23 Burst results for "Maryelle Sagarra"

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"This year has been big for streaming services with many people spending more time at home or just need a distraction from everything like many others. I watched a lot of anime. Japanese animation is having a moment earlier this year. The film adaptation for the popular series demon slayer became the highest grossing. Film premiere ever in japan and during a pandemic no less also earlier this month anime streaming platforms crunchy roll and fundation announced. They'll merge in a nearly one point two billion dollar deal so there's money and demand for the medium right now here to talk about it. We have lindsey loveridge executive editor at the anime news network. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me kimberly. So why is anime having a global moment right now. I know it's not just me. Oh no anna's been having a moment for the last couple of years. But i think it's especially increased during the pandemic people have been inside and looking through their q. And maybe they've watched other episodes of great british bake off and they wanna move on to something else. So anime is a global phenomenon. I would say it's definitely exploded and there's a little bit of something for everybody no matter what your tastes are. Yeah you've got sort of the action you've got the fantasy or or the john that they call slice of life with just sort of snapshots of how people live there every day. And there's just a huge backlog of content for people who are running out of things to watch. Oh definitely we get about thirty to forty. New shows out of japan every three months so in a year. You're getting a hundred and fifty different shows to pick from talk to me about the business landscape for anime and how that is changing since it is rising in global popularity. Anime has definitely made some major investment changes over time. As far as who's become interested in it and we've seen streaming services get a very deeply involved in the production of anime as far as getting series made just for net flicks or just for crunchy roll or just for fun of nation. They're putting the money forward to get on those production committees and make some of the decisions about what gets adapted based on what they think popular. Do you have any sense of how this global popularity of anime playing out among fans in japan <hes>. All i can say about that. Is that whenever i talk to. Creators directors character designers but <hes> producers. They're always happy to see that. There is an international response to their art. And that it. Even though it's made in japan that's not limiting. Its appeal to kids in europe or south america. There's huge phantoms. For shows that it didn't really take off in the us. So there ends up being different touchdown series in different countries. All over. And i think that's great. What was the first anime. Show that you watched. And that got you into it. The first one that got me into it like hooked was sailorman. And that's around the when we got access to the internet in my house and there was all these fan websites. There's a whole culture like a social culture and for me. I was someone who had a hard time making friends and meeting people with similar interests but that was all online and i could have this online life with with friends who had that that interest. The big one for me was any asha on a network <hes>. Was really and that one. Scott that one still has a lot of a lot of fans actually got a new spin off this year. it's a whole new entry point for fans. Yeah and i imagine from a business perspective a reason to sort of re license the back catalogue. Oh yeah for sure <hes>. Somebody who's been into anime for really long time. You know you talked about sort of feeling a little bit lonely in that space when you were younger. What's it like sort of seeing it go mainstream. I think it's wonderful animates me. Was i think kind of eye opening started. As just you know cartoons i like to watch and characters that i felt a sense of connection with but it also opened up to other cultures. And you get curious about that. And that curiosity i think is is wonderful. Everyone should have a curiosity for things outside of their immediate circle however they happen to get that. Lindsay leverage is the executive editor at the anime news network. Thank you so much. Thank you

marielle zegarra Lear georgia sonya lipinski alex partners gregory dako oxford economics senate sagarra susannah caputo justice brennan pnb broadcasting david perdue brennan stations atlanta Leffler david purdue jon ossoff wabc john
A look at the state of retail, as holiday shopping wraps up

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:26 min | 1 year ago

A look at the state of retail, as holiday shopping wraps up

"Michelle mentioned retail sales in his press. Conference today to numbers out this morning show. They fell a bit more than one percent in november which matters 'cause that most likely includes the first wave of holiday. Shopping and retailers are doing what they can to encourage us to keep on buying walmart for instance just announced its deadline for free shipping to get there before christmas. It's going to be december. Twenty first is their deadline. Which i don't know seems tight to me. If you want to risk it marketplace's. Mary barra has more now on four. The holidays in this very strange year every year nicole fritz michigan goes to holiday gatherings where she sees co workers or cousin. She doesn't really know that well so every year she finds herself standing in a store looking for that perfect generic holiday gift. Alosha shanna candle. You've been some kitschy but fun. Little coffee mugs since fritz is not really seeing anyone this year. Her shopping list is much smaller. She's mostly buying online from small retailers. She ordered a custom made dress for her sister in october. One of several packages. That still haven't arrived. They send stuff out but the delivery date of keeps getting later and later. Meanwhile dana chadwell in tennessee has been shopping exclusively online. She says stores are too risky because their parents are elderly and her brothers on dialysis also. She often buys people experiences like concert tickets. But this year. She's getting her mom cookware. She asked for and her dad. There's zero chance. My dad will hear this. So i can tell you you know. I got him a couple of flannel shirts and colors that i thought he would really like. And some tanker chips. Danny groner in new york is trying something new to instead of physical gifts he sending money on ven mo like his friends have two young kids and at a picnic in september. The eight dollars. Pretzels on hanukkah are yellow. The mom ten dollars earmarked for pretzels. Just as a nice note that despite the fact that we couldn't see one another over the holiday. I was still thinking of them few days later. That friend sent groner some photos. The kids had turned the pretzels into a craft project. Making minora's out of them using marshmallows and other things groner says he's hoping some of year's new traditions will stick. I'm maryelle sagarra for marketplace. So you know that lady's dead is totally going to hear this somehow right. That's absolutely what's going to happen. Also stocking stuffers big thing in my ass were worried about that.

Mary Barra Nicole Fritz Alosha Shanna Dana Chadwell Walmart Michelle Danny Groner Fritz Ven Mo Groner Michigan Dialysis Tennessee New York Minora Sagarra
Athletes have so much more than symbolic power

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:21 min | 1 year ago

Athletes have so much more than symbolic power

"Athletes in at least five professional sports leagues the NBA The WNBA. Major League Baseball Major League soccer and tennis. Have decided to paraphrase one of those athletes that they are black Americans first and athletes second and so have decided not to play for the time being the decision of course, comes in the wake of the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha Wisconsin the other day many other black men and women in many other cities through time. These athletes want fundamentally police and criminal justice reform right marketplace's Marielle cigarrettes going with what leverage those athletes actually have and how long it might last last night Elizabeth Williams who plays for the WNBA Atlanta dream made a statement she and the other teams would not be playing and she had an ask for their fans if you truly believe that lives matter than vote. Go and complete the two thousand twenty cents is now don't wait. If, we wait we don't make change. Pro Athletes have a platform, and in this case, they're using it to reach out directly to fans and viewers Laurie latrice Martin calls, but they're doing a strike. She teaches sociology in. African. American studies at Louisiana State University. Why striking there providing inspiration for those that are on the front line and goes they're involved in various grassroots efforts. But what about more direct financial pressure the players are withholding their labor hoping their demands will be met. That's a little trickier when they refused to play that does hurt the bottom line for leagues and team owners who could try to force change the NBA billionaires and millionaires you have. Eric. loomis. Who teaches history at the University of Rhode Island says owners could use that power to lobby state legislatures like Milwaukee Bucks players are doing they're trying to get Wisconsin lawmakers to pass police reform legislation, but highly unlikely was Austin. Legislature is gonNA listen about because Wisconsin. Is dominated by pretty conservative Republicans who had been opposed. Chinese protests and and Ben unders. Order of the police enormous times players would also have some leverage over local governments when teams play in a city that city collects tax dollars from parking concessions but there are no fans in stadiums right now so they can't pull that lever. And MARYELLE SAGARRA for marketplace.

