35 Burst results for "Masha"

"masha" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

04:53 min | 3 months ago

"masha" Discussed on Science Friction

"Deciphering these very different reactions to such shocking material. Juliet realizes that the personality of each of the sisters, and adapted to survive the traumas they'd been subjected to. And these had stuck with them, changing how they interacted with the world. And even with each other, or mashed did have a kind of shadow of the sort of person she was, which was very controlling and actually quite well mean, even though, you know, she had this superficial charm. Whereas dasha was just had this calm lurk and you could see the intelligence shining out of her eyes somehow. And I felt great empathy for her. As the years went on, particularly, masha was just a bit of a bad girl. And she couldn't drink because she had some problems she would throw up. So she got dashed to the drinking for her dad really didn't want to, but as I say, she would literally pour vodka down her throat. Since their teen years, masha had forced dasher to drink. Sharing a circulatory system, if dasha could take in enough alcohol. Both the sisters would get drunk. And that was part of the abuse, just forcing her to do things that she didn't want to do. She rarely didn't want to do. Masha decided almost everything for the both of them. That they cut their hair short, were trousers instead of the dresses that dasha preferred. And eventually, Juliet realizes that masha's control over dasha. Can go to some very dark places. I would come in in the morning, and dasha would be beaten black and blue and the nurses didn't really do much about it. Or were such fell off the bed. And I would say, well, obviously you're hitting her. I never seen you hit her. But I come in in the mornings and your knuckles are split and her face is broken. How can you keep doing this? And masher would say, if you're just going to complain about it, don't come and see us anymore. It was so tragic. I didn't know how to help her, and neither did anyone else. Juliet says that on a few occasions, masha would fall asleep during one of her visits. That she could always feel instantly if masha had not at all. And Juliet says that it's at these times, she felt closest to hearing dasher speak with her own voice. And I think in a way she was telling me what sort of life she would have liked. She would have loved someone to love and to have children and I think through that, perhaps she was being honest with me that all she wanted was to be a part from masher. But she couldn't be because Marshall liked being together. Marcia didn't want to be separated. Juliet continued to worry about dash as well-being. And years into their friendship. She makes a final attempt to help shift the dynamic between the sisters. So I'd heard there was a surgeon in London, and I wrote a letter to him, saying that there were these conjoined twins in Russia and did he think it was possible that his team might be able to perform that surgery on them. The surgeon writes back and says, yeah, he's looked into their case and separation is possible. Juliet pays the sisters a visit and reads out the doctor's reply. And then I said, so what do you think? And masher just looked straight at me with her sort of cold eyes. Dash of glanced to her right to masher. And then turned back to me and said, Nick. Meaning, you don't know. And I said, what are we not going to discuss this? At least discuss it. And dasha said neat yet again. And then they got up to make a cup of tea and said, we'll see you tomorrow. A few years later, in the year 2000. Juliet would move back to England. The biography she'd written with the sisters would be published the same year. Masha had been given final editorial say before the manuscript was published. And she heavily altered the book, changing and redacting huge sections of Juliet's reporting, but didn't adhere to her version of the truth. Then, just a few years later, in early 2003. Masha would wake up one morning complaining of a pain in her side. Dasha spent hours trying to call an ambulance. But staff at the care facility denied her medical attention. It wasn't until the next morning the sisters were finally taken to hospital. Masher had suffered a heart attack. But by then it was too late and masha was already unconscious and they were saying, no, she's fine. She's just sleeping, this thing, so she was lied to, right to the very end. Dasha distraught and alone is left without pain relief for 17 hours..

masha dasha Juliet Masha dasher Marcia Marshall Russia London Nick Dasha England heart attack
"masha" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

05:29 min | 3 months ago

"masha" Discussed on Science Friction

"Not long after the interview, Juliet's article is published. And it makes a splash. A huge amount of sympathy for the sisters living conditions pausing from around the world. With attention from outside, pressure inside Russia begins to build. Finally, after nearly 40 years of struggling to have their own place to live. The sisters are moved into a brand new care facility in Moscow. Not far from Juliet's apartment. It's still an HK home, and they still need permission to leave the grounds. But for the first time in their lives, the sisters have a comfortable room of their own. Masha had been right. Public outcry, it could create change in the new Russia. Spurred on by the public's interest. She soon asks Juliet if she'll consider ghost writing a biography of them. They wanted me to do the research and I was really happy to do it. But yeah, I think I'm curious by nature and they were curious about what had happened to them. As a friendship with the sisters deepened, Juliet had developed some questions of her own. Observing their relationship, masha could be domineering, and dash had compliant. But just how deep did that dynamic go? Were they conjoined, you know, this is how can they look so different and be so different. And so that's what really began my fascination with being a twin myself as well. I was thinking, oh, my goodness. How could I possibly live a life attached to my twin? How do they do it? So Juliet gets to work on the book. Interviewing the sisters at length, taking advantage of the opening up of Soviet society. She begins visiting archives, contacting government officers to request records. Trying to reconstruct the early lives of masha and dasha. The sisters had always been warned of contacting their biological family. But Juliet soon tracks down mason dasher's mother in Moscow. And she sits down to hear her side of the story. She finds a kind, depressive woman, now in her old age. Heartbroken by the loss of her daughters. All those years ago. She tells Juliet that she'd gone into labor in 1950, with no idea that she was carrying twins. And she'd given birth naturally. In the days afterward, she'd had the chance to feed her daughters. A handful of times. So she says she remembers this little bundle being brought in with a head at each end, a swaddled up. And she wasn't supposed to feed them, but a nurse brought them in at night so that she could see them and she said, I just fell in love with them. But immediately after the birth, doctors removed the girls from her care, sharing scant details. Given the twins physical condition they told her. It's best if they be given over to state care. Their mother protested, but was sent home to recuperate, while the girls stayed at the hospital for further monitoring. Ten days after giving birth. The mother gets a visit at home. And she said, I remember one of the physiologists coming to the house and me staring up at the ceiling. And saying, how am I girls? And the physiologist saying, I'm really sorry, but they've died pneumonia. After a lifetime of being told that their mother had abandoned them. The fact that they'd been forcibly removed was a truth that masher in particular found hard to accept. She didn't want to pursue a relationship with her mother. Nor did she allow dasher to do so. But there was a bigger revelation to come. As Juliet would soon uncover why the family had been separated. Because they knew that if there was a mother present witness to the things that they were going to be doing to these twins. Well, I would have just been difficult. So the easiest thing to do, of course, being Stalin's Russia was to tell how they died. And it all started with one man. Doctor Peter and hocking while he was a student of pavlov. He put out an alert all over the Soviet Union. So as soon as conjoined twins were born, he wanted them. So they would literally taken from their cradle and snatched by him. To experiment on them. His interest in what role the nervous system played in regulating the body. Was it the brain essentially or was it the blood? So because of that factor, he thought finally now we have what he called the perfect human experiment to resolve all these questions. Juliet shares with the sisters a dissertation, describing an aachen's project. He carried this out a top secret wing of Moscow's pediatric institute. For the first 6 years of their lives. They deprived them of sleep. They would starve them as babies, they would electrocute them to see what sort of reactions they both had. A knock in was also fascinated by the sisters shared circulatory system. Injecting the infants with barium and radioactive substances to track how quickly it moved from one body to the other. Then he turned to extreme states of hunger, and temperature. So one was wrapped in ice and one wasn't and then both our temperatures were measured. I mean, it was extreme torture, and how did the sisters respond to hearing what was in this dissertation about what they had been subjected to? Well, masha was absolutely furious, of course, horrified. Angry, but they had no recollection of it. No idea, and.

Juliet masha Russia Moscow mason dasher Masha Soviet society dasha depressive pneumonia pavlov hocking Stalin Soviet Union aachen Peter
"masha" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

02:27 min | 3 months ago

"masha" Discussed on Science Friction

"And lies lies lies. It's there that the sisters go from young adults to middle aged women. Their lives passing before them. But then, after two decades of sameness. The situation changes. The local health authority announces that the aged care home they're living in is being converted into a mental health facility. And the sisters will now be forced to live there. They realize they have to get out. It's the late 80s, and the winds of change have begun to blow through the Soviet Union. Mikhail Gorbachev has come to power with his promise of glasnost and an opening up to the rest of the world. Masha recognizes that there could be an opportunity here. But they'll need to strike quickly. It's around this time that the persistent toothache the sisters had suffered for years, become unbearable, and they were allowed out of the aged care home, for an extended period of treatment at a dental hospital. This is when masha makes her move. She was very bright like that, she was reading all the newspapers and watching the TV and thinking this is something that we can capitalize on. Right now, we've exhausted every other opportunity, but people are now going to the public and saying we want change and we're going to do that too. And that was when I saw them. This is what Juliet learns in her first interview with the sisters. Sitting in the room at the dental hospital. She begins finding an article for The Sunday Times in London. Hoping it will bring some international attention and support for the sisters. To change their situation. But as Julian is finishing her reporting on the article. Masha makes a leading suggestion. Masha said, you've got a nice big car. We'd really like to go out in the countryside. We never get out of Moscow. So Juliet and her husband get permission to take the sisters along on a camping trip outside the city. Masher and dasha meet Juliet's daughter. The first baby they'd ever been allowed to hold. You know, the kids saw mushrooms. She was antimatter and anti dash showing. Being swung about and given treats and things. So yeah, it was a pleasure to be able to do that and to take them out to, you know, on trips, family trips, picnics, and things like that. They wanted to come to my house so they often come and see me and have a separate stay over sometimes if they were allowed. So it became a long time friendship..

local health authority Masha Mikhail Gorbachev Juliet Soviet Union masha The Sunday Times Julian Masher London Moscow
"masha" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

07:14 min | 3 months ago

"masha" Discussed on Science Friction

"After seeing the talk show, Juliet starts making calls, trying to track the sisters down. She's repeatedly told that they don't want to be found. But what she'd seen was a one off interview. But eventually, on learning that she's a foreign journalist. The sisters agreed to meet joyet. And she's directed to a dental hospital in Moscow, where they're getting treatment. I've got down to the hall at the bottom and one of the nurses that I'll take you up. And as we were going up the stairs, she was saying, I just have to warn you that this is going to be a really, really terrible experience for you and it's horrific and some people as soon as they see them literally faint dead away. It was kind of like, wow, then she knocked on the door and then backed away, and I heard these two voices saying, come on in. And there they were. Dasha was making a cup of tea that I put the kettle on and masher was whipping away and saying, why didn't you bring Prince William and because English? You know, immediately, they were just two sisters who happened to be together in one body. Juliet is a fraternal twin. She has a twin brother, though she says they hardly alike in any way. And so it's not all that surprising to her as she begins to speak to the sisters that while these are identical twins, who also happen to be conjoined. Masha and dasha seem to be very different people. I could see that masha was very feisty and chatty and at that time she was very witty and charming and cracking jokes all the time and sort of flirting with male nurses who came in and dasha was just much quieter and more serene and thoughtful and asking me intelligent questions about what it's like in England and you know she was curious. About this other world outside the Soviet Union. And they put me at my ease and yeah, we just started chattering away and I said, well, I was amazed to see that program tell me a bit about your life. And so the sisters begin to tell her. How it is that they got here. Born with separate nervous systems, but a shared circulatory system. My sisters were ejected by their family at birth. And they tell her that they spent their early childhood in an isolated wing of Moscow's pediatric hospital. At the age of 6, they were moved to an orthopedic institute in another part of the city. It was here that they first learned to walk. Each sister using one arm to control their crutches and wrapping their other arm around one another's shoulder for balance. The girls were 9 or ten when they were first allowed to play outside, exploring the grounds of the institute. Though, that didn't last long. There was this incident that they both remember quite clearly, whether they were playing hide and seek with their friend Lucia. And they got near the fence and the gate and people from outside saw them. They were within minutes people were crowding around the gate saying, I go with two heads and monster and mutant and suddenly all these rumors were going around town that there was a mutant girl with two heads being kept in this hospital and the crowds kept on coming standing waiting to see. This phenomenon. And then they were really taken back indoors. And they actually didn't want to go out after that. This was a theme that would follow the sisters all their lives. From the earliest memories, masha and dasha were told, it was their responsibility not to traumatize others with their appearance. The Soviet philosophy was basically society was divided into what they called the healthiest and the defectives and the defectives had to be hidden away and not upset the healthiest because the are the ones who are going to be doing making the Soviet Union the USSR, the great power, but it's going to be the useful ones whereas the defectives are the ones that we're never going to be useful. It becomes clear to Juliet over the course of the interview. The for most of their lives, but this has been kept in the dark about the most basic functioning of their own bodies. In these institutions, they felt that they would be protecting children. If they never had any mirrors, and never took photographs. That is until, in the early teens, when the sisters are living at the orthopedic institute. At one of the rooms was ballroom, which was closed off, but of course being mashed and managed to get us up in there somehow. And there was a great mirror at the end of the hall, and they both recall just thinking what on earth is that and so they were walking towards this image of themselves. It was a horrible shock to both of them, but particularly dasher. She said that she just couldn't get out of bed for a week she couldn't believe that that's what other people were seeing. Meanwhile, the crowds outside the institute kept coming. Swarming around the front gate demanding the chance to see the sisters in the flesh. Eventually, the attention becomes too much for everyone involved. And the sisters are sent to a school in southern Russia. But then masha and dasha discover that being banished away from the capital, it might just be the best thing that's ever happened to them. They were given schooling. They were with the kids, the teachers were so nice there. The sisters begin to take high school classes, make friends, go on summer camps. And that was the happiest time of their life, I think, through those four years of high school, the girls are told they can pick a profession. Eventually get a job. They too will become a productive part of the Soviet dream or culture that could send Yuri Gagarin the first cosmonaut to space. Of a culture that did to imagine a new way of being. The march toward communism. But that promise? Was not delivered. Because I said to them, well, why were you put straight into an old people's home at the age of 18 and it seems incredibly cruel. They said, well, the one, any homes for the disabled, so that was the only option available. In the lead up to the Moscow Olympics in 1980. Leonard brezhnev then later the USSR refused to hold the paralympics and reportedly declared in our country, there are no disabled people. The Soviet government didn't openly recognize the existence of any person with disability. Therefore, the reasoning went, there was no need to offer housing or support for anybody. These people simply didn't exist. Cut off from the outside world, denied employment. Masher and dasha are trapped in an aged care home, sharing a tiny room in a dilapidated facility, with a bathroom so small the sisters can barely walk through the doorway. For 20 years of brezhnev's reign from the late 60s to the late 80s. This was how the sisters were forced to live. And that was a bit like the brezhnev period in a way. It just rolled slowly on slowly on with nothing really changing.

