17 Burst results for "Mary Yancey"

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"We've got a listener question about music in tonal languages. This question comes from Ashley Hammer Hummer. How do you say this? I have no idea who who knows these things very strange. No but this question actually really did come from me so my question was about how you can understand the lyrics of songs in a tonal language to get some help with the answer we got in touch with James Kirby reader in phonetics at the University of Edinburgh here. He is with a quick refresher on what a tonal language judge even is so tone languages are those languages where you use pitch to make a difference in the meaning of the word right so in Thai which is one of the languages that I work the most with if you if you say the syllable Bligh with a falling pitch like that so bligh means near here but if I speak you with the more neutral tone just say by that means far so obviously getting the pitch rate is is very very important to getting your your message across. We Use Pidgin English too but we don't use it in quite the same way that brings us back to my question. How could you possibly sing or understand lyrics in these languages? James told us that one major way is context basically knowing what we're does or doesn't make sense in a phrase and another way is phonetic effect meaning that a singer can kind of sneak in the tone of a word moving up or down as an accent or Melissa to what they're singing but here's the other major piece of the songwriting puzzle the perk that we've worked on the most and it actually seems to be the most surprising thing to learn about that was really. Important is what we call tech setting constraints which is basically the principles that govern how you assign the notes to the words and the short answer is sort of the more the tones and the melodies match the easier it is for the listener to understand the lyrics composers and lyricists tend to light to write lyrics this sort of match the melody the trick is what does it mean to match right so one possibility would be to say well we could we could match notes musical notes and linguistic tones so that you basically are singing the words using a very limited number of notes and this is done sometimes if you listen to to chanting religious chanting various kinds or if people are performing poetry what they will essentially essentially do is style is the lyrics are stylized the verse and there's sort of singing it but it's being sung with a with a very small number of musical notes which gets to sound a little bit monotonous so frequently turns out to be much more important and is now whether or not a particular tone is some on a particular note but actually the relationships between pairs of successive notes. The basic idea is that composers try to avoid what we call contrary settings and so put simply that means that if the melody Freddie has a low note followed by a high note so if you're going from C to g the lyrics that are set to those notes should not be a high tone followed by a low tone right so if I want to sing if I'm seeing tie and I want I want to sing white rice. which tie would the cow cow and so I've got a high falling tone followed by a low rising tone ideally liked to sing that second word on a note that's lower than the first word right so I want my melody to go something like law rather than? La La because if I go low to high deliver is ner might understand. I'm trying to say Cao Cao which means would mean something like rice news which doesn't make any sense so so that's the basic. That's the basic idea is that were when people are trying to compose was these texts they look the melodies because in a lot of music melody is generally written I and they try and find a way to compose the text in such a way that the tones of the words aren't in conflict with the direction of the melody between successive notes and there's exceptions to this. It's clear that singing in a tone language doesn't require that you have a close match between musical and linguistic pitch but it seems to it seems to facilitate understanding and some kinds of music. It seems to be seems view followed more than others that makes a lot of sense to me because even in English we're still constrained with what words we can use any given melody there certain number of notes. There's certain rhythms that work better with some words than others so this really really isn't actually that off base from the way that we compose lyrics here. No that's absolutely right and in fact one of the one of the examples that we try and drawn point out is that this does have exactly that kind of analog in languages like English that aren't tonal so one of the examples we think of is if you were trial of a certain age you probably teased your friends on the playground by singing things like Johnny has a girlfriend or Mary has a boyfriend and of course the names Johnny are Mary. You don't have to be in there you can you can change out the lyrics but even without having been taught this this song the genre we all know if I wanna give Johnny a hard time about the name of his girlfriend like if Janis girlfriend's name is Pamela right I can't sing. Johnny Loves Palm Right. That just sounds bad right in the thing I would want to do. Is I want to do something like Johnny Loves Pamela and if you actually analyze what's going on there so the you've got to measures for notes a four note in the first measure in two months in the second measure and kind of what the principal is. Let's put the stressed syllable of the word with the down beat of each measure right so johnny has stress on the first syllable girlfriend has stress on the first civil right but Pamela Pamela. It's got three syllables so I can't just assign syllables to notes left to right right. I've got to do something nifty in order to make sure that that Pamela that that first syllable of Pamela followed on the downbeat and so what we ended up doing intuitively without anyone teaching us to do this all right as we create this Melissa on lugs and so that doesn't sound as good as Johnny has a girlfriend but it doesn't sound nearly as bad as Johnny Loves Pamela so in that sense you could say well the the most important principle there is don't assign an unstressed syllable to the down beat of the measure and in the singing tone example. It's don't try to line successive words that have tones where the tones go in opposite directions to the melody he also stressed that of course these are not hard and fast rules and that a lot of musicians play around with our expectations by using different tones or rhythms than what we might expect something that you can hear in some music from Southeast Asia and here in the U._S.. US In a lot of rap music again that was James Kirby reader in phonetics at the University of Edinburgh and thanks for your question Ashley. Oh you're very welcome cody. Oh Hey you hear oh before we recap what we learned. Today we want to give a special shout out to Muhammad Jaffa's Ause and Dr Mary Yancey who were executive producers for today's episode. We really appreciate your generous support now. Let's review what we learned. We learned the D._N._A.. Can hang out for a long time if it's in the right place in new chromosomes and the composing songs in tonal..