Elizabeth Williams Wnba NBA Laurie Latrice Martin Wisconsin Kenosha Wisconsin Louisiana State University Tennis Jacob Blake Maryelle Sagarra University Of Rhode Island Milwaukee Bucks Eric. Loomis BEN Atlanta Marielle Legislature Austin
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"I'm sorry to report. . It was more talk but no action again today in Washington has roughly thirty million began to face their economic futures out an additional six hundred dollars a week in federal unemployment benefits until and unless Congress, Hammer , out a deal for more pandemic relief most jobless people will have to rely on state unemployment insurance and as marketplace's Kristen Schwab explains when it comes to state benefits geography just maybe destiny. . If. . You're unemployed in Mississippi. . Your Life could start to feel a lot different than if you were unemployed in Massachusetts, , the maximum benefit in Mississippi is around two hundred and thirty dollars a week in Massachusetts. . It's over eight hundred dollars and the gap isn't just about cost of living big differences. . The philosophy is unemployment something that supports labor market or is it a business cost be minimized? ? Chris leary with the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. . There is no federal standard for unemployment benefits. . So states create their own rules around who qualifies how much they. . Get and for how long Michelle Evermore is with the national employment. . Law Project in some states like Florida north. . Carolina. . Only about ten percent of people who are unemployed or even able to get a benefit that impacts people's access to food and shelter during pandemic. . It also dramatically increases their risk of getting sick because of monetary concerns they have to take an unsafe job and that's GonNa actually spread the virus in slow the recovery even further she says black and Latino workers may suffer most because with the smallest benefits have the biggest minority populations. . And Sylvia Grow Labor economist at UC Berkley says differences it benefits can have direct effects on a states. . Economic Health unemployment benefits have A. . Really, , important affect of propping up the greater economy well, , that extra six hundred dollars meant a lot to workers who lost their jobs. . It also meant a lot to all the businesses relying on people who were spending it.

Maryelle Sagarra Michelle Evermore Taylor Chris leary Upjohn Institute for Employmen Dan Kristen Schwab Joseph A. Bank google UC Berkley Seattle Sylvia Carolina Kantar Florida Michael Kobe Neiman Marcus J. Crew Hogan
Where the money from food stamps is actually going

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:22 min | 2 years ago

Where the money from food stamps is actually going

"We begin today with news that is squarely squarely at the intersection of government spending social policy. Redel Reality and work. The trump administration announced this morning. It's going ahead Ed. With what's called a final rule that will tighten work requirements for the supplemental nutrition. Assistance Program. Snap as it's known food stamps as it sometimes referred to with unemployment so low the administration's thinking goes it should be easy for people to find work and the White House says this rule will save the government five and a half billion dollars over five five years. It's a decision not without controversy. Obviously on a lot of levels but it's also decision with real world economic impact because until now at five and a half billion dollars has gone to retailers. Marketplace's Merrill Sagarra gets most snap dollars go to a particular kind of retailer Craig. Gunderson teaches consumer economics at the University of Illinois NAP participants because they're on limited budgets will go to places that have less expensive food so so roughly eighty percent of staff benefits are spent at you know supercenters in large-scale supermarkets. You Know Walmart Kroger Safeway. The rule change will require more people to work at least twenty hours a week to get benefits which means fewer people will qualify. That's the point Ed. Bolan at the center on budget aged in policy priorities says according to the USDA about seven hundred thousand individuals will lose their benefits Those benefits on average about one hundred sixty five of dollars a month for this population so certainly the places they go. We'll see a drop in their business. Food retailers often pay their workers so little little that they qualify for snap and need it to survive. Also those workers schedules tend to be erotic and part-time James ILIAC directs the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty. Dirty research he says the new rules could make things harder for those workers in one week they might be satisfying work requirement. But then the next week the firm says well you know we don't need you or we only need you for ten hours then. Suddenly they're in violation of the work requirement for that week Zilly says retailers might feel some pressure to consistently instantly give workers at least twenty hours a week so they stay eligible for the snap benefits. They may even be spending at their own stores. I'm MARYELLE SAGARRA FOR MARKETPLACE I.

ED James Iliac Merrill Sagarra University Of Kentucky Center Zilly Gunderson University Of Illinois Bolan White House Craig Usda Billion Dollars Twenty Hours Five Five Years Eighty Percent Ten Hours One Week
Hasbro’s poor earnings report tells a trade war story

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:32 min | 2 years ago

Hasbro’s poor earnings report tells a trade war story

"The calendar proper says it's fall all the counter according to Wall Street says it's earning season and in general corporate America's doing alright that sentiment however does not extend to Hasbro the third quarter was not kind the toymaker reported profits of this morning that we're well below estimates of earnings news that is actually the story of the trade war in miniature three of tariff announcements and delays and the chaos that makes it one company just ahead of its most important season marketplace's Merrill Sagarra tells the tale in the Toy Business Chris Miss Comes in the summer that's when retailer start stocking up getting shipments of toys from Hasbro and other manufacturers they can buy those toys directly from Hasbro in the US were they can import the toys from Hasbro factories the retailer buys the product from them in China the retailer puts it on their own ship you know there's a lot mark target the big guys and they ship it to the US themselves that's Linda Bolton Wiser managing director at Da Davidson? She says a lot of retailers do this because it's cheaper they get discounts is an economy of scale but the calculation was different this summer retailers were staring down a deadline September first that was when new tariffs were supposed to go into effect on toys and lots of other stuff coming from China tariffs the retailers did not want to pay therefore if you're a retailer between June and July August you're saying Oh my God we have to change the order retailers started cancelling their shipments from China they told Hasbro to import the toys itself and tariffs to Hasbro had to scramble they had the rush around and get whatever freight on the ocean from China and they had to pay more you're but those tariffs everyone was freaking out about they didn't go into effect in September in August the trump administration delayed them until mid December to save the holiday. being season but that didn't help Hasbro the toys have already been put on the bow it takes six weeks on the boat so it's too late you can't switch it back you know and that's the problem it's not just the tariffs it's the whole on again off again thing the uncertainty Garrick Johnson is equity research analyst at B. M. O. Capital markets uncertainty is often worse than bad news because you do assume the worst and not knowing how to plan especially for very seasonal business has been very different old and this won't be the end of it for Hasbro because those tariffs are still slated to go into effect on December fifteenth unless they don't I'm Maryelle Sagarra for marketplace

Hasbro China United States Maryelle Sagarra Da Davidson America Linda Bolton Managing Director Garrick Johnson Equity Research Analyst B. M. O. Capital Six Weeks
What we talk about when we talk about jobs