Juliet joyet dasha masha USSR Moscow Dasha Masha Prince William orthopedic institute Lucia England Leonard brezhnev Yuri Gagarin Russia paralympics Soviet government Olympics brezhnev
"masha" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

03:35 min | 3 months ago

"masha" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast one night in 1988 Juliet butler was in her living room. In Moscow. Oh, it was very Soviet. So it was quite bare. I was looking out over a cathedral ski prospect. So I was in a high rise flat, virtually everyone lived in these high rises. My daughter, we hadn't even got a cop then because she was so young, so she was in a laundry basket, I remember on the floor. Sleeping there because I could rock it. Juliet grew up in England. She'd studied Russian university and landed a job as a nanny in the British embassy. Shortly after graduation. Within a week of arriving in Moscow, she'd fallen in love with a local. And so he she was, 6 years later, doing chores in front of the TV as the Soviet Union teetered on the edge of collapse. I was doing the ironing in the evening, watching this program is glad it was a talk program. So now Gorbachev was in power. And he created this big openness campaign. And so they talked about things which had never been able to be talked about before. Like the incarceration of people who were, well, in the Soviet Union, they called them defective, horribly. Which was disabled. So matter and Joshua walked onto the stage. They strode out, they walked down the steps, they walked to the sofa next to the host, sat down and as they walked out this hush fell over this massive audience. I couldn't really quite believe what they were saying. Juliet stops what she's doing. And she concentrates on the glowing screen in front of her. She sees the faces of two sisters in her late 30s. Clearly twins, though not entirely identical. Each sister has her own torso, each her own two arms. But from the waist down, the sisters share a body. They can join. Each sister has control of one of their legs, and with a crutch under HR musher and dasha crossed the sip and sit down next to the host. And he was very friendly with them sort of chatting to them. You know, tell us where you're here, what's happening? Dasha speaks first. But whenever she falters, masha jumps in, echoing her sister. They tell the host, the audience, and tens of millions of people watching across the USSR. That they've come here today. To ask for help, I realized later that this courage that they'd had to go on was because of the desperation that they felt that they had been incarcerated all their lives. Because in the Soviet Union, in the USSR, the windows such thing as invalid symbols were flaws. They were hidden away. And they were desperate, literally desperate to get out somehow. And the only way that they thought that they could do that was by taking advantage of going on TV and appealing to the great Russian public. Hearing the sisters speak, Juliet knows right away that she has got to meet them. And as a foreign journalist, she's got to help them in any way she can. It's a chance viewing that would lead to a 15 year friendship. And would change the lives of all three of them. I'm Elizabeth cool ass, I'll be sitting in pinata Mitchell over the next few weeks. And today on science, friction, the remarkable lives of masha and dasha cleavage leopolda, who would overcome unthinkable challenges through.

Soviet Union Juliet butler Russian university Juliet Moscow British embassy Gorbachev ABC England Joshua dasha Dasha masha pinata Mitchell Elizabeth dasha cleavage leopolda
"masha" Discussed on Our Unicorn Diaries

Our Unicorn Diaries

04:54 min | 7 months ago

"masha" Discussed on Our Unicorn Diaries

"Trying to be funny or make light of anything. But i think because of the whole bisexual what i'm saying. It's not anybody tron a minute. You know look. Masha our look for women. Because you're trying to look good for you know thinking you tension in women. Is this the bunch of by nice. Those could gang is together and it's like hey you know what's the big deal and i think that's the difference about women. Yeah yeah so. I could force the next on what e- only. I don't know that it isn't ass you can't you you know and it's still never meet ready so it's just one of those and then you were just there for the night you weren't even stay in over uses there for that that so he had a hotel room to go back to and clean and maybe next time you should consider having a into stand back. You know maybe do that though but you recommended them on. Go if somebody you into. Yoga side weren't nervous at how affordable whippy the email got the hours. it was non-judgmental.

Masha
Lionel Messi Equals Argentina's All-Time Appearance Record

ESPN FC

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Lionel Messi Equals Argentina's All-Time Appearance Record

"And of course another record Leeann messy making the most appearances now in history of the junior national team matching maturana. Oh how would you rate his performance. Joe's he was good really in by example and we sat down the other day he looked like a modern emission like name for brazil to win the copa america. Finally winning something with argentina. He will beat the record. Now of masha. Rhino in time against bolivia. She's the next game. He's got all week to rest hallway to prepare for the next game to come to the rest of this competition then there's the quarterfinals etc

Maturana Leeann Copa America JOE Brazil Masha Argentina Bolivia
Women & Gender in the Qur'an, with Dr. Celene Ibrahim

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

02:44 min | 1 year ago

Women & Gender in the Qur'an, with Dr. Celene Ibrahim

"Honored to have dr. Selene ibrahim For the show today in dr selena brahima. She's the author of women and gender in the crown a published from oxford university. Press last year. She's also the editor of one nation. Indivisible seeking liberty and justice from the pulpit to the streets Probably the previous year and her comeback project is on the concept of monotheism in the crown in intellectual history so dr ibrahim Deaf has a lot of a lot to say about some very interesting topics in on gender in the koran. She is very qualified. Masha llah she has a A masters degree in women's and gender studies near eastern judaic studies from brandeis. She has a masters of divinity from harvard in a bachelor's degree with highest honors from princeton Dr ibrahim is a trusted public voice on issues of religion and civic engagement. She's deeply committed to countering counteracting bigotry and fostering varies pluralism integrity and civic responsibility. And we are absolutely honored to have dr ibrahim on the show today. So thank you dr ibrahim or do you prefer to go by selene. How do you want us to call. Let's go with selene. selene okay. Well we'll welcome selene. Dr ibrahim professor ibrahim to the show. We are so delighted to have you. I read your book in In earnest and I got a chance to also up. See some of your more recent obser- podcast media appearances. But it's funny. Actually the first time you ever kind of came across my radar even before you reached out via email was. I saw a lecture. And i don't know if it was livestreamed or a saw recording of it you gave For z to college Was that was that recorded on the west coast. Did you visit the bay area. Or was it one of those in communion out in the communities a tuna now. I had the good fortune of of coming to zeh tuna and it's a such a blessed place in the spirit. There is just incredible. So i it wasn't my first time visiting and hopefully it won't be my last either in shala in shalva that's rain out and we missed you so it was like a public lecture that you gave at. That event has a series where. I'm sure it's on pause during these times. It's probably been taken more online where there is a community outreach program and so there's i think it's a wonderful asset to the community. They really do bring in a number of speakers and not just on islamic topics but really a range of themes in the humanities

Dr Ibrahim Selene Ibrahim Dr Selena Brahima Dr Ibrahim Deaf Masha Llah Dr Ibrahim Professor Ibrahim Oxford University Brandeis Princeton Harvard Shalva West Coast Bay Area Shala
Entrepreneur Masha Malka on Her One Minute Coach System

Women Worldwide

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Entrepreneur Masha Malka on Her One Minute Coach System

"Joining us show. Is masha malka. Masha is an entrepreneur and she is the founder of the one minute coach system. She's also been on the forbes council for over ten years she's a mother. She teaches on the university level on mindfulness and leadership and she has been coaching clients internationally for over eighteen years. She's developed unique original programs. Such as clarity hats or motion hacks to clarity. Mommy's gonna crack me on that. One and also manifest with russia could go on and on about masha but i think it's time that she shares her journey and advice with you. Masha welcome welcome to win. Worldwide thank you dr wonderful introduction. Thank you so much app. You can finally connected. I know me too. So it's i wanna get the program name correct. It's emotion hacks to clarity Actually it said. The woman had coached the mastering emotions. So it's my book are my second book But yeah. I have a how different broken clarity. So it's all connected x-l-e-a-r dive into all that. I always want to find out though. I you have this one minute system. You've been coaching internationally for over eighteen years. I mentioned in the university where you're teaching mindfulness in leadership. How did you get on this path. What made you choose your career path Well it's one of those stories is false It finds me. I didn't find it Anything does that the best gun impacts where you just allow things fall into place. Which was it initially. Because i wasn't as wise as i am now and that was Really stressing about what i wanna do. Wasn't one of those people who knew exactly or wanted to do in life. I to all kinds of classes actually made the maths enhance. But i ended up being a writer and the coach which has nothing to do as much. And it's just wolf On something that they naturally love doing I always slept learning. And i love to Aspect learning to others so teaching which he did not exist. When there wasn't interested. So when actually i found out the research thing of a completely fell in love with and the as attracting my programs i math. Nationalism eucation. my have a master's degree in higher education. And i'm all about changing educational system by my thing. And so i like to design my courses using my knowledge in accelerated learning techniques. This whole brain learning. And how my. I will actually skull discovery in virginia's and in some the topic of learning how to learn And my first book is based on my experience being a refugee from the soviet union. America and my last book one which the mastering motions. This one It's actually based on my divorce. So is eight goes life and they learn things near research things on how to overcome fears. Obstacles can find it works for me than with my clients and then it just would have

Masha Masha Malka Russia Virginia Soviet Union America
"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

Paradigm Shift Wrestling

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

"Bunch <Speech_Female> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> of pictures from <Speech_Female> my high today. <Speech_Female> And then i upload <Speech_Female> all kinds of wild <Silence> contents on their <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> you know. <Speech_Female> There's there's <Speech_Female> free merged. <Silence> There's so many things. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Patriots dot com <Speech_Female> find at marshalls <Speech_Music_Female> lion witch and <Speech_Female> there's also <Speech_Female> twenty percents <Speech_Music_Female> off all by <Speech_Music_Female> t shirts on caressing <Silence> dot at <Speech_Female> masha slam of which <Speech_Female> also right <Speech_Female> now. <SpeakerChange> I think its <Speech_Female> until tomorrow. <Speech_Female> I think the sale <Speech_Female> ends. You <Speech_Female> can find <Speech_Female> me on twitter and instagram <Speech_Female> at masha slam bitch <Silence> role with my rambling <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> tweets. <Speech_Male> I gotta <SpeakerChange> say <Speech_Female> if <Speech_Female> y'all got to keep <Speech_Female> your eyes open because <Speech_Female> twitter is about to get real <Speech_Female> crazy. <SpeakerChange> Y'all heard it here <Speech_Male> first. <Music> Oh how <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in new orleans. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Lucid <Speech_Male> wrecking news. <SpeakerChange> Right <Speech_Male> like we've been <Speech_Male> saying on this whole <Speech_Male> show if you're in texas <Speech_Male> area <SpeakerChange> in buta <Speech_Male> pinball <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> kingdom <Speech_Male> you can come check <Speech_Male> out. Masha <Speech_Male> legitimately <Speech_Male> hearst. I <Speech_Male> think rebelled. It's <Speech_Male> going to be there. Nyla <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> herbs and <Speech_Male> goes on and on <Speech_Male> and on thunder grosses. <Speech_Male> A <Speech_Male> brand <Speech_Male> in its booming. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> So <Speech_Male> you gotta check that out <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the real <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the real reason why you want <Speech_Male> to go is because <Speech_Male> you wanna see mosca <Speech_Male> slap josh. <Speech_Male> That's the <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> reason you <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> that doesn't flap. <Speech_Male> And <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> not what <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> if you don't get <Speech_Male> their live. Remember <Speech_Male> to tune in on <Speech_Male> the twenty four th we <Speech_Male> will be shown <Speech_Male> live on <Speech_Male> the paradigm shift <Speech_Male> of this happening <Speech_Male> and i will be <Speech_Male> showing my bruises <Speech_Male> if you're still <Speech_Male> here with us sir <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> here with <Speech_Male> us. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Goodness <Speech_Male> masha <Speech_Male> down <Speech_Male> with us today. <hes> <Speech_Male> it's been really <Speech_Male> awesome talking <Speech_Male> to you in getting <Speech_Male> to know you and i look forward <Speech_Male> to meeting you of the <Speech_Male> twentieth <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Guys <Speech_Male> anything <SpeakerChange> else to <Speech_Male> say. I'll <Speech_Male> say is masha <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> anytime. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> You're in the <Speech_Male> area anytime you want to <Speech_Male> come on. You're <Speech_Male> welcome to <Speech_Male> as as <Speech_Male> inaudible guest <Speech_Male> as honorable <Speech_Male> person. That <Speech_Male> could come <SpeakerChange> on at anytime. <Speech_Male> You just <Speech_Male> train. Johnny <Speech_Male> rogers is welcome <Speech_Male> on. This show gives <Speech_Male> we can. We <Speech_Male> tend to get a lotta <Speech_Male> johnny roj trainees <Speech_Male> on this show. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yeltsin picking <Speech_Male> picking <Speech_Male> good bunch <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Silence> appreciate it <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> kingpin <Speech_Male> says we are <Speech_Male> kingpin approved. <Speech_Male> Yes <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> a thank <Speech_Male> you once again. <hes> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to you on the twentieth <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> If you stick with us <Speech_Male> just real quick and background <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Guys we love. Y'all <Speech_Male> thank you for joining <Speech_Male> us. Join us next <Speech_Male> week. We're gonna have duke. The <Speech_Male> dumpster drowsy on <Speech_Male> continuing <Speech_Male> our anniversary. <Speech_Male> Yeah it's going <Speech_Male> to be really cool show <Speech_Male> again <Speech_Male> And then on seventeenth. <Speech_Male> We're doing <Speech_Male> one of our awesome. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> look back <Speech_Male> at the greatest wrestlemainia <Speech_Male> all time. Wrestlemania <Speech_Male> x seven <Speech_Male> and then on the <Speech_Male> twenty fourth <Speech_Male> will be showing the footage <Speech_Male> of <SpeakerChange> me <Speech_Male> getting my chest cape <Speech_Male> then so <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a great night. <Speech_Male> They for joining <Speech_Male> us. Thank you masha <Speech_Male> again <Speech_Male> We'll <SpeakerChange> see <Silence> y'all