Pamela Pamela Johnny James Kirby Ashley Hammer University of Edinburgh Dr Mary Yancey Melissa Bligh Southeast Asia La La Freddie Thai US Muhammad Jaffa executive Janis principal two months
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

United States Armand hammer Zillow Dartmouth Godzilla Bravo Japan Cavs Cody Julian executive Marshall Islands Tokyo Muhammed Jaffa Dr Mary Yancey one hundred percent seven months fifty meter
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

09:36 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"A few minutes. I'm Cody gov. And I'm Ashley Hamer today, you learn about how scientists developed a self repairing battery. And we'll also answer a listener question about the difference between four g and five g networks with a special guest science communicator, trace Dominquez satisfy some curiosity last month, scientists announced that they may have achieved a major breakthrough they've developed a self, repairing battery, this could mean that in the future. Those days of having an old phone or laptop that just can't hold a decent charge anymore could be over before I get into how they did that. Here's a quick refresher on how batteries work all batteries, contain three things a positive electrode a negative electrode and an electrolyte between them rechargeable, batteries like the lithium ion one in your phone or laptop charges by sending charged particles from the positive electrode through the electrolyte and into the negative electrode those charged particles are called ions. And when it's time to actually use your device. The ions head in the opposite direction this time from the negative electrode to the positive one. Okay. So why does a battery stop holding a charge? Well, let's use a lithium ion battery as an example, the electrodes in a rechargeable battery are usually made up of a bunch of super thin layers of some type of metal super thin as in about as thick as an atom in a lithium ion battery the negative electrode is made of graphing, which is basically sheets of carbon atoms. And the positive electrode is made of lithium cobalt oxide or lithium iron phosphate. These layers are held together by a week Vander walls force, which is the force that exists between really closely packed neutral particles when your batteries charging the lithium cobalt oxide in the positive electrode send some of its own lithium ions to pass through the electrolyte and hang out between the layers of graphing and the negative electrode that release of ions physically changes the electrode, it actually creates a little bit of extra space between the layers since the force. Is holding the material together need the atoms to be closely packed that extra space can degrade the electrode, and after a while it'll lead to cracks or flakes, known as stacking faults over time, these stacking, faults, make it harder for the battery to store and deliver a charge is scientists figure out a way to prevent or repair, these cracks, then they could end up creating a significantly longer lasting battery and in a paper published in nature last month engineers at the university of Tokyo announced that they developed a way to make batteries repair these cracks on their own instead of lithium ions the team used sodium, which is a promising alternative. We've talked about on this podcast before the natural degradation of the electrodes is reversible. Thanks to the extra sodium atom in the electrode layers, the material, they used was held together by force called Columbus attraction, which is the fancy term for the attraction between particles with opposite charges, and that might not sound super impressive. But the force of Columbus attraction is a lot stronger than van der Waals forces which means. The new material. They made the electrode out of can do a lot more than the stuff in your run-of-the-mill electrode. Thanks to this more powerful force. Once the sodium ions make their way back to the positive electrode during charging they can return to the same structure. They started in and repair any extra spaces or cracks that might have formed when the battery discharged cracks aren't the only things that limit rechargeable batteries. So this doesn't solve every battery problem ever, but it's still a big step toward longer. Lasting batteries with more capacity, and that will make a big difference in everything from electric cars to your smartphone. Today's episode is sponsored by Armand hammer, who have a new cloud control cat litter. You know what I love my cats? Calico coloring. I think she's gorgeous. And she's also a science lesson in herself. Because Cody did you know that almost all calico cats are female what? Yeah, it's because the gene for for color is on the x chromosome, and in order to be calico, you need to have a different color on each x chromosome and only female. Cats and male cats who have an extra chromosome have two x chromosomes. So anytime you see a calico cat, you can just be like, she's so pretty the owner will be like, how did you know nice pro tip. Of course. I knew Agla was a female. Yes. Because I talk about it all the time when I don't talk about all the time is how terrible it is to clean her litter box. But every cat owner knows that pain, which