18 Burst results for "Mason Gross"

Sayer Ji - Unlocking Your Body's Radical Resilience

The Ultimate Health Podcast

05:56 min | 3 months ago

Sayer Ji - Unlocking Your Body's Radical Resilience

"Jesse Chap. AC- with Marnie Wasserman and we are here to take your health to the next level each week. We'll bring you inspiring. In formative conversations about health and wellness, covering topics of nutrition, lifestyle, fitness, mindset, and so much more and this week. We're speaking with CEO G. He's the founder of green. Info the world's largest open access natural health database. He's the author of the recently released regenerate unlocking your body's radical resilience through the new biology, and Sarah Somebody. We've had on a raider for a long time, and wanted to have honest guest, and I'm really. Really happy with this conversation and how it turned out and I know you're going to get a lot from it. Some of the highlights include Sayers. Health struggles and becoming a natural health advocate Mike Ernie's in foods, and how they impact our genes, the Apple Mono Diet, Y raw foods are important to eat at every meal and falling in love with his wife Kelly, and how this was his medicine. Lots of other great information shared in this episode as well. We really appreciate it. If you could help, spread the word shared the show with somebody in your life, and without further ado here we go with Sayer G. Hello Sayer welcome to the PODCAST. Yeah really say to have you on the show. This has been a long time coming. And I really loved your new book regenerate, and in there you share your story, which wasn't familiar beforehand, and and it goes all the way back to childhood, and the sickness that you went through as a kid and a teenager, and you share a whole bunch in there that you went through such as money having your tonsils removed, and you ended up having hip surgery later on, and it goes on and on overweight unfit. You ended up I think it was about at age seventeen. You had surgery on your sinuses, so you went through quite a bit. And my question for you is what was the catalyst behind all that well yeah I think for me. Getting into natural advocacy was allies were destined sesame given. Experience by. Acute episodes the Bronco Asthma you know. They checked me up enough in US multi fight lungs working. So from very early on I just. I struggled allies, and then came later in my life to ernest on nutrition, exercise and mind body practices so ultimately. That was guest that I felt so much because than it needed a passions. WanNa share you know the alternatives. Natural Approaches that I know can in some cases provide so much humor well. Let's talk about that. Turning point and I know this took place in your first year in college so. I become exposed to alternative health ideas. Well, you know my sister was someone who is naturally inclined to health food stores for example, I was way more conventional member over time I started to. Like the of that way than starts looking to literature that you'd find in these helped stores and taking on raw shrewd in the mucus diets, as it was known by Arnold era and a member thinking well. I've never not eaten. Save Council products. What would happen if I ate raw? And within three days of just going ahead and eliminating house, my asthma went away and never came back. It wasn't so raw. Fruit is, but the BUFFY Diet says exclude common engaged delicious. Western foods such as cow smoke novas like my. Moment, and when you hit that piff any moment, obviously, you've been going through a lot for so long. What was your initial reaction? Were you angry that you've been through so much? And you're just finding this information now or obviously? You're excited about digging in deeper in seeing what could come a vet, but talk about those initial reactions when you start to feel better over the course of a few days. That's such a great question because I think it's true that while I was elated excited, because for the first time in my life I didn't have to carry an inhaler around and think that you know. My body was fundamentally cursed. You know cloak in I was shocked to fine that you know something as simple as excluding cosmic for my genetics type would have prevented me from the Medical Mary around downward cycle. You know that I went to some level. There was a part of me that became. Hannah triggered to like oh my. What is my parents? Know this you know. You. Pour me. A. Journey retakes. One of these starts reclaim. Our health is you do? Realize there is a bit of. archetype underneath some of the symptoms. You know would've been more convenient for me to say. The doctors are right. This pathway humid of causes it, but you manage symptoms by ways. You should thank us for saving your last person. Sandwiches that the way we eat in this country. Is Disease Camale, N detectives and I'm barely one of the things that happened for me to sort of took the red pill that speak event. Lady but I was also like Gosh. We need to change things people now. There are these ways to heal known. About and this big shift in your life in your health happen when you're early in college as I mentioned. What were you taking at the time? The time you know, it was sort of just exploring the why started out actually went to university as an art student, and Mason Gross and I found it a little bit more fizeau. I ended up. Just go to college proper and. Just. Five years trying out pretty much anything that interested me. It ended up getting a degree in philosophy, so it's like a deep expiration time both in an hour.

Sarah Somebody Marnie Wasserman Jesse Chap Sayer G. G. He Mason Gross CEO United States Apple Sayers Mike Ernie Founder Arnold Era Ernest Medical Mary Kelly Hannah
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

05:40 min | 5 months ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"We are a community of nearly twelve hundred Undergrad and graduate dancers, musicians, theatre, artists, filmmakers, and visual artists from around the globe. My name is Laurie coronary and I'll be sitting down with some of these artists, discussing what fuels their curiosity, their passion, and their impulse to make. It took Hurston Hauswald a wild to admit it. She wanted no had to be a filmmaker. She felt pressure to pursue more practical path. An Inter way toward film. From a major in communications, who major in cinema studies and eventually to making her own films. This transformation hasn't occurred in isolation. Asphalt who is in her fourth year in the BFA filmmaking program here at Mason, gross. has found inspiration and solace in the work of faculty member, Dunya less events, and in the works of filmmaker Elisa Hitmen. As, she tells it. Hitmen validates pass Wilde's own experience as a girl in the suburbs. Seeing herself were Berge of herself has meant everything. has won't seems less intent on capturing the subject or a moment in time then she is offering to viewers a thoughtful, relatively observation, one that trusts her subject entrust the narrative to unfold as it should. This approach perhaps mirrors her own life. That pivotal scene played out over several years. The one in which pass. Password essentially stood up. Raised her hand. And finally admitted the truth. that. She is a filmmaker. The thank you so much for joining US remotely. From. Yeah we're grateful to have you in. This is a really For lack of a better word, it's a really uncertain time for everybody. But I think especially for students. I I just wanted to ask you how you're feeling. How your family's doing. First and foremost before we get started. Yes so I'm actually you know given the current circumstances I feel like I'm doing pretty well I think the when it first all went down in the beginning, it was really. Scary and heartbreaking I think. Once I found out that graduation was canceled. That was really rough in and had to take some time to think about that because I think. I talked about it. Overclass with one of my professors in the rest of the students about how we were feeling in for me. It's like a loss of community earlier than expected. I, think we. We look forward to a lot of the memories that I mean I myself a graduating senior this year so. There's a lot of memories and events that you look forward to in those last month. So I think that was really the most devastating thing to get over, but I've kind of been pretty optimistic about it moving forward as Mason Gross, his shared the ideas of doing graduation later on, and even like the chair of the department has reached out about reserving space. NB packs at the end of September to do our senior showcase and the fact that people are..

Elisa Hitmen Mason Gross Berge Laurie coronary US Hurston Wilde faculty member gross.
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

04:28 min | 6 months ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"I walk on the side. Some people will still try to take you know the entire space so sharing and taking space in finding that balance always really interesting. That is that is really resonant. I know so many times on walking and I will move out of the way for anyone and I will apologize when I should not be apologizing. I don't Yeah Yeah. You're learning that a lot sooner than I S. I saved the apologies for when they're really necessary. Yeah so that they mean something for sure. I want to ask both of you. How you've changed as artists as people because of create however you different in these performance and rehearsal spaces. Now that you've taken this in hand I think create has made me more proud to be who I am I guess feeling or being a black artist. It's a lot of emotion involved in it Because sometimes you go to rehearsals or you going certain spaces where you feel discouraged But every time I've thought about create or seen something that reminded me of Creator just WanNa create meeting. I was felt proud and I wanted to step out in find more work out there. That related to who I am culturally I also find myself looking for more composers and trying to seek out art to watch That release to WHO I am as a person and not only as a black person but as a woman Yeah Yeah I feel like. It's really my focus in terms of finding the spaces that I want to be in and from there like even just winter programs that I did it was like I know these are the spaces. I WANNA be a part of Going to conference in Philly. I knew that was a space. I wanted to be a part of because of because of that. Motivation and inspiration around Matt and so it's helped me like career-wise also just to continue that. Continue to look for artists of color that are creating really honest work and that leads me to my last question which would be okay so here you are. You're in your lap. You're both in your last semester here at Mason Gross. How do you take this out into the world? What are your plans? What are your hopes for? Ut create out into the world beyond red curse with create I haven't tensions of making an actual organization after I leave Rutgers Because of so many people come up to me that don't currently go to Rucker's Or that are currently in records on our graduating as well and are saying like this program is really necessary or just this organization in general is very motivating. Can you please continue? Keep doing programming So I would love to do something like that increases For these people and continue educating people on how to be successful and be black and Latino in the artistic community And personally I feel like I do that with my own. Work as well Because what I love to do personally And I'm in the Kerr. I'm in the process of finishing an EP that I've been working on cross my years at Rutgers And I love to combine the classical world with different genres that usually can contrast with that. So like rb and hip hop My favorite things to combined with classical So I take both of my world and combine them but still stay true to who I am as an artist and the things that I love and the roots and the music that I grew up listening to. Yeah that's amazing. I hope to continue to be a part of it outside of this. And maybe forming these collaborations. I also think I just have a new circle of friends that I can hold onto. That will still go here but also that are graduating. And I'll have that with me as a move into the world. Thank you both so much. I think you know. We all know that the artist's life is not easy so having this kind of support I hope it nourishes both of you on your journey. Thank you very much.