"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

Paradigm Shift Wrestling

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

"Promo wrestler. That you've that you drew to or that sort of that helped you get into the business. Pardon me i'm sorry. Particular investment promos that drew you into professional wrestling. I only the physical wrestling itself but the pro unlike a promo aspect. I don't think i ever thought of it like that. Actually that's why. I'm so confused by the question. I think wrestlers were always like a full package freeman ever think. I stopped two greet from the wrestler. When i was a kid i was like one of them. Talks better than the other one wrestles go. Nice nice okay. That that's why because it has some of us we we are promo guys as well as dusty rhodes jade snake ric flair. Were some of the influences that i would say that also helped me I'm we're all influenced by wrestling so that that'd be i would say That's right. that's right brandon dusty. Rhodes masha before we get out of here. Is there anything else. You'd like to say anything you'd like. Plug well since you brought that up. What is it like the third of the month or something. Come join me on. Patriots dot com forward slash islamic. Were having a good time over there. I uploaded a.

Rhodes masha rhodes one brandon two greet Patriots dot com jade snake ric flair third of islamic
"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

Paradigm Shift Wrestling

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

"Speaking at seven central eight eastern every wednesday with k. And punisher do guys again. They're unmarried them so next week. If you haven't caught that you're missing out it's amazing show Though it's brings me to question. Masha when we were on commercial. I saw you wearing a cruiser. Are you motley crue fan. Goddamn right so what is that your that. I'm a huge music fan. That's just one of my giant passions other than wrestling. And is that where your musical tastes. Come to light in that genre or is it pretty diverse. It can be kind of. They were so time. But i am a huge metal head motley crue. I love metallica. It's the thirty fifth anniversary of one of their albums today by the way Yeah i'm like give me some. Give me some hair. Metal gave me some free own all of rock and roll. Give it to me. I feel you there on rock my entire life and it's where my roots lie constantly Talking about getting on that topic what. What are you do in your downtown. How do you get away from us. And how do you just unplug. Is it just music. Do you play video gangs. Or i know that a lot of restaurants do that. I actually just came back from hiking all day mountain so i definitely like to get away to like naser like random scenic places in america And listen to music. While i'm at it you know music hiking gets them up. Were grilling or whatever you call going on out there. Yeah i don't really have much spare time. So traveling and photography. I guess and music would be the stuff like when it's not wrestling. Here's a good question for mr brandon. Random what's your favorite wrestling tori territory in the us man. I'm really loving to nexus right now. not gonna lie. Texas texas is really doing it for me lately in you. Just were at the brandon randall. In me were supposed to go to the mat. She the ventura at this weekend tells tells about that like Because that was a stack card to that was very much. Fat carter was very show and me. Invert vixen out there and ammos broker goddamn neck through her from one side of the link to the next. So we're gonna see that w dark one day maybe a well. I mean you said like you said you're wrestling legitimately though hers on the twentieth and that would be an epic. Dark met epic epic. I count on that. I'm doing on for one of the are not here because you know of technical difficulty. Tom tommy is a promo man like myself promote we loved the promos with an was there a particular promo were or a.

america Tom tommy next week twentieth today thirty fifth anniversary k. brandon randall one Masha brandon one side one of their Texas texas central eight eastern motley crue seven nexus wednesday carter
"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

Paradigm Shift Wrestling

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

"Whatsoever. Be moving that fast for such a long matter side and it's like way slower so that's the main difference because i mean it's completely incredible Of witness over there with the high-speed wrestling don't i know what brandon asked Brand randomly he was one of our co co hosts and now he's over starting to do his own wrestling training. Yes you want he. He's trying to get some some ends miss brand this brand but as we do take another quick commercial break and we're gonna continue with this interview. We'll be right back. Masha sandwich and now sued the a bit. He mac Are that is southern. Energy writers digest cuts out on sunday. Nine eastern with miss. It means mr mean. Jean as our boy hickey We're continuing his interview We actually have special guest one of our buddies and podcasting to come in here and say hi and he's a good friend of ours and i think he knows you as well all peers growth. Hey masha i'd orders. I'm good. i'm good i saw. You had had the pleasure of interviewing masha myself. And i just wanna to come in and say hello and good to say that you're back in the us mosher and happy doing well. Thank you. I made it back alive. Shockingly americans it i was. I was just remembering told a pretty funny story about your time in canada when we were talking about The traveling get a wrestling show and the.

canada Jean one sunday masha Masha brandon traveling americans Nine
"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

Paradigm Shift Wrestling

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

"Oh good evening ladies. Gentlemen welcome to another episode of the paradigm shift. I am your host josh. Haney i am joined by the man with stash misdemeanor gene are you doing. I'm doing fantastic. And we start our road a celebration of one year of this show tonight and man i. I couldn't be happier to be celebrating it with you. So yeah there. S one as the two. Oh jeez here. Right now We gotta take a moment in. Say congratulations to us on one year. Look a slip. On one year man went from one show seven shows with pinball streams like is been crazy. But we're not gonna take any of your time with our faces you see us every week. We're libertarian right away. One of the up. Incoming stars in indy wrestling right now. very excited to have her on. She is It's going to be an interesting conversation. So dench she's the russian diner rushing dynamite man. Thank you thank you. That's why you're here. Gene water right now. Marcia marcia how you doing today. I'm doing pretty well tonight. How are you guys doing doing. Good peers got the other will hd. Morgan everybody i do not much man. All right So we're gonna jump right into a guys start off with our everyone's favorite segment and we didn't warn our guest So when we come out we will be dancing. Just ignore it. The favorite the favorite segment.

Marcia marcia josh Morgan today seven shows two tonight russian one year one show one Haney One
"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

Paradigm Shift Wrestling

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"masha" Discussed on Paradigm Shift Wrestling

"A moment raises on monday bag. Am the league. Oh good.

interview With Ustadh Asim Khan

IlmFeed Podcast

04:47 min | 1 year ago

interview With Ustadh Asim Khan

"Today. We have a guest who must allow is What we call hitting his hat trick on the on the podcast. 'cause this is fed periods. And that's exactly why it doesn't need any introduction. Masha llah It's our very own. Stop us on joining us this time of actually it said i'm ali consortium while they salamina the law and Doug missile three-time hatrick you get the hat trick. Bonus blades but how you doing okay. I'm very well and I really appreciate been given us all to sit with you. Get an shot lava in Interesting conversation cha thank you for taking the time. I guess i'm in a couple of things that are different from lost. You know the the Fest two times. I guess that you joined us. I guess the first thing is you will with us you know. We were together physically in the same space in the in the studio Now obviously because of events over the pasta zero so You know we have to connect remotely virtually in other words and the second difference. Is that in terms of what we're going to be discussing. Usually we talk about a lot right when we have discussions and today it's not directly related to the hold on. It's more going to be focused on the sierra which is interesting because We haven't we haven't yet on the on the podcast that we've done here had like a proper compensation on this era so i think it's a good opportunity to to get into the of course we've touched on aspects of it but not like a dedicated focus conversation on this year so that should be interesting and before we started recording. Ah realized that You recognize something in my bookshelf. That that we go. I'm pointing at right now. That's my salon salon. Book the heart of the on his commentary and so they seed and we. We are going to speak about books as well today. Write checks and we're gonna talk about some exciting new projects as well. Yes definitely in. Charlotte are super announcement to make Some point jolla. But you know what point you made it in the beginning about how things are different now right so meeting. Virtually and in many ways. There's lots of things got to lose out on the company of each other being one of them and the brotherhood that comes with it But i don't know if you know this but many many years ago i used to work as a pharmacy manager and it was part of a big corporation and read had this appraisal. So you sit down with the guy who's aligned manager took about what you're gonna and talk about what you know other challenges i think is particularly correct that these so basically he the by lineman's game piece of advice and When he said it. That's pretty deep actually and during this whole lockdown and pandemic time that we've been going through that has been ringing in my mind. So basically what he said was awesome. Was what makes a successful business wasn't number one quality that makes us successful business and i was like this that and he's like no. It's actually the ability to adapt house. I interesting he goes yet. Look we're in a crowded marketplace And things are changing all the time and small changes If you don't keep up with them you get left behind very quickly. As a cutthroat business say goes if we adapt continuously to the changes that we will be we will be successful and economic of the business mind and putting that into maybe a spiritual place. I think that looking up. The prophecy salaam for example is a real manifestation of this like you think about how his life began when he's reaching age of fourteen which is usually the comfort zone for many people. He's williston upside down. He's made a profit of law and a messenger to humanity and people that loved him. No hate him. And he's got the way to the world on his shoulders and he doesn't crumble sapan he adepts and every day today because things didn't stay the same from that day until the day passes away twenty three years later What days of loss of sorrow of fighting of dealing with abuse of you know. Unbelievable things happen during his life. So feel like this pandemic Though this so much negativity when you think about it yeah also and there's a lot. There's a lot of positivity we can take chrome especially on that perspective of how the adapt is probably how you succeed

Masha Llah Doug Missile Hatrick Jolla Charlotte Lineman Sapan Salaam
Interview With Cory Doctorow

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Cory Doctorow

"Doctor. Wrote welcome to monica. Reads so tell us tell us more about the primus of tax service well attack surfaces the third novel in the little brother sequence at the first two little brother and homeland were young. Adult books about a character. Marcus yellow starts off. His very young teen who is caught in what amounts to a police state when his hometown of san francisco is bombed by terrorists and the department of homeland security swoop in and effectively suspend the constitution and all civil liberties and he and his mates form guerrilla army. Using things like hacked. Xboxes that use cryptographic secured wireless networking to outmaneuver the joss and eventually expelled them from the city and and restore human rights and civil liberties to the population and the third book attack. Surface is a standalone novel for adults and one of the first two are about people who are terrified. By the possibility of technology being used for oppression and excited about the possibility of technology being used for liberation. This third books protagonist is the young woman. Masha maximo who appears in the first two books as a kind of antagonised in the first book we meet her as a vhs contractor. Helping to spy on marcus and his friends even though she's of the same age and from the same background as them in the second book. She's a way bandit working to spy on jihadis and disrupt insurgent networks in iraq for the us government an enormous markup and when we meet her in the third book. she's just gone full cyber mercenary and her job is helping a thinly-veiled version of a company like the ns. Oh group to spy on pro democracy movements on behalf of post-soviet dictator so they can figure out who to round up and torture and murder and she has a reckoning with her conscience. She on the one hand has been spending her whole career finding ways to justify what she does Sneaking secrets out to marcus and his friends so they could blow the whistle wrongdoing or helping marcus escape from the da chest in the first book but by the third book she's really had to Devolve into some pretty self destructive conduct like helping the people that she spies on Defeat the tools that she herself as installing. And that's obviously not sustainable. And eventually she gets fired and worse has to run away from this post soviet republic and finds herself back in san francisco where she discovers to her horror that her childhood best friend who's now on a successor movement to black lives matter is being targeted by the very same cyber weapons that she herself spent her whole life building and while the first two books inspired a really large cohort of technologists and civil rights lawyers and writers and activists and security researchers and cryptographer offers who wanted to use their technical and legal powers for good and to stave off technological apocalypse. And dystopia this. Their book is aimed more at the people who rationalize their way. One decision a time in tech and other industries into participating in a vast confiscation of human liberty and human thriving in service to large corporations and oppressive governments and to talk about what it means to pull back from the brink. When you recognize one day that that you can no longer justify what you've been doing of course corey. That is exactly the situation. We find ourselves in absolutely i mean in two thousand eighteen. We saw twenty thousand google's walk off the job tech won't build it and tech solidarity and no tech for ice and other movements within the giant tech companies are not only organizing around technological issues but also around labor and environmental issues and and you see technologists now reaching outside of their bubble so for example at amazon the movement for justice there within the company spans warehouse workers who are laboring under absolutely ghastly and what should be unlawful conditions and tech workers. Whose initial concern was surveillance and climate. But who discovered that they could not make progress nor could they feel good about their movement unless incorporated the labor concerns of these people at the bottom of the ladder at the company.