is why arm, and hammer created new cloud control litter. There's no cloud of nasty stuff. When I scoop, it's one hundred percent dust free free of heavy perfumes, and it helps reduce airborne dander from scooping. So what happens in the litterbox stays in the litterbox, new cloud, control cat, litter by Armand hammer. More power to you. We gotta listener question from a Dutia, who writes, five G is the next big thing in networking. How is it different from three G and four G? Great question, did ya and perfect timing, because our friend science communicator, trace Dominquez recently produced a super. Depth video about this very thing on his YouTube channel dose of trace. We called him up to shed some light on this cellular subject. So five G is really interesting because it's similar to four G and three G but it's not the same. So it's a good question to ask. Because when we think of these cellular networks, we usually think of them, as just this solid kind of thing, but they're constantly changing, we've had all of these different. Jeez of cellular technologies two G three G and four G R are all pretty well known. There actually was one g and half g and there are even like two and a half g and things. I it's a way for the cellular industry to kind of keep track of different standards, so three G and four G standards were created in the year, two thousand or at least around there. They have something called the International Telecommunications Union Nick created these standards called EMT two thousand and we've been using those for a long time, actually, we still use. All those standards for our three G and four G wireless now five G is a new wireless standard that honestly hasn't even been released yet. So we only know what we've seen at mobile world, congress and other kind of conferences in meet ups where all of these people who are going to create the standards are talking about what they are doing. So what we know about five G is that it's going to be an all wireless system where there is small cells, scattered throughout cities, and urban areas that will communicate very, very fast like on the order of gigabits per second, so, essentially, instantaneous, wireless, communication, if you get further away from the small cells, you'll get slightly slower speeds, there'll be faster than four g but they'll be using different frequencies than what three G and four G currently use. Meaning the reason that it's the distinct kind of G distinct network is because it's using these new standards and different frequencies. And. Different technologies. So over the next four or five years, we're going to slowly get five G rollout across the United States, you'll still see four G out on your phone. If you're say in the middle of a rural area, you might see four G on your phone just like now. You might see three g on your phone. If you drive away from a city in some directions, but for the most part, five G is just this next iteration of cellular technology. The small cells, the reason I bring those up is, that's the real big change. That's the thing that we're going to now have to understand a rapper heads around the small cells use something called millimeter waves or em waves. They're very high energy in comparison to, like to g technology, but not high energy in comparison to like x-rays and Camrys, and they will be the thing that transmits the data super fast. You might even have to have one of these in your house, or in your home office to get this speed. Because millimeter waves are scattered by things like brick and concrete by a potentially rain and moisture in the air. So it can get really messy. When you start to build these fast networks. But once it's built, I mean, we're talking being able to drive a car remotely. If you're on a five G network and the car is on a five G network. You could drive it remotely and react in real time to stuff the tapping around, you, you could do surgery, remotely if you're both in five G networks, I mean, these things are essentially for all intents and purposes, the perfect wireless network, and that's not just me saying that, that's according to the international journal of computer science, and management studies. They said, quote five G is assumed as the perfection level of wireless communication in mobile technology. So it's going to be pretty big deal. We trace about five G and the rest of the world, too. And he said that, since the International Telecommunications Union is part. Of the United Nations. We're going to see similar rollouts worldwide, although the timing could vary again, that was traced Dominquez science communicator, and host of the YouTube channel dose of trace. He gets much deeper into the subject in his video about this, which will link to in the show notes. Thanks for your question. If you have a question, send it in to podcast at curiosity dot com before we wrap up, we want to give a special shout out to doctor, Mary, Yancey and Mohammed Jaffa's, who are executive producers for today's episode. Thanks to their generous support on patriot. Thank you so much. You're listening in, you want support curiosity daily then visit patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com all spelled out. Join us again tomorrow.

