He fell from a parking lot

"This is an ABC podcast on Monday. A police officer in Hong Kong shot an unarmed twenty one year old protester with live communication at point blank range. The entire thing was caught on video tape later later that day video emerged of a middle aged man being doused in petrol and set alight after arguing with protesters. These videos show a snapshot of how both police and protesters seem to be upping the ante in this ongoing face off. I'm really jeans and I'm Christine Gate and today on the signal I know. There's been a significant escalation intention violence in Hong Kong this week but the student protest remain resolute. So what's China's new tactic and bringing all of this to an end so this reason spike in violence in Hong Kong started on Friday after a twenty two year. Old Uni student died. Yeah he fell from a copper roof roof after running away from police the previous Sunday and it's being called the first official death of a protester inactions linked to police. The the desert of the student surnamed her name Chow did affect people of course because jess does create a different dynamic. And we've heard in public calls for quote Unquote Revenge Bench Gordon. Chang is an Asia analyst and author of the coming collapse of China clearly. The four then protesters Really were were looking to fight the police on because there have been allegations that three protesters on August twenty first were beaten to death in the prince. Edward Mass Transit Railway Station and since that time protesters have Just taking a very different attitude towards the police. The police police also have been extremely brutal and so this has become a fight on both sides and the descendant of violence has been marked specially especially since the end of August but of course with the what is called the the first death of a protester. an action linked to the police Clearly the things got out of control. We don't know if that student was actually a protester But he was running away from tear gas and so therefore His causes taken up by Everyone although we feel sad we need to to continue our movement so We need to gather together and here and voice our something to the police foles so this past weekend has been one of disturbances across the territory especially on Monday. A Hong Kong traffic policeman shot at unarmed student of purchaser in the torso protester dressed in black like many of the protesters are faceless covered. He's approaching a Hong Kong police officer in a wide open area The protests are didn't have anything thing in his hands Obviously was unarmed. Did Not pose a risk to threat to the safety of the officer. Officer wasn't a wide open. Area could easily easily a retreat. It but didn't took out a gun shot the protester asbury close range and clearly this was an unjustified on justified use of force and that shooting isn't the only extreme thing that happened on Monday also there was an argument between People in Hong and One of the people who is expressing pro-beijing statements was doused with some sort of liquid and set on fire. He also was admitted to hospital in critical condition and remains that way with Burns on twenty eight percent body the discovery well have been staged and indeed We don't even know. It's not entirely beyond China's communist us to of Sacrificed one of their own. Perhaps without his knowledge that this was going to happen. I'm not saying that's what occurred. But that's a possibility and until we know more about the perpetrator I. I don't think we can say that. This has been a Hong Kong protestor who did this so no one's apprehended over that attack yet and there's also reports of protesters facing off with police at universities throwing petrol bombs and police yes using tear gas and pepper spray and aiming the guns at people and then this is footage of a police officer on a motorbike driving into a crowd of protesters several times ramming something a little before taking away so later on Monday. Hong Kong's late Carrie Lam gave this press conference in which she he condemned the protesters and code them the enemy of the people. Finally I want to appeal to everyone. In Hong Kong to stay calm the frame from taking part in any unlawful activities. This is not language that Hong Kong leaders would use. This is a language that the Communist Party uses and matter of fact they've used it Routinely in recent years And of course this goes back to the era of Mao Zedong. The founder of the People's Republic of China and was widely heard during the cultural revolution is what started in the mid nineteen sixties. The thing here is that it. Carrie Lam is using chinese-language and this comes after. She had two crucial meetings at the beginning of this month she had meeting on November fourth. Where see Japan the Chinese ruler in Shanghai and she also had a meeting day or two later with the Hong Long? Jiang who is the member of the Politburo Standing Committee the Portfolio for Hong Kong. So this is Essentially Carrie Lam getting her orders and given the even more aggressive tactics of the police since those two meetings we can assume that she got her her orders from the top of the Chinese leadership to move aggressively against a Hong Kong people. Essentially Beijing is is forcing goosing. Carrie Lam to take a a hotline. I think so because this doesn't seem like the Carrie Lam who was elected chief executive This his mirrors Beijing's position on this and ask as we've seen the events last two or three days we've also heard word State media in China step up their attacks on protesters so this does seem to be coordinated right. So according Gordon Carrie Lam has go to roads from Beijing and she's following through. Yeah and Gordon thinks that part of that plan involves a kind of unofficial ray structure of the Hong Kong Police. There are a number of videos which show that People from the mainland are now operating on the streets of Hong Kong in the uniform informed of the Hong Kong Police in I think one of the more telling videos. There is a Hong Kong riot. Policemen who is obviously from Hong Kong because he's speaking colloquial colloquial Cantonese. Then he turns around on to a couple of other riot officers and starts talking to them in Mandarin. Remember Hong Kong cantonese-speaking city and The first Hong Kong riot officer speech calls them comrade now to to Hong Kong. Policemen would not use that term when addressing each other there's other videos Another one of them is Is a line of Hong Kong policeman who who absolutely refuse to show their Hong Kong tleyss identity cards and who apparently don't Speak Candies Because uh there's a A PRO democracy figure. I think he's in the council. I forget Talking to and they just impassive as if they don't understand understand so there is growing evidence that There are either Hong Kong a plea Chinese troops or Chinese police who are now wearing con-conflict doc police uniforms and the one thing that that has always struck me is that once we start to see these videos and it coincided sided with a breakdown in discipline in Hong Kong police if we go back to year two years ago. The Hong Kong police were recognized as the most professional professional and disciplined force in of its kind in Asia and now they've just completely broke ranks. There's very little discipline on. They're acting savagely. This is not the Hong Kong police force of a year ago. And we've got to ask. Why has this occurred? And especially since and this Change in behavior does coincide with these videos of the obviously Chinese personnel in the Hong Kong. Police we can guess that may be. This is very much what Beijing okay. So if he's right that's interesting and pretty crofty tactic to infiltrate the Hong Kong Police. Gordon reckons it shows China's realizing it needs to be more and more covert the in dealing with Hong Kong. This is not one thousand nine hundred nine Tenement Square. Where you had these big broad boulevards low buildings on each side? Chinese armor armor tanks and armored personnel carriers just swept through from the Western approaches of Beijing into Tenement Square. And they killed almost it will. Hong Kong is very different. It's defenders territory. Scott narrow streets and alleys got lot of tall buildings. Every apartment building is a fort for the hostels which means that these kids can go to do these apartment buildings third or fourth floor ring down explosives or petrol bombs on concentration of Chinese troops and then just completely disappear and I don't think Beijing has has an answer Militarily for that and certainly politically this would be extremely disadvantageous. China because countries would start to impose sanctions. Asians don't want an open display of raw Chinese power on Hong Kong streets which I think would enrage many people across Hong Kong society that is the signal for today and if you'd like to get in touch L. email is the signal at ABC dot net. And if you like you can give us a review on apple podcasts. That helps other people find us and we'll be back tomorrow. See you later bye. You've been listening to an ABC Z.. podcast discover more great A._B._C.. podcasts live radio and exclusives on the A._B._C. Listen Up.

Hong Kong Hong Kong Police Hong Kong Hong China Carrie Lam officer Beijing ABC Gordon Old Uni Christine Gate People's Republic of China Beijing Communist Party Edward Mass Transit Railway St Mao Zedong official Chow
At War with Fashion: World War I, LIVE from Bard Graduate Center

Dressed: The History of Fashion

1:02:26 hr | 1 year ago

At War with Fashion: World War I, LIVE from Bard Graduate Center

"And even weird conversations with those who have unparalleled influence in our lives your superheroes some villains and those behind the scenes making it all possible influence an elite group has godlike control over our world in the majority of the decisions be made I'm talking on a carrier now my podcast behind the influence I'm having revealing personal Working with collections across the UK before turning her attention to academia and she currently teaches at Falmouth University in England and her research focuses primarily early on hidden figures throughout History Her PhD dissertation on Queen. Alexandra Queen Victoria's daughter in law and surprisingly hidden figure it turns out you fabulous guests fashion historian and season one guest Dr k Stratton and the modern French historian Dr Margaret Darrow and we had a wonderful I would put forth how many of our listeners actually have considered the origin of this term trench coat or the phrase digging in because was organized by Kristen and each part of this conversation explores the relationship to fashion so anxiety in society and fashion through the when they reached out to us to be part of the four part conversation series that they were programming called fashion anxiety and society and inch warfare was just one of the many military strategies used during World War One an both burberry and aquascutum clothing brands claim the invention really cool stuff she's doing also joining us was doctorate Margaret Daro who's a retired professor of French history and she specializes in French women and different lenses including Labor justice subversion and of course what you and I were there to discuss gender and we were joined in this conversation by that series on fashion and World War we recently had the honor of moderating discussion at the Bard Graduate Center in New York City in conjunction with their current exhibition was published in two thousand seventeen by Bloomsbury and this was entitled the World Wardrobe Address History of Queen Alexandra she was a guest on dress last season discussed being and are very excited to be able to share part of that conversation with you here and a recording of our second ever live podcast but before we do we wanted to take a moment inch fashion women and the First World War which is running now through January cast you and I both knew the exhibition was coming to Bard Graduate Center but we were so thrilled one of the so-called trench coat that they made it for officers of the British Army during World War One today we are excited to present part one of eighty two a podcast where we explore the WHO ran of why we wear we are fashion historians and your host April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary you know seven billion people in the world we all have one thing in common every day we all get dressed welcome to address the history of Fashion World War One which is the subject of her fantastic book that was published in the year two thousand French women and the First World War and this was a book just the history of fashion is a production of Iheartradio so rose most recent project addressed the failed effort by the French legislature in the nineteen twenty s to pass a piece of legislation that would have mobilized free women for future wars like outside of World War One so this legislation did not pass but it generated an enormous amount of controversy so I think some of our listeners might be thinking right now just what does war and fashion what do these two things have to do with one another well for one has an and briefly introduce our guest Dr Kate stressed in specialty lies in nineteenth and early twentieth century women's where she started as a curator in the mid nineteen ninety s in this very book so check that out if you have not already and cates current research project is looking at a nineteenth century dress diary which was compiled by just one British woman so the time particularly within the feminist movement as it applied to the right to vote so at this time Frenchwomen did not have the right to vote actually they wouldn't even gain it until after World War Two and now that we've introduced our guests without further ado here is our second ever live podcast we hope you enjoy hello everyone for those of you who may not know me my name as Cassidy Zachary and April and I are so pleased to have you joining us that we read cast and we even reference when we're writing our book fashion and Art Push Warr so it was a real pleasure to get to meet her in person and Dr this evening we want to of course thank Kristen Owens and the entire team here at the Bard Graduate Center for asking us here to moderate this discussion this evening with our guest Dr theme for tonight's discussion within this broader conversation series is gender which I'm sure all of you realize a huge topic under Andress which has been a persistent and even arguably defining element of dress history for hundreds of years and so when we first got this invitation cast and I were like whoa how do we even begin to tackle the social anxieties surroundings case streisand joining us all the way from London and Dr Margaret Daro as part of this fashion anxiety and society lecture series and I'm April Callahan I I I would just like to mention that there are more than one past guest on dress podcast in the audience tonight so then be folly at best and while the Perlis scholarship at worst so we decide we just decided to narrow it down more or less the scope of our inequality and it focuses on garments fashion media fashion magazines plates there's some really fabulous fashion satire in there which I always love cute to all of you for joining us yes very exciting yes and also a big thank you to jarrow Dr Streisand for being here tonight to the very specific period addressed in the exhibition French fashion women and the First World War currently on view until January twenty twenty sedition it covers the years nineteen fourteen to nineteen eighteen and it really examines the lives of French women during World War One particularly and lots of other assorted ephemera which all of them really speak to these tensions that surrounded fashion during this period in French history my attic manifestation and this has actually never been more apparent than in the strict `gendering of male and female clothing European and American societies I would along with these distinctions such as respectability responsibility and even morality and transgression of these codes you know historically theriault designations are societal ideologies intent on regulating this incredibly strict gender binary and in this way just set us up a little bit before we engage with our lovely guests these tensions largely centered around women's dress and the semiotics surrounding it all the relationship is certainly something that we have discussed time and again on the show we really decided that to engage a topic that broad and under an hour in the early twentieth century and I'm hoping that you can talk about how these women negotiated contemporary fashion of the time with the through the lens of fashion their relationship with fashion and what they wore and exhibition is curated by Bob Bass Krueger and so if you Kirk John Encroachment into the masculine sphere in which women were simply not invited which leads us ladies to our very first question which is you've not seen it yet highly recommended it is absolutely incredible so many call pieces on display yes in case some of you in the audience have not yet seen the S. she writes is quote the Social Organization of sexual difference the knowledge that establishes meaning for bodily differences while then it follows that clothing is it's visual time when the women's rights movement was in full bloom unintended this adoption of pants by women was criticized as yet another and was not a call by feminist to dress like men but rather one for comfortable clothing that afforded movement and ease in everyday life and yet at that living is used as a powerful tool with which to encode and even enforce definitions of the masculine and the feminine and all the other notions that I would like to direct towards Kate because I know that you have studied the `gendering of garments in your work on the pioneering mountaineering women of the late nineteenth century so in the one thousand nine hundred eighty historian John Wall Scott's groundbreaking work really helped validate gender as a valuable analytical tool with which to study history in gender I mean I was confronted with images when I used to me out as a as a teenager Owl's women in the eighteen eighties particularly crossing crevasse says issue was over with hindsight they were labelled as being ridiculous I'm wearing inappropriate comments in fact they were succeeding and I think that has been viewed as a great threat to this very gender balance on which entire societies have been bill the bloom resum movement of the eighteen fifties for instance highly accepted norms of femininity with practicality it's really interesting actually because I think I discovered in my research so I looked at is that one of the most blatant examples of this could be the designation of pants too the Romans men and skirts the rumble of women and embedded in these it was really interesting thinking about women mountaineers or search they used Scotts in a in a way I think we have come headline history has anes that choices femininity I think has been mythology choice about Scott so they chose Twelve Ska they obviously feet and the Franco Prussian war of eighteen seventy seventy one margaret can you speak about how masculinity and femininity were constructed in the aftermath of this war well I found that really problematic because actually they were doing it you know they didn't die they didn't fall down so Margaret you specialize in French social and women's history and you've written extensively about French gender dynamics especially in the wake of Francis humiliating writings by a sale where she talks about the coal sit and kind of suggest renegotiation of how we think ritual same with Kim Campbell with her that was a breaking up marriages and so I did my research looking at how these women operated wearing skirts wearing corsets which the similar to what happened in the United States after the defeat in Vietnam War we get Rambo on so you have a kind of Rambo Ization French culture focusing on the need for men to become stronger soon get a phrase body building athletics the climate and the cat she's on as contemporary photographs always said things like ridiculous women wearing city clothes to cross by because it really lays the groundwork for generations during World War One yes sure so the Franco Prussian wars awareness they say the ways of adapting to skirt but a were molested optional but I think it was a sign of women's agency in that choices too they were looking for causes. Solis fail a French masculinity in the need for Mass Transit Society this is very in credit full and of course we will certainly see how women's similarly made there clothing more functional during World War One but I I actually would like to turn our attention. The French considered themselves the heirs Napoleon trance the great military nation and defeat was shocking of course they it might say on the heels of guests on keyboards of typewriters real kind of association of women and typewriters we want the way that he told fat foods and this was a women's choice women chose a man grossed out by women shouldn't wear them so within the context of Barron coach norms they did adopt them they were Grayson they had a kind of contraction we could graze them like Roma bind pull ups education so a big need for schoolteachers also a greater bureaucratisation in government and the use of women particularly Dr Masculine men fear women kind of getting out as their place of anxiety about emancipated women it destroyed him civilization as we know it going under but this is also the same period in which women were actually moving into denigrate swearing if I'm back to this idea of femininity is somehow problematic and I found that with the mountaineer women they mate uh of women and women in employment instead of publicly visible ways so you have this kind of tension between the need for era in which the town starts the modern Olympics which is also part of this movement so the sense that this was sent me the things that came out when they were writing that tirees dresses were more pure than I think we have ed to climb some of the highest at he be highest mountains in Europe and they did so successfully and it set me on a coal of looking at humidity had to be pumped up and at the same time kind of demonization of women in public life and aftermath of the suffragettes in Britain who were doing things like harassing legislators it was these women on Brian in France who did public protests harassed official role is being the official Church of France but nonetheless you had them you know acting publicly political way Margaret my next question during this period it was given a women's organization meeting in Nineteen twelve and it reads as follows it says quote it seems paradoxical to unite localized to protest against try to prevent separation of church and state in France and they want to capacity at the same time keeping more publicly visible a real complex coming together anxiety surrounding women's equality were anti clerical deputies and in many ways much more radical than the suffrage movement which was quite respectable but you do have the emergence of women is lengthened from two years to three years so you have this kind of sense of horse coming we have to be prepared be prepared and young women reactions were so goes to you a few years ago you published a book Frenchwomen and the First World War and you open the book with a quote that was taken from a speech into surrender and the women who supported that movement or scene or demonized to securities were accused of having burn he's two words or and women and quote so my question is why was this paradoxical at this time in one thousand nine hundred and and how did women's roles within society at large change once the war broke out am kind of hoping that you might also discuss some of the societal expectations of their or having more opportunities for employment because of the growth of the public sector example public education mandatory public intimately nine hundred eleven major war scare because of German attempting to block French colonial expansion north Africa which universal male conscription had been voted ninety five and then in nineteen thirteen mandatory military service was down Paris this was seen as a what happens when you let you know women into political roles femininity hey clearly within the context of the rising women's suffrage movement cracked Margaret yes The French suffrage movement was much smaller than what was happening Britain denied got kind of you might say caught up in the kind of nationalistic fervor appearance there were only two officially sanctioned roles for women expansion of actually the female labor force because most of the women who worked during the war were already in the labor force or the women who you know young deserve of this new digital universe unmasked join me for behind the influence on Apple podcasts or on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts also if the Franklin pressure more of the commune kind of civil war in Paris that Paris was resisting the armistice with Germany sort of refusing demand a political voice the women on the right or not the folk were demanding was that the Catholic Church should not be expelled from disappear or overlaid on that it was an amazing brutal war very swift and million defeat for France states the time actually the biggest women's political organizations entrance we're on the right there were women Catholic women who were lead trance and Germany almost two more and really put on the horizon the possibility that France was going to Oregon This was coupled with the fact possibility of the Red Cross which was what jumping was promoting that women with nurse that actually came to pass national duties of the major one was smother they're supposed to have sons who would that become soldiers for the nation but the other was this new typewriters we have to have women and also the Telegraph the Women Is Telegraph operator so get more I guess what we would call pink call Tom in the lobby that was just amazing pictures of all the different work that went to during the war to set of women chimney sweeps where women who would have joined the labor force anyway but there was a shift trump said female sectors in textiles and clothing to replace men and workforce and take on all kinds of jobs that have been traditionally male jobs and this had been no one's that they had to be prepared that there should be a duty for women to do if all men were going to be conscripted so the first time women needed what was unexpected and not land for in in any in the governance clans one broke out was the need for women elite horizon before that you have enormous expansion of the kinds of work that were were doing during or it isn't necessarily much role versus what the reality of the situation was well one thousand nine hundred was actually this speech given by Red Cross Motor amid a man who wanted to recruit for the Red Cross in one thousand nine hundred was just after the second Iraq in prices which I'm sure you on about commit tractor two of whole variety of jobs men and if you go to the exhibit missile wonderful film from one thousand nine hundred eighteen thinks about half an hour house workers you know pushing enormous bundles of obviously women working in factories quite extraordinary and this was not anything that had been lived and we're GonNa talk a lot more later on about the anxieties that this really caused but I to that paradox of war and women I think we would also like to introduce a third cat so it was rebranded as that it was actually the collection had been due to be released any way that autumn so the August nineteen fourteen collections had already been of Paris and prestige genius and daring the arrows in her quiver fashion defends her right to life liberty and the pursuit of woman under Duress Kate that leads to you can you tell us about how fringe efforts to stimulate consumers during the war played out in terms of silhouette because round the world at the war's onslaught yes because combined Francis Fashion and textile trades were the second largest industry in and despite the occupation in the northern part of the country and the destruction of linen and cotton mills in that region Paris itself was never actually occupied the country and more than a third of workers in France were working in jobs that were either directly or indirectly related to the fashion traits you know shoot industries such as military footwear ready to rare manufacturers all depended on the prestigious haute couture trades to set their compass from ateliers of haute couture houses to that of the cloth die embroidery and lace industries and there were also dozens of other they continued success of the French fashion industry was imperative fashion was one of the primary driving forces of the French economy the country set the pace of fashion eighteen so change was coming incredibly quickly despite the war was interesting with those two main silhouettes is that you had see early twentieth century yes it is hard to write about go day skirts instead of uniforms of French fashions instead of French humanity but the world trade must go on if those millions left the industry from ready to wear two main to order at this time revolt around demand for Prejean not American design and the New York Times wrote shortly after the beginning of the war during World War One and it was able to really sustain production during the war and the New York Times wrote in October nineteen fourteen quote with her back against the wall in terms of like the direction of future taste and style non to mention the coaches foreign clientele America America's multi-million dollar clothing a switch was a fuller garment with a shorter hemline the poiret had been hinting towards even though his his actual silhouettes were I liked that I liked that fashion is hunting the woman with so much on the line French couture houses needed to ensure that business continued as normal as possible albeit we really have the narrow line of the prewar era and after that comes a so called war crinoline silhouette of Nineteen fifteen sixteen followed by the barrel line of Nineteen seven Roane and we're ready to present before broken out and the decision was taken by the syndicate that they present any way but they kind of rebranded the silhouette signed are to eat it was an economic imperative for the Parisian couture to carry on sales and production without interruption as best as normal a pre war you have the designs like Qurei who who were introducing new lines who were changing that gilded age silhouette that had been marriage of feminine and and of the Practical woman and in a funny kind of way it's also the silhouette persisted afterwards and slightly preempting assist whatever they might be needed out with but at the same time the fullness was referring to that feminity said this was the perfect flint perhaps throughout the loan the last decades of the of the nineteenth century so change was afoot anyway before the war I think as as ever hosted by practical feminine so the way it was actually marketed was that it was shorter so that women could be racing too narrower but they were shortening so it was rebranded and given this kind of name of Walker and Lynch the idea the idea of delineating things Q. Shop please is we have to be castle that that that change was afoot already and in fact the wall Kremlin what we took out but but if you look at the rope to steal that emerged in the nineteen twenties with with long fan I think it's interesting to see how fashion sometimes tends to a new romantic Victorian aesthetic so this is not necessarily unusual in a in a wartime context was interesting about the barrel line which comes on reach back in a post-war situation in a very similar way to deals realization of his nineteen forty seven new-look which was very much a kind of although couture did continue to flourish throughout the war I'm to an extent that surprised many people I think the American industry were really after the war crinoline is that it was a direct response to sales that had dropped as the war continued so in fact surprised at how successfully the concerns drink continued throughout the earliest nine hundred fourteen fifteen sixteen by nineteen seventeen sales had dropped and was the result of that that thing king so although in some ways it was designed to be a a narrow silhouette that use less fabric than the war linnet was was it a response to rationing in fact bit was away of making people refresh their wardrobes so it prompted change it creates hey it's cassidy and April and we excited to tell you that we have partnered with fabrics Kate Hudson's fashion focused active wear brand with a mission that was a real desire from among those people were he chose that had to be a the head to be a chef that had something near and the barrel silhouette include our personal favorite leggings high-waisted power hold with styles cater to every activity from Yoga to running just cannot go wrong so head over to blacks dot com for slash dressed to take super-quick style quiz after which you will receive a personalized showroom of pieces specifically catered towards your own it's an an interest in a different kind of repurposing it wasn't it wasn't you couldn't Repub is the Wolfman Lynch turned into the barrel silhouette you had of course one of the other ubiquitous looks for women during this period was that of the costume Taylor or the suit and Kate you have actually given a lot team member you'll get up to fifty percent off regular pricing an instant access to their latest collections plus the best part is that there's no commitment to order on a regular basis you can to empower women by making healthy active lifestyles accessible to everyone thanks to its exceptional price point in right now is offering dresses Sner to leggings for only twenty four dollars when you head over to fepblue dot com forward slash dressed and become a VIP member that's a ninety nine dollar value skip any month so head on over to fabric dot com forward slash dressed now to get to leggings for twenty four dollars the of the feminine suit during the Nineteenth Century. I'm hoping that you might be able to talk to us about the costume to their within the concept of feminizing Masculinity Nick Style and make sure and enter your email address at the end of the quizzed receive exclusive monthly discounts and the inside scoop about new collections that haven't been released yet and as the suit By the time we get to World War One yes so Alexandra who was Queen Victoria's daughter-in-law married to her eldest son Edward Fire that continued into the World War One era and how also the suit evolved within the war setting in particular because as soon actually golf quite a bit during the war you know from that body hugging tailor-made of Alexander of the eighteen seventies we're basically talking about a completely different animal when we look at the development of the custom tailor especially in relation to Queen Alexandra who was a big fan of the Taylormade and off cited for the growing popularity remain appropriating masculine dress in their anxieties about that but those anxieties were coming from men they were very much about women entering the appropriating different materials about the different aesthetic that it allowed that was very different to the nineteenth century tape by the new common so it was a way of reinvigorating and injecting some some renewed interest in the computer industry can she was not a fan of of the overtly confront fru comments if they late nineteenth century and took these comments that had been previously reserved and it's something that evolves into late nineteenth century and I think there were criticisms of it that somehow it was she had popularized the tailor made in the eighteen seventy s she was somebody who had a figure that lends itself to this particular kind of aesthetic those women are expressing gain not it isn't about expressing masculinity it's just a new version of femininity I think but not about dressing like man despite some of those critiques depressed about women and this is back as far as the eighteenth century where you have hogarth writing about it quickly becomes adopted by a lot of women as kind of almost this ubiquitous uniform I think I think the idea it's interesting when you look at the A different sort of images dignity that was appropriate for Clinton public presentation one could argue even that dialogue this alert opposite concepts fashion consumption and wartime deprivation being mitigated in the name of patriotism and yet fringe women were bombarded I think there's also it becomes also adopted particularly by these women working in public as say sort of appropriate so not which allow you tap award ripe that is more flexible in many ways so you do see that emerging with those pieces in wellborn in the way that sees a uniform is embraced because the possibility that it is allowing women the shorter skirts the gored skirts on one hand women are being encouraged by the fashion traits to consume and keep up appearances for the sake of weary husbands and soldiers on leave from the front we bolting events Yaw-tang going to watch the races this Kinda Gama she took out that both context and into the every day and they say some along still continues today with women being expected to wear suits in that very professional sphere so throughout the war we witnessed two seemingly silhouettes held the power to soothe your mail loved ones yes as we know fashion is a very powerful thing the males fair in terms of dress but actually it wasn't women wanting to dress like man this is not what the Taylormade was about it was about with competing messages so consumed for the good of friends concern for the welfare of minute the front and this debate really turned the matter of dress into this hotly contested topic manish women drafts marching around in Writing Habits and being inappropriate and wearing frogging and this was about women who wanted to be manly's wasn't about missile invade the very elaborate comments of the late nineteenth century and say the Taylormade is very much about something a different kind of God not so for a new woman in separates in the blouse the gored skirts plane Scott and the notion of the woman in the Taylormade this new woman it should form a contrast with a cheerless severity of the hospital ward and quote because you know apparently has the purchase of one of these new wartime kind of professional woman away although of course they want those working class women were being professionals and they certainly were not being paid right well but or wartime dresses which basically acknowledged these greatly shorten timelines from this wartime silhouette and but it also it says quote we should appear before a sick man as fine as we can and they are quite right for just as we bring flowers to their bedside so are of course women 'em fashion has been for a long a source of humor for for humor magazines day with the subject of women and wartime fashion and they did indeed the April Twentieth Nineteen Sixteen issue of the satirical journal La Bayonet Komo cramped doctors letter carriers sort of adopted of the of the suit as sort of I mean here's the rather propagandistic plea which appeared in a catalog that accompanied an exhibition which promoted French fashion San Francisco in Nineteen fifteen and it raises this is quote you're man home on leave has quite enough amendment things masculine for the time being what he wants is the rest and change provided but the eternal feminine or it was a special edition focused on women's wartime fashions and in its pages are these really humorous illustrations of fashions of the day not necessarily the policing of the gathering but a different kind of construction offset parts of wearing blouses and mixing and matching different kind of garments that warned women that and this is a loose translation it says ladies you'll have to modify everything of theirs victory your skirt left to go back to your ankles if you're societal anxieties regarding women's fashion during this period and in what ways were these anxieties reflective a broader tensions regarding gender relations during the War Osmond's comeback covered in glory thank you April for that fat tire rolled at the satirical press play and reflecting when he wants to be mad but this was about a different kind of government that allow a different expression feminity and during World War One of our gallant soldiers so women were really available at a scapegoat and so you have recreating rebranding of they're buying high heeled boots they're buying silk stockings one Credit is actually claiming the munitions workers were a stereotype or disappointed dragged on for three years prices skyrocketed. This was not the war anybody had expected so you know it's completely ludicrous but it shows the kind of society about women's events patient women being outside a war profiteers peasant women who are you know causing the price of food to to shoot up women working in these on one hand women were encouraged by the fashion press to remain Okrand and reality the women who did so during the war were subject to public ridicule satirists had a field in this particular issue there was also a little bit of satirical music was sheet music and the accompanying lyrics to this Song Rub together women because in reality women were making substantially less money than the men that were being paid for these same positions they were they were usually only making male jobs were now making unconsciously high wages you know according to these these critics and wasting their money guess what fashion very diamond combs in their hair like complete fantasy but women's undesired fashion was actually prolong the war because women of women were working these male jobs and they wanted the war to go onto that could keep making these kind of wages so they could by the time comes the garments he would wear at home but although people took where women dig rid of suits at Hamas but as a kind of so you see them in terms Lim in Nineteen Fourteen Nineteen fifteen you know about making fun of this notion that this was actually somehow practical and and patriotic thing than that you know you see in a sergeant portray of that amazing nevermind pending proclaims Isaac Newton Singer Anyway you'll all night when I mean two thirds of what doing the same job we're we're making on the other hand they were making more than they had made in the female occupations that they had had he was not at site but the search for an explanation on the scapegoat and it couldn't be the soldiers right it couldn't be a fail but I think it it really nineteen seventeen the depths of the more it goes beyond the normal well let's make fun of Women Fashion Smoking women are drinking you really focusing anxieties of what's happening to France in this billy depths of nineteen seven gory and that is fashion I think it's really important to note that while they consumption a fashion might feel immediately at odds with the horrors and atrocities of war not new during the war but I think it became much more pointed during the war and particularly we had a lot of humor about the war prints and these new professions ranged from everything from ambulance and cab drivers metro workers mail carriers and even mechanics and the uniform here featured at left actually is in the June twenty-fourth nineteen seventeen issue of the excelsior newspaper provides a really fantastic opportunity for us to see women at work and their various money on the other end of course prices skyrocketed so the idea that working class we've been revived you know the thing it was they were wasting money and through there professions in France during the war and also how they were dressing at this time and I think it's really important to note that for the most part these women were largely responsible Ansi in a women out of place they're earning too much money there too much independence day are also adopting bales vices so women chickens and pastry which now middle class women couldn't afford oh dear our prices had skyrocketed so the the women working women needed those higher wages just to maintain their their families at the level that they had before so you have this kind of he said wherever you know nurses as you mentioned earlier or one exception to that as later on were a slight handful of female military drivers which you can learn about for dressing themselves for these particular positions that they were in and standardize uniforms were more or less denied women working or volunteering in the talk that comes focused on what's happening to women and also their relationship to fashion can you talk a little bit about what the actual realities were why don't mail control of earning a living wage for the first time and whole Exi- about what was happening to society in this world before the war and you you women leaving the feminine sectors to take jobs that in a male jobs and making we're in the exhibition and the accompanying catalogue by and large standardized uniforms for women at this time we're not part of the way that women were dressing for these new professions shake their fault somehow or other speaking of nineteen seventeen I think this cover that is displayed behind us on the screen of the the comparison between the eighteen eighties there with the way that the Taylormade works later this great examples in the exhibition that this various professions Frenchwomen occupied during the war because women were never mobilized exhibition curator Sophie Kirkby John Rights of the excelsior exhibition it's a fantastic example of a woman British woman ambulance drivers uniform so no such standardization ever came into place for the you can listen to commit every Wednesday on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts up's still adhere to traditional feminine appearances and indeed multiple instances you can see how women negotiated the national standards of femininity with the takes us directly to the men's cover all wearing munition et worker because up until this point pants were not a society in the late nineteenth century particularly in an American context you have women wearing bifurcated garments full sporting buy yes acceptable garment for women and yet during the war for some professions they were an absolute necessity so margaret. I'm going to be the filling shells with TNT like dipping sugar. It's amazing this question to you was there any negative public reaction to the pampering mission nets and Kate also I'm hoping that you can contextualized honesty of their jobs but we also see something that we have not seen before this evening and that is paints yes and this trousers in the factories and you get lots of rhetoric about how is really just like housework option of pants by women within a broader history you know it was the scene as gender transgression it's interesting that you would think this would have generated lots have the fish wise you have women wearing trousers and being photographed by philanthropists like awesome so the idea of women wearing trousers was not alien and certainly mm munitions factories are wear dresses their rank lace collars they're wearing only this was incensed to raise the issue of women well because you know in the eight obviously we'd saw the picture of the Amelia bloomer and that rational dress movement in eighteen fifties assistance entering kind of the post for a look of women is was really coordoned-off just for this illustrations in magazines attended to try to be enforced so the anxiety about women wearing trousers we can really see by fact it's really super rests largely on that the images that we see in exhibit and that we see here I mean they existed but they weren't so dominant mov as we as we would lots of criticism it really didn't there weren't many photographs of munitions trousers most of the photographs of women the sort of you know we look ahead they didn't make it into fashion you don't have trousers showing up in in fashion and thanks riding bicycles but also things like again mountaineering that was the Sierra Club that's amazing photographs of the women who are members of the Sierra around cloths because women were certainly in the late nineteenth early twentieth century wearing trousers in different contexts in there are women in fact airing trousers is already know an alien concept in certain spaces but certainly in a western in a in a European the idea of fashionable assets it's not a tool acceptable impact my even now my grandmother his ninety eight she's never worn pants and now never will cultural oddities of the week we're also often visited by special ghosts I mean guests who dropped by the studio to discuss their own personal obsessions and weigh in on your paranoid oh new episodes drop every Monday listen tonight call on apple podcast the iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts we'll dilemmas whether it's advice about what to do with a possibly cursed Ouija board or your personal evidence for why we are definitely living in simulation nyquil is here with a reasonably Sephardic period for these specific jobs will disappear which is largely did an interestingly I think is about space place and context is butts so it takes a little longer for that to happen it's eleven fifty nine in Hollywood California and night call beautiful Paris began to beat again in quote so after four years of Struggle Peres as all countries involved slowly began to pick up the pieces but I'm in munish nuts in UK won't wearing trousers they will wearing a kind of a mid length dress and some of these still survive but the mechanics were so of hemlines matching movement in a sense so the different kinds of activities women were doing socially kind of detail in mind and just enough healthy skepticism to keep things interesting give us a call at one to four zero four six night and we'll discuss your ghost stories and after hours musings on the up in in the early nineteen hundred so from nineteen hundred own words wearing very voluminous bifurcated garments so I think the idea of wearing women people's lives were irreversibly altered and with it so to as women's Fashion Kate you talked a little bit about it already but can you speak to fashions continue trajectory towards modernity that continued after the war and Margaret. Can you put this in context for us how did this modernization of dress how the drop wasted boyish silhouette that emerges in the twenty so you do have a couple of variations happening our tensions was it actually at odds with French women's position in society I think the concept of the flapper that emerges in that post postwar period is is a familiar one the rising hemlines often associated I think with developments in changing trends and things like music and the idea of the Jesse h you know heavily embellished much shorter garments but you also have people like Chanel who are embracing different materials on the Air I'm Emily Yoshida I'm test Lynch and I'm Molly Lambert and every week the three of us take your night calls and discuss our favorite mysteries conspiracies and poplar vogue wrote shortly after the bells were rung cannons boomed Croup Strangers formed on the street corners hugging and kissing each other in the space of twenty four hours the heart of our even then about these slightly what you might think her old fashioned silhouettes with the rope to steal which is if you look the Thera- tensions attentions about about women wearing pants has been a long held anxiety but I think based often Husky so armistice was declared on November eleventh nineteen eighteen and with it ended one of the greatest human tragedies of the twentieth century in a very specific way I just want to read a quote real quick from vogue about the trend for bobbed hair in December nineteen nineteen they were asking if it was a women's intention to be unattractive as possible concluding that quote perhaps a more reasonable explanation is that their life had simply he is not sufficient time for an elaborate toilet and anything that simple flies life is welcome and quote so this is the post war era and zing in women's fingers used for embroidery are now I'm GonNa get all this kind of stuff it's it's really very feminine to do this kind of work and the imagery the another whole time spaces they were they were wearing trousers as well

