32 Burst results for "Maslow"

S6 E12 - This is how to get (financially) healthy

Courage to Fight Again

19:24 min | Last month

S6 E12 - This is how to get (financially) healthy

"Your housing your food your transportation and then medical and absolute necessities so if you have prescriptions or you've had doctor's appointments or you absolutely have to have daycare because you don't have family or friends that can watch and you have to pay for daycare. Those are absolute necessities. Everything else is extra fluff lifestyle spending. So when you're going through and figuring everything out these four things need to be taken care of welcome to another episode of the we serve now. What podcast the show. Where i do my best to answer the questions veterans and their families are already asking so you can make your post military life your best life. My name is aaron perkins. I'm a us army combat veteran husband to a beautiful wife. Daddy to amazing kiddos. I'm the author of the resolve book and that is a step by step guide. That takes you the veteran through a process of rediscovering. Your life's purpose. After you left the military. And i gotta tell you i have so been looking forward to today's episode because my special guest is here to talk about something that matters to every single one of us is topic money. My guest today is quite boss. Marco is a twelve year navy veteran who deployed in support of operation enduring freedom. He got out got his bachelor of science. Degree started a side gig as a financial coach in two thousand sixteen while working in the nonprofit industry in didn't take marco long to realize that he was struggling with a lot of the same financial issues as the people. He was trying to help so in an attempt to fix his own struggles. Marco applied business cash flow principles to his own finances with an eighteen months. He added nearly one hundred thousand dollars to his net worth and his skills are skills that anyone can use. Marco now has his own financial consulting business. Called live like others. can't marco. it is so good to have you on the show today. Welcome to we serve now. What a thanks for having me on. It's pleasure to be here to serve all the rest of the veterans. They're listening absolutely man absolutely. Been looking forward to have you on the show. So what just take a few minutes and introduce yourself. Tell us a little bit of your back story how you got here. Well you covered a lot of it which was great but like it said so. I served twelve years of military. And when i got out i had a mountain of debt. I think it was like sixty thousand dollars in debt. When i left active duty was going to school got my bachelor business management and when moved down to florida a job. They're kinda help me pay down some more of The debt that ended up having once i got back from afghanistan. 'cause so side note. I went to afghan volunteer to to afghanistan to pay off my consumer debt and paid off the debt and then had a ton of money when i got back and did some investments that were really great but the problem was is. I didn't change my spending habits and some other habits. That i had that were really ingrained so i ended up building up that data again and was down in florida before i moved back home to ohio i ended up with like it probably about another twenty grand worth of debt when i moved back home and i was like said twenty twenty sixteen. I started looking at my personal finances. I got married in two thousand fifteen and after a year of trying to manage to all that we finally got everything into really like one pot start applying the business finance principles to my own personal finances and when i first started i was negative. Twenty five thousand dollars in my net worth so because all everything and i still wanna own twenty five thousand dollars so when i started applying some of those principles and turned it around and it was like oh my gosh in eighteen months be able to get to seventy five thousand and net worth. It was not so. I started taking some of those same principles and teaching some people. I knew some friends. And it's like okay. I really got something here but was really interesting. Is that these same principles basic math principles but these are the same things that have teaching the low income. People that for the nonprofit that i was working at so is really crazy that. There's so much parallel. The only difference is that my mistakes were spectacular because there is a larger amount of income to work with so it's it's really interesting the mindset that we don't teach so i that's what it was like. Okay there's a group of people working in the nonprofit world and the rule low income side of things. There's a whole support system around that but there's very few supports for this this middle class. The wealthy know how to do it. The low income have a ton of support. And when you're trying to make that transition to from low income or even the lower middle-class into an upper middle class even making that transition if you don't have some the fundamentals You're never gonna make it or it's gonna take forever by the time you retire like oh okay now i get. It would have been great thirty years ago. Sure so that's why i got into. That's what i got into being a coach. Cool man all right. So so the first question i have for you is it. It's a simple one. But i think it's one of those things that needs to be addressed because a lot of us find ourselves in a situation where we think that our finances are kind of like a bygone conclusion. You know i grew up in poverty. You know song going to stay in poverty. And so i don't even think about i. Just go through the motions. I you know. I get the car loan. I get credit cards. I get in debt. You know i do all these sayings in. I'm not really focused on my financial health right so when it comes to finances why should i even care. How big of a deal is it. Well i would have to say just starting out. It's actually perfect timing because this last year taught all of us. I mean how many people lost their jobs or were furloughed or laid off and maybe two never even get them back. It can come at any time. And if you're not prepared for it is what a lot of people don't realize is that when they signed their name for alone they're trading future time for something right now and it takes a special type of person to be an entrepreneur to be to be able to go out and create wealth but the majority of americans work for their money as opposed to creating their money. If that makes sense and there's nothing wrong with that. There's nothing wrong going to work and and working a nine to five job you can be in everyday millionaire working a nine to five job you can. It's entirely possible but it's just. It's really crazy that when when wrenches thrown into it that we lose traction so fast if thing was like bank rate. It's on the ads that you've been running for me so it's six hundred ten. Ten people don't budget seven ten barely budget. An eight out of ten are living paycheck to paycheck. It's it's crazy as stupid number. Eighty percent of the people in the us are living paycheck to paycheck. That's nuts. That really is so eight out of ten people living paycheck to paycheck. Just you know if if you miss a paycheck or like you just mentioned you lose your job because of whatever reason pandemic or anything else. It's a huge impact. Not just. I don't know how i'm gonna pay bills for the next couple of weeks but it can like really really set you back. I think it's a perfect setup to talk about. What you just mentioned budgeting a little bit right. A lot of people don't budget so let's say for example. I know what a budget is. You know i've heard the term of. I've seen it on the news talk about but i've never tried it for me and for my family. Can you give us an insight into that. Like where do you even get started. Well sure an you can do a search on the internet for how i do a budget and almost all of them are going to give you the first piece of bad advice that you will ever hear when it comes to budgeting track your expenses for the next month. No you don't have to track your expenses for the next month. You know why because what you do. This month is the exact same thing he did last month. Just pull your bank statements. Look at your bank statements. That will is a great snapshot of your personal financial behavior and what your lifestyle choices are and when you take a look at that then you've got you've got gotta place all of those into a it or as we'll talk a little bit here a of a wall for foundation. There are four things that you have to take care of everything else is fluff and you can create whatever whatever other buckets you wine or i mean flake from an accounting. Were coming perspective. These are lineups okay. So you've got you've got your income and your expenses and then your expenses or all of your line break it down and then it breaks down even further when you file your taxes so every category that you make is a line item but there's four that are super important. Four and a lot of the times people tried to budget everything and they say okay budget down every last dollar and even the even the dollars that you're gonna put into savings if you don't have a good foundation to take care of the basic things that you need to have. It doesn't matter what you put into savings. It doesn't matter what what you spend on clothes. It doesn't excuse me it doesn't matter what what extra expenses and entertainment things that you wanna do. You've got to have these four things. Take care of i and what's interesting about them. Is it lines up. Perfectly with maslow's hierarchy and i'll leave it at that for further on all right so talk to us a little bit more about the four walls right. You mentioned the four walls and you know unite chatted about these a little bit before we go kind of hit the record button here as we were preparing for the show but that i'd never heard that term before the four walls. Can you explain like what those four walls are shirt. A quick back story on on the four walls. Is that if you do any personal financial searching on the internet. You're probably gonna come across the name. Dave ramsey dave ramsey. Oh yes some guy of phenomenal mindset really. Is there some things. Because i'm a business guy. There's some things that i can't entirely subscribe to because for me personally. There is some good debt. Because i'm a business guy. I used other people's money to make more money for my business. So that i can go ahead and potentially hire somebody in sure. Grow the economy that right right so for me. There is some good data. But from dave ramsey's perspective. There's no debt is good so the four walls are the four basic things that you need to survive. And when i say talking about maslow's hierarchy the bottom two levels of maslow's hierarchy pyramid are psychological and safety and that deals with food shelter and essentially money and i clued transportation in that because you need transportation get to and from work sir so the four walls are actually order. I it's it's your housing your food your transportation and then i. I don't like saying catch off for this last one but medical and other absolute necessities. So if you have prescriptions or you've had doctor's appointments or you absolutely have to have daycare 'cause you don't have family or friends that can watch and you have to pay for daycare. Those are absolute necessities. Everything else is extra fluff lifestyle. Spending this is still considered lifestyle spending as well but this is your baseline lifestyle. So when you're going through and figuring everything out these four things need to be taken care of and as you're going through the math and figure out okay. I'm not bringing in enough to cover the us basic four things. you're living to lavishly. You have played into the game of catching up with the joneses. You're trying to find too many influencers and live like them and showcase to the world. What all the amount of debt that you're bringing on is essentially what you're showcasing. You're not living the good life you're actually living a really crappy life. So that's kind of the premise of the four walls. And it when. I didn't really know that term when i first started doing my own budgeting but i realize kay. I've got regular monthly expenses that i always have to pay out have to pay my mortgage. I always have to pay the insurance. I always have to put gas in my car. Food on the table and a couple of medications and and some clothes. Those are the things that always spend money on every single month. What's fantastic about that is because it is you have the ability to look back over the last twelve months and really identify what your lifestyle is just by those expenses alone. Yeah that's that's interesting and it's it's definitely a a i won't say it's that different but it's definitely different than like you said what a lot of folks are gonna find when they do that. Google search for when they do that duck go search right on the internet of. Hey how do. I do a budget you know. What are the first things. I i should consider and and using hierarchy of needs and for those who are familiar with it. This basically just a pyramid that that stacks from bottom to top the needs. Every person has basic needs like markos already talked about psychological needs and then tops off. Self-fulfilment needs achieving your full potential including creative activities. And things like that. But with the four walls i know. They're all critical right but is one more important than the other. Is that the all really really for lack of a better term foundational for your financial health. They all are foundational. But dave will argue. And i kinda back this little bit. Is that if you have a choice between spending money on your electric bill and spending money on food you buy food and you can work with the company to to keep your electricity on food. Would probably the be the highest priority. Next would be your housing so everything that's involved with your housing your mortgage your mortgage. Iran's your utilities and then transportation would be third because there are things that you can do if you're spending too much on transportation. There's things that you can do to to lower those expenses but we can get into that little bit and then obviously medical. Now it's it'd be a toss up then if you've got to take medications or you need food a well. Okay then yeah but but at the same time. If the majority americans being healthy and not needing a whole lot of medications food would be the top priority so food station and then the other necessities sure sure so that so that kind of helps me prioritize as far as you know if i do find myself in a situation like I don't know what i'm going to you know. I only have so much money this month. And i can't pay whatever this one bill. Is you know kind of helps me. Prioritize food housing transportation medical. You know and then if it's more detailed it's down to the really really fine details of a few dollars here versus a few dollars here then. I think that's something you really just sit down like. If it's if it's you by yourself you just make the best decision right an absolutely. If it's you with your family you know you sit down with your spouse and or with your partner and you you talk about it like what do we want to do this month to make ends meet well and and i would say to that the amount of people who actually don't realize where their money's going is phenomenal so he say eighty percents living paycheck to paycheck. I would say one hundred percent of that. Eighty percent have no idea whether money's going and they don't realize that they probably have enough coming in to cover these four walls and then some that the problem comes is when they make all of the additional lifestyle choices and then they're like oh. I don't have enough money for food while it's because they just bought a thousand dollar iphone. So i mean like i know that's really rudimentary example. Because most people are buying their phones on the month to month plan that they put on that they tacked onto your bill which side note really crazy. I was trying to buy a new phone for my wife. No cellphone store will let me pay full price outright for the phone. They forced me to put it onto a monthly plan. Really i is crazy not i was like. I've got nine hundred dollars. That i'm gonna pay you right now and they don't want it. They want it on the monthly plan. So what's funny is so my family. We are an android family. Okay we've always been. We've never gotten into the iphones. You know my daughter. She's a teenager now. So she's kind of leading me toward the iphone but we've always been an android family and for the past few years. I have bought all of our phones directly from samsung. I don't know if you can do that with apple or not if it has to be carrier specific and you have to do over a month to month plan but if i go to samsung dot com. I can just buy that phone outright. I couldn't yeah. I basically i swipe my card more or less you know and you type in my numbers. He and then a couple of days i get new phone on my on my doorstep and so have to remember that for my wife because she's a samsung guy. I'm an iphone. Yeah for sure and so we when we started doing that. We've been with our with our carrier for. I don't know five six seven years now and so we're not really planning on leaving and going to another carrier. But i do get the unlocked phones just in case i need to right and so and so it is really nice to just be able to swipe their credit card and be like. Hey here you go. Here's all the money up front. I don't have to worry about that That money coming out every month right so off that sidetrack for second sorry about that it was just. It was really crazy when i was trying to do that. I couldn't believe that is crazy for phone. So why things that. When when i sit down with somebody and i'm going through this. Is that a lot of people. Don't realize all of the essentially the line items within each of these categories so under housing. There's a couple of lines you've got your mortgage or your rent which includes particularly if you have a mortgage. It also

Marco Aaron Perkins Dave Ramsey Maslow Afghanistan Florida Us Army Navy Ohio United States Markos KAY
How to Create an Environment for Self Growth

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

01:58 min | 3 months ago

How to Create an Environment for Self Growth

"I started reading all of these things that i love to read about. Theory of counseling and theory of indifferent theories about how we as humans develop and strive and work through our stuff in life and combine that with what. I'm hearing a lot of when i'm working with my clients at any given time in for the last week one word has been coming up over and over again and that's acceptance so in doing my digging. This morning i was reminded of this. From carl rogers while he agrees mainly agrees with the basic assumption of maslo. You might remember. Maslow's has this hierarchy of needs that old triangle. We learned when we were in grade school. Probably there are certain means that we as humans have to get met before we can reach something called self actualization the needs maslo included in his hierarchy from the bottom to the top are psychological safety love and belonging esteem and then this self actualization and what this means is that we as people. Human beings need relational support before we can develop in this fullness of self esteem. Carl rogers takes it a bit further. He added that for a person to actually grow. We need an environment that provides us with genuineness openness in self disclosure acceptance being seen with this unconditional positive regard and empathy. Being listened to and understood

Carl Rogers Maslow
Using a Prosperity Picture to Create Your Perfect Life with Ellen Rogin

Agent of Wealth

04:37 min | 5 months ago

Using a Prosperity Picture to Create Your Perfect Life with Ellen Rogin

"Back to the agent of wealth. Podcast this is your host mark on. Today's show brought on a special guest ellen. Rogan ellen has more than twenty five years experience in my world as a financial adviser and now focuses our work on consulting and speaking internationally on generosity success strategies and creating prosperity on purpose after media resource and the author of the bestselling book your prosperity. I recently took a workshop. She hosted which. I got a lot out of looking into talking to her about that so l. Welcome to the show. Oh thank you. I'm so excited to be here with you. Mark great so. I you start off your workshop and even in your your book with asking the questions people. What is prosperity meteo. What are some of the responses that you've gotten from from people because i know it's it's different for everyone it is and that's why i love that question so much. Sometimes people go right into. Oh it's money it's wealth. I often hear security. Sometimes people say it's love. It's flexibility in. It really is all over the map and What is so great about that word is helps people start to envision what they really want for themselves and to realize that money isn't the only a scorecard in it's easy especially as a financial adviser when people are talking to you. They're thinking about their money but when we can have a conversation that really expands the. I'm that i think it gets people excited or thinking about things in a way than might not have other thought otherwise thought about them. Yeah and for me that really. It's home as an adviser. Because you know when i started i used to think it was all about the numbers. And it was all about collecting data and spitting out some fifty page report or giving some advice and one thing that kind of made me realize that it's more it's more than that was. I don't know if it was fidelity or if it was another group put out something called the advice value stack and it was a play on a maslow's hierarchy of needs where they have managing the money is the bottom of that pyramid. And that's really the table stakes. Everyone needs to manage their money needs to pay their taxes. Needs to make sure they have insurance. And then you have your goals after that right in your goals may be to retire at this age. And we're still in the numbers with it or you know. How do i save enough to put my kids through college but then once you start going up the stack you're really looking at what import break in. The next level up is peace of mind. You know maybe for someone it's how can they get organized. Or how can they sleep better at night when not having to worry about a lot of this stuff and then i think the top. Which is the pinnacle or where everyone's trying to get to exactly what you're saying is what is your life purpose or do you want to leave a legacy or what what are you. What is all this that really hits home with. What your your messages on and often. I don't think people widened back enough to say like what this for like. Why is it that it's so important to you to have this. And some of the comes from all these outside forces or other nothing against having lovely things but sometimes that materialism takes away from the true meaning that people wanna have in done in the values that they want to impart on their family. If they have kids so i i love the way you described like i know it's about the numbers and that's where i started and then in your evolution as really getting into being an experienced advisor working with your clients. You saw how the real value add is yes. Of course you have to manage money. Well in advise people on the data but it's really having them have a bigger picture and feel really good about what they're doing with their money. Yeah i use the the scrooge mcduck analogy lot with you brought. Say when i say we can. We can count your net worth as it's grown. Count your money all the time but really what is that money for. What makes you happy. What are you trying to to do and you know. I think you mentioned in the book. A lot of people don't know you know it's it's hard to to just ask that question. Fire that question. Someone expect them to rattle off. I want to do this business. And so i think what you do is a lot of visualization creating. At least one we did in our shop was creating this visual picture map. So maybe you can explain a little bit about what that is and how someone can go about doing that. Great what we talk about his creating a prosperity picture which is a visual representation of your financial plan in some ways so some of you may be familiar with a vision board which is a board or a poster that you put images of goals that you have