Rutgers Matt Mason Gross Philly Kerr Rucker
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

11:52 min | 6 months ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"Technology and more adequately acknowledged black and Latin X artistic influences. Really just as importantly create seems to engender a sense of community for artists who often find themselves the sole person of color in the practice room onstage. In the classroom as coulter has said when you're the only minority performing on stage to an entirely wait crowd. It makes sense that you may begin to doubt whether you belong there. And this is one of the topics we hold discussions on with create members. Their robust instagram records create regularly serves up bite-sized history lessons highlighting prominent artists of color and in March create hosted an art career workshop. That delved into the need to be both creative and entrepreneurial and the organization recently encouraged members to support an event that included a discussion of representation in film in short create serves as a resource water in the well. Both state and coulter are in their final year at Mason gross but they hope to bring Crete along with them as a source of nourishment. A kind of bread for the journey. Arianna Sano welcome. Thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us. Thank you thank you for having us so I would love to talk to you about the collaboration that you formed via create my first question though has to do with how a dancer and a flute performance major met up and decided to do this. I mean you're also busy at Mason. Gross I know often this cross pollination doesn't happen as much as we would hope it would Hi this is on an talking Me and Arianna actually met outside of Mason Girls And we met at the freshman dorms of Douglass Residential College And we were just a few rooms apart on the same floor Believe we met in the dining hall just sitting there talking and trying to meet people as freshmen. I mean we found it so interesting. I didn't know that many artists Or people at Mason gross that were in that Douglass residential college dorm So we were able to have conversations about artist and just connecting on that level. I the matter we became friends. So talk to me about the need you saw for something. Lake create on this campus Personally I think I saw the need It started off when I hadn't ethnomusicology class And it was the first class where we talked about cultures our outside of Tilden and art and we were going into different cultures. What their artistic processes are their musical instruments and it just blew my mind the lake. There's so many instruments musical cultures and different types of arts out there that we don't necessarily talk about music history classes so I wanted to create a space where we could have those discussions not only from older times but also art that's currently being made And then I put more emphasis on myself as a black musician. knowing that it's a small percentage of us at least here at rutgers but also in the greater artistic world When you look on stage is you know. You rarely see minorities on stage Or rarely see composers and their works being created so I wanted to create not only the space where we could talk about all these different cultures but also the artists that are here at rutgers come together and collaborate with one another and meet one another Since there's so many different arts disciplines but we don't really see other because we all have really busy schedules and we're practicing so it was nice to meet different people and I'm here and I'm a senior and starting this organization. I'm meeting so many people have never seen before And we've been here this whole time. So what about for you? Arianna what need did you see? And what does this mean to you to do something like this? I thought this was really important. Work and I was so excited to be part of it. we talked about earlier that there's a lack of collaboration and communication even venturing the departments. And it's really outside of those spaces that you come together and it is sort of limited in the minority pool so when you come together in space of artists of color and you're like oh we are here we exist in. We're in every department and out of that like collaborations have happened with like dancing and acting or like poetry and things like that. So it's exciting to see what's come out of that. I definitely want to talk more specifically about those collaborations but I. I'm also interested in knowing what it's like to be in a space with people of color where you are not the most underrepresented person in the room. What what is the comfort of that? The excitement of that. I think it's really it's really I opening. And as an artist it's really inspiring because you're surrounded by people who understand you not only on an artistic level but a cultural level and understand what art means in our community but also has a sense of activism Because a lot of issues are worked to express who we are but also who we are as black people as Latino people So I think it's it's more inspirational when we're altogether and that type of space. Yeah I don't I don't even know if there's a word for me that can express that feeling of warmth in community and I've I've really been invested in creating and finding those spaces. What are some things that you can talk about that? You don't feel comfortable talking about with your your other students who are not people of Color. Can you talk a little bit about what you're able to address I think Not only at rutgers but in my classical training ever since I was like in high school or Middle School They talk about careers. And how you make a career as an artist and it was also really general In not so much base to who I am as a person as a black woman So I think in this type of space. It's different because you can talk about how to build that career but as the person that you are being more realistic about the experience and not just saying okay do you. Can you know go perform here? It's a different type of environment as a black woman. And as a Latino next person When you're going and building your art and building your career and how you can put it out there so Saana. I just want to clarify what you're talking about. Do you mean you're talking about how to go into say the classical music space where you're auditioning and how how you might meet that space which is filled with white people. Yes yoke and there's so many percentages and studies done And you really have to dig to find them which I also find really interesting But as a musician I know in the orchestra's it's about one per one point. Five percent Of Musicians are of color that are on these stages and taking up these spaces so being more realistic about what it's like jumping into those spaces is a good thing to talk about appear. Yeah and I was just speaking to a professor of color also About having to build your own space in these spaces and so it's just a lot of extra work for yourself. Combine that support and it's nice to come in to a create meaning into already. Have that as a freshman or something like that. Something that I did not have. Were you already have people that are doing it doing what you WanNa do and are about to go into the field saying like you have space here and and you have support everywhere Arianna? I was thinking you were saying you were talking about this with professor of color. Talk about what it means when you do have someone who is older and in the profession a person of color. Because I know what you're speaking to is that often you don't have that to hold onto. But what does it mean you do? What's the difference? Yeah I think it's super important and I didn't even realize that was what was missing from my college career and I am happy to say I did have a mentor last semester. And we still keep in touch because she no longer Is here currently But having like those anchors in the in your program like now and outside of the program also it just it just reminds you that you can do it and and there is a place for you and people like you right. Because you're saying right there you're seeing the reality unfolding a person who is already doing it. So talk about create about some of the activities that you've sponsored. Are you doing anymore? I'm I'm really happy to talk about that too This semester Give us a sense of how this's fleshed out and and presented itself on campus. Our first few meetings were more kind of general base just to get to know one another And See with different type of arts. There were And there were a lot of people that were in mason girls but also many who weren't And a lot of people that were reaching out via instagram or social media and email blast Just saying Oh. Maybe I wasn't able to attend this meeting but I would love if you could send that information through an email So those first few meetings And then it transitioned into thinking of the bigger picture And how to help these people like we were saying building a career and how to go into the job field then. We started thinking about the artist's career workshop And turned it into a newsletter. Actually so we have about a artists who are professionals in their field And it's something that is either performing art or administrative as well Because we understand that there is so much importance in arts administration and doing the behind the scenes works. We want to educate people that that is also a career option. You can take on So we're going to have weekly newsletters coming out and we're currently building the schedule of who will be featured each week And we'll have. These artists interviewed. Ask THEM DIFFERENT QUESTIONS. Depending on what they do and also Have them able to answer questions? The req- A on our instagram. So we'll have actual artists are students here able to ask the questions and they'll be able to answer as well And the last thing that we're planning on doing for the semester and for the year Is a video documentary Which is sort of like version of a showcase because we understand how much on the artists here busy and everyone has so many different schedules and usually April and may are very busy for the artist. Mason girls between recitals and final concerts and everything. So we figured like let's leave the artist's creation and the timing and everything up to these people and we're going to be doing a call out to artists and we're going to take videos of whatever their art is and have them answer the question. What do you love about being a black artist? Or what do you love about being Latina artists? And then

Arianna Sano Tilden and art rutgers instagram coulter Douglass Residential College professor Mason mason Middle School
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

15:35 min | 7 months ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"You know working on a lot of Shakespeare. I think makes you realize that Shakespeare headed all figured out and it's all in the tax and you don't need anything and everything you add to. It is just more and and I've had really great opportunities to work on Big Shakespeare with lots of scenery and creating these whole worlds and that's been really wonderful but at the same time I've worked on some pieces of Shakespeare where you just need a ladder and a chair you know. And it's and you you can do the whole show and it's just like approaching things from both ends sometimes is really helpful Because sometimes you don't have the resources to to sort of make huge statements but you still have a responsibility to tell the story right. I was thinking about that. You know you've worked. I'm sure on some high end productions. Where you've you've had the resources to make the exact world do you want? You know you had those high production values but plenty of times. I'm sure you've worked with very small budgets. What is challenging and actually fun about that? I'm sure it can be frustrating. But looking at the flip side of not having the money to yeah I mean I like to approach every show the same way and not think about the budget. Because I think you can it affects how you approach your imagination and and Breath that you bring to the project but very soon you know you're dealing with real parameters and sometimes that's the space if you're in a very small space that means something if you're in a big space that means something and I think the challenge comes in when you're dealing with a very big space and you have very little money because you need to create some sense of the world or focus are you know Frame for the show framework for the show In order just to see the people but I think the good thing about working with more limited resources it really a lot about design is making choices and you. I think when you're working with a limited budget you have to make sure that the choices you're making are essential to the world that you're trying to create and the story. You're trying to tell and I think sometimes if you have too much money you're not necessarily making those same choices and you can get kind of further away from those those sort of goals. It's kind of like you get flabby right. And so yeah I would imagine. A budget focuses the mind. But I love that. You said that you start not thinking about the budget as you start thinking big and you don't WanNa limit imagination because the best the most exciting part of the process to me is coming up with the ideas and I think if you come up with a strong enough idea or approach it can be scaled to some degree and it can. You can stay true to that idea and maybe you know. Cut the fat out of it. You know to to still stay true to the story. You're trying to tell and all of that but maybe simplifying it in a way without without throwing out the idea you know being being a teacher now being in the place of being the mentor. What are you finding most challenging and most rewarding to communicate to students as you go through this process while I'm learning a lot because I just started teaching last fall and as I get to know the students more I feel like I can really focus on their individual strengths and weaknesses. And in a lot of what we've been talking about is world building and process but also. I've been so inspired by the the ideas that they're bringing in trying to help them realize how to translate them or transform them into a design and that's like I said the most exciting part of the process for me and so being able to do that and and sort of introduce them to the world of design in a way that I feel like they may not have been experiencing up until now the other design work. That's happening out there that I'm inspired by other designers that are working like when I started I only knew gene. You know and so my my view of what theater designed was was very limited. And so I'm trying to offer the students here. Some of the things that I didn't have when I was in their shoes. Where do you have them? Look for inspiration because I can imagine just having spoken to you for a few minutes that you find inspiration in so much. Yeah and I think that is an individual. That's an individual kind of response. And I think trying to see where their natural inclination lies and then offering say. Oh well. Have you seen this artist's work or this reminds me of a gallery show that I saw or an or an installation that I saw a couple ago and and really pointing them in specific directions that can help open up their their mind or Sort of visual vocabulary a little bit to two things that have been done that are adjacent to their ideas about the play and to see what what excites them. You start to see the importance of education outside of the theater. Totally theatre about theater is so boring and I think it it really is about what you bring to it and without as much life experience. It's sometimes really hard. And so I think you know. Finding material to work on that feels relevant and inspiring to them is something. I'm working on. But also but also opening up their their frame of reference little bed and I know that there's a lot of conflicting opinions about Internet research and Google Image Search which tends to be very limited. And so I've been trying to bring in a lot of books because you don't know what you'll stumble across an there may be something that jumps out at you that is unexpected or wouldn't come up in the algorithm when you're searching so narrowly at actually relates to one of my questions is how technology has changed what you do and how you approach you. Do I think it's different depending on where you're at in your experience or career I definitely use technology every day. And you know the way we communicate now is so different than how it was. Ten years ago you know being able to send Drawings around the world in two seconds just makes the workflow happen so much faster at the same time. I feel like there's an expectation that the workflow happen so much faster which I think has cut down a little bit on the exploration and discovery process that I remember being more sort of Having more space for having more time for everyone's trying to economize And that Means they want you to make choices very quickly and even have time for something to simmer right right and so I think the earlier you can start on a project to better so that there is that simmering time to lead ideas bake in and throw things out there you know I have been really talking to the students that what we do is about trial and error and you can't expect to read a play. Sit Down Design it and be done like you have to. You have to make marks and you have to make choices and see if they work and eliminate the ones that don't work or build upon the ones that do work in that trial and error is sort of an unknown. It takes an unknown amount of time. So things are never in my opinion finished. You get to a point of Finnish nurse and you know you on So getting getting those that muscle working in that process sort of under control. I think is what What I'm trying to to sort of focus on right now as I'm listening to you. I have a lot of different words coming into my head. I'm I'm worried about how pejorative they are. But I'm just going to start talking about the benefit of failure of error because I don't think you think of these is pejoratives. You know I can imagine it's really difficult to communicate that to a student to take the work seriously but not too seriously. I think you have to be at two things at once. Sometimes you have to be committed to your ideas but also and this is a hard thing even for experienced people to do is to look at your work objectively after you've done and say okay. Maybe we'd be better if we just got rid of this you know and and be flexible about it because it's not just about you and your work it's you'll show your work to a director and they may be like Oh. I can't direct the show in that space and you have to be okay with that and be like oh well. What if we did this? What if we did that and really be reflexive and responsive and that's sometimes hard because you spend a lot of time and energy cultivating these ideas and you get very attached to them? So that's what I mean about but I think that's if you can bake that into the process somehow to sort of say okay. There's always more than one way to achieve this idea and these are the choices. I'm make this time and see if they work. You can kind of bill that flexibility into the process. Yeah what is it? They say create with heat but then go back with a Colle di Ya or they say. Hold on tightly let go lightly which is sort of the same thing. It's like you really. You have to be committed and passionate about your ideas but you also have to be willing to let them go if they're not right or if they don't work for whatever reason and that may be the director doesn't like that color and you know that's okay it can be another caller and it's not going to like destroy the show you know rate it goes back to service. Ryan One's going to right and I think I that mistake very early on in my career several times where I felt like the thing that was paramount was the design and I wasn't going to compromise certain aspects of it because for what because I felt like they were necessary but with a little more experience I realized. Oh that was silly. You know it's not about me. It's not about that piece of rock hanging in the sky. It's it's you know it's the show is going to go on without it and it's GonNa be okay. I think that's an important perspective. You know you alluded earlier in our conversation to the community of the theater. And even I know as an outsider's an audience member I've seen that I've seen people really feel that community. Is that part of what drew you to Cedar. What did you did you love about that intensity well? I grew up going to see theater in Chicago when I was in high school and I think I was sort of deeply inspired and informed by that experience like I remember going to the Steppenwolf theater in high school and none of the kids in my high school. Whatever we lived in the suburbs so going downtown to see theater was not common for most of my friends but But I was lucky that my parents took me and And I saw pretty crazy stuff for a for a high school student. I think and and I was just blown away by it. Just the daring this and and the Saxena Soviet and and the the kind of Rebellious Nessa of it and the fearlessness of it and I think it was a lot of that Where I wasn't seeing you know elsewhere and it was a very different time like we didn't have access to so much media And so there was. It felt very special. What about that rebelliousness? In what you were seeing on stage. Why do you think you were drawn to that? Were you rebellious? No anything but yeah. I was trying to conform as much as possible so for me. It sort of was like this. Really you know..