Marcus Yellow Guerrilla Army Marcus Masha Maximo San Francisco Department Of Homeland Securit Monica Us Government Iraq Corey Google Amazon
Interview With Ustadha Muslema Purmul

IlmFeed Podcast

06:46 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Ustadha Muslema Purmul

"Today at handle i have with me. All the way from california will sell them. Monthly muslim pommel style is a muslim chaplain and scala. She graduated from the university of california san diego with a double major in religious studies and middle eastern studies as an undergraduate. She said at bear varying leadership roles for the muslim student association. She completed the bachelor program in sharia from her university in cairo and also completed graduate work at the american university in cairo in islamic studies. She is co founder and scholar in residence at south center for research and education. So a salaam. Aleikum where i lie. You've got to go to lie. Who didn't honor to be here with you and hound ally. I've been looking at some of your talks online and over the years i've heard about you. Masha llah always want to connect with with yourself. And with my sisters in america so This opportunity today to do that. How from the last the likewise. The work that you do is very impactful and And feed panama. We actually. I used to always wonder who. Who's behind. adam. Feed who's behind venus helen. So wonderful to meet you in even if it's virtually into intimidate the lettuce sister behind this this project wonderful community project michela and we are a team of people and masha. Lots of talented people involved joined the scene. So i feel honored to be part of this project because we try to bring positive inspiration to muslims all around the world so that you that also benefited atlantis. I worked the lao. It's interesting that you know. In the current climate of a pandemic how the programs that are being offered virtually and over the internet have now become so much more significant and so work of the work of and feed. You know is is truly a blessing for our community. And i think that that's something that bef- again before the pandemic it was there and it was beneficial but like during the time the time that people can actually gather is these types of projects that are really helping the communities You know heartbeat collective heartbeat keep pumping you know in the right direction with all. Our warton's reported them egis so My husband i founded a community institution. A i would call it like a community space and more. I guess we could. The best words to describe. It will be an intentional community. Third space project But the the methodist literally memes like a place to sit so people can sit really close together and learn and grow and you know have good companionship in all of that and penalty after the pandemic started. You know we we. We were completely puzzled because the whole idea was local. Sit next to each other. Know each other intimately as a community Support each other as brothers and sisters in person have live relationships and all's antisocial media you know the sense of or Was really like go back to the way things used to be where people would physically go out to a program and drop their kids off at the babysitting and that was really emphasizing that in the pandemic hit and we had we had to overnight transition everything virtually a that was a. That was a big just a challenge for us. But we realize we couldn't resist like this is now the way that we have to be both local and global. It's a lesson we learned the hard way. The the the yeah. I think everyone is having to adapt right by whatever plans anyone had had to rethink them But i've seen people being quite inventive quite like Innovative in their approach is to i guess overcoming the challenges of the pandemic so so tell us a also in california in general. How has it been like the effects of the pandemic and you know. What's the current situation. Are you still in a lockdown. Yeah we're actually. We went back to the most restrictive Phase of the lockdown so we're currently in purple there's different colors and purples the most severe and so that means that's the stay at home order. Which would which is how lockdown started and then it eased off. it transitioned in restaurants. Were open again and people could eat outside You know and now it's the opposite where things that were even slightly accessible are shut down again and So i want to say that the numbers are currently the highest ever been In terms of the numbers of people who are testing positive with covid nineteen and The the icu's are are almost full capacity so it's In that sense it is worse than actually. I mean they're describing in terms of numbers and percentages and on top of that people have covid fatigue so as we're in the beginning people were ready to try their best at this point. A lot of people are Are sort of easing off for I wanna say they're tired of keeping masses on things like that so it's It's a it's back in the next. Three weeks are expected to be probably one of the worst. I mean as according to the cdc the one of the worst health Situations in america and in particular california is bigger. I mean it hits california in a way that's more severe than maybe other parts of the country because of the major metropolitan cities rations of people in small areas

Muslim Student Association South Center For Research And Masha Llah Cairo Venus Helen Michela Warton American University Sharia University Of California California San Diego Panama Adam America ICU CDC
Why Do We Seek Comfort in the Familiar?

No Stupid Questions

04:43 min | 1 year ago

Why Do We Seek Comfort in the Familiar?

"The band's. I love the books and movies of already read and seen the poetry that i love etc i wonder if there is existing research that explains that is common and also whether the need to find comfort in the familiar increases with age and conversely whether the desired try out new things requires both a positive outlook on life and the physical energy to do so. So let's start there. Angie what say you to that query. This is such an interesting and deep question. There's actually a lot of research on the idea of finding comfort finding enjoyment in things that we've done before so one early finding that's relevant here is called the mere exposure effect. This is the idea that merely experiencing something was second third or fourth fifth sixth seventh and eighth time the more you're exposed to it the more you like it without anything really changing so even if it's something that prima facie you may not have thought you'd like or maybe even didn't like that exposure makes you like well. The original psychologist is robert science and he would show people in his studies in nonsense syllables. They didn't really have any meaning. And the first time you see a probably have more of a neutral response but then the eighth time the nighttime it's like you like it and you like it more and more with more exposure which is really remarkable. It is remarkable. It's interesting question to me too because in a way it's obvious why. Why do you think that is well. Because if you're feeling uncomfortable you would seek out the opposite which is comfort and the familiar is more comfortable almost by definition than the novel right. I guess i was connecting familiar and comfort in a way that maybe is an obvious but to me it felt obvious but on the other hand you could also imagine that during tough or unsettling times you'd want to stir things up to read or watch or explore new ideas that may help you get into a new frame and take your mind off what's distressing so i can see both sides but i have to say i totally identify with masha and i do the same. I'm curious if you do angela. Yeah i mean. I like most human beings in times of stress tend to seek the familiar and the comfortable and the lower risk. Love actually probably the greatest film that's ever been made and every time i see it and i can't even tell you how many times because it's been so many i feel comforted. It's like a warm cinematografica hug. Is it a romcom what you've never seen love. Actually i've heard of it. You've never seen love. actually. I don't see a lot of movies. Maybe that's why i'm so uncomfortable. The gist of love actually. It's like several intersecting love stories. You had me intersecting. Okay that says and each of them has aspect which is bittersweet and get a humorous. But the thing about this movie is you know what's going to happen. You know that you love what's going to happen and instead of that making it a diminished experience. It's almost better the team at the time. I don't know if this is just a pandemic coping mechanism. Actually i think there is good research that suggests that's pretty universal so somewhat argue that emotions like fear and also emotions like sadness. Get us to withdraw a little bit to that which we know is going to work and conversely happiness and safety and contentment tend to get us to be a little more venture. Som what's called broaden and build theory. This is work. Barbara frederickson and others. So i think we're all in a kind of state of uncertainty. That makes us want to retract a little bit. Even if you're right even sometimes trying something new might be exactly what we need. Can you tell me a little bit about this. Broaden and build theory which. I've never heard of yes so well. We know why we have fear like if we didn't have fear we'd get eaten by a tiger and we also know why we have the cousin of fear anxiety. Like oh i'm anxious about this test or i'm anxious about this thing is going to happen so i prepare for it more. All the negative emotions had been catalogued understood in terms of their evil lucien airy function for survival. So barbara. Frederickson is a psychologist who wondered. Well why is it across culture that we have certain positive. Emotions like happiness contentment surprise. Like aw and so forth. And that led to broaden and build theory which she's spent the rest of her long and storied career studying which is basically the idea that when we experience these positive emotions they are assigned a signal. That things are going well. And therefore now is the time to broaden and

Robert Science Angie Masha Barbara Frederickson Angela Frederickson Barbara
"masha" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"masha" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Flagship news show Anker Dmitry Kiselev refuse the first presidential debate to criticize America as a whole choose to a breeze. Gilly with Theis put with enough See actor, he said. Anybody who watched the acrimonious debate was left with a feeling of disgust. According to a poll conducted last month on Ly 23% of Russians are positive about Trump, while 43% are negative. Perhaps even more surprising. 55% of respondents said they were hearing about Biden for the very first time. Kremlin, of course, knows Biden very well. I think the very fact that Biden was Obama's vice president already makes him not a friendly figure in Russia. That's Masha Lipman, a political analyst in Moscow. Well, Obama looked down at Russia in some of his statements. He certainly sounded not respectful. This caused the sense of events on Russia's part in Britain, of course, is seen as part of the same team. Biden once said It would be bad for Russia if Putin ran for a third term as president. He's now in his fourth term and looking ahead to two more. Leyden made disparaging remarks about Russia's role as a global power. And when Russia seized Ukrainian territory, Biden became Obama's point man on Ukraine. Still, Putin knows Biden could very well be the next American president. Asked by a Russian TV reporter about his preferences. Putin tried to be diplomatic. This President Trump when you're not nervous cause also, Trump has repeatedly called for better relations which the Kremlin values, he said. But the US president has been limited in his actions by a bipartisan consensus in Congress to contain Russia said, seconded that Democratic party no As for the Democratic candidate, said he uses a lot of anti Russian language while on the other hand, Biden has expressed interest in a new arms control treaty with Russia. In the end, Putin said, he'll work with whomever the American people choose. What Masha Lipman says the prospects for better relations are bleak. I don't think that Kremlin can expect any improvement in the years Russian relations. Whatever the outcome off the election in November, she says. It's a lose lose situation for Russia, because if Biden becomes president He may consolidate European allies against Moscow. While if Trump is reelected, his political opponents may pursue an even harsher policy toward Russia, the only thing that helps the Kremlin, Lippman says. Is more polarization and turmoil in the United States. Turmoil means United States weakened thiss is what the Kremlin can actually benefits from. Not an improvement on relations, she says. America's internal divisions are the Kremlin's best hope. Lucien Kim. NPR NEWS Moscow This is NPR news. And this is W one might see coming up later here on the morning edition. During the Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Cockney Barrett, Republican senators made much of the fact that she is a working mother. Judge Barrett is a tireless mother of seven. You a working mother of seven. She's a remarkable mother. She has seven beautiful Children. Analysts say that messages aimed at white female voters in the suburbs. We will hear more about that coming up in about 15 minutes. Beautiful blue skies Right now. In New York City. We're expecting a high of 70 degrees today, Sunshine all day 52 degrees at the moment tonight, back down into the upper fifties with clear skies And then tomorrow More sunshine. A high of 73. W C..

Russia Biden Putin vice president Trump Masha Lipman Obama US Anker Dmitry Kiselev Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Moscow America president Lippman NPR Gilly New York City Democratic party Theis
The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