Rogan Ellen Ellen Maslow Mark
The Neurobiology of Peak Performance with Steven Kotler

FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

05:33 min | 5 months ago

The Neurobiology of Peak Performance with Steven Kotler

"So early in the book. Stephen writes that the only thing more difficult than the emotional. Toil of pursuing true excellence is the emotional toil of not pursuing excellence. I thought that was a really striking idea. Sort of starter interview. I asked stephen torn pack that for me. It's not a new idea. Abraham maslow's psychologist in the fifty s by sang. Whatever a person can be they must be humans evolved to go after sort of to rise to their full potential to tap into their full capability and there are significant consequences. If you don't use the system for how it's designed and and that sounds weird. They're eight major causes depression two of them genetics trauma get the most attention on genetics. Alone will never caused depression or anxiety and trauma as a general release to most radic growth not stress. The store on the other six categories are what happens when you fail the optimize intrinsic motivation. The way it's been designed to be optimized and things along those lines to breakdown in saves system that allows us to tackle high hard goals which were built to do. if we don't it starts breaking down on us for with significant consequences. When i read that what i thought and i'm curious what you think about this as okay pursuing true. Sounds like something for the very few like that. Is that is sort of like your olympic athlete. Your see over major company. But i guess what you're saying is this. This is something that needs to be universal. So how how does somebody who you know. Just kind of normal life integrate. The idea of two excellent into their own life an interesting question. I think most of us have singer to that. We do. Maybe falls in the hobby category for us. Prove that for that matter that we would love to be great at. I haven't met too many people who don't have one or two things like that on this essentially the system is built for that and and the handle that capacity. It's interesting on the more important point though is in this is a point. I make throughout the book. Which is the book is about people who are really interested in tackling high hard goals. Right what would we might call through excellence. But it doesn't matter because people form has nothing more or less than getting our biology work for us rather than gets a so. If you want to have an easier time at work on monday to make better decisions on tuesday you want to be a little more productive on wednesday. Maybe some creative problem solving on thursday. Take your pick the same tools that allow us to achieve. pure excellence. Chur excellence are of the same tools that we can use to improve our performance at any level. That's the only toolkit there is which is our biology. You talk about how you came into this world of looking at extreme performance and you use the term extreme innovation and it started out. Interestingly enough wasn't a lab it was in the world of extreme sports and he were journalists covering it so just to get us kind of in your head and how you were called to do this type of work. How did you arrive to the place you are today. I became a journalist in the early nineteen ninety s journalists astounding career. Because you get to kind of exploit your curiosities right anything. You're super passionate about their You you could write about. And i was super passionate about psychology and neuro science predominantly neuroscience fascinated with how humans work and neuroscience seemed to unlock a level of of kind of human mechanism. It was super interesting to me on the other side. I was obsessed with action. Sports adventure sports rock climbing surfing skiing. Snowboarding in the like and this was the early nineteen nineties. These sports were just kind of nascent activities. The gravity games just starting the x. games had just been launched and there weren't a whole lot of writers who knew much about the sports and i did. I was super curious. So i was lucky. Enough to basically spend the better portion of a decade chasing athletes around mountains across oceans. And as you pointed out the nineteen nineties is often considered the great era impossible in action. Sports were more impossible. Feats meaning things that were believe. Never going to happen. Never been done never going to be done. Were just being done. They were being iterating upon and this caught my attention for all the obvious reasons like it. Just it didn't make any sense. Waves that had been twenty five feet at. That was the max we could serve some. They were one hundred feet tall. Like everything was happening Like that across across the board in all these sports so it begged an explanation but more important was that there was a real every man effort to what was going on the the athletes. I knew who are sort of reinventing. The limits of human possibility. They had difficult childhoods came from broken. Homes it very little education the deb. A lot of money is let drugs and alcohol. There was a lot of risk taking. And you know. I knew from the narrow size of the psychology that normally when those things show up in a population you have bad consequences. People go to jail. People die young. What they don't do is reinvent. The limits of human performance over and over and over again and. That's exactly what. I was seeing so that was sort of where this started for me. I wanted to understand what i was looking at

Stephen Depression Abraham Maslow Trauma Anxiety Olympic Skiing
"maslow" Discussed on Pratt Cast

Pratt Cast

06:03 min | 6 months ago

"maslow" Discussed on Pratt Cast

"I think one thing that a lot of people out there don't realize about the entertainment industry especially maybe listeners of this show is like in your case you book this nickelodeon thing so obviously nickelodeon and disney or not friends and in a perfect world. You probably would have been like. I love to do the movie and i would also love television. Show and make all the money and disney says. No you can't work. Vertical odi neglect. You cannot go work for disney I hate that mouse and so you have to make a decision which is so tough. I imagine especially as a kid. So how long. This is one of my favorite questions to ask people especially people who started really early. When did you realize things were popping for you. Good question to be honest it was hard to really understand it at first because we didn't know things are happening because we were literally so insulated by how much we were working. We single camera show so we're up at five in the morning. You onset at six you film minimum of twelve hours and you just go home and learn your lines. Go back to work and we have like ten pm. Cut off with a police escort to make it to the airport to go fly somewhere in play three shows and be back at six. Am we did this for months years on. It was really hard to like understand what was going on. We get numbers. Oh that's cool but until you actually play music so you actually get out in front of a crowd and then you're like we're playing for how many people holy shit there's ten thousand people here. There's twenty thousand people in You realize at least a few people like that. And then there's always those really cool moments stick in the back of your head like one of the first concerts we ever did wasn't a middle of times square. Most people will never get to experience times square but for one of our first concerts we had every single billboard filming us ly took over the entire place a stage had thousands of people And of course it starts raining right before we go on stage and we think that's six ever feel like rockstars we're out. We know like three songs four and so we do can get off in like you know you don't really recognize how cool that stumpings until years later when you like once in a lifetime opportunity the bar set a little high after that first gig. I guess it was. It was so in our second gig. I ticketed gig. This is actually a fantastically embarrassing stores. First time we've ever sold a hard tickets. I guess we'd played like some random things like you know pop up performance shows but we actually charged people money to see us perform. It was in henderson. Nevada at the henderson pavilion. I believe so. I don't know if a few thousand people. Maybe they made it clear. We only knew by songs but the fans don't read the fine print know that we only know five songs. What we do we will not. They're playing the track your no ban. Nothing little choreography in crush. Our five songs can go off stage and don't realize that everybody's enchanting for an article and we did not have an encore. Didn't have any more music so we felt so bad like screen and all they want us to come out and say one more measly song we didn't fuck and no one so we got in our cars are like waving goodbye like such assets. We gotta go learn some more music but Never forget it anderson. So how long did big time rush run for. I guess our last tour was like twenty three twenty four something like that The show did four seasons almost one hundred episodes in a movie or two in there in a beatles album a bunch of music. I mean we did so much stuff. Yeah i guess. We stopped touring around there. And then what happens next. Look everybody was ready for a break had spent day in out years together. Doing this one thing planning one character of singing these specific songs and that's amazing but any artists wants to mix it up. You don't become an artist you the same thing for your life so For me was very much about. Hey let me. I was focused on acting before. I was focused on music. And i guess. In retrospect would have been nice. Had like a bunch music ready to go. That's not where my head was ad. And i just wanted to go and do grittier roles so i remember like buzzing off my hair for the first time going to do on my first gritty role. Was benny boom movie called. Forty eight hours to live. Where tommy flanagan. Melia rivera de ray davis all these fucking killer actors are in it any was about like drug scene. That's dancing in it in like some fight scenes and got killed someone one of the persons. I remember but that was was so exciting. And i'm like this is what i wanna do and doing. Ten independent films like you realized. Ironically more people will probably see small romcom stars film alabama which also very proud of than some of these other roles at maybe three times as long to film and create of all the effects are your dance or fights or whatever. I'm not just the way that will work. So i just went out and did as many movies that could started getting back in and creating my own sound. Took a very long time and really wasn't until lts couple of years ago that. I found the niche. That i really want to do with music. You know but then undescribable that it will bigger data mentally the stories crazy. It's so interesting. And i just can't wait to see what happens next because you're so versatile if you could only choose one form of art to continue doing what would you choose. I'd never give a direct answer to this question. Not that i'm trying to avoid it. But i truthfully don't know if anything i would lean towards music in the sense that it's more versatile in terms of doing one thing for the rest of your life you can be in a different city every day you can create a new song every day. The turnaround on creating music. You know putting it out in the world is a lot faster than a movie..

five songs twenty thousand people four seasons second gig twelve hours first gig ten thousand people ten pm three songs two three shows nickelodeon couple of years ago Melia rivera de ray davis Ten independent films henderson Nevada First time disney one
"maslow" Discussed on Pratt Cast

Pratt Cast

02:39 min | 6 months ago

"maslow" Discussed on Pratt Cast

"Feel very strongly about the merits of a good stretch before you podcast or before you listen to a podcast or really anything. He'll just do it together. Stretch it out. Okay all right. Let's go do it. This is a wells cast with wells. Atoms iheartradio podcast. All right stretched out. Limburg dealing good as everyone doing out there on the bachelor this week barely. They cut your boy out which i mean. I'm used to listen but this week. I don't even say anything. I'm just there for like three seconds then boom so whatever. I had like seven really good jokes. I was so excited for it. I made like a biggie. To pock joke that i thought definitely was gonna kill pun intended and they caught it. Whatever it's fine it's not about me. It's about matinees. Ginny clarin dale though ha. Who saw that coming every. Everyone got it okay. Sorry certain. here's the great thing about the podcast. They can't cut me out. Because i do the kuttan. You boy is the editor. And also the editors over abc. Listen i get it. I can't stand myself either. So i'm right there with you but not in cutting out our guest today because this guy literally has done everything. He's an actor. He's a singer is a songwriter. He started out early on nickelodeon. Show a big time rush part of the best selling music group of the same name. He's pivoted over. The edm side of the music quarrel got a song right now. That's number one cross. The pond dude won the iheartradio rising star award. Who else the last man. Standing on dancing with stars is the current host of the cw global talent. Show the big stage with lisbeth. Stan us on the first season of cbs celebrity. Big brother he's got a new romcom outright. Now called stars fell on alabama. He's got a war movie coming out later this year. I mean this guy's on everything except my show until today coming up on the wells cast. We got james. Maslo stick around. This is a good one good afternoon. Would you like to try a free sample of our double fudge brownie. Sure that's very good. I'll just take one more to be.

nickelodeon three seconds james this week later this year today first season seven really good jokes Ginny clarin dale Maslo lisbeth alabama The Limburg rising star award iheartradio one double number one
Chakra's, Contemplation and the Rainbow Bridge

LIFE IS MAGIC - Healing

05:52 min | 8 months ago

Chakra's, Contemplation and the Rainbow Bridge

"Shuckers and contemplation follow the exact same path. It is incredibly strange that the maps to the sacred self out true selves are absolutely everywhere and have been since the beginning of time when we moved from our root chakra all the way to crown chakra. We will see that seven stages and the use the same stages of this light and energy flowing throughout body. An after the talk we use that same process In the journey of waking up to what is contemplation so presence gratitude connection love courage empathy and self regulation are seven parts shuckers literally mean wills or discs and to us they are little maps energy maps that take us from one level of life. Pretty much like maslow's hierarchy of needs the six basic needs of of growth. All the maps look the same. So let's look deeper at the shuckers. Understand how that energy flow can take us back to a state of self regulation and sacred self so shuckers to the contemplative desk. These discs are evolutionary software. And they run by computers and autonomously regulate the energy needed for what we do every day. So living a balanced and meaningful life is kinda regulated by these seven shockers e seven colors. And how the energy gets stronger and stronger as we wake up realize ourselves become more spiritual metaphysical is just incredible. So how we do that Especially in our contemplative practices. Are we go through. Things like learning about meditation self-regulation and mind be because shuckers already rooted in the physical body. So when we're anxious depressed lost in our thoughts obsessive thinking that leads to a ton of depression anxiety personality disorder on we turned back to the shockers. We keep it simple and we got back into the physical body so in alcohols and book. We describe that people need to out their minds back into their body. It's simple breathing. Take for example. Meditation relaxation techniques are going to take you back into the body but what four to get the energies open and flowing again. So yoga means union. We keep saying and the union of the seven colors and the flow to us roadmap to keeping aligned open attached connected and moving through the various stages of life without closing down when we closed down. We suffer so the road blocks personality a main to be transcended or transformed as we do the thing that humans do develop more and more consciousness all we are doing is developing more and more consciousness. How we heal. Anything is we go. We look for the truth or reality in it and we develop a new consciousness. That says we're okay. Consciousness is what contemplacion's about and it's what the shockers to sir about sir we hugh imbalances in the body in the mind the soul with an acceptance or an understanding awareness that our minds bodies and souls have been compromised. Somehow how healing takes place as we start to realize in the beginning. I'm not working. It's not working. it's not the life is not working instead. We are not working. Life will out of control for example now thinking and we have lost our way over. Become entangled blocked stopped sick suffering. We develop a disorder an addiction. Whatever it might be all be described as being blocked so those books would be called a thousand years ago. it'd be called up demon shuckers. Those would be the things stress. The demon shoppers. That would stop us from letting this energy flow and what we in contemplative intelligence is how to get that flow going again. We go beyond the imbalances and back to the nature of four. What nature intended so shuckers and contemplation already described as the bodies. Mine matrix they. They show us that something else besides just mere survival and mia problem solution is going on. So the primary shockers made from color root chakra through the heart. Mind body soul and up to the top where we have what we believe contemplative intelligence. I think it has shown us the study of all of this That this map is the way we get to transcend olympic systems. We get to transcend. Fight flattened freeze were sponsors of the downstairs of our brains

Maslow Depression Hugh
Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

Untangle

05:27 min | 8 months ago

Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

"Dr ron epstein. It is so great to have you on tangled. Thanks so much for being here real to be with you. I just want to read some of the quotes that are in the beginning of your book because they really struck me. John cabot zand says this book will be phenomenally useful to all of us who are desperately in need of true health. Care and caring. Dan siegel says the book is a beautiful synthesis of inner wisdom and hard earned impure cle findings and you start the book by saying that you believe the practice of medicine depends on deep understanding between clinicians and patients and that human understanding starts with the understanding of oneself. And i would just like to start with this question. where did you begin with understanding of oneself. It's probably in my james to some degree. Because i remember even as a young child being interested not only in the world outside but also the world inside pat. I was interested in what thought was and i was interested in breeding. I was has not as a child so badly. Learn how to briefing not cost kind of interested in how the body were town on a mind. Were tell ideas got into your mind. Things like that from a pretty young age. I guess it's the upside of being somewhat introverted at that dual view of the world just that interior human observers you. When did you first recognize that in yourself. will you ten years old. Did you have some influences. It sounds like you a seeker that you were asking a lot of questions. Her number certainly started before high school. I was really interested in reading. And i read things that were beyond the point where my world experience but allow me to truly understand and i was reading cavu when i was in junior high school. Obviously you can't really get what he's talking about. I mean i knew the words. But i kind of had the sense that he was really trying to understand the world and sewers. I am discovered hermann hesse fairly early on also that actually resonated with the because all of his novel is basically the same plot to people who start out life one becomes a contemporary live and spends there's lives on monastic search for wisdom and the other goes out in the world becomes longer and tries to understand universe through experiencing the world in a deeper way and i saw both of those in myself and quite a young age thought was drawn to that. I think it was sometime. In highschool that i learned about maslow's hierarchy of human vs botanist like survival and at the top was self actualization wanted the express train to sell That's where i wanna be. I can't say that there's wild ridden. It does the same thing from the. I discovered his poetry. We had to read some of his poetry like a junior high school or something that i really discovered it as a personal manifesto probably but i was like fourteen or fifteen history of connection to the world to everything that the world offer and an internet connection wasn't just observe that but i have merged myself in this i jumped into the water and the deep end and swim through it. So that was the place i started. And as how i ultimately got interested in meditation and autos actually at age nineteen thought i would become a monk. A serious attempt back. Yeah you spent a few months. At the zen saying cisco center person there. And why did i. I can't imagine what some of the older students were thinking about this young kid. Who is there that i just needed to do. That was the next step for me. It sounds like you could have gone down this path of being a spiritual monastic or a philosopher. How did you take what you were learning from. Meditation and from studying at the zen center and then decide to be a doctor. The subtitle of your book is medicine. Mindfulness and humanity. And i think that's so perfectly represents the essence of who you are as a human being but when did this and how did this all come together for you. As a child. I was interested in things medical and originally when we first got an encyclopedia paper encyclopedia. Nothing and i look up. I interested asthma. As as matic started reading about other illnesses aspects of human experience and that coupled with a fair degree of family. i wouldn't call it pressure. I guess some expectation or hope or aspiration that the family would somehow produce a doctor