Shakespeare director Big Shakespeare Saxena Soviet Google Steppenwolf theater Cedar Ryan One Chicago
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

13:26 min | 7 months ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"Today we'll speak to Oliveira's Marino and Schroth. What compelled them to move beyond talking about social justice issues to facilitating a conversation about the real work of social justice. That's being done. Each day in our area often quietly deliberately and without fanfare because windows of understanding sirs as a compelling testament. Not just the power of art to communicate but through the inherent worth and the art fullness of collaboration of drilling deep and considering issues in community. Welcome Krishna and Cassandra thank you for taking the time to talk about windows of understanding because under I'm going to start with you My understanding is that the impetus for windows of understanding was the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville in two thousand seventeen. Could you talk a little bit? About why the response was baked art. Sure so in the in the midst of that rally my husband and I stood watching on line these marches and these mantras tiki torches and it was that rally but it was the overwhelming negativity in media landscape. That was coming over us like a wave and while while I point to that specific incident as the inspiration it. It was almost like a breaking point in terms of feeling completely helpless and I felt very frustrated because what I was seeing with those white nationalists marching was so incongruent with what I have been seeing in our midst and when I say that I mean here in New Brunswick and here in highland park that there was significant work being done in the realm of social justice humanitarian efforts around so many issues including issues of immigration and race and not to deny that those things are happening in our midst. But I had I mentioned to my husband. I wish there was a way that we could create a window so that folks could see inside the work that has been doing. That's being done in real time around us that's invisible. It's not sexy. It's not dominating our headlines that that this homeless Person is being assisted that this immigrant is being You know assisted in obtaining paper's going through the detention system. These are not sexy headline so we don't see them necessarily and later that night it occurred to me. I I work here in Mason Gross School of the arts in the art department in art and design and I also serve on the New Brunswick Community Arts Council and it dawned on me quite literally that night that you could create an actual window through art using the visual vocabulary. That is so vivid and distinct that I see in a now every day but almost take it for granted because it's so omnipresent and that we could use that visual vocabulary to tell the stories of the social justice organizations that are in our midst and so that was the colonel of the idea. I took it than very next morning and I pitched it to New Brunswick Arts Council And they immediately were in support and two of my colleagues in particular Jennifer Sevilla and Tracy Regio Clark really stepped forward and we became co founders of this process this project and we co conceptualized what it might look like how it might roll out. What in addition to the actual visual art might comprise these partnerships and relationships? I I'm thinking about the vocabulary you've employed around this and you've described these window displays as interventions why interventions. There is a really deliberate intention to stop people in their tracks on the streets particularly in the most gray and cold time of year we launch this project every year this is the third year thirty duration on Mlk Day and we go through February which just black history month and so we really want to create a visual statement a pop and when we talk about the power of art to to do this it can be very disarming because that can really the art has the ability to challenge what we think we already know and in our wildest dreams. That's exactly what we hope happens in these partnerships that the artists can visualize something that brings the humanity out and not just a cold mission statement. That might not read. You know that you would be here as something. Maybe perhaps stock right so that artists can cut through and and really challenge the viewer to become aware or even more deeply become involved. Well I am definitely one of those people who's been stopped tracks in fact when I was running to get coffee today yet. Another grey day. I passed by your piece and I have been passing by it. And I'm wondering Krishna What is of interest to you about someone seeing your work again and again because that's different you have to make sort of a purposeful decision right to go into the gallery with the white walls and make a beeline for that. But when you're on the street you're seeing it again and again. What appeals to you about that relationship I think just like the repetitiveness of seeing a work again just really is able to strike a chord with you whenever you see you know something every day instead of having to go to a gallery I think just public art in general is something that you know appeals to the masses and isn't just like honed in on specific people that are interested in like the high art scene so I think having a piece in public that's open for everyone is something that relates to everyone and not just a specific demographic of artists. I was thinking about that that every time. You pass something you're different. You're in a different mood or you have a different thought in your head. And what does that mean for the intervention for the interaction? But Krishna told me why you wanted to be a part of this. I imagine you are super busy. I know that Mason. Gross students have an intense schedule. So talk about why. Why despite all of that the reality of being a busy student you felt it was important. I just you know helping organizations in general is more important than anything else that I really have going on in my life I was really attracted to being able to help an organization especially the food pantry. 'cause I know it's something that hits close to home especially with other art students so I was really thankful to be paired with the food pantry and it was really exciting. Being able to see the process of you know providing food for students and that was just something really wanted to explore and help out with talk talk about the relationship that was form so you were paired up. You didn't choose the Pantry but you were paired up the pantry. Did you visit the Pantry? Talk a little bit about the process. You went through before you even touched the paper so Tracy one of the CO founders of windows. She invited me to go check out the Pantry and I was met with a student. At first she acted like a receptionist almost and she greeted me at the door and she brought me to like a living room setting and it was really homey. There was a fireplace and just like beverages that they were offering me. And so I waited there for Kerry One of the leaders of the organization and she mentioned how students are welcome to come in with their student ideas. And you know. Fill out some paperwork and they're able to fill up bag from things from pantry and so she brought me back to the pantry and it was filled it was filled and it was a really great experience being able to see all the things that they provide for students. Who Need those things? What surprised you about the Pantry I think just the networking and having them have food. Come in from other Rutgers organizations like the rutgers farms I think jurists just the networking and like the collaboration that they you know they really work together as a team you know I. I don't even think my college had a food pantry when I was there. What does that mean for you? That rutgers has this available. I think it's again a great resource and I'm really thankful that the school provides that resource I'm also really thankful that because we have this resource we're able to not only support. Our practice as artists were also able to eat and like food itself is something that really nourishes and without that nourishment. We wouldn't have been able to do what we do as students yeah to be able to create and to be able to sustain your attention even right. I want you to describe your piece. We have it up on the website as well if you could talk a little bit about the piece itself. And I'm very interested to know how involved The people at the Pantry Guide in terms of directing you or or not. You know talking a little bit about what they expected with the messaging was. They were really helpful They really gave me during shit direction. they really wanted me to try to depict the hardships and the tensions that students face and whereas I wanted to like be more positive with it but I understood like how important it was to. Have you know the hardships depicted? Because I wanted students to be able to relate to it more As opposed to the positivity that I initially wanted to have that was something. That wasn't necessarily realistic. That I soon learned so Again I really wanted to try to find that balance between positively negatively within it and I wanted students who able to relate to it in terms of the hardships that we face in like choosing food or money for art supplies so describe a little bit how you did that how you depicted the hardship. The pantry investing and one of the pieces. Unlike the bottom coroner's I had Two figures trying to choose between a canvas or food but then I had you know another figure from Lake representative as the Pantry. Help that student in that crisis I noticed too. You use text in talk a little bit about the text and why you chose to use text and imagery in this piece I think texts itself just like address as it had on and directly and you know is able to jar and like grab the attention of the viewer as they pass it so I think using texts incorporated like into that Pius was able to easily grab the attention of someone walking past it. I'm wondering what it was like working directly with an organization knowing that it wasn't you perhaps being inspired by something and going about it kind of with your own creativity but but having to work with the client. Did you feel straitjacketed by that or or not? I'm interested in that relationship. Initially I did but then like as time passed and as I worked with it more it just it made me feel better that I was working with someone and knowing that they were going to be happy with the piece that I was making for them. I think that was the most important thing than having my hand in it as an artist could imagine. That's huge because Sandra question for you why was it? Crucial to involve rutgers students and alumni. Because quite a few are involved as it happens. And why was it important to.