Armand hammer Dominquez YouTube International Telecommunicatio Columbus Ashley Hamer university of Tokyo United Nations United States Vander Cody congress Agla Dutia international journal of compu
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Hanes grand valley state university Dr Mary Yancey Muhammed Jaffa executive two months
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Arm and hammer. More power to you may believe were rational thinkers with open minds, ready to be swayed by convincing evidence, but in reality research suggests that when your beliefs change you probably don't even realize it because your brain fights attempt to be open minded, and your brain Hanes being wrong so much that it actually adjusts your memories to make you right in retrospect, this is science. That might make you reevaluate your mind, shortcomings, and. Careful about being persuaded in the future. A study from researchers at grand valley state university, where looking to find whether people were even aware that a persuasive article had changed their minds. They recruited more than two hundred undergraduate volunteers and asked them to share their beliefs about whether spanking children was an effective form of discipline. The researchers picked this topic because previous research had shown that people are more likely to change their mind. When it's about something they don't know a lot about, and they don't feel very strongly about. I mean it's likely a lot of these undergraduate college students didn't have kids, thus probably not very strong feelings. The students I filled out a pre screening survey that rated their beliefs, then two months later, after enough time had passed to forget the survey, the students were given articles to read the presented arguments, either in favor of or against the effectiveness of spanking after they answered questions about the article's contents. They again, rated their beliefs, and we're also. Asked to recall their beliefs from the beginning of the study as could be expected for an issue. They didn't know a lot about reading articles for or against spanking was enough to change the students minds. But when they were asked to recall, what they believed that the beginning of the study, the students remembered their previous beliefs aligning more closely with their new beliefs than they actually. Did the researchers blame poor meta, cognitive awareness and proposed that people do not monitor changes in beliefs? But rather use the information they have on hand in the moment to reconstruct their previous beliefs. Of course, this study only looked at an issue that the students didn't feel strongly about and didn't have much knowledge in. It's probable that people will be less affected when they believe something more strongly or when they're experts on a certain issue, confirming those ideas, we'll take more research. But in the meantime, be aware of your mind shortcomings, you might be more easily. Persuaded than you think before we wrap up. We want to give a special shout out to Muhammed Jaffa's, Dr Mary Yancey, who were executive producers for today's episode thanks to their generous support on patriotic. Thank you.