Dr Ron Epstein John Cabot Zand Dan Siegel Hermann Hesse Maslow Cisco Zen Center Matic Asthma
Getting Past Our Bias and Unconscious Judgements  Howard Ross - burst 11

A New Direction

05:04 min | 10 months ago

Getting Past Our Bias and Unconscious Judgements Howard Ross - burst 11

"Yeah. We all know the Maslow's pyramid the hierarchy of needs right and you know the history of motivation which by the way, we have constantly in psychological research have said, you know, that's really not true. That really doesn't work that way. And Howard it demonstrates a flaw because well, I'm going to let you tell them, you know his big sure because right because our the primary need a name is that you know, it's it's our it's our physical. It's our physical needs are the primary needs and you it's right but Harry Harlow and I will let you take it away. Okay, great. Yeah. Well actually, you know Abraham Maslow created is model 1943. And for those who don't know is basically model needs is considered to be a foundational model in bondage psychology. And it was really it's really important work because it does have us look at human-to-human a tax people but Amazon created a hierarchical structure for these needs and and as you're saying Jay, it starts at the lowest level with our physiological needs food sleep that sort of thing and above that safety wage above that belonging and above that self-esteem and finally what he calls self-actualization which is when we fully realize ourselves as human beings and and for the most part that that has gone unchallenged wage. 270 years at any major way, but we now realize and and some of it is by sending functional magnetic magnetic resonating imagery. You can see which parts of the brain trigger in certain ways. We now realize that something was wrong that that that that belonging is actually a key human need and it makes sense. If you think about it, you know, what's the most vulnerable type of human being's existence infancy? Right? And if you don't belong to a gym is an infant you die and so for the first get and because human beings are more dependent on others to survive in our first couple of years than any other animal on the planet the key message that we get in the early stages of our life is Faith exists because you exist whether your Mom Dad Grandma Grandpa or whatever and so we've been we've been raw and and when we look at things like, you know a suicide bombing whether it was, you know, the Japanese in World War Two or Palestinians today or or other, I mean obviously completely refutes Maslow's notion because in there you see the need to belong to the needs of my larger group or more important in my physical needs now, he's As a footnote to the shape since I wrote the book and and and talking about this I've spoken a lot as as we talked about already and I was at a major university speaking about this and this guy comes up to me afterwards and he says he was actually a direct disciple of Maslow's. He was a student of Madison mezzo died very young but he died in his fifties or heart attack and he told me that at the time that he was working with mezzo, which was toward the end of his life. I was Furious to everybody put it in this. In this pyramid structure cuz that wasn't his original structure that he never apparently saw it as as as as hardened in a hierarchical structure as it was later drawn up now. I don't know whether that's true or whether the guy loved Maslow and he was trying to protect him or not, but I just don't know but if we look at these needs we can see and and and other people like I said for example would be the great Dutch sociology organization sociologist has said that Maslow's hierarchy also applies more in individualistic cultures. Zinc elected absolutely. So if you go to places like like Asia where the cultures are, mostly collectivist the group needs are by far more important than individual needs. So so it's it's so important that we don't that we behave. Like I said, I've said numerous times that we question some of these models that have been so foundational to us because this need to belong to fit in is undoubtedly primary for most of us. In fact, we know that being excluded from a group home in the door. So posterior insular the brain which is the same part of the brain associated with physical paint, you know, I just as a just as an an anecdotal practical level of them, I say this regularly I said this to the college students when I taught psychology, you know, if if if that pyramid and whether it was true or not that it was a pyramid if that was true age understand that you would not have a desire to text message while you drive if your safety was so important. Exactly, but because you want to belong want to be part of the conversation, you will text and drive at the Peril of your safety physical safety. Look I can give you a more basic need how many people who are listening to us have been in a meeting at work. You had to go to the bathroom and you sat there squirming rather than be the first one to stand up and leave the meeting go to the bathroom right now. There's no more basic physically than that right and yet we could all relate to that story. You didn't want to get out. You didn't want to be the one who stood upright. Yes, and and and it's a prayer mat example what you're talking about the need it in the group and not be seen as an outsider by the group members, even that basic physical need of elimination. So so so we know that this is true as human beings. That's awesome. His name is Howard J. Ross the book entitled everyday bias and you are listening to him here on a new Direction. Hey everybody. I

Abraham Maslow Howard J. Ross Harry Harlow Amazon Mezzo Madison Asia JAY
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 1 year ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