Krishna rutgers Pantry Guide Schroth New Brunswick Oliveira Mason Gross School New Brunswick Arts Council New Brunswick Community Arts C Charlottesville Tracy Regio Clark Mason Pius Marino Sandra Kerry One
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

11:05 min | 10 months ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"You know. Run the full gambit of my warm up routine but in the order that it In the order that it arises and whatever I was working on last time in the preteen so I guess kind of prioritizing the least crisp material in that section. That's really interesting. The idea of having a log having something visual right that you can you can take a look at and really get a sense of where you're going with your own practice. Have something there that is to. Kind of hold you accountable. I guess right definitely. Yeah it it lets you keep track of aspects of it. The you'd never otherwise notice like You can write down exactly how you practice the material you can write down note for no like what the pattern was the. You're transposing examples. You can really like recreate the exact learning environment you know. Set the set. The metronome say two three clicks higher the next times really try to stay on top of it talk about competition. I know it's like the dirty word but if it is I'm it's gotta be an element for anybody who's driven and you can talk about any element of that. There's the good the bad and the ugly of that. How how does that hit you? What was your I mean I don't know I know there's definitely it's present. Even if it's latent right yeah I try as much as possible to keep it that way because I think he kind of earliest the way that I respond to it. isn't really the most productive for I'm trying to do it's I mean I love enjoying what other musicians are playing and learning from them and exchanging ideas and practicing together and challenging each other and whatnot. I think the best the most productive practice bases are those wearing musicians are not judging. Southern's everybody's COMP at competitions definitely I guess maybe even more playful nature. Yeah it's like the okay. Here's an analogy So in high school I was on the wrestling team and they talk about how like when you're sparring. You WanNa go at like seventy ninety percent. You know so that. You're you're working yourselves out but you're not trying to like really go at your opponent. 'cause you're on the same team not trying to like at all costs whatever that is an interesting analogy and and I'm wondering if there are times when when competition can be can be good can be con- there can be even a kindness in it if that makes sense like you said a playfulness where you can inspire one another to And and make each other better. What will you know? You've you've spoken to me on several occasions about how. Your professors have inspired. You and I'd love to talk about that here. Can you talk about different times when you've had a professor who's made you think differently about competition or about a certain piece of music and you've talked about Burton and how he's he transformed a particular piece for you? Tell me a little bit about your professors in their their role for you. Well I guess Professor Herwig Probably has one of the when my experience anyway? The broadest catalogs of stories of peer motivation. Like wow like way to do it. You know I mean I mean he. He's told us stories of how his roommate in the most loving way possible. He would wake them up in the morning. Like all right you know. Let's at the shed like now professor. Who was like? Oh yeah okay. Let's go this cat. Comes back dumps a bucket of ice water on on. Let's go shed like right now. It's like okay you know. And obviously we all see where he's today so That's definitely inspiring. Yeah I mean I guess the the more the story so to speak is that. There's never really not going to be other things to do other time. You know life things to take care of so The extent to which we can motivate each other and work together so that we're not entirely estranged in that kind of like practicing doesn't have to be just a completely walled off experience. What does it mean for you to hear those stories from Professor Herwig or any of your other professors knowing how successful they are well on the one hand? The that's really what it takes On the other hand that that it reaffirms I suppose the the notion that it is something to be desired like that it's worth that level of paying attention to and chasing after. Tell me what it means to you to be able to gig while. You're still an UNDERGRAD student. I'm very grateful for the opportunity. It's great yeah. It's nice to have the experience I guess kind of have a taste of what it'll be like. Afterwards and the different avenues that would be available to focus on the more time. You're playing around New Brunswick definitely a little bit of New Brunswick New Jersey City a little bit of new home Pretty much wherever wherever possible. What are you learning through these gigs? Everything that was my question that you're not necessarily learning in the classroom. What are you gathering at this moment? You know I think the and this is truly a credit. I guess to the of the classroom experiences pretty accurate. It's just so interesting to see in person the the different aspects that make the scene what it is and how I mean maybe certain stories that seem out of context. You know in a classroom setting. It's like wow. That's that's such a straight like how did that happen? What types of you know. Social Assumptions and circumstances could have caused that story to transport by. We'll give me an example. I guess just when I pose with situations where it's like okay. You're going to have to read transpose. She music or play parts. That weren't necessarily -essarily intended for your instrument or for you know whatever subpar circumstances where it's like okay you know this is not good but then where. I guess the mentality like. When you're on the bandstand you're faced with that situation. What could you possibly do? You See. You have to do your best and helpfully over with. That's that's why I guess. Really stresses the importance of all that preparation. Because wow you really never know what's going to be thrown your way. It's like Kinda crazy in the moment in front of all those people who may have paid to get in her waiting for you to resurrect their Friday night. No pressure there. I guess you learn flexibility in humility there Have to say so. Yeah I can imagine I can imagine you know von what would you say to a prospective student who is perhaps apprehensive about applying music school? Would you have any advice for them about music? School about rutgers. Oh yes so definitely I guess music school in Rutgers because rutgers is huge right so there's a bunch of wonderful opportunities that are available in all these different avenues but at the same time I mean music schools such a time intensive thing so sometimes it feels the the might not necessarily be able to to access all of those things but ultimately I would say the fact that it's like a closed community but really do have access to to the the full spectrum of a huge university with such a broad array of not just disciplines but I guess I guess Semiotics domains like head spaces. It's it's really like if you don't only talk to people within your major it's guaranteed to be an interdisciplinary experience. Is I guess what I'm trying to get at. Yeah and that it can be really stimulating in that way. You don't have to be in your little cell right definitely. Yeah for sure. You're not hidden away the way you could be certain conservatories for sure for you. Why why Mason Gross? Why did you ultimately decide that? This is where you wanted to land would have to say it's the faculty really all the faculty and the alumni. I mean both the as far as the faculty goes I think it's it's pretty rare that you get such a thorough lineup of such experienced musicians who have played with so many so many great musicians who are themselves such phenomenal performers composers educators. I guess it was a combination a little. Bit of just the fact that The professors have and are playing with and are people who listen to And have admired for years and also I feel like out of the conservatories. I mean locally but really in general I appreciate the emphasis that they place on Jazz. Talk to me about the importance that you feel. The jazz program has at Mason Gross. And what that means to you that it's it's valued I feel like it's not information that's made available frequently in such an accessible and Thera- format as it is here.

professor Professor Herwig rutgers Mason Gross New Brunswick Southern New Brunswick New Jersey City Burton
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

11:59 min | 11 months ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"It has really enabled me to do this. It was either I was between two schools and they were ruckers was pretty much the same price because the other school gave me a scholarship and then rucker said well. We really want you here and I was really really excited about that because my parents would always loved Mason Gross. My mom went to records and she knew that Mason Girls Great and I think the scholarship is really enabled. Me To be here. I I think I would have worked and I would have somehow paid it if I didn't have a scholarship to be here because I had to go to school But it it's like a it's a burden taken off for that amount of money Every semester and it it. It's something that reminds me that I'm valued here. You know because it's so easy to forget that were so critical of ourselves but to know that I am an instrumental part to being here at Mason. Gross it it truly makes me feel like I belong and I love I love Mason Gross and I've always felt like I belong but it's always it it really solidifies it for me. You know because especially looking at that tuition bill every every semester knowing like that much. I don't have to worry about absolutely. I'm going to ask you to weapons wax poetic a little bit about Mason gross to give people a sense of why you chose Mason Gross Ray because you have. I love that you're mentioning. You have these smaller classes. I think there is a preconceived notion that rutgers is this huge place where you're just a number and at Mason. Gross we fewer than twelve hundred students. So you are getting that boutique experienced so to speak but talk about why Mason Gross. Why Rutgers? Well I'm not going to give you the Spiel but I'm going to give you this view. I coming from Jersey. You always think there's going to be a certain amount of kids from your school. Who are going to go to rucker's and you're like I don't want to see these people and you really won't see these people at Rutgers. Rutgers is massive and INA very you can take it in bite size portions so you have rutgers as a big thing and then you have ruckers into five campuses and then you have ruckers into individual schools and then you could even go into your class or your major and then your individual class is so I think rutgers is completely you can bite off as much as you want to take and it's completely up to you. How Big Your Group of what you would say The people surround yourself with you. Can you can choose how big you want that to be. And I think that's so important because we think oh it's we're going to be a small school and we're not going to be acknowledged by rutgers but mason gross is a very valued part of rutgers. And you can either say you can either put yourself in the perspective of. I'm a clarinet. Music education major at rutgers like maybe like ten of US. I think maybe I don't know that's probably an arbitrary number. Maybe about fifteen could be twenty. I don't know I'm sorry or you could say I'm a rutgers music records Mason krispies at major that gets bigger and then he can Sam Records Mason gross major these. It's there's so much opportunity being at a big ten university and also being in a very very professional music conservatory. I think it's it's really important to push past that high school. You don't know what you want a lot of the time like you're going to say oh. I don't WANNA be like rutgers. I've heard like it's it's a state school state. Schools are amazing. You think of the opportunity that you have compared to sometimes like the private liberal arts colleges you're looking at. I could not have gone there. There's just so much opportunity here that I missed out on had I gone there. What are some opportunities that you've had here that you you wouldn't get at at one of those smaller campuses? I love the bus system. People really hate the bus system but I think it is so cool even as a person with a car on campus. I think it's amazing. That with all the cam with all the different campuses that we have all the different classes were running and all the buildings have to be That you have to get to. There's a there's a way there's a you have a phone and you can check your phone. You can just hop on a bus. And they're like pretty much running almost twenty four hours when they're not running. There's something you can call. That will pick you up I think that's amazing. I just just makes me happy because I lived in the dorm that wasn't close to Mason gross in I'd have to either walk or take the bus. I also think that there's amazing mental health resources because we have caps and capsules huge in records. Because you've got about forty forty or fifty thousand students with Camden too but You have a lot of kids who need these resources. And I don't know how big those resources can be at other schools who aren't dealing who aren't dealing with as many students as is I think that at Mason Gross with opportunities I've had is to be in the marching band. You sometimes are marching. Band is the size of like somebody's class at their school because they go to a small like we've got like two hundred. Twenty kids in marching man was amazing. My high school marching band was about sixty seventy eighty at Max when we had our good times so that to be at a place where there's so many other kids who think the same way as you is amazing to me and then my ensembles. I just don't think you could split that many kids up into the different ensembles we have. We have a couple of different new music ensembles. We've got three bands. We've got two orchestras. We've got four choirs. There's you can just you can find exactly where you belong here. And I'm so grateful for that and I love it here. I don't think I could really even see myself at another school for my Undergrad. I love it here. You talked before about how you of this crazy drive right and you keep joking about how your parents will say Elizabeth on her ideas. How do you balance this drive? Would not driving yourself crazy. I can go to my backpack right now and show it to you. It's called my notebook journal. And I have a checklist that I do at higher things that have to today and a it helps me feel really accomplished. But be okay. I'm there's going to be a list be. It helps me see all the things they do in a day because we can be really hard and ourselves and not what we do in a day and say wow I really did nothing today and then you look at it and you're like wow. I went to like eight classes today. I did so much today but it really helps me. Put Myself in just perspective for my time management. Because it's so easy to be like. I'm going to do this and I'm going to do this and read after my dress rehearsal. I'm GONNA do this. Performance thing with my friends that is not productive for me so I like listing things that I plan to do in a day and I like planning in the future because I think that's really important for me because I need to know those things to look forward to a past what I'm doing right now. I think it's a constant struggle because I struggle with how much I wanna do things and how all the different things I wanNA balance And I think you do that when you love music Especially when you love to different parts that make up a whole music but like if you love voice and clarinet. It's so easy to try and commit yourself supposedly to both and I have to pick and choose the things that I really value and being in Kirkpatrick choirs amazing. And that's something. I value being in like a chamber choir experience and then doing band which I I I have to for my requirements but I I love being in band do marching minutes completely Something that I choose to do and those are the things that I prioritize. Those are the three ensembles that really light the fire in me and keep the fire going you know and if I want I could do acapella. Because they're so. There's a great acapella presence on campus and I could do the voorhees choir. Which is the only all female choir and I could do the New Music Ensemble and I could do the orchestra. It's just like I have to think about the things that I'm GonNa do right now. Like when marching man's over next semester. I'm doing pep band and hopefully orchestras. So it's I have to write down and plan my life in the way that's going to make it the most worthwhile to be in those ensembles because if you're over committed you're really not gonNa be contributing as much as you would want to and the unsolvable would expect of you then if you were doing just as much as you can let me ask you. Why Music Education is important to you. Why you value that enough to be a major and what you would one young music to know if you were their teacher. I'm very fortunate that I grew up in that choir. Because when you start off in that church choir you go from being in the right choir and having people take care of you to start and take care of yourself and then taking care of the younger kids and I was also able to do A music class with real really small kids and to just see the light in those kids is when they were just loving what they were doing with music because they really couldn't put it into many words because they're really young and just see the kids who are growing through the music program. Love what they're doing it to help them go through that journey. That's when I knew that I wanted to do it because I I I love people. I love talking. If you can tell I really love talking but you have to accept that when you go into teaching you're going to be talking to people who aren't like you're not going to be music school anymore. You're going to have to be the person who's responsible for lighting that fire and other people and helping them realize how important music is in their life. And if you don't feel that fire then it's going to be so hard to to impart it on other people and I think we have to know that. It is a grueling job to be a musician music educator. Because you're always having people think oh. Oh what's the career and that like? What do you hope to do out of school? And you say we`ll. I hope to be a teacher and I'm probably going to be a teacher. You think it's more concrete than other people do and it is really more concrete than other people think it is But you have to know that you're going to be responsible for somebody else's experience with music and you have to know that that's going to be so important and you know it's important because you're in music and you have to take that with a sense of pride and the aspect of imparting another language on somebody. Music is a whole other language people to express themselves and to know that that is going to be a resource for them afterward. I think that makes it very worth it. Even though you're going to struggle with kids on their phone and kids not wanNA listen and always undermining music as a career. I think you just have to know that you're going to push through and you're you have to. I keep saying half to have to. I feel like I have to in a way that because you owe it to yourself and you owe it to the art that is music and other musicians who've come before you and who are currently with you Lissouba. Thank you so much for sharing the fire that you talk about and your experience now you have a long day ahead of you so ungrateful that you stopped by. I'm really happy to be here. Thank you so much..