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:38 min | 2 years ago

What we talk about when we talk about jobs

"We introduced you earlier. This week to a group called the Institute for Supply Management Management IFM for short literally people who do all things supply chain for a living we were talking about their manufacturing index how busy American manufacturing and factories these are not all that busy and getting less so it turns out was the macro economically troubling upshot today. It's their service sector survey. We want to talk about the non-manufacturing manufacturing side of this economy still growing but at a much slower pace than anybody had thought so to get us going on this Thursday marketplace's Marielle Sagarra has the service service sector primer accountants lawyers Baristas Uber Drivers math tutors. What are they all have in common their part of the services sector and radio reporters quarters? I'm a creator. I'm out here toiling away cranking out radio pieces but apparently I'm in the services sector to produce a good or a structure. You're right you produce service so that's the difference that's Gad Lebanon Chief Economist for North America at the Conference Board also a service sector the job if you make car parts you're in manufacturing. If you're a farmer you're in agriculture but as a rule of thumb if you don't produce a physical thing you're part of the services sector of the economy about eighty percent of American workers fall into this category it wasn't always this way one hundred years ago the majority of Workers Hello Greek culture or manufacturing and now those with Sharon significantly and that's how it usually goes Danny Bachman the US second omic forecaster at Deloitte says as a country's economy develops it tends to shift towards services one reason that manufacturing become more more productive. There's better technology and that makes a lot of manufacturing jobs obsolete. We just need fewer people to produce the same amount of manufactured goods up by the way the exact same thing happened with agriculture. Meanwhile as people who live in this developing economy get wealthier they start to demand more services like banking king in healthcare. Now the services sector is not an island when there's a downturn in manufacturing say workers an auto factory get laid off. They may be less likely to spend money on services like restaurants and travel. I'm Maryelle Sagarra for marketplace so continuing with the theme here that is in its manufacturing services services indexes Kimberly Adams story for us yesterday about what seemed like as of yesterday the possibility that we're just in for a long slow period of economic economic met that a recession might just never come. It'll just be slow but perhaps we were too hasty because maybe what's happening. Is that the slow hello is speeding up. Marketplace's Sabrina sure explains the Institute for Supply Management in their survey. They ask companies questions including just basic stuff a flight. How's business best at the moment. Eric Harrison is CEO of the Jay Renee Group an importer and wholesaler of shoes which puts him in one of the sectors actors covered by ISM's non-manufacturing index. He is worried his business is going to get hammered by the next round of tariffs so he's not investing in new technology not hiring new people as much as he normally would just trying to play closer to the best which on Portuguese were a lot of our customers are doing as well so it has kind of ripple effect. That's the story behind the numbers I assume survey of non-manufacturers was the weakest in two years a common theme and the comments businesses are worried about trade and that's been true for manufacturers for a while the big takeaway here is that it is not just them anymore. Sam Coffin is a senior economist at UBS looks as if from today's Today's data that the manufacturing weaknesses spreading into the rest of the economy take for example accommodation and food services hotels big importers of furniture furniture. That's tariff. This is Anthony Nevis. He helps run. ISM's non-manufacturing survey and there's food products that they're starting to see increases on stuff coming in from MM. China higher priced imports could seep into more of the economy. Ian Shepherdson is chief economist at Pantheon macroeconomics will probably have good to go up which retailers but it also hurts everybody else who's selling things you can see him is because people are less cash to spend on discretionary services like entertainment and leisure activity so so it seems to be scaring everyone for now. It's possible that the US economy might just be slowing down to a creep but these numbers are assigned that maybe it is worse than that in New York. I'm sure for

Eric Harrison Supply Management Management I Gad Lebanon Chief Economist Fo United States ISM Marielle Sagarra Institute For Supply Managemen Ian Shepherdson Chief Economist Anthony Nevis Maryelle Sagarra Deloitte Conference Board Senior Economist China Danny Bachman Pantheon Macroeconomics Sabrina
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On is on the line from London. Hi, hi, David. So when the US raised tariffs on foreign medals. We saw countries like Canada and Mexico responding right away or at least pretty quickly. Why did take so long for India to respond? Well, it did respond did say that it was going to increase tariffs on US imports, but it didn't actually implement those threats. I think part of the reason was that there were these ongoing talks between India and the US and remember that India was facing this big national election. Now. That's out of the way prime minister Narendra Modi's back with a huge mandate. And the fact that President Trump removed India from that generalized system of preferences, where roughly five billion dollars worth of Indian goods coming entire free. I think India now feels it can respond. And so it has raised tariffs on things like American apples, and almonds and walnuts. So I've been writing this using the phrase trade tensions US, and India. Would you say it's now a trade war? I don't think it's a trade war yet in twenty eighteen total US, India trade was worth one hundred forty two billion dollars. That's a seven fold increase since two thousand and one so nobody really wants to completely upset that. But certainly there are barriers, the US wants much more open access for things like US dairy goods and medical devices. And India is trying to protect both. It's growing economy and the developing parts of its own. Thank you. Thanks David more than thirteen million children live below the poverty line in America. According to report today from the any Casey foundation, that's twenty seventeen the latest data available and that report says in thirty years, the US has made little progress. Marketplace's Marielle Sagarra reports in two thousand seventeen the child poverty rate was eighteen percent. Go back about three decades to nineteen ninety also eighteen percent, Noah burger at the Annie, Casey foundation says, there are a lot of reasons for that one is an under investment in education another wages. A poor part of reducing poverty is making sure that jobs pay enough to support a family. And even when you've had strong economic growth over the past several decades, it largely hasn't translated into higher wages for low and middle income, people childhood poverty can have long lasting effects, Robert Moffett who teaches economics at Johns Hopkins University says research shows kids who. Grow up poor and also having lower lows of education, higher rates of unemployment when you're adult and lower wages, so lower earnings all of which contribute to poverty when you were dull tube. Their report also found that child poverty is way worse in some parts of the country. It's twenty eight percent in Louisiana and fifty eight percent in Puerto Rico, but in New Hampshire, it's only ten percent. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. Checking markets. The footsie index in London is down a tenth percent here. Dow futures are up less than a tenth percent, each NASDAQ future up two-tenths percent with an interest rate decision from the fed do Wednesday. The lights are back on in most spots, and Argentina Paraguay Uruguay after a massive electricity failure Sunday morning affecting nearly fifty million people. No cause has been determined, but th- authorities say the chance of a cyber attack. They say that is being downplayed and the cash registers at target stores in the US are mostly backup after Saturday's nationwide outage. Their target blamed an internal technology issue. Marketplace morning report is supported by smart sheet, whose work 'execution software empowers more than seventy seven thousand companies and over four million users to plan manage, automate and report on work at scale, learn how to move from idea wins hack at smart. She top calm smart. She what different.

US India David London Narendra Modi Canada Casey foundation Marielle Sagarra Mexico prime minister Johns Hopkins University Noah burger President Puerto Rico Robert Moffett Louisiana Trump fed America
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KCRW