On the Media

10:04 min | 1 year ago

The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

"Election of Donald J. Trump. We in the United States have become accustomed to a degree of fabulous. Um I've done more for black Americans than anybody. With the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln, the president, self aggrandizement provides the framework for his alternate reality. We have one of the lowest mortality rate way had 900 Deaths in a single day. You have the numbers place because I heard we had the best mortality number one low mortality, right? We are being given something I can't recall in my lifetime, a choice of realities. One that is mostly regarded as evidence based and one that you might call faith based that faith being in Mr Trump In either case, you have a sizable cohort to back you up. Truth has been displaced in many quarters by rage and fear. Over the past four months, we've had many opportunities to observe the impact of paranoia. When deployed by a fantasist in the White House in Arizona Man died after taking Clara Quien, his wife said that they heard about it from Trump's briefings. Are you gonna allow the government to tell you you have to wear a mask? Some believe these mask orders go against their freedoms will protect. All right, I will know asked me and I will not pay for antibiotics. Conspiracies of Sena numbers swell on Facebook and doctors warn, if left unchecked, they could undermine an effective vaccine. The death toll from the Corona virus pandemic has surpassed 150,000 in the United States. That's the highest number of fatalities in any nation by far. And accounts for nearly 1/4 of the recorded global. Told immediately after the 2016 election, I spoke with New York ER writer Masha Gessen, who, after having lived long under Vladimir Putin had some advice for anxious Americans trying to navigate the so called new normal. She explained that for the would be authoritarian, the lying is the point that the ability to create a reality flagrantly staring down conspicuous fact. Is a crucial component of building and sustaining power. And last fall boxes, David Roberts noted bluntly, where such a strategy left unchecked, could lead this sort of cultish, increasingly authoritarian movement takes over the country. In Russia and Turkey and Poland. Right's a disturbingly longer and longer list. We see countries that we thought were democracies devolve into this. In the U. S. So much has happened in the last few years that we thought would never happen. I think we should really loosen up our imaginations as to what can happen when a movement that is convinced that everything it knows and loves is in danger of falling apart movements that's thinking like that unconnected anymore to fax or reality. And got its hands on the power of the federal government is the basic recipe for democracy is falling apart. And so last fall on, the media producer Leia Feder reported on one of those places Poland, a young democracy teetering on unstable ground and where it's far right Nationalist government is intent on rewriting the nation's painful history. For almost a decade, Poland has been in the grip of a conspiracy theory what really happened when a plane crashed in a forest in western Russia, killing Poland's president and dozens of other government officials. The plane had been on route to commemorate another Polish tragedy, a massacre that had occurred in the very same location in 1940. 1973 documentary explored the mystery While the German army is advancing from the West, the Soviets crossed Poland's eastern front court in a method of Polish army collapsed, Um, surrendered. The victors, divided the country down the middle and imprisoned every soldier they captured. Russia took a 215,000 Poland officer Corps were never seen alive again. Many. What die near Smolensk, in a forest called catching after decades of opacity and suspicion on investigation in the early nineties, confirmed finally, that it was not Hitler. But Stalin, who had ordered the massacre. And so when, on April 10th 2010 a delegation of 96 Polish politicians and officials traveled from Warsaw to Smolensk. It was in service of remembrance and reconciliation. But what happened instead compounded the national pain. Poland's prime minister burst into tears when he heard the news today that his country's president was killed in a plane crash pilot tried to land in a thick fog at least twice missing the runway. And ignoring the control tower's direction to divert to another city. Not just losing the president of that country. The first lady, the ahead of the army chief of staff, the National Security Office head deputy Parliament speaker, the deputy foreign minister. It was a devastating national tragedy. What's more, the symbolic layering was undeniable. Ah, longstanding tragedy finally solved and a new one appears in its place. And yet, in the immediate moments and days after the crash, there was a kind of common shock. An Applebaum is a journalist and academic beast in Warsaw At the time of the 2010 crash, her husband was minister of foreign affairs in the Polish government, and there was pretty straightforward reporting. About what had happened. What was immediately clear There were people on the ground who saw the crash. So there was a kind of concensus initially about what had happened that it was a terrible Accident and that you know many people of value to the nation had died. But the story started to shift is the investigation into the crash proceeded. Investigators say pilot error was mostly to blame. It became clear that one of the causes of the crash was the fact that the pilots were under pressure to land. The president's delegation had arrived late for the plane. They were running behind schedule as they got closer to smell lens, which was even really an airport. It was a kind of airstrip in the forest. They began to be worried about the fog and the pilots weren't sure they could make the narrow landing. But according to black box recordings, Polish President Lech Kaczynski, head of the opposition party directed the pilots to do it was meant to be the launch of his reelection campaign. So there were cameras there which he knew, and he was very anxious to go under pressure, the pilots tried to make the landing. Instead, they hit a tree, killing all 96 people on board. The president's twin brother, the head of the nationalist right political party in Poland, same parties, the president He didn't like this story. It made the president look bad, more to the point. This is a terrible crash very near to a place where a Nurlita generation of poles were murdered by the Soviet state. Because of that eeriness. People immediately began to speculate that there was actually a different, deeper story that perhaps the Russians caused the crash. Perhaps there was a bomb on the plane. And conspiracy theories began to proliferate online. The president's brother, Nijinsky began openly alluding to them. Kaczynskis Law and Justice Party made unraveling the Smolensk conspiracy. It's key campaign promise once you had bought into their idea that there is a secret conspiracy, possibly involving the Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk. Possibly involving the Russians, and that lots of people high up in the state were implicated in some great big secret plot to kill the president. If you believe that Then you can believe a lot of other things. The point was to get people to believe in a kind of alternative reality to doubt institutions to doubt that the government was telling them the truth, and that was absolutely an attempt to help win an election, But it did more than carve out a new electorate. It created new divides in Polish society. Where one's Polish politics were split between Communists and anti communists around economic policy. Now it was over a vision of history. It was how you see Poland's place in the world. And whether you think secret dark forces air trying to undermine your country and whether you know you need to elect a government of Patriots in order to make sure that doesn't happen. Where you fell on that dividing line affected how you would vote and how you would understand politics for the next several years, And so when line justice one in 2015 it spawned a new kind of power a power based on the willingness to embrace the myth. They fired large numbers of Polish civil servants. Polish members of the foreign service. All kinds of people who work for the government also leaders and board members of state companies and they replaced all of them with people whom they were sure we're loyal. And one element of the loyalty test was belief in this Molinski myth. Smolinski conspiracy implied that there were dark, mysterious forces continuing to try to manipulate and undermine the Polish nation. It also drawn the larger story of a Poland continually attacked by outsiders and the valiant Polish resistance to threats past and present line Justice Road that narrative electoral victory. And then wrote its electoral victory to further consolidation of that narrative in service of Polish nationalism.

President Trump Poland Russia Polish President Lech Kaczynsk Smolensk United States Donald J. Trump Warsaw Prime Minister Mr Trump Federal Government Poland Officer Corps Abraham Lincoln Facebook David Roberts Arizona Masha Gessen Vladimir Putin Deputy Foreign Minister
The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

On the Media

10:04 min | 1 year ago

The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

"Of Donald J. Trump. We in the United States have become accustomed to a degree of fabulous. Um I've done more for black Americans than anybody. With the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln, the president, self aggrandizement provides the framework for his alternate reality. We have one of the lowest mortality rate way had 900 Deaths in a single day. You have the numbers place because I heard we had the best mortality number one low mortality, right? We are being given something I can't recall in my lifetime, a choice of realities. One that is mostly regarded as evidence based and one that you might call faith based that faith being in Mr Trump In either case, you have a sizable cohort to back you up. Truth has been displaced in many quarters by rage and fear. Over the past four months, we've had many opportunities to observe the impact of paranoia. When deployed by a fantasist in the White House in Arizona Man died after taking Clara Quien, his wife said that they heard about it from Trump's briefings. Are you gonna allow the government to tell you you have to wear a mask? Some believe these mask orders go against their freedoms will protect. All right, I will know asked me and I will not pay for antibiotics. Conspiracies of Sena numbers swell on Facebook and doctors warn, if left unchecked, they could undermine an effective vaccine. The death toll from the Corona virus pandemic has surpassed 150,000 in the United States. That's the highest number of fatalities in any nation by far. And accounts for nearly 1/4 of the recorded global. Told immediately after the 2016 election, I spoke with New York ER writer Masha Gessen, who, after having lived long under Vladimir Putin had some advice for anxious Americans trying to navigate the so called new normal. She explained that for the would be authoritarian, the lying is the point that the ability to create a reality flagrantly staring down conspicuous fact. Is a crucial component of building and sustaining power. And last fall boxes, David Roberts noted bluntly, where such a strategy left unchecked, could lead this sort of cultish, increasingly authoritarian movement takes over the country. In Russia and Turkey and Poland. Right's a disturbingly longer and longer list. We see countries that we thought were democracies devolve into this. In the U. S. So much has happened in the last few years that we thought would never happen. I think we should really loosen up our imaginations as to what can happen when a movement that is convinced that everything it knows and loves is in danger of falling apart movements that's thinking like that unconnected anymore to fax or reality. And got its hands on the power of the federal government is the basic recipe for democracy is falling apart. And so last fall on, the media producer Leia Feder reported on one of those places Poland, a young democracy teetering on unstable ground and where it's far right Nationalist government is intent on rewriting the nation's painful history. For almost a decade, Poland has been in the grip of a conspiracy theory what really happened when a plane crashed in a forest in western Russia, killing Poland's president and dozens of other government officials. The plane had been on route to commemorate another Polish tragedy, a massacre that had occurred in the very same location in 1940. 1973 documentary explored the mystery While the German army is advancing from the West, the Soviets crossed Poland's eastern front court in a method of Polish army collapsed, Um, surrendered. The victors, divided the country down the middle and imprisoned every soldier they captured. Russia took a 215,000 Poland officer Corps were never seen alive again. Many. What die near Smolensk, in a forest called catching after decades of opacity and suspicion on investigation in the early nineties, confirmed finally, that it was not Hitler. But Stalin, who had ordered the massacre. And so when, on April 10th 2010 a delegation of 96 Polish politicians and officials traveled from Warsaw to Smolensk. It was in service of remembrance and reconciliation. But what happened instead compounded the national pain. Poland's prime minister burst into tears when he heard the news today that his country's president was killed in a plane crash pilot tried to land in a thick fog at least twice missing the runway. And ignoring the control tower's direction to divert to another city. Not just losing the president of that country. The first lady, the ahead of the army chief of staff, the National Security Office head deputy Parliament speaker, the deputy foreign minister. It was a devastating national tragedy. What's more, the symbolic layering was undeniable. Ah, longstanding tragedy finally solved and a new one appears in its place. And yet, in the immediate moments and days after the crash, there was a kind of common shock. An Applebaum is a journalist and academic beast in Warsaw At the time of the 2010 crash, her husband was minister of foreign affairs in the Polish government, and there was pretty straightforward reporting. About what had happened. What was immediately clear There were people on the ground who saw the crash. So there was a kind of concensus initially about what had happened that it was a terrible Accident and that you know many people of value to the nation had died. But the story started to shift is the investigation into the crash proceeded. Investigators say pilot error was mostly to blame. It became clear that one of the causes of the crash was the fact that the pilots were under pressure to land. The president's delegation had arrived late for the plane. They were running behind schedule as they got closer to smell lens, which was even really an airport. It was a kind of airstrip in the forest. They began to be worried about the fog and the pilots weren't sure they could make the narrow landing. But according to black box recordings, Polish President Lech Kaczynski, head of the opposition party directed the pilots to do it was meant to be the launch of his reelection campaign. So there were cameras there which he knew, and he was very anxious to go under pressure, the pilots tried to make the landing. Instead, they hit a tree, killing all 96 people on board. The president's twin brother, the head of the nationalist right political party in Poland, same parties, the president He didn't like this story. It made the president look bad, more to the point. This is a terrible crash very near to a place where a Nurlita generation of poles were murdered by the Soviet state. Because of that eeriness. People immediately began to speculate that there was actually a different, deeper story that perhaps the Russians caused the crash. Perhaps there was a bomb on the plane. And conspiracy theories began to proliferate online. The president's brother, Nijinsky began openly alluding to them. Kaczynskis Law and Justice Party made unraveling the Smolensk conspiracy. It's key campaign promise once you had bought into their idea that there is a secret conspiracy, possibly involving the Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk. Possibly involving the Russians, and that lots of people high up in the state were implicated in some great big secret plot to kill the president. If you believe that Then you can believe a lot of other things. The point was to get people to believe in a kind of alternative reality to doubt institutions to doubt that the government was telling them the truth, and that was absolutely an attempt to help win an election, But it did more than carve out a new electorate. It created new divides in Polish society. Where one's Polish politics were split between Communists and anti communists around economic policy. Now it was over a vision of history. It was how you see Poland's place in the world. And whether you think secret dark forces air trying to undermine your country and whether you know you need to elect a government of Patriots in order to make sure that doesn't happen. Where you fell on that dividing line affected how you would vote and how you would understand politics for the next several years, And so when line justice one in 2015 it spawned a new kind of power a power based on the willingness to embrace the myth. They fired large numbers of Polish civil servants. Polish members of the foreign service. All kinds of people who work for the government also leaders and board members of state companies and they replaced all of them with people whom they were sure we're loyal. And one element of the loyalty test was belief in this Molinski myth. Smolinski conspiracy implied that there were dark, mysterious forces continuing to try to manipulate and undermine the Polish nation. It also drawn the larger story of a Poland continually attacked by outsiders and the valiant Polish resistance to threats past and present line Justice Road that narrative electoral victory. And then wrote its electoral victory to further consolidation of that narrative in service of Polish nationalism.

President Trump Poland Russia Polish President Lech Kaczynsk Smolensk United States Donald J. Trump Warsaw Prime Minister Mr Trump Federal Government Poland Officer Corps Abraham Lincoln Facebook David Roberts Arizona Masha Gessen Vladimir Putin Deputy Foreign Minister
"masha" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"masha" Discussed on KCRW

"Of the Soviet Union's feared secret police. And for decades a statue stood in front of KGB headquarters in downtown Moscow on August 1900 won. As decrepit communist regime crumbled. Pro democracy protesters tore down the statue. A despised communist hero wearing a goatee and a great coat was dumped on a vacant lot near the mosque for River. Other toppled Soviet statues followed, and the next year Moscow turned chaotic collection into a sculpture park. Our guide and historian Artem Goldman was born that same year the same, so it's cold outside. Let's go over the menu, he says. The sculpture park now displays more than 700 sculptures from the 19 thirties to the present day. It's been incorporated into Moscow's Gorky Park, a riverside haven with cafes, yoga classes and shady lawns. It is one thing what statues mean when they are in conspicuous sites in main squares in big streets. It's quite another thing when statues like that are collected among many others in the card. Masha Lipman is a political scientist who studied Russia's changing relationship to its monuments. She says in sculpture Park. The context of the Soviet statues has changed entirely, and in that sense they've lost their symbolic power. Also, it's a nice park. You can just go for a walk. There were sit down and picnic. Rollerbladers now skate past the Avenue of leaders, which includes sculptures of Soviet rulers like Vladimir Lenin, Leonid Brezhnev and chose a Stalin. Stalin, with his hand in his coat, is made of pink granite and is missing his nose surgery me in them you after my guide points at the sculpture right behind Stalin. It's a contemporary work. Stone heads in a cage symbolizing the.

sculpture Park Moscow Stalin Soviet Union Masha Lipman Gorky Park KGB Artem Goldman Vladimir Lenin Leonid Brezhnev Russia scientist
A Look at Big Mouth