Mason Gross rutgers Mason Gross Ray Music Education rucker Sam Records Mason US voorhees choir Camden Max Elizabeth Kirkpatrick
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

11:08 min | 11 months ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"The person who I wanted to be. At that time it made me really down on myself And the second semester got better and I started picking up and then realizing like there is so much more work to be done. You can't just give up. You got got the weight on your back. You have to keep carrying it before until it becomes fruitful and this semester placed really. Well I'm so excited I mean it's it's great. I'm not saying that there's there's always a difference and ensembles and I think that we have really great on some wolves at Mason Gross. But I wanted to be in ensemble that I'm in now and I was really happy about it but there's like even I'm in the ensemble I WANNA be. There's never there's never to stop working like if I even if I was I share in Wind Ensemble which I wish I'm not so I always have something to look forward to something to keep working towards because if you let yourself get into that please. It's terrible. It's it's I really don't wish it on anybody. I think that there's so much support at especially at rutgers and Mason gross that we have to give ourselves break and we have to just keep pushing for because we can't just stay. Stagnant music is constantly transforming and so are we as music students who are learning to be professional classically trained musicians so I think it's really important to always reach out if you need help. I was actually just going to ask. You is how do your professors help you. In this way to not get stuck in your head to yes of course be committed work hard but how do they? How do they help you? How do they steer you to not kind of freeze up and get down on yourself? Where do you see them figuring into this? I think were incredibly lucky that we have some very compassionate professors at Mason Gross. There have been. I'm not very proud to admit it. But there've been times I've been late to A couple of exams two of them in the same class and they were performance things for our skills and you they know that ultimately it's your career and they know that they are supporting you to do what you do. So if I showed up only takes showing up to show that I came like a couple of minutes late I had slept in. I was so upset and he saw that. It really mattered to me and I was still there that he let me take it still and I have my teacher my private teacher an amazing resource. You have to know who you're going to be coming to study with because that's the person who's going to be your biggest advocate and ally for your career especially for the next four or five years that you're going to be here. I'd say that your professors want you to succeed. And they want you to dive deeper into what they're really is because to just do the surfaced value. I think a lot of the kids who are musicians want to genuinely want to get better and wanted to learn more and I think there's always that drive especially if you're a musician and I think Dr is so important so I think there's a certain degree that the professors can facilitate it. But I think that that drive is one of the most important things about being musician and if you lose it you always get it back. You know if you've had it it'll it'll always come back. So I guess you have to understand that it ebbs and flows like anything else definitely. Can you give me an example of a time when a faculty member has just really steered you in the Right Direction? Picked you up. Just been there for you. I would have to say that my current teacher Mark Dover. I had gone through a really bad mental health period in the second this in the spring semester I don't sugar coat things. I think that mental health is a very important thing to talk about and I was really depressed and it was really hard for me to do anything but go to my classes and my ensembles and every time I came to my lesson I was just disappointed in myself because I really it was just it was. It wasn't a long time but for the time that I was I it was one of the hardest things especially because I'm you always have that inspiration running in the background. Even if you're depressed you like I should be doing these things because I wanna be doing these things. And he sat with me and he didn't let me vent to the point where it was unproductive but then he said okay well. We're going to be productive this lesson in the we're GONNA do duets and we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA make music this lesson and we're going to get through it and you're doing so much and you have to be patient with yourself and that was so important to me because I've just I've had clarinet and I've just had teachers who will let you just keep talking and they won't get productive and I know it's not their responsibility but it really helped up somebody say well. Here's the productive part of talking about it and then here's how we're going to be productive with music because that's what we're here to do and I'm really happy because I really we. I pushed through it. Especially that I have some really great friends and There's really amazing resources at Mason Gross. Because it's GonNa Happen Your College student. You're there's so much pressure on you and you're GONNA get anxious or depressed and you're gonNA need someplace to go and you gotTa know that your professors are going to be there for you but you also have to take care of yourself and go and get help. I really appreciate your talking about that because this still seems as if there's such a stigma when it comes to mental health and so many so many of us experienced this and you're right the pressure is tremendous you know financially Socially you've a lot of things coming at you and I know Elizabeth part of the reason I wanted to interview. You is what impresses me about. You is how practical you are and how you just kind of keep going forward and I know you said that this has been a challenge financially for you for your parents being a professional musician. Eight sheep can you talk a little bit about that? I know you said you were originally on a plastic instrument talking about that commitment that you all had to make to get you here. Yeah you know when you're going to be auditioning for music school and how I knew I was going to start private lessons private lessons if you're with a teacher that's at least usually sixty dollars an hour to think about that. That's a very big financial commitment that I was really fortunate to have. My parents agree to because you it was it was instrumental to but it was instrumental as you might very funny I do. I do have main page for music. Means girls just kidding but it was to have. My parents agree to do that. And then when I met the teacher he was saying that I would need. I would need a wooden instrument and my parents really liked him. He he's just this. Was this older self starter. He owned a music store that we loved and we worked with at our high school and they felt we when we realize about how much it would be to how it wouldn't instrument. My parents were like wow. It was mostly mood sailing. Singing's free the plastic clarinet. I use my grandfather. Great Grandfather Beautiful Violin when I played violin. But we're never really never tight on money and And it was just as a pretty much a middle class family and The suburbs and my parents both both working jobs and my sisters both They were living at home at the time it. It was hard to think about spending too much money and we were worried because it's a lot of money that it's when you're oriented four figures for an instrument that you didn't have to pay for before and I still been getting reads but that was reads are not as expensive as the instrument you know and We didn't I. I didn't think we'd be able to do it because my parents they they've been like. Wow this is going to be a lot and I think they were that I wasn't serious about it because me and my ideas and they were worried that I wouldn't keep up with clarinet but look where I am now but and then I one day I came home and my parents said. Oh you should go in the living room and I won the living room and they're claus was my beautiful buffet clarinet and I love him and Klaus. Talk to me about this he is. He's thoughtful compassionate of instrument. I he took a lot of time to break in what instrument so it was kind of a very good lesson in patience for me because I was working in a pit at high school and I had to. I had to like play that clarinet for a little bit. And then work on my other instrument Which was fun to get and getting used to a new instrument but just the fact that my parents had done that for me was so incredibly marks. The place where I knew that they were going to be supporting me. Further my career just because it was it was scary like to have a fourteen fifteen year olds start deciding what they WANNA do And then I was lucky enough when I auditioned here that I got a scholarship and when I applied for more scholars by got more scholarship and it just it's always. I feel like the wonderful things that happened to me in my life by my parents are just are by hard work and by commitment and Beila Dry. I haven't crazy drive my parents say you and your ideas and it's it's always rang true because I think if you work hard enough it really just kind of If you're fortunate falls into place I don't even think sometimes it has to do with locker fortune like I just. I've worked so hard to be where I am and I'm grateful for my parents because I know it is not easy afford a music school Especially with scholarship. I think in state. I think we're very lucky if you're in state to have such an amazing conservatory basically at your fingertips in New Jersey for sure and I'm wondering If you can talk about you know. We're always looking for more scholarships right trying to explain to people what scholarships mean and. I think you can give the best witness to that. What has it meant to you and to your family to have this money to put towards your education. The scholarship money. I think that it's already an amazing honor to be able to go to a conservatory but to have a conservatory. Determined that you have worked wh well academically and in artistically It's an amazing honor and it..