Alexandra Queen Victoria UK Dr k Stratton Napoleon Kate Falmouth University in England TNT Chanel Croup Solis Mass Transit Society Emily Yoshida Molly Lambert Lynch twenty four dollars three years one hand ninety nine dollar
Whats next for mass transit

Axios Today

10:07 min | Last week

Whats next for mass transit

"This episode is sponsored by the american bankers association. Good morning welcome to axios today. It's thursday june tenth. I'm booth. Here's what we're watching today. An uptick in trans murders in the us. Close president biden reverses the ban on tiktok. But first what's next for. Mass transit is today's one big thing during the pandemic ridership of mass transit. Pretty much collapsed now is the country reopens transportation. Experts are hoping that commuters will come back to but what if they don't joann muller's excuses transportation correspondent and joins us now from detroit. Good morning joanne. Good morning nyla. As i was just saying. Mass transit took a huge hit during the pandemic. I are experts confident that writers will come back. I think that this is still to be seen. These transit agencies really suffered a lot. I mean transportation was down like ninety percent at one point. So we've crawled back to fifty percent because There aren't a lot of options but people who can't afford it have been buying their own cars and driving themselves where they wanna go. But there's also this great uncertainty about how the future of work is going to shake out and therefore how Commuting will shake out what are different agencies around the country doing to entice writers to come back. Well one thing that we're seeing a big movement on is the addition of sort of flexible on demand. Rides on shuttles. Very common company. that does is via. They have partnered with a lot of transit agencies around the country to sort of fill the gaps Do that first mile last mile connection to the existing transit system but often you know there's just not enough demand to have a full forty person bus running up and down a certain street or to a certain neighborhoods so you could do this on demand. Flexible shuttle ride and it suits people much better and it gets people where they need to go. So we're seeing a lot of that. We're also seeing as traffic. Has increased agencies have figured out that they need to clear lanes for buses because they want people to ride the buses so if you can make a dedicated lane just for buses bus travel actually becomes pretty nice and so you're seeing a big push toward a bus priority lanes so those are a couple of examples in as you mentioned. There's so many unknowns here both in the short and the long term we don't know if commuters will come back. We don't know how work in office is going to look like how our transit agencies trying to plan for this well they're not known to be very flexible but i think the pandemic really caused them to spring into action. Get creative because there were a lot of essential workers that still had to get to work. During the pandemic and while agencies were really hammered on revenue that made them a little bit more nimble to go forward now in this new world when we try to figure out what comes next. Joanne muller's axios is transportation correspondent. And you can read her entire story about this this weekend at axios dot com and you can read more of joins reporting in the new newsletter. What's next that debuts on monday. Thanks joanne thank you nyla. We'll be back in fifteen seconds with the alarming increase in trance murders. The banking system works best when it works for all americans. America's banks are joining bank on movement to give everyone a chance to enjoy the many benefits of bank account more at p dot com slash bank on blue. Welcome back to exodus today. Twenty twenty one is on track to be the deadliest year for trans and gender non-conforming people in the us according to the human rights campaign. That's been this since two thousand thirteen of the twenty people have been killed so far this year. Almost all are black. Or latino women actually says. Orion rummler has been reporting on this high ryan. Thank you so much for having me. Orion one of the things we've talked about before with hate crimes is how hard it is to have accurate information on what's happening. Who's keeping track of this when it comes to deaths in the transgender community. So the human rights campaign has been tracking this sense two thousand thirteen and advocates every year. Expect the numbers to be severely under reported because it can be difficult to know for sure in some cases whether someone was trans or gender non conforming. They can be misidentified. Miss gendered by police. The remaining family can miss identify them and many a few friends or people in their networks who may feel safe to talk to me about this in so far. Twenty eight people have been killed so far this year. What does that compare like to last year this time so compared to last year. We've seen more trans people killed at this point in the year at this time last year. They're only thirteen known. Trend killings for the hr and. we should talk about the fact that almost all of these murders are black. Or latino women. Most of these killings are of black and latino or latina women and that's consistent year over year i mean advocates are saying like the women of color are the most vulnerable here because discrimination puts them in a position of poverty. Maybe you don't have access to how saying maybe can't afford healthcare. Are we seeing similar patterns outside the us when it comes to killing of transpeople to their court. A number of trans killings in the us is higher per million inhabitants than in countries like australia. South africa france india canada but our rate of killings is well below latin america specifically hunter is Which by some counts has the highest concentration of trans murders in the world. Actually says orion rummler thanks ryan field reporting on this. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. Here's some other stories we're watching. We learned yesterday the. Us has purchased five hundred million doses of pfizer vaccine to donate to low income countries around the world. This comes as the president makes his first trip overseas and attends a summit of world leaders in the uk the excel pipeline is officially dead. Move by calgary based tc energy to cancel. The project was expected after president in blocked its permit but puts an end to one of the most high profile north american battles over energy and climate change and yesterday president biden issued an executive order reversing his predecessors bans on chinese owned apps like tiktok axios tech and policy reporter ashley. Gold is here now to explain. Good morning ashley. hi guys. what's behind this move. So we're looking at the biden administration. Basically saying we to want to be really tough on china and showed china that we're not backing down when it comes to protecting americans security in being competitive but we're going to do it in our own way so they put out an executive order yesterday. The basically said they would be looking at chinese companies. That do business in the us. In whether these companies put any direct risks to us consumers and sort of analyzing it a point-by-point instead of taking a more blanket approach which is what the trump administration did and just to clear up some confusion. Do we know what the risks already user. Privacy for apps like tiktok. This is always a hard conversation to have about. Chinese owned companies because they claim to be acting in good faith in taking mitigation measures to make sure that the user data of their us users is well-protected. Tiktok has made those promises over the past year or so ever since their business practices. Were called into question. But you never really know how much a company that is. Affiliated with china in any way is going to be subject to chinese laws. We're just never going to have a good view into exactly how that works from the other side. Axa tech and policy reporter based in dc actually gold. Thanks ashley thank you and before we go back to president biden's first foreign trip for the reporters going with him. Yesterday it was a rough start as the white house. Charter plane for the press was delayed almost seven hours. The reason why a cicadas warm that messed with key exterior parts of the plane in a statement delta said they apologized to our charter customers for this rarest of logical delays but still. Nothing is more important than safety. You can always send us feedback by emailing us at podcast at axios dot com where you can reach me directly on twitter. My handle nyla. Thanks for listening. Stay safe and we'll see here tomorrow morning. America's banks when everyone to enjoy the many benefits of a bank account. That's why they are busy. Improving access to banking no matter where you are with over eighty thousand bank branches across the country easy to use digital banking tools on your phone and computer and affordable secure bank on certified accounts. It's easier than ever to access banking services learn more at aba dot com slash bank access report.

president biden joann muller joanne America Joanne muller american bankers association Orion rummler orion rummler detroit ryan tiktok axios tech ashley biden administration china Tiktok latin america dc pfizer
The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Haunted Places

39:33 min | 1 year ago

The Chinese University of Hong Kong

"This episode features depictions of violence death and graphic imagery that some listeners may find offensive listener discretion is advised especially for children under thirteen. The train scuttled across the tracks may fend watch the countryside role by her boyfriend standing beside her they were so close so close to escaping. China for a new life in Hong Kong. They were riding to Kowloon but plotted Abreu. That would circumvent border security. They didn't have proper passports so it would still be risky. If they were caught on board the train may fence boyfriend could tell she was nervous rubbing her neck and stroking her beautiful single braid to ease her anxiety. The serenity was interrupted when the door to the next car slid open a border officer step through the CAP may fence heart corner throat. She turned toward her boyfriend but he was already gone. Not a care for her or her safety. She looked back at. Your Eyes. Met The officers. He could see the terror in her gaze. Despair overwhelmed may immediately. There was no time she would have to risk it or else face deportation arrest or worse with all her strength may force the train door open and watch the landscape pass below. The officer pleaded with her not to jump. It was too dangerous. She took a deep breath and launched yourself to freedom almost immediately. She felt a terrible pain. Snap her head back. Her beautiful braid caught on the door as she flew through the air she flailed helplessly pulled along by the train. Her legs were skinned and then shattered as they were dragged along the tracks her scalp torture slowly along with her beautiful dark hair. She heard a sickening snap and she was free tumbling across the tracks coming to rest on a lonely road nearby. She was delirious with pain and heartache as the flood of adrenaline slowed maith and realized. She couldn't link. She felt her head but could only touch on. The train. Hadn't just pulled off her hair. It pulled off her entire face and scalp with it. She cried and screamed for help for her former boyfriend but nobody came. May Ben died on the road. The road outside the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Welcome to haunted places. A podcast original. I'm Greg Paulson. Every Thursday I take you to the scariest areas. Most taunted real places on Earth. You can find all episodes of haunted places for free on spotify and every Tuesday make sure to check out urban legends. These special of haunted places are available exclusively on spotify at podcast. Grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do it. We love let us know how we're doing Rachana on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network this week. Join me on a supernatural journey to the Chinese University of Hong Kong and discover why to this day. It's haunted the Chinese University of Hong Kong or see you. H K was founded in one thousand nine hundred sixty three with a charter from the local Legislative Council created as a research university with a mixture of both Chinese and western educational styles. See You H K has the largest campus in Hong Kong after assimilating nearby schools. It boasts nine different colleges as part of its unique school system the campus located near the Hong Kong Mass Transit Rail or MTR with university station being essential. Stop for students. It was there that the legend of the single braid girl was born. The story goes that a woman was attempting to immigrate to Hong Kong from China alongside her boyfriend instead of a promising new life. She only found heartbreak and her boyfriend abandoned her to save himself and her precious braid caught on the train. Door as she attempted to escape border security she was scalped and left to die by the side of the road. They say her restless spirit haunts the very same road at night still searching for her boyfriend wanting to bring him to the other side. Henry was nervous for his first day of school hailing from Frankfurt. He was truly a stranger in a strange land. He barely said a word. To anyone else encountered. Since he first arrived in Hong Kong he had to attend orientation events for his first week on campus. Andy absolutely dreaded it fearing the awkward moments that brochure to come Henry Paste about the auditorium surrounding him where students from all across the world. He had a conversation here an introduction there but it was all small talk. He was sure the faculty would instigate name. Games or some other annoying icebreakers. Henry decided he might as well make the best. If it at enjoy the free food the group was led outside to a beautiful park near the water the starlight above them mingled with the lights of shot ten to create a stunning blow. One of the IRA stood before them. Then affable in popular classmen named Ken though he insisted everyone referred to him as Kenny. He welcomed the incoming freshmen and thank the other current students for helping for dramatic effect. He lit his flashlight under his Chin and gave a sinister smile. You wanted to usher in these fresh new faces by showing them the darker side of campus by telling the story of the single brave girl. It was currently August the seventh month in the Chinese Lunar Year. A time when ghosts were said to be closer to the living realm meaning that ghosts like the single brave girl had more power and were able to materialize campus. Kenny went on with Tail Halbe. Single Braid girl allegedly died around the same time. School began construction in the sixties officials fearing an incident. Covered it up. By bearing her in an unmarked grave in Potter's field. After all she was just some nameless emigrants. Once the school was opened. Male students saying even professors claimed to see her on the road. Beckoning them looking for her. Lost love and lowering men to their demise this elicited murmurs and casts from the student body. Henry was amused. He didn't believe in ghosts and thought it was just another way for the upperclassmen to mess with freshman. He recalled reading about the poltergeist known as chopper from his home country of Germany. That goes taunted patients at a dentist's office but then it turned out to be merely a sick joke by a board assistant to could throw their boys like that instant and certain this tale was merely entertainment. It went on like that through the night Kennedy and the other older students sharing ghostly tales making the assembled freshman shiver and shake until it was time to return to their dorms as the group is ready to return to their rooms. A hideous scream echoed through the park. All eyes were back on Kenny. Who pointed and shouted at the site of a girl in a white dress? Slowly walking towards them she had a single black brain just like in the story her hands. Reach down to grip Kenny by the throat. The students were shocked and terrified by the ghastly scene before them many screaming and cowering before the sinister spirit the spirit let out a dreadful wail. That made Henry's handshake. She pointed at Kenny asking if he was her beloved boyfriend she reached out to him with a Pale hand at black fingernails reaching closer closer only to pull her brain aside to reveal herself as simply another Ra. Kenny Halden laughter. Along with the other students who are in other joke. The confused Freshman soon joining Ted Relieved. It was prank Henry barely budged. His heart was palpitation but he refused to show it. He found the whole setup annoying. You walked away from the assembled crowd preferring to return on his own display their freshman traveling on the main path. Henry had enough of Kenny. The Ra's and the other students for one night. He just wanted to be alone. It would take a bit longer but he was. He could walk around the campus and find a shortcut back to the dorm. Refused TO ADMIT THAT. They're stupid. Stunt. Tatham rattled and in spite. He refused to let it create some sort of bond between himself and his peers. While walking past the Cantina Henry admired the beauty of Chateau in the lights of the city. Glow across the water. Suddenly she heard something around the dark road. It was a woman crying will was sounded like she wanted to be left alone. But Henry's curiosity pulled him forward all the same. He scanned either side of the road looking for the weeping woman no one on the benches no one in the bushes. The road was completely empty. Maybe his mind was playing tricks him or worse. Maybe it was Kenny. Ra's singling out the one freshman renegade. He rubbed his eyes. He was tired. That was all the crying. Did Not subside. In fact it grew closer. He blinked and with the opening and closing of his eyelids. A woman materialized corium standing under the streetlight and facing away with a long black braid trailing from her head down her back up next Henry finds there is truth behind some legends. I'm really excited to tell you about a fantastic new podcast. Original call daily. Quote this two to three minute. Podcast hosted by my good friend. Kate Leonard and has meant to inspire you and put you on the path to positively each day. It will share a quote that will motivate uplift and renew your outlook on life. You'll even get the specific context surrounding the quote so you can learn more about its origin and the meaning behind it and right. Now we're going to play you an episode so give it a listen and then followed daily quote free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Good morning everyone. Welcome daily quote a podcast original. I'm Kate Leonard. Today's quote is from the author Margaret. Atwood in her short story collection moral disorder. She writes all that anxiety and anger. Those dubious good intentions. Those tangled lives that blood. I can tell about it or I can bury it in the end. We'll all become stories. This quote comes at the end of a short story where a woman passes away in her home. The real estate agent becomes convinced that the House is haunted when the previous owners friend tells a story to the houses new buyers. They find it charming to them. The alleged haunting and the story behind it adds character in the end. It's these stories that live on after we die. The memories told by the people. We touched each moment. Good or bad adds texture to the narrative overtime even the painful experiences. Lose their sting and you can see them for what they are an indelible part of your life story so instead of dwelling on the difficult times or trying to bury them remember that every experience is part of what makes our lives unique. The past can't and shouldn't be forgotten but the future is still a blank page. It's up to you to write the rest of your story. Daily quote is a daily podcast. Follow on spotify to make it part of your morning routine and let it inform the rest of your day. Daily quote is a podcast original. If you're listening on spotify you can share this quote with your friends on social by tapping the three dots in the top right corner of the episode. Page scrolling down to share and selecting your sharing option of choice. If you're looking for a morning jumpstart amid day. Pick me up or evening inspiration. You can hear new episode three hundred sixty five days a year followed daily quote free on spotify over every. Get Your podcasts now. Back to the story. Henry wasn't impressed by the upperclassmen attempts to scare him with ghost stories during orientation but now that he was walking home he was forced to contend with a sudden appearance of a girl that looked a lot like the single brave girl of campus. Legend jaw gape from shock. Henry stared at the woman who clearly hadn't been there moments before he gulped and approached. Hoping this was just some insane coincidence as he stepped closer. He asked if she was okay. No Response Henry asked if there was anything he could do to help her once again. No response her face was hidden behind her hands. The single braid. Trailed Down Exter- shuttering with her sobs. He was unable to turn himself away feeling drawn to the strange woman. Henry reached out to touch your shelter and get her attention. She lowered her hands to reveal a terrible visit. No skin no pace tears streaming from her eyes sockets like waterfalls through her crack teeth. She asked if he was her boyfriend. Henry screamed with such force. He fought his vocal chords would rip. He turned and sprinted away faster than he had ever ran in his life. The image effort skeletal features stuck in his mind not leaving him even after he got back to the safety of the dorms. Kenny was the first to find Henry screaming and terror on the edge of a breakdown. The campus security invested the road but could not find the skull. Face girl that Henry Raved about Henry became obsessed afterward spending his nights at single braid road until he had to be removed but he never saw the weeping woman can oh they're conflicting reports as to which specific road around campus is the infamous single. Braid road. The one most cited has been campus circuit road along the residents road close to the New Asia College section of the university. You might think if you stay off single braid road at night. You'll be safe but the ghost of this university sometimes strays off the beaten path though the single braid road is the usual home of the single braid girl. There's another place. The spirit has been reported to appear campus urban legends. Also say she manifests at a small park with a pond called the Lotus Pool. The ghost is said to crawl out from the body of water at a certain time at night in order to drag unfortunate men to a watery demise. Sangyo didn't think too much of the Lotus Pool when she started school but she had eventually come around on it. Now enter junior year. It had become her preferred study spot. Far better than the CLAUSTROPHOBIC study halls libraries the sound of running water in particular soothed. Her stressed out my she often sat at one of the park. Benches around the pool and writer. Textbooks of the students would walk or jog by play. Some sports maybe lay down and take a nap but never no way. That disrupted the Serena Environment today however she noticed something. It was the French professor. Mr Francis Zang rarely if ever saw him outside of the classroom yet there he was standing at the water's edge staring into the pool. It was like he wasn't even seeing his own reflection. Mr Francis stared with such intensity that Ziying would swear. He was attempting to look beyond the pool. And into the earth below sweat beading on his brow. Those something had shaken him to his core sang was tempted to say hello or to get his attention at some way but he was in such a trance. She felt doing so opting instead to return to her studies. She told herself. Mr Francis was simply lost in fog. The next day sang's tranquility was once again interrupted by the odd behavior of a French professor. Just like the day before he stood at the water's edge staring into it's depths. He was transfixed hypnotize until the water bubbled. Any gave a startled gasp nearly tripping over himself as he backed away he scrambled to his feet and shuffled off to the main campus so fast. His shoes skit on the pavement. Zang was unsettled by teachers. Strange behavior two days in a row of Sterry and now this bizarre reaction looking over to where he'd been standing. She realized he had dropped something at the pond. Saj curious she walked over. It was a crumpled piece of paper. Zang unfolded the page to discover a series of scribbles in ink. All repeating the same words in English. Ten o'clock dozens if not a hundred times over on both sides. Ten o'clock ten o'clock ten o'clock that night sang eight with some friends at the canteen. She explained the situation and the note. Everyone had a theory. One friend said that maybe Mr Francis was being blackmailed and had to turn over a huge sum of money at the park. The another suggested that he had lost his mind and it was writing the same line on repeat. Well having some kind of psychotic break yet. Another suggested he was possessed by the ghost that supposedly haunted the Lotus Pool. A young woman who drowned herself after being ditched by her lover thank scoffed at these ideas. Abrar Auto. She just had her French class with Mr Francis earlier this week and he appeared normal. There had to be some logical explanation so with that in. Mind saying excuse yourself. She told her friends she would be going back to her dorm for the evening to finish your studies as she walked out of the canteen she noticed how pair the campus had become. What time was it looking at her watch? She realized it was close to ten o'clock that it occurred to her. Mr Francis would most likely return to the Lotus Pool at ten. She was certain of it. It would bring some answers at least some peace of mind. She walked down the path leading from the canteen until the pool was inside. The area around. The Lotus Pool was completely empty. She relaxed at least she didn't catch Mr Francis in some kind of scandalous rendezvous. It was just her. But crickets chirping. The placid water and the approaching the Lotus Pool. She stepped on something saying look down and moved her foot. It was a notebook picked up the book and leafed through it. It started normally enough various notes and memos that Mr Francis left for himself reports grades that sort of thing but as she read further. The phrase. Ten o'clock began to appear in the pages. I A few over Mr Francis Academia then over schedules on each page. Ten o'clock repeated over and over again until it filled entire blank pages. Most of it was written in ink. But some instances seemed to be scratched in by hand and written it blind. If this was Mr Francis Notebook where was Mr Francis? Thank stepped in a small puddle. It hadn't been raining and there was no sprinkler system. The only water nearby was the latest poll. She scan the rest of the water. There was no sign of anyone. Let alone Mr Francis saying it had enough. She was going straight to campus security to tell them everything she saw. As she turned to move she heard an unfamiliar voice asking her what time it was the thanks saw girl with a single braid standing at the edge of the park. She couldn't see her face in the darkness but something felt off about her eyes. Were two black spots in the darkness. She took a wary step back and fell into the Lotus Pool. Thanks struggled to stay afloat. In the coal murky water coughing and gasping for air embarrassed she paddled back to shore then she felt something. A large buoyant objects. She couldn't make out floating just under the surface acting purely on instinct. She used her newfound lifesaver to help her swim forward until she reached the shore. Zang took several deep breaths so she felt the solid ground beneath her feet and relief washed over her but her relief was short-lived once she wiped her eyes and got a good look at the object she had used to guide herself to shore. It was the body of Mr Francis is face was Pale. Body bloated is bulging and his mouth stuck in a perpetual screama poorer. Zang screamed for him. The Louis Pool near the Chinese University of Hong Kong's Chong Chee College is another extension of the urban legend surrounding the single braid girl. Supposedly the single braid girl was to meet her boyfriend at the pool. At ten o'clock they would run away together in order to Elope. He never arrived despairing. She drowned herself in the water. Students say her ghost appears around the pool on certain nights to try and find the boyfriend who abandoned her haunting the pool and asking for the time from any wayward men who cross her path. If a man tells her the time is in fact ten o'clock she will respond by grabbing them and dragging them to a watery tomb if the man tells her that is before or after ten her window of opportunity will closed. And if it's a woman she will lose her interest up next. The single braid girl seeks revenge against the man who betrayed her now back to the story. The Single Braid Girl Ghost story has always been popular on the Chinese University of Hong Kong campus. While there is no clear date or time line on the history of the story. It seems to stretch back decades. The story differs in incarnations such as with the Lotus Pool version but a few key elements remain throughout the girls single braid her facelessness and being jilted by Callas Boyfriend. They're clear details on the single braided girls cowardly boyfriend except that. In every incarnation he abandons her leading to death her spirit anchored to the location of her demise in wanting nothing more than to be reunited with her beloved or any man. She can get her hands on. Christopher poll. Look out the window of the train in excitement. It was his first time. Traveling to shut can tebas ecstatic to look at potential colleges. Chris had an interest in architecture. The Chinese University of Hong Kong had an intensive program. That would be perfect for him sitting across from him in the train. Musk's father David. He and his father had been a strange lately and he had to practically begged his dad to accompany him on his visit to the university. Chris didn't know why but David seemed distracted. The father and son barely talk during the entire train ride content to simply stare out the window silently at the cityscape. Still but would be student looked forward to making his dad proud by getting into a prodigious school. The arrived at university station and made their way to campus. Chris had signed up for a tour as well as an interview with one of the deans as they walked. Chris asked his dad why he seems so. Distracted David responded that the area was strangely familiar to him as though he had been here a long time ago. David tried to collect himself telling his son how proud he was him and how he was that. Christopher would get accepted the arrived at the Dean's Office for Christmas Interview David. Making himself comfortable in the lobby taking a seat and reading the newspaper. Christmas sweating bullets for what could be one of the most important interviews of this. The young man made a passionate case for why he belonged at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and why the schools programs in architecture. What help him flourish in his career. The Dean was impressed with Chris's determination and positively is prospects forgetting in. We're looking good when he exited the Dean's chamber. Chris was shocked to find his father was missing. The interview hadn't been that long. Chris was just about to search for his father when he heard the hallway. Doors Bang Open. David sprinted from the hallway as though he were being chased he looked Pale. Sweat glistened on his brow. He breathed heavily. Chris asked his father if he was feeling okay. David responded that that trip had made a meal but he would be fine. He just needed some air. Chris responded by trying to get his father to sit and calm down. David refused insisting he was well enough to carry on. They had a campus tour to get to after all. Chris couldn't help it find his father's behaviour increasingly suspicious from the train to the tour. Something seemed to be weighing on him. Chris resolved to bring the subject up once they were alone. They decided to get dinner at the campus canteen being so far away from Home Chris and David planned on spending the night on campus and leaving by train in the morning while eating. Chris asked his father why he was so anxious. David insisted it was just travel. Sickness and weariness. Chris noted that he looked nearly ready to faint when they had passed by the Lotus Pool. David nearly jumped out of his seat in Anchor. He did not want his son to bring up the subject again. Chris was apologetic and suggested they go back to the dormitory to get some rest. His father was out of the door as the words left David. Small Chris Struggle to catch up as they exited David Pause before a lonely road bending around the canteen his face went Pale. Jaw clenching and unflinching. Chris had a snap his fingers in front of his father space to get his attention. David excused himself saying he was just lost in thought he needed to rest and retiring to the dorm room was a welcome idea. Chris couldn't help but wonder what had shaken his dad's so much it was around three a m when Chris Startled Awake from a strange commotion but door had slammed shot in a panic. Chris turned on the lights to discover. His father was missing his bed. A mess and his luggage was still unpacked. He looked out the window to see his father run from dorm and across campus. Chris quickly got dressed and chased after him. The anxiety was suffocating. He had to know what had writing this father so much he was able to follow David's trail with relative ease. That late at night there was no one else around just as he was nearly out of breath. Chris saw his father entered the site street. He had been transfixed by earlier that day. It was dark. But flickering streetlights barely illuminated the pavement beneath but Chris could make out a couple of silhouettes in the shadows his father and someone else he called out to. David and his father responded by yelling telling him to get back to run away while they still could. Chris didn't understand David. Nearly Som- he was apologizing profusely to another person. A woman with a single braid repeatedly calling the name. May Fan apologizing for abandoning may then apologizing for May fens. Crucible death apologizing for finding someone else under the streetlight. Chris got a closer look. The woman had no face. It looked like the skin had been violently ripped from her head leaving her skull. Enter Braid and to horrifyingly permanent rick discrim. She grabbed his father tightly in her own debt. Grasp her Pale hands sank into David. Scalp she gripped at so tightly. That Chris feared father's head would burst instead. She pulled on his hair. He screamed in agony and the skin slowly split from his face. David's face was ripped off in a cruel mimicry of the fate that befell the single braid. Girl she whispered words of love and affection to David. Even as she held the bloody remains of his face. Chris promptly blacked out. The last thing he heard was father's terrified yelling when he came to it was morning if he was back in the dormitory but there was no sign of his father in their room. He searched throughout the building throughout the campus but couldn't find him eventually. Campus Security and then. The police joined the search but David Poe would never be when the People's Republic of China established itself in one thousand nine hundred forty nine Hong Kong experienced a massive wave of immigration from the mainland in order to curb. This anyone caught in the border zone was sent back. However from nineteen seventy four to nineteen eighty. Hong Kong established a touch base policy where any migrant to manage to make it to an urban area and get proper identification could stay. The policy was canceled due to a failure to deter any further illegal border crossings in the tail of the single braided girl. Not much is known about what became the lover who abandoned her. Some iterations of the story say he managed to successfully make it to Hong Kong and find a new life for himself. Others say he was already a citizen and left. You're at the rendezvous at the Lotus Pool. Whatever the truth. The legacy of the single braid girl lives on as a story of betrayed love and the search for a better life. Thanks again for tuning into haunted places. We'll be back on Thursday with a new episode and don't forget to come back on Tuesday for our urban legend series available. Only on spotify. You can find more episodes of haunted places and all other park has two originals for free on spotify. Not only spotify already. Have all your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy. All of your favorite podcast originals. Like haunted places for free from your phone. Desktop or smart speaker just stream haunted places on spotify. Just open the APP tap rows and type potted places in the search bar and don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram. At podcast and twitter at podcast network. I'll see next time haunted places was created by Max Cutler. As a podcast studios original executive producers include Max and Ron Cutler sound design by Kenny. Hobbs with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden and Isabella Way. Episode of haunted places was written by Jacob Davison with writing assistance by Greg Castro. I'm Greg Poulsen.