The Vergecast

46:42 min | 1 year ago

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

"Everybody from the British. Ask this week's interview. Episode has any Greenberg senior writer at wired. He just SORTA book called Sand Worm New Era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's Miss, dangerous hackers, it is all about hacking group inside of the Russian government called San Worm. They were responsible for the most damaging cyber warfare attacks over the past year there behind not PECI. The hackers took out in the mayor shipping line hospitals across the U. K San has totally escalated. What we think of Cyber War, and he's book gets all into how they were discovered how they were flushed out the. The intricacies of these various hacks. It's super interesting. The book is a thrill ride. If you're looking for something that isn't the virus. This is like a thriller, a highly recommended. It was really fun to talk to her about the stuff. one thing I. WanNa know we're all at home so during this in every might hear some kids in the background. I asked you just be a little forgiving that we're all. We're all dealing with it and he was a great interview. Check Out Sandy Greenberg of sand worm, a new era of cyber war and the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous hack. Any Greenberg your senior writer at wired you're also the author of Sand Worm, new era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous. Welcome glad to be here so even writing about cybersecurity frontier I think you just said two thousand six and writing about Cybersecurity, but this book sand worm as I was reading it. It seems like it's called the new era of cyber war. It seems like there's been a huge turn in sort of state-sponsored. Particularly Russians sponsored cyber attacks. How did you come onto that notion? How did you begin reading this book I'm I'm very curious how you see. See that turn happening well. In late twenty sixteen, my former colleague Kim Zetter she had been the one who really covered state sponsored hacking in cyber war stuff, but she left wired, and this was also at the time. When you know Russian hackers were meddling in the US election, they'd hacked the democratic. National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Clinton Campaign, so my editors were really primes on face, mantra hacking all of a sudden, but what they? They really what they told me they wanted was a actually like a big takeover of the whole magazine. All about cyber war, but cyber war to me is different than those kinds of espionage election, meddling tactics so I went looking for no real cyber war story, which means to me like a actual disruptive cyber attacks, and as I looked around. It seemed like the place where that was really happening was in Ukraine not really in the US in fact maybe. Maybe what was happening in? Ukraine seemed to me like it was in some ways, the only real full blown cyber war that was actually occurring where Russian hackers were not just attacking the election which they had done, they tried this spoof the results of a presidential election, but they had also attacks media and destroyed their computers. They had attacked government agencies and tried to like destroy entire networks, and then they had turned off the power for the first time. In December of two thousand, fifteen, the the first actual blackout triggered by hackers, and just as I was look into this happened again the the effect, the seem hacker group caused a blackout this time in the capital of Kiev so I wince looking in Ukraine for this cyber war story that. Turned into a cover story for wired that kind of gave editors what they wanted, but then also kept unfolding This cyber war kept growing in scope and scale and. The original story written for wired was kind of about the fact that you could look to Ukraine to see the future of cyber war that will what was happening. There might soon spread to the rest of the world. And that is actually what happens to like just after we publish that cover story to same hackers released this climactic terrible cyber attack in Ukraine. Called Not Petiot that spread beyond Ukrainians became the worst cyberattack history cost ten billion dollars, so when that happened, that was when I saw that there was potential to do a book about this that it was not just a kind of case study about Ukraine or even kind of predictive story, but a an actual full story arc about this one group that had carried out the what I would say was not only the first. First Real Cyber War, but the worst cyberattack in history and the you know I wanted to capture the the Ark of that story in the effects, the real experience of cyber war. Yeah, so the group is called sand worm in this is just one of the the sort of opening arcs of the book is how they've come. They come to be named this because references and code walk people through just like it's so. relatable that like even these hackers are using using this language that leads them recalled Sandwich Tell people about it. So when I started to look into the origins of this group after that second blackout attack I I found that this this company called eyesight partners which have been acquired by fire I I, said partners was the first to find these hackers in twenty, fourteen, basically using fishing in kind of typical espionage tactics, plant malware in the networks of typical Russian hacking targets like groups across Eastern, Europe and NATO in a look like what they were doing was just kind of typical espionage. They were planning. This by wear calls lack energy buds will first of all they could see that they were rushing, because they had this server that they were using to administer some of these attacks and they. They left the server, so anybody could look at it in. There was a kind of Russian language to file for how to use black energy on the service, so these guys seem like they were rushing, but even more interesting in some ways. was that they to track each victim each instance of black energy? This malware has little campaign code in each campaign was a reference to the science fiction novel Dune and you know so like one of them was something about Iraq is, and then one of them is about the sutter cars, these like imperial soldiers in in that SCI FI universe so I said partners named this group sand worm, because well just because it's a cool. Name associated with doing, but it turned out to me. It became this very powerful because a sandwich miss this monster that lies beneath the surface, and occasionally arises from underground to do terribly destructive things. partners didn't know that at the time, they they soon afterward realized what sand. was doing was not just espionage, but they were actually doing reconnaissance for disruptive cyberattacks. They were also hacking power grids. They were planning black energy, not only in the European Eastern European targets in the US power grid networks as well. The Ultimately Syndrome was the first twenty fifteen to cross that line in use black energy as the first step in a multi step attack that led to a blackout. So this was not just espionage really was kind of like you know this monster that rises from under the ground to do terrible acts of mass destruction that came to pass so one of the things that comes up over in the book. Is this growing sense of dread from security researchers and analysts? Oh this is an imminent threat to the united. States just Ukraine, but like this is happening here and then there's a sense that the United States actually open the door to this kind of warfare with stuxnet. which was an attack on Iran? How how did those connect for you that it seemed like there's a new rule of engagement new set of rules of engagement for cyber warfare that actually the United States implicitly created with with stuxnet by attacking Iran. Yeah, I mean I tried to highlight. Clearly sand worm are the real bad guys in the story, they are the actual hacker group that did these terribly reckless destructive attacks that actually in some cases put people's lives at risk, the kind of in some parts of the story they actually shutdown medical record systems and I. Think may have cost people's lives with cyber attacks today they are the actual antagonist here, but I also want to highlight the ways that the US government is is partially responsible for the state of Cyber War, and there are a few ways that that's true. I The US! Open the Pandora's box of cyber war with stuxnet. This piece of now where that. That was used to destroy Iranian nuclear enrichment centrifuges that was the first piece of our that actually have caused that physical disruption destruction, and we now see Sandra doing the same thing in Ukraine. In in fact, in some ways around the world, also the the US hordes, these kind of zero day, secret hacking techniques, some of which were stolen and leaked and used by sand worm, but then I think the in fact, the biggest way that I tried to highlight that the US is responsible or complicit or negligent. Here is that we did not call allows what Santorum was doing in Ukraine and say to Russia. We know what you're doing. This is unacceptable. Nobody should be turning out the lights. Two civilians with cyber attacks. There wasn't a message like that I. mean the Obama White House sent a message to Russia over this kind of cyber hotline to say your election hacking is not okay. We see what you're doing and we want you to stop, but they said nothing about a tube blackout attacks in Ukraine, and that was kind of implicit signal to Russia. They could keep. Keep escalating, and even as all the cyber security, researchers and Ukrainians were warning that what was happening to Ukraine, would soon spread to the rest of the world, the US government ignore this both Obama, and then the trump administration until that prediction came to pass and a sand worm cyberattack did spread to the rest of the world, and it was too late, and we all suffered globally as a result, so let's talk about patch it. WAS CATASTROPHIC IN SCOPE, right? It took out the mayor shipping line, which is a massive business. It took out some hospitals in UK like it was huge in scope. I don't think people really put it all together. Talk about how it started and how big it grew. Yeah, so not too was kind of like big apotheosis sandwich, where all of these predictions of the terribly destructive things they were doing to the rest of the world came to pass but it did it started in Ukraine. They hijacked this. The the software updates of this accounting software called me doc that is basically used by everybody in Ukraine. The quicken turbo tax of Ukraine. If you do business in Ukraine, you have to have this installed, so sanborn hijack the updates of that news to push out this worm to thousands of victims mostly in Ukraine, but it was a worm, so it's spread the mmediately end quickly kind of carpet bombs. The entire Ukrainian Internet's every computer at spread to would encrypt permanently. You could not recover the computer, so it very quickly took down pretty much every. Every Ukrainian government agency twenty two banks multiple airports for hospitals in Ukraine that I. could count and in each of these cases. What is eight took them down. I mean it destroyed essentially all of their computers, which requires sometimes weeks or months to recover from, but then as you know, this is a worm that does not respect national borders. So even though it was, it seemed to be an attack intended to disrupt Ukraine. It immediately spread beyond Ukraine's borders. Borders to everybody who had this accounting software installed? That was doing business in Ukraine and some people who didn't so that includes Maersk. The world's largest shipping firm and Fedex and Mondelez, which owns cadbury, NABISCO and ranking manufacturing firm that makes tylenol in Merck. The Pharmaceutical Company in New Jersey on each of these companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars. The scale of this is kind of difficult to capture but I in the book I tried to. To I focused in part Maersk because it is just a good company to look at because you can. They had this gigantic global physical machine that is they have seventy six ports around the world that they own as well as these massive ships that have tens of thousands of shipping containers on them. And I told the story of how on this day seventeen of their terminals of were entirely paralyzed by this attack with ships arriving with just. Piles of containers on them. Nobody could unload. Nobody knew what was inside of nobody knew how to load or unload them with around the world of seventeen terminals, thousands of trucks, Semitrailers, carrying containers were lining up in Lyons miles long because the gates that were kind of checkpoints to check in the these trucks to drop something off or pick it up. They were paralyzed as well. This was a fiasco on a global scale is responsible for a fifth of the world's lable shipping capacity. They were truly just a rendered brain dead by this attack, but yeah displayed out at all of these different victims MERC had to borrow their own each vaccine from the Center for Disease Control because they're manufacturing. Manufacturing was disrupted by this, and it ultimately spread to a company called nuance, nate speech to text software. They have a service that does this for hospitals across the US to dozens of our possibly hundreds of American hospitals at this backlog of transcriptions to medical records that were lost because of this, and that resulted in patients, being do for surgeries or transfers, other hospitals in nobody knew their medical records were updated. I mean this was scale where hundreds of hospitals each of which has thousands of patients missing changes the medical records. We don't know what the effects of that work, but very well could've actually harmed people's health. Our lives I mean the scale of not petty is very difficult to. Get your mind around, but we do know that you know monetarily cost ten billion dollars, which is by far the biggest number we've ever seen, but it also had this this kind of harder to quantify toll on people's lives, so it it you know you read about it at length and wired. Obviously these companies go down of ripples in mainstream sort of general press, but I don't feel like people really not like Oh. This Russian group called San Worms sponsored by the Russian government. Unleash this attack in it caused this cascading effect of failure and disaster cost in that because we know what we can attribute it to the government, our government. I don't feel like that connection got made for people. What is the gap between other as a hack and Oh, this is actually a type of warfare engagement, because that that connection seems very tenuous. I think for a lot of people. Even as sort of the more general mainstream press covers this stuff. Yeah, you know. I don't think that that's is just like the nature of. Of Cyber War I think that was a failing that that lack of connection is a failing on our government's parts, and on you could say even on the part of some of these victims like these large companies I mean I at the time did not pitch it happened. I was fully on the trail of standard within days. I was talking to cyber security researchers who? Who had piece together? Some of the forensics to show the not petiot was Sandra that it was a Russian state-sponsored attack in yet none of those companies that I mentioned mercker Mondelez or Maersk or Fedex, or any of them wanted to say the Russia had done this to them and know governments were talking about either like the Ukrainian government was. They're always willing to point. Point the finger at Russia, but the US government was not, and you know that to me seemed to be just kind of I mean I felt like I was being gas. Let's at that point. I had watched Russia due to Ukraine for a long time at that point tonight. I sort of understood that NATO in the West. We had this kind of cruel logic that. Ukraine is not us. Russia can do what it likes to Ukraine because they're not NATO not e you. They are Russia's sphere of influence or something I think that that's very wrongheaded, but at least it made sense. You know to have that that viewpoints, but now this attack had spread from Ukraine to hit American soil American companies in many cases and yet still the US government was saying nothing I just thought this was bizarre and you know so i. For months I was like. Trying to get any of these companies to tell the story of of their experiences, not Peta I was trying to figure out why the US government wasn't talking about the fact that this was a Russian cyberattack and ultimately I. Think it was I. think it was kind of I know partly disorganization negligence. I think it may have something to do with the fact that the. The? Trump administration doesn't like talking about Russian hackers for obvious reasons, but eight months after it took eight months ultimately for the US government to finally say not that it was a was Russia it was the worst cyberattack in history, and then a month later. The White House impose consequences in put new sanctions on Russia and response, but it took nine months and more importantly it took. Multiple years this without was the first time this was twenty eighteen, and the Russian cyber war in Ukraine had started around the fall of Twenty fifteen, so that's just incredible span of negligence when the US government said nothing about these escalating unfolding. Acts, of Cyber Award that there should have been unacceptable from the very beginning I mean these are the kind of quintessential acts of state sponsored cyber attacks on civilians, trying out the lights. You know that's the kind of thing that I believe that the US government should have called out and drawn a red line across at the very beginning took ears, so I do think it was a big failing. Of of diplomacy, it just seemed like that part of the problem, and this is kind of an expression is it's so hard to describe like if the Russian government sent fighter jets to America and live their support. Okay, like everyone understood, you can see it. You can understand what happened there. In the you know, there's like a however many decades of movies about how to fight that war. This is a bunch of people in a room typing. Like it there's just an element of this where the dangerous Oh federal where the attack is invisible, and while the effects might be very very tangible, the causes are still sort of mysterious people so. My question is who is sandwich. What what do we know about them? Where do they work? What are they like? Do we have a sense of how this operation actually operates? In some ways the the biggest challenge of reporting this book, and I spent essentially the third act of the book, the last third of the reporting of the book, trying to answer the question of who is in worm, who are these people? Where are they located? What motivates them and I guess to partially spoil the ending here. They are a unit of the year you. They are a part of Russia's military intelligence agency, which is responsible for you know, this is not a coincidence. They are responsible for election meddling responsible for the attempted assassination of You. chemical weapons in the United Kingdom they're responsible for the downing of a seventeen as commercial passenger jet over Ukraine were three hundred innocent people died on the G. R.. You are this incredibly reckless callous out military intelligence agency, but they act like kind of almost just cut through mercenaries around the world. Doing Russia's bidding in ways that are very scary, so I threw essentially like a combination of excellent work of a bunch of security researchers who I was speaking to combined with some confirmation from US intelligence agencies, and then ultimately some other clues from the investigation of Robert Muller into meddling all these things combined created the trail that led to one group within the JERE. You that were you know I? Eventually had some names and faces even address of this this group, and all that was actually only finally fully confirms After the book came out Justin in recent months when the White House finally actually was the State Department's. End as well as the UK on Australian and other governments together finally said yes, sand worm is in fact that this unit of the year you so this theory that I developed in positive near the end of the book was finally basically confirmed by governments just in recent months. So one thing that strikes me at that is I, think of the Russian military things. Gru is being foreboding being obviously, they're very very good at this other a buttoned up in then they have like a incredible social media presence that kind of POPs up throughout the book that distracts from what doing. They set up Gucci for two point Oh when they were doing the DNC hacks that fed to wikileaks in the. That account insisted it was just guy. They set up the shadow brokers which was. I read. It is just like your some goof-balls like they wanted to seem a lot dumber and a lot smaller than they were. They were very effective at it to people I. Talk About those that strategy, and then I guess my question have is like a re better at seeing that strategy for what it is well. You make a really interesting point. The uses these false flags like throughout their recent history that we I should say we don't know that they were responsible for shadow brokers. In fact, nobody knows who shot a brokers. The shadow brokers truly are, and they are in some ways the biggest mystery in this whole story, this one group that hacked the NSA apparently and leaked a bunch of their zero day hacking techniques, or maybe they were even say insiders. We still don't know the answer to that question, but the other other incidents you mentioned. That are you are responsible for this Guja for two point zero fake hacktivists leaked a bunch of the Clinton documents. They're responsible for other false flags like they at one point to call themselves the Cyber Caliphate pretended to be Isis. They've a pretended to be like patriotic pro. Russian Ukrainians at some point they they're always like wearing different masks ends. They're very deceptive. in the a later chapter of the book, some of the biggest one of the biggest attacks they. They did was this attack on the twenty thousand Olympics where they not only wore a false mask, but they actually had layers of false flags where as cyber security researchers W. This melwert was used to destroy the entire back end of the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics. Just as the opening ceremony began, this was a catastrophic events. The aware had all of these fake clues made look like it was Chinese or North Korean or maybe Russian. Nobody could tell it was like. It was this kind of confusion bomb almost designed to to just make researchers throw up their hands. Give up on attributing mallards. Any particular actor was only through some amazing detective work by some of the analysts that I spoke to the able to cut through those false flags identify that sand was behind this essentially, but yeah, it's it is a one very real characteristic of the jury you that they are almost they seem to almost take pleasure or like be showing off their deception capabilities to and their evolving those capabilities they are getting more deceptive over time as fake gets more, destructive aggressive. Advertising content when I say Utopia what comes to mind? Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the Pathak social body. Everybody in that place. Everybody happy now. While the peacock original series brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. The concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. 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Not Connected Right, but the way they throughout the book the way they execute East campaigns they're deeply connected, and that seems like not only just a new kind of warfare, and you kind of craft, but some just consistently seems to work in surprising ways like the tech press is GonNa. Be Like Gucci. I says this and we're. There's never that next step of also we think it's Russian government, and that seems like first of all I'm dying. I imagine the meeting right. I would love to be a fly on the wall of the meeting where they decide what their twitter name is going to be today. I'm very curious how they evolve those attacks in such a way that it just seems to be more and more effective time. Yeah, I mean. I also love to have been those meetings in. It's my one kind of regret in this book that I never actually got. Interviews, it's almost an impossible thing to do. They liked find defectors from the R., you or something. He will tell those stories at a knock it murdered I mean. It's kind of a possible, but but. In some cases? I think your earlier points. They almost seem kind of bumbling in these things they do them in a very improvisational way. for two point Oh seemed almost like it was a justice thing they invented on the spot, tried to cover up some of the the accidental ups like they had left russian-language formatting errors in the documents that they had leaked from the DNC, so they admitted this guy who appeared the next day and started. Talking about being a Romanian. Friends as motherboard Lorenza, Franceschi decry he started this conversation. Align with with Guja for two point, oh basically proved at the guy could not actually properly speak Romanian. BE Russian speaker. In fact, it was. It was almost comical at the same time. They're using very sophisticated hacking techniques doing destructive attacks on a massive scale, but they're also. They seem like they're kind of making it up as they go along. They do things that don't actually seem very kind of strategically smart. They kind of seem like they're trying to impress their boss for the day. Sometimes with just like some sometimes, it's just seems like the Jere. You wakes up in asks themselves. Like what can we blow up today? Rather than thinking like? How can we accomplish the greater strategic objectives of the Russian Federation? So they are fascinating in that way and very stringent colorful group. That's I think one of the biggest questions I have here is. We spend a lot of time trying to imagine what flat and Mirror Putin wants. You know when he grows up, but it. None of this seems targeted like what is the goal for Russia to disrupt the Winter Olympics right like. Is there a purpose to that? Is that just a strike fear? Is it just to? EXPAND THAT SUV influenced. Is it just to say we have the capability furious is there? has there ever really been the stated goal for this kind of cyber warfare? That one is particularly mystifying. I mean you can imagine why Russia would want to attack the Olympics. They were banned from the two thousand Eighteen Olympics doping, but then you would think that they might want to attack the Olympics and send a message maybe like eight deniable message a message that you know if you continue to ban us. We're GONNA. Continue to attack you like like any terrorists would do, but instead they attacked the winter. Olympics in this way, that really seemed like they were trying not to get caught, and instead like make it look like the was Russia North Korea? And then you have to like what is the point of that was? The could kind of. Sit there in Moscow and kind of like rub their hands together in gleefully. Watch this chaos unfolds. It almost really does seem like it was petty vindictive thing that they just for their own emotional needs wanted to make sure that nobody could enjoy the Olympics if they were not going to enjoy them I that was, but that one is i. think outlier in some ways for the most part you can kind of see. The Russia is advancing. The G. R. You that sand worm is advancing something that does generally make sense which is that. In Ukraine for instance, they're trying to make Ukraine look like a failed state. They're trying to make Ukrainians. Lose faith in their security. Services are trying to prevent investors globally from funneling money into Ukraine trying to create a kind of frozen conflict, as we say in Ukraine where there's this constant perpetual state of degradation. They're not trying to conquer the country, but they're trying to create a kind of permanent war in Ukraine and would cyber war. You can do that beyond the traditional front end. It is in some ways the same kind of tactic that they used in other places like the US which. which here we saw more than influence operation that they were hacking leaking organizations like democratic campaign organizations and anti doping organizations to kind of so confusion to embarrass on their targets. They're trying to influence like the international audiences opinion these people, but in Ukraine, it is in some ways, just a different kind of influence operation where they're trying to influence the world's view of Ukraine. Influence Ukrainians view of their themselves under government to make them feel like they are in a war zone even when their kid hundreds of miles from the actual fighting. That's happening on the eastern fronts in the eastern region of. Of Ukraine so in a book you you you go to Kiev. You spent time in Ukraine. Is there a sense in that country that while sometimes light goes out sometimes our TV stations. Their computers don't boot anymore. Because they got rewritten, the Hydros got Zeros like. Is there a sense that this is happening? Is there a sense the defy back is there does Microsoft deploy you know dozens of engineers to to help fight back. How does that play out on the ground there? Yeah, I mean to be fair. Ukrainians are very stoic about these things and regular. Ukrainian citizens were not bothered by you know. Know a short blackout. They didn't particularly care you know. This blackout was the first ever. Hacker induced blackout in history but Ukrainian cyber security. People were very unnerved by this end, people in these actual utilities were traumatized I mean these attacks were truly like relentless sins very kind of scary for the actual operators at the controls I mean in the first blackout attack. These poor operators Ukrainian control room in western Ukraine they were locked out of their computers, and they had to watch their own mouse cursor. Click through circuit breakers, turning off the power in front of them I. Mean They watched it happen? At these kind of Phantom hands to control of their mouse movements, so they took this very very seriously, but yet Ukrainians as a whole I mean they have seen a lot. They are going through an actual physical war. They've seen the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of the east of the country. You know the the date hits. A Ukrainian general was assassinated with a car bomb in the middle of Kiev, so they have a lot of problems, and I'm not sure that cyber war is one of the top of their minds, but not patio I. Did, actually reach Ukrainians normal. Ukrainian civilians to it. It shook them as well. I talked to two regular Ukrainians. who found that they couldn't swipe into the Kiev Metro. They couldn't use their credit card at the grocery store. All the ATM's were down The Postal Service was taken out for every computer that the postal service had was taken out for more than a month. I mean these things really did affect people's lives, but it kind of. A until that kind of climactic worm. Not Patio for I think for this to really reach home for Ukrainians. who have kind of seen so much. How do you fight back? I, mean I one of things that struck me as I was reading. The book is so many of the people you talked to people who are identifying the threat. They're actually private companies. Eyesight was the first even detect it. they are contractors to intelligence agencies the military in some cases, but they're not necessarily the government right like it's not necessarily Microsoft. Who has to issue the patches from the software not necessarily GE which makes simplicity, which is the big industrial controls talk about a lot. How does all that come together into a defense because that seems like harder problem of coordination? Yeah, I mean defense in Cyber. Security is in an eternal problem. It's incredibly complicated, and when you have a really sophisticated determined adversary, it know they will win eventually ends I. think that they're absolutely lessons for defense in this book about you know. Maybe you need to really really think about software updates for instance like the kind that were hijacked to a with this medoc accounting software. As a vector for terrible cyber-attacks. Imagine that like. Any of your insecure apps that have kind of updates can be become a a piece of Malware, really unique to signature networks need to think about patching on. There are just an endless kind of checklist of things to every organization needs to do to protect themselves so. In some ways that just like a Sisyphean task and I don't. I don't try to answer that question in the book because it's too big, and it's kind of boring as well, but what I do really hammer on is the thing that the government's really could've done here. which is to try to establish norms tried to control attackers through diplomacy through kind of disciplinary action through things like kind of Geneva Convention for Cyber War if. If you think about a kind of analogy to say like chemical weapons, we could just try to give everyone in the world a gas mask that they have to carry around with them at all times, or we could create a Geneva. Convention norm that chemical weapons should not be used in if they are than crime, and you get pulled in front of the Hague. Hague and we've done the ladder and I think that in some ways should be part of the the answer to cyber war as well we need to establish norms and make countries like Russia or like organizations like the G. Are you understand that there will be consequences for these kinds of attacks, even when the victim is not the US or NATO or the? The EU and I think we're only just starting to think about that. One of the questions I had as reading is it seems like a very clear red line for almost everyone you talk to is attacks on the power grid right? That is just unacceptable. You should not do it if you do it. You've crossed a line and there should be some consequence. Is, that clear to governments. Is that something that our government says? It's something that the says it has been established. It seems like it's it's the conventional wisdom wants to salvage, but I'm not unclear whether that is actually the line that exists. It definitely has not been established, and when I kind of did these I managed to get sort of interviews with the top cyber security officials in the Obama ends trump administration Jay Michael Daniel was the cyber. Cyber Coordinator for the administration was the kind of cyber coordinator boss in the The Homeland Security Adviser for trump and both of them when I asked him about like wiped. Why didn't you know to put it bluntly like? Why didn't you respond? When Russia caused blackouts in Ukraine? Both of them essentially said well. You know that's not actually the rule that we want to set. We want to be able to cause blackouts in our adversaries networks. In their power grids when we are in a war situation or when we believe it's in our national interest, so you know that's the thing about these cyber war capabilities. This is part of the problem that every country. Absolutely the US among them isn't really interested in controlling these weapons, because we in this kind of Lord of the rings fashion, we are drawn to them to like we want to maintain the ability to use those weapons ourselves and nobody wants to throw this ring in the fires, of Mount Doom. We all wanted maintain the ring and imagine that we can use it for good in out. So that's why neither administration called that Russia for doing this because they want that power to. Make the comparison to to nuclear weapons but Negotiated drawdown and treaties with Russia in the past we count warheads where aware that the United States stockpiles can destroy the world. Fifty Times over today maybe tomorrow one hundred hundred like what we have a sense of the the measure of force that we can. Put on the world when it comes to nuclear weapons, there's a sense that Oh, we should never use these right like we have them as a deterrent, but we've gained out that actually leads to his mutually assured destruction like there's an entire body of academics. There's entire body of researchers. Entire body is got scenario planning with that kind of weapon. Does that same thing exist for for cyber weapons. There are absolutely. Know community is of academics. Policymakers who are thinking about this stuff now, but I don't think it's kind of gotten through to actual government decision. that. There needs to be kind of cyber deterrence in how that would work. In in the comparison to nuclear weapons is like instructive, but not exactly helpful. In fact, it's kind of counter-productive because we cannot deter cyber-attacks with other cyber-attacks i. don't think that's GonNa work in part because we haven't even tried to establish it yet. There are no kind of rules or read lines, but then I think more importantly. Everybody thinks that they can get away with cyberattacks that they can. They're going to create a false flag. That's clever enough that that when they blow up a power grid, they can blame their neighbor instead, so they think they're. They're gonNA. Get Away with it, and that causes them to do it anyway. A not fear the kind of assured destruction so I think that the the right response, the way to to deter cyber attacks is not with the promise of a cyber attack in return. It's with all the other kind of tools we have, and they've been used sometimes, but but they were not in the case of Sand Werman. Those tools include like sanctions which came far too late in the story indictments of hackers. In some cases, we still haven't really seen syndrome. Hackers indicted for the things that they did in Ukraine or or even not petty. And then ultimately just kind of messaging like calling out naming and shaming bad actors, and that has happened to some degree with Sandra, but in some cases there have still been massive failures there there has still been no public attribution of the Sandwich attack on the twenty eighteen Olympics I mean. My Book has been out for months. I think show pretty clear evidence that syndrome is responsible for this attack. The very least it was Russia and yet the US and Korean War, These Olympics took place at UK, none of these governments have named Russia as having done that. That attack which almost just invites them to do it again whenever our next Olympics are going to be, I guess maybe not this year, but if you don't send that message than you're just essentially inviting Russia to try again so I think might my big question is what happens now? I mean right we you write about. The NSA has tailored access operations, which is their elite hacking group. We are obviously interested in maintaining some of these capabilities. We've come to a place where people are writing books about how it works. What is the next step? What is the next? does it just keep getting worse or does this kind of diplomacy you're talking about? Is that beginning to happen I? Think there is some little glimmers of hope about the diplomacy beginning to happen I mean this year in February I think it was the State Department's called out a sand worm attack on Georgia, where a worms hackers basically took down a ton of Georgian websites by attacking the hosting providers as well as a couple of TV's broadcasters in the US. State Department with a few other governments not. said this was sand. Worm named the unit of the GRU. That's is that was confirmation that I've been looking for for a long time, but they also made a point of saying that we're calling this out is unacceptable, even though Georgia. Georgia is not part of NATO or the U. so that's that's progress. That's essentially creating a new kind of rule. That's state-sponsored. Hackers can't do certain things, no matter who the victims and that's really important. Also, it was kind of interesting because federal officials like gave me a heads up about that announcement before happened, which they have very very rarely do and I think they were trying. To say was in we. We read your book and we. Got The message okay like Stop attacking us about this like we're trying. We're doing something different here I. Don't want flatter myself that I actually changed their policy, but it did seem interesting that they wanted to tell me personally about this so i. I think that like maybe our stance on this kind of diplomacy is evolving, and we're learning lessons, but at the same time we also see the attacks evolving to. To and their new innovations in these kinds of disruption happening, we've seen since some of these terrible Sandra attacks. You know other very scary things like this piece of our called Triton or crisis that was used to disabled safety systems in a oil refinery in Saudi Arabia on that was you know that could have caused an actual physical explosion of petrochemical facility? The the attacks are evolving to okay final last real question. Tell people where they can get your book. You can find all kinds of places by on indie Greenberg Dot net. Written another book as well previously, yes. That's right. I wrote a book about wikileaks. Cypher punks and things like that. That's right well. I'm a huge fan. It was an honor to talk to you. Thank you so much for coming on I know it's. It's a weird time to be talking about anything, but the coronavirus I was very happy to talk about something else, which is that it seems a little bit more in control Even if it is quite dangerous, a thank you for the time. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm glad to provide people with a different kind of apocalypse as a distraction.