"I will be watching hearings begin today looking into the effective further raising US tariffs on Chinese goods in early, July higher. Import taxes could kick in on all sorts of things clothing, sporting equipment, mobile phones, laptops, and this weekend. India hit the US with some retaliatory tariffs of its own response to US steel and aluminum penalties levied on many countries my marketplace colleague, the BBC's wanna undesired line from London New. Hi, david. So when the US raised tariffs on foreign medals. We saw countries like Canada and Mexico responding right away or at least pretty quickly. Why did take so long for India to respond? Well, it did respond did say that it was going to increase tariffs on US imports, but it didn't actually implement those threats. I think part of the reason was that there were these ongoing talks between India and the US and remember that India was facing this big national election. Now, that's out of the way prime minister Narendra Modi's back with a huge mandate. And the fact that President Trump removed India from that generalized system of preferences, where roughly five billion dollars worth of Indian goods coming entire free. I think India now feels it can respond. And so it has raised tariffs on things like American apples, and almonds, walnuts. So I've been writing this using the phrase trade tensions US in India. Would you say it's now a trade war? I don't think it's. A trade war yet in twenty eight teen total US, India trade was worth one hundred forty two billion dollars. That's a seven fold increase since two thousand and one so nobody really wants to completely upset that. But certainly there are barriers, the US wants much more open access for things like US dairy goods and medical devices. And India is trying to sort of protect both. It's growing economy and the developing parts of its own economy. New, thank you. Thanks David more than thirteen million children live below the poverty line in America. According to a report today from the any E Casey foundation, that's of 2017 the latest data available and the report says in thirty years, the US has made little progress. Marketplace's Mariel ago reports in two thousand seventeen the child poverty rate with eighteen percent go back about three decades to nineteen ninety also eighteen percent. No a burger at the an. Annie, E. Casey foundation says there are a lot of reasons for that one is an investment in education, another wages a poor part of reducing poverty is making sure that jobs, paying support a family. And even when we've had strong economic growth over the past several decades, it largely hasn't translated into higher wages for low and middle income, people childhood poverty can have long lasting effects, Robert Moffett who teaches economics at Johns Hopkins University says research shows kids who grow up poor and also having education, higher rates of unemployment when you're a dull and lower wages, so lower earnings all of which contribute to poverty, when you're dull tube. Their report also found that child poverty is way worse in some parts of the country. It's twenty eight percent in Louisiana and fifty eight percent in Puerto Rico, but in New Hampshire, it's only ten percent. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. Markets. The footsie in London is little changed. Dow s&p NASDAQ futures are up a tenth of a percent, or less with the US Federal Reserve meeting on interest rates later this week, the lights are back on in Argentina, Paraguay and aura Guay, after a massive electronic failure Sunday morning affecting nearly fifty million people. The powers back on and most spots. No cause has been determined. But authorities say cyberattack is not a prime suspect and the cash registers at target stores in the US are mostly backup after Saturday, nationwide outage, their target blames an internal technology issue. Marketplace morning report is supported by smart sheet whose work execution software and powers more than seventy seven thousand companies and over four million users to plan manage, automate and report.

US India US Federal Reserve david Narendra Modi BBC prime minister London New Canada Johns Hopkins University E Casey foundation Mariel President Puerto Rico aura Guay Louisiana Robert Moffett E. Casey foundation Mexico
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There is some risk alienating the traditional hotel franchisees that are joining the Maryanne brand renting out private houses. Even high end ones. Also, poses risks homes and hotels are built with different safety standards around soon Dhiraj on a professor of business at NYU says that's one example of why it's going to be difficult for Marriott in another hotel chains to compete head on with Airbnb. I think Abyan be has made depot. Inroads into the business than any of the hotel chains will into the home shipping business. Andy says Marian interest in the market makes the home sharing business. Look more attractive as Airbnb prepares for its later this year. I'm Megan McCurdy Carino for marketplace. This was big weekend for the National Rifle Association and not in a way, the group is probably pleased with a very public leadership fight at its annual meeting. And now, the New York state attorney general's office is investigating the group financially in particular possibly threatening the NRA's tax exempt status in New York. Now granted this is a state AG looking into a state issue. But there could be repercussions for the group's federal tax status as well. So we asked marketplace's Mariel Sagarra look into and explain what exactly Texas status means and how an organization might lose. It groups that are tax exempt don't have to pay certain kinds of taxes like income taxes charities are the most well, known example of church churches, Newseum organizations that when you give them you get a tax deductible contribution Miranda Fleischer at the university of San Diego school of law says charities are a type of taxing group known as five oh one C threes. But there are other ways to get exempted from taxes groups that promote social welfare qualify under a different section of the law five, oh, one C four Philip Hackney at the university of Pittsburgh school of law says these groups follow different rules, you usually can't deduct contributions to them and they're allowed to get involved in politics a wad of organiser. Nations will form once four in order to lobby in order to engage in politics that they can't is charity the NRA falls under this category. But it has a five oh, one C three foundation to an organization can lose its tax exempt status. If it say does something illegal or pays its leaders excessive salaries, but minoshe Viswanathan who teaches law at the university of California says IRS audits are rare the enforcement arm tax exempt organization at the IRS is underfunded and not as active as it probably should be but states have their own laws on tax exemption, and they can investigate groups to. That's what's happening in the case of the NRA maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. On Wall Street this Monday, you know, what you get if a stock index goes up after a record high. Well, yes, that's right. You get more record highs. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Congressional leaders democratic congressional leaders. I should say how speaker Nancy.

NRA Airbnb Maryanne university of San Diego school New York university of Pittsburgh schoo NYU Megan McCurdy professor of business Mariel Sagarra IRS Dhiraj Miranda Fleischer Marriott Abyan National Rifle Association Philip Hackney minoshe Viswanathan Nancy Andy
What Airline Passengers Need to Know After the Boeing 737 Max 8 Crash

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:11 min | 3 years ago

What Airline Passengers Need to Know After the Boeing 737 Max 8 Crash

"Aviation accidents are almost always complicated, and it can take months or usually longer to figure out what actually happened. And why? So while we wait for the specifics of Ethiopian flight three oh to to become more clear. There are some very real concerns being raised by would be travelers and airlines about the aircraft involve as you know, it's the newest Boeing plane the seven thirty-seven max eight the same model that crashed in Indonesia late last year, south west an American or among the US carriers that fly at marketplace marrow. Sagarra looks at what this crash might mean for them when Stephanie Johnny heard about the thean airlines crash. She thought about her daughter Juliet who's about to fly to Thailand, I sent her Texas morning thing. Juliette? If you're a need to find out what kind of plane, you're flying to Beijing. And then Thailand because if it's a seven thirty seven max. Changing your fight by Yanni is fifty three and lives in DC. She owns an active wear company and travels a lot for work. Now. One more thing to do check. What kind of a plan you're on? It's not clear yet why the airlines flight crashed on Sunday. Or if there is any problem with the Boeing seven thirty-seven, max eight and regulators like the FAA will be looking into this Daniele Quincy Chiku is an aviation professor at the university of North Dakota. We jump at this point, we hugest wheat, whatever instigate this to come up with the commend issues. B's don't sucks. The US airlines that fly the plane southwest in American say they stand behind the safety of their fleets including the seven thirty seven max eight, but travelers are getting nervous. American Airlines says it won't be waiving. It's changed fees for customers who refuse to fly on the jet southwest wouldn't disclose its policy Richard Obolov via an aviator. Analyst at the teal group says any cancellations probably won't have a huge affect on the airlines there are only three hundred fifty of these planes in the world. American Airlines has twenty four south west has thirty four. Ruin away small number. So they're not gonna lose business. I mean, just because of the relatively small number fight service by these jets Stephanie body, I need by the way was relieved to hear that her daughter will not be flying to Thailand on the Boeing seven thirty-seven max eight I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. One of the reasons the crash of flight three, oh two has led to so much international concern about the max aid is that if the opium airlines isn't some small budget airline. It's big it's well respected into an international carrier with a history that goes back to the end of the second World War as marketplace. Ben Bradford reports it is also arguably the most significant company in the horn of Africa, both economically and culturally in the US. The president doesn't typically show up for an airport opening a new terminal, but that's what happened in Ethiopia in January. People celebrated as prime minister, a b m cut the ribbon on the new international terminal at the bully airport in the country's capital Addison baba expanding Ethiopian Airlines hub to about the size of Dole's airport outside Washington DC. Is ABI linked. The airport's expansion without of Ethiopia's economy praising it saying the country still has far to go. If yoga was sub Saharan Africa's fastest growing economy last year. It's trying to drive that growth through state investment, and the airline is its crown jewel analyst Craig Jenks lichens Ethiopian incised to Canada's westjet, it is widely regarded as a well run a well-managed well operated company, the company's passenger count has quadrupled over the past decade is over a hundred international routes and its revenue is a quivalent almost five percent of Ethiopia's entire GDP. Economist Dubna lemme at the university of Massachusetts says via Skype that it's not just the country's economy. But it's national pride that's tied up in the airline. It's something happened. Something like, this is not considered just us. Some accidents happen on some company. It's considered as the symbol of the country. After yesterday's crash Ethiopia's parliament immediately declared a national day of mourning.

American Airlines Ethiopia United States Thailand Ethiopian Airlines Boeing Stephanie Johnny Yanni Sagarra Beijing Indonesia Juliette FAA Texas ABI Stephanie Body Opium Daniele Quincy Chiku Richard Obolov Africa
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tuesday five March is always to have you along everybody we begin today with some metallurgy and some national security trade policy specifically section two thirty two of the trade expansion act of nineteen sixty two as amended there's a lot in that sense. So let me explain the aforementioned section to thirty two lets the president impose tariffs at his discretion on certain imports that he or eventually she decides are essential to national security, which is to say American national security demands this country have its own industries in the tariff items make sense. All right. That is the legal grounding for the president's tariffs last year on steel aluminum section to thirty two now to the metallurgy. The Commerce Department says under section two thirty two it's looking into putting tariffs on imports of something called titanium sponge, except this time it's not acting. At the behest of the White House. It's a company called time met that's doing the asking the only manufacturer of titanium sponge in the United States. Workplaces Marielle cigar takes it from there. Titanium sponge is a raw form of titanium that's used in a lot of military equipment helicopter, blades jet, airframes and engines tank armor, Jennifer Hillman, teaches at Georgetown law the companies that make those things imports sixty percent of the titanium they need from other countries anti met. Again, the only company in the US that makes titanium sponge is arguing because it's used in all of these military applications that is an essence a threat to the national security of the United States. If a Commerce Department agrees, the president could impose tariffs on titanium imports, but Barent Jansen a trade lawyer at aching Gump says, there's bound to be some pushback for one thing, the US gets most of its titanium from Japan and Japan, of course. Is one of the closest military allies of the United States timeouts argument is a little different from the one that Trump administration used to justify tariffs on imported steel and aluminum in those cases, the administration said the country needs healthy steel and aluminum sectors to have a strong economy. Johnson says that's a controversial reading of the law. What we're seeing? Now really is a is a stretching of the statutory concept of national security to include economic security. In other words, he says the administration has been using the national security argument as an economic policy tool. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. Just because you can never have enough trade. All right. That's a bit tongue in cheek. But the news is the news. There is a meeting in Washington tomorrow with a European Union trade delegation. American officials about cars nominally in the Trump administration's demand that the EU cut its tariffs on American vehicles. As happen often times with trade, though, things have gotten mess. Easy as marketplace's Stephen beard reports from the European desk in London. These talks should be easy. I'm like China. The EU is not a geostrategic rival for the US. And it hasn't been ripping off American technology the spat. Oh, the call tariffs could be settled fast says Daniel gross of the center for European policy. Studies you could reduce its high tariffs on cars. The US a little bit on trucks. And then both sides could claim victory for were only about cars. There wouldn't be really a problem. The problem is it's also about farm produce like chlorine wash chicken and hormone-treated beef the US wants to sell the stuff in Europe. But analyst Peter Clapp says Europe won't stomach that because of protectionism and consumer irrationality. There's this irrational fear about American foods. Nobody seems to notice that Americans are eating it. So it can't be the end of the world nevertheless, says HOGAN schmead ING of the German Bank, berenberg this produce is political poison here. It would topple for instance, the German government if the government were to try to lower the German or European consumer protection standards for certain agricultural goods, the US and the EU want to avoid a trade war. Professor Allen winters of Sussex university thinks they probably will. But it is quite a significant John. I think that we really could have a major bus stop. And that would be really serious for the world at one on a quarter trillion dollars a year. This is by far the world's biggest trade relationship in London. I'm Stephen beard for marketplace. Wall Street today, flat flat, flat flat. We'll have the details. When we do the numbers. The oil industry in this economy is really a tale of.

United States EU president Commerce Department Stephen beard Trump administration London White House Daniel gross Washington Europe Jennifer Hillman HOGAN schmead ING Barent Jansen Johnson Professor Allen winters China Sussex university
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KCRW

"Or they just don't want to in Laredo, Texas. I mean Euler for marketplace. We're due for a whole slew of initial public offerings this year chief among the Uber, and it's rideshare competition lift about which there is interesting reporting being done by the Wall Street Journal, the paper says that when lift does go public. It's two co founders will own less than ten percent stake in the company, but in what is becoming Silicon Valley standard practice. They're going to keep a lock on majority voting control the journal reports that lifts founders like those Facebook, and tesla and a whole lot of other companies actually are going to do that by creating a class of water called super voting shares super maybe for the people at the top the rest of the shareholding public though. Marketplace mariusa Sagarra has that one if you own stock in a company, you have rights, the first company makes profit then you gotta shave in it and the second writers who have a C in the affairs of the company on oops robusta teaches finance at the university of Calgary. And he says it's a second one that's gotten watered down here. Super voting. Shares are a special class of stock available only to certain company insiders. Ken Birch is executive director at the council of institutional investors are the most typical structure, the insiders, our founders have ten votes pershare and everybody else has one vote for share last year when snap went public. It gave regular shareholders zero votes per share, creating multiple classes of shares isn't new the practice has gotten more common though, and lots of big companies, do it board berkshire-hathaway, the New York Times founders say super voting shares give them the freedom. They need to run the company. Lindsey baron teaches finance at Kent state. It allowed the insiders routine control of sort of the vision or the where the company is going without having to meet the short-term pressures of being a publicly traded firm and without having a battle activist investors, but concentrating so much power in. So few hands can be risky investors. Look at this. And they say, well, there's this potential for these. Insiders to make really poor decisions. And we would have nothing no control over that one. Recent example, Facebook whose problems are well documented CEO, Mark Zuckerberg shares give him virtually total control over the four hundred seventy billion dollar company. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. Coming up. They love this burger because they don't feel like they're compromising feel like they're eating a black bean burger that has zero comparisons you sink your teeth into that one. But first, let's do the numbers. The Dow industrials up three hundred and seventy two points today. One point four percent closed at twenty five thousand four twenty five the NASDAQ up one oh six also one point four percent finished at seventy four fourteen the S and P five hundred lifted thirty four points more than one and a quarter percent twenty seven and forty four Justin. How was telling us that Americans are feeling pretty upbeat about their finances. Look retailers today that stand to benefit when confident workers use their wages to buy stuff. Target rang up more than a third of one percent. Walmart added eight tenths percent online retail giant Amazon deliver two point nine percent day bond. Prices fell yield on the ten year treasury note rose to two point six eight percent. And you're listening to marketplace. Marketplace is supported by Charles Schwab,.

Wall Street Journal Facebook Laredo Texas Ken Birch Walmart university of Calgary New York Times Sagarra Lindsey baron Charles Schwab Mark Zuckerberg Amazon tesla Kent state executive director
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KCRW

"People who have to pay taxes on their lawyers fees. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. We're barely a month. In in two thousand nineteen has already been a rough year for media companies get at the biggest newspaper publisher in the country has laid off four hundred people. Buzzfeed, McClatchy in Huffington Post got hundreds of jobs in January and just last Friday. Vice media announced it's cutting ten percent of its staff timely, then the Jill Abramson who used to be the executive editor of the New York Times has a new book out on the business of news disagreements with the publisher of the times about exactly that how to transform the paper in the digital age was at the heart of why she lost her job back in two thousand fourteen her new book, it's part memoir part investigative narrative about the changes in the media business model driven specifically by BuzzFeed vice the New York Times and the Washington Post is called merchants of truth, you'll Abramson welcome to the program. Thank you so much. I'm happy to be here. Why these four companies in this book, what was it about them? Well, I wanted to pick four companies that all illustrated somewhat different crises, and when I started my reporting vice and BuzzFeed where the shiny new stars. Vice said, it was gonna shove CNN, you know, off the map and BuzzFeed was seen as competition to the times and the post because it a built a huge audience using Facebook. So when when did you well, we'll get the Facebook in a minute, actually. But when did you start reporting this book because as anybody who's been following the news of the news? The news of the news business knows the bloom is off the rose for vice in, you know, BuzzFeed just had those big layoffs. So it's not clear sailing for them by any means vice and BuzzFeed, you're right are having layoffs and their news divisions seem to be in crisis. But with the Trump bomb by and digital subscriptions, go. Going up at both the times and the post they're more secure. I mean did the post is owned by Jeff Bezos is giving them a long runway to regain their glory days. The times is feeling good and hiring people, and you know, expand and all kinds of ways a word here about Facebook. Since I mentioned it. I'm reading the table of contents here, and you've got a chapter titled BuzzFeed, Juan vice one New York Times one. And then you go on and on BuzzFeed vice near Tonj washer tebow's by BuzzFeed. And then boom out of nowhere chapter nine is Facebook. Why Facebook in a story about the news business? Well, because Facebook is the news business. Let me let me just that's slightly horrifying. Yeah. It horrifies me. That's for sure Facebook has become the dominant distributor of news stories. It's affectively the biggest publisher ever known to man. So I thought Facebook needed needed to be altogether. I wanna talk about metrics firm, and we can now measure what nears people are consuming to the nth degree the post as you point out in. This book has had you know, big screens in its newsroom range clicking on what a good thing or bad thing for the business of news. Well, I think it's both, you know, why should editors when the tool of something like chart beat is around. Not know what news is most interesting to their readers our audiences. But I fear that reporters. Reporters, and I include myself where vein creatures where particular kind of tribe, and you know, at times journalists I saw recently admitted to me that when he's not writing about Trump and Trump isn't in his headline. He'd get the traffic. So you know, it it fuels and skews coverage in a way that's worrisome, Jill Abramson, formerly of the Wall Street Journal, also the New York Times now a new book.

Facebook New York Times BuzzFeed Washington Post Jill Abramson tebow publisher Huffington Post Trump Jeff Bezos McClatchy CNN Wall Street Journal executive editor Juan Tonj ten percent
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I honestly didn't know this until this morning. But there is officially such a thing as tax filing season. It starts today. The Internal Revenue Service will accept and process. Your return now not one day earlier for some reason, this is as you know, the first filing season under the two thousand seventeen tax law. The biggest change to the internal revenue code in thirty years, and that new tax law, and the changes it has wrought could make a big difference in the size of your refund. This year, marketplace's Marielle cigarrettes masking around to see how people are feeling about that Graham Austin and her husband usually get back around two thousand dollars tax time. It'll probably be bad news for us this year. Austin is a professor at Montana state university last week. She got this Email from our HR department was a sort of warning. And it said that's happened with the tax code last year. You might be in for an unpleasant surprise most people got tax cut under the new law. So last year. Or the IRS told employers to withhold less in taxes from their workers, paychecks mattress tax preparer in New York says the thing is it's not really a one size fits all kind of adjustment. And it doesn't really take in consideration the individual facts and circumstances that people face like whether they rely on deductions that went away under the new law. So some people might be getting refunded size of, but they're normally used to where some people may be getting them substantially lower or even end up owing. That message hasn't gotten to everyone. Anthony lower is an IT director at temple university in Philly. I know where that yeah, I wish I had he usually gets back a couple thousand bucks every tax season. And he says his financial situation hasn't changed this year, but he just did his taxes online. He owes thirteen hundred dollars, which means maybe Novick this year. His only hope for that vacation. He's gonna ask an accountant for a second opinion. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. We'd love to hear your refund story are you expecting one. And if so what do you do that you can tell us at marketplace dot org..

Graham Austin Internal Revenue Service Novick Anthony lower Montana state university New York accountant temple university professor Philly director thirteen hundred dollars two thousand dollars thirty years one day
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KCRW

"In New York, I'm in for David Brancaccio who's on assignment in the Senate yesterday to attempts to reopen the government failed one included funding for the president's border wall. The other did not end today. Eight hundred thousand federal workers will miss their second paychecks since the partial government shutdown began thirty five days ago. Now, no paycheck means more than just workers not getting their salary. It also means they will miss all those automated contributions made on their behalf by their employer. The government things like health insurance premiums, and that is creating some problems. Marketplace's Merrill, Sagarra talked to some workers Mandy Renslow would like to go to her doctor appointment next month, but she's a federal worker, and she's not sure she'll be able to keep her vision insurance the government deduct their premiums from her paycheck that is when she gets one but during the shutdown after three missed paychecks. She has to pay the insurance company directly or lose her coverage. I guess it would depend on how much it costs. I mean, right now, my focus is really. Just paying my rent. So I don't get victim. Something else that happens during a shutdown workers are not contributing to their flexible spending accounts, and they can't get reimbursed for medical costs. That was an issue for Heather Nodar who also works for the federal government. I had the flu and pneumonia. And so I had to pay for like the doctor and the prescriptions and the chest x rays and all that stuff out of pocket. One thing federal workers are keeping during the shutdown. Even though they're not paying the premiums their basic health insurance. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. As we've talked about before on this program. There's a lot of data that is not being produced during the shutdown of the federal government. You've got factory orders construction spending retail sales inflation the list goes on just today. We won't be getting housing starts, nor will we receive data around durable, goods items like cars, home appliances manufacturing equipment. Why do we care about durable goods? Well, here's marketplace's Eric embarrass investors. Make some key decisions based on a durable goods report. If those orders are up that's manufacturers are optimistic about future demand that drives wear investors put their money. But if the data shows that dip in purchases that suggests uncertainty in the economy and makes investors pullback on investing in this case where there is no data most likely, they'll stall investment until the report is out. But one consequence down the line that may mean slowing of economic growth leading job loss. Marketplace's Erica barris. We're telling the story of missing government economic data across our platforms today to here. For more. You can check out marketplace dot org or tune into marketplace later today, let's take a look at the numbers..

Mandy Renslow David Brancaccio Erica barris Senate New York president Heather Nodar flu Merrill Sagarra pneumonia thirty five days
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Who's on assignment in the Senate yesterday to attempts to reopen the government failed one included funding for the president's border. While the other did not end today. Eight hundred thousand federal workers will miss their second paycheck since the partial government shutdown began thirty five days ago now no paycheck means more than just workers not getting their salary. It also means they will miss all those automatic can contributions made on their behalf by their employer. The government things like health insurance premiums, and that is that is creating some problems. Marketplace's Marielle cigar talked to some workers Mandy rans law would like to go to a doctor appointment next month. But she's a federal worker, and she's not sure she'll be able to keep her vision insurance the government deduct premiums from her paycheck that is when she gets one but during a shutdown after three missed paychecks. She has to pay the insurance company directly or lose her coverage. I guess it would depend on how much cost. I mean. Right now, my focus is really just paying my rent. So I don't get addicted something else that happens during a shutdown workers are not contributing to their flexible spending accounts, and they can't get reimbursed for medical costs. That was an issue for Heather nod ler who also works for the federal government. I had the flu and pneumonia. And so I had to pay for like the doctor and the prescriptions and the chest x rays and all that stuff out of pocket. One thing federal workers are keeping during the shutdown. Even though they're not paying the premiums their basic health insurance. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. Now as we've talked about before there's a lot of data that's not being produced during the shut partial shutdown of the federal government. So you've got your factory orders construction spending retail sales inflation the list goes on and just today. We won't be getting housing starts, nor will we receive data around durable goods like cars, home appliances and manufacturing equipment. Why do we care about durable goods? Here's marketplace's Erica barrels investors. Make some key decisions based on a durable goods report. If those orders are up that's a sign manufacturers are optimistic about future demand that drives wear investors put their money. But if the data shows a dip in purchases that suggests uncertainty in the economy and makes investors pullback on investing in this case where there is no data most likely they'll stall investment until I report is out. But one consequence down the line that may mean slowing of economic growth leading to job loss. Marketplace's air embarrassed. We're telling the story of missing government economic data across our platforms today. So to hear more. Checkout. Marketplace dot org and tune into marketplace later today, let's do the numbers..

Senate Mandy rans president Marielle flu Heather pneumonia thirty five days
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"It's a win win, and it gives Amazon a chance to grow its already sizeable several billion dollar a year at business. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. At some point the shutdown is going to end. And when it does there's going to be some pent up demand. Let loose in this economy, including on Wall Street where the securities and Exchange Commission, not being fully staffed has meant initial public offerings just aren't being offered. But when they do start up again, the Wall Street Journal reports slack the workplace messaging service is going to be right there in line, but instead of issuing stock through a traditional IPO. Slack is said to be considering something called a direct listing. Instead, marketplace's Eric embarrass explains what a direct listing is. And why a company might want to do one. Usually when a company is about to make stock exchange debut with a traditional IPO. There's a whole bunch of people involved investment bankers analysts, and it cost the company a lot of money, Kathleen wise, Hanley finance professor at Lehigh university by using and underwritten process, the underwriter can often get information about how much the securities will be priced and it can reduce the amount of volatility that occurs in the first trading day, then there's a direct listing when a company bypasses the whole process and starts trading. Existing shares. It can be risky without established investor is built into the offering their more exposed to volatility. Plus, no company wants to have to go through the education process of doing something for the first time in getting investors used to it. Jay Ritter, finance professor at the university of Florida says, although it's unusual for large companies to do it direct listing. Spotify did that, and it's widely viewed as quite successfully. And that's opened it up for companies like slacked, try direct listing building on their cash infusion an established brands all without paying fees to investment banks and getting a quicker sense of the true market value of the company so self-confessed teaches corporate governance at Stanford law school and is a former Commissioner at the SEC. He says if direct offerings become more common. And I think we may actually see a major seachange in the relationship between issuing companies and traditional investment banks, and that could be the latest tech disruption. I'm Eric Harris for marketplace. Speaking of stocks, by the way, you could say the markets have been facing a lot of this my favorite five syllable word, right all together. Now Vall a till it t-, we call it. The good people at merriam Webster and get this. The number. Of searches for volatility was up more than two hundred and fifty percent last year. You can read more about the history of that term at marketplace dot org. If you were following the Golden Globes.

Slack Jay Ritter professor Wall Street Journal Eric embarrass Amazon Exchange Commission merriam Webster Eric Harris Golden Globes Kathleen wise Lehigh university Spotify Stanford law school university of Florida Commissioner SEC billion dollar
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KCRW

"A win win, and it gives Amazon a chance to grow its already sizeable several billion dollar a year at business. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. At some point the shutdown is going to end. And when it does there's gonna be some pent up demand. Let loose in this economy, including on Wall Street with the securities and Exchange Commission, not being fully staffed has been initial public offerings just aren't being offered. But when they do start up again, the Wall Street Journal reports slack the workplace messaging service is going to be right there in line, but instead of issuing its doc through traditional IBO slack said to be considering something called a direct listing. Instead marketplace's Eric embarrass explains. What a. Listing is and why a company might wanna do one. Usually when a company is about to make a stock exchange debut with a traditional IPO. There's a whole bunch of people involved investment bankers analysts, and it cost the company a lot of money, Kathleen wise, Hanley finance professor at Lehigh university by using and underwritten process, the underwriter can often get information about how much the securities will be priced and it can reduce the amount of volatility that occurs in the first trading day, then there's a direct listing when a company bypasses the whole process and starts trading. Existing shares. It can be risky without established investor is built into the offering their more exposed to Bala Tilleke. Plus, no company wants to have to go through the education process of doing something for the first time and getting investors used to it J Ritter finance professor at the university of Florida says, although it's unusual for large companies to do it direct listing. Spotify did that, and it's widely viewed as quite successfully. And that's opened it up for companies like slacked, try a direct listing building on their cash infusion an established brands all without paying fees to investment banks and getting a quicker sense of the true market value of the company Joseph grind fast teaches corporate governance at Stanford law school and is a former Commissioner at the SEC. He says if Iraq's offerings become more common. And I think we may actually see a major seachange in the relationship between swing companies and traditional investment banks, and that could be the latest tech disruption. I'm Eric embarrass for marketplace. Speaking of stocks, by the way, you could say the markets have been facing a lot of this my favorite five syllable word, right all together. Now Vall a till T. We call it the good people at merriam Webster and get this. The number of searches for volatility was more than two hundred and fifty percent last year. You can read more about the history of that. Term at marketplace dot org. If you were following the Golden Globes coverage last.

Eric embarrass professor Wall Street Journal Bala Tilleke Amazon Exchange Commission IBO merriam Webster Golden Globes Kathleen wise Lehigh university Spotify Stanford law school Iraq J Ritter Commissioner SEC university of Florida
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So it's a win win, and it gives Amazon a chance to grow its already sizeable several billion dollar a year at business. I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. At some point the shutdown is going to end. And when it does there's gonna be some pent up demand. Let loose in this economy, including on Wall Street where the securities and Exchange Commission, not being fully staffed has been initial public offerings just aren't being offered. But when they do start up again, the Wall Street Journal reports slack the workplace messaging service is going to be right there in line, but instead of issuing its stock through a traditional IPO slack is said to be considering something called a direct listing. Instead marketplace's Eric embarrass explains. What a. Correct listing is and why a company might want to do one. Usually when a company is about to make stock exchange debut with a traditional IPO. There's a whole bunch of people involved investment bankers analysts, and it cost the company a lot of money, Kathleen wise, Hanley finance professor at Lehigh university by using and underwritten process, the underwriter can often get information about how much the securities will be priced and it can reduce the amount of volatility that occurs in the first trading day, then there's a direct listing when a company bypasses the whole process and starts trading. Existing shares. It can be risky without established is built into the offering their more exposed to volatility. Plus, no company wants to have to go through the education process of doing something for the first time and getting investors used to J Ritter finance professor at the university of Florida says, although it's unusual for large companies to do a direct listing. Spotify did that and widely viewed as quite successfully. And that's opened it up for companies like slacked, try it direct listing building on their cash infusion an established brand all without paying fees to investment banks and getting a quicker sense of the true market value of the company Joseph fast teaches corporate governance at Stanford law school and is a former Commissioner at the SEC. He says if direct offerings become more common than I think, we may actually see a major seachange in the relationship between swing companies and traditional investment banks, and that could be the latest tech disruption. I'm Eric embarrass for marketplace. Speaking of stock, by the way, you could say the markets have been facing a lot of this my favorite five syllable word, right all together. Now vol till it t-, we call it the good people marriam Webster and get this. The number of searches for volatility was up more than two hundred and fifty percent last year. You can read more about the history of the. That term at marketplace dot org. If you were following the Golden Globes.

Eric embarrass professor Wall Street Journal Joseph Amazon Exchange Commission Golden Globes Kathleen wise Lehigh university Spotify J Ritter Stanford law school Webster university of Florida Commissioner SEC billion dollar fifty percent
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Dow Jones industrial average is down almost two point six percent this morning. It's about six hundred and five points. Yes. And P five hundred is down two point one percent. The NASDAQ is down two point four eight percent and new data out this morning from the institute for supply management its manufacturing index had its biggest drop since late twenty fourteen and the department of labor is working to fix its visa application website after it crashed on Tuesday, not because of the shutdown but because record number of businesses applied for H two B visas temporary worker permits in just a few minutes. There were three times as many applications as there are visas. Marketplace's Marielle Sagarra has more H two b visas. Let companies hire workers from other countries for temporary seasonal jobs in industries, like hospitality, landscaping entertainment. So we're talking about line cooks and gardeners and amusement park workers. There is a cap on these visas thirty three thousand every six months and demand is growing has unemployment is low and companies say they can't find Americans to do these jobs at least not for what they're paying moves. Offer Chishti is with the migration policy institute. The jobs are short-lived. They are seasonal, and that's not a high priority of many US workers are looking for most stable employment. The Trump administration recently changed the visa application system. Now it tracks. When you apply down to the millisecond. So when the website went up at midnight on January first companies rushed to apply within five minutes. The site was now functioning so the department took it down. It says it's working on a fix and that it'll give twenty four hours notice before it's up again, I'm maryelle Sagarra for marketplace..

migration policy institute Marielle Sagarra department of labor Chishti US Trump four eight percent twenty four hours five minutes one percent six percent six months
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Marking free trade anniversary with an ongoing fight over the border wall from marketplace in Washington DC, I'm Kimberly Adams in for David Brancaccio. The partial government shutdown continues into this new year with hundreds of thousands of federal employees, unsure when they'll go back to work the fight over border security or wall or fencing ties back to President Trump's campaign promises. Another promise he made on the campaign trail repealing NAFTA today marks twenty five years since the North American Free trade agreement went into effect and NAFTA's three member countries. Canada, the United States and Mexico have reached a tentative deal to replace the original agreement the controversy around NAFTA is nothing new the trade deal had lots of critics when it was an acted. And that's partly because it was historic. Marketplace's Marielle Sagarra reports. We're going to set aside Canada for now even back in the ninety s. Nafta went into effect. The controversy was about Mexico. Nafta was the first major trade agreement between a wealthy country like the US and poorer developing country like Mexico. Edward Alden is a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations. Previous trade agreements had largely been among ad Vance economies, and it raised an entirely different set of issues, namely would business and industry flow to Mexico to chase the much lower wages some of that did happen, but Mary lovely and economics professor at Syracuse. University says NAFTA also helped US manufacturers who could make parts more cheaply in Mexico. The ability to produce certain components in Mexico, close by has enabled American manufacturers to compete, successfully. With Asian firms near paean firms at twenty five NAFTA may not be around for much longer. But the new tentative trade deal looks pretty similar a maryelle Sagarra for marketplace. Markets are closed today for the holiday, but let's do the numbers anyway, twenty eighteen edition US markets had a good day yesterday to close out the year, but it was a pretty bad year for the markets. In fact, Wall Street had its worst year since two thousand eight the S and P closed down six point two percent for twenty eighteen the first time that index is dropped year-over-year since the financial crisis. The Dow ended down five point six percent. And the NASDAQ was down three point nine percent bonds actually did go up for the year. The yield on the ten year t notes started off at two point four one percent. And ended the year at two point six eight percent and twenty eighteen was also a year of devastating fires in the American west last year. Those fires burned down more than three hundred homes in Malibu, one of the wealthiest cities in California, many of those homeowners employed gardeners and housekeepers who are now out of work KPCC's. Emily, elaine. Doug, Dale explains. How? The local community is stepping in to help these workers. This is the Malibu community labor exchange a gray trailer draped with flags park just off the Pacific Coast Highway where day workers connect with locals who need help with job around seven AM director, Oscar Mondragon polls.

NAFTA Mexico United States President Trump Canada David Brancaccio Marielle Sagarra Washington Kimberly Adams Edward Alden Oscar Mondragon KPCC California senior fellow Doug
"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"maryelle sagarra" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"New year with hundreds of thousands of federal employees, unsure when they'll go back to work the fight over border security or wall or fencing ties back to President Trump's campaign promises. Another promise he made on the campaign trail repealing NAFTA today marks twenty five years since the North American Free trade agreement went into effect and NAFTA's three member countries. Canada, the United States and Mexico have reached a tentative deal to replace the original agreement the controversy around NAFTA is nothing new the trade deal had lots of critics when it was an acted. And that's partly because it was historic. Marketplace's Marielle Sagarra reports. We're going to set aside Canada for now even back in. Ninety s when NAFTA went into effect the controversy was about Mexico. Nafta was the first major trade agreement between a wealthy country like the US and poorer developing country like Mexico. Edward Alden is a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations. Previous trade agreements had largely been among advanced economies. And it raised an entirely different set of issues, namely would business and industry flow to Mexico to chase the much lower wages some of that did happen, but Mary lovely an economics. Professor at Syracuse. University says NAFTA also helped US manufacturers who could make parts more cheaply in Mexico. The ability to produce certain components in Mexico close by has enabled American manufacturers to compete successfully with Asian firms near opean firms twenty five NAFTA may not be around for much longer. But the new tentative trade deal looks pretty similar. I'm maryelle Sagarra from our. Replace markets are closed today for the holiday, but let's do the numbers anyway, twenty eighteen edition US markets had a good day yesterday to close out the year, but it was a pretty bad year for the markets. In fact, Wall Street had its worst year since two thousand eight the s&p closed down six point two percent for twenty eighteen the first time that index has dropped year-over-year since the financial crisis. The Dow ended down five point six percent. And the NASDAQ was down three point nine percent bonds actually did go up for the year. The yield on the ten year t notes started off at two point four one percent. And ended the year at two point six eight percent and twenty eighteen was also a year of devastating fires in the American west last year. Those fires burned down more than three hundred homes in Malibu, one of the wealthiest cities in California, many of those homeowners employed gardeners and housekeepers who are now out.

NAFTA Mexico United States Canada President Trump Marielle Sagarra Edward Alden maryelle Sagarra California senior fellow Syracuse Professor Mary six eight percent twenty five years