Mason Gross rutgers New Jersey Mason faculty member Mark Dover Elizabeth Beila Dry Singing Klaus
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

12:58 min | 11 months ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"We are a community of nearly twelve hundred Undergrad and graduate dancers musicians theatre artists filmmakers and visual artists from around the globe. My name is Laurie. Gra Nari and I'll be sitting down with some of these artists discussing. What fuels curiosity their passion and their impulse to make Elizabeth Manca? Meyer does not have a poker face. This is a supreme compliment. She uses joy for music making music talking about music. She's a powerhouse undergraduate student a music education and clarinet performance major. Who also happens to be a member of rutger's symphonic winds pep band rutgers Kirkpatrick Wire and the marching scarlet knights. This hasn't come easy in our interview. Monka Myer says I did not audition well my first or second semester. I was not where I wanted to be. It made me really down on myself. She's candid about the pressure. College students face from all sides but mostly from themselves people talk a lot about the word passion in relationship to making Art Monka. Meyer possesses passion in spades but what strikes me about her and about so many Mason. Gross students is her grit her ability to answer a practice room alone day after day. Close the door and do the work what may appear easy or natural. Onstage is the result of a daily grind of hours and hours of repetition. This in other words is the work of Art Elizabeth. Thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us. I wanted to ask you. How did you know that you wanted to pursue music in college? I'm really happy to be here. Thank you I was always a very. I was an honors student. I studied a lot. My mom was a teacher. My Dad was an engineer so they were very serious about school. And I'd been in a choir when I was probably starting about first or second grade with my church and I was there pretty much every Friday and every Sunday and it was wonderful. I love being in that choir But I wasn't i. I never really saw myself going to school for music until I was doing clarinet and give me. The clarinet was very long. I started doing voice in the choir and then I took violin was my first instrument so I played violin all the way up to about ninth grade in high school but I had friends who were in marching band and I really wanted to marching band. And you can't march with violent even though my dad wanted me to but I took my mom's old clarinet and I tried to play it and I did so successfully and it just sparked something in me and I knew pretty much after I had been in March I was. I was struggling all three things. Then I was an orchestra choir and band and I was. I was hooked. I knew I wanted to do music once I'd been in everything. See you're talking about your your mother's clarinet. Your parents musicians then you know. My parents joke that they don't know where this came from that they say the talent is genetic but They my mom played when she was about my age when she was in high school like that was strengthened. My sister played the clarinet when she was instrument. My Dad played a little bit of guitar. But they're really not that musical my things and choir. My Dad doesn't say so. How did they react to this decision? I mean how you were quite young making this decision and making this announcement. How do they react to your decision? You know? Having to very academically driven parents and I have two older sisters One of them's a lawyer and the other one is about biology major. She went She's actually hydrologist now so they both have very practical. You know traditionally practical jobs and I did well enough in school that my parents were convinced that probably go and academic trout track academic in the traditional way and or business and my parents were very hesitant at first as what as parents would be because they were worried that I wouldn't have a job prospects and they didn't really know how serious I was about music. It took a lot of a lot of blood sweat and tears. I had to work my butt off and I had to talk to my parents about doing lessons and I had to convince them that this is what I was serious about and I did so by doing all the ensembles I did and putting all my effort into it and they they eventually saw Joe's great. I suspect that we have some prospective student's listening or maybe their parents. What would you say to someone who wants to apply to Mason? Gross wants to be a music major but is hesitant fearful. I say that is very reasonable because it is really scary to be so passionate about something but if you're that passionate about something that means it's what you're meant to do and I was scared. My parents really didn't understand what you'd go to do. When you go to music school because pretty much every day out of high school I would either be during school. I'd be in an ensemble and after school I'd be an ensemble so they didn't really know what those classes would be if I was in mostly on so they didn't know and I actually got to shadow I didn't quite shadow a student. I came and visited and I was able to go to classes. I was given to schedule. I would've loved to shadow someone Which I have people I do. I let people shout at me now and it's great and I think it's a really great way to know if you WanNa do it because you can see the kind of day that you're working with I think music school is rigorous. And I think that you need to really care about what you're doing to succeed and to successfully get through it. I will say it's not for the faint of heart because you're going to be whining and complaining a lot but I think you need to know that it's what you WanNa do in your heart and then I think you need to go and visit schools and see what you would be doing at those schools. Because I think that's really important to it as well. So how long each day would you say you're running and working you've if you're a freshman you typically have more ADM's Most of my classes start at like nine or ten. But if I I I start on like a Tuesday. Yeah it started about. Nine and rehearsal gets out at nine. Pm and then sometimes you want to practice a little more. You want to get more food. So this sounds grueling. Why do you do this among Meyer? Because I of course you could always see yourself and like an alternate universe. Like what would I do if I didn't have music but I would not be the same person and I would not find as much joy as I do going to the things that I do? I I was last year. I didn't really dive in as much as I had hoped. And when you're going to these classes every day and you're not passionate about it's raining it's it's not it's as is not for the faint of heart. I love going to theory because it makes me think and I love going. Arles skills because I'm constantly engaged like you're always being pretty much and you're challenged because you have to think really critically about the thing that you're going to be doing basically say reading and if I'm really I've gotten a lot better about planning because I couldn't plan before but now that I'm able to plan and bring food with me. I'm not as grumpy. And I think I can see like logically. Oh in addition to doing music my body also needs food and sleep so you really need to be good at your time management and that doesn't come really easily to me so I actually had to work on that and like my first year but I just love it too much i. I don't think I could be doing anything but music. I was thinking of other things like maybe nursing or biology but I just do band on the side or just do choir on the side. That's just doesn't like the fire within me. You Know I. I couldn't you said something earlier that I wanNA follow up on. You said that it's scary to be passionate about something. What's scary about it? Well my parents say to me you and your ideas because I when I have something in my head I will go for it. I'm stubborn. I'm persistent and music is something that can be so time consuming. If you're so passionate about it so you have your academia. You have your classes that you have to go to and then you have ensembles and then you have your individual practice time. And then you've got all the different like I have these amazing friends who are also amazing musicians and I want to collaborate with them and you have to think about how many hours in the day can you really say nly commit to something and not be scared of it to be scared of something. That's inside of you. That says more more more like this is what I need to do. You know it's a good kind of healthy addiction. You know but it's scary because if you haven't really been able to tap into that if you're in high school and then once you're in music school it's all you can just jump into it you know and it's a completely different experience from high school. So is it intimidating to meet people who are as passionate as you are and as talented as you are? What's that leg to not be the proverbial big fish anymore? It's incredibly intimidating. Because you you come from a place where you're the first chair you been working your You've been working and working working and then you think that you're going to be ready to go to another place in still. Be that person where you're the still could be the most hardworking but still comp- comparatively when you auditioned for things. You're not always the best and that can really get you down going from. I dare to maybe last chair. I chair at High School in the last chair in a music. School is scary. But you have to think about the relative talent around you and you have to think that it's a place to grow and I love that because I think if there's people ahead of me there's always more places and a ways from me to grow and to become a better musician. There's more opportunities to do so. There's like four more chairs for me to grow in this. You Know I. It's not always about being the first part but sometimes we as musicians were perfectionists and we hold ourselves to that but it's it's so scary to be around people who are of the same mindset of you even though it's so incredibly engaging and exciting. It's to know that you're not alone. Is a great thing like humans. Were were pack animals. We love knowing that there are people like us. We Love Commuting together but it's there's always that That drive to be the best and to have that same drive with a bunch of other people. It's it's scary. Especially if you hold yourself to that standard of being the best you know as I think a lot of us do some of us are very music oriented and I applaud people for that and I like to think that myself. I am but there's always the traditional who is the best at every school every ensemble. You know it's it's not always the biggest thing but it's always in our minds as musicians because we hold ourselves to that standard. It's important that you having given into despair because I'm sure some people who are perfectionists would go to that place very easily and just say if I can't be the best right away I'll give it up. Yeah you know. It's too to think like that is very I got it got me. I did not audition well my first semester or my second semester and I just wasn't where I wanted to be And it.