Ukraine United States Russian Government Nato Olympics Kiev United Kingdom Sandra Cyber Award State Department Kim Zetter Barack Obama Clinton Russia San Worm Sandy Greenberg NSA DNC
Recentering Our Souls When We Feel Out of Control

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

05:09 min | 1 year ago

Recentering Our Souls When We Feel Out of Control

"Good. Day To you all. Hey, lynn sober therapist, hanging out and Beech, tree, city and feeling. Oh my goodness some overwhelmed today. I. Don't know about you, all but I feel like. Wow, this thing. This cova did political intense chaos. That the United States is going through, but certainly it's happening in other countries as well is not going to end anytime soon. In fact, things are getting crazier as we rolled toward the fall and kids going back to school so much dilemma. so much uncertainty and wow. We really don't even know where to turn. At least I don't know where to turn for patients any longer so today I thought I'd talk about my feelings of uncertainty and. Ways to create some semblance of calm in this crazy crazy time in our lives, tips and practices and hints, and whatever else I can pull out of my back pocket. For us to recenter our souls, I know. I need it I'm pretty much thinking you all need it as well so that's what we're. GonNa do today. For months now we've been consumed by this thing. And it's entangled in most of our conversations with friends families. The looks above are masks at the grocery store. I was just at target this morning and everybody looks tense. It creeps into our minds when we're alone and. We can see the frowns on everybody's foreheads. Yep, even over those masks. It's this energy that we have in the air and. Even though we're trying to go about our lives pushing through and You know motivated. It's hard and of us are not doing it I know I'm not doing it every day, and it feels bad, and when I was thinking about it last night and this morning. It is because it just feels so inescapable. We can't see the light at the end of the tunnel. It's all consuming and I know for me. I have got to find a way out of this. In my time of self reflection over the last week when I've been trying to figure this out for myself, and of course trying to prepare for what I'd like to share with you all. It really comes down to for easy. How do I consume all this? What am I letting into my mind into my mindset if you will into my? Very fibers in my body. How can I help myself from not feeling this overwhelmed this feeling of not being able to escape this problem. Let's I go back to what's actually happening to me and likely all of you collectively we have to look at an acknowledged that this incredible anxiety inducing situation that we're in produces a lot of uncertainty. And feeling as though we have zero control especially in regards to our safety, which when you're looking at the maslow's hierarchy of needs, it is one of those very first building blocks, and it is at the heart of how we are hard wired to respond to the world fight, flight or freeze, feeling, fear and anxiety during this time is evidence of our humanness. It can also allow us to be more cautious, careful and protective of ourselves if we can dig in under that fear and lifted up a little bit, so that we can build some buffer zone in between the fear, and that automatic response that were having. It's tough, so hang with me. What we I have to pay attention to in this idea of consumption is it's not just the news. It's hyper vigilance when we hear somebody, cough or sneeze. Or breathe hard whether it's our family. Members or somebody were standing next to six feet apart at the grocery store. We are listening harder. We are watching seen with big awareness is for danger. All of this has a deep effect on our sleep. The way we talk to each other our appetite how we eat what we eat, digestion or just having this fear looming above us.

Cova United States
Building Resilience in Your Medical Staff

Outcomes Rocket

06:52 min | 1 year ago

Building Resilience in Your Medical Staff

"Welcome back to the PODCAST Sal Marquez. Here and today. I have the privilege of hosting Chris Democ and Carlos Arce both are at the outstanding company elation. Chris is the founder and he's been interested in what drives improved human performance since his days in college, a curiosity about developmental psychology expanded into a love for organizational development and the design of technologies that improve organizational performance. He was inspired to start elation after a career the tech industry is passion. Passion for helping people through the use of innovative technologies transition into a calling to help people flourish by applying what they know from neurobiology and mindset research, seeing the transformative benefits of his approach, it's only fueled his enthusiasm, and helped the track, an extraordinary team of people who share in the mission Carlos Arce is the Organization of Development Consultant and facilitator at Elation, and he's been highly successful as a keynote speaker, workshop, presenter and consultant he works. Works directly with many of the clients and organization hired by Elation. He's a coach and teacher, whose purpose is to inspire people to be better. He continually helps leaders. Companies achieve outstanding business results while improving organizational culture and employee engagement. These are these are things that we all strive for in our businesses, and in our in our organizations and today we're going to dive into the work that they're doing at elation to help with the problem physician burnout. burnout and the feeling of lack of community, those things that are so important and primary needs in in Even you think of Maslow's hierarchy of needs they're they're getting after it in a big way and have seen a lot of success, and and I'm and I'm privileged to have both of them here with us today to talk about the work that they're doing so Carlos and Chris. Thanks so much for joining me on the podcast today. So, thanks for having a huge absolutely so before we dive into the work of Elation love to to get a feel for what inspires both of you to to work within healthcare. Well, this is Chris. I have looked at the statistics in healthcare over the last several years, and been absolutely sort of amazed at the level at which out has become an issue among physicians and other medical personnel you know studies been fairly consistent that it's around the fifty percent level of diagnosis symptoms of burnout, according to the WHO's diagnosis trim, so it is sort of a burning platform issue for healthcare in the United States If you have physicians who are performing at less than their optimum. Ability obviously impact the quality of outcomes or people, yeah, and unsolved. That's a great question. I had the privilege of actually spending thirteen years of my career in healthcare as the. Support percent at a title that some people find a little bit mystical called chief learning officer for a portion of that time where you got I got a chance to really experienced the industry on a daily basis, and to be honest with you. It was an extraordinary privilege to watch the kind of work that's happening daily by nurses and doctors, and in my time there I really got a chance to explore the cultural dynamics of howled interactions. Interactions between professionals how the interactions between administration and clinicians although kind of contributes to the general sense of the support and the affect of daily activity rate, so in my case I wasn't necessarily ride into address burnt out, but I was really focus on. How do you altima optimized performance of both individuals in the group? So I had a passion for healthcare from the very beginning when we started doing work with elation seen the results that we. We, were accomplishing private sector, a lot of different kind of exploratory technologies in the combination of exporatory and proven methodologies. That's thought had something. I think that can contribute to this to this industry that is as Chris. Put you know dealing with some pretty challenges, free dot, daunting threats that happen on a regular basis. And how do we make sure we we We give it to the folks who need it the most love asset so. So fantastic I mean. The problem is clear, and and you know we we talk about the quadruple aim that fourth one being you know clinician satisfaction, right and wellness, and so you guys are tackling it head on, if providers aren't healthy, then it's going to be even harder to provide better outcomes for patients overall, and and so let's let's dive into it, guys. What is it that elation is doing to add value to the provider ecosystem? Yeah I'll I'll take that on crystal in. If you want to chime in, feel free to. My. What we're doing is we're looking at the problem. In its most authentic form, we are addressing this as an organizational dynamic. We see that we know the pathway that clinicians have to take to become practitioners in this country is not easy. It is not for the faint of heart, so we actually often referenced the notion that we'd take some of the most resilient humans on the planet and created epidemic burnout, and so if you're honest about that. That statement and you have to acknowledge the systemic implications of that. You know what what's happening when you put those people into this workplace that over time ends up eroding this amazing competency that they bring to the table, so that's an important element because of our approach because of that focus. We see that there isn't. This isn't about fixing physicians and this isn't about this direct cause and effect relationship that will just one thing is causing. Causing this dynamic for everybody there is a local element to this that you've got to pay attention to. And then there's this combination of both the individual and the individual with Indus Group in the system, so we've taken methodologies that are helpful for individuals like executive coaching that we know works and puts people in the right spot. We've taken this approaches. We've learned for organizational development when it comes to creating workplace cultural dynamics that are that. That are healthy, and that are actually what we would call resilient, enough themselves, so this idea of organizational resilience which involves group work and group interactions between the the key players, and we have kind of combine those two ultimately influence not only the individual themselves in a way, and give them informed about what helps them, or what actually contributes or undermines their own resilience, but also best in them as catalyst for change within that

Elation Chris Democ Carlos Arce Sal Marquez United States Founder Indus Group Development Consultant Officer Consultant Maslow Executive
The Best Type of Content to Create During Rocky Times

Marketing School

06:16 min | 1 year ago

The Best Type of Content to Create During Rocky Times

"I'm Eric Su and Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about the best type of content to create during rocky time so again we're in the thick of it right now in this cove in nineteen. We hope everyone staying safe. So you know what we'll go ahead and jump into this right now because typically what you would do when you're creating content letters blog content video content. You're on a normal cadence you know. You're talking about the newest at least for us. Neil nine on this podcast new tools new marketing tactics all this stuff right but you know in times like this happen you have to kind of adjust a messaging that you have and think about truly marketing is is thinking about what are people's desires during this time and a lot of people they safety right a lot of people they want to be able to save their business and want to be able to keep the lights on. So you have to think about how you might adjust your content strategy and I think one of the smartest things that you can do is if you're lucky enough to have really let's say you have a product and you have special data profit while for example or even this. I'm looking at this website. Right here is go. Dot Within Dot Co and the euro the sub folders retail dash pulse. We can search for that and this agency right here. They spend about five hundred million. They manage five hundred dollars in ad spin. And you can see. Let's showing the different categories like ecommerce getting crushed right now. You know fresh is not doing that. Well and I think just having data and presenting a very simple way for people to look at their signs that is something that is genuinely helpful while not trying to prey on other people kneel. You can also use any cure research tool and type in you know industries that you're considering going after you'll start seeing trends over the last twelve months and that'll include some of the past few months during the krona virus as well and that'll give you ideas of what's growing popular and what's decreasing. You can do the same with Google trends as well. And when you do this you'll get feedback on what's growing on a day by day basis. Could Google trends can do hourly or daily weekly monthly? Whatever you want and then on Google trends you can also see what's trending on. What's hot right now? These will all give you ideas of the type of content. That's working the other thing that I want you to do is go into your Google analytics and look at. What's been the most popular over the last thirty days and compare that to the previous thirty days. That will also give you some ideas of what's working right now versus what was working before. Yeah and I think a couple other tools that you can use. You can definitely use twitter search feature. It's I often find. The trends are really helpful. I've actually been using twitter quite a bit more than the other social networks actually back. I should delete off my phone but I get a lot of my news from twitter and h refs is good because they have a content explorer section. And you can see kind of what's trending very similar to that but sumo actually keeps up with the trends is also combining these together. You're going to be able to you know be equipped to well be in the know in terms of other types of content great and Neil to my my first point. You actually did something on your blog. Posts around Corona virus correct. I do something around current a virus. This is when it happened really early to let people know not to freak out about the traffic and I broke down. What industries were decreasing in increasing in? How much buys Walsum conversion data? Funny enough it was probably one of my most popular posts in the last twelve months. Didn't have any intention of that. The Post in generate any revenue of course because there was nothing to really pitching there but more so to keep people at ease. Because they're like oh my traffic's diet. Google extra factors. 'cause it's something that most of us have never been through technically probably all of us haven't been through and yet it did really well but the problem with those data rich post is it's really hard to create them. Not everyone will another option for you. If you see other people creating these data rich posts you can use tools like Info Graham in Cambe and turn it into info-graphic cite them as your source put on your website. Head of all the people that linked to original source in Sheridan and ask them to share content linked to it. And you'll find that you'll do quite well doing that as well. Yeah I mean you know coming back to to earlier like don't talk about mindset that much but if you think about people psychology right now think about maslow's hierarchy people want to survive right now. That's the most important thing so you know when people are worrying about marketing. They're probably working in advertising or they rely a ton on advertising or Seo right so they wanNA bring about how the protect their business because that ties in with their livelihood and that ties in with their employees livelihood. Now you know for the survival blog that I have more. We're looking at the traffic when we look at some of the things that we have been creating content wise. It's basically what everyone's looking for. They want tactics on survival. They're looking for specific equipment. They want reviews as well so because of that not seeing anybody is trying to take advantage but knowing what people are looking for right now a creating it at the right time. That's all you thrive in terms of your content creation. And then during this time you don't want to write content too much in advance and schedule it out because things are changing so drastically you ought to be able to play by the day and what. I mean by. That is if you're one who likes planning that's fine but be willing to change around which content you publish each day depending on what you think may do well during that time and if you don't schedule too much in advance you know look a few days beforehand and right on what's working there has yes. There's still volatility but not as much as there was during the early days of the corona virus will. I don't know about you but I basically stopped posting as much to instagram. Because it's like you kind of have to be aware of the stuff that you're posting. Make sure it's not tone deaf so I don't know about you. Yeah being more careful on what I post because I don't want to be too aggressive not necessarily even The things that aren't related to corona virus. But still. I just want to be sensitive enough post anything that could potentially offend anyone even though it's about marketing or whatnot

Google Neil Patel Twitter Eric Su Dot Co Cambe Maslow Sheridan
Transcend: The New Science of Self-Actualization, by Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D.

The Psychology Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Transcend: The New Science of Self-Actualization, by Scott Barry Kaufman, Ph.D.

"About Maslow's we're we're going to go into your new book coming out called transcendence is that right that's it's called transcend transplants. Verb got it transcend. Is it like an order? You're giving people please transcend. Yes yes that's the idea. It's an action action word for sure. It's a hopefully a inspirational northstar kind of book. They kind of shows what humans could be well any builds on the work of Abraham Maslow's. So tell us a little bit belt who he is we all. We've all heard of him but Philipson is if we didn't know oh good. I'm really glad you said that. Because I've had other people billy well no one's no good no sue Masilela. Why should they care about your book and we thanks so I like your attitude about that? Everyone knows who might as well. Well I think most people who've taken introductory psychology class who have taken an introductory management class have come across maslow's writings. Yeah for sure. I've come across at least if they never even heard him as well have come across that. Connick pyramid now. As Abraham Muscle was a humanistic psychology. The pyramid is the hierarchy of needs. That we're talking about correct maslow's hierarchy of needs and it's usually depicted as a pyramid where you have n- order of needs. That must be met before one can become everything. They're capable of becoming sandwiches labeled soft actualization. Now this is the story this is this is the story that's being told to so many introductory psychology management students and people who see at diagrammed on the Internet however it turns out that massive never drew a pyramid and and there are so many misconceptions about the hierarchy of needs. It's it's incorrect. How it how. It's been taught the past sixty years. Correct a list of needs a hierarchy. But he's never drew them in the form of a pyramid correct. He never conceptualized in that way. His theory was very developmental. He made it very clear that we are constantly this dynamic of moving two steps forward and one step back and then we can also that we can. We can target multiple need simultaneously. We don't have to wait to to start self actualising until everything else has done until we check all the boxes and also as I like to say in. The book of life is not a video game. It's not like we reached one level of the hierarchy like connection. Some voice from above is like congrats. You've unlocked esteem mortal combat or something. It's just not the way the world works and was very clear about that so I really tried to infuse the spirit of what Mazal actually meant as well as the rest of the humanistic psychologists it really is an attempt more globally in this day and age in this world today to to bring back a lot of the ideas of of the humanistic psychologists have been lost but tell us what the hierarchy is. What are the levels the original model in medicine and I revised it revised it but in the original model you had the safety needs or even had below that yet physiological needs okay like food water shelter and safety needs need for certain sense of predictability in your environment and then you have belonging in love and he lumped him together which I teased them apart? And we can talk about that in in my my revised model but he had love and belonging together and then he had a steam needs which is esteemed from others esteem. It's the esteem and others hold us in both. I'd say he. He has two components of that. Both the scene from others as well as our own self esteem. But the problem with that is it's hard disentangle that because we do drawl so much of our own self esteem on this team. It's almost like redundant in like ninety percent of humans and then but then you can get to the self actualized individuals so that's too that's the next level is self actualization is a big. It's a big leap jets. I've always viewed that as quite a jump like okay. I feel really pumped up ego. Wise boom can self actualize? I you know this seems to be a lot of steps along the way there. And in a Lotta ways. That's what I try to. My book is is connect those dots and I took self actualization out as a stage. It's not because it's not we ever reach again. Life is not a game. It's not like you ever reach self actualization and then you win the princess or whatever that was whatever my my video game. I understand just an ordinary language. The words you know physiology safety belonging esteem but self actualization. I'm betting most people hurt either directly or indirectly from maslow's hierarchy of needs. Can you can you tell us a little bit about what he meant by that? I contact Maso talks about in different ways. But there's one one quote he's he used to. If you give me a moment to actually find it I really love this quote. It was the best description of self actualization. I could find okay. Short tie found a unpublished essay that he really wanted to publish it was he was calling critique of self actualization. This was really his attack. He really wanted to publish this before he died. And instead it was left in an unpublished collection. But this is the quote. I think this is this really gets the heart of what he really thought about. Self-isolation we try to make a rose into a good rose rather than seek to change. Roses into Willie's incessant pleasure in the self actualization of a person who may be quite different from yourself even implies an ultimate respect and acknowledgement of the sacred and the uniqueness of each kind of