Is It Transphobic Podcast

04:19 min | 2 years ago

A Look at Big Mouth

"Here to talk about big mouth. We're here to talk about big mouth. So, we're here to talk about some specific one specific episode, and then there's a couple of things leading into it season three episode eight, where they introduced a character named Ali who is voiced by one of my favorite Comedians of all time Allie Wong And it gets really. But before we get into that, let me ask you. Lillian how'd you watched big mouth or you? A fan of big mouth? Is this a thing that you were just like all right? I'm psyched for this season. I I? Have I I really like like I almost didn't watch it. When it first came out, just because the Internet was so down on it and like just sort of treating it as like Oh. This is just gross gross out humor and stuff like that, but I inevitably did watch it and I really like it. It's like one of my favorite shows on Netflix lakes. So every time a new seasons come out I've always made sure to binge it, and yes, it does have a lot of gross out humor, but it's like it's not like you know Ren and stimpy, whereas just like Oh here's butts for its own sake or something like that. It's like in the service of something you know. Yeah League in this. Oh sorry. Continue almost all of my favorite comedians ever are in big mouth like eleven. Kroll I like John I didn't know that I. Like John Mullany until I saw this. I I especially love Jason Zukas, I love Jason Manzar can. And like the, there's like this weird movement on the Internet to just be like big is one of the worst things of all time, because and tying it back to ren and stimpy. The like lots of Internet disciples of John Kay. Who believe like you know animation beats should be strictly. You know by artists and story, board ESTS, and with no sort of. Slip I mean this is turning into an animation podcast now, but like with no sort of inkling of like scriptwriting or stuff like that and like big Ma, and if you look at big mouth like the artistic style is pretty ugly. Yeah but but I feel like that's on purpose to. Well, and I think that there's there's like every medium. There is a place for a lot of different things whether it's like the writing is so good that it makes up for the animation, which then they can hire great animators to make it better in the lions. I feel like Archer was like that at the beginning like the animation was Janke, but the writing was so good that held up. And now the animation is a lot better. If you see the newer episodes, yeah, like wow, yeah! I guess like with with big mouth me I didn't like it when I I watched it. At all I was put off by, and it's not necessarily the gross out. It was like the gross out for the reason of gross out was sort of like my like I'm good and I gave it another shot, and I'm happy, because I really did enjoy that for season once I finished I finished it. Yeah. I mean for as much as I. Liked it, I will you know cop to? It's not an easy show to get into yeah. But I think I think they do. Do a very not realistic by any means but like. A realistic humor of like sophomoric childish, but at the same time. Of elements that are very sophisticated and very adult, and very like you know what, yeah, we don't talk about ciswomen who go through puberty, really in a comedic sense right and so getting a lot of these voices is actually really good, and like the humor is very funny. Once you're able to sort of look past the fact that it's like Oh they're showing Dick's all the time. And it's like. I mean yeah, I mean it's funny. You mentioned that one of my favorite jokes in the series like I forget what the ultimate context of it, but it's very Meta joke where Andrew just basically mentions. or or maybe it was like the hormone monster basically mentioned like. Sort of animated adult animation and Andrew Responds like, but that's Ju-, but that's basically just animated child pornography, isn't it? And the Hormone Masha goes. Oh I hope not that would get people in a lot of trouble, and he just looks at the camera like right.

Allie Wong Big Ma Andrew John I Netflix Lillian REN ALI John Mullany Jason Zukas John Kay Jason Manzar Archer JU Dick
Alex Natera on the Origin of Run-Specific Isometrics

Just Fly Performance Podcast

05:46 min | 2 years ago

Alex Natera on the Origin of Run-Specific Isometrics

"Alex it's awesome to have you back and I think in this type of necessity really where I think a lot of us are a little bit more barebones place than we typically are in our own trading environments and things like that. I I'd like to ask you a little bit of the history of what we talked about. Lascaux which was Your isometric training protocol and. I'm curious how did you come up with that? Like what was the necessity that sparked the all the overcoming isometrics in that protocol that you talked about last time on the show? Yeah sure I think. There's actually a real spock incident before that incident occurred always already involved in some full loss metric training through right back to where a little kid. I was a martial artist Back in the day as a youngster is a five six year old and happened to do a really sort of traditional style. Mosh largely run out in the Wilderness and the and the scillies out in the wilderness. And you'll you'll they're bamboo flooring in your training out there. Doing all sorts of a real traditional taught work. And there's a lot of awesome metrics back. Then I remember back in the Divan and advocates that were in the martial lots like I just felt like always automatic genetics. Whatever the youngsters. Six seven eight year old but I always felt stronger than them but we just doing. Masha up four or five. Times die Just Chine- Anyway. But in that. Masha outs sign much. Awesome metric stuff ruled traditional stuff pushing against your own hands against objects are the people that were bigger than you and that sort of stuff let alone. The numerous amount of push ups. You do as well or whatever but so. That was a I sort of Introduction the awesome metrics Was Awesome Energy. Was just something we have to kind of thing and then I guess another key moment was going into high school starting to try starting to lift weights learning Lipson. Let's Basically much traditionalist. There was some point in time and Utah used to try. And he's still do try to stop a very visceral that but locks when you're young and so. I remember trying just thinking from a necessity. Really Thinking Rob will Lift the white up but also lower light down as much as possible. I didn't know anything about muscle actions yet. I've learned that you can also hold a white cockatoo. That with different loads at different times. We'll warm I gonNA just sit there and do bench press and then file pushing it up and rocky no one on file lowering it. I'll get a spot on. I'll foul Lawrence and on a file like holding it. As as long as I can with the highest white on compulsively hold it for so I was already playing with stuff then and obviously now. You've got lots of other things. Come into the system. Here you've got your growth and maturation ideologies Chinese very rapidly in whatever nonetheless. You're starting to think while they stopped really works like this is amazing. I'm getting far stronger than everyone else. And Excelling Sport and so on but then I finish them Action into my sport now as a professional and one position applied we American listens But in the scrum always in from the middle of a scrum where you're literally pushing V. I gather As much load going through your body and if your dominant scrum you might start with. We men overcome them eventually. And then push would. But there's not a lot of concentric taught movement it's really a high blood isometric and modernization onto struggle kickable back to the arrest of nights so on between massive men and I honored killers. Where the pressure coming at you and I'm having to stabilize on one leg while accessible by and start it just made sense to me. That has all its training. Could squat uncle really well. A strong squad relatively speaking an absolute sims will for my size but I just started doing more symmetric work and it felt like what heavy load felt lock the scrum and therefore and the transit was dramatic from an average on ended up becoming quota yet act became a strong point of Ma Game. Attest completely dos. Metrics now is very specific wrought as in muscle action was very specific to the to the movement that I needed to do in the game then moving along in our going into the professional environment in terms of a practitioner working as a strength and conditioning are starting to use awesome metrics in the reeb setting often and at also in the assessment the assessment of neuromuscular capacities particular peak force. So that'll started coming in really when I started moving over to the English Wish probably my my biggest development journey for instance for example. Sorry and time on end up taking a few people through the rehabilitation early with the Physiotherapists import obviously on the early stages. But then some of the exercises way would doing on carry on with the longer because we'd see guy for a period of time where you got six weeks or something doing awesome interest. Because that's all they could in the Rehab setting and then I'd move on to more autonomy would but actually stop keep keeps them awesome metric in long because my mind I was going hold on getting any pine from this exercise where actually really really high near Moscow. So I can look them hot on this exercise. Robin drop the white and become what we thought was more specific moving into US twenty tropic so that and then what I was seeing the back of that with some really promising results like people just coming back a lot quicker and a lot stronger and so I needed less back work of strength training to get them often and returning to plan returning to

Alex Divan Lipson United States Moscow Utah Ma Game Lawrence Robin
Bitcoin Battles $10,000

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:57 min | 2 years ago

Bitcoin Battles $10,000

"Active weekend and we still still tinkering around pretty cables right now. So let's talk about that. Let's discuss the elephant in the room that everybody is saying is very aware of and ten thousand so bitcoin over the weekend I actually found a long. I am long becoming stalking this position. For quite some time and The candle in the crowd on the two-day shot. I'm very happy to belong here. of the day with. I'M GONNA make a profit or not or ought I do know that my promo ability success is reasonably high bicester my trading records. But you never want to win is gonNA come. You don't know if it's destroyed all the next tried. You know that is if you flip the coin a hundred times in this guy to be a stretch re probably gonNA flip and land on towels five times and arrive at the probability of coming back to it being even author. Honda tosses is very very hot necessarily my trading okay. I'm I'm flipping the coin. I'm following the same strategies and structures every single time. I take that try Dr. No which tried is going to kill. The PIG will eno is that. I've got the probabilities in Moi. Five up now right now. That tries looking really really nauseous. But this definitely the hurdle of ten thousand you got to get through that region. I think that if we can get through that area I think we might actually have a little bit of potential upside mentioned. Carry through and the reason that I signed. This is because the has been a little bit of a battle up there at ten thousand. We saw yesterday in the evening. We pushed out through ten thousand in the Kennel. Started to get a bit wacky. Some big candle went straight out three. We wouldn't wish got into it and then back down a couple of hundred all's on a couple of hundred neely a couple of hundred dollars relatively quickly so we went back up there again to die. We pushed through ten thousand. We actually met a high of more than ten thousand and thirty six dollars before guiding a got scuttled other. Speak to now at nine thousand nine hundred and twenty eight point four tool percent today okay today so we are. We are having taught little hustle with ten thousand. If we can get through we good because we'll have cleared out the sales if not then there is potential further down. Saw what could also be an option is a consolidation now because the daily is not telling me enough. It's the Tuta I've taken my tried on. I really liked the look of his trend. Thus far we did pull back on the weekly can which was lost. Wicked closed point three percent. Up of the interesting thing is that we went down as low as nine thousand three hundred thirteen dollars before closing at nine nine. Seven one so felli good shift. We went into that cradles. Very close that cradles off the candle closet is a bullish candalyn. If we ingest I will get about ten thousand and then get above the high of last week's candle ten thousand three hundred thirty one. They've got the break of another. Hi sorry not a high sil- drug and then we break the high of another weekly candle that stocks we saw. We want small as we push on to new highs there the bitcoin just sitting there waiting seeing goes on. It's pretty slow at the minutes. Precipitous slow indeed. Now therapy has been my best tried for a little while. Buffet It's of move my stop up again after having guilt long way did I get long long. background to twenty three. My stops out to fifty six and I only had a two to twenty three to seven days seeks to stop very good trade. They locked in more profit highway currently sitting rotten out point two two percent and You know the weekly here gain loss. Cantwell's bullish close up six point. Two two percent in has just gone ripping streit outside. I be surprised at all to see except I saw a theory. Pull back a little bit this week. If the rest of the market does take a break because it has been a pretty still around were to seventy four seven point two five of a percent except as awesome. The kids their twenty eight cents. Were Dan point five percent. Little breakout happened yesterday. What say we just saw always? That's all it's doing. This does not a great deal more to decide really about Tom. About Excel pay. Bitcoin cash half a percent as I speak to you right now at full of five spot three five that is Willa. It's taken a long and again To Canada push the outside this another opportunity. Potentially if anyone out there trading those br sorry trading cradles base to ninety six and nineteen dollars down to three percent very solid way still locked coin do pull bucking that cradles to really nice move there. As a matter of fact the next tweet is preceding. That was eight point nine. Five percent move. It's at seventy eight dollars and seventy six cents. Currently down one point six percent on this day Eos perp. Masha talk of their deep pool but quite hard about south at three fifty. Roughly ran three fifty quite well. Our photos and thirty six point three percent. Bon Ami childhood really do like to look up here The bonnets contract on the two-day ripping the bonnets contract on the two against Bitcoin also ripping really good. It's at one percent right now. Twenty three dollars and thirteen cents. Kadota another pool back into the cried ozone over the weekend. The two day were six point. One percents We're looking good. They're really nice. Looking trend until break stamped low ally. There's nothing really to worry about for me. Just holding on and seeing what goes on the therion classics down one percent right now. Pretty Ivory agree pretty ugly looking shot. If on honest with you guys a little bit of consolidation starting to form around bat just show up at the ten dollar marks actually now that implies on what actually just throw that a more watch list to keep an eye on that nine dollars and sixty eight cents. Ten Percent Tron. Is Dan Warren? Half percent up two point one cents as well to round out that top ten.