Chris Struggle Lotus Pool Henry Paste Chinese University of Hong Kon spotify Hong Kong David Kenny Halden Campus Security Mr Francis China Mr Francis Zang facebook officer Greg Paulson Ben Kowloon Legislative Council Hong Kong Mass Transit Rail Hong Kong
More Mass Transit Minus Macomb County? Plus The Ford Mustang Mach-E

Daily Detroit

15:59 min | 1 year ago

More Mass Transit Minus Macomb County? Plus The Ford Mustang Mach-E

"Daily Detroit is brought to you by the community support our work at Patriotair Dot com slash daily Detroit on today's show two big stories. Mass transit may be moving moving ahead and southeast Michigan minus mccomb county. Cheyenne Sereni has more Greg Maclean Aura of auto blog joins me to talk about the brand new Mustang Machi from Ford word. It's an answer to Tesla and was even revealed next door to a Tesla property before we get into that though. The Motor City is getting some star power this week hunger games actor Liam Hemsworth is in Detroit shooting his new. TV show dodging miles. He's been spotted downtown including in the GM run set. It's Tuesday eight November eighteenth two thousand nineteen. I'm Jerry stays and welcome to your daily Detroit on daylight. Today the queue line bell will usually use for storage transitions is very appropriate. Red Metro Detroit has a long twisted history with mass transit since the removal of St Cards in the nineteen fifties. Well it's been very very hard to get around our region without a car but there are new developments and Cheyenne. No Srini is with me to talk about him. Hey jair good see Shan so you went up to royal oak today. Beaumont Hospital to find out what's going on with these regional leaders. These mucky mucks. We're all getting together. They're looking into new way forward. Yes they are the city of Detroit. Oakland Wayne Wayne and Washtenaw counties were all there and are pushing to change state legislation so that they can raise money for transit. I noticed something though. There's no mccomb home county what you said there. NOPE but I'll get to that later so it's kind of a coalition of the willing will. What about smart the suburban bus system? So this goes over and above of what we have right now. SMART would be untouched by this proposal that aims to raise additional dollars for more service in the counties of the willing they plan to do it through revising advising the Municipal Partnership Act. So if you look at the data and I have been following the story for years I it feels like Millennia to be quite honest Metro Detroit spends less per person on transit than almost any other region. Even Cleveland Spins more than double what we do and in my hometown of Denver they spend two hundred and sixteen dollars per person per year on transit and Detroit spends about sixty nine bucks. So what you're saying as you get what you pay for. Yeah exactly and leaders are saying that it hurts the region for attracting and keeping people here the kresge foundations rip Rapson. Told me me this story. A number of speakers referred to attracting young people retaining young people encouraging people to stay and make this their home in retirement. I mean there are all sorts of ways in which the absence of a regional transit system hurts US economically Over the long term and I have two children. Both of whom have moved out of Michigan Michigan and both of whom have said that they would come back if we had a transit system it is that basic and so. I'm hoping that this is a step in that direction. Here's some more audio audio. Dave meter the vice chairman of energy. Let's roll that. We're trying to attract new businesses to this region. The first question they're asking us about talent the second question right behind that is how people get to and from work so as we try to grow and diversify the economy. It's important and also for those of us that are working on workforce development and you know trying to get people either to their first job or people to a higher paying job. Transportation is really critical. We have a fair number of people in this region. That don't have access to and from work is just way to hurt. So let's get back to the fact. mccullum isn't a part of this shy. That's interesting to me well. They barely passed a smart millage and leadership. There read the tea leaves. There just isn't an appetite for more transit with mccomb Voters Warren Evans Wing County. Executive had this to say he also outlined that. This isn't a final step. We didn't see that would be different this year next year or the year after necessarily early and so this gave us an opportunity to create a plan to be able to go forward where each count gets the opportunity to vote. I mean the statue just allows tells us to what's on the ballot voters still have the opportunity to take up or down and we know the transit has to show value to people. They're not gonNA vote for it so if we can get this cog in the wheel done we can work on. We can work on the planet. So what is next. The idea is to get the law changed in December so that the three counties could put some sort of enhanced transit separate from the arty a separate from smart separate from D. Dot talk on a future ballot and all no. There's bipartisan support for this. Do you know how much they're looking to raise well. There wasn't talk of how much or what this plan. Dan would exactly look like just that. They would like the plan to be out by spring of twenty twenty and then on a November twenty twenty ballot initiative so another layer of government. Doesn't that Kinda seem like duplication. Many regions start with multiple agencies and. Let's be realistic about politics here. You're not going and to see a merger if you're waiting for a merger of all of these systems you're going to be waiting for a very long time to get anything done okay. So let's get into some some things I know. Cheyenne you went to Indianapolis for us to cover transit. Awhile ago how does how does that relate to this. Yeah so this seems very similar to how they passed it. There sign up. Who wants to do this and build around that the county's it don't sign up now can do so later at another date? This looks like this could be progress. It wasn't that long ago that I had to always take a transfer at the state fairgrounds just to go from downtown Detroit to nine mile and Woodward to get home from work mark. Our system isn't competitive on a national or world stage. But it's better than it was. I remember that shy. That was a complete and total mess. It really really was a mess and I also want to call out there that you had an editorial that basically lined out that those who want transit should just do it Wayne Washtenaw in that time and with the death of elbrick's Patterson Oakland leadership has flipped to match their voters. If you look at how the smart millage passed the Oakland County. The commission is now in democratic hands and for regional mass transit. Yeah I figure this is how this would need to get done mccomb. County just doesn't have the appetite for too many regional things things there's already the. Dia Already Kobo. There's all kinds of noise that gets made and culturally mccomb often sets itself apart from Wayne and Oakland mccomb tense identify itself as more rural. There's in fact lots of dirt roads. That are even just right around where I six ninety-six is however I think long term this could be very bad for Their economy new businesses are going to prefer to go where they can easily get workers where young people want to move. And that's where transit is and I think it's going to be interesting interesting to see how this one plays out. Maybe Penny wise pound foolish. So this timeline is really aggressive chair. So this'll be really interesting to watch. Well thank Cheyenne for all of this. You're welcome joining me on the Line Greg mcgarry from auto blog. Welcome to daily Detroit. Hey how's it going. It's going Oh and well my friend going well. There is a major reveal. That happened over the weekend From a Detroit automaker specifically Ford. I mean this thing I I mean. It's seems to be a major entrant into the whole electric car race. This is so this is the Ford Mocking E. This is You know landmark vehicle for Ford. It's the first Mustang to be electrified it's the first Mustang to have four doors and of course this is sort of you know boards Moonshot to compete compete with You know car. Companies like Tesla you know. They revealed it last night. You know very splashy event out Head of the Los Angeles Auto Show. which is this week And you know initially it's it looked very compelling You know it's it. Offers a wide variety of different ranges. You know you're looking looking at You know everything from like three hundred miles to A little bit more Lots of different power configurations The prices GonNa start a boat forty four thousand dollars and then range up to about sixty thousand five hundred which would be a top end model with a lot of power you know a lot of amenities on it so you know. It's it's exciting. This is a really important car for forward looking at the pictures and some of the video up on auto blog. Doug it really strikes me that this vehicle has embraced being an electric car with that big center screen dash and things like that the more space. It's it's less like instrumental in more like a frankly kind of like a phone. Yeah I think that's the idea. The reveal last last night was An airplane hangar. Pretty close to Tesla's headquarters. which do the Math I? I don't think that was a mistake in Tuzla is known for having very You know. Cool interactions with the riders. Drivers consumers like that as far as screening for ten minutes so I think Ford is trying to connect. Thank you know with this sort of you know new breed of customers by using tactics like that. It looked pretty cool. If you look at the pictures you know we have a ride. Along one of our reporters was out there. He got very brief ride in the new mock E. and You know you can see that. It's all very forward looking very futuristic futuristic. I think it looks cool. Yes some of the feedback online that I have seen include that you know. It's it's definitely different. Look to a degree for for the Mustang brand to not be just A. It's not just a car per se. It's more of a crossover right. Yes so that is probably like the big point of controversy for this. Is that Ford. Put the Mustang name. this crossover vehicle I actually don't think the electric occasion part of it is all that that controversial. I think it's frankly a natural step to make the Mustang Electric. I think we're seeing. The future is going to go electric in most segments concern. I think frankly you know I think making a electric mustangs brilliant move you got a ton of performance and power out of that You sort of future proof it if you will in some ways I think some of the controversies come. From the fact that this is more of a crossover a crossover if you look at it it's You know got that sort of silhouette the wet The stance is a little bit different than Traditional sports cars sports coupe like the Mustang But it also has a lot of mustangs styling cues and you know especially if you look at the the headlights. The Hood. The tail lights So I think I think basically what they're trying to do is take their strongest name. which is Mustang? It's like conic it's been around for decades really resonates with consumers with Buddhist and put it on Perhaps one of the most important vehicles going forward which is an all electric Crossover so I think they're just going all in on this It's risky but it's a very aggressive play and it could really pay off. Do you have any kind of like background on the infrastructure for these kinds of things. Because I know that there's like charging that that works in that tends to be a concern for folks of like. Where are they going to top off this thing? I know there's varieties on on range but it is kind of. I believe it is comparable comparable to the test as far as rain. But what about access to charging basically topping this thing up yeah So there's a wide variety of ranges actually all the way from two hundred ten miles to three hundred to even more than that depending on what size You know battery options you take or if you want all wheel drive rear wheel drive so once you kind of figure that out then you would sort of sketch out. How are we going to use this? You know your Mustang Machi And there's two different kinds of chargers as you can get. There's a home charter. which would you know? Certainly if you're going to buy a vehicle like this. You probably very seriously look at getting a home charger. I I think that's a very logical practical thing to do. There's also a mobile charger. which you could also purchase so that would sort of maybe alleviate some some of the Ranging Ziobro a little bit if you could get somewhere where you can set up your mobile charger And you know a lot of that is to come this vehicle isn't going to be You know available until late twenty twenty so I think there's going to be a lot more As we get closer to the launch as far far as Ford plans for it infrastructure and really just setting up the rule out of the Machi and just first impressions for you. Then how do you think this is going to stand up in in the big electric car. Debate is is something that Ford really should be able to hang their hat on. Yeah I think so. I think As far as making this watcher car I think this is a really strong move. I think if you kind of look at the landscape and say hey. The future is electric and consumers consumers like crossovers. What's our best name Mustang? Okay let's roll with it. I mean to be this is taking all of your strongest elements and looking at the competitive appealed. It just going for it. I think I think that's a great play I think Ford is probably going to run into is running into some distance from its hardcore hardcore Mustang Bass reading some comments on our site and you know some of the tone from some of the other maybe more enthusiast sites. There's a little bit of. I'd say mental calibration calibration. is they try to sort of bigger these new elements of the Mustang But I do think once you get past that and I think that's actually very like vocal vocal minority. Perhaps if car people. I think once you get past that having electric Mustang is a very compelling thing it's a sort of thing that if this was just called like something generic like the Ford you know the Ford something like a green kind of ten for the name before the week you in order to steal like a Nissan name or something like that. It might struggle to cut through the clutter but now you've got a name universally known by all kinds of consumers and you had the element of what Trysofi and you make it Fairly you know practical. It's a crossover that's going to give people who are maybe crushed shopping Tesla's or some of the other electric offerings from Jaguar. And Audi and take a look at this 'cause this could fit their needs. And then you like I said You roll in the Mustang Element and people are like. Oh that's cool. It's not just generic electric crossover. It's also a Mustang so I think it's a risky play but I think the payoff is is very. Hi potentially very high. Well Greg. Thank you for your time to talk to us about this one. We'll be sure to link to that right along video and all of your coverage over on auto blog. I appreciate you and looking forward to talking to you for the next big reveal anytime. Thanks for joining us today. A quick reminder that membership matters and is an important part in keeping your daily Detroit it going independent. All local media requires independent funding. And that's where you come in be like Katie. Alan and Tony in seth join us as a member number for just a few bucks a month at Patriot dot com slash daily Detroit. And thank you with that. I'm jair stays to care of each other and we'll see you around Detroit.

Detroit Ford Tesla Mustang Detroit Cheyenne Wayne Wayne Beaumont Hospital Liam Hemsworth Cheyenne Sereni royal oak GM Oakland County Oakland Oakland mccomb Shan
Episode 226: The Death of Trolleys (Entry 320.GN4519)

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

1:01:41 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 226: The Death of Trolleys (Entry 320.GN4519)