Abraham Maslow Connick Pyramid Abraham Muscle Philipson Sue Masilela Billy Mazal Maso
"maslow" Discussed on Marketing Above All

Marketing Above All

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on Marketing Above All

"Is good and then as you continue to go down the pyramid and I'll go through those different areas. You'll see that. It goes down to the bottom which is psychological but the only way to get up the pyramid is if the items below have been met so at the bottom of the pyramid is what. I would argue the General. I guess characteristics and such of human beings in general. And that's psychological. So that's things like breathing and food water sex sleep. I mean different things like that and then you go up the ladder or up the pyramid and the one right above that is safety. And that's when we're GonNa talk about today and that's safety but more so security security of your body employment in resources your family health business property the one above that is love and belonging and that's friendship family and sexual intimacy. The one above that is a steam so self esteem confidence achievement respect of others and then finally at the top again is self actualization so and what does this have to do with everything going on in your business so plenty? You'll see that I mean when times are good and business is humming and everything seems really really bright. We tend to focus on the top three so the love and belonging esteem and self actualization but when things literally start to go south and life becomes uncertain and the future becomes uncertain. We've very rapidly fall down into those lower two tiers of safety and psychological and I think that we can agree that as of this very second most of us feel like we are in the safety category as we speak and when we fall into those bottom two categories and ends up happening is our decision making becomes flawed. We often start to make hasty and unwise decisions because it's based on fear and it's fear of the unknown and even as we put this brave fronton and say everything's GonNa be fine and everything's GonNa be okay. We're really still not one hundred percent. Certain of that exact statement and ourselves and really for good reason. I mean that the scary news and the scary media. I mean that affect it's already having on our businesses really makes a lot of people wanna just go deep hibernation in a cage and or cage but a cave and sleep until it's over. I mean there are days that I've been waking up thinking that this is all a bad dream but as business owners. We not only have the welfare of us and our families to consider. But you've got your employees near customers and clients to take into account now the declining stock market valuation of retirement accounts that really only adds more fuel to the fire and and really continues to exaggerate and really can aggravate the situation but again you know all that so what I'm looking for you to do is to take some steps back from this abyss and that'll allow you to start to get a better view of what the future might realistically hold. We can't predict the future because this crisis is just so unusual but we can definitely start look at recent history and look at facts not necessarily hype so some of the things that I've learned doing just an insane amount of research so the first cases of this cove in nineteen were reported in Wuhan China during the summer of Twenty nineteen now even with China slow response and things like that the new infections they're claiming have essentially reached zero by the end of March. And there's been other countries that have taken aggressive action. Singapore Hong Kong Taiwan Cetera. I mean they've been able to keep the virus at bay and they've done that even with their close economic times so despite the slow realization by the US government that this is such a really serious threat. I mean they've definitely jumped into gear to really start to slow things down. But when I look at things I tend to look at. What'S THE WORST CASE SCENARIO? And if we use China as an example we're looking at a ninety day span possibly even shorter now. Of course there's going to be long term implications and things like that and those really have yet to be seen and those are obviously dangerous threats and things like that but if I look at that being the proposed and probable time line you can start to take some actions now. If you don't believe this is going to be a short term thing I mean you can go into hibernation mode and literally hunker down but for every threat. There's an opportunity and there's an opportunity for you as business owners to leverage this time to grab the market share from people that are going into hibernation. They're literally going in to hibernation. So if you're really worried about what's happening in how it's affecting your business. I encourage you to start to act. Everyone has to start acting rather than retreating. And there's a really good quote and the quote is everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth. It's not about getting knocked down. It's about getting back up and I know because I'm with you working with people just like you. It can be lonely at the top as a business owner like it can be insanely lonely. But what I've realized because what I was doing was looking at the media constantly and I get. I'm not a doctor and I'm not arguing. I'm simply trying to give you some of the facts that if this situation should potentially be around for three more months on the high side effect you but more. So what are the actions that you can start taking? How can you start to Pivot Your Business? And I want you to listen to some of the episodes that I've done over the last two weeks because I'm giving you ideas to pivot how to communicate things to slash plan and all of that good stuff but I thought this episode would be important today to really just talk about this whole maslow's hierarchy of needs but more so to just bring your awareness to it that I'm concerned that a lot of you are making really really rash decisions and I almost made a couple of those myself but when you start to see the situation as it is start to find the opportunities it refrains your brain to start to act strategically an act to preserve your legacies and keep your family there and keep your business intact and your team members. Hope you've enjoyed today's episode of knows a little bit off typical marketing topic but maslow's hierarchy of needs. Shirley is a marketing topic. Get out there. Take some action to day. I'll see you back here tomorrow. Michael Asner signing off. Good morning good afternoon and good night. Thank you for listening to this episode of marketing. Above all get out there make a change and take some action and hey don't forget to leave a five star review until all your friends. This is the greatest marketing podcast ever ever ever. We look forward to seeing you here tomorrow..

business owner China Wuhan China US Singapore Hong Kong Taiwan Michael Asner maslow Shirley
"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

"Either. Do Billy Lisa or I love rabbi. Don't WanNa do Billy's yeah. I don't approve of any of this. Is that what the Mid West is. Just that much withholding I love you. I love you I love you fucking poker chip you put on the table. Like what the fuck does it mean. It means you got a chip at the fucking cashier. Does I go I love you like like like people go. I Love I love you too. I'm trying like cody's family. Like they say it and I believe them and I'm like I love you. You choose like a hard for me to say it to cody's dad but like like those people say I love you fucking just hanging out that gets just like Martin and I just like I love it. That's like a family I come from those words mean something. Can you help oatmeal. What's your love language because it sounds like words of affirmation aren't but you gotTa have? I mean it's not like a normal thing that happens people are like I don't want these fucking gifts. Or whenever cody. It's like like all bets are off. It's just whatever and I think that may be part of the problem is that I look I. Ah Go like. Oh that's an intimacy thing. Love is for partners and that makes it maybe sexual and so maybe then you can't. You're not supposed to say I love view to people that partners with Keith. And Steve Twenty five years. Can you define what love is between you two. Yeah we don't want to kill each other. Ah We take the desire to kill each other and we crumple it off. It's Thanksgiving what are you guys do it do you. How.

cody Billy Lisa Mid West Steve Twenty Keith Martin
"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

"Month about a month and a half after we met. We were on tour together. We were not the only time I've been. This is Dave Matthews is known. God knows. Steve Steve's here can I can I ask you both. So you're both deadheads and fish fish. Fifty ooh I love fins fish fry fan mannix. They call them what what is. I'm not talking Shit. What is the appeal of dead? Had like like grateful dead and fish. Because I listened to it. And I don't really like get Improv Improv. Jazz style. Improvisation applied to rock and roll music. Basically right so if you hear jazz and you think boring. You probably won't like the debtor fish right it's because you're watching transparency and stage. You're you're like they're doing something they're going like. Hey let me try this bone bubble right it is it. Is it really Improv. Or are they doing the obviously songs and songs but they improvised segues and they a lot of they'll just they'll just they'll just right for a while. So we hypocrites that's such an important distinction. It's not just riffing. It's more like narrative storytelling without words hurts. Basically using bite improvisational. Yes okay wow yeah. It's it's a fish for me the what I love about their improvisations and their style l.. Is that they build these sort of repetitive and yet still subtly slowly changing sort of patterns and I swear where. It's just like how my brain works like I do. Great thinking at fish shows really. Yeah like the big thing for both fish is that it gives one a chance to be alone with oneself in a really beautiful way in a crowd of people. Yeah I love being alone around people. That's one of my favorite things. Our friend here has whittled was a big fish. Guy had a whole all podcast about like chuck come at me about fish. And that was his whole thing it was later on parks and REC and was like a valued employee and then he'd go to fish concerts and it. It's like I never heard it described that way though that it's a way to actually it allows you to keep people at a distant now. Jerry has gone did did you. So this'll have dead shows they do. The company was used to go to them. Not so much jerry. Jerry was pure. It was genius But fish like let's say who don't know anything about any of this. If I went to like just walked in cold to a fish show. What do you think my New York was really boring? Yeah and you might think that lyrics were nonsense and I think that most of the fans are robotic cult members things in unison. UNISOM dive bar in Orlando Florida and a giant group of people came in and there was a Jimmy Buffett show had just broken up in a bunch of fifty year old fifty. Something Sixty somethings parrot. Heads came in and they were the nicest happiest fans I've ever met in my life and said the there must be something going on here. Jimmy Buffett I want to take my own life now I know exactly. Yeah absolutely well. I'll tell you something. Actually there is believe it or not a Dan Harmon. Grateful did Connection which is that. I'm an which is one of the things that we've been hearing about all night. Tonight is is misfit power. That's how Bob Weir said it a about the grateful dead. That's what drew people to the grateful dead because no they were not cute route. No they were not stylish. No it didn't matter. If they were you know had a hit record or not people would be self selecting into the community of deadheads and just because you love the music and you like the people and you love to have a good time around these people but not a good time like those other people have but this this good time and I think community has self selected in the same way for people who haven't felt at home in other places in the world but really feel at at home here. Yeah.

Jerry Jimmy Buffett Steve Steve Dave Matthews deadheads Bob Weir Dan Harmon chuck Orlando Florida Guy New York
"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

"A towel. So that like this line is straight you just want slavery might straight lines. Everything is straight is my favorite line against anything. If if anything's Kirby that's actually like well it's just not the style. Yeah well they don't they don't really have like curves so much as maybe you're facing the vaccine it never works is the word Komo is referencing a a whole style or just arming Ki. Ki Mona keep means where and mono means thing things you wear so it is like A. It's a style hi. It's like La Cosa Nostra this thing of ours it's just garbage garments. Yeah but I mean it is a certain style of garment. Do you rock Akebono just around town especially. Yeah oh well this I mean this is special but yeah I do wear. Sometimes you're visiting from Japan Going back home soon or home is a sucker for you. Yeah Yeah I can't okay so you you she you. You gave me a a folded piece of paper Gami. I know I know I know I do. Origami I made a floor.

La Cosa Nostra Komo Kirby Japan
"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

"That's one of coolest promo codes. It cut out the Harman. Thank God yeah too. Long as the tyranny of Harman's name just slathered all over our rand. That's what the new podcast I cash should be called. Yes Oh my God. We're doing Matt Spencer You have just one picture seem so me. Upload picks whatever I walk some Dick Pics summer not I said Said Hey Spencer take skyline I said Hey ze bastard take a look at my sky and the church singing Spencer her can take you to a weird uncomfortable place because I think the last time we talked. Maybe I was having dinner with you. In San Francisco with cody. But I think maybe the election had just happen and we were like hippies in San Francisco going like okay. I guess the world's ending now now but by the way but like name and now like I guess I something that I have perceived as a tragedy is that whereas in the past neuro neuro diversity built the Internet neuro diversity like gave us everything that we're using. Swipe left swipe right like who comes up with that like the answer is and and what are we all. We're all moving that direction but like now that the infrastructure has been placed and like all of society eighties on the Internet. To the point where you're presidents are chosen by the Internet. My biggest frustration is my brothers on the spectrum spectrum and I don't mean I'm not diagnosing myself I'm saying my people my I narrow divergent people by virtue of their Hans Solo mentality -ality. They're like I don't fuck and like think like anybody like that. Those folks are now whereas is in the past they were the builders of of of what we have now they are simply sitting on line. They were they're now I I watch them the only way they can express their neuro. Divergence is by going. Oh blue but our emails. Yeah I wake like like I'm like dude. You're you don't like you like in my wrong about that or well. I mean there are always a lot of people watching television but yeah I mean I know what you mean. You'RE NOT GONNA I'M NOT GONNA take part in this system like okay classically. Yeah your psychology has not taken pertinent system however now the definition of that taking pertinent system has has now become part of this fucking death star. And I'm like Oh no I was twenty five one off and just like I received my swimming pool. I I don't know I know in the early days of wired when we're all in this one huge room with dub music playing and everybody was high and had Hicks on there. Yeah we thought the Internet was going to absolutely unleash human creativity and unfortunately what at least was Russian propaganda. We thought that the Internet it was like bound. Everybody assumed that almost in a shameful way I think we were all like God damn wins the government GonNa catch onto the fact once someone in Saudi Arabia can just sell you jewelry in Montana that everything. Racism is GonNa stop like everything's GonNa stop like it's GonNa pull the plug everything that's been driving human jingoism wisdom and I think it was the opposite opposite like Oh. The Internet made us more racist. Well not US But yes people may be racist. I certainly do. You know what it's made me a bigger fucking Dick. It's not devicive. It's made me go. There's they're good people and there are bad. People never felt that way before. Yeah I I agree with you. It's made me a worse. Buddhist regular sort of tired fantasies involving certain we spoke earlier. Are you in over the last few weeks when people were kind of coming to town. Because it's going to close in. I mean we a lot of people that talk about like why they listen to our weird unprepared stupid show and it means a lot. It means different things to different people. What makes you as someone who does what you do? What what what draws you to it and what made you come out to go see because a lot of people came from far and wide to come come tonight which is really really cool and Kinda blows my mind like what? What is it for you personally that this did or does or didn't do? What's what's your connection to this? I don't really have a lot of personal connections overall so it's blue unacceptable..

US San Francisco Matt Spencer Dick Harman rand Montana Saudi Arabia Hicks
"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

"You get saw. Ladan net carpets autistic cystic. It'll take you anywhere but it doesn't share but they I would. I would watch them and they would go like I love. I Love Abba because he doesn't Have Pinocchio Syndrome he doesn't do. This doesn't do that and I was like. I want these people on my side. I want to do right by them and then I took tests tasks online because I wanted to learn the details of like I wanted to send them signals. I'm on your side. I I want to be like if you were like writing sons of anarchy like let me take a test about motorcycles like oh my handbrake gives me skin burns or whatever. I'm like whatever. Give me fucking talking money. Chang like I was only doing it through greed and narcissism. Let me. I like this community. I I want your approval. Well you know I went through the same thing while writing your tribe yeah us. I started writing about autism is a science writer for wired but as soon as I did a bunch of research going all the way back through through the Holocaust and everything I realize I like these people. These people are on a journey towards Thomas Created America right exactly and Chinese Burns talk to me. You said yes. Explain that to me. What I mean is autistic adults for most of the twentieth century like living and dying and institutions so so and everybody was talking about autism behind their backs so it was like Oh what causes autism? Believe it or not most autistic people don't wake up in the morning and say I wonder what caused my autism. They think about how they can have fun or how they can have friends or how they can fall lover how they can get a job or etcetera and so I wanted to send them signals in my book that I was on their side to and so that's why my book sort of took off with the blessing of the artistic community for which I'm very very great. Yeah Yeah it was. I've listened to regard. Yeah and there are anyway but Sorry like I was describing this person. Who can't I wanNA talk about autism and she literally did not know that you're the guest tonight? And so I I would be remiss so the guy the guy we should bring her and I spoke to. I spoke for you. Did I was at the earlier. And she said I think it was her first episode. You're the guest and we have to bring her out. I don't want to put too much pressure. But a a also don't want her to live the rest of her life going like I wanted to talk to autism and then the autism guy was on the show. Whatever so Jessica Right Jennifer Jennifer.

Chang Jennifer Jennifer Thomas Created America Jessica
"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

"Summed it up so well let's the whole year class also is like magic and you have a person trying to explain magic to you the whole time pretty fascinating. Yeah no it's it's a lot of fun. Biology Guy Myself but the site. You don't like it consider that and I like biology just like a weird theater play it built on the set and then I responsible for now. Okay here's a real question for. I want to know about as as a teacher now. You've done middle school and high school like I do. Want to know when you're standing in front of the Class Lake in. Try to be honest about an I do trust you had dinner together and like your I like like I always always wonder about high school teachers. Like what how much of your brain is occupied by that idea of Europe performer. Marin like I'm killing I'm dying. I'm losing them. Oh yeah getting them back. Yeah I like a lot. Yeah and how much does it drive what you're Doing because I would think if I were a teacher. That's why I'm not a teacher because I would be like okay. Guys to two equals a yawn and like equals party ready through. It doesn't know but I would teach that because I'd be like don't kill me. Yeah no it's well. I saw when when I was a kid I loved doing theater so I feel but then I also fell in love science and studied science so I do feel like it's sort of a bit of acting and a bit. You're like you know. Who am I presenting as like character that they can trust? Yeah I feel like when I think about it I feel like I'm definitely myself in front of my classroom. I'm really opening my kids. I try to be really honest about a lot of stuff but I do feel you like I put on a character when I get to school every morning a little bit. I'm a lot more outgoing. I'm a lot more outgoing and humorous there. Then you're gonNA find out that I am tonight. I feel like the bow tie is part of that. But that's an absolutely because I'm thinking of running a simulation of my high school south and like imagining myself being in your class and my first thought like just looking at you before would without knowing you at all I would be like. Don't fuck with this guy. Oh God no no. I don't think I've ever taught a student who thought that about me me. Well I mean. Don't fuck with him because he could kick my ass. I mean don't get on this guy's bad side because he's actually like he's hardcore. Og nerd and like he is going to pay huge dividends. If you're like if you give him a minimal on out of attention and he's and he will leave you behind with the smart kids if you if you fuck around. That's a version of hierarchy that I would recognize he keeps gets really nice letters years later even from students who thought his class was too hard or whatever whatever like it makes you cry sometimes to get right. I got a lot of things in American. Modern Society about the Bowtie Tucker Carlson. The BOCCIA is sort of flake. Hey like formal so but only in a in the sense that I had to Keith. Can you know it's it's I can't put my finger on it. Can you tie because Oh you wear them all the time right one. Every do you do it without looking mirror. I can't do it with looking. I have terrible spatial reasoning left. And right gets it's mixed up so if I try to look here and do it so you do it without strangle myself would it be. Would it be a bullshit thing for me to ask for your entire to bow tie guy was except that I have to have a mirror to a lot of people have never seen a bow Taibbi tied including speaking for myself..