Dan Warren Stalking Honda PIG Neely ENO Cantwell Streit Bon Ami Willa Canada TOM
Mickey Drexler's Formula for Turning Retail Around

The Business of Fashion Podcast

11:46 min | 2 years ago

Mickey Drexler's Formula for Turning Retail Around

"Welcome to inside fashion on the podcast. This week. We have a very special conversation with someone who has come to be known as merchant Prince of fashion. Mickey Drexler grew up in the Bronx working at his dad's company in the garment district and then carved out a legendary career working at Bloomingdale's Bloomingdale's and Taylor the gap and J. Crew. These days Mickey is working with his son on a new brand called Alex melon in his conversation with B.. JIO FS chief correspondent in New York. Lauren Sherman he shares his advice for young executives working with creative partners. Here's Mickey Drexler inside fashion. So Mickey thank you for being here happy to be here. Let's start from the beginning. Are Your parents or your parents in retailer apparel or anything that I My Dad worked worked in the garment business. New York City We grew I grew up in the Bronx and he had like a lot of other First Generation Jewish families whatever he worked in the garment business. He worked By buttons and piece goods for coat manufacturer named Jill Junior and my mom always worked. She was ill From Twenty eight years old she had cancer and passed away. Wait fifteen years later from a Being a chain smoker in those days no one really knew that cigarettes actually killed you so So she but she always worked as a secretary at the Y. M. Ha So they both worked hard. I had no siblings but I had seven cousins. Who Live down the St and three of my mom's sisters so as an extended family well it was the y m h a a young men's Hebrew Association? WHO's in the South Bronx Bronx? I went to overnight camp where she was a secretary for the summers At the camp camp because she worked it was affiliated with ym Ha and growing up. Did you think you would go into the same business. Your Dad was well I I didn't think anything as a kid I I only worried about. I worried about a lot of stuff. 'cause I was a worrying kid but I didn't really think about what I do who I always dreamt that my dad would be a successful. Because that's what he talked and dream about he talked about always Wanting wanting to kind of de successful he never was by any measurement Successful at what. He did He worked for a kind of a boss who you know. I heard about all the time who didn't treat him as kindly maybe As he might. That's true a lot of bosses and he wanted to be. I'll use the word big shot. Now this is in the sixties in the Bronx and So I didn't really know what I wanted to do. I had no idea it would be the garment business But I always worked starting at a young age my teenage years going because he kind of forced me to go into work with him on holidays on Saturdays Saturdays so I went to work for the coat. Company ticketing coats a Aaron's the shipping carrying samples to the other people in stores etc.. Did you know Ralph Lauren. Growing up because he grew up in the Bronx right. He was on Masha Loop Parkway. I was Barnes Avenue He I went to high school at Bronx sites across much Lou Parkway did you do you remember when he hemas coming up in the late sixties. I remember him exactly. 'cause I always followed people who did things that I admired. I was at Bloomingdale's started Sixty nine working at bloomingdale's and I remember Ralph. I didn't know him personally. But he came in selling selling wide ties to the men's department and it was like revolutionary and so I didn't know him but you know because I worked at Bloomingdale's I A new people who bought ties from him. So I always looked at. Ralph is someone. I admired immensely. What he did and at Bloomingdale's did you do the retail program? I know a lot of the department stores used to have these great training programs. Very lucky. In the sense first day was in housewares. I couldn't stand it I was trying to look for pots and pans. I knew nothing about it and I was Kinda lost. And the second day They moved me and this is my second day of my right official career. They put me into a department of junior department was called the Lexington shops. I was the buyer I actually went to the market every day. A No supervision really knows days and I. It's changed so dramatically you didn't have someone breathing down your neck. Tell you what to do so there I was twenty three years resolve. Whatever and I had a department Lexington Juniors whose only in fifty nine th street and I was in charge of buying all the merchandise. I had a really nice boss Stanley Stern. He left me alone. I had two or three really hot items and you make a lot of money on hot items Elephant Pant by Arthur Arthur. Bell was my hottest pant. The world's a cuffed big elastic waist pants every day. I was rewarding like crazy so I did that for six months because Barbara on jr was on maternity leave. Unfortunately she comes back and there. I go to the branches so I did that for a while and then I was promoted back In to fifty ninth street Iran. A woman's swimwear our T shirts and sweaters. My first buying job I they say I was like. I did it really quickly and again there. I was pretty much on my own as most of us were learning the business. I was very fortunate. I had a woman that he katy Murphy who passed away a young age. She was a fashion Shen director and knew more about the business than anyone I knew but because she was a woman She wasn't the seal. She could have positioned set set. She just got it and I was very lucky to have her as I kind of her pet. They treated me like oh go out with Katie went to Europe together. We bought together and only in hindsight that I realize that the fundamentals of what I even do today I think was set in place by Katie. And I going on these trips and we've been buddies so if I had an issue in work I ran to Katie. Not My boss. What do you think of this Katie? Anyway think of that and you know you don't realize you're learning so much everyday idle huge learning curve and so I did that job for a year and a half then. I was promoted moded into the boys area and then maybe it went up to the branches again. Then I quit and you said you had a couple of hot items. What what what does that mean? And how did you identify them. Especially back then when you were just starting out. How did you know that something was gonna hit? I think a lot of what people do. Who is kind of a DNA? Instinctive nature not nurturance much. I'm not sure but I always like I used to sell When Wilkinson Sword Blades came out I was in eighth grade? I was working in the garment center. I was young I was as a kid and I used to get a supply of them. They were really hard to find. They were the best razor blade. Hello in the sixties and I bought supply and I told them to when I made deliveries. I Have Wilkinson Sword Razor Blades. I didn't think I was an entrepreneur. I didn't think anything I could. Maybe maybe make some money and as a young child I money. My father's will obsessed about money because he never really made it. And I think I picked picked up some of the habits of wanting to have some safety and security so that was a little safety and security to keep handle drawer with my cash in it. I saved it. I never spent. It was not much to spend on very impressive. I wish I had a drawer with cash while it was like ten dollars dollars wasn't like a lot. So why did you quit bloomingdale's and what did you do after that. You know it's interesting just to step back end up working at Bloomingdale's I had a summer job at a NS. Now macy's and I fixed them up with a friend of mine I loved. I summer there so I was ready to be hired and I fixed them up with someone. I went to school with and they offered him five hundred dollars more in salary I did now. I didn't think about I was furious. I fix them up. They offered me eleven the offer him eleven five and I am crazy. Furious and You know I didn't have mentors like everyone has a mentor today. I couldn't talk talk to my parents about that but I was pissed off and I interviewed at Bloomingdale's and decide it and it was huge important decision in my life if the second most to that date businesswise and So I decided to work at Bloomingdale's they offered me eleven five. I wasn't negotiating a lot of great negotiator gator salaries and all that stuff and I went to work at Bloomingdale's. Ns would have taught me a whole different way of doing business. Sale Promotion They they were very successful But you know it's funny. So that kind of infuriated me any. Why'd I leave Bloomingdale's I got to the point where and you don't have to make a living and I said this is and once I moved up a little not a lot. I start to think about two things one. I don't love it as much now. I had the boys area and I was supervising but more importantly I always wanted to have really important in regard for people. I worked for Maybe it was my expectation and I realized that you know forgetting what titles are that. At at some point you know people get promoted without earning. The promotion and big corporations was like a huge corporation was big bloomingdale's relative to what I thought of his big back in those days and start to realize put your time in to a degree if you're older than me or whoever you may get promoted moded and I looked at the surroundings and who was moving up and I I I wanted to change someone. One recruit someone at macy's recruited me add Finkelstein who was then the chairman very charismatic guy. Recruited me I left and I stayed at macy's year and a half why because I was obviously looking for something I wasn't getting in a department store business. My last last movie in a Department Store Business was bloomingdale's was owned also a NS federated department stores. They recruited. It'd me back and I went back the stake but again I didn't have the freedom of I'll just do whatever it wasn't like everyone to start up. I you know. In those days who did startups who can raise money to pay the rent and I went to Ns for four years. And I said that was

Bloomingdale Bronx Mickey Drexler Macy Ralph Lauren Lauren Sherman Katie Jill Junior Department Store Business New York Chief Correspondent Secretary Alex Melon Masha Loop Parkway Katy Murphy Lou Parkway Wilkinson Sword Blades Hebrew Association Arthur Arthur Lexington Juniors
The Dual-Career Couple with International Travel -- how Masha Saunders makes it work.

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

07:44 min | 2 years ago

The Dual-Career Couple with International Travel -- how Masha Saunders makes it work.

"You're kidding how many times have you flown across the Atlantic with your daughter at this point so I think it's been at least ten

Atlantic
A Culinary Tour of Rue du Faubourg Saint-Denis

Monocle 24: The Menu

04:39 min | 2 years ago

A Culinary Tour of Rue du Faubourg Saint-Denis

"Hello and welcome to food neighborhoods on monocle twenty four. I am articles hippie all various the local salah for their food and drink offerings and in this series we get these places this week we had two hutu faubourg santoni in the heart of paris's tenths out of this more more nicholson suggest phil mccord's takes on a coronary tour of a street that has long been a door to buy parachutes. Anthony wants to kings passageway back into paris falling trips to the basilica of santa. Ni foster would a few hundred years and blow t might not be the first thing that springs to mind when it comes to the area slightly rough around the edges malone different coaches a microcosm of paris itself. If you will combining influences insist from asia africa and of course france the area's unique mixture of people is brought exciting food and drink businesses by the bucket load making it a popular antidote antidote to some of paris's more well known addresses phobic santoni just below gardiner your point venture to the city from charlotte goal airport and the eurostar falling your travels. You probably have what i saw. It is worth taking a quick detour till the point grow an ivy. Don't bretagne style tavern. That's just a short walk away from the busy street surrounding the station. If the weather is pleasant i would advise ordering a traditional bretagne sida applause of shocker trio so let's take a seat outside. He can enjoy with views of the nineteenth century san culture. Now you're refute you can take the ten minute strode onto rufo books anthony. You are on holiday though the way you may get distracted if you do it advice being distracted by the masha couvert santa power says managed to protect his indoor food markets and as a result they remained relatively untouched trans- don't really hold any sway in these establishments mean. You won't find any watering the price south tattooed street food here in its place stews from all over the world the ninety brilliant role produce but cook it to as a result is a place you could easily visit just cheese and lee four hours later alarmingly before beautiful books anthony's no particularly long road however has a numerous passages that branch off housing a wealth of hidden gems one such place the coup depite jackie is a perfect place to stop far from the fast paced buzzer the surrounding area. This tiny cobbled street laundry relaxed bars restaurants else if you're trying to imagine it pitching delic postcard image of paris and you're probably be quite close. It's attracted slightly. More family orientated crowd than the rest of the road eight so it's a lovely place to have relaxing drink. Oh two and just soak in the surroundings. It's about time for more food now. Though for a classic french bistro with a modern twist fifty two folks anthony is a real neighborhood favourite the food menus typical of a french bistro in that there are just a few choices of dish per course a positive for the parentally indecisive vice amongst us. The restaurant doesn't take reservations however it says continuously from eight a._m. Until midnight so finding a place for you shouldn't be a problem now the community institutions is you less. They have a row of shops from number fifty four to sixty that showcases the best in french food and drink freshly baguettes temporary breast to french wine chocolate and cheese. It's the kind of business you dream of having on your doorstep but some way your wallet and waistline is probably very thankful that you don't after gazing show for punch chef of wine at drink might be on the agenda next progressive something to eat than changing. It is definitely worth a visit. It's an archetypal neighborhood that has been given another lease of life with new onus making the most of the beautiful interior and rubber impressive full mccann talk bar. It's definitely a place to be seen very popular in the evenings with powers young and fashionable now if you enjoy evening as the locals do then a visit to earth durham durham is a must. It's a kurdish sandwich shop that specializes endure. It is a flat bread. This is road and baked right in front of you and is then filled with freshly grilled meats and salad. Don't just take my word for it though the keys out the door say more than i ever could. If you'd like to combine your cuisine with culture and get your durham to take away a short strove to the bottom of the road will allow to admire the towering put sentani older sibling of the auditorium and the grant waite andrew colin retail even even though royalty may not frequent vodafone books under knee anymore. It remains true that in this part of paris it is still possible to enjoy feast fit for a king for monaco. Oh i'm charlie film core.

Paris Anthony Bretagne Style Tavern Earth Durham Durham Basilica Of Santa Asia Phil Mccord Durham Nicholson Andrew Colin Charlotte Vodafone Mccann Jackie Monaco France Africa Hundred Years Four Hours Ten Minute
Marcia Jones, Ebony Jemison And Mary discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:47 min | 3 years ago

Marcia Jones, Ebony Jemison And Mary discussed on Here & Now

"An Alabama woman who is being charged with manslaughter for the death of a fetus is waiting to hear with a hook as will be prosecuted. Masha Jones was five months pregnant when she got into a fight with another woman ebony Jemison in the parking lot of Dollar General loss, December Jemison, who claimed she fit for life short. The pregnant Jones in the stomach resulting in Jones losing the fetus Famour. Let's bring in Mary, Scott hodgin a report at WBZ 'em in Birmingham. She's been following the story as it develops Mary, welcome. This is quite a complex story because at first seems as if we'll if a mother was shot, then surely, the shooter should be the one who is charged. Why not the case? Right. So this incident happened in December of twenty eighteen and at the time of the incident, one of police Lieutenant on the case said that all the evidence points to the fact that the victim, which is Jones, the pregnant woman was the aggressor. And so she. She allegedly instigated this fight, and at that time, the police Lieutenant said, no, the only victim in this case is the unborn child, quote. So from the beginning, you know, they said that Jones instigated this fighting suggested that she may be charged. We'll, so this case went before a grand jury, and at that time the evidence against the shooter ebony Jemison and Marcia Jones. All that evidence was presented at the same time and the grand jury decided that Jimmy Johnson, the woman who pulled the trigger was acting in self so they said, okay, we're not going to indict her on any charges. But instead, we're going to indict Jones, the pregnant woman and said, she should face charges because her actions resulted in the death of her fetus.