"Nothing awesome we are Jennings and John Rodrick. We speak to you from our present which we can only assume as your distant past the turbulent time that was the early twenty first century during the great cataclysm that will surely befall our civilization we began this monumental reference of strange obscure human knowledge. These recordings represent our attempt to compile and preserve wonders esoterica. That would otherwise be lost. So whether you're listening from an advanced civilization or have just reinvented the technology to decrypt our our transmissions. This is our leggit you. This is our time capsule this is the you have accessed entry. Three two zero dot g n four five one nine certificate number one four eight seven the death of trolleys F- The death of trolleys. All things must pass John. He's Andrew even trolleys are you. Have you ever gone through through a phase where you regularly used mass transit. Yeah All the time. I mean anytime I visit overseas. It's such a delight to have functional mass transit and my kids love it because kids all grow up is transit fans like America has to turn them into little car kids. Yeah you're right but it's it's true. Liking buses and trains were way more. We're all train spotters. Exactly you have to really have to drum it out of a little patriotic American kid who insists on driving everywhere and it's true really any major city anywhere. Outside of America and Canada has a a completely functional and bustling doing little mass transit system. Mind bogglingly effective. You just like the bustle of the Tokyo. Oh trains I love them. The efficient mapping and signing of the London Underground. I like the beautiful. Old Art. Deco entrances to the Paris Chris Metro every Germantown has a has a very efficient and clean. Trolley Got Streetcar Ring. That takes you everywhere. Wonderful careful sort of vintage cars in Amsterdam and Vienna at that. Share track with with new. Hyper hyper modern car. Can you feel like you're doing your part because you look around the city that is not car token car dependent. And you think well I want to do my bit for that. I'll I'll take this charming little train instead that goes Ding Ding. And then takes you right where you're going. It goes clang clang when the trolley and even even cities built on hills like in Switzerland. I mean there are mass transit systems that involve a funicular cable cars. I love a good me to go. I mean it literally starts with fun and they're not wrong interesting with their also not wrong testicular structure. Something everybody hates a test right true but funicular starts with something a little better. It's like fun. It's like testicular except fun. That's what they should say. And have you in in your experience overseas in all these wonderful little train sets Shirley you have reflected on the fact that in the United States. We don't seem to be able to make a go of those systems and have you. Have you sat a consternation trying to figure out why I have as the as the quaint quaint European shops drift by the window my thoughts to drift to a different America to wear. Because it's very much alive question here in Seattle title where we are finally building light rail decades after we could have right decades after we were offered federal money that instead went to build a non-functioning transit system in Atlanta right. Although I took it not very long ago and run and I take it together. Oh we did. We enjoyed it very much. We went out of our way to take the train back. Did did in fact we And remember we sat. Oh No at one point. We had lunch in a restaurant where they had taken the tracks up and turned it into into a bike path. Oh yes I remember that we did take the omnibus was born. In fact at that steakhouse but we took the train and And had a had a lovely old time. We made a transfer even we did. And that's part of the fun of it. Yeah you know if your commute or maybe complain about having a transfer but a for a tourist. What a treat free transfer from one train two different train? We got off and stood there with our map. Unfurled at a local person came by and said can I help you. Can I help you boys. I think the problem with the Atlanta Santa System is because it was built in the seventies the main goal of the planners was to make sure Black people never got to go anywhere. Good it's a super brute. a-list environment into it has well and the jokes on them because because Atlanta because the black people ended up getting to go blazes good in Atlanta Glenn they did and it's just not. The train doesn't go anywhere useful because people were so worried about it not serving the wrong kind of neighbor. Yeah that's right and we risk that even now in building our transit system here in Seattle part of the Part of the the most recent controversy. Is that the people over in the lily white suburb of Bellevue or what used to be lily. White now has French overwhelmingly Chinese Severeville. It has a lot of immigrant population coming to work at Microsoft but They tried to. They tried to put the Kyw Bosh on building mass transit to Bellevue. Because they were afraid that it would bring the unsavory the evil man who runs the mall was a successful in making sure that the train came nowhere near the actual retail core of the city. Because then suddenly you'd you'd see teams from the not so good schools scaring everybody away from Swarovski coming over to to Bellevue Bellevue Square. which is still the the mall that has inexplicably expensive stores in it? And it's not we don't want it to be a teen hangout. For for MOMS to go to Panera or places maybe even nicer nicer than Pinera right. Well no we do want to team hang out but they have to drive there. BMW Cabriolets Park in the parking. It's a certain kind of teed WHO's there to buy by something at the Apple Store and maybe a five hundred dollar. Lego set right but But so so it surely occurred to you that America could have a functioning trolley and Light Rail Transit System in our major cities and has assumes conspicuous by. Its absence does our cities. Aren't that much different. I mean we had. We now have suburban sprawl because of the century the automobile. But there's nothing inherent about about. San Francisco explains why Muny and Bart are so much lousier than their equivalent in any small German city and it's in contrast to the the intercontinental rail system where the size and scope of America and the great great distance between our large cities and Canada also It is more difficult to build a network of rail than it would be in Germany or Hollander Belgium or France or in fact all of Europe an interconnected system that that is that all works together although although there were some gauge problems for a long time in Europe where trains had to stop and change undercarriage. I think I once accidentally only books myself halfway between Paris and Barcelona because I didn't realize you have to get out at whatever the last French city on the line is and get onto a different kind of trained to go through the FEENEY's Arnie's right because the rail gauges Franko didn't want his trains to be the right with her whatever as who would rightfully so the only thing that appeals to me about fascism issues on the trains run on time but they run very odd scaled tracks and so in Europe and you're traveling by rail from country to country or city to city and reflect on the fact that or in Japan and reflect on how efficient it is and how well designed and built those systems. Aren't that doesn't instantly translate to the United States and we're seeing right now. Alon Musk's attempt to build a high-speed rail from San Francisco to Los Angeles becoming just this bugbear of cost overruns and And increasingly it looks like it's not going to be anything close to what was promised which was what a maglev train inside of a vacuum tube And now it just looks like it's going to be a train. It's yeah you don't expect something the size of the United States to be like Wales where you can just get up and take the train to the other side of the country because the United States is not the size of Wales. It's it's it's one of the one of the things we boast about right bigger than way we say on our great seal also dollar Bill I would say Wales is a bad example of a country that you can navigate all to all four corners by rail. That's true but you know that the south okay. The south of England though yeah. Yeah sure sure. You're all over there on a train every hour. There's a train to the a place you want to go. But the frustrating thing about our cities is that they although many of them particularly in the West are built on larger wider street plans than say for instance a medieval German city. There isn't any reason. Why Light Rail wouldn't work just as well appear as they're made even more frustrating by the fact that many of these American cities were actually designed around public transit tracked Transit Electric Trolleys? I didn't realize that until moving to Seattle. I think because then you can see all the weirdly wide streets that USED TO BE STREETCAR CAR. Lines all the current cool biking and hiking trails that were once into urban rail. And you realize oh before everybody could afford a car. We had very functional transit in this in this remote corner of the country which means I assume pretty much. Every city had really good streetcar. Lines Functional Transit and transit ends at that that the construction of the construction of the transit actually focused and affected the way the city grew in the way the city built and a lot of cases. Transit investors and transit companies were also connected to property development so that there wasn't just it was a mutual interest or or even a corruption one would say corruption and there's a ton of corruption in this story for sure but but tracked transit started even before electricity. It was trolleys. These were put into American cities and European cities in the mid nineteenth century and they were drawn by horses or by you know by Mule. Yes but why do you need the rails. Well because in those cities at that time but horses were dumb and we'll take the wrong turn courses are horses have always been incredibly smart. They're just as smart in eighteen fifty. They are now which is to say extremely smart. And you seem to be worried that I'm going to get counsel to our to our future e kind to our wine listeners hello centaurs shores of future just say can misspoke no the quality of the roads in those cities were cobblestone and And Broken Malcolm and pebbles and skulls of our enemies and long which particular repave. This goes on our enemies. Indianapolis Comoro and that's right and Tampa but also mud and You you know city streets were not. We're not smooth and rail was a bustling thing would have just been rattling all rattling constantly. And if you put If you put a trolley on on tracks and pulled it with a horse it was the smoothest and most efficient way to move people through a city and it was kind of a kind of a revelation and does clang clang clang it. The previous song would have been a little bit with the trial. Thank you thank you thank you and so that that method of public transit kind of exploded became very popular and it was a It was during a time of horsedrawn where horsedrawn carriages where the worthy Were the primary means of conveyance outside side of walking where I guess riding on a horse it it. It was pretty easy to dedicate a certain section of the street to to this gleaming gleaming new rail influenced by the spread of steam locomotives around the world and rail was kind of a new fashionable style. Dial I wonder why no steam solutions. I guess it's not efficient on a small scale not efficient. I mean certainly not efficient on a small scale would have been you know just another element of total pollution Russian and much cheaper to have a horse poll. Because you're going to be doing a lots of stops and starts a little trolley. You're going to go up three blocks and stop you. Don't want somebody shoveling coal shovel oats into your horse instead so. This infrastructure was built and then when electricity became a you. You know a new utility these lines were all electrified and and Trolley lines and electric companies unease were also often in partnership or cahoots depends on who you trust. The the press release said partnership contracts said. Nobody's ever in good kind of cahoots. Yeah there were there were. This was the era of course of of antitrust or or of the big trust and American business then as now is always seeking to find OPPORTUNITIES TO EXPLOIT NEW EFFICIENCIES and also to develop a kind of top down or symmetrical vertical article immigration integration control every aspect control the re aspects. So if you could control the delivery of electricity the supply of parts the the rails and and and cars themselves and the property out in the suburbs where the new houses were being built that the that the tracks went out to you had a perfect vertical integration of the whole of the whole system. It's not just livery stables that are out of business you can put people out of business at every level of the economy and it was and that that that was part of the of the early development of the trolley systems in the country so much so that those early public transit magnates who sought to find find opportunities to to have a monopoly control over public transit were regarded and this is crazy to us now now because we think of Public transit exclusively in terms of the public. Good those are the good guy big Biz. That's right and IT'S A. It's a a little liberal cause celebre but at the time the what we're what we're called the traction interests traction the tr- because traction was the the noun informative laying track well and also like the electricity provided the attraction for the for the trolley attraction interests Chris were seen as as monopolists and rotation capitalist to that was coming in and not not just monopolizing this business but also our city streets. I WANNA go back to a world but so innocent that EUR LEX. Luther is the Guy who runs the Streetcar Line. The streetcars Raphael. Like I could I could do okay by the turn of the century. Of course I mean most American cities not just the big ones had just like we were talking about in Europe and Asia. Aw there were. Trolley lines extensive trolley lines. It probably led us some sprawl right. We we think that as an automotive problem it led to sprawl role in in a sense that we now think of even the furthest extent of the trolley lines as being kind of within the city right. I mean if we hear West Seattle we talk about we still talk about the junction amend the top of West Seattle well. That was a Streetcar Junction. There hasn't been a streetcar there. In seventy year nothing gets joined at the junction but we still call it the junction and that would have felt then like a long own way out of town but now if you can afford to live at the junction you're you're it's thought of is like I mean you're still in west Seattle. Let's be honest but but it still. It feels like town. So it created sprawl at a scale that we would think of. Today is kind of still responsible and manageable. There was a you could always walk walk. If you were able bodied you could walk the distance that the streetcar could take you. But of course that's a that's a false standard because you couldn't hang off the back if you're buster Keaton Harold Lloyd. My the streetcars were for. My Dad grew up in Seattle in the Nineteen Twenties and thirties and he couldn't afford the nickel to ride the Streetcar Car but he in his knickers and leather shoes. That required some strange would handled hook to tie. He would run run after. Grab a hold of the cow catcher. Sure on the back and crouch down ride so he would do the free kidder. I think just like an old time movie Nicole about right or is that just your hypothetical I think well it was probably a penny and then as well so a nickel fare became the standard of Cost Nationally of a streetcar ride and in a in many many cases that was mandated streetcar circles. That's what Nichols were called Streetcar Circles. And an tokens were were often used. But those tokens it's cost a nickel and in many cases what happened. That's big token for China. That's right 'cause it's just a token comment in their in their haste and desire to establish a kind of monopoly control over over transit systems within within a city's a lot of the transit purveyors attraction interests were quick to agree to to business arrangements with city governments where they said in exchange for a monopoly interest. Here we will maintain the right of way. We'll be responsible for snow plowing and for keeping the the roads in good order and we will stick to a five percents. I'm sorry a five CENT COST FOR A STREETCAR RIDE with with no provision for inflation. Yeah no it was part of this the way that the city's negotiated these contracts. They said you know you have to keep keep the cost at five percents built breath by the way that would be less. That'd be around seventy five cents today depending on whether this was nineteen twenty or thirty or forty. But that's a cheap ride. It was a cheaper ride and but a profitable one because at the time the the way the there wasn't a ton of competition and not a lot of complexity to building these things that's right once they were built operating them was fairly cost effective although there was a kind of legacy a a legacy culture of having to operators per train that was kind of a holdover from like a driver and a conductor or a holdover from even like the crew. That would run a horse team. You had you had two people sitting there and they were superfluous the second one superfluous in a in an electric trolley. But it was. It was kind of an institution by that point but even so the employees in the at the turn of the century. Where were the the the cost of having to trawlermen wasn't an onerous cost? You know the first time I ever road city buses my check that I never took the my dad took the bus awesome Seattle to work as a but I walked to school and so the first time I wrote a city bus much was in South Korea and in the early eighties all buses had a driver and a second person usually a young gloved woman. Halfway up the buzz us who appeared to have no job really it was definitely a relic of a different time. Yeah because work maybe at some point yes she took fairs or something but that'd kind of all gone away with with better mechanized buses and I don't know how long that lasted. She have a seat or did she stand just through her whole work. I think she had a little seat by the door. And that went away sometime in the late eighties but you could definitely see. Just whatever the technological article legacy was it had left an extra person for the job and it's hard to it's hard to legislate away you remember riding the monorail in the seventies and eighties where the pilot would would would pull into the station dock and then pull their little handle out that allowed them to control the motor. It was a kind of a little like It looked like the handle of a large coffee grinder and then they would carry the handle all the way through the train to the other end and inserted into the control panel at the other end. And why didn't the monorail just have a handle any chand while because the handle was the. That was the key. That was the without this handle. It's almost ceremonial thing. It's like delivering. The crown jewel really was your guests probably When you when you got your Your certification to drive it. They probably cold cold getting your handle here. He let it be known. The monorail is going the other way. I remember watching that pilot and just thinking that was the greatest job in the world and they didn't have an assistant it should be on a little pillow carries it all the way to the back of the train. But it really was the success of the of the trolleys that began and the the process of their own demise the trolleys took people out to the extent of the line and Here in Seattle as you said you can see all the streets that used to have trolley lines yesler and a union and so forth you can go sort of down the down the street and see which neighborhoods which little stores little clusters of stores were located at former trolley stops. But but this was the this started to create a kind of envy on the part of the people that lived just a little bit further out of town. The the people that we're kind of living in a rural slightly ex urban areas who felt like the trolley line went out to some neighborhood Ravenna or someplace and stopped and at that point also so the streets stopped being maintained and the snow stopped being ploughed. There was a movement in the nineteenth century. Late nineteenth century called the good roads movement which was a kind of national movement to improve equality of roads in the country. People that you know it was kind of the era of the rise of the bicycle and the the The notion that time in the country was good for you an and kind of force people as much as it was for people who lived out there it was a was a sort of. Yeah the type of thing that if there were. NPR At the time they would've supported the good roads movement but it was A. It was an idea that now that we have these roads. Now that you could conceivably get from city to Pity on these on this network that now we are next step was to improve them and make them not just not just transit corridors but but to to elevate the entire network to make it a own steady steady and and pleasing like we. Because that's what was happening in the cities right. Parks were being built. The boulevards and people in the country recognize the her people in the in the in the surrounding areas also wanted some of those amenities and as part of that. The idea of bus service started to enter into the equation. What would omnibus have been back? Then it would have been. It was well initially horse-drawn and then And then gradually just wheeled trolleys but were that had that could then travel further out from the last rail stop from the last trolley stop the same vehicles they could just literally early. Go off the rails. No there were. There was a separate network and buses. That would then take you from take you from the last trolley. Stop and take you out to your house house. Further Afield and the buses were more flexible. Because you could turn you didn't have to follow the track. They we're more expensive at the time but only slightly you know because there was Because although operating costs were higher gradually over time infrastructure costs were a lot lower. Right you had to. You didn't have to maintain a trail. Gra I'm sorry track network and so right about the right about World War One era the the real real networks kind of reached their apogee. And we're were now connecting to these these bus US networks a member name of John D Hertz. And he wasn't actually born John Anti hurts. He was born shunned or hurts Chandra. Yeah he's from Slovakia Chandelier much cooler named John. John is great as a great name. John de he seemed to Echo John. D. Rockefeller that he took on after he emigrated to the United States was the defer. Dick like stick hurts. Oh no now. What kind of this is a family show where you never in the fourth grade? You don't remember Dick Hurts. I was in the fourth grade before that kind of humor was positively friend. uh-huh Dick Hurts having not yet been invented yet. Yeah so he's I guess he's the rental car namesake right yeah but in fact. Jd Hurts probably deserves his own entry in the omnibus because before he founded Hertz rental cars he actually founded the yellow cab company. It hurts was was one of these plucky sort of immigrant characters who came to the US and and you know was a was a teenage boxer and then became a newspaper delivery boy which he turned into a a job as a newspaper reporter and then he suggested that he become a used car salesman in the very early days of off of cars beginning of used cars and after he owned a you know a couple of cars he started to lease them out and then he kind of started a cab company and after running a cab company for a while. He started to bill buses. Oh he started a company. The building cabs yellow cabs and then he extended that to building coaches which he called the Yellow Coach Company discussed doing vertical integration. But he's just trying everything he's trying every step of the ladder and at a certain point. He combined all of his His coach building operations into a company called the Omnibus Corporation where he was supplying coaches to all these different transit companies. I want to hear about when he took out John. D. Avis just destroyed in. He started hurts his his rental car company which was called hurts. Drive yourself and in which which is yeah popular popular style. It was Dr Dash. Ask You our dash self. So he was like he was very much pre pre Internet there. He invented text-speak. Drive yourself but he and during this era like cab companies and transit companies. This was all the the these were highly competitive businesses. There was a lot of gangsterism numb to pay off the right people. Contra companies were were blowing up one another's stables in one another's bus depots but hurts ended up selling He he sold the he sold interest in his company to General Motors and ended up ended up being on General Motors Board of directors and at the point at which General Motors enters into the story. we're arriving at a moment in Streetcar three-car history. That has that became very. That became a point of great controversy later her in looking back because there was this sort of pivotal moment right after world. War One where. STREETCARS went into decline. And in later years there was a lot of contention about what it was that caused this declined. But let's because everybody saw who framed Roger Rabbit Rabbit throw and realized it was. It was a conspiracy by the by the freeways by Christopher Lloyd by someone shut down all the trolleys not today they try only go to the neighborhood of make believe they don't even go to toontown anymore. Roger Rabbit came out in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight but this conspiracy theory had its origins a lot earlier than that. So it's reflecting something people already believed about how the trolleys died. That's right and and the conspiracies the conspiracy stories started started in the nineteen forties and in fact the companies that comprised conspiritors were General Motors and firestone tires standard oil of California. All the great you know like small businesses all the great villains from American corporate history and all people who would benefit from car culture Phillips Petroleum and mack trucks All together her as a consortium Started transom transit companies or or rather bought pre existing transit ends at companies Under the under the ages of National City Lines and through that company company started buying up defaulting transit companies across the United States. Bus and Streetcar Lines Streetcar Lines in in particular. And what did they do with them with their new. Is this like the Hedge Fund. People like by Toys R. US and fire fifty thousand people. Yeah they bought the the they bought up. The transit companies tore up the rails and replace them with buses. Oh okay because well so the conspiracy the conspiracy spiritualists would have you believe and have us believe that this was a there naked self interest sell more cars so more cars on oil and tigers. Here's and deprive us of the choice of public transit not driving cars and filling our cars with guests that's right and and and And to take away. These public works right. transit's transit systems that belonged to cities that served the people and replace them with the you what seemed to be an option but what in fact became a necessity privately owned commercials. And this This conspiracy was a this national city lines. Process started in the late thirties. All these transit companies were in receivership. A lot of them bankrupt already and being being purchased and dismantled by this national city lines and its subsidiaries the American city lines in the Pacific City General. Were they in trouble because of the creeping influence silence of cars. Like is it causing affecting Wilson. Now this is the this is the the place where this conspiracy is kind of a debunked by history or or debunked. In retrospect and the the desire for it to be a conspiracy has always been political even from the nineteen the late in nineteen forties when it when it was sort of I floated these companies were actually prosecuted and prosecuted persecuted for prosecuted in. What looked like an antitrust prosecution? But really I mean. They were prosecuted for the antitrust crime of off controlling monopoly in the part of the manufacturer of parts and services for buses like it was not. There's not a widespread and not a sweeping prosecution and even that prosecution the judge that oversaw the trial said that it was the he felt that the jury was influenced by unemotional appeal. But the the death of the trolley had started a long time before it was a it was a product of this confluence of factors that. We've kind of already discussed one of them. Being that the trolley interest traction interests rather had agreed to contracts with cities that were that did not have a lot of leeway to account for inflation or changes changes in ridership so the the companies were on the hook for maintaining the roads and were only able to charge a nickel for fair for locked into a nickel all and as more and more people started using the roads as the the rise of the automobile. Meant that these roads we're now in widespread use by a variety of motor vehicles. The transit companies for profit companies were are maintaining the roads on behalf of the city for the good of all with no return free rider problem and this the the the the cars that were now choking streets drastically reduced the efficiency of the electrified rail because all of a sudden these trolleys were stuck in traffic and the cities where trollies remained a viable. And it's really only a handful that survived through this whole period Chicago Boston San Francisco. Do they have dedicated. Land dedicated the war or were elevated roads and so any any town like Seattle or Atlanta or Saint Louis where the trolleys had to share the roads all of a sudden. They're stuck in traffic and although they were still only a nickel they were now in competition with the buses that that had originally just been part of the system to continue the the travel at the end of the trolley line. The bus owners and Bus Interests of course they're going to want to move into areas of greater density. That's where the greater profit center is so insular bus. If you go all the way to the city centre instead of dropping you off at the railhead they just kept kept on big omnibus. That's I I hate it less 'em so yes these General Motors and firestone saw that their interests coincided incited with those of buses rather than rail. But the but rail ridership was plummeting. They were not shutting down a a thriving enterprise because it was going to do it was doing so well they would if it was doing so well they would have held onto it and people were naturally gravitating to two cars and busses because of the appeal of the the new the new form right if you the novelty not of Albany Independence driveways that had just to said just the three blocks from your apartment or whatever that's right But this became came in the second half of the Twentieth Century as as Urbanism Started To to a as the philosophy of urbanism started to become kind of a An academic discipline and the memory of these he's lost trolleys still You know we still lived in recent memory. I mean I don't know you couldn't you couldn't possibly remember this and most listeners won't but in the early seventies when I was a kid. There was in Portland Oregon still a trolley barn where all the old wooden trolleys that had been retired from the Portland. Streetcar System. Were or stacked one on top of another piled up but were they being kept for they. They just had never they'd never set on fire. They they haven't gotten around to. and Ah throughout the sixties and seventies you would see these in the of the outskirts of American towns these big just dumping grounds of old trolley car. Were they occasionally repurpose like like photo. Mats were there some sometimes little fish and chips stands or whatever that were little diner or trolley. There was some some of that there were some old trolleys that were converted to buses that. And they're they're beautiful to see when you see a little thing. That clearly used to be a train. That now is a bus but a lot of them were mean. Even by the time they were retired they were pretty decrepit and they just sat stacked one atop the other other and I have a picture of me and my sister I was probably five and she was three and for whatever reason we are in our Sunday best asked. She's in this white dress ankle length dress and I'm in some kind of little white suit with a blue bow tie and we're standing inside night of a very trolley car with the windows all busted out and the and the floors and ceilings. Everything's made of wood. Like very weathered would at the time. Tom And I think that car was sitting on top of another car. And there was a car on top of it and my dad had hoisted us up there. Somehow for this photograph Autograph Child Safety Not yet been invented yet invented and I don't. I'm sure that those trolleys didn't survive to pass asked Nineteen seventy-six would have those all would have finally been crushed up. They were old enough to seem cool. It just seemed like the previous technology team your grandma's vacuum or something. This notice Daljit for them yet. But by the mid that seventy S in and this was during a time when the Atlanta mass transit system was built and the Washington D. C. and San San Francisco when when suddenly there was a resurgence in ray probably oil crisis leading to federal investment. Is that right. We'll crisis and desire also to make to make cities accessible to to build these utopias. These are urban utopias. I mean there was starting to see the first the first ill effects of white flight right and there was a lot of awareness. I think that awareness of the tendency to try to not build transit to serve poorer communities and there was a lot of pushback from from progressive interests that that wanted to make sure that that transit did serve those populations and of course it was politics right so it wasn't a lot of it for show and a lot of it got blocked a lot of us to have your local guy like a good guy because he's he's fighting to bring the right the trains to the neighborhood even though he knew that there that there was that there was no chance people pay to shut that quiet down at some point. That's what usually happens. During the Johnson administration's and the Johnson Administration and the subsequent sequent sort of Nixon era. There was from Congress a lot of energy directed toward urban renewal. And we've I've seen it in a lot of different aspects of what what urban renewal was. What they what? They thought it was going to do how they were going to roll it out. But in nineteen sixty four there was an act called the urban mass transportation act which was an attempt to have a coordinated not not coordinated system but a coordinated a mentality about urban mass transit. And that was that was extended. There was a then a subsequent mass transportation acting nineteen seventy. That was part of this This system of grants that resulted in the construction of Marta. In Atlanta and Bart in San Francisco and would have produced a Seattle mass transit system. If we hit only voted to accept the money one one percent more vote or something because that was part of the National Mass Transportation Assistance Act and all of this was a congressional recognition that oil crisis gridlock. But also urban renewal efforts attempts to combat the death of the inner city and offset some of the effects of white flight from urban cores. All sort of you no part of this great society attempt by the by mid century intellectuals to WHO cities cities are getting worse. But we're still the greatest country in the world. We can do better. That's right yeah well inter- into this Ralph Nader a frequent excellent guest on our program. Your former boss. Who who kind of looking back at the at the the way that Streetcar Her street cars disappeared from the American scene and the role that the national city lines and General Motors played in the in the aftermath? And as you know Ralph Nader in General Motors already had that history had a nice relationship with one another. He kind of made this assertion that that the death of the streetcar was part of a larger conspiracy on the part of these these oil and gas and and and car industries. So he popularized this historical misconception he popularized it and then in nineteen seventy three a man by the name of Bradford Snell wrote a like a what became a very controversial paper. Asserting a asserting the whole broad conspiracy that we came to understand as the as the facts on the ground and during the Roger Rabbit era. I mean everything's subsequent Roger Rabbit Arab American history. They they were all sort of based on this This testimony that Snell L. gave to the Senate and that became then a received understanding that a lot of politicians the mayor of San Francisco Cisco of of people that wanted to politically present themselves as pro city pro transit anti-cooperation an anti you know the even in the mid seventies these companies were also recognized as polluters. Yeah as as counter revolutionary. I think General Motors and Phillips Petroleum Probably are among the most counter revolutionary companies. So they became a they became kind of punching bags are Straw man to attribute tribute all of the whole of the problems of pollution. Oil Dependence reliance on the car which are all real problems and all problems promulgated by General Motors and felt petroleum but they they were then set up against this idealized version of what America could have been one where it wasn't just that the trolleys went away because of you know a a multitude of forces it was that they had been destroyed. Think about conspiracy theories of often. Simplify a problem. Yeah and that's very tempting instead of saying well. It was all influence on things. Nobody likes to hear that what you want to hear is. Here's the deal. It's from a policy point of view it's pleasing because it makes. It seem more solvable but also we crave narrative like from a narrative point of view. It's like here's a story I can tell you can understand the evil car. Entire oil. L. Interests Killed The trolley right. And it's one hundred percent true. That General Motors did not have any interest in electric trolleys. They wanted them. I'm gone because they were in competition with their desire to sell. Cars and Phillips Petroleum didn't gain from trolleys either. They wanted them gone. I mean this. The national city lines was a a was dedicated to taking the trolleys out And so the conspiracy theory so so General Motors role in. It isn't misrepresented as far as them being they're not getting railroaded as it were right But but General Motors and Phillips Petroleum. Were so late to the party and really really if if the traction interests had been allowed to raise their fares or if the traction interests had had the foresight to make the the trolley lines a separate grade the from the street or help put the city's on the hook for some of the maintenance of general. There's no reason why trolleys wouldn't have survived through the twentieth twentieth century but nobody's making at a corporate level. Nobody's making decisions for twenty years from now then is now. I mean it's worse now or two years from right exactly nowadays. It's more like do the numbers look good this quarter so I don't so I get my bonus I mean that's that's industry now and in the end it is. It is a case where that particular particular American brand of capitalism where Where we hope that the market will Will make the best choice is at the heart of of The fact that there are great trolleys in Europe and Asia and not in America because because in those other countries there is much more of a holistic sense that these aren't. I mean the the trolley lines in Amsterdam Mar not a not a private utility right. They're not they're not a prophet generating company owned by a by a robber. Baron Aaron with diamond stickpin which is what Americans want. Where's the diamond stickpin guy? I trust him right. I don't want this. I don't want this thing for everyone to enjoy Roy and we see that in a lot of utilities in the United States right the the the electrical utilities which in most cases now are public utilities ladies all began as private utilities. There's always some company that's that says. Hey Hey cities let us come in. And we'll wire everything up and we'll handle all the billing for you and the cities go well sure allies good and then eventually you either have to him. You have to sort of nationalize those utilities when you recognize that that. They're they're a universal in ubiquitous. Good or are you have a like we do in most American cities. Now you have an Internet service provider. That's a private company and everyone in the city including all loves the city businesses the government. Everybody needs the Internet. It's no longer a it's no longer like HBO. It becomes a public utility. And and I think in Internet in particular in twenty years it will be inconceivable to us that that was run by some some company with a guy with a diamond stick. Pin comes best And that includes the death of trolleys entry three zero dot four or five one nine certificate number one four seven one in the omnibus one of US speaking disappearing technologies. If you somehow have access to the Social Media The early twentieth century. You should really take the time time to follow at John Roderick Atkin Jennings Omnibus Project. Why not bump up our numbers make us look and feel good to our peers? Would it kill you you. You could also send email if you have questions or comments about this endeavor to the Omnibus Project at G MAIL DOT COM. I just WanNa thank Penny Who emailed US per academic writing about having sex in space? It's called joining the two hundred and Fifty Mile High Club. Let me just don't solicit this in any way. She just decided to send me a long article about some of the issues regarding extraterrestrial copulation You could send US physical items to our Po box. Five five seven four four shoreline Washington nine eight one five five for example. You and I just got a book about parenting. Teenagers called teenagers suck. Oh Oh they do. Yeah really. I'm on board with this book already. Teenagers do suck. I was working my daughter and I were walking home the other night along dark trail and she said I'm scared I said well there's only a few things that could hurt us on this trail wild animals but most wild animals. You can scare way by Jingle your keys this angle my keys. She said that works. And I said mostly and I said the other thing occurs his ghost but ghosts also flee from the sound of jingled angled Keith. Luckily Jingle and I said the other two things that could hurt us are bad men and bad men do not run from the sound of jingled single keys jingling but lures them. In bad men will run from Daddy. Daddy is a banner and the last thing to to worry us. Our teenage boys and teenage boys are not scared of keys. And they're not scared of Danny and they're not scared of ghosts and they're not scared of bad men even even because teenage boys suck in. Many cases are scared of teenage girls. So maybe your daughter will be able to help you. In a few years usher was keep them where I'm standing there. Surrounded by a gang of wilding teenagers she steps forward and goes you guys have bad hair and they all shrink up and curl up in balls and die. Save me from confident teenagers. We also got sent a flat brimmed. You got a flat brim. Baseball hats understand the reference it says prestige mouth so is this. Is this a reference to your very happy about the press. It's so easy to make John Happy why that particular Jaffer. Wow look it's exactly. We ride Presi smart right so to explain. A few years ago I was dating a woman who was a A lawyer and a Tech Company lawyer San Francisco Tech Company lawyer who moved to Los Angeles and became a tech company lawyer for even Bigger Tech Company. You're making your to likeable in this story. She's and she's known on some of the The the podcast in the John Rick podcast universe as Millennium Girlfriend. I've always wondered. She's a rare thing girlfriend while some some of the other lawyers in her office I know used to listen to some of the shows and they would tease her and call me. People single like I was listening to people on his show. People shouldn't have podcasts. It gets tricky. That's why we're putting this sharing the ground. That's right so she at one point bought me black baseball hat that had been custom made by some Internet entrepreneur hat making that set but it was a guy it was like a rich guy a guy that some young guy that owned a tech company that was worth two billion dollars had a couple of baseball hats made for himself and his friends that said entrepreneur across the front of a black baseball. You know what's cool billion dollars in a baseball CAP. That says entrepreneur runner so she got me one through her insider trading and gave it to me as a gift which she thought was funny and for a long time. I wore my entrepreneur baseball hat around in order to please. Because I'm I'm a people pleaser. You're a millennium NEOM girlfriends leader and so there was a there was a picture of me in my entrepreneur baseball hat and then someone on the Internet. I don't know if you've ever experienced this but someone on the Internet was goofing around and I often I don't know if it's true on omnibus but but I often will say in response to someone who has said something and I think is correct. I will say proceed small. It's my way it's just another affirmation. You're like a backgammon player chasing the the old world elegance of of Europe while someone this is now several. Oh years ago photo shopped me and my entrepreneur hat so that said prissy small and I loved it it just looked so cool. Cool this photo this this like faked picture and at some point along the way I said again on the Internet I really wish I that that precedes Mohammed was correct was actually a real hat and not just a photo show now someone out there in the world. Some friends has had a hat made. This has to be the only one or one of only two. It's turned into a three D. Printer where you can take some Virtual object along this case it was not like a cat object. It was a photoshop but this looks exactly like the picture. It's really it really is really key conjured into into reality. It really is and it's like a genie bottle scenario. It's not fake. It's really like it's really a embroidered into the half. And now I have my prec- we see small hat and I can happy man I. I cannot think of a gift that has made me happier than this APP. It looks like it's from a fan in Olympia off their local WASHINGTONIAN. There is a note. What does it say? Hey John I hope this finds you well. Thanks so much for sharing much of yourself with the world in word and song song where this hadn't health while in sickness to I guess but hopefully more health and it's got like a user name I don't know I don't know who this is but I'm I'm so delighted I'm so delighted user. Keep making all good. I don't know what this means. I'm sure it's some injured from one of your other. Shows what is a KM G. O.. T. W. Trois. Is That A. It's a Rodrick on the line. I don't think so. Keep making making all the good out of the world keeps something something it's got to be out of the world right. I don't know keep making all good out of the world that doesn't it seemed like a good mantra. Keep making all galoshes out of thin weasels. That's right it's probably well anyway anyway. Thank you Thank you thin. Weasel seven seven seven. And I'm GonNa wear this hat in good health and in in sickness and health you do not need to conjure virtual objects for us and send US physical items. Although I'm not against it. I'm so thrilled. Thank you so much You can support US financially. That's the kind of physical objects we like appearing on a thin air is American currency. You can do that. At Patriots Dot Com Slash Omnibus Project keeps the show healthy enrolling along You should definitely congregate with your fellow facebook future lanes on the fan page. There's a similar sub reddit if you're boycotting facebook book for all the correct reasons to boycott facebook like maybe dislike the winkle. Boston's you can find us on talk. If you're if you're boycotting read it John's doing doing a tick tock downs right now. If you're boycotting tick tock you can get high on Shrek. If you can't find us on kick squeak if you're if you can't take Shrek anymore. Do all the good outcomes. That's everything future from our vantage point in your distant past happily sheltered in our professional hats. We have no idea how long our civilization survived. Ken Scott His whip inflation now pin over there and he was going to slide it over here to me but now I think you keeping you got you got a nice hat. I don't know in our sad trolleybus world. We we have no definitive. We're we're not taking a side in whether or not General Motors and Phillips Petroleum are responsible for the death of the world. I personally have long been at war with firestone. I'm tired the real number. If the worst comes soon this recording like all our recordings may have been on final word but if providence allows we hope to be back with you soon two for another entry.