Taibbi Class Lake Tucker Carlson Europe Marin Modern Society Keith
"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

"The the clean lines and I think it's like oh it's not for poor people. It's meant to protect rich people from the apocalypse collapse but not from throwing a brick at the window. No it's meant to know it's got a really sensible price point no I know but it's it's meant for when the world ends and you have to like go. Oh between your billionaire compounds so you could just drive over people with spears or whatever aesthetically. That's what that's what it presents but the reality what it is is A. He's eliminated the the big because he caught so much shit for like. I'M GONNA make my own car. That's part of why it's hard to make a car is because because engineers will tell you what you make. Humans feel safer by adding like these Weird Roman arches to the architecture which don't add to the safety of the car are but if you just make those straight lines he can make those cars even faster. They're cheaper that trucks going to be cheap. That's one I read. I read in wired magazine. It is. It's not super expensive. Speaking of wired magazine we're GonNa Bring yes. I brought these guys down from San Francisco because we're in the final leg of our podcast. There's no rhyme or reason to it except that I love them and then the history of this show like of the the amazing decade that we've spent together is one of the highlights was my ability to reach across the world having read a book and say like hey come down to make a new friend and I just I just wanted these guys to be here for the for the end times and and chat with us and a good introduction Dan Marino bring please welcome New York Times bestselling author cyber our truck. What Steve Silverman and key?.

wired magazine Dan Marino San Francisco New York Times Steve Silverman
"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on Harmontown

"The word job sure. Aw then harbor thank you. The law is a Spencer UH SPONSOR TAB Damn Damn Damn jail Spencer Spencer Sir. I already did something ladder all all now Dan that with me. I not go burress tool Dan. I remember breath time. When you didn't knock over stool scares yeah okay good button Hutton? PODCAST star.

Recovering from a Breakup ft. Onward: A Post-Breakup Concierge Service

This Is Why You're Single

10:38 min | 1 year ago

Recovering from a Breakup ft. Onward: A Post-Breakup Concierge Service

"To you that this is what you're saying awesome Elena we're talking about what's new in dating news signs you're not ready to date after a break up and cosmo readers way in about whether or not it's okay to ask us significant other to delete picks of their ex then we're diving into the Mailbox Stanford your listener questions including one listener grappling with staying friends with her ex and enough you're listening who has questions about pet sharing with an ex but first we want to welcome this week's guest she is the CO founder of Onward Post Breakup concierge service in New York City the service is being talked about by everybody from refinery twenty nine to good morning America please welcome Lindsay Mac welcome to the show thank you I'm so delighted to be here were excited to have you because you know a lot of people they struggle after a break up and you have created an entire concierge service around this problem so tell everybody exactly what is post breakup concierge how much does it cost what does it provide sure download yeah so I think when my best friend and CO founder and I were coming the idea are thought was you know again at sort of coming out of our own breakup wouldn't it be amazing if there was like a ghostbusters for breakup right here's this traumatic transitional life moment where you really need to call in the big the big guns to sort of get yourself you know out and onward so we started thinking about what were the main pain points and leaving a long term relationship and because you know we live in New York City the big points was moving out you know how do you quickly relocate if you're living together with a partner where do you go how do you find housing how do you appear new life you're you know get off all the streaming accounts and all that kind of stuff and sort of start over but then there's of course the second piece after logistics which is holistic finding therapists finding a gym sort of reacclimating yourself to society in a new phase because you might need a new gym if you if you worked l. with your husband or husband boyfriend at the same the same Jim Yeah I mean your husband I guess breakout of do both we do both we do both you know we see the primary folks in our service to be folks leaving breakup not not divorce is a lot of people end up turning their lawyers into their therapist Sierra which is probably a lot more expensive than hiring Lindsey service you probably you are getting through a divorce remember to use your divorce attorney just the logistics yeah yeah use them sparingly and then for for all other issues maybe talked to Lindsey Yeah we're we're a lot more affordable within your divorce attorney you don't need either of us but if you do we offer ten day thirty day and three month plans to kind of get you moving and our price points are a lot lot less lot less money were like one ninety nine is our is our entry point yet time's up by lake ten you're talking about a divorce attorney so our per our right what does one ninety nine covers what chunk of time so that's the ten days that's a really good deal for ten days if someone helping you like I like I feel like one hundred ninety nine hundred therapists charged yeah like one session -actly exactly and we're not we're not your therapist but certainly we act in in sort of a asses ambassadorial role and you'll find a therapist exactly so that's yeah I actually love that about your service that you guys don't claim to be like the aw how whatever like you you outsource to the people that are experts in each fields rate yeah that's one thing that's Angela and my pet peeve is like people Oh pretending to be experts in a certain field like even when it comes to dating Angela are very clear that we are not trained therapists this podcast is US giving best friend big sister advice and when we are talking about serious issues that's when we have our experts on the show so we we love that about you that you say you look to subject matter experts to Guy eight from everything from fitness to finance food prep how do you find your vet your experts that you bring in so we've been really fortunate we work out of the wing co working space says and we found a lot of women to love love wing the wing and they've been a great resource for finding the folks in our ecosystem and we spent a lot of time like you're eating and vetting these folks like I would never recommend any any service that I myself wouldn't use and so we're you know we're looking for folks in financial planning and therapy and you know moving companies that don't suck which is as hard in New York so you know we spend a Lotta time interviewing folks and talking to them and making sure that they're you know that we're putting our members in the best hands possible for this moment so you mentioned at this whole idea came from when you and your co founder went through your own breakup so how did that go from being like I wish that was the thing that existed to being like let's make this a thing that exists I think it was a weird it was weird moment. I went through my break-up right before the election for Hillary heartbreak our life and as I was working with sort of Mita in in the sense that she had just recently gone through her break up and we realized that we were like buying the same I e furniture and we we sort of have the same logistic needs we thought Oh my goodness there are so many friends that you know as New Yorkers who was actually in DC you know who we've helped through this experience that you know there's they're sort of like there's sort of like a scalable role roadmap to this and no one is clean that Beijing you can you know you can rent the runway for your fashion you can freshdirect for your groceries but when you're going through this and I do all of that they seem all of those things you can go to the subject matter experts but wouldn't it be amazing for this moment where and also New York is the city of transplants we don't necessary really have our you know mom from Ohio down the street to like car mattress down four flights of stairs and maybe even she was here we'd be embarrassed to ask her because you know breakup come with like a certain sense of stigma and embarrassment sometimes which we don't love so wouldn't it be amazing if we could take the experience we had and make it be helpful for other people we started thinking about it in both of us have backgrounds in project management I was Broadway producer for a long time Angela before she booked we'll have to talk about that later is I don't even like Broadway Junkie doesn't seem to Suffice Theater nerd Peter Nerd we stopped we love so megan are both very very big Broadway people she is a fan me as a former participant in Kearney world I and I think there's something very similar to Broadway and breakup you know obviously a lot of high drama but also like the show must go on right like you know the break-up is not the end of your life if this is a transitional empowering moment and we're going to figure it out you know we're going to get you on stage and like get it done And so I think there was something in that that we were like the service needs to exist so I guess we have to do it. Your website lists the three phase process for coping with the break-up can you walk us through what a typical aw sure what steps are sure as we're sort of finding unfortunately you know not breakup are the same in the way that no two relationships are the same but they do sort of seemed follow a similar path which is like the first step is always sort of the logistics piece like you're in this survival mode and you gotta you know if you were living together or if you have you know commingled anything you've got to figure out how to take care of that so so we look at the Logistics Pieces Bean Housing and moving and just your day to day like a good place good as to sleep you know we we started this off the sort of psychological concept of maslow's hierarchy of needs you need a place to sleep every night you need a place to be then the next phase we call the holistic which is like okay you've gotten settled in like let's focus on your emotional and total wellbeing physical wellbeing are you getting enough sleep or you're drinking water but you know with therapy it'd be good idea would be finding a new place to work out you canoe good idea for you would it be helpful for you to start kind of engaging in your neighborhood in some way and then finally like what we call sort of altruistic stage which is really just because we wanted is at the end but essentially like okay now you sort of gotten yourself together like maybe dating is something you're interested in maybe like expanding your community because a lot of times what happens in breakup we lose we lose a big portion if not all of our community you know you don't have your XS friends anymore you don't have your exes family anymore you know you sort of have to Ford your new your new sense of self and your new sense of tribe your new community out of that so we focus on that sort of the last last piece of it I love that yeah so I have a lot of a couple of friends going through breakup right now and they're in therapy and something they always say to me is like I wish therapist would just got to do because at therapists can't do that so we'll we'll like a break up concierge do that for you a little bit I mean we're not you can't force their hand but we do try to kind of happening here what are the resources you have to get going and whether that's like okay like maybe you should delete the unfiled up person on facebook because every time it's

New York Elena Beijing Facebook Hillary Angela Peter Nerd Mita Ohio Producer Megan Ten Days Three Month Thirty Day Ten Day
"maslow" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from the Motley Fool whose mission is to make the world smarter happier and Richer Their Service Motley fool stock advisor makes picking good stocks easy when you become a member Rostock advisor you'll get to new stock recommendations every month plus access to every past recommendation and the Motley fool is offering five stock pigs for NPR he our listeners for free goats fool dot com slash radio hour to learn more support for NPR and the following message come from comcast through Internet essentials comcast has connected more than eight million people from low income households to high speed Internet most for the first time more at comcast cooperation dot com slash. Internet essentials support also comes from Netflix. The politician Peyton Hobart was born with a silver spoon and a dream to to become president of the United States. PEYTON's first hurdle is becoming president at Saint Sebastian high where he must outwit a scheming gold digger the revenge bent ex of his secret lover backstabbers and indifferent high school voters indulge with the politician starring Ben Platt Gwyneth Paltrow and Jessica Lang now streaming only on that flakes asthma. I think it's time for a big change all right. What does that mean. I think it's time to make the NPR politics podcasts age daily podcast. Well we do have more than ample news. You and I are on the campaign. Trail seems like nonstop and now there's an impeachment inquiry into president trump so starting this tweak the NPR politics podcast will be in your feed every weekday to keep you up to date ahead of twenty twenty elections subscribe wherever you get your podcast the NPR politics podcast now oh five days a week..

NPR president Peyton Hobart comcast advisor Ben Platt Gwyneth Paltrow Saint Sebastian high Netflix Jessica Lang United States five days
"maslow" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"This message comes from NPR sponsors stable genius productions hear your stories about the changing culture of business and work on their podcast zigzag with Manucher Summar Odi. More entrepreneurs are putting ethics before prophets like the C O who who gave his million dollar salary so his staff could have higher wages get the episode wherever you listen to podcasts or at Zigzag pod DOT COM It's the Ted Radio hour from NPR. I'm Garros and on the show today were exploring ideas is about maslow's hierarchy of human needs and ranked at number two security. The second step on the pyramid is no other a place for it to come securities basic without security worrying about anything else doesn't matter this is Bruce Schneier Schneier Riser Frequent Flyer Liar. I'm a security technologist. I write I speak. I have a company I do. Research and roosting sped security in a much bigger way than just through the prism of technology. He thinks about the psychology of security and fear if you can't trust that hundred unrelated people could get together in a room and not kill each other. You're not going to build a society but we do that. All the time. We watch a movie. You Watch a sporting event. We have dinner. That's because we generally feel secure in our society and can act that way. The security is immediate. Security personal security is survival and until that need is met other things are are less important but when it comes to security bruce says we humans we haven't problem because in the modern modern world we are not good at estimating just how secure we should feel. Here's how Bruce explained it from the Ted Stage. So security is two two different things right. It's a feeling and it's a reality and they're different. You could feel secure even if you're not and you can be secure here. Even if you don't feel it really we have two separate concepts mapped onto the same word so if you look at security from economic terms. It's a trade off every time you get some security. You're always trading off something and whether this is a personal decision whether you're gonNA install a burglar alarm in your home or a national session where you're gonNA invade some foreign country. You're going to trade off something either money or time convenience capabilities maybe fundamental liberties so you'd think that us as a successful species on the planet you me. Everybody would be really good at making these trade offs yet. It seems again and again that hopelessly bad at it and I think that's a fundamentally interesting question. I'll give you the short answer. The answer is we respond to the feeling of security and not the reality we estimate the probability of something by how easy it is to bring instances of to mind so imagine how that works if you hear a lot about tiger attacks. Let's be a lot of tigers around you. Don't hear about lion. Attacks aren't a lot of lions around this. This works until you invent newspapers because what newspapers do is they repeat again and again rare risks. I tell people people if it's in the news don't worry about it because by definition news is something that almost never happens when something is so common. It's it's no longer news for car crashes domestic violence those of the rest you worry about. You're talking about about rationality responding wanting to risks in a reasonable way. I mean I get that but like once I had children right there. Was this feeling that would come from. It still does pretty much every day. which is are they okay? Okay I mean is everything okay and and I get that that's irrational. It is and they are always okay. It's kind of neat but the thing is is that if something happened and it's it's I think it's like the fear of the possibility of something possibly happening. That could possibly go wrong that could be its worst case thinking yeah. Yeah I mean worst case thinking is. I think incredibly dangerous incredibly damaging but you know we are creative people. You know you ask us the worst case we can come up with all kinds of stories and you know all the things things we watch the movies. TV shows they tend to be about worst-case stuff and we sort of like watching other people's disasters knew we wanted to become okay in the end but you know we don't tend to watch people's normal days where nothing happens we watch the extremes and then we think extremes are more normal but there are are people who spend a good part of their lives in these extreme insecure situations places like war zones or you know places where people are competing for the resources and that becomes normal to them so I mean can people survive and thrive in a situation that is fundamentally insecure. If people can and thrive to the extent they can but you will generally find smaller communities. You'll find shorter-range plans. You'll find less complex complex systems of everything because that's all you can do. You're not going to worry whether you're happy or not. If you're constantly under the threat of attack that until you're secure happiness or not isn't really relevant to you so let me complicate things I feeling and reality. I want to add a third element. I want to add model so feeling is based on her intuition. Model is based on reason in modern and complex world. You need models to understand a lot of the risks we face. You know there's no feeling Ling about germs. You need a bottle to understand them. Models can come from the media from our elected officials think of of of Models of terrorism a child kidnapping airline safety. Some models can change right. Models are not static example. A great example is the rate of smoking in the history of the past fifty years. The smoking risk shows how model changes and also shows how an industry fights against the model. It doesn't like I mean really though information seems like our best hope we we have the ability as thinking human beings to overcome our fears but but this goes back to as you said in your tedtalk feeling feeling secure rather than being secure and isn't feeling secure isn't it just as important. It's it is just as important and this is where our brains kick in that we we are smart enough as a species to recognize that we can get over some of our primal urges.