High School Meyer Mason Monka Myer Elizabeth Manca Gra Nari rutgers Kirkpatrick Wire Laurie rutger Art Monka engineer ADM Art Elizabeth Gross Joe
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"Tasks that you saw that were challenging challenging for the people. You spoke with Every time I went over to Ann's house she insisted on making me a cup of tea which I appreciate because I love but you know just filling up the cup and getting it on you know in the microwave and dunking the tea like it. She was happy to do it and wanted to do it. It wasn't that you know this was like a burden for her. She was more than happy to but it was. It was challenging. And you know you you have to think about you know. That's such a simple thing for us to fill up a cup of water and put it in the microwave. Impressed those buttons on the microwave. But that's a big challenge for her and then there's other things that you would assume that she wouldn't be able to do like painting that she does all the time. And she's one painting competitions and submitted her art to festivals and things. Because you know she is. You has a special technique with the way that her hands move. So it's like it's a balance of things that you think she should be able to do is difficult but other things that you would just assume she couldn't she does crossword puzzles. And The New York Times and it's difficult but she persists and she does them so it's it was really fascinating to get to talk with her about all those things in the things she can and can't do anymore. That's gotTA leaving impression on. You absolutely sure. Have you know I'm so interested in the role of the editor? At least my idea of it which may be a little naive is an editor you know sitting in the dark alone with all this footage and kind of having his or her own relationship with the the footage. Talk to me about what it really is like. And why you love that why you would rather be that guy than Andrea added which is perhaps more sociable right Well IT'S A. It's a really long process. And like I said. There was hours of footage so primarily in the class we would There was three editors and we would kind of we. Each tackled a different person. It was all organized for us and we would Watch the footage Listen to the interviews and log it all and says this here. This could be a good Enter this is pretty moving. And it's just long lists of and a lot of work and it's not the most fun all the time but near the end. When you're really shaping the story and you Kinda like fall in love with these people it really just like you have a real sense of accomplishment so it just feels really satisfying to me. It's the experiences we have these days that you had that delayed gratification right in and I would imagine you need have a ton of patience and you know it's kind of like being a scribe or something right. How were you able to have that? Patience says a person who well this is the first time I've ever done anything like this so I I'm used to shooting my own stuff and editing my own stuff so this is the first time I've just gone in kind of blind and not knowing what I'm going to get So I think it was just the excitement of it all was what kind of allowed me to be patient because I was looking forward to the finished product so Maybe if I if I do it again maybe it'll be a little bit more challenging because I understand the the work that's going to be put in but I thought it was really a blast. Yeah you'd be service to client. That's a lot different. I imagine maybe doesn't talk to me about that than it is to just be realizing your own vision on your own time and You know you had Jeff Friedman from the Dance Department who. I'm sure had very strong feelings. About how it should go. And you had Pamela Quinn's so you had you had people to satisfy with this. What was that like? We're working for a client So typically I actually you know Make Science films where I'm doing a lot of like talking with the scientists about what they want to be expressed so it wasn't totally foreign to me but I think this was a little different in that the people it was actually really great working with these particular clients because they were also artists and they understood that you know giving us specific guidelines on what they wanted they. We're happy to do that. But they were also happy to step back and you know. Give us free reign which I think made a lot of the difference and You know because we were able to talk about it. We had a LOT OF MEETINGS WITH JEFF. Right at the beginning about you know. This is what we think would be moving. Can we make this work? Can we contact them personally? And go into their homes and it was a lot of back and forth and I mean any client. Work is like that. It's a lot of back and forth and ultimately you WanNa make your client a collaborator artistically. In the peace rather than just you know handed down on high from you know what they want you to do. So it it depends on the client but these particularly. I don't know how much you guys worked with them. Sam But they were very happy to allow us to do what we thought was best in. I think it worked in the different because it and it's just initiated by you rights and getting them from other people so yeah I mean I wasn't too involved with the The collaborators I kind of felt like we were in our own little world but they were always in the back of my head and like any peace at least for me. I I want people to enjoy it and have a good time so I I wanted to make sure that everyone felt well represented and they work so that was always in the back of my head. But I never really talked to any of the Collaborators Lennon at the head of the the documentary film lab was kind of overseeing the project with you and of course he's he's won multiple Oscars for making documentaries. What did you learn from him in this process? I mean Thomas is gate of Thomas before he even came on staff. I was talking with Patrick. Who is the chair of the program? And you know he's like just wait till you meet. You're GONNA love him. Andrea is great. He is and I think he brings a really practical side to our education here. Which I appreciate and you know series important. It's necessary you need it to become a good filmmaker but sort of Thomas. Brings that down to earth deadlines things need to get done. His line is everybody needs to be a producer doesn't matter you're not a producer everybody needs to be a producer because you need to know what it is to work in the real world and get things done and handed to people on time and I appreciated that from him and he taught us a lot of practical skills you know even just about filming and brought in people that he knew from the industry that was really great so I think he. He brought a very down to earth perspective even if his expectations were high. He you know he helped us get there In terms of editing he was extremely helpful for me because Documentary is something that I am looking to do. More of and he he did this analogy where he talked about. How a film is similar to a slalom course? Like when you ski and how you're going downhill and you have to build momentum but then you have to you know you notice long course as you go around the cones and then got to slow down shift direction and speed up again until you make it to the bottom so a story is all about momentum and changing directions and and he taught me that and it really changed my perspective on how to edit documentary and I was so grateful for that so it's really appreciative view. Both I'm really grateful that you took the time to talk about this experience..

Thomas producer Andrea editor Ann Jeff Friedman The New York Times Pamela Quinn Oscars Dance Department Sam Lennon Patrick
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

13:09 min | 1 year ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"Of the disease if anything before you started? Editing Parkinson's wasn't something. I was entirely familiar with. I've heard of it in the past but I didn't really know what it entailed so A lot of what I learned about. Parkinson's was through the film through editing. The film so I was grateful for that experience. What about you Andrea had? You had any family members who have Parkinson's or what was your understanding Not any family members but some family friends that I knew growing up but definitely most of my knowledge was sort of like textbook science classes and there was none of the personal element to it. You know this is such an intimate. Look at these people's lives know you spent a.

Parkinson Andrea
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

13:46 min | 1 year ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"Tendency as a serious that is sort of working disturbance in this piece are for in the forefront of my later work as I got older There's a lot more my music. That is highly introspective. Been and even even dark and and more just a friend of of those of whereas this one's sort of straddle the two in in a way that I think is very interesting but Is Complex and might not have been quite whether you would Well I'm wondering to that. Mix Right the person you were the composer you were. And what you reach for their How do you relate to that person now looking back at who you were and what you expressed in this concerto I you know when I heard the reading I can. I can bring you a little more up to date in terms of What happened at Rutgers we? We didn't never never got got back to that but I I would say this was. This is a almost a different person In some respects of because of this sort of duality Which I was not entirely aware of You know today if if I write in a style that is As outgoing is this much of peace to I'm very conscious of the duality. And and it has a more refined kind of quality to it. I reconcile these these warring impulses with more awareness But but what I would say is I was very cut and very excited and very joyful to Rian counter. This uninhibited work I found it exhilarating to hear the the the movement that I attended at Rutgers In in the spring of two thousand seventeen It was really a fantastic experience because I felt that The peace of been rescued. You know and this younger self was Suddenly available to me I could. I could I could check out what I was trying to do. At that time. You know we we composers have to hear our work in order to learn and learn who we are. Learn what we can do. Better learn how to orchestrate and all these things so so It was tremendous Koreans through reading that self. But it'd be a difference. Bill you know I I I have three children this was before I was apparent You know with a life. Changing experience but My parents were both a lot there. it's.

Rutgers Rian Bill
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

16:01 min | 1 year ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"Physicians Theater artists filmmakers visual artists from around the globe. My name is Lori Greiner and I'll be sitting down with some of these artists discussing. What fuels curiosity their passion? And their impulse to make composer. Alan Shawn was understandably thrilled in the early nineteen eighties when the legendary clarinetist. Benny Goodman commissioned a classical piece from him but sean tells it when Goodman ultimately decided not to perform the work his essentially shoved the composition in a drawer now thirty years later. The Rutgers Symphony Orchestra is Yanking Shawn's concerto for clarinet and cello out of the drawer and bringing it to audiences here in Central Jersey piece featuring Mason Gross Faculty Maureen Heard House and Jonathan Spits as soloists will make its world premiere at the New Brunswick Performing Arts Center on September Twenty Eighth Two Thousand Nineteen Goodman known as the king of swing enjoyed a robust classical career both as a performer and a commissioner of classical works. Shawn's concerto a piece that he describes as wild in joyful is in fact Goodman's last classical commission before his death in Nineteen eighty-six. The Concerto has never been performed with an orchestra until now we love that. A youthful disappointment has morphed into a triumph of sorts. As Sean finally sees his work on the concert stage as he tells it he feels that his concerto has been rescued and that this younger self is available to me. Sean is a professor of music at Bennington College in Vermont as well as a respected composer and author he's written books on music as well as acclaimed memoirs about living with Phobias and about his autistic twin sister. Mary he is a son of the late. William Sean the legendary longtime editor of the New Yorker and the brother of actor and playwright Wallace Shawn so Allan. Talk to me a little bit about how you brought your work to rutgers okay. Well there's a long long road between young youngest composer who wrote this piece and rutgers So I met Benny Goodman in nineteen eighty one. We're really sounds like the Middle Ages at this point can pray. I was thirty two turning thirty. Three I'm now seventy one I met through a mutual friend and And since I was excited to meet him and Wanted to hear so my music I brought him a piece of mine called Cabaret Music which was for clarinet violin cello and piano and I had been a child's composer. I started at the age of ten. But that doesn't mean I was a mature composer at the age of ten. In fact I didn't really write a piece that I thought was decent piece until I was about thirty I composed all that time but and I studied of course a great deal but Cabaret music was a piece. I'd written nine hundred seventy eight when I was thirty years old and I thought it was actually finally a pretty good piece and it was a Eight-minute very condensed Piece that had some some flavor of of cabaret and jazz like material but it. Was you know classical concert piece And Benny liked it very much. And he said why I'd like you to come over to the House Nathaniel Rosen the cellist and I've been playing music with him and we can read through some maybe read through the Beethoven trio and re read through the Brahms trio As you know Laurie Quite a few important Trios for clarinet cello and piano. We think of the Piano Trios Violin. Don't count but there are a number for clarinet Joel. Piano and And Bennie said you know maybe you can write something for us so I was very excited and I went to Benny's house several times and we we We read Various things I might have read through some some of the Read through the bombs clarinets about as with him. I can't recall that anyway. He's very quickly asked me to write. A concerto. Were Clarinet chill and Instead he would commission me to give you any specifications with he you know how how. How much was his hand on your shoulder here or did he did he. Just say that. How many specifications did he give? You know You know Clarita Cello and orchestra and he said you know maybe we can play with Actually he mentioned the New Jersey Symphony. Which is Such an interesting coincidence but For your listeners. They should know that. Benny Goodman was One of one of the these extraordinary musicians who is not only in one John Rock music so he was a composer and arranger and performer in the guy's world and actually he was legendary in many ways. Not just for swing music but also Maureen can maybe stay more about this than I can but I believe he was really a pathbreaking musician in terms of breaking away barriers having an integrated on fumbles on so on And he was also a perv classical player as well and and perform more dark clarinet concerto and and was You know really wonderful musician in classical music as well and many pieces. In the past including for example the.

Benny Goodman William Sean Bennie Alan Shawn Maureen Heard House Rutgers Symphony Orchestra Lori Greiner Wallace Shawn professor of music Phobias Vermont Bennington College Clarita Cello Mason Gross Nathaniel Rosen Mary New Brunswick Performing Arts Central Jersey Allan commissioner
"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Work Of Art: The Mason Gross Podcast