United States Seattle General Motors Atlanta Europe John San Francisco America National City Lines baseball Phillips Petroleum Canada John Rodrick Switzerland Light Rail
U.S. CDC issues guidelines on how to reopen schools, transit and workplaces

Audioburst Editors Picks Feed

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. CDC issues guidelines on how to reopen schools, transit and workplaces

"The CDC has issued corona virus guidelines for schools and businesses to determine if they're ready to reopen it amounts to six decision trees boil down from earlier guidelines that were shelved by the trump administration the guidelines cover yes and no scenarios to assess readiness for opening workplaces restaurants bars mass transit childcare camps in schools the guidelines stress working with state and local health officials.

CDC
Darting into the Future

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast

23:40 min | 2 years ago

Darting into the Future

"Welcome to season four of the Morgan Stanley ideas podcast. I'm actually emailed tight on this season. We're taking a look at the future. We're looking at how the things you do every day will be different ten twenty fifty years from now how you pay your groceries. Where will you buy your clothes? What would your food tastes like to answer? These questions were going to the places where the future is already happening this season our trip to the future. We'll take all over the globe from the US to Sweden from Japan to Tanzania because if you Chit is already happening somewhere, it's just a matter of knowing where to find it. We're in DARA Salaam Tanzania, and these are the sounds of a morning commute. But it didn't always sound this way. What you hearing is the Dar-es-Salaam boss rapid transit system or dot for short. It's a new buff system launched in two thousand sixteen and even though it might sound like a regular old boss. It's not it's actually a little slice of the future. Mumble? Nocco at me. This is Stephen mumbi a journalist and alarm who asked a few passengers why they used art for them on in commute starting with the youngest passenger any sunny money sunny. This is Samir. And he's telling Stephen that he takes the boss at six AM every day to get to school six AM is early. But not as early as Samir once had to leave to make it to school on time writing a dollar dollar or private minibus. Now Samir gets to sleep in a few more hours because something on the dot is much faster. When we think about the future of transportation, we tend to talk about tournaments cars and apps that will send a ride right to our doorstep. But as exciting as the future might be in twenty thirty most of us will still need mass transit, and we'll need it to get us to work or school or overweight going quickly reliably and other low price this future with high-speed affordable. Unreliable public transit might feel far away even on a chief -able. But the future of mass transit is already happening in DARA. Salaam today on the Morgan Stanley, ideas podcast the future of your commute. The four dart Dar-es-Salaam had the problem. So many big cities have a growing population and expanding population of five million men. More cars on the road and not meant terrible traffic. I don't mean moving slowly down the road for an extra fifteen minutes. I mean, four hours a day sitting completely still and a patch street just to make it a handful of miles. It was a problem. The city government realize it had to make a change. And so Dr was born I tend to believe even people who used to use private costs canal choose to use the the bus the buses the bus rapid transit because it's faster. You don't have to stay in the traffic jam. This is Jerry m borough the transport planning manager at the institute for transportation and development policy. An international nonprofit with offices all over the world. And Jerry is based in Nairobi where she thinks about the future of. Transportation for major African cities like Dora. Salaam, in fact. Identify which used to take about two hours is now taking about forty five minutes. So that's a saving of well over an hour for two hundred thousand people two times per day before Dr most people in Dar-es-Salaam got around in privately owned minibuses that clogged the streets force passengers to pile in one on top of another and weren't reliable. But now the city streets have completely changed to make way for the dot system. It has hey capacity buses running on dedicated bus slits. And we have stations in the middle of the road to reduce a conflict with vehicles in mixed traffic, and these bus lanes about a real snowball effect that goes way beyond the buses. There are new policy for bikes. They're green ways of foot traffic, even the stations themselves designed to get those two hundred thousand passengers in and out quickly. All they have to do is top that small call to pay the fare. And they're on their way, the buses are frequent they're reliable, they're clean, and they're also USA friendly. It's one of the best in Africa today. A not only in Africa in many ways dot is the model of transportation needed all over the world. I know it's a boss. It doesn't sound nearly as exciting as getting to work with a jet pack. You might have in your vision of the future. But think about it. This is. Public transportation is false. Te imagine cutting your commute time by more than hav. It's environmentally friendly. It's technologically advanced and when all phases of the project to complete it will connect every part of the city all that up. And you have a more successful public transit system than you'll find in most parts of the world, and you have happy commuters. Chevy should use a sequel. Here's our journalists on the boss in alarm again. 'cause Donnie another passenger says he loves dot because of the reduced commute times the ease of boarding on the safe ride. The most of all now that he spends less time on the boss that means he's making more money. The reason we think it's so important for cities to improve transit is not because we liked transit. But because improving transit is a path toward cities that are more economically prosperous. We have to talk about transit as a means to the different ends that it produces for cities bought Stephen Higa she day and the director of research for transit center, which is a New York-based foundation working to improve public transit in American cities. Stephen spent a lot of time thinking about what has to happen to make public transit in the United States. Look more like the future. We're seeing in Tanzania, the US seems like a country that would have great, or at least adequate public transit systems in all major cities. But. The reality is it doesn't unlike other western countries. The United States doesn't have a great track record of prioritizing public transit. But Stephen believes it should because a future with that kind of thriving public. Transportation is the key to a thriving economy. I think one of the really compelling ways to talk about transit is talking about the increased access that it represents. You can really even argue that public transit is freedom and one of the things that we've seen in campaigns around the country are incredible statistics about the number of jobs, for example, but you can get two and half an hour on transit today versus what it might be. If we had a better transit system is really sort of a diagram of possibility how many jobs, can you get you how many places could you go. How many people can you meet? That's really what transit enables the future of transportation isn't just about the future of causal trains buses. It's about the future of the economy. So improving public transit for the future should be a priority for cities everywhere. Right but transportation projects on note easy. The removing a few barriers standing between us and the Dilip future transit system for one politics. Endorse. Salaam dot was successful in part because it was supported by the local government the man himself spearheaded the change. So a need in the city and addressed it. But in the US, it's sometimes a little less clear whose job it is to map the future of public transit. What are the common things that we often hear from the mayor of a city is the sense that oh transit is run. By some other agency. You know might be a regional authority, it might be run by the state, and yet so much of what we know makes transit work such as can you walk to it. Does it have space on the street? That's controlled by the city in the US. The government already spends sixty five billion a year on public transit. So if the government is spending that much money, you might think the majority of people would one use public transit and to CARA bash it, but actually only twenty five percent of the population in the u. US uses public transit to get to work. Most people would rather take their own call to get from point a to point b and the biggest problem the majority of the country doesn't even have access to public transit in the US. Public transit is really built to serve urban areas. And that leaves people who live in more rural parts in the lodge. But even the people who do live in big cities public transit can often be inaccessible. So whose job is it to fix that the federal government state local transit agencies this not my problem attitude that Stephen described is partly responsible for transportation. Barry, a number two infrastructure. So you do have this dynamic where because there's not one entity responsible for all of this individual entities will sort of deal with problem as as they pop up, but it allows for the whole system to kind of decay overall. This is Michael seizes he leads public policy and municipal research for Morgan Stanley. And he says when you'll thinking about the future of public transit, the state of US infrastructure can be a big problem. People would generally agree that the state of infrastructure in the US is is pretty poor particularly around roads and bridges and transportation, there's about four hundred four hundred twenty billion dollar repair backlog on roads right now, there's Android thirty six billion dollars worth of roads and bridges capital needs. And that's against the backdrop where we project that vehicle miles traveled in this country are going to increase about seventy percent by twenty forty from about three trillions of five trillion. It's hard to imagine a shining new future. When the roads at the present r rule, but crumbling. The of the future has been easier in places when you transportation projects get to start with a blank slate before dot that wasn't a lot of existing transportation infrastructure in Dar-es-Salaam. It was a lot easier to drool new bus lanes where they had never existed rather than fit them into a flawed system. A matz. The problem a lot of US cities confronting how do you improve public transportation without scrapping the system. Mass transit advocates sometimes we'll talk about Houston or Los Angeles. And they'll think it's crazy that these communities are not investing in mass transit, but they've grown so large without them. So spread out without them. Retrofitting? For mass transit is also really really expensive. You can use roads for multiple things. And it's a lot cheaper to build a road than it is to dig a tunnel or put a piece of rail on the ground. You know, this is where some of the the new technologies particularly around autonomous and self driving cars and ridesharing apps can really create kind of a harmonious in sort of cost efficient approach that gives you the best of both worlds. According to Michael, that's one obvious way to bypass the huddles of politics and infrastructure, and that's to expand our idea. Of what public transportation is. He says me half to start imagining how the road to the future of public transit might be paved by private companies new technologies like self driving cars and ridesharing apps. They could make the future of public transit a lot cheaper right now to pay for one of your citizens to ride one mile and mass transit it's about eighty cents per mile to pay for someone to ride in autonomous vehicle. You know, X years down the line. The estimate is that's going to cost about twenty cents. So you could you could look at those two things and say, well, if I'm, you know city ABC, and I don't have a mass transit system. Maybe I shouldn't have any type of mass transit system and just pay for people to ride in you know, self-driving shared cars. So maybe the future of transportation will be shaped by the private sector. Maybe they won't be such a harsh line. In the public and private transportation of the future off to rule. The private sector is already mold and self driving cars and ridesharing apps. Bike sharing has the best of both worlds. It has the investment of the private sector paired with use of city streets and public space. So it can really complement other moods that are available through cities, but without cities having to fund the development of this mood. This is Sarah Kaufmann. She's the associate director at NYU's route incentive transportation, she's been tracking the way technology has transformed. Mass transit and some of the biggest cities in the world. And she says one thing that has helped revolutionize the way we commute the biggest change in transportation. In terms of tech is the smartphone which religion just how we get around cities. What's come after? That are the shared moods enabled by smartphones. Like scooters and bikes even if you haven't bike to. Cross town or scooted you away to a friend's house. You've promptly seen these shed modes in action to use one of these e bikes or excuses vio- commute only you have to do is download the company app. Open the app to locate a scooter or bike near you pick it up unlock it with your personalized code and you'll ready to ride their electric which makes them easier to ride and then not tied to any specific location or dog. So they can go any way you do in the bay area. There are tons of Scrooges and bikes propped up against buildings playing on the side, walk everywhere. Just waiting for someone to ride them. So all produces max and Jenna decided to take an e bike for spin date. Thirty PM in Palo Alto, California. Oh, the it was on walking. And now you're just going to get on this bike and drive away. Hey, it's working. Sia? I can't believe you just got a bike is lying on the sidewalk. Bakes and scooters are not just a last mile option because in denser cities when you're traveling between say one in three miles that's often the entirety of your trip. San Francisco found that the average scooter trip is between a mile and a mile and a half and in cities, especially San Francisco that are very dense. There is allowed to be said for accounting for that length of travel. The Coles e bikes in east as so user, friendly, accessible and portable. They can solve different types of transportation problems in San Francisco, a city of winding streets and steep hills that extra boost from either a pedal assist e bike or an electric scooter can get you up those inclines without walking up switch, and then think about the infrastructure problem in cities, like Houston, Los Angeles that Michael described earlier because darkness e bikes east Scrooges aunt tied to any infrastructure. They. Can more easily dab to the needs of a city and work alongside? What are the public transit is already that take Denver, for example? It's a growing city with a limited public transit network. But after introducing e skews to the city in Denver, they're requiring some scooters to be pleased. At the transit stations to help encourage people to take transit, and then take the scooters home and about a quarter of people who were using scooters during this pilot period had treated in a car trip for using a scooter instead, and I think that what we saw in Denver can be similar for other. Similarly sized cities around the country scooter and bike chace can adapt to the needs of a city filling. What are the gaps left by public transit? And as we're moving further into the future of transportation cities, realizing that multiple Shad modes can work together to create an ideal customized transit system. Him every city should have a variety of moon. So that people can take the trip, but that is right for them about eighty percent of Americans live in some city and take shorter trips many shorter trips throughout the day. So cities needs to be able to provide the right transportation for the right type of trip you might take a bike to the gym. But then at the gym you work out, really hard. And you don't want to take a bike home because you're too tired. So instead, you can take a ride share home from the gym. It's this ecosystem that operates together hybrid transportation networks moving the conversation about the future of transportation away from the opposite ends of the spectrum public versus private and into a monkey a middle ground on his moon. New Shad transportation options pop around the country. We might see the decision makers behind traditional public transportation taking a few notes from the. Top world take bus lanes. What if cities thought about you bus lanes the way astonish up would one term from the world of startups that I think is important for transit agencies is this concept of the minimum viable product. And when you think about something like a Papa bus lane. That's really the minimum viable product. It's just a lane with some cones. And you know, that if that becomes a permanent project that there are concrete capital things that you'll want to do you'll wanna put some concrete in the streets to bull out the sidewalks. There's more room for people waiting you'll want to paint the bus lane. You wanna have scientists you might want to change the traffic controllers at the intersection? But in the short term, you just put some cones on the street, and that's the minimum viable products. Public transit projects. Take a long time eight to ten years in most major US cities. But what if he didn't have to be that way? If public transportation plan thought copying from the private sector's playbook the future of transportation could start coming much more quickly. And according to Michael seizes that future might mean, even more melding of private on public transportation. Most of the time when we think about self driving cars and public transportation, we think of them as opposite ends of transportation spectrum we even think of them as Muto enemies. So if the future is full of autonomous vehicles summoned bio smartphones than we won't need public transit anymore. But that doesn't make sense because you create traffic problem, but what you can do is you can help people get to their sort of main mass transit area. Their main, you know, rail stop or bus stop or whatever by subsidizing that shared ride. You can increase the amount of people who were riding on that rail you can actually then reduce the amount of stops on that real line. So you you get more people using the rail system and the rail system moves faster because of. Have as many stops. So you're still getting all those positive extra analyses of mass transit and you're getting it at a lower cost with higher utilization. And so for cities that don't have a big mass transit option at the moment. I think that is kind of the the symbiotic future that we have, you know, ten years down the line in just ten years. Mass transit could be this perfect harmony of public and private transportation of cools in Dar-es-Salaam dot was the sedation. Don't just a few years transformed decision once called with traffic. It's one of the few public transit systems in the world. It's false comprehensive and available to all in twenty eighteen Dar-es-Salaam, even one the IT DP sustainable transit award cemented it as a model for the future of public transit in Africa. I dream of the day night cities like narrow be compiled Lusaka boy. To have very nice, safe walkways, and very nice public transport systems and beautiful green ways boulevards the same. As the ones we see in developed countries. I believe it's if it can happen in that Salaam, it can happen in Robie. It can happen in compiler can happen in African cities. I'm on a bus rapid transit system might not work everywhere that all solutions that come woken every city the backbone of transit might be a public boss or a subway system or even a call. But in the future, we'll be able to choose how we want to enhance that base. Cars are not the American dream anymore as they used to be. In fact, cars will be owned by say a neighborhood or a community or a school or or even the. Eighty and people will pay for minutes of trips like we pay for minutes of talking time on our phone plans. Now, if we want to decongest our city streets, we need to encourage and develop other moods. So it could be bikes scooters or whatever comes next, but whatever it is the future is access to alternative modes of transportation. Whether people is sitting in that shed autonomous calls hoping on an e by Cohee Scotia or zooming around on another hybrid solution cities will be in charge of creating that own transit systems that work for them. Instead of relying on ideas about what the future of public transit should look like the future of transportation is about redefining public transit as we know it cities shouldn't sit back and try to predict the future. They have to write the transit future that they want. Thanks for listening to the Morgan Stanley ideas podcast. You can listen to previous episodes at Morgan Stanley dot com slash ideas. You can also find us on apple podcasts or anywhere else. You get your poke costs. I'm Ashley tight cenex time.

United States Stephen Michael Morgan Stanley Dar-es-Salaam DARA Salaam Tanzania Morgan Stanley Tanzania Samir Africa Stephen mumbi government Chevy DARA
U.S. CDC issues guidelines on how to reopen schools, transit and workplaces

Audioburst Editors Picks Feed

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. CDC issues guidelines on how to reopen schools, transit and workplaces

"The CDC Today issued Corona virus guidelines for schools and businesses to determine if they're ready to reopen it amounts to six decision trees boiled down from earlier guidelines that were shelved by the trump administration the guidelines cover yes or no scenarios to assess readiness for opening workplaces restaurants bars mass transit childcare camps in schools the guidelines stress working with local and state officials.

CDC
Aries 12, 5854 FY: The Air-Powered Subway System

Archives of Fabella

07:17 min | 2 months ago

Aries 12, 5854 FY: The Air-Powered Subway System

"Hello and welcome back to archives fabella daily. The only podcast talking about the anatomy of centaurs today is april first. Equal to aries trump. Books are available on amazon. Please rate and review the podcast on itunes. Or wherever you listen to your podcasts and hit that subscribe button for more great stories right in your feet april first. Eighteen fifty four is the day charles. Dickens work hard times began serialisation in the magazine household words but a way in the world of abella and ingenious inventor developed a way to transport. Centaurs i'm dillon foley. And this is archives. A bella Beyond our world there is love beyond our world. There is war beyond our world. There is life beyond dr world. there is abella aries. Twelve fifty eight fifty four f y fabella year equal to april first eighteen fifty four. Ad earth year in the late machine age of fabella. The democratic union of her asana was a blooming nation exclusive to centaurs. They claimed this area in the continent of asks dr. Because of the wide open pasture in which to run most buildings in the capital of stirs in the fifty eight hundreds were built on one story because centaurs struggled to climb stairs ceilings were higher doors were wider and interior areas were more spread out for free movement. Some said he officials instruments wanted a way to manage mass transportation for the centaur people. One stallion an inventor named lagaras app does thought he had the answer when you think about it. The anatomy of a centaur is outrageous. They take up much more space than an average person. they're happy they typically stand higher than six feet. They have to torsos housing vital organs. And because of the way they're built they can't reach the entire body requiring assistance just to bathe centaur simply wasn't built to live in an average city setting knowing all this. How could they possibly get mass transit for their people to work. This was a problem that magic couldn't sung. Only science had any hope of finding a way to answer the question of how to accomplish this arduous task abacus believed the best method of mass transportation was an underground subway in fifty eight forty eight apoptosis learned about the science to use fans to create air pressure. It was a device that was capable to effectively move canisters from one end of a shoot to another. This innovation was called a pneumatic tube. Suddenly otto's believed he found solution to relieve. The city's oppressive congestion apt does wanted to make a pneumatic tube. That could centaurs underground through the city. The entire apparatus would be powered by fifty ton van and the idea was that it would drive the training in both directions then reverse it on the other end to pull the train back but could train. Car filled with people actually be powered by compressed. Air apoptosis decided to put his revolutionary idea to the task onsides terriers third fifty eight fifty an area with staked out along a main thoroughfare in downtown city where construction crew broke ground on a one hundred foot. Trial section of the pneumatic subway. End for the next one hundred days. Workers laboured tirelessly digging a massive tunnel to make way for twenty two passenger railcar in pisces of fifty. Eight fifty apoptosis was ready to reveal his creation to the public. The very concept seen with implausible. But would it work. The doors opened and centaur passengers entered a lavish car filled with plush seating and hardwood floors and as the fifty ton fans powering. The apparatus sprang into action. The train suddenly inched forward and centaurs were surprised that apoptosis air powered subway actually work. The pneumatic train was a big hit with people who love to take that ride invigorated by the success of his pilot. Testing avocados began making plans for five. Miles of track to his pneumatic subway and drew up an ambitious proposal on aries twelve. Fifty eight fifty four. The first pneumatic subway system opened to the public apoptosis paved the way for mass transportation throughout cities and the technology was incorporated in other cities worldwide. That's going to do it for us today. Tune in tomorrow for the origin of the bellas. Most famous superpower. Subscribe now to get more new episode. Right in your feed rate and review the podcast on itunes. Or wherever you listen to your podcasts. Send your questions to archives of bella. G mail dot com archives of about the his created produced and hosted by dylan foley with music by garrett fares and audio blocks books are available on amazon in e book and paperback as always look outside of what is possible and think about what might be.

fabella daily dillon foley abella aries fabella democratic union of her asana abella Dickens amazon charles abacus otto dylan foley garrett
The Future of American Public Transit Depends On Congress

TIME's Top Stories

10:20 min | 6 months ago

The Future of American Public Transit Depends On Congress

"Brought to you by quantocks. School of business and technology transformative business leaders need a transformative. Education quantity brings the traditional mba to life with a focus on innovation and technology delivered a micro lesson format providing personalized feedback every eight seconds visit quantico dot edu slash time for more. The future of american public transit depends on congress by abby. Visualize at this time last year. Tens of millions of americans were riding subways. Buses trains and streetcars for their daily commutes quietly paying the required fair in both directions but in the dumpster fire year of twenty twenty in which cova nineteen up ended. How we live that routine now seems inconceivable at least until the vaccine is widely available but the budgets of major transit systems may not be able to hold out that long as covid nineteen has forced people to avoid crowds and work from home. Transit hubs across the country have seen their profits from ridership tank. Rail ridership in washington. Dc has plummeted eighty six percent since two thousand and nineteen daily ridership on new york's metropolitan transit authority. Mta subways is down. Sixty seven to seventy two percent in boston. Subway ridership is only a quarter of what it was pre pandemic and in the san francisco bay area mass transit ridership through bay area. Rapid transit bart is eighty eight percent below its baseline. These declines have fuelled extreme budget shortfalls forcing transit authorities to slash routes and delay scheduled expansions decisions that experts say could impair mass transit for the next decade. A transit system with fewer slower routes attracts riders and therefore earns less revenue in fares. Which means there's less money to maintain infrastructure. The result is a negative feedback loop in which the bona fide efforts to save. Transit systems cost cutting measures ultimately fuel their downfall. When you cut routes entirely. You're losing ridership there. When you cut weekend service you're losing ridership there when you operate less frequently. Fewer people will use transit simply. Because you've made it less convenient and they're going to start looking for other choices says christopher steeler senior lecturer of urban transportation at rice university and the author of trains buses people and opinionated atlas of us transit and win mass transit systems flounder it has a nationwide ripple effect exacerbating inequality hindering infrastructure maintenance and slowing the economic recovery in both the cities where mass transit is ubiquitous and across the national economy at large. It seems likely that congress will soon act to support the struggling sector at least partially the bipartisan. Emergency corona virus relief. Act of twenty twenty unveiled. Monday includes fifteen billion dollars in funding for transit systems but that may be bare bones. The new york. Mta alone is requesting twelve billion. Meanwhile wma in dc's budget shortfall already exceeds four hundred fifty million dollars. New york's mta threatened. It may be forced to cut subway services by forty percent if it doesn't receive a significant stream of federal aid soon on wednesday the agency's board approved a budget. That delays these drastic measures for now and instead settled on fare increases and service reductions for the long island. Railroad to mitigate twenty twenty one budget shortfalls but it indicated. It's still deeply in the red similarly washington. Dc has floated a proposal that would eliminate weekend train service entirely allow certain trains to run only every thirty minutes on weekdays and shut the system down at nine pm monday through friday. The proposal also includes cutting more than two thousand positions which would pose further challenges to the authorities post pandemic success. When you wanna bring service back that means you have to find new people to fill those slots you have to train those people. That's not easy says steeler transit service isn't like some dial you can easily turn down and turn back up again. logistically ramping. Up service can actually be quite difficult while the pandemic is temporary its effects on mass transit. Ridership transportation finances may not be all of those changes tend to be long lasting. Speller says about writers responses to budget cuts if somebody is forced into buying a car because transit no meets their needs. They're going hang on to that car even if you bring the service back. If mass transit stumbles there's a national ripple effect if big transit hubs or forced to cut routes or service millions of people will be inconvenienced but the impact will fall disproportionately on low income americans who rely on public transit more often than their richer wider peers. Those on the bottom rung of the income ladder tend to have the poorest access to alternate forms of transportation like personal cars taxis and ride shares like uber or lift due to budget constraints are more likely to be essential workers who don't have the option of telecommuting and live further from the places they need to get to such as jobs and grocery stores transit. Ridership has always been disproportionately low income. Non white writers immigrant writers says evelyn bloomberg and urban planning professor at the university of california los angeles. that composition is even more disproportionately poor non white and immigrants during the pandemic. it's a problem. I understan- on somewhat personal level. While i've been fortunate to work from home since march. I don't own a car like nearly forty percent of my washington. Dc peers. buying or leasing. One is cost prohibitive. Even if i could swing the car note. Parking at my apartment complex would cost me about two hundred dollars per month on top of the parking fees at every destination. I drive it to these costs. Of course are on top of gas insurance and maintenance. Walking isn't much of a solution. Either it would take me two and a half hours. Each day to commute to work by foot. Additionally scaling-down mass transit systems in major cities would also pose logistical challenges for people. Who don't even use them. If a sizeable chunk of the population who depends on reliable mass transit suddenly purchased cars or relied more heavily on rideshare services roads and interstates would struggle to handle that influx. Once more people start working out of office buildings again to build a highway that moves as many people as a subway. You'd need about a twenty lane. Highway says marlin net a transportation expert and public policy professor at the university of southern california. The math is at some level. Just unforgiving you literally run out of land beyond the logistical consequences. There are major economic ones to if we cut back weekend service. If we cut back evening service. You're severely impacting job opportunities opportunities to practice recreation and anything you would travel for for a group of persons for whom transit has been part of social safety. Net says bornet most of our highly productive cities that are driving. Our economy cannot operate their transportation system or their economy in an automobile. Only setting is transit too important to fail as cities in states. Struggle with their own budget shortfalls. Most experts agree. It's up to the federal government to step in to sustain mass transit now early in the pandemic congress did help with transit systems budget shortfalls. The cares act passed in late march included twenty five billion dollars in aid for transit agencies to respond to pandemic related challenges but as in nineteen infections and deaths have relentlessly ticked up for eight months and counting requiring some transit organizations to ramp up cleaning costs while also reducing their capacities. Cities need much. More president-elect joe biden's november third victory offers some solace to transit system operators biden who's long relied on amtrak to get between delaware and dc is a self proclaimed public transportation enthusiast and may push for more aid but some may find his selection of one of his twenty twenty democratic challengers buddha judge for transportation secretary les comforting. The former south bend indiana mayor hails from an area with no subway system and a population of just one hundred. Two thousand politicos ran went as far as likening. Buddha judges ascension from managing indiana's resident complaints about late night train noises as a mayor to potentially leading the entire federal railroad administration as transportation secretary to a quote discarded plotline from nbc's parks and recreation if confirmed by the senate. Buddha judge will have his work cut out for him. Styler explains the stakes. This way. the question we're asking right now is not. Do we still need transit. It's very obvious we still need transit. It's not does transit make financial sense because beyond this blimp covert. This doesn't fundamentally change any of that math. It's not can we afford to keep transit running. There's no doubt we can't afford it. The question is he says. Do elected officials care enough about transit to keep it running.