Bruce Schneier NPR Garros kidnapping Ted Stage Ling million dollar fifty years
"maslow" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"More from Margie Lock Ben later on and as she mentioned the first and most fundamental needs in Maslow's hierarchy were physiological needs food water shelter and a need did that most of us just don't treat like one sleep. Asleep has to be absolutely at the top of that hierarchy in the sense. This is Russell Foster. He's a circadian neuroscientist at Oxford University where he studies sleep in his research. He's discovered that most people don't take it seriously as they should. I think it's the dilemma that we we don't seem to be doing anything. We seem to be just essentially wasting our time. Were Asleep. So when you celebrate your sixty th wedding anniversary it's worth reflecting that of sixty years twenty one and a half republic sleep therefore it's perhaps only reasonable reasonable to celebrate thirty eight and a half years but the key thing is that the quality of that twenty one and a half years spent asleep. We'll to some extent dictate the quality of those years a week with your partner of course why exactly sleep is so important and what's going going on only do it is still largely a mystery to scientists like Russell but there are a lot of theories out there. Russell Foster described three of them in his Ted Talk Doc. The first is sort of the restoration idea and it's somewhat intuitive essentially all the stuff we burned up during the day we were store. We've replaced we rebuild we build during the night and indeed as an explanation. It goes back to aristotle so that's why two thousand three hundred years ago it's fashionable at the moment because what's been shown is that within the brain a whole raft of genes have been shown to be turned on only during sleep and those genes are associated with restoration and metabolic pathways so there's good evidence for the whole restoration hypothesis what about energy conservation you essentially sleep to save calories when you do the sums though it doesn't really pan out the energy saving of sleeping is about a hundred and ten calories a night now. That's the equivalent of a hot dog Bun so I'm less convinced by the energy conservation idea but the third idea I'm quite attractive to which is brain processing and memory consolidation allegation. What we know is that after you've tried to learn a task and you sleep deprive individuals the ability to learn that task is smashed. It's really hugely really attenuated so sleep in memory consolidation is also important however it's not just the laying down memory and recalling it. What's turned out to be really exciting. Is that our ability to come up with novel solutions to complex problems. Is Hugely enhanced by night of sleep in fact. It's been estimated to give us a three fold advantage sleeping at night enhances our creativity what seems to be going on is that in the brain those neural connections that are important though Senate connections of important linked and strengthened while those less important tend to fade away and be less important and so when we sleep parts of us are shutting down but but actually big parts of our our our system never sleep never shut down. They're constantly working right and in fact that's very important because one of the ways we thought about it is that we've got all these jigsaw pieces flowing in during the day the brain is essentially having to deal with billions of bits of information and we haven't had time to sort of put it in into the rest of the Jigsaw puzzle but at night you got that time to try and associate those bits of the Jigsaw Jigsaw puzzle those new pieces of the puzzle in with what you've experienced previously and what you might anticipate happening in the future so all life on earth has an innate sense of time in mammals. The Q. of course is light. It's what determines our circadian rhythms and researchers like Russell are starting starting to better understand the neurological and physiological impact of what happens when the ignore those rhythms and he's don't get enough sleep which accounts accounts for most of us. That's across the age spectrum from teenagers stress. Adults indeed the retired population and not getting enough makes you less alert more irritable the illness and if you're sleep deprived your releasing one of the hunger hormones Ghrelin and that enormously increases your appetite for carbohydrates and particularly sugar's lack of sleep hurts your memory. It affects your judgment but perhaps most importantly lack of sleep hurts your body's ability to defend itself so for example even even one night of no sleep can reduce elements of your immune system by about twenty four twenty five percent and Russell says in lab experiments when mice are are sleep deprived. They don't die exhaustion. They actually die from infections and one of the problems of not having enough sleep is that we're very very poorly able to judge how tired we are an even if we are sleep deprived by one or two hours we sort of get by but we've all experienced after that really fantastic holiday l. d. where we feel like a different person. We forget so quickly when you get back to work and you are sleep deprived again. You forget that glorious feeling of what a good night of sleep due due to you so most of course asked the question. What do you do make your bedroom a haven for sleep. The first critical thing is make pitches. Dhaka's you possibly can also make it slightly cool okay so you've probably heard this advice before sleep in a cool dark bedroom no caffeine late in the day no uh-huh screens before bedtime getting a regular schedule but so many of us even though we'll spend thirty six percent of our lives asleep we just don't. I do these things. We don't treat sleep as a need on par with food or water or shelter. Yes it is that important and especially if you think about it. It's his six percent of our biology if we didn't do it then that amount of time is telling us. That sleep of course is incredibly important. We wouldn't do it unless it was essential. Chill evolution doesn't work like that it it essentially hones and fine tune our biology to maximize efficiency and the fact that that we sleep so long indicates that this is a massively important part of our our overall biology and we must not ignore it and if we do it's at our own peril but I mean but what explains I mean why. Why do we ignore it. I think it's in the twentieth century in particular where we've relegated sleepers this sort of illness that requires a cure here so many people during the eighties nineties and even very recently sort of boasted about. Oh did an all nighter I haven't slept only step one or two hours but in the pre preindustrial era poets society in General Embrace Sleep Shakespeare is absolutely littered with with quotes about sleep of the honey heavy slumber sleep sleep nature softness why has taken me a and all of this sort of intuitive glove of sleep has been lost and Scienc- AH radically because it's uncovering the importance of sleep is is restoring sleep in us and our priorities at something we can't marginalize but something we must embrace embrace once again missile fosters entire talk can be found at Ted dot. NPR Dot Org more ideas about maslow's slows hierarchy of human needs in just a moment. I'm guy rise and this is the Ted Radio hour from NPR. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Tiaa committed to the idea that most things in life run out from clean shirts in the morning to a favorite dessert at night lifetime income in retirement shouldn't learn more at Tiaa dot org slash never run out. Thanks also to e-trade. Technology is making investing easier every day and senator core portfolios from e-trade. It's it's a simplified approach to investing that saves you time by building monitoring and managing the portfolio for you with access to support whenever you need it with core portfolios investing never feels like work for more information visit NEUTRA DOT com slash. NPR E-TRADE Capital Management LLC.

Russell Foster NPR Margie Lock Maslow Oxford University NEUTRA DOT Tiaa partner Ted dot senator Senate Capital Management LLC Dhaka caffeine Scienc- AH two hours
"maslow" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"maslow" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Technology Entertainment Design Design. Is that really what I've never known delivered Ted Conferences around the world. If the human imagination we've had to believe an impossible thing the true nature of reality beckons from just beyond those talks those ideas adapted for radio from NPR. I'm Guy Roz. You'd never know it from just walking round but in simple mid century building on the campus of Brandeis Rush University near Boston. There's an office where some of the most revolutionary ideas in psychology were first developed an office. It's just a room Yup. nope blackout side. Yeah. We really should have a plaque outside that officiant we margie lachmann professor of psychology at Brandeis University gave Eh tour of the office same halls that he would have walked down that once belonged to and he was here Abraham Maslow's. Were you hear what Abraham Maslow's okay so he knew so there are a few people around Maslo worked here until a year before his death in nineteen seventy desk located here but it was about twenty years before that they looked out this window in the nineteen fifties when his ideas really really began to change the field of psychology before that psychology focused on what's wrong with the person they looked at people who are neurotic. Roddick people who had psychological disorders psychology was really the study of of problems in mental illness in other words before Maslo. Slow psychologists were more interested in why people were the way they were rather than how they could change even improve. I don't think there's anything pollyanna about saying. Yes improvement is possible. You have to work hard at it. Here's the way to do it and so instead of looking at what was wrong with his patients. Maslo Tesla was really one of the first to think about what's right with the person. There is a possibility of improvement now it. It has to be probabilistic. This audio was recorded during a retreat in the mid nineteen sixties where he lectured on self-improvement now decades earlier art people looking for this kind of help might have been called patients who were sick on it but they were called clients. There was much more of a face to face relationship between the therapist and the client that was a natural human relationship of trying to work together to understand problems problems or issues that might occur that was really revolutionary at the time believe it or not and Maslo didn't just come up with this idea that perfectly functioning people could nonetheless strive to be better persons can be improved as you might remember from psych one guarantee. AP actually designed a framework to help understand how some people are more difficult than others that framework is known as Maslow's hierarchy of NEAT beat. It's an idea that to this day shapes modern psychology on the show today we'll explore maslow's five human needs in order of of importance the things he said humans need to survive and then to thrive and so this notion of hierarchy start at the bottom and you build up like a pyramid and at the base the most fundamental human needs basic survival needs shelter food and as we'll hear later sleep we they have not taken sleep seriously since the twentieth century second on the pyramid security without security. You're not gonNA build a society there. Maslow's believed you could move up to higher order. Growth oriented needs that other people really hadn't talked about before love and belonging the reality. Odi for primates is you can't even survive without belonging to a group. Then comes esteem to be in a healthy relationship to like yourself. I chose takes work and finally something called self actualization really focusing on growth and finding meaning in life and purpose in life. The world is so so full of things to do that. You can try to do better and if you can do nerve. That doesn't matter what you do. Mesler believed there was something fundamentally finally human about these needs and about our desire to be better and more fulfilled most of the work at the time had been bill had actually been done with animals animal work had been done looking at things like hunger and thirst in these basic needs and he tried to apply this to humans is and found that that wasn't all there was he. It wasn't just people were trying to survive. They were trying to do something beyond survival and they had this basic seemed like a basic motivation to improve and to reach their greatest potential earn.

Abraham Maslow Maslo Tesla Brandeis Rush University professor of psychology Guy Roz NPR Mesler Maslo Boston Roddick twenty years
In a changing climate, we need tech to adapt

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:10 min | 2 years ago

In a changing climate, we need tech to adapt

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by vast a global cybersecurity company trusted by over four hundred million people avast is dedicated to protect you online. So you can connect to the internet confidently avast keeping the world safe from cyber attacks. Visit them at a vast dot com and by Laci. Analytics, lots of business intelligence, vendors, claim their is the best, but they can't all be winners. Lodge analytics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner, and Dresdner comparing twenty-six BI vendors, get help folks in your evaluation, prioritizing features and determining what solution fits your tech stack. Visit lachey analytics dot com slash tech to claim your free reports. That's L. O. G I. Analytics dot com slash tech. In a changing climate, a closer look at the tech, we're going to need to survive from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Ali would. We're continuing our series on how tech can help us adapt to climate change called how we survive as you've heard throughout the week solutions can involve a lot of things transferring existing technologies to more vulnerable parts of the world, updating infrastructure, applying, artificial intelligence and maybe eventually space colonies today. We're looking at a few areas on earth, where innovation is already occurring one big market risk assessment, Emily Maza karate is founder and CEO of the climate data firm four twenty-seven based in Berkeley, we hear a firm specialized in helping businesses corporations investors understand an integrate projections from global climate models and plan for the physical impacts of climate change her job. She says is all about big data the company pulls for more than forty different models for predicting climate events at the global scale those models are not for the faint of heart sue. We have developed a set of tools. That extract and process, the data and apply it to real economic assets. The customers for twenty-seven creates can help real estate, developers decide, what to buy and wear or convinced building owners to prepare better for extreme weather. Other scientists and entrepreneurs are thinking much lower on maslow's hierarchy of needs food, and water. Laura cool is a professor at Northeastern University who studies climate adaptation in agriculture, one of the biggest problems across the board will be water management's. She says transferring, simple tech, like drip, irrigation to developing countries or small farmers will be a good start. And then it's all about using tech to tell people when to irrigate in the US. There's really fascinating innovations occurring in terms of how we actually use artificial intelligence to do precision irrigation. And when it comes to water self sufficiency is a huge deal in terms of that. Station. So there are start ups trying to figure out how to make houses or schools, or neighborhoods, less reliant on local water utilities, Cody Franson is CEO of the startup zero mass water, which is harvesting water straight out of the air. So a source hydra panel effectively take sunlight and air, only and produces perfect water, so no pipe input. No electricity. Input, basically, it's a six thousand dollar internet connected panel system that creates water out of water vapor, for drinking super cool, but it is still early days, and professor, Laura, cool notes that tech can't solve everything. So I guess one can have cautionary note, I would say is that there's a danger of kind of technological optimism that could start to creep in cool says true change and true adaptation requires major political and social changes to otherwise the tech won't be available to the people who need it most. And only those who. Can afford? It will benefit so tomorrow in the show. We'll talk with a longtime marketplace climate reporter about how this shift toward adaptation, isn't sitting quite right with everyone. And now for some related links. So yesterday, we talked about private money getting into the climate adaptation game. And today, we talked about the tech and startups and the New York Times had a story last week about both of those things you can find it on our website marketplace tech dot org. Unfortunately, the story is about how venture capital funding for cleantech startups has fallen for most of the last decade because investors don't think there's money to be made there, a lot of BBC's rushed into cleantech, and solar about ten years ago, most of them didn't make any money and they don't wanna get burned again. Now, most of the discussion in this piece is around carbon capture technologies technically in the mitigation category because they'd either repurpose carbon or figure out how to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere altogether. But either way it's kind of a bummer in future. Episodes will look at how Silicon Valley is reacting or not reacting to climate change. Especially considering that the expensive and fancy office headquarters of Facebook, Google, and several other Silicon Valley companies are likely to end up underwater even under pretty conservative models of sea level rise. You guys are gonna want to adapt. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by low G planning to update the dashboards and reports in your application, lots of business intelligence benders claimed their software is the best, but they can all be winners. Loggia analytics is offering five reports from analysts like Gartner and Dresner comparing twenty-six vendors, get help focusing your evaluation, prioritizing features and determining what solution fits your tech stack. Visit loggia analytics dot com slash tech to claim your free reports. That's L. O. G I. Analytics dot com slash tech.

Gartner Laura Cool ALI L. O. G Professor Loggia Analytics Founder And Ceo Laci United States Dresdner Lachey Cody Franson New York Times Northeastern University Emily Maza
"maslow" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"maslow" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

"Like one of those companies that you will never heroes in your day to day life, but they are everywhere in huge. So and they're doing amazing stuff with the internet of things. So let's. Just orient people ghetto as the chief digital officer. How do you think about the internet of things for personal faith? I know that you cover the engineer that thing, very broadly. But I think that really has to markets. There's a consumer internet of things where we talk about colored light bulbs and home alarm system and all kinds of connected speakers and devices like that I cover the industrial internet of things which is the other part of this equation where you're talking about divisive better connected. But they're offering by chemical plants and factories inside of mind Orlan gas field. So as a chief digital officer for ADD, I'm trying to inject digital technologies and every product and service, we make that isn't tall order. And I know that we have spoken about your maslow's hierarchy of IOT. And I would love for you to break that down for people because I think it's a good way that companies can look at team kind of assess where they are in in the journey to basically making more efficient use of their people there. Processes resources. I mean, really everything I'd love to do that any facts have explain a little bit. Why I came up with this construct it because the internet thing is back the complex. There's use Capers that are different industries that our different technology stack. Everything from the very small rise fencers communicating analytic software in the gateway at the edge or McLeod machine learning drone technology. I mean, it's it's almost too much to get your head wrapped around, and what I found time and time again as I was studying what barriers companies and customers were doing with the genetic things all of a sudden one day sort of a light bulb went off. And I said, you know, this looks a lot like maslow's hierarchy of need. And so instead of talking about having safety and food and community, mental spiritual fulfillment. The not love hierarchy IOT is a way of classifying all these hundreds of thousands of individual applications and essentially reduced them to really only about. Out five different capabilities or level. But let me the base of the maslow's hierarchy IOT is monitoring whole bunch of applications, but nothing more than oh, we had this thing. We're gonna put a little chip on it. It's going to be able to talk we communicate. And it tells us how doing why do we care well monitoring that's pretty good because you can then at least go from time based maintenance schedules to condition based you you only have to intervene if something about to go back. So that's the really quite beneficial. Because there's a lot of equipment infrastructure, deployed. And of course, maintaining it properly is a pretty important thing. So downtime is expensive. So that's the base of enough armory. But if you can read you can probably also right, meaning you can change values in that system. You can write to the chip that's on that device and make it behave differently. You can beat up the robot. You can make it do new things. And as a result, you can go beyond monitoring, and you can able to clap application that I call Optima Vatian you. Make things when faster consume less energy be more reliable by not operating them in extremes. And of course, this all depends on what the customer wants..

IOT maslow officer Optima Vatian engineer one day
"maslow" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"maslow" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

"Like one of those companies that you will never heroes in your day to day life, but they are everywhere in huge. So and they're doing amazing stuff with the internet of things. So let's. Just orient people ghetto as the chief digital officer. How do you think about the internet of things for personal faith? I know that you cover the engineer that thing, very broadly. But I think that really has to markets. There's a consumer internet of things where we talk about colored light bulbs and home alarm system and all kinds of connected speakers and devices like that I cover the industrial internet of things which is the other part of this equation where you're talking about divisive better connected. But they're offering by chemical plants and factories inside of mind Orlan gas field. So as a chief digital officer for ADD, I'm trying to inject digital technologies and every product and service, we make that isn't tall order. And I know that we have spoken about your maslow's hierarchy of IOT. And I would love for you to break that down for people because I think it's a good way that companies can look at team kind of assess where they are in in the journey to basically making more efficient use of their people there. Processes resources. I mean, really everything I'd love to do that any facts have explain a little bit. Why I came up with this construct it because the internet thing is back the complex. There's use Capers that are different industries that our different technology stack. Everything from the very small rise fencers communicating analytic software in the gateway at the edge or McLeod machine learning drone technology. I mean, it's it's almost too much to get your head wrapped around, and what I found time and time again as I was studying what barriers companies and customers were doing with the genetic things all of a sudden one day sort of a light bulb went off. And I said, you know, this looks a lot like maslow's hierarchy of need. And so instead of talking about having safety and food and community, mental spiritual fulfillment. The not love hierarchy IOT is a way of classifying all these hundreds of thousands of individual applications and essentially reduced them to really only about. Out five different capabilities or level. But let me the base of the maslow's hierarchy IOT is monitoring whole bunch of applications, but nothing more than oh, we had this thing. We're gonna put a little chip on it. It's going to be able to talk we communicate. And it tells us how doing why do we care well monitoring that's pretty good because you can then at least go from time based maintenance schedules to condition based you you only have to intervene if something about to go back. So that's the really quite beneficial. Because there's a lot of equipment infrastructure, deployed. And of course, maintaining it properly is a pretty important thing. So downtime is expensive. So that's the base of enough armory. But if you can read you can probably also right, meaning you can change values in that system. You can write to the chip that's on that device and make it behave differently. You can beat up the robot. You can make it do new things. And as a result, you can go beyond monitoring, and you can able to clap application that I call Optima Vatian you. Make things when faster consume less energy be more reliable by not operating them in extremes. And of course, this all depends on what the customer wants..

IOT maslow officer Optima Vatian engineer one day