Marcia Jones Ebony Jemison Mary Alabama Jimmy Johnson Scott Hodgin Birmingham Five Months
Woman shot in stomach indicted over unborn baby's death

BBC World Service

03:45 min | 3 years ago

Woman shot in stomach indicted over unborn baby's death

"Now this story that's being told about internationally it's about a pregnant woman in alabama not shade jones she was shot in the abdomen five times by another women of to being in an argument last december unborn baby had died i'm shay was charged with manslaughter as the state came it was hopeful that the child died whilst the women who shoto walked free poche shifted is involved with the sexual assault prevention education in the state of alabama and she spoke to me alabama one benxi loses her unborn child she had been shot she got arrested and after she got arrested the shooter went free she in getting charged with manslaughter and was just indicted by jefferson county alabama which is birmingham area grand jury own maslov charge it was taken back into custody all yesterday right now the police one of the police offices following the shooting said it was the mother of the child who initiated and continued the fight which resulted in the death of her own unborn baby so the blame is being put upon this mother what's the reaction being has been outrage even from conservative which was shocking to me just to be out of this you know a lot of people want one that that i definitely agree with that i see across the board is that she needs punishment she physically is to get into fight and the stand punishment for there is a saudi battery which seemed appropriate for what they said that she did charge of manslaughter is ovary if it one own particular jurors shed any moral fiber in their bones that this had to do with the person who had of the unborn everything to do with she actually did and what was done to her she's guilty of assault and battery and nothing more and i think that that's something that maybe wasn't convinced to the jury enough for them to make that particular decision but mass louder is definitely harsh okay so this comes porsche up to the alabama governor signed a bill in may banning abortion almost every secombe stance including rape and incest now this poses another challenge in this case of masha jones yes it does pull it a another challenge towards her because it's proven that a person that is pregnant as to produce a live healthy baby at all times and everything is blamed base back on the female and another stab towards females that no matter what it is that we do the blame is going to come back on the woman even another one was in environment is particular case sue shot the victim in her stomach that led to the death on the show as somehow is dead of the individual pull the trigger wasn't blame it was the women who carry the child once again what's to blame for the actions of someone else because alabama again reminded is one of the eight states with fetal home aside laws that recognize a fetus as a potential victim it's interesting you point to the fact that she was shot by another woman and yet the mother is to blame we've got to talking about it it's been kicked on several times people are reading it around the world they're reading it across america just tell us what it's like with an alabama what's the discussion and how people feeling about this case is it divided all is it very clear whose side the state is on is in the middle like i said the shocking part is seeing conservative people that i know for fact pro lifers who's coming into fits of her based on the decision and saying that the punishment is too harsh as it relates to what happened in this particular situation and what that tells me is that

Alabama
"masha" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"masha" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"A hold your hand. Every once in a while. What are you gonna do? Now. Call on Roger and make like a sucker. Thanks. You know, it's going to be quite a treat seeing Masha married to unhappy beginnings before oh, you know, about those Masha does. I suppose in a way. Yes. You want to see me about something? Then what is the social? Not at all. I was about to leave anyway. Roger, it's very strange strange. What you'll have an ask me anything about myself. I don't have to Dan. I've been very busy since this morning is the I have quite a bit of influence connection so to speak, and they told you what? Who you are where you live what you do for a living. Then how much do you love Maggio? I'm going to marry you have quite a good income. So it's not the money you're out there. Obviously, Dan, I'd give anything in the world to see Masha happy. We we practically grew up together. There's only ten years difference in our ages is my brother was twenty when I was born. I see Masha is my only living relative. I understand your concern far. I'm glad you do. I wanna show you something was Claridge bringing Jameson the state papers. William thank you. Dan, you write mysteries among other things. Consequently, I think you have a as suspicious mind. What do you mean by that? Well, I'm uncle trustee of her fortune until she gets married, which must be by the sixteenth of this month. Now, surely one of yours stories, you must have written about a guardian who misappropriates funds embezzles. No, I never have. Well, it does matter. St james. Asked miss Claridge to bring them in was he was busy, and I was on my way past anyway. Charles. This is Dan holiday Viansa, Dan. This is Charles crane. Fine. -gratulations? Thanks is that oh, Mr James. Thank you. Here. The papers. I think you'll find every penny accounted for. Everything. It looks like we're going to get along and get along beautifully. I wonder for how long. I portion of box thirteen.

Masha Dan miss Claridge Mr James Roger Charles crane trustee William Jameson ten years
"masha" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"masha" Discussed on WDRC

"Why do you want to go through the files day? I've got a hunch Masha, maybe I'll go Roger didn't show me. The right papers state. Allison. The office. I can get one and want to get them. You say today on the outside the harbour your to go there tomorrow night. He's ranged engagement party Dannatt. If you don't wanna go if you want to back out now. Nothing doing I'm beginning to like this. All right. Give me the case. Getting into the office was easy. I went to the files Mark sameness. Papers with at all. But not the set uncle Roger Shanley, these different on the line about finance showed me some fancy juggling been going on. I was checking. A neat round hole pit in the file case alongside my head behind the case around just in time to the daughter the office close somebody with a silenced gun play play pigeon, Whitney. So Roger was on the. I got back out on the state of stomach kicked up. I took a cab back my apply on Masha. She didn't answer about such gone. And Roger was on the. Late in the evening. The note from ussia. Tonight. Please. Kind of take you on. Been a trap. I compared the writing on this note for the first team on all right, Kev. Nate. Precise. Okay. If this was a showdown might as well get it over with. I got the pitching and rolling bad bronc with a burner saddle all day storm headed up a bit. Then I was on board. Nobody was his it was one cabin with a light inside. I went to open the door. Doing visiting. Understand the party was tomorrow night..

Roger Shanley Masha Allison Whitney Kev Nate
Ariana Grande Closes Out Coachella 2019 with Justin Bieber for Surprise Performance

The Morning Toast

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Ariana Grande Closes Out Coachella 2019 with Justin Bieber for Surprise Performance

"Justin Bieber makes first appearance in two years at Arianna. Grandy's Coachella set our anagram they knows how to make up a loss opportunity after facing near-disastrous sounded. Shoes during Nikki Masha it wasn't. It wasn't the show went on. It was fine after a performance that was relatively similar to weaken one grenade. Took a pause between break free and her penalty track. No tears to cry to bring out Justin Bieber said instant come twice. I guess if it was as similar as it was the week before then. Yeah. I don't know. I really wish I watch it on live stream. But like game of thrones was on. I'm sorry. Do what you she said? I wasn't going to bring on any s tonight. But my friend Justin Bieber came all the way out and he went on stage. And he also said album is coming

Justin Bieber Nikki Masha Grandy Two Years
"masha" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:03 min | 3 years ago

"masha" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hour. I'm David Ramnik. Masha Gessen is one of our keenest observers of Russia and Russian politics. He grew up in the Soviet Union and its latter days emigrated with her family to the US and then return to Russia as a reporter. So she's got a unique perspective on the US Russia relationship and all through the Muller investigation. She warned people not to expect some kind of magical revelation or smoking gun of collusion between Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump. In two thousand eighteen and she sat down at the New Yorker festival with a guest. She knows pretty well. Her younger, brother, Keith guessing. So this is a completely self service panel Oregon to talk about ourselves entry Asia other introduce ourselves. So this is my brother Keith. Keith guests in is a founder of the magazine and plus one and he teaches journalism at Columbia University. He's written two novels. Most recently a terrible country which came out last year. Okay. This is my sister. Masha. She is the person who in whose shadow dwell. But in fact, it is more like she is the sunlight. Yes. It does raise grove. Okay. So I very happy to one q. Yes. I will ask the first few questions if that's okay, that's fine. So in in late two thousand thirteen and because of various unpleasant developments in Russia, you moved to Moscow. I mean, you move from Moscow to New York after being away for twenty years. You've always worked kind of in both countries. But when you went back to Russia, you became a Russian language journalists working for Russian publications, you were publishing books and articles in the US, but your day job was as Russian language journalists. And now you've moved back to the states and become primarily an English language journalists. So what has that been like? Well, it's actually has been lovely. There's you know, there's a line in your most recent book that is absolutely brilliant. You describe a character who in some ways, there's a certain resemblance to me. You're observing the narrators observing this character walking around Moscow and says nobody liked him here. And that put him at ease. I think the experience of not being liked by anybody it might be sort of character building. But it's really lovely to just not have that on a daily basis. Like, I hardly getting death threats. It's lovely. Talk about our parents right now. Right here. When I think about our immigration our parents were in their mid to late thirties. And I grew up thinking, well, you know, basically their lives are over. Right. And so the only possible reason they could have emigrated was for us. And and I kind of felt like you had mixed feelings about it. About our immigration, and you kind of left home. So I I was like, well, they just it was just me. They did for me. So I better do good. He did. Well, thank you. So from your perspective is that what do you think I think that for them? It was very important. Not to see us go through the experience of applying to university and experiencing what they did which was just really explicit discrimination against Jews. It's one thing to know about injustice and unfairness. And it's another thing to come face to face of it. And have it be completely sort of unabashed? I think for both of them. It was a formative thing. And so they didn't want to see us go through that. But mostly I think they thought they were doing it for themselves and they were like in their thirties. They they had their entire lives ahead of them. But they really I mean, I I've thought about it a lot. I've thought about what kind of courage, it would've taken to just step into the abyss. And they had they need nothing about this. Right. They read a few letters from people who had emigrated, and so they they stepped into the abyss. But but our dad or mom died along time ago about our dad always responds by saying we thought of it as a great adventure. Do you want to talk about politics a little bit? Sure. Yeah. Okay. Why you didn't like hearing about our parents? I found that very therapeutic. Thank you. Has being here and writing about Russia changed your perspective in terms of what Americans need to know and need to hear. What's great question? I mean, I think that the perception of Russia has really gone through some very strange for mutations in the last. I've been here for for just under five years, and it's been a very strange five years for Russia's perceived in this country. You found yourself in some somewhat curious position of having been a person who was writing about Putin and kind of warning about Putin for a long time. And now you're in the position of saying. Hey, relax. Sometimes I go on Twitter. I see people calling you a paid propagandist for Pineau. No amazing. I've been pulled. Russia's puts them chill pay pay some propaganda. There's an online community of anti-trump Russian immigrants who. Yeah. Had they had a long thread going about how I was what I was intimidated or paid into what they see as supporting Putin. Yeah. And they say that because you have been skeptical all along I of about the evidence, but then about the significance of the Russian interference in the election. Right in a way, I was one of their originators of that of that narrative. Right. When I wrote a book about Putin. And find myself in the very strange position of saying come on, you know, he's not that kind of monster. He's a different kind of monster. But but not the kind of monster who who's masterminded the takeover of the entire western world. He doesn't have the mind for the kind of masterminding among other things. Do you feel do you feel partly responsible for this narrative? What an interesting question. Yeah. A bit. But. The problem with writing with journalism or anything of writing it is so impossible to predict how much influence what you're right. We'll have and what kind of influence we'll have and what sorts of anxiety and imaginary is it will tap into. I can acknowledge sort of contributing to that narrative. But I don't think that I can take too much responsibility for it. And I also want to estimate the number of people who buy, you know. Mount fiction books and actually read them. But you're at the fascinating article for the New York Times magazine earlier this year on so-called Russia hens. And you positive kind of dichotomy in that article that some people basically think that everything that has gone wrong in the Russian American relationship over the last twenty five years, which is basically everything and consistently regardless of who was in charge. Was attributable to Russia and its intransigence in its own trajectory. And then there are those who think that it was about American policy at American failure to move past the Cold War narrative, and I think that that's that's actually almost perfectly describes the stories that I have been writing versus the stories that you've been writing you mean, I am more likely to blame the US. Yeah. That's that's my strong position do ever worry that that actually overestimates American agency. And it's kind of backhanded imperialist position. That's an interesting question. I mean. Yes. And no, yes. I mean, I think the article kind of traced American policy toward Russia in the post Cold War era. Through the sort of people who are inside the government and the State Department and national Security Council who were kind of running Russia policy and the article began because I had watched. Obama seem to really want to de escalate tensions with Russia and really emphasize Russia in general, which struck me as objectively correct? Right. Russia is a troubled country that that is declining. Right. Unlike its neighbor to the East China, which is not declining. And that was the kind of Obama argument right for. Shifting our focus to the east and yet under Obama, you get that Ukraine crisis, and eventually the hacking of the Democrats, and I was like well how you know, why did that happen here? You had a president who had made his preferences. Pretty clear is there a deep state, right, which when I started working on this. This had not been popular. By the right, or at least, I had not come across it. And I mean, the partial answer is yes. Presidents. Come and go policymaker, you know, the people who they appoint come and go. But there is this kind of small core that moves between the State Department, the national charity council and one of the kind of really surprising things to me about them was just how strong their views were and you talk to them and they're quite convincing. For example. Some of these people were in the kind of center of debates over NATO, and whether it should be expanded. And their position was we have this historic opportunity to push the sort of zone of security as they called it. But other times, they call it the free world, right or the west closer to the borders of Russia. Right because eventually Russia, we'll come back and threaten those neighbors, which you and you could say, well, they've been proved correct. I was just going to ask. Yes. Or you can say this was a self fulfilling prophecy, right? And I don't know if the US had had a very different policy, whether we would have had a totally different result. I don't know. Let's gears so wrote this book and. I know that the the process of writing up, of course, quite interesting and lengthy, right? You said to write something fairly different. Can you talk about that? I so it's basically kind of a story about a guy who goes. Who is actually a loser and goes to Moscow to take care of his grandmother. At the request of his swashbuckling, entrepreneurial older, brother. Who's not based on Marcham? He has this fantasy that she's going to tell him stories about socialism. And this will then he'll write these stories down. And then it will help him get an academic job. And then he shows up there. And she can't remember who he is much less detailed narrative about Stalinist Russia. Yeah. And then I finished this draft. And I read it, and it was horrible. And I cut all that stuff horrible. It was just boring. It was just really really boring. What I realized, you know, a few years into the process was that actually the grandmother needs to be kind of central figure not just as a kind of domestic background, but her life needs to make the central argument about what happened after the Soviet Union fell apart. And as you know, I changed some details, but it did strike me that our own grandmother's life. You know, she hated the Soviet Union, and she was delighted when the Soviet Union fell apart..

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