"Undergrad and graduate dancers musicians theatre artists filmmakers and visual artists from around the globe. My name is Laurie Greenery. And I'll be sitting down with some of these artists. Discussing what fuels are curiosity. Their passion and their impulse to make Valerie. Marcus rancher is a Lucille Lord El Nominee and critically acclaimed New York based costume designer. Whose work has been seen in dance film TV and theatre productions on and off Broadway. She's also the head of costume design here at Mason Gross. Her work as an associate costume. Designer has appeared in the Broadway productions of HEDWIG and the angry inch a BA- handing and Spokane Tony Kushner's caroline or change. Russell Simmons Def poetry jam and a raisin in the sun among other productions. She has also worked on. Madonna's rebel heart world tour and on national tour of in nights. But that's just a Scintilla of what you need to know about Valerie rancher because too loosely quote Walt Whitman Valerie Ramseur contains multitudes her impeccably researched. Costuming is teeming with influences steeped in references to history and to the every day. This is the woman who after all has said. There is an endless amount of inspiration in the ordinary. It is how we train our eyes to see and acknowledge it all how we look deeper and open ourselves to the countless ways in which to process all the stimuli coming in. Ram sure a daughter of a poet and theatre artist knows from looking deeper. She about as much as anyone I've ever encountered is committed to living or creative life. Not just backstage on the job but off stage at the supermarket or while waiting for an NJ transit train on a cloudy Monday morning. Check out her instagram. Vm Ramp sure or Ogle of her designs on our website. And you will see what I mean. I promise you'll be inspired. Welcome Valerie thank you so much for having. I'm so excited to talk to you. I saw somewhere along. The line is I was getting deeper and deeper into the wonderful colorful rabbit hole of your instagram. One of your captions. You said what? We need fines us. I loved that I think it was a bit of inspiration that came your way that you felt resonated with you on in that particular moment. Can you talk about what you mean by that what? What's found you along the way that you've needed got so many things that so many different times I am. I'm a great believer. That what we put out comes back to us right negative or positive boring or stimulating any of those things and sometimes we don't know what we need and we're so busy pursuing what we think we need whether it's monetary or romantic or artistic that we stopped to we don't realize what's actually coming at us and so if we can just stop take a moment take a breath and observe. What's happening around us? We might find something. We never expected or a person. We never expected or here a piece of music that suddenly takes an entirely different direction. So I think that's probably what I meant I usually. I'm a quote person ends up taking a lot of quotes. I but I do think especially a life in the arts. We have to stay open to all possibilities and all the stimuli coming into us like I said in the quote you read because we never know where that's GonNa take us right. It's opening always opening a new door to another door to another door and we just have to be willing to kind of go down that rabbit hole and see and observe and take in everything around us and some people aren't some people are scared by those possibilities. But you're not I'm not. I'm scared about other things but no taxes. Taxes more but rodents. I'm scared of rodents but no I think no not afraid of that. Because in that risk taking is where we're fully live. We're fully alive or fully present. We're open wide open to chance and opportunity and you know one of the things I tell my students all the time is just take a risk get messy try it turn left instead of right you know and all of those things are so important so now. I'm not afraid of that risk. Yeah so I have to ask you. Did you play dress up as a kid? Of course I did. I was the best dressed Gypsy in California. Yes of course. I mean growing up in a family of artists and theater artists. There was no shortage and of course it was the seventy th and then of course into the eighties. There was no shortage of fabulous. Rags in Schwab is hanging around our house so yes stress was a very important part of my childhood and my teen years as a club kid and it still is still is what we wear says so much about. Us onstage. Offstage the decisions you make every morning whether you're picking up a piece of clothing off the floor or out of the laundry basket or in the closet you there is a moment whether you realize it or not that you've chosen to make a statement about yourself in the world that day so I'm not a fashion person per se. I I love to follow fashion. But that's important obviously to my job as a designer but the stories that we tell with clothing was fascinating to me. I'm I'm curious about your curiosity you I mean you know as a as I think. It's very obvious that that you're teaming with that. In as beautifully stated you know it it inspires you in an essential to who you are. Do you think it can be taught? I mean as a as a professor in talk about that. Let's such a good question. I asked myself every day especially after a class. I hope it can be working really hard if it can't. I know I think some people are born with a natural energy and curiosity but I don't I think can be taught. I think he just has to be unlocked. That's what I'm choosing to believe this week. Is it just needs to be unlocked. I think especially younger generations especially the kids. I'm having in my class. Now who are eighteen? Nineteen twenty year olds. They're afraid they're afraid to go off the beaten path and they've been geared towards a particular path with checklists tests. And you know that anything off. The beaten path is scary right. You stay in the woods. You stay on the carved the path in the woods. But what's happening in the forest is really? What's interesting do you get them off that path? I can't be easy. I think what I try to keep exposing them to what I find interesting or assignments that get them off their phone and out in the world or on their phone. Taking photographs of particular. Instances of light were shape or color or texture. Anything that starts to unlock some of the fear and the fear that they have in their heads so I hope it can be taught i. I'm obsessed with trying to figure out how it can be tough because it really is. The most important thing and artists can have a designer. Can have it if you're curious if you're genuinely not interested in the world around you then I don't know what to do with you. You gotta find another way of living. And that's okay you don't have. There's plenty of people who aren't interested in the world around them they're interested maybe an internal world the world of the mind that they're creating and spinning but again that takes a kind of curiosity. So what are you exposing them to this off the beaten path because I imagine it's beyond fabric? Yeah so for me. It's always about just getting out seeing art seeing nature here in use it that they're not used to hearing drawing them into history. I teach a history of and decor class. And it's really a sort of sweep through history from message potato into the twenty first century and architecturally interior design and costume. And it's really a culture classes. Well trying to connect those lines through history all the web of interconnectedness that happens and I think just exposing them to what has come before they suddenly go. Oh I didn't know. He invented that. And that led to this or that led to that or I see the renaissance is GonNa key. Greek REVIVAL IS GONNA keep happening over and over and over and there's a reason for that so as they start to make the connections they get excited and that takes them down a different path. I think seeing also that their professors are excited by what we do and energetic in the room and learning alongside them you I learned something alongside them every class session. You know getting your hands dirty rolling up your sleeves. I think that helps them go. This isn't so scary. These are just people looking at things and making art or turning left instead of right. I say that a lot but I it's true so I think that's what it is you know. Just trying to expose them to history. Expose them to taking a chance talking to each other talking to people. I joke when I was an UNDERGRAD million years ago. The best ideas happened on our smoke. Breaks right outside the building of you if you had a cigarette in your hand suddenly had a tribe right or something. So they don't do that anymore obviously. That's a good thing but But getting kick everybody out of the room on break because they gotta get outside and get some air and just look at each other in the eye and try to connect and and then things seem less scary once they start talking to one another hearing each other's narratives and big about that conversation rate interest in the idea of having a conversation across time right whether you are reading a book or but especially in the story and can you talk a little bit about that. I know you've been very interested in history and archives. What's the importance of that conversation that you're engaged in? How do you think it enriches? You is as an artist. Yes I very fascinated in archives and so much so that I took a break from design for few years and went back to get my degree in library science in archives and I'm almost got a few more classes but I- preserving stories right. That's what's important to me and that's what we do in the theater as well and when you preserve stories or when you preserve people's narratives they don't disappear right. They become part of the fabric that we are wearing every day out in the world. Our ancestors artists anybody that is. Somehow I don't have to be great people every day. People are fascinating and so when we can preserve narratives and revisit them it. It opens a whole world. It opens a world. That is less you feel less alone. You can connect that..

Valerie Valerie rancher Russell Simmons Mason Gross Marcus rancher Tony Kushner New York Laurie Greenery Madonna Schwab Walt Whitman NJ Valerie Ramseur Ogle professor caroline California
"mason gross" Discussed on Origins with James Andrew Miller

Origins with James Andrew Miller

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"mason gross" Discussed on Origins with James Andrew Miller

"There's no quibbling with him. There's no he does what he wants to do. He feels confident in his choices. And he really felt that I was right for this. He said, I wrote this with you in my head, which I was struck by because I didn't think that I would ever have made an impression if somebody was writing the role of Carrie Bradshaw. And he said something else to me at that meeting that I thought was really interesting. He said, listen, you could produce this. Show with me. And I said, I don't know anything about producing television. I've worked in television for years, but I haven't really paid attention to that discipline thinking one day. I might have an opportunity he said don't think of it that way, you know, I you'll consult and we'll will study in you'll pay attention. And you know, you'll absorb we talked about the fact that I had never done nudity, and I didn't really want to and I didn't feel like it was a great time in my life to start doing it. And he said doesn't matter that's not important to the story. You don't have to. And then I gave the script to my oldest brother Pippen, whom I've given many scripts to and to Matthew and both of them read it quickly and said you have to do this. And so I did it. I finished this musical closed on Sunday. We started shooting the next morning in New York City, and we shot the pilot very quickly and my life went on. And I really mean this when I say this I sort of forgot about it. You know when? You're kind of a journeyman actor you just you go from job to job. You're grateful for good experiences. But you don't really invest in the idea of it being able to sustain itself. It's just not the nature of our work typically born in rugged Boulder, Colorado, Kristin Davis spend, most of her childhood in Columbia, South Carolina, where the age of nine she was cast in a local theater production of Snow White and the seven doors in one thousand nine hundred seven she graduated from the Mason gross school of the arts at Rutgers.

Carrie Bradshaw Kristin Davis Pippen Mason gross school Boulder New York City Rutgers Snow White South Carolina Colorado Columbia Matthew one day
"mason gross" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"mason gross" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Teachers in how to teach students how to ask questions and how to organize the material and fanatic ways so that we can understand the context of the world that we live in today because it's complicated and it includes all people and you can't just look at it from what's happened in the last six hundred years what about schools that might say look we can we can offer courses in history that is essentially precolumbian let's say years zero to fourteen fifty an offer the course from fourteen fifty to current day so i think there's value learning world history over more than one year for sure my issue right now is the exam itself is only going to cover fourteen fifty the president and so whatever you're teaching students are going to ask this is going to be on the test and if it's not they tune out what should we know about the some history courses go to emphasize enough one thing is just like i think about africa when especially black students learn about african history a lot of times it just starts at slavery and something that i got a chance to really learn about in teaching ap world is you know the mali empire and the riches of the west african nations and even like someone like monster musso who's the richest person to ever live and he was an african king and that's not something that many students no or many people know so i think that's just something really cool for students to know and understand that like those riches were part of their history those achievements were part of that amanda do amaral thanks so much for being with us thank you so much at the age of sixty four when some people would look at brochures for retirement cruises nell irvin painter the acclaimed princeton historian and writer decided to go to art school not just an adult extension course but the mason gross school of the arts at rutgers to get a new bachelor degree then the famous rhode island school of.

president africa musso amanda writer mason gross school rutgers rhode island school mali amaral princeton six hundred years one year
"mason gross" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"mason gross" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That is essentially precolumbian let's say years zero to fourteen fifty an offer the course from fourteen fifty to current day so i think there's value in learning world history over more than one year for sure my issue right now is the exam itself is only going to cover fourteen fifty the president and so whatever you're teaching students are going ask this is going to be on the test and if it's not they tune out what should we know about that some history courses go to emphasize enough one thing is just like i think about africa when especially black students learn about african history a lot of times it just starts at slavery and something that i got a chance to really learn about in teaching ap world is you know the mali empire and the riches of the west african nations and even like someone like monster musso who's the richest person to ever live and he was an african king and that's not something that many students no or many people know so i think that's just something really cool for students to know and understand that like those riches were part of their history chievements were part of that amanda do amaral thanks so much for being with us thank you so much at the age of sixty four when some people would look at brochures for retirement cruises nell irvin painter the acclaimed princeton historian and writer decided to go to art school not just an adult extension course but the mason gross school of the arts that rutgers to get a new bachelor degree then the famous rhode island school of design for her mfa she is now a real life income producing professional artists to and has written a memoir in her seventies but going to art school with students third her age and how art school change review of what she thought she already knew nell painter there was also a professor of american history merited princeton joins us now from the studios of wbz gio in newark thanks so much for being with us.

president africa musso amanda writer mason gross school nell painter professor mali amaral princeton rutgers rhode island school of design newark one year