School of business and technol christopher steeler Mta congress new york washington quantico abby evelyn bloomberg rice university san francisco bay bay area Speller
Why transit projects fail

Vox's The Weeds

1:05:05 hr | 2 months ago

Why transit projects fail

"The right now less than one percent of covid nineteen vaccine doses administered globally have gone to people in low income countries and meanwhile a handful of wealthy countries could vaccinate their whole population and still have over one billion vaccines leftover. I'm kalem worthy. And i've joined the one campaign in the fight for global vaccine access vaccine. Hoarding by few of the world's richest countries could result in sixty percent of the world's population going without access to covid vaccine until the end of twenty twenty two or later if the vaccine isn't everywhere. The pandemic isn't going anywhere. But here's what you can do to help join once fights and the pandemic go to one dot org slash pandemic to learn more. Okay picture this you turn off your tv in want to kick back relax and completely over analyze what you just watched we made galaxy brains just for you. Hi dave schilling. And i'm joan array. We're the galaxy brains. Paulie guns brand. New podcast launching thursday april twenty. Second follow galaxy brands on apple podcasts. Or your favorite podcast app to get new episodes in your ear but every week that's right unit galaxy brains were movies. Tv and overthinking choline. I'm elisa barkley boxes science health and climate editor. This april our podcast are teaming up to cover some of the most important issues threatening life on earth from sustainability to biodiversity two straight up cool things about the natural world will focus on our planet and its limits and episodes throughout the month tune into today explained box conversations the weeds unexplainable worldly your perfect and vox quick. Hits listen to all the shows find them at box dot com slash birth month. Welcome to another episode of the meets. The box media podcast network. I met with glitziest guest today. Eric goldwyn is an assistant professor at. Nyu's marin school of a urban management and he's been working on a project on mass transit construction costs. Which i think is what we're going to talk about here. Try to give people selling a little bit a little bit different in. Vox media's earth week sort of paradigm here so hair. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So i just as like background and gives people have never seen me rant about this on on twitter The the basic thing here that we are talking about is that The construction of mass transit projects in the united states is very expensive in international turns right in a way that seems a little bit anomalous and maybe not that well understood by any. That's that's exactly right I just was like looking through the data a couple of days ago and and one of the things that was most striking is that so america in our database. We have six hundred projects in sixty countries and america is the sixth expensive company to build mass transit. But what's interesting about that. Is that the five countries of the united states. they're building projects. Were eighty percent of the projects were in tunnels and in america only thirty seven percent of the projects were in tunnels so the point being right is that building tunnels is really expensive. That's true but we're also not building as many titles but still extremely expensive and you know this is a little. I think contrary to most people sort of i mean people know that american cities do not have like the best mass transit in the world generally speaking and i think most people you know liberal people lease guess about that is that it's what we are appropriating very small amounts of money and that must be why we can't you know building a glorious Subway system for every city that we have and it's just seems to not really be the case that we actually spent a fair amount of money a new transit projects that the cash doesn't go there. Yeah so. I think one of the things that we saw happen with sort of transportation bills. You know going back to ice tea if that is meaningful to the listeners. Talking about like the nineties is that they're sort of at least according to older people than i am. There is sort of a bargain made between sort of the highway lobby and the transit lobby. That was like okay. We'll support transit getting money as long as you don't sort of opposed the highway lobby getting money and so transit as as you note has gotten a bunch of money and that seems to continue to be sort. The deal is that we do funnel money into transit. Funneling a bunch of money into roads and like these things work at cross purposes. Right if you have you know not not. Necessarily free flowing. Abundant rose and you're constantly widening them and expanding them but also building transit. You're not really solving any problems. You're sort of saying you know this is an all you can eat buffet on one side and then this is one entree on the other side and so people go for the you know all you can eat limited as ice tea for those who do not know. This was the intermodal surface transportation efficiency act of nineteen ninety one So this is the way. Congress works in case people don't know is that there are certain bills. This is the surface transportation vehicle and congress passes a new one of these every few years. They they expire. You said get extensions of them So for a while they had these kind of cool they would always end t so there was. Ta t safety lou at some other ones. the most recent one is called the fast act But but what they all have. Is this kind of fixed of Basically highway transit spending in which most of the money goes to highways but a lot goes to transit as long as you keep building lots and lots of roads everywhere. This is a rich country in which most people the vast majority of people can afford cars and in new york city a few other places. There's a good reason drag mass transit anyway because stuff went to park but most of the country isn't really liked that you can sort of string light rail lines here and there but like if you're widening highways every place people keep keepdriving. That's exactly right so you know. I mean if you if you care i think really about transit usage. You have to think not just in terms of what of the dollar spent on the project but what is like what's happening yeah. I think that's the thing about transportation that is either vexing very interesting depending on your point of view but like there just isn't one lever you pull and it's like okay saw. It's like like with everything else in the world. There's lots of things that are interconnected and so if you just make one change it's not gonna solve all the other problems So if you want to get more people onto transplant you have to do stuff about driving and roads and so on and so forth in addition to getting costs under control so he can build stuff. But yeah i mean. Let's let's talk class. Because i mean you can get sucked into kind of pointless debate about do quote unquote like. We need mass transit. Clearly in parts of the country mass transit's very very relevant to help people get around so in new york where you live at where where i grew up you know. They built a new subway up part of second avenue. I'm that's clearly something like people. Do people people need the subway in york The upper east side is not very well served by transit until it was built. They were above capacity elsewhere. Like it's a no brainer to dig that tunnel. But he lost like crazy sums of crazy sums of money about four and a half billion dollars not including the financing charges. Like another eight hundred million dollars. And i mean what what happens when when cost so in order to get to that sort of scale i mean the the big thing and you know we've talked about this and other venues is sort of stations are a big part of that story so i dunno mad at. You've checked out second subway in your return. Trips near is sort of assume you have. but i. i've been there and you know. The stations are essentially underground cathedrals. They're they're they're massive. And the art the frescoes are said said. Speak and they. They cost a lot of money. So i mean if you look at sort of the budget of second avenue subway sort of at a ten thousand foot view. It's about a four and a half billion dollars but then three and change is going to be for hard construction costs and then about two billion probably in the stations. So that's the big driver of cost like a lot of people focus on the tunnelling saying okay. That's union santosh. People like complain about that But the only contract is about three hundred fifty million dollars. Maybe a little bit more. What some added added stuff. Stations is where you see a lot of of the cost. You know it's time of labor. Absolutely it takes time to dig and blow up stuff and then it's all the amenities that get added on a thing that i've been looking at pretty closely recently. Is all these ansari buildings which is where you put the ventilation structures And they're just. I have not seen anything comparable anywhere else in the world. I've been told that there are some decent comparisons in london. But i'm not i'm not convinced yet That's the cast. I mean i think this this point just on. The station's is is important because Well because people like to talk about elon. Musk and you know he has a company. Whose whole premise is that. He's gonna dig like better tunnels for an. I mean that's great. I mean it's good to innovate. It's good to make things things better. But it's also it's important to understand what what are the actual points and the existing tunnel boring machines like this giant drill right. It goes to the and they're fine. I mean like it could be better but like that's that's not why this cost so much. I just interrupt i to any of your listeners. Just google tunnel boring machine youtube. It look up earth pressure balance machine whatever it is just watch some of these videos. It's insane. they're amazing. The technology is incredible. Like i mean sure innovation. I'm sure it would be better. But it's like so mechanized it requires very few people to actually like you know sort of the the the boring machine and then like it automatically sort of lines the tunnel magically removes the spoil the that's the earth at it's exiting the that's excavating. It's like really high tech. It's you know it's not. It's not where we're sort of struggling. I i would say yeah. I mean that that's the thing is the the cost of that project. A very share of it is creating these stations. Because you can't you can't drill a station. The little yawn must tunnels They're like they're just two sides to the questions like what what's his four like. Like i don't know that we could walk side by side with our arms extended so that is is technical right but this sort of policy question. I guess to ask about the second avenue. Providence is like why did they make the station so big right like somebody tells you a problem here is that it's expensive to dig out space for stations like the. Musk solution. like don't bother when that doesn't quite work right. It's like you need. You need to station right but you would think like commonsense is just like well. Okay try to make it as small as you can get away right. So so the thing is there are reasonable explanations for why this line of subway engine would be more expensive than the average in the country of the world and that it would be one of the most expensive in the world for existing density in yorkshire. It's it's a legitimate concern. The other thing is the train sets in new york are actually just much longer than most other trans fats in the rest of the world right so like new york might have eight to ten cars so the platforms are going to be six hundred fifteen. Let's say six hundred feet long not to get through precise and that's a lot longer than say transits in copenhagen in paris or in london and so that means you do have to have a very long station box and the other piece of that is that it means that the capacity on those trains is also going to be theoretically much higher than other trans so from a fire safety point of view. You need to be able to account for okay. Do i safely get two thousand. Three thousand four thousand people out of the station safely and suppress a potential fire. And so like those things are sort of those laws. I mean not. The lake legalized sterling the statistical laws of a system. That you can't really mess around with but there are things about construction techniques and ways to make this process happen more quickly that we could look at to sort of move things because that's the other part of the rises like the longer these projects take it is the more money. You're sort of funneling into contractors labor all the renting equipment all that stuff is just expensive so if we could move more quickly that would help reduced costs and i don't mean on the planning side i mean that's an whole other place where we should also make move more quickly. I mean surely on we've agreed on the project we've allocated the money and we started construction like the timelines shouldn't still take ten years to to build two two miles of subway tunnels or whatever what you're talking about the actual execution. Yes just the construction not planning. That's another stick can of worms about but lice. Just the construction. Yeah still wish it back up here though. Like let's what's it gonna like. How how did you get involved but with this question of of transit. Construction costs like butts. What's what's the genesis of this style. How how far back are we going. Here let's go all the way we're going back to all the way back to the beginnings of time because this is i like this issue but it's not it's not really like ripe in dc. Bright why. I think you know matt. The one of the main things that we share is that were from new york. And you know have been. I assume writing transit for a long time and sort of understand that i mean. I'm someone who still doesn't really drive that without subway or a bus like life is pretty bad like when i travel around the country. I feel like a child. That's what got me a lot down this path and then obviously you know. I was very excited about Secondhand subway when it was announced. I followed the project you know here and there and i went to opening day of course and then obviously alon who i work with. has been sort of banging this drum for i think more than ten years now and so we started working together on something a little bit different related to buses. Which was that. I had been working on but when we start working together we were talking about construction costs and was are planned to sort of focus our energy on this topic because one as you know it. It's just a very important topic you know not just for newark before other places that wanna to build subway in those places are growing cities like seattle los angeles like all these san francisco. They're they're also trying to dell subway dallas and so if we want to actually be able to build at a scale which could actually attract people out of cars. You just need to build a lot more than we're building and so that's sort of like what motivated us all. I think one of the things that we were concerned about when we started this research was that people view us as saying it's so expensive. Let's build any transit. That's not our point of view. Our point of view as it's so expensive. Let's figure out how to make a cheaper build a whole bunch of transit. You'll i think that that's an important point. Why because if you don't look in a comparative context right if you just look at. What is the cost. Benefit of like the la metro as it exists. Like it's true. It's the it doesn't look that good and then the question is okay. Is that a fact about mass transit. Like it's just so expensive and it doesn't work and then you look at other places you say no like what. They have a subway milan. They've subway madrid. They built tunnels in berlin in in seoul. It doesn't have to cost them. Yes that that. That's that's right and like part of the differences in those places. 'cause says for our work at we we do take this comparative look and we're currently working on three cases right now and two of them are international and are trying to sort of get at okay. What are they doing differently. And so we're we're looking at northern italy and we're looking at Istanbul in turkey and part of absolutely is sort of that planning process in the in the beginning and sort of dealing with you know people complaining lawsuits but just also like having a long term plan for okay. We're gonna we're gonna build a hundred miles of subway. We might have the money right now but once we get the money like these products are all approved and we'll just like move forward with construction. Where in your or in america should say. It's a much more ad hoc process where it's like. We don't have any money to build this stuff. Like how do we get the money. That's the first thing you have to answer. So a lot of places will do a sales tax or will do bonding or something like that. No city is like actually putting up the cash to do this stuff or no state or very few states are willing to put up the cash But to do these things and then it's like okay. We apply for money from the federal government. And if we get that then we can move forward with this process and it just sort of like. Yeah you you have to jump through a couple of hoops and it's like you can't really plan around sort of so many unknowns if you have a process with one hundred different beato points. And there's a one percent likelihood of them being enacted. You're going to build any project because eventually you know for lack of a veteran allergy and that sort of like the place that we're at in the states but you can use it for some just like broad facts like how how how high art the costs in the united states compared to some other reasonable kind of comparison country. Yes so well. I think the most important thing if we are talking about the tunnel is right. So according to our data looking at a country like spain or south korea They can build at essentially a tenth of the price of of what new york is building at. Just you know. That's i mean that's like the the big wow number sort of that they can just do so much more with each dollar than than than what we can do. Anything costs in new york are uniquely high right like so. We did a case in boston on a light rail so sort of a different beast. That project was about three hundred million dollars. I think we do. Everything climbers per kilometer While second avenue subway is like two billion dollars a kilometer. They're different beasts. But you know the the the project. Boston is accurate versus tunnel. And as i was saying earlier tunnels are really. That's that's what gets you and so. Yeah you know. Projects in some of the nordic countries also very cheap sweden Stockholm switzerland is cheap in these places can build at you know two hundred three hundred million dollars a kilometer or a million dollars a mile the wet. I was the wild moment. I think it's just sort of like some of these places may be. Have some labor cost differences that you need to account for and do adjust for those things but you know you can't really argue that. The nordic countries are you know took a cheaper place to do business necessarily or that they don't have protections for workers you know so on and so forth when we started to see countries that were sort of with head equals sort of gdp per capita. We're very close or even higher in some cases but had much lower cost was kind of like There's an interesting story that must be that we must be able to tell and it's interesting because it's not i wouldn't say so. You can deduce from first principles right because you might think. Oh well you know. It's it's cheap labor but no hidden you. I guess you have to do the work right. And actually just look up the fat and a big part of it right is sort of building stuff and like continuously building stuff and like worrying about costs and like trying to figure out how to do things better. You know the story of of madrid which is sort of one of the big success stories in sort of our story at least is that they really tried to figure out what to do and you know they really studied their geology and they like at different construction techniques mining stuff in tunnel bore. These things are maybe two are a bit more expensive than if we did cut and cover stations and there are there are differences around around the world and new geology is part of the story like the netherlands has challenging jealousy. Some of the projects in china have challenging geology. These things just add cost and there's nothing you can really do about it. It's going to be more expensive than where you had. No really good conditions like amsterdam. But they're underwater but yeah exactly. It's hard to tunnel their alluvial soil and gives the is different. There we got. That's that's that's that's the real weeds. Let's let's take a break. And then i wanna talk about busted if the last year has taught us anything. It's that we don't know what will happen next. But there's one thing we can all sure of. The only future is one we can all share and leading the charge and building that future. His mercy corps with over forty years of humanitarian work under its belt building together as a mercy course. Dna as the climate crisis increases. They're partnering with those in the front lines making resources more accessible to farmers across the globe strengthening communities against escalating natural disasters and ensuring people had the tools they need to thrive mercy. Corps is doing the work that matters but they can't do it alone. That's reunite come in together. We all have the power to reshape the world when it seems like every day brings a new crisis when every news alert makes you wanna throw your phone across the room. We may start to feel a little powerless. But mercy corps is here to remind us. We don't need to through community based action. We can make change. We are nothing if not in this together. What's next is up to all of us. Learn how you can be a part of what's possible at mercy corps dot org that's m. e. r. c. y. c. o. r. p. s. Dot org right now less than one percent of covid nineteen vaccine. Doses administered globally have gone to people in low income countries and meanwhile a handful of wealthy countries could vaccinate their whole population and still have over one billion vaccines leftover. I'm kayla worthy. And i've joined the one campaign in the fight for global vaccine access. The science says that the world's richest countries horde vaccines it could result in more than sixty percent of the world's population going without access to covid vaccine until the end of twenty twenty two or later. And that's not a problem for some people around the world. It's a problem for everyone. The fastest weights and the pandemic is to make sure everyone everywhere has access to a vaccine as soon as possible because until then the virus will continue to mutate. Spread and devastate lives and livelihoods. If rich countries are allowed to stockpile weren't of a much longer pandemic that could be twice as deadly if the vaccine isn't everywhere. The pandemic isn't going anywhere. But here's what you can do to help to win. Once fights and the pandemic go to one dot org slash pandemic to learn more. Okay so what things you've done. Is this sort of detailed. Look at one particular project in in boston. Which is interesting because essentially it almost got cancelled because it was going to be too expensive and they sort of rebooted to to make it cheaper at. Can you explain to me what what what. What was that. This project that they did right so in in boston they were extending the green line which is an existing route in their system. It's project sort of was born out of the big dig. People know that was a big highway project from the ninety s. It was agreed on at least and in the environmental mitigation from that project in nineteen ninety-one. I believe massachusetts agreed till fourteen. Different transit improvements and the argument was that it was to keep in accordance with to clean air act. His boston had fallen into violation of at certain points which risk getting sending their federal funding. But if you talk to sort of the secretary of transportation at that time suci he's publicly stated. That really wasn't about that it was more about. They understood that if they built. This highway would eventually get filled up cars and you had to have some alternatives for people. So that's why he authorized this decision now. Nine hundred ninety one today. Replaying twenty one project still is not complete although we're getting close it looks like So there's a lot of You know there's a new governor. Bill weld comes into office and is just not really interested in transit and doesn't fund the project and so this is the practice sort of like in this state of limbo for really until like the vault. Patrick sort of really moves on it. I mean mitt romney sort of his life. Yeah let's let's build this thing. And he has an adviser doug foy who used to work at that law firm who is also very big on transit So his in his era sort of encouraging this and then. When patrick comes into office he does want to do it. And you know. There's a congressman in summersville. Whose name. I got wrong. Capuano mike kaplan yeah. I might capuano to his credit. Really wonderful guy. someone. I i have spoken. Three times really was a cheerleader for the project and even when i went off the rails he helped bring it back on. But what happens. They agreed to the project they start the planning process. The project is meant to be longer than it currently is. It's supposed to go up a little bit farther. North to domestic valley highway and cost us. Continue like incrementally getting higher and higher than the cost estimates right so the initial estimate from like two thousand and five which is a conceptual design is in the order of five six hundred million dollars and then as the project looks like it actually might happen and they're gonna apply for federal funding. The price tag is nine hundred million dollars a billion dollars in that zone. One point one two billion dollars and then it's you know one point five and it's two billion dollars it gets approval for this federal grant at a budget of one point nine nine. Two billion dollars in the federal government is basically kicking in half of the costs. So you know on the one hand right. It's it's governments can give you billion dollars like you might as well figure out how to get it. And so they're trying to essentially story goes to dot every i and cross every t and so they think that if they encourage more public participation like that helps the project look better in the eyes of the assessors at the fbi and things of that. Sort the big piece. Big change though. Is that the station design. Those from essentially unadorned bus stops at. It's sort of like a weather shelter to sort of full-on sort of head houses. Which is just like a building with elevators. Escalators you know personnel. Rooms really nice plantings on the outside redoing. The streets here. I'm gonna. I'm gonna cut it because if you're listening if you've got Lived in in the boston area. What's what's striking about. This is that the green line exists it has existed for a long time. I think the fact that the tunnel part of it. It's basically like a set of kind of like trolley lines in some of the kind of fancy suburbs west of boston and then they converge. And there's a tunnel under downtown boston. And it's actually very funny if you're used to like normal subways. 'cause you're down in the station. That disease kind of tiny trolley cars there but but the surface segments of it which go to two nice parts of town recline and stuff like that it. It is not like it's only sub-par neighborhoods. The stops are just like the book like bus stops. You know some of them have some parking spaces. there's a roof so that you don't get rained on but even like cold ass boston. You'll see people any morning like out there and coats shivering and obviously in some sense like you would like to have maybe a more fabulous station but the point is boston's full of like narrow streets. Slick really bad traffic. It's hard to park so which is like classic mass transit like this is a good way to get downtown if near the station did. The extension is going out to cambridge and summerbell which again they're very desert. Somerville is actually one of the most densely populated municipalities in america. So you know you walk to the station. You take a train downtown like it would be very useful but they went from what we should copy the stations. We already have to like. We should build the most awesome stations that we can dream up even though there was no. There's nothing wrong with the existing stations but like people use right. It's not make or break in terms of am. I gonna take the train to work at one of my early on in the research so like we started doing the research. Right in the grips of corona. So we didn't get to go visit for this part of the party. There was a lot like google street view. Sort of terrorism. And if you go up and down. Nasa ads in in boston he look at the stations. It's quite literally like sort of a highway. Divider like cinder block thing. And you know that's it like there's a line that says enter the green line here like there's not even whether you know it's not even about. It's not even a nice bus stop. It's just like a piece of pavement or expansive pavement or something like that and But yeah as you describe it so what ends up happening sort of at least this way. The story has been piece. It together is that in. I think he doesn't sixty thousand seven. There is a lawsuit That mvp as sort of resolves with vcsel. it's basically like a disability group and they're like we're going to commit to. Ada improvements all threats station all throughout the system. Excuse me and sort of will honor that as we go forward with agreement although if you read the sort of the text of the agreement there's no mention of the green line in it. It's sort of like there are specific. Things mentioned like downtown crossing there are specific stations mentioned And i think that it's it's not controversial. Say like stations should be accessible at. That's a good thing But there are different ways to do that right so you can build ramps and like that. The stations that we're going to be built in the conceptual design costs. Five hundred thousand dollars a piece had written like they were gonna be you know satisfy all of the requirements but then they became more and more elaborate. And i think one of the other things that i think is sort of emphasizing is the way that the budget ends up breaking down on a on greenland. Is that like the professional services so like the costs that or consultants end up. Sort of getting is like you know. Twenty five thirty percent of the total budget and is actually the biggest line item of the whole project. And so basically by having your concerns go back and re study everything or go back and redesign things like you're just adding billable hours to them in like they're not going to say no if you're like can you study this idea or can you. Maybe redesign this thing and obviously like in a complicated project like you're going to have to do some of that anyhow. But in the end in in this specific instance they basically went from very austere spartan stations. To very elaborates asians. And they've got back to the sort of more steer so there's been a lot of design work and like even the engineering To get the project along whence relate multiple consultants like doing things a couple of different times So just like a lot of you know. White collar hours were burned on this project and station thing is interesting right because whenever you talk about like the clinical cost of something way just one thing is like the unit crisis right like are we paying an unreasonable amount for you know. Bricks or for a construction workers time off than the other is just like. What are we buy right right and get a one of the things you see here is it. It just sorta depends like whose problems you're trying to sell freight and for what right if he if you're trying to move people then like yeah you have to build the tracks right and there's a certain amount of cost as a sign with that and you know of course things should be accessible so you need ramps But they evolved to like okay. There's going to be free standing buildings. They're going to be on a different level so you can eat lots of elevators which you know you do and like it was like a break room personnel personnel for the crew. And stuff like that. Then it's like well okay. So it's y. Would you ever say no to stuff like that right. And then the then. The community started stuff but besides the station right like there was a bike path. I think there's a community path was of added in after there's a federal funding grant agreement with the fda in once. That's agreed to like those are the specs of the project and then the after that was agreed to they added this piece on so things like a big issue. That comes up is you. Don't want the project scope to sort of increase once it's been set like that's really bad for you. Know cost containment as you can imagine and this is one area that sort of we honed in on that just sort of it just required additional design work and additional thinking. And there's like a viaduct involved at at to get like redesigned a couple times but then the the happy part of this story is to reached a point. would i feel like projects. The united states often don't reach. Which is like i. Somebody said no. You can't spend that much money. But then they didn't like throw the whole thing in the trash can they like actually went back and came up with a cheaper plan right in instead of instead of everyone just freaking out and like how does that come together to to like put their foot down but then get it. Reworked read so as you go along in project like there is regular reporting on your costs and design work and all that stuff and so it just it kept being like the schedule was being delayed and the costs were increasing and so the project when from that you know one point nine nine. Two billion dollar estimate of two point three billion to two point seven billion to then it was like three billion dollars and you make people i spoke to like. I don't think it ever would have gotten there. But that's just like what. The trend line was at that point in time and sort of the new governor. Governor baker was dislike. Come on like we cannot. We can't really do this. There are some other things going on in boston. Around this time. He comes into office in two thousand. Fifteen is a big winter. Storm that like paralyzes the t very embarrassing. The director of them. Be ta resigns in the middle of this And they're like where our resources going. What's the state of good repair here. Like what's going on with nba and then like why is the biggest. You know sort of cost this project. That's going nowhere and only getting bigger So it just like there was a three hundred sixty evaluation of everything and he like changed Some of the governance at amputee they created a new board overseas and stuff and they the people in charge of that sort of like looked the private and dislike. We know that we can do better than what we've done. And like some of the people on board have a lot of experience in this world and they're just like let's take a shot and say can we sort of push forward if we don't spend any essentially additional money they did have to raise some additional money To get done so. I don't want to pretend that they didn't but it's the final budget is around two point. Three billion dollars which is actually pretty much in line with that one point nine nine to number because that included some financing costs. I mean it that does not include the financing possession. Say and i mean what. What's striking about this part of it is just. This is not a tunnel right at this. There's no tunnel. There's no title. What is it like in the old freight rail track. So it's in the commuter rail track so i mean there is some viaduct involved. There is some elevation. But it's all so the thing that so i think we take a step back from green. We don't talk too much about but it's it's parallels existing commuter rail which i think is insane like just make one good thing and then people in somerville and know. Just put a stop at a tux. Or whatever put a stop at summersville electrify the fleet. And like you don't need to build a parallel light rail to in existing commuter. I like the idea of doing that. Is i think quite bizarre. I don't want to. Let's let's take a break and rant and rave commuter rail at the hey teddy on the host of recode daily. And i'm john williams co host of worldly throughout the month april. General are gonna be working with our colleagues all across. Vox podcasts host a series of episodes about one of the most important issues facing the world climate. We're going to have climate focused episodes from archie shows. Worldly enrico daily as well as some of your other favorites like today explained fox conversations. The weeds future perfect and more. We'll be diving into everything. Climate from the global problem of fossil fuels to the real possibilities of clean energy and answering questions like why. It's so hard to talk about. Sustainable fashion and how the administration is planning to act on climate. So we hope you'll join us. Good a vox dot com slash earth month to learn more and listen. That's vox dot com slash. Earth box is turning seven this month. I think vox says as my older child at my side just turned six. I in the world has changed a lot during these last seven years at during this time boxes always held tight to our mission which is to make the most important issues clear comprehensible empower you to shape the world in which you live as a is committed to keeping their unique journalism free for all. Who need it about. Your support helps us do that to help us celebrate boxes seventh birthday support. Vox unique mission and this show but going. Vox dot com slash. Give make a contribution of seven dollars for the seventh anniversary is great. 'cause you know give it a shot so this was a while ago because i haven't done stuff because of corona but my my kid loves He loved this double decker tourist bus. We went on When we were in spain so we have those in. Dc like there for tourists and for people who live here. But i took them up and there was some German tourists sitting near us and our bus was idled near the l'enfant plaza metro station And there was like a train. Just stop. They're not going anywhere and it was. Virginia railroad express train which is commuter And one of them was saying. What's that I i was like. I was ashamed because it in germany. You they don't have commuter rail as we understand it. Really which is like in america is this idea of will run trains from the suburbs into the city. And they'll be really expensive and then they'll be they'll be so expensive that then you analyze it and you're like well. Should we built another stop here in a poor neighborhood and the answer will be well. No delong people won't won't ride it costs so much so we'll just not give them any service at all and then you get things because we have this in dc to where because the train tracks are already there. It's like convenient to build more tracks adjacent to them. But now you're building the red line parallel to trains that you already have. But it's cheaper. It's cheaper to ride but is it can't possibly be cheaper for the government to be double building train tracks so mike. My understanding of the of what happened in boston is that so when they started looking at green line in two thousand and four thousand five. The idea of sort of electrifying. The commuter rail was a go And and the reason why electrified is that the diesel trains. It takes too long for them to turn them around to run them more than like twice an hour or something or maybe four times an hour and greenland. I believe the headways are going to be about every six minutes. So if you have ten hour right like the math doesn't work out on the existing commuter rail but right like the answer seems pretty obvious as i. Oh well then like. Let's just run this more frequent train farther north Rather than sort of having to widen this existing trench which like it dates back to the eighteen thirties or something. You know it's like it's it's old and like there are some valid environmental concerns in the corridor like their legal fall-outs from houses that were built in the eighteen. Whatever is and there were significant drainage issues that came up in expanding the trench and doing the work for green line. And if you sort of just kept the trench exactly as it was electrified. The existing existing real. Maybe you avoid some of those headaches. But yet i mean to your point about the divide between commuter rail and sort of subways It's yeah it's it's pretty mind boggling and there are pretty easy ways. It seems to sort of like mary. The two the two technologies right. And so i mean by a electrified. Right means you string those polls yes right and so then you can run electric trains on them. They accelerate faster You can just make them go. Backwards incentive elaborated turnarounds. But it's like in every american city. I'm familiar with there's like completely separate bureaucracies so like in the bay area. They're extending bart to san jose but there's already a commuter train goes from san francisco jose and so you ask people there. It's like well. Why do you want this bart extension. And they'll say was a cal. Trains no good and they like have all these grievances with it which are legitimate but instead of making it better instead of making the train. You already have better. You're building this entirely parallel set. Yes of infrastructure. Were where if you ignore it. You can send like actually. This project is more affordable than you might think but the only reason it's affordable is that the whole right of way is already there and it's strange but billions of dollars to build train tracks where you already have train tracks. Yeah totally. I think you know with green line like you know i sort of plunged into it and we're like you know looking than i think maybe in reading alternative analysis it just mentioned the idea of the commuter rail thing and it was like a light bulb like yeah. Why would you build a parallel technology to existing murali clearly. A stupid idea and You know they went through the explanation in the analysis and it passes muster like i get it as an argument But i think right if you just sort of think a little bit longer to say okay like how do we just fix this so that we can use existing right of way. We can sort of improve sort of everyone's trips by doing this. That's the big thing and to what you're saying about electric occasion. Yeah you can. The trains accelerate the accelerate faster. So you can stop more frequently and you can turn around more quickly. Apparently and obviously their electric rather than these which is also a big big environmental benefit on top of that which is worth stated. So you know there's this federal infrastructure bill coming It's gonna money for for transit. And i mean i think that's good like it's it's good to have transit. It takes money. But i kind of feel like reading between the lines. I i don't know how you feel about this. But i feel like reading between the lines of a lot of this stuff like the planning gets done in weird ways because it's not really it's like it's someone else's money right like like the name of the game is like can we get a federal grant for this otherwise it doesn't happen. Yeah not like. Here's our budget. Like how much can we do with that much but noted that that's exactly i mean. I think one of the things was alluding to earlier cities or transit agencies however whatever unit we wanna talk about like sort of a medium term in a long term plan on like this is the next hundred miles of of transit that we want a bill like if that if that process sort of happened in on a regular basis and like they work through the environmental impact on some of those things in independent of okay. Can i get you know an fte grant for for x. y. or z. I think that that would. It would change the los angeles for like in that direction. Seattle sort of in that direction. But like if you were to talk to people at the mta and say okay. You built phase one of the second subway. What's next they'd like to. And then it's like okay. Well is there anything beyond second avenue subway products. Well it's like. There's i mean there are some things but like not really. There's no there aren't really like a plan if like okay. Well what should the future of new york look like with mass transit bike. Should we build the subway on. Utica down you kathy. Late know those types of things are all still kind of people at the agency. Yes they know about that. Stuff are aware but it's not true official like doctrine like this is where we're going and that seems like a problem right that you don't have sort of broad visions and how i mean. How does the federal grant work like is it. Just it is there is there a technical evaluation is just like what is the secretary. Wanna do like how. How do you get this money right. So my understanding. So there's a a program called new starts. It's like see five three zero nine or something like that and agencies put forward projects with budgets. You have to get through a certain amount of engineering and design. On and so forth and in the federal government will to find at a certain percentage and like when the program sorta first starts. And i think it's in the ninety s like utah guy like eighty percent matches one hundred percent matches. It basically paid for front runner in like all these commuter rail and light rail projects in utah but then as more city like oh we can apply for these in. They have sort of scaled back the contributions secondary subway things like twenty five percent match. But the the way it happens right is sort of you have to go through sort of the environmental review process right so you have to do this alternative analysis to choose your preferred alternative right so you look at all the different options for green line and so you look at. What is the bus version of this like like. What does a commuter rail version of this look like and then you decide what your preferred alternatives. And then you sort of do som- engineering and preliminary engineering and some design work some cost estimating and you go through environmental view right. Like what impact is this going to have on. You know the wetlands or historical buildings or no all these things that you have to to cross off your list and if you sort of dot those is in and cross all those t's you submit your your package and they make a decision on whether or not the approval. Now that's a broad track that you have to follow but my understanding is that in the george w bush years there was some technical analysis that was done by the fta to say. Okay like this project is not up to snuff. This one is cost benefit that kind of thing and then in the obama years into the trump ears my understanding is that basically is a local if a transparency can show that they have a local match for the project and they've agreed everything else looks good. The federal government will approve the project. And that maybe explains the spate of like streetcar projects and of dubious merit Emerged in the last ten years. I'm trying to be somewhat diplomatic. I can be undiplomatic. He's a big concern. That i have with the democrats back in office because the last time. The democrats want one presidential election and did a stimulus bill and had transit funding. They built all these shitty streak and it doesn't seem it doesn't seem great right so to step back right if you live in washington dc. I think Natty has to use. The city has enough there. Was this fad for putting train tracks in the middle of roads. That also have cars on them. Exactly where a bus would run or many times where bus does run. And then you run a train. That's just the same as a buzz accept. It can't go around. Trevor apart car and it's really weird. I mean you got. I'm on blogs does uh us to hug there would be like these vicious endless debates about this about whether there was some like magical benefit and like i'm not against trains right but it's like a real train doesn't get stuck in traffic like that's the point right i. I'm with you on this. I like they're so like toronto. Has like a very strong like streetcar. culture in it's very polarizing to argue streak carcasses subway and like berlin also has like vicious debates about and like there was this slow movement saying Gabe klein who has the you know. The the head of the dc aren't transportation like very interested in like just slow things down like that's really good and it brings back street life and like i've been on the bus that parallels streetcar in dc. 'cause like why on earth would i get on the street car and it was stuck like in traffic and kansas city is extending their streetcar. They got some money to do that. They've all been horrific disasters in terms of like missing ridership estimates. You don't pay for them. Initially like they're they're free and like may be okay but still not what was estimated and then it's like then they start charging money maybe and then you know. No one's getting on these things so they're just not reliable And like that's the name of the game with transportation rises like if something is reliable people use it. If it's not reliable people probably won't use it and i think that's where you want to focus your money right. Is that like if you can pay to run subway every like five minutes rather than every ten minutes like that seem. That's worthwhile in the same goes with the bus by the way right like a bus. That can run five minutes is going to. You have most likely better. Ridership in a bus runs every ten or fifteen minutes. I mean pre assuming. It's like cited somewhat appropriately. That's exactly right though that. It's i know how to put it right. But it's like they got into all this idea that like like all kinds of stuff other than making the transportation more convenient rose going to be important but actually i mean and some people will do these like takes on the internet or the like. It's time to like rebrand the bus. But if you look at bus-lines in america right like when buses go from dense neighborhoods to destinations that a lot of people want to go and when they run frequently like a lot of people ride the bus. There's no dislike no need for like special magic but you you could just like run them more frequently on places where people actually live. And so in dc right. They built the streetcar on what was already a very popular bus route. But it stuck in traffic so like have you made like a bus lane like that would have been really nice for people but it would have annoy drivers. Yes so instead. They did this much more expensive option. That doesn't accomplish anything. Probably noise drivers not equally. It'd probably still is in annoys bicyclists. 'cause 'cause you'll like fall off and die if you hit the tracks ron so a and i worked on a bus that redesign. We had a meeting with some fancy people. can't say exactly who and one of the things they said was like. How do you get the bus to speed up and just kind of like you know. Buses can go pretty they can. They can move quickly. it's like they are unimpeded. And there's like yeah. Like what is like a technological solution to this and it's like i mean i don't know build the viaduct sure like maybe there is Bus zapping technology that low exist in the future but like the existing technologies perfectly. Good the problem is just like how we allocate space on the road and then you know what are the rules and stuff like that. That's why i studied transplant right. It's like you don't actually need to be smart at all to understand how to like nathan better. You know so people ask me. They're like you know because they know i i liked. I liked references. I go well like what what should we do. You not prove transit in in the jobs plan or something like that. And i feel like you know. They really have to try to bring back technical analysis of the cost per se. I as i recall the bush era disputes the they were looking like pure lee at like decongestion of highways right that was one of the things s and so so urban s didn't like that because that's sort of promotes run. A train to a highway media have park and ride stations which is not good like urbanism or really good transit by you. Know those routes and dc that go to the west falls church or whatever. Good luck finding out that station. No i mean need strand. It's true it's like that. That sucks ranking. But i think what you what you wanna do is say what you should build projects that will attract membership. Yes right up like no. That's uncontroversial. But that's i think that's the thing i when you start to talk about this stuff. It's all extremely logical. And just like yeah that makes sense like if you remove obstructions from a bus it will run more reliably if you connect dense corridors people will ride transit especially if there's like congestion on roadway above or jason or however you wanna think about it and then we're things fall apart is like okay well to do that. I then need to do this other thing and like that other thing i don't want to do and that's like tape parking away from someone or You know spend a bunch of money on subway tunnel. And i think part of the subway story right. Is we get into that. Three chasta's let's try to anticipate all of the sort of complaints that we're going to receive about like okay. This is disruptive their smoke from the blasting mechanism and then like we're going to build a station like eight million feet below ground. Donal even know that. We're digging it because it's going to take ten years and costs now three extra billion dollars to do in a in a very political assessment of transportation projects rather than like finding more of a balance right. I think the politics are inevitable. You can't get rid of it but maybe it needs to tilt although the different. I think that's what we're gonna see with lot. Intersex yourself like i. I don't know. I'm sure you've been reading all the high speed rail stuff and like the naysayers arguments i find mystifying about like let's just like start slow and like build some stuff like that high speed rail though like we don't want to go that far like let's just like make what we have already a bit better rather than service like if we're gonna invest a bunch of money like let's get the best technology we can't. Let's build the super fast connection between the cities that makes sense. And then maybe after that we can continue building stuff. Go slow or whatever but like let's really like hammer home on like boston. New york dc l. a. San francisco chicago in whatever point on connected with you. Know dallas okay Like i'm a little A little confusing. I read sort of the like. We shouldn't dream big on on hospital a bit strange actually. I don't know maybe point to his offices. I think different questions have scale right. But i mean i could like what what sort of ties us together is that you want to have a A sort of comprehensive plan and then like a reason why. That's your plan right. Not just kind of like what's the easiest thing very possibly do. Just go do it or like. What do we happen to have some money for right. Now right you wanna have some kind of fury of like what would people brought it and then you can like assess okay. What are like all the routes that meet that criteria and then we can investigate the engineering properties of all of that right. And then it's like. Yeah then you have to see. Like what can you get funding for. What's a schedule you know it cetera et cetera et cetera. But it seems very backwards to be like to this boston red. So it's the big dig. It was basically a created this like highway tunnel under part of the city. I don't know for weird raise triggered the opportunity to grab some more funding for mass transit but then it seems like everything that happened after that was driven by like like. What's like the lowest impact way we could spend that money right or like the least disruptive right like least discomfiting to anybody so then it's like well what if we build it where there's already train tracks but like why would you do so. That's like the theory of like a lot of modern. American transit practices is like you're basically taking existing rights of way in adding stuff or improving them. Or whatever rather than sort of cutting. And you know. I use that word intentionally cutting through new rights of way. Because yeah you don't wanna be disrupted and you don't want to discuss it and i think you know that type of thinking it. Yeah it's very defensive from the get-go and is very mindful of okay. I don't want to have a needless political fight on my hands. 'cause like i mean that is invariably what happens. I mean i think when we talked about this you had the expression. There's no such thing as a shovel ready project. There is such a thing as a lawsuit radic fragile read and you know that people have that i mean absolutely i mean it's i mean and i do think that that is one good thing about this round of federal initiative from from the bite administrations. I think they're clearer. On the fact that like people who are out of work right now because the restaurants that used to be at close in the pandemic. Like you're not gonna get them a job like next month for building. The transportation system future like we need to help people who are out of work and we also need to built the transportation system in the future but like those are different questions. I think fundamentally right and like you need to make you need to have a good planning process abso absolutely. Why was i think you know with all public policy like you. Don't just like dua policy. Descript see what will happen like you have goals that you're working either working backwards from from planning perspective in working towards like real world time. I think as you're saying with a lot of transportation practice it feels like what can we do and like who knows what it's going to really achieve and it's it is fitting with whatever goals That we have. That's always been. I think with congestion pricing or others of interventions. Like that's gotta start with okay. What are we looking to achieve is about. Getting people at a car is about moving men. People translates about reducing greenhouse gas emissions. By whatever or reducing you know collisions and crashes like what is the thing or the suite of things. We want to optimize the foreign. Let you go up. I should asked like what's what's what's next for transfers project but which which had fans be looking forward tipped so we are in the midst of were going gonna start writing up our next three cases which are going to new york istanbul and a couple of italian cities northern italian primarily and you know the the goal there is is sort of like continue learning about know what works. Well what does not work. Well where costs sort of increasing. Where can you find cost savings just like what can we learn to sort of better design and govern these projects going forward to that here in the states we can take advantage of you know the biden largesse and build the instructor we need for the next ten twenty thirty forty fifty years or whatever so yeah. That's why you have to look forward. Thank you so much erik. Goldman marin institute Thanks as always to our sponsors producer. Eric. genetic s up in the weeds back on tuesday right now. Less than one percent of covid nineteen vaccine doses administered globally have gone to people in low income countries and meanwhile a handful of wealthy countries could vaccinate their whole population and still have over one billion vaccines. Leftover i'm kayla worthy and i've joined the one campaign in the fight for global vaccine. The sign says that if the world's richest countries horde vaccines could result in more than sixty percent of the world's population going without access to covid vaccine until the end of twenty twenty two or later and that's not just a problem for some people around the world. It's a problem for everyone. The fastest weights and the pandemic is to make sure everyone everywhere has to a vaccine as soon as possible because until then the virus will continue to mutate. Spread and devastate lives and livelihoods. If rich countries are allowed to stockpile weren't risk of a much longer pandemic that could be twice as deadly if the vaccine isn't everywhere. The pandemic isn't going anywhere. But here's what you can do to help to win. Ones fights and the pandemic go to one dot org slash pandemic to learn more.

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Indias COVID-19 unlocking challenge with more than 90,000 new daily cases

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

06:44 min | 10 months ago

Indias COVID-19 unlocking challenge with more than 90,000 new daily cases

"This marketplace podcast is supported by transfer. Wise. The smart new way to send and receive money internationally join over eight million customers in eighty countries who are already saving and try it for free at transfer. Wise Dot com slash marketplace, or download the APP. Mass Transit Restarts in India's capital despite a rapidly rising corona virus case count live from London. This is the marketplace morning report from the BBC World Service Victoria Craig Good Morning yesterday India became the nation with the world's second-highest Corona virus infections. It now has well over four million cases, but today the nation's largest rapid transport system, the Delhi. Metro, along with those in Hyderabad Coachee Guru, have reopened more than five months. After they were shut down to prevent spread of covid nineteen, the BBC's nickel and Andrew reports. The government is now truly caught between a rock and a hard place at faces further economic ruin if it doesn't open up the economy but risks further spike ineffectual rates continue moving forward. India has overtaken Brazil the second worst affected country in the world more than ninety thousand new cases are being reported every day battle the rapid. Increase is due to testing but also because the country is in the fourth phase of unlocking the economy which has led to the virus spreading in more rural areas, the government's view is due to the economic impact of the BANDIC. especially in poorer about the population, it is virtually impossible to keep the country lockdown. Last week, official figures showed the economy contracted nearly twenty four percent between April and June making it the. Worst performer in the twenty according to the IMF in Mumbai BBC's Nikola Narmer for marketplace this week, the UK and the EU will resume crucial brexit talks but reports indicate UK Prime Minister Boris. Johnson will announce that unless a deal is agreed by October fifteenth, the country will change sections of a bill that regulate how will move between Northern Ireland, which is part of the UK and the Republic of Ireland on the same. But not part of the UK if you're scratching your head wondering how we got here, the BBC's Rob Watson, we'll get you up to speed Victoria going to have to forgive me for a brief history to try and read all make sense but it goes like this Britain left the European Union at the beginning of this year, it signed a withdrawal agreement but ever since then it's been in a transition phase. Where it's been negotiating with the European Union well, it's a new relationship should be and it's not exactly a great international secrets that those talks of not been going very well, and what appears that's happening that the UK government and this is extraordinarily revolutionary stuff I mean I can't emphasize this enough. Victoria. Is essentially sort of saying well, look I'll tell you what if we don't get a good trade deal with? You guys than we're rather inclined to tear up parts of the withdrawal agreement and why that matters the withdrawal agreement. It's an international treaty and you just don't really expect the government to do something like that. This is an attempt by the UK government to really put some pressure on Brussels as we've seen from the economic data in the last couple of months, the covid nineteen pandemic has dealt pretty severe blows. Not just to the UK economy, but those all across Europe. So do you think there's a chance this environment could make both sides just want to avoid any cliff, edges any unnecessary controversy, and just get a trade deal agreed and focus on repairing their economies. Instead I guess the Scholtz on steel question as it's possible Victoria I mean if you take the case of the European Union White, might they not do it? I think it's because they really do want to prioritize keeping up all the rules of the Single Market and that customs union in other words sort of saying look you know you're only the INAU club, any follow the rules or you're not and you can't expect to get. As good a deal outside it as in it so I think the EU may continue take what it would see as sort of principled line. As for the of course, there's massive pressure on Mister Johnson's government to do a deal most economic forecasts suggest that the harm of of a not your brexit were massively outweigh any harm from from the corona virus forecasts suggest. A hit a Britain's economy of up to ten percent be ten percent smaller than it might have been in fifteen years time if it leaves without to deal so you would think there's all souls of pressure on both sides to do a deal the BBC's Rob Watson thanks for breaking this down for us. Victoria checking financial markets. European stocks are on the rise while the pound is falling nearly seven tenths of a percent against the euro as those brexit talks restart. Meanwhile, Softbank shares ended down more than seven percent. After reports, it played an outsized role in the US tech rally earlier this year, how are you feeling about the shift to remote working according to a recent survey by nonprofit catalyst? Most respondents are optimistic about the changes and think the shift to more flexible. Working will accelerate gender equality in the workplace but some feel the road to progress will be bumpy forty five percent of women leaders surveyed said it's hard to speak up an e meetings and three and five say they feel remote working has crippled prospects for getting a promotion Kathy Matsui vast vice chair at Goldman Sachs Japan has long studied gender equality in the workplace and she believes many companies need to do more. The first place to start she says is by. Treating men and women differently when it comes to say a promotion opportunity, let's say there's ten skills necessary to succeed in that role and the woman would look at those Tennessee. Well, I have eight of the ten. I'm clearly underqualified whereas the man would say, well, the most important are the top three and I've got those top three and I should be promoted lack of self confidence I. Think it's not just unique to win in Asia I think it is pretty Universal. So if they reject your offer to be promoted the first time around, don't give up push again and how do you think the coronavirus pandemic will shift what an office worker does because some people say the shift to working from home means childcare burdens are disproportionately impacting working mothers. I think that the length of time Japanese fathers spend at home sharing and child rearing I believe it's less than half that of say fathers in the United States in Europe on average. But having father's probably forced to take share that burden of household duties, what I've been told is that. Fathers of all of a sudden realized that more equal sharing responsibilities at home will ultimately hopefully drive more equal opportunity outside the Home Kathy Matsui Vice Chair of Goldman Sachs. Japan. Thanks so much for your time. Thank you very much much more with Kathy on our podcast wherever you get yours in London, I'm Victoria Craig with the marketplace morning report from the BBC. World Service.

BBC UK European Union Kathy Matsui India Victoria Craig Victoria Victoria Rob Watson Mister Johnson London US Britain Europe Goldman Sachs Hyderabad Coachee Guru World Service Delhi Tennessee
Rural Areas Continue Planning For Future Growth

Florida Matters

28:00 min | 1 year ago

Rural Areas Continue Planning For Future Growth

"This is Florida matters. I'm Robin Sesing. Ham Mass transit in Tampa Bay's densely-populated big cities grabs the headlines but there's a case to be made that transportation has even more of an impact on people living in rural areas where it plays a part in that's a barrier that we have to spend a lot of time with seniors and folks and transportation disadvantaged to let them know this is something that they can share with us that's comfortable that will be kept confidential Phillips Executive Director of polk counties citrus connection and Dave Hutchinson Executive Director of the Sarasota Manatee Metropolitan Planning Organization he's out of the way rural areas that were addressing sure so we're talking about Hernando County Population Fernando counties one hundred eighty seven thousand not as much however the same issue with transportation disadvantage programme funding exists in Sarasota Manatee and probably statewide I suspected Asian thank you all for being here so ron to describe the demographics of the people generally living in the we do have an urbanized area which is about one hundred fifteen thousand so when we're talking about the kind of people that are living in rural areas Tom tation disadvantaged but they're just not comfortable sharing their financial information with you the transit system or what they perceive to be the government so the poverty line regardless of where they live in the state of Florida and they're able to utilize transportation for a variety of reasons in polk county that's limited to Nicole or medical related Robin because the need is so great just to get people to medical appointments that we are unable due to capacity issues to open that up the larger trip purposes like employment so Dave Tom described a high a high poverty population in parts of Polk County are you see few gentlemen see the same thing. The transportation disadvantage does have a mild invasive financial assessment that's required so there are many citizens that could utilize able to take advantage of the transportation disadvantaged program that's a program that is unique to the state of Florida and it is for those who are at or below disabilities are are much more rural where the seventh poorest suburban area in the United States Seventeen point seven percent of our population is at or below the poverty line so tom it's a one percent sales tax increase that the that the Hillsborough County voters passed to fund transportation. I was going to ask you what went through your head it's tougher in the rural areas and in rural parts of Sarasota Manatee county's because the trips are longer one of the challenges that we haven't poked with the program and I don't know and and were largely agricultural had been hit hard by the citrus greening so in our rural transportation we see many individuals who are when you saw that because I know you tried very hard for polk county to pass something similar so we're very excited for the Citizens Hillsborough and Polk County we did have to have approximately six hundred twenty six thousand individuals we have seventeen municipalities but the largest of our cities is Lakeland Florida which is only a hundred and eighteen thousand so sixteen of being that same kind of thing in parts of Sarasota Manatee that you're serving in parts yes in to the percent of the overall population probably not tation referenda we had the two thousand ten effort which was a half cent sales tax for public transportation that failed sixty forty so in our infinite wisdom we decided to go for we have in our studio today Ron Piontek the planning zoning director for Hernando County Tom Worse and so we understand that the taxpayers are comfortable with the level of funding for public transportation within polk county so since then we've consulted dated all of our transit into the citrus connection we've been able to return over six hundred thousand dollars to the Polk County Board of county commissioners while delivering the same level of service are full penny for transportation or half a cent would go towards roadway infrastructure and the other half cent would go towards public transportation unfortunately that failed seventy thirty describe older people veterans so it's it's it's diverse makeup so I'm from Polk County Avin port and Lake Hamilton they've received public transportation in the fixed route system for the first time and to put that in context for your listeners the town of Johnny has made additional investments with that money on the east side of the county so in the law from an area as well as the twenty seven corridor which has rural community such as AAC was unable to afford their local match so Eagle Lake Florida no longer has public transportation and last year unfortunately the city of frost proof Florida Gamble Tin only has one thousand three hundred eighty two people and they have public transportation so we had to get creative with our funding but we have seen and is we've asked municipalities to help fund public transportation we have unfortunately seen to rural areas that have abandoned public transportation the city of Eagle was unable to afford their local match for their funding so well because Eagle Lake this I think is right next to winter haven piggyback onto that but Bruce and their local match was thirty eight hundred dollars for us to be able to provide public transportation that money was in the budget Ross proof kind of out there on its own it is and so for us proof had six runs of the boss of the fixed route service and also the Ad Para Transit Sir System ultimately frost proof said he commissioned decided that the transportation disadvantaged system would be enough for their residents Dave you're the director of what's called the Metropolitan Planning Organization we're talking about world transportation so does most of your time gets spent on transportation the the city budget but the city commission felt that there was a value proposition with public transportation and even though folks came and talked about how they use the luke transportation services available for people to get to and from work and when you're in the more spread out parts of Sarasota Manatee and and the rural manning for the cities and do you feel like rural areas might get left out of the mix in the urbanized areas we have at least some level of again we do have an urbanized area so we have a fixed route and we recently expanded service to include Saturday service and extended the hours of operation for the fixed route counties of the state I think it's very challenging for someone who's Lou lives sort of out in the country so to speak to get to work if they aren't able to drive ever car or they have a an issue with their car so Ron Hernando just put money into extending the bus service we did and typical that you would see in an urban area typical door to door not door to door but we do provide a complementary door to door service that averages about thirteen services that provides the rural transportation service and it's important that they integrate and we integrate together so that they can get people into urban areas into the me kind of describe the situation in Hernando county a little bit because it it's a little bit different than what we've been talking about with with Tom and Dave we do two thousand to sixteen thousand trips a year as opposed to our fixed route which is about one hundred forty thousand trips per year right now there's a nonprofit mid Florida community sampler medical facilities which in Florida will always be important when you have cluster development and planned development than you're much your transportation I just want to ask what do you mean by fixed route fixed route is the bus is on a prescribed route with prescribe stops people know where the stops are has our rural areas develop and land and you land uses change it's important that some clustering of uses be allowed onto occur because then you are able to provide you know a a some sort of service to a cluster of doctors offices for route so they can get to shopping and doctors that that actually brings up land use and I guess I would stick my neck out here and say that that look at going from Haines city Florida to Winter Haven Florida to your job may be at Legoland you're looking at possibly eighteen and so I think that there's this over-simplification for those of us that live in urban areas when we go on vacation and we say wow buber was so affordable it was so easy to use but think about using that for one hundred percent of your daily trips if you live in a rural area where your closest grocery store doctors office is eight ten fifteen miles uber is and lift absolutely affordable compared to a taxi but they're not affordable as compared to public transportation especially if you're on a fixed it and putting in a bus route which would be expensive what about credits for an uber ride somebody might need once every couple but we we tend to be very risk adverse in government and when you don't require the same level of gene or sixteen dollars Uber ride each way and if you're earning fifteen or twenty dollars an hour then you're not taking home eight hour paycheck you're taking home a six hour paycheck uh-huh safety and carrying capacity wheelchair carrying capacity of a of your contract with Uber or lift then you know it's yes in the rural communities in the in the rural sections of our counties is that Goober and lift our somehow the solution for everyone however when Newell's who are in Mobility AIDS and that could be a wheelchair either power or a manual wheelchair and while Uber and lift are attempting to close that gap Kevin can achieve efficiencies. Yeah that makes a lot of sense Tom absolutely because I think robin the one of the over simplification that I see and I think is the elephant in the room for all of us on Piazza Planning and Zoning Director for Hernandez County Tom Phillips is the executive director of polk counties citrus connection and Dave Hutchinson expensive to provide a van that will take someone scooter versus just hop in and some people can't hop in and so how do we how do we provide and today we're talking about how to provide public transportation options to people living in rural areas my guests in the studio are it's a niche service it's exactly what it is and there are as Tom pointed out the majority of those writers have some in is the executive director of the Sarasota Manatee Metropolitan Planning Organization I just think this discussion of Uber and lift and ride sharing they have some need for a wheelchair lift where they have a scooter or they just need assistance getting on the vehicle and all those vehicles that are equipped with wheelchair lifts and systematically from where I sit as a transit professional it is the biggest issue that no one is talking about right if Uber or lift systematically said that we king at that and there's no reason why we shouldn't continue to look at that and experiment with it to see if it helps stretch the dollar and provides the needed trips but I backseat of a sedan. You're listening to Florida matters so we're going to take a short break and we'll be right back this is Florida matters I'm Robin Sussing Ham five six o'clock in the morning until six o'clock in the evening because of our funding would there be a place for Uber and lift where it is more financially feasible for based on your answer would be on the front page of the paper however hundreds of people every day throughout the United States that are in wheelchairs or are visually impaired or otherwise four where we hit capacity times I think that Uber and lift absolutely have a role to play but again I think that that this discussion is healthy left the curb by Uber and lift because these drivers do not have to accommodate the Americans with Disabilities Act so I think it is extremely important to recognize that even if there were strong pilots out there we really need ridesharing services really need to address that not everyone is able to just hop in for them but I don't want to have an Uber or lift pylon however Robin I think it's extremely important to point out that many of the door to door trips that we're doing our individual services is really there's a lot to be said about it and I think Tom you just made a great point about the fact that they don't have to pick up people who have an electric wheelchair lawyers to develop van pools and that's more robustly developed in the Tampa Bay region than it is in the Sarasota Manatee region your point yes there's a there's a role that they can play so in Polk County because of the budget constraints in the in the need we typically operate from about five forty or something that just can pick up maybe a few people dave are you guys using this and maybe go door to door were encouraging the private sector or large does that can use uber and left for us to look at expanding our hours to maybe eight o'clock or earlier in the morning or later in the evening absolutely aren't going to pick up people per particular persuasion let's say African American it would be on the front page of the paper if we were left ask for your sexual orientation and then left you at the fair or something like that but can it be part of the mix Ron are you looking at it as something that could help wasn't yeah how how affordable are they would they be for for the state funding for that for the county funding agencies in other words instead of buying a bus as a solution it's not it's not the Solution Day our transit agencies are looking added as well and I think in certain instances it will pan out are not paying gasoline tax and most of our transportation systems have been funded by gasoline tax that's a huge point so as you see all of weeks to go to shopping or you know to go visit their children or whatever it is I I think I think a lot of a lot of talk about that and a lot of people are help rural areas and I just WanNa know I wanna get your take on it ron well it'll help rural areas in the sense that it will lead to and the that so that's a challenge but we can't keep doing things the way we've been doing them because we can't afford to as far as transportation goes electric vehicles offensive vehicles you know they're they're eighty thousand dollar vehicle so you can't expect that Uber or lift would be provide that kind of service but Robin I think the General Fund Property Tax revenues and and again having as you said by the vehicles that match the service I really I think we have to look for Innovation Ed Gasoline tax has been paying for transportation projects yes and I think we've seen a twelve percent decline in the gas tax Robinson's two thousand and ten in Polk County some of the communities are not prepared for growth nor do they desire growth so I think that's a big issue to vet that with the land it will extend the suncoast parkway from the Tampa Bay area north to Georgia extend the Florida turnpike West Hook up with us the fuel efficient cars millennials don't want to drive as much and and and people are just ultimately driving less now with the economy they're starting to drive more but it is it is something that's a challenge so we've had to rely more and more on either the poll county board of County Commissioners who've been very gracious and have plugged that gap with UH sector's investment in in the communities so you would all I think be affected by the state's new toll road because we're talking about what the limitations of Uber and lift our and I think there's just in the last few years I've seen such an over simplification impact fees from New Development new development in Florida is important it's part of our economy it's part of how our regions grow and the private Inco's parkway and then a new transportation corridor from polk county to Collier County Senate President Bill Gov GALVANO WHO's from Britain says these roads would zing I think what's described as micro transit so not these big buses that you'll see in the cities but maybe smaller I think you called it rod a mini van that well Uber and lift are going to put you out of business anyways so let's just go ahead and partner with them but I do believe that there's a role to play but you're saying you are multi infrastructure corridors because they're going to look at more than just transportation they're looking at electricity and impacts will be as negative as feared I think there will need to be careful environmental analysis done so that there planned right I think nine hundred people a day or thereabouts are still moving to Florida and they're not all moving into our urbanized areas so we're going to they can't all get around individual cars so we don't our grid having a robust grid system is important for individual communities and Mindy that might be impacted by these new toll roads I would I would reiterate as well or or agree Our longtime congressman Congressman Dennis Ross that far into the future before we will need something to relieve the current to interstate systems. I don't think that the other utilities and I think that there's the potential for even providing a corridor where some mass transit could could go soda Manatee County so anything that helps relieve the congestion that really does exist on I seventy five will benefit our region that's something that is probably for another show in in that we really need to look at with bright line coming and and express and look at xpress buses and how do we really like that and I think our transit agencies in Florida have been and are innovative but they're challenged it's hard to hire enough drivers mobility fees versus as far as taking people out of their cars and into public transportation I'm not sure exactly what the effect of that is going to be long term but important for the state so having one more Route North and South along with I seventy five and I ninety five is it's not going to be connect the region with rail and with Public Transportation Great Points Robin I'm a fan of what they're calling the Multi Modal Compact development can can end up being much more efficient and for the portion of the nine hundred people a day that are moving to Florida careful about how those areas do develop when they get the opportunity so that they're dense enough to provide public transit and provide access to jobs and seventy five is is certainly an issue but we did talk earlier dave about urban sprawl and integrating land use with transportation so we have to be growth in Herbs Ation and Your Business and what do you have a planning background okay and I think and economic opportunities as opposed to urban sprawl where we just compound the problem absolutely that's the opportunity that they exist what do choose the rural lifestyle or find themselves wanting to go to a rural lifestyle later on I'd imagine that if you pull those that almost one hundred percent I is if we can sort of revamp how we are growing and not exist on you know I mean I know that having one ahead a very famous saying that he would say when he talked about public transportation and roads in general which transportation breeds opportunity so I think that these toll roads will bring new economic development it's will be important but I seventy five and the ability of people to get back and forth on I seventy five and I four affects Sarah them would say that they want to age in place that they want to be able to age gracefully in their home and spend their last days or years in their home not in a facility to medical appointments getting to church in those types of social outings becomes difficult and if there is not rural public transportation it leads and one of the things that we see is that one of the first challenges to aging in place is typically transportation they've lived in their home they moved here in in there little bit of what's coming down the Pike I wanNA know what what's next what are the promising developments that you see in public transportation they're built right and I think the impact on the community is that as part of the environment are are crucial so involving the people who are along those routes and the prospect of of some sort of automation coming into vehicles it's improving safety already You know imagine the Tom mentioned it but that loss of independence you know is very important as we age and we have to be able to provide the popular extremely important aging in place not only to the nine hundred people who are coming here but the fact that the baby boomer generation is the largest cohort of the population is retired early retirement years now fifteen twenty years later the macular degeneration sits sets in or arthritis or gout early as you get older Dave Will Robin I think this is one of the most exciting times in transportation in several generations because of technology for five acres is kind of a base of density but having villages in having a little bit more and we have to continue to also provide funding so dedicated funding is going to be key to long-term transportation and you know other issues that don't allow them to drive and they've lived in their home they've lived in these communities they're able to take care of themselves in their homes but getting to the grocery store getting date the the the glut of the population they literally changed this country and I believe this very large voting bloc is going to be in for a surprise when they find that there are not the public transportation door to door services that are there to meet their needs on a consistent basis well let's look ahead things like partnering with other agencies and partnering with Uber And lift those are those are very important concepts that that we have to continue to develop satellite to hear from you ron you know I think that more efficient vehicles more

Florida Sarasota Manatee Metropolitan Dave Tom polk executive director polk county Dave Hutchinson Robin Sarasota Manatee county Robin Sesing tom it Hillsborough County Hernando County Tampa Bay Sarasota Manatee Tom tation Phillips Executive Director
Amazon faces opposition to possible  warehouse near Seattle light rail station

KUOW Newsroom

01:25 min | 2 months ago

Amazon faces opposition to possible warehouse near Seattle light rail station

"Opposition this morning to a new warehouse. Amazon appears to be interested in building on rainier avenue. The site is a short walk from the mount baker. Light rail station k. u. o. w. joshua mcnichols has more typically cities. Try to encourage big apartment. Buildings are offices near light. Rail stations dense walkable. Developments helped mass transit attract writers but plans filed with the city. Show this warehouse would sort of be the opposite of that vans and trucks driving. In and out all day could make the environment more dangerous for pedestrians. Amazon didn't file the plans but the company's name appears on them as well as on other property records. Currently there's a lows on the site city council member. Tammy morales posted a video on twitter assuring her constituents that a big warehouse here is not a done deal. Residents in this neighborhood have been working very hard for years on their neighborhood plan and to make sure that this area this gateway to the rainier valley has affordable housing and that we're really focusing on safety on rainier avenue. Morales said any developer building. There would need to prove their project meets. The city's larger goals amazon's goals to deliver packages. More quickly and the company has said the way to do that is to put more. Warehouses in urban settings. Amazon didn't respond to a request for comment joshua mcnichols. Klw w. news.

joshua mcnichols Amazon mount baker Tammy morales city council rainier valley twitter Morales amazon
Public Transportation: Moving Us Forward

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

29:13 min | 2 years ago

Public Transportation: Moving Us Forward

"Yeah. It's late eighteen sixties and traffic in New York City is already a nightmare decades before the introduction of the automobile Broadway, which runs the length of Manhattan is clogged with horses headers and just about anybody somewhere to be but Neath the street and odd and secret project is underway. An American inventor named Alpher ille- beach has been granted permission from the city of thirties to build a pair of underground postal tubes beneath the bustling thoroughfare. Pneumatic tubes. As called or a fairly recent invention using the power of compressed air to speedily move capsules containing papers. And other small objects around crowded nineteenth century, downtown's beach hasn't told the authorities though real story. What he's planning to build is something much bigger than a male tube. It's a project that was already shot down by the city's biggest political influence or Tammany hall powerbroker William boss tweed with the permit for postal tubes. In hand features and his crew were furiously and in secrecy for fifty eight days excavating under one of the city's busiest arteries and in eighteen seventy he unveils his clan to Stein project. The beach pneumatic transit system the city. I underground transit. Powered by the same vacuum force. That would have driven is fictional male. Tubes it runs underneath Broadway. From Warren two Murray street, a distance of only three hundred twelve feet, but this proof of concept comes a small sensation with over four hundred thousand riders trying out the novel form of transportation in its first year as it doesn't really go anywhere wider, simply pay the twenty five cents to take the system single, lavishly decorated car one way and then promptly back on and go back. The beach. Pneumatic transit line beat the New York City subway which opened in nineteen oh four by almost thirty five years, but I financial downturn in the eighteen seventies meant that beaches dream of a line that we connect the city would never come to pass. And it was eventually demolished in eighteen seventy three a few decades later a more conventional electrified system would be built. And the New York subway would become one of the most celebrated transit systems in the world. But beaches dream of a pneumatic mass transit never really died. In fact, it's only been slumbering a new wave of mass transit may be just around the corner, and while it innovative and potentially world changing. It's got a lot in common with that little three hundred foot line of the past. I'm Walter Isaacson. And you're listening to Trail Blazers and original podcast from delta acknowledges. Between the train and. I'm to go. Many people are going with it. The three par. We must first bio tickets Crawley coaches inside the passengers are finding their seat ELD. Transport workers their job. Lockney responsible for the ride of modern. As our planet gets ever more crowded and urbanize the problem of how to move city dwellers from one place to another has become more and more pressing, but crowded cities and harried commuters aren't new they're not even unique to the automotive era. During the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century and enterprising French doctor named Stanislas Baudry spotted an opportunity. He noted that while horsedrawn carriages were convenient way to get around. There was a small drawback of you having to be wealthy enough to actually own one. And there were plenty of workers with places to go. So in eighteen twenty six he launched a horse drawn bus service for the locals in the city of not it was a huge success. It called it the omnibus within a year. The idea had reached Paris, London and New York City. It is basically a coach that is drawn by two horses. Annastasia Luca Edo sedaris is a professor of urban planning at UCLA. It carries about twelve to twenty people. And it always goes along fixed out. There were a lot of problems usually gets pretty crowded the seating or very primitive benches sometimes very hot days. There is not enough ventilation in the summer in the winter. It gets pretty cold. And also it runs only on certain streets that promise the most riders. The other problem was that it was extremely expensive. So at that time, a general wage of an average worker was about one dollars a day and the cost for a ride was about twelve cents or twelve and a half cents. So you can imagine that only the quite wealthy could have. Ford the fares. Nevertheless, it is the I form of public transit. The industrial revolution introduced mass produced steel and in the eighteen sixties the omnibus carriages were put on fixed rails where they could carry more people in go faster with fewer horses by eighteen seventy New Yorkers had racked up a hundred million trip so year and the horse drawn streetcars success. However, run a rather unpleasant side effect. The city was now home Dr one hundred fifty thousand horses each generating twenty two pounds of manure a day. Salvaging from the pungent air arrived in the form of one of America's great inventors Frank j Sprague an associate of Thomas Edison's Sprague's own inventions would be responsible for a great deal of the electrification of America from streetcar wires to electrically powered elevators his new electric motor was capable of operating at a constant speed for long stretches of time and pulling heavy loads. Finally, an eighteen eighty eight in Richmond Virginia he used it to replace the stench e horsepower that move the trolley cars. So it's the first time that electricity comes into that s q of mass transit them. The only problem that remains sometimes is that these electric trolleys have to make with of the traffic that occurs in downtown because they're still horses, and they're still number of other vehicles and people on the streets show, some CDs. Start elevating these electric, railways, and these are called the else that you see for example, Chicago's still has an L in order to avoid the traffic CD's either go upwards and develop the the else all start thinking of how to go underground. That's exactly what was happening across the Atlantic in Europe to avoid the chaos of the streets. They tunneled under them in the mid eighteen sixties the various underground railways that would eventually make up the London underground were being built. And while they connected, the sprawling imperial city, the tunnels were described as having a hell like quality by riders as a trains were powered by steam engine with very little ventilation. In fact, the air quality and the confined tunnel was so poor that the conductors of the metropolitan railway, we're encouraged to grow beards and the optimistic cope that those whiskers would act as a filter for the more noxious elements in the air. It would be another forty five years before the tube. When electric. There was another option that avoided the stink in toxic smoke of the tunnels. Build a mass transit system in the sky. In the late nineteenth century, the powers that be invoked. Petar a burgeoning industrial town northeast, Germany would dealing with a noun familiar issue, albeit with an unusual twist city others the kind of benevolence capitalist costs as it were. We're trying to come up with some new transportation solutions in the city. That was having a lot of traffic problems Benjamin Schneider is a writer covering urbanism, technology, and culture. And Secondly, they wanted to figure out how to get people to the new zoo that this wealthy merchant Haas had just built and which was proving to be a big success. With traffic jams spoiling towns people's John's deceive the Patel's zoos prize family of bears the city elders reached for Nigeria that had been proposed them back in the eighteen twenties. A horse driven railway line that would be suspended over the region's Rupa river strikingly the cars would actually hang from the rails rather than travel on Papa them at first locals were wearing of this radical new idea people were kinda freaked out by the idea of moving fairly high speeds above ground and seeing the world go by so fast. But for the most part, it was a dotted really quickly, and it has seen really high ridership for its entire history. The Volpato suspension railway or SRI Bonn as called still serves the region. Although it's currently under maintenance and is expected to be up and running later this year. It's a visually distinctive piece of technology made all the more remarkable by the fact that it's nearly one hundred twenty years old the Shwe bonds impact on the history and culture of the region is indisputable. When was built it connected to seize the cities of Elberfeld barmen on they were right next to each other in this little valley bipper river valley because of it by the late nineteen twenty s the city leaders realize that didn't even make sense to have two separate cities. So they merged them into the city that we now call top. Although the SRI Boban thrived hanging trains. Never really caught on around the world. The future clearly belong to the undergrad back in North America Boston, and they team ninety seven would become the first North American city to move its electric, streetcar alot ground other major cities around the country were soon to follow. But the largest impediment to the wholesale adoption of mass transit which just around the corner by the nineteen twenties. Henry Ford's model t put car ownership within the grasp of the average American family. The love affair with the automobile had begun one hundred years later, it's still going strong so much so that getting commuters out of their cars and onto public transit is uphill battle. Despite the fact that city spin oh of dollars on sleek new monorail subways of light rail transit ridership is down and thirty one of the thirty five largest metro areas in the country. But in those few cities that are gaining riders. The common denominator might surprise you. They focused on improving the oldest and Lisa fisa gated mode of transportation the city bus. Buses kinda get a bad rap, and partly it's because too many transit systems across the country have just let their bus systems laggard in waterways, Andrew glass Hastings is a former director of transit in mobility for Seattle. Public transit actually gained five million riders between twenty sixteen and twenty seventeen. He says the key was making life easier for bus riders by creating dedicated bus lanes and improving service. Take for example, what happened on Wesley Gavin? Oh, one of the main arteries leading to the Seattle headquarters of Amazon. West like avenue was your sort of traditional four lanes four travel lanes and parking on either side. So traffic transit through there where we actually run. A streetcar of the congestion was terrible bus reliability was terrible. The streetcar reliability was constantly getting stuck in traffic. So we thought of the idea of what if we create transit lights, and there's a lot of concerns even in the local media. The Seattle times was critical saying that we were continuing the war on cars and trying to push a sort of an anti-car agenda. Really what we're trying to do is make the transit system run better. So we implemented these transit lanes and the cars to a certain extent kind of disappear and in reality, they really disappear they found other routes to take. But traffic was not a disaster. We're not huge backups on west like it worked, and we had significant ridership increase on those bus routes, and and the streetcar. Are because of it. The future of bus travel is gaining momentum with projects from Singapore to California plotting out how electrically powered driverless or autonomous buses might ease. Congestion in our rapidly swelling cities, lock people are going to be moving into cities over the coming decades. We're gonna move from just over half the world's population living in the city to about two thirds by twenty fifty Mike Brown is a technology reporter and inverse dot com. So with this increasing of annoys Asian of the world cities are going to have to look at new technologies to better manage different people moving around. And if you have absolutely everybody doing the same route ATM on Monday morning, it's not gonna be efficient having everybody getting onto the same subway comb, you need to solve encourage people to move in other direction. So maybe that involves having a smartphone app suggest to people. Hey, look, you can take the autonomous bus that would follow the roots. And it will get you to your destination in about the same time. Powered by big data these autonomous system can we at dynamically to traffic condition and commuter patterns automatically we Wooding themselves and suggesting alternate routes to passengers, but the reality. Is that no matter how fast reliable, you make public transit? It can never often the door to door convenience of a car. If you live a mile or so from the nearest bus, stop a train station, you'll probably just get in your car and drive to work. No matter how much mass transit improves. It will never be able to compete with options that can take you from door to door. And that is why transit planners a hoping that commuters will warm up to micro mobility vehicles such as bikes and scooters to travel those micro distances for that to truly happen. It will require very specific and incredibly innovative technological breakthrough. And for a brief moment in time. It looked like we'd found it at the end of the twentieth century and inventor New Hampshire was struck by an idea for an entirely new method of getting a row. Round. And when he introduced it to the world some people speculated, it might become even more important than the internet. My name is dean Cayman to this day frequently identified when I'm asked to go places speak as dean came in the segue guy. And the fact is I've spent my entire adult life and even as a teenager. I started my first company making medical equipment. Dean Cayman didn't set out to build a revolutionary scooter. His original goal was to reinvent the wheel chair after seeing a wheelchair user struggling to negotiate a malls, curb and store aisles. And as I drove home. I just kept thinking we put people in submarines under the ocean, we can fly across the continent. But somebody who's lost the ability to stand up in bounds and walk is held captive in a two hundred year old piece of junk. So came in and his team set to work in nineteen ninety nine he introduced the world to. I'd bought a battery powered wheelchair that you. Censor microprocessors end gyroscopes to climb stairs and curbs. It could also stand up right onto wheels. So that users could see and move at I level, they had solved one mobility problem. And they soon recognize another potentially bigger opportunity. A few of our injured Israel is hey, you know, what if we take the seat off it, if we make this complicated thing that can walk downstairs just a platform. But us everything we learned about human balance and Cervo controls solid-state gyros and exceleron as we could turn the I but into something that everybody could enjoy and we call it a segue after months of speculation the segway human transporter was unveiled with great fanfare in two thousand and one the self-balancing device had two parallel wheels and was steered using body way. Cayman boasted it would be to the car with the car was the horse and buggy. He expected to be selling ten thousand segues a week by the end of two thousand and two that Taff a million a year, but it didn't work out that way by two thousand eight he had sold only thirty thousand units, the segue proved to be too expensive too heavy and too hard to figure out where the park there was nothing cool about being seen on a segue. But despite the disappointing results came and came away from the experience more convinced than ever that cars are not a future of urban transportation. And I think someday it's pretty clear that cars are not going to be the standard method of people at five miles an hour around congested areas. They're just not going to be is it going to be a segue is going to be something else. I don't know. But it's not gonna be cars like the beach. Pneumatic transit line of the shreve Abban. The segway was an alternate evolutionary path for public transportation a little ahead of its time. But the world may be beginning to catch up with dean Caymans idea alternatives. The car ownership of booming just ask Uber or left. And now, I some lower after oven business model is being applied to electric scooters and bikes. Lime based in San Francisco began as a bike sharing company and June twenty seventeen those first bikes were regular pedal buttons. But in twenty eighteen the company added battery-powered bikes and scooters to the mix. And that's when things really took off the company now operates in more than one hundred cities and fifteen countries and users have taken their east scooters and bikes for over thirty million rides. What's so innovative about lime and the other companies in this field is not the scooters, but how users access them traditional by sharing operations work. Like this. You pick it up at a station and return it when you're finished to another station near your destination. But limes model is different. They all right on free floating basis, which means that you can pick them up anywhere and drop them. Off anywhere rather than being restricted to certain docking locations like traditional bike sharing system. Emily warn is a senior director of policy and public affairs for line and not feature is I think what makes it so attractive to consumers because it offers them the level of flexibility to go from where they wanna go to where they wanna go and actually be competitive with other modes of transportation, like driving a personal car or even taking a lift or Uber if they can have that same level of flexibility with scooter or bike, it becomes useful to them for much larger number of of types of trips. They might take. But limes practices have raised a few hackles, especially when it comes to what to do with the scooters when you're done with them when you're finished your trip. You simply leave it on the sidewalk for the next user to eventually pick it up that doesn't go over. So well with pedestrians lime is trying to address the parking problem by encouraging its riders depart responsibly. And by convincing cities to set aside designated scooter parking corrals. The solution to the problem of sustainable. Mass transit on a larger scale may actually come from the world of tech. And specifically from the mind of Texas who has been responsible, at least in the public mind with redefining how we see the automobile in the twenty first century and in doing so he's reached back to an idea as old as the beach pneumatic transit system using vacuum. Power to move people around the idea for hyperloop has actually been around for over a century. Robert guttered actually came up with the idea of people travelling within a vacuum environment in nineteen o nine. And since then, they're definitely been idea Asians on this idea. Why in Kelly is a head of global marketing and communications for virgin hyperloop. One in twenty thirteen Elon Musk printed, a white paper about hyperloop transportation, and we actually came to be in a garage about four years ago in June of twenty fourteen actually when we were originally did since then there's been a lot of progress on the hyperloop front, and we are the only company that's actually created a working hyperloop prototype. So it seems like the time is now for hyperloop to become a reality. A hundred years later. Must the CEO of the electric car company. Tesla brought the idea of vacuum powered travel into the twenty first century with his fifty seven page white paper, he proposed a high speed form of mass transit for distances up to nine hundred miles in the form of sealed tubes containing passenger capsules or pods that could in theory zip around the country at speeds of seven hundred sixty miles per hour. That means you could go to the station in San Francisco. Plop yourself in a comfy seat in your pod. Check your Email and being Los Angeles. Thirty five minutes later the forces behind hyperloop see it as a long overdue disruptor in the field of mass transit. We haven't taken a leap in infrastructure and transportation or mass transportation, and the very long time here in the United States. So the last leave was really in the nineteen fifties. When we created the interstate systems before that it was connecting the country with rail the idea of using nineteen fifties solutions to solve twenty-first century problems doesn't really make much sense. So our system in hyperloop system has actually taken a lot from the digital revolution as well. What do people want? Now, they want something that's vast. They want something that's acceptable. They want something that's personalized they want something that's sustainable on demand cetera and hyperloop really encapsulates that and we're trying to a mass transportation system that works for people. One of the hyperloop key benefits is its relative sustainability compared to gas guzzling automobiles. And passenger jets. We have zero direct emissions. We want to use as much clean energy as possible. You'll see a lot of imagery of our tubes. Actually with solar panels on top of them. And obviously were only as green as the energy that's in the grid itself. But we want to work with cities and governments to make this as clean as possible. We also go to three times as fast as high speed rail, but we use the same amount of energy or a little bit less. We are ten times more energy efficient than an airplane as well. For now hyperloop tubes. And pods exists. Only in various prototypes around the world in Los Angeles. Ilan must boring company recently introduced a one mile working test version that feels in some ways like an echo of Alford. Ille- beaches pneumatic transit system of one hundred fifty years ago time will tell if it's more successful than its predecessor. But it has Agneta interest from governments and private industry around the world in a way beech could have only dreamed of. I'm Walter Isaacson. And you've been listening to Trail Blazers and original podcast from Dell. Technologies to find out more about any of the guests on today's show. You can visit a website at Dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. On the next episode. We'll be looking at the history of fashion from civil war uniforms to the online disrupt or rent the runway until then thanks for listening.

New York City hyperloop Walter Isaacson Trail Blazers Los Angeles Manhattan Alpher ille- beach San Francisco London Tammany hall Stein Warren Seattle Henry Ford Atlantic dean Cayman
Pacific Northwest needs 4 new cities on undeveloped land, report says

KUOW Newsroom

01:06 min | 7 months ago

Pacific Northwest needs 4 new cities on undeveloped land, report says

"Imagine new high rises towering over small pacific northwest communities like burlington and centralia may sound far fetched. But it might be necessary if we're going to accommodate all the people moving here in the decades to come. That's according to a new report by the cascadia innovation corridor k. u. o. Is joshua mcnichols house. More group is led by former washington. State governor christine gregoire and leaders from vancouver b. c. and portland oregon. The study argues that the cascade region needs to grow more dense. But it's not happening quickly enough. As a result it argues that housing will get more expensive. Urban sprawl will increase an emissions will rise instead. It says we need four new cities cities with three hundred to four hundred thousand people and two hundred thousand jobs each built densely around fast mass transit to fit that growth in cities like seattle would require bulldozing. Forty percent of the city's single family homes. The report called that politically impossible. Joshua mcnichols k. o. w news.

joshua mcnichols State governor christine grego centralia pacific northwest burlington cascade vancouver portland oregon washington Forty percent seattle Joshua mcnichols w news
Rush Limbaugh Feb 05, 2021

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

02:06 min | 4 months ago

Rush Limbaugh Feb 05, 2021

"Save as much as eight hundred dollars this year on your cellphone service. That's how much money your family could be saving by switching to pure talk from verizon. At and t. Org t mobile same bar same coverage but at half the price get unlimited. Talk text and six gigs of data for just thirty bucks a month. All you have to do is go to pure usa dot com. Enter the promo code pure talk and save an additional fifty percent off your first month. According to politico the biggest public transit system in america is facing ruin. Will congress step in and save it after the coronavirus hit. New york's metropolitan transit authority got a four billion dollar bailout from washington. They blew through it now. They're facing a ten billion dollar deficit and they're worried. The three billion dollars the mta gets from taxes won't come through because the tax basic gone. Now all options are supposedly on the table. Massive increases in fares slashing the workforce which means war with the union slashing the operating budget slashing service. Even if governor cuomo takes all these actions they're still gonna be billions in the hole. If new york mass transit fails liberals fear and a leading economic crisis in the entire northeast so new york politicians are begging the federal government for thirty two billion dollars to keep the transit authority going. Democrats who run. The house are happy to spend whatever andrew cuomo and chuck schumer ask for but republicans. Not so much. Why should the republicans intervene northeast liberals spent every waking moment for the last four years. Trashing trump now. They come in hat in hand begging for billions to save the city. They are destroying proper response. Is it tells me go pound sand at a at a landfill. Let them fix their problems themselves. They're going to have to save that city somehow especially since their policies caused these problems.

metropolitan transit authority america governor cuomo New york verizon mta congress washington chuck schumer andrew cuomo federal government
Are buses an overlooked climate solution?

Climate Connections

01:30 min | 10 months ago

Are buses an overlooked climate solution?

"Dr Anthony Lizards and this is climate connections. In many cities running the bus can mean enduring a long trip and unexpected delays we have to do a better job because better transit and better buses are essential to solving inequality in our. Fronting the climate crisis. Stephen Higa Day is with a foundation called Transit Center. He says improving bus systems could encourage more people to use mass transit instead of cars and it would give non-drivers access to more jobs and opportunities. But decision makers often lack the political will to pursue upgrades like designated bus lanes and more frequent service bus riders are more often low income people, people of Color, young people, and for all those reasons they're discounted in the planning decisions. He gives she says, riders and Advocacy Groups, Organiz. They can push officials to prioritize buses and unlike hyperloop or self driving cars bus systems are here and now. So making them faster and more reliable could provide almost immediate benefits. We're going to give people more mobility and freedom, and we're going to confront the climate crisis and inequality all at the same time. Climate connections is produced by the Center for Environmental Communication to hear more stories like this visit climate action's Dot Org.

Transit Center Dr Anthony Lizards Stephen Higa Center for Environmental Commu Advocacy Groups Organiz
Lagos Pays N93m Death Insurance Claims

Newscast - Africa

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Lagos Pays N93m Death Insurance Claims

"Carries the news at this hour on Africa Business Radio. Legaue, state government said it's paid insurance benefits with ninety three million naira to relatives of disease civil seven in three months. This was closed in his reports titled To. It's a great illegals. According to the reports, legos presented insurance death benefits of ninety, three million Larry to thirty-five rex beneficiaries of these civil servants between December twenty, nineteen and March twenty twenty, it said the governor approved the reinstatement of the Global Insurance Package for yet twenty twenties launch. Launch Twenty Twenty one insurance, yeah, the state governor also disclosed that it had commenced. The issuance of identity can't to retirees and enlighten them on the need to enroll for the health insurance scheme as well as enjoy free rights, governments, mass transit, buses and ferry, and that was the news at this time when Africa Business Radio. You can't continue to listen life online at www Africa business radio that come or von App thank you for listening.

Twenty Twenty Africa www Africa Larry three months