Hanes grand valley state university Dr Mary Yancey Muhammed Jaffa executive two months
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"We got a listener question from men who writes, we have hand dominance and dominant, s- do we also have ear dominance. Great question. Men short answer. Yes, you do. Have a dominant ear. It turns out that most people prefer to listen to speech in their right ear. It's generally believed that your dominant ear is correlated with a side of your brain that does most of the language. Assessing which in most people is the left side. So the opposite side from your right? Ear both of your ears connect to both sides of your brain. But the signal is a little stronger from a given ear to its opposite brain hemisphere. Scientists have found that when they have people try to hear a word uttered with a background of white noise. They're slightly faster and more accurate when they listened with their right year than with their left. Well, most of those studies were done in a lab. A study from two thousand nine figured this out in a real world environment where hearing would normally be pretty difficult a dance club. The researchers approached one hundred sixty different people in an Italian dance club and mumbled an inaudible meaningless string of syllables is someone said something the unit club that you didn't understand you'd probably turn your head both to signal that you'd like them to repeat themselves. And to better direct your ear to make it easier to hear them. That's exactly what these clubbers did the scientists recorded which year they offered after asking them for a cigarette. I mean they had to say something fifty eight. Percent of the clubbers offered their right ear and forty two percent offered their left in another experiment. The researchers just asked people for a cigarette in either their right or their left ear and got significantly more cigarettes from the right sided requests. Still, this is just when it comes to hearing, the information content of speech for most people. The left ear is better at discriminating more musical elements like pitch timbre and loudness in the end it all works together. Thanks for your question. If you have a question, send it in to podcast at curiosity dot com. In fact, we're running a little low. So I really couldn't use more questions from the audience again that Email address is podcast at curiosity dot com before we wrap up, we want to give a special shout out to Mohammed Jaffa's, and Dr Mary Yancey, who are executive producers for today's episode. Thanks to their generous support on patriots..

Dr Mary Yancey Mohammed Jaffa executive forty two percent
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

08:52 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Why do we run or walk into each other sometimes and seemed to make the same movement in sync with each other? Great question Muhammed. I think we all know that awkward experience of walking down the sidewalk and darting. Right than left, then right to avoid an oncoming pedestrian. And then if that pedestrians into dad jokes, they go shallower dents, and then it's even weirder. But why does this happen in the first place? It mostly comes down to a sort of unwritten contract. We all agree to as we make our way down the sidewalk back in the nineteen seventies, there was an explosion of research into pedestrian traffic. And as a result, scientists were able to quantify some of the unconscious rules that city-dwellers followed. To avoid collision. There are few obvious ones. Like stated the right unless you're somewhere like Australia or New Zealand and you walk on the left, but there, some surprising ones to like one study found this subtle, but complicated combination of body angle. And I contact that has to take place multiple times for two pedestrians to avoid one another, and another study found that when people need to squeeze past each other. They'll do it differently based on their gender men tend to face toward the oncoming pedestrian while women tend to face away, another researcher found that an oncoming pedestrian needs to be at least seven feet or two meters away for someone to accurately, judge their speed and direction and get out of the way in time and some pedestrians start to evade a collision from his far away, as seventeen feet or five meters culture plays a part in this, too, since people in some countries maintain a larger bubble of personal space than in others. If any of these unwritten rules is broken. You're stuck figuring out how to avoid each other last minute, even if you do see each other. Seven feet away a walking speed of three miles an hour gives you only a second and a half to make the right adjustment. And if one of us is wrong, you'll end up trying to pass in the same direction again, and again and again, thanks for

Monica l Smith Hamer Muhammed UCLA Mohammed Jaffa professor Cody Goff Saleh Westwood One Mt southern England CEO Mary Yancey executive researcher
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

10:25 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Is there a limit to how much we can? No, great question. John. This is actually a pretty contentious topic in neuroscience circles, you'd think that since the brain is a physical organ. It must have some limit to how much knowledge it can store. I mean, a brain only has about one hundred. A billion neurons after all if the brain acted like a computer hard drive and only let you store a single unit of information in each of those neurons you'd run out of room pretty fast, but that's not actually how memory works instead memories and information or stored in the connections between neurons neurons, send out little branches that connect with branches from other neurons at a junction known as a synapse when you recall the capital of Luxembourg or where you parked your car. That's thanks to signals flowing across this connection from wonder onto the next sometimes continuing over entire networks of neurons and get this each of your one hundred billion neurons can make thousands of those connections with thousands of other neurons, which can make thousands more themselves. So how does that translate into the memory capacity of the human brain that's hard to say since memories don't come an individual bytes like they do on a computer? There are a lot of estimates out there. But even on the low end, it's pretty huge somewhere between one Tara. Bite and two and a half header bytes, by the way. One terabyte is about one thousand gigabytes and one pedal bite is one thousand terabytes it's a lot. But in reality. It's kind of useless to even talk about the brain's memory capacity in terms of a hard drive. Many regions of the brain are involved in many different memories at the same time while other regions aren't used for memory storage at all, but at least for practical purposes, there doesn't seem to be a limit on the brains overall capacity. There are a lot of champion memorisers in memories of ons out there and nobody's ever seemed to have found the brain's memory limit. But there is a limit to your short term memory, the part of your memory that only holds onto information for few minutes at a time that limit is seven most people can hold onto seven units of information before they start to forget

Ashley Hamer Damon Kirk engineer John writer Cody gov MIT press Westwood One Archer Miller Luxembourg Mike Dr Mary Yancey executive one thousand gigabytes one thousand terabytes One terabyte
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

10:25 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Gotta listener question from John on Twitter who wrote on your March fourteenth episode. You mentioned we always have room in our brains for more knowledge. I know it wasn't meant to be a statement of fact when you set it, but it got me thinking is there a limit to how much we can? No, great question. John. This is actually a pretty contentious topic in neuroscience circles, you'd think that since the brain is a physical organ. It must have some limit to how much knowledge it can store. I mean, a brain only has about one hundred. A billion neurons after all if the brain acted like a computer hard drive and only let you store a single unit of information in each of those neurons you'd run out of room pretty fast, but that's not actually how memory works instead memories and information or stored in the connections between neurons neurons, send out little branches that connect with branches from other neurons at a junction known as a synapse when you recall the capital of Luxembourg or where you parked your car. That's thanks to signals flowing across this connection from wonder onto the next sometimes continuing over entire networks of neurons and get this each of your one hundred billion neurons can make thousands of those connections with thousands of other neurons, which can make thousands more themselves. So how does that translate into the memory capacity of the human brain that's hard to say since memories don't come an individual bytes like they do on a computer? There are a lot of estimates out there. But even on the low end, it's pretty huge somewhere between one Tara. Bite and two and a half header bytes, by the way. One terabyte is about one thousand gigabytes and one pedal bite is one thousand terabytes it's a lot. But in reality. It's kind of useless to even talk about the brain's memory capacity in terms of a hard drive. Many regions of the brain are involved in many different memories at the same time while other regions aren't used for memory storage at all, but at least for practical purposes, there doesn't seem to be a limit on the brains overall capacity. There are a lot of champion memorisers in memories of ons out there and nobody's ever seemed to have found the brain's memory limit. But there is a limit to your short term memory, the part of your memory that only holds onto information for few minutes at a time that limit is seven most people can hold onto seven units of information before they start to forget

Ashley Hamer Damon Kirk engineer John writer Cody gov MIT press Westwood One Archer Miller Luxembourg Mike Dr Mary Yancey executive one thousand gigabytes one thousand terabytes One terabyte
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"What's a second? Someone couldn't have just made a moving object look at ticking hand and a and said sixty ticks is one minute and sixty minutes is an hour and so on. So who decided what a second is? Well, before we divided time into seconds. We divided time into days and hours historians credit. The Egyptians with being the first to divide the day into equal parts while the counting system. We're familiar with his base ten you have ten fingers after all the ancient Egyptians had a base twelve system. They counted on their finger joints using their thumbs a pointer, cool, right? As a result, they divided the day into twelve parts and the night into twelve parts, which we know from seeing the sun dials. They left behind the subdivision of each hour into sixty minutes in each minute into sixty seconds started. With the Babylonians who had a base sixty counting system. You are gonna be counting to sixty using body parts, of course, but that's does have mathematical advantages. I don't have time to get into. Anyway, that definition of a second a sixtieth of a sixtieth of twenty fourth of a day or one eighty six thousand four hundred of the average solar day, which is the time. It takes the sun to come back to the same place in the sky continued to be the standard measure of a second until the twentieth century. See the average solar day actually changes length. So this definition wasn't exact enough for science. So in one thousand nine hundred they were like, okay instead of making it a fraction of the average solar day will make it a fraction of the specific solar day on January first nineteen hundred well that didn't really help things. You can't exactly go back and measure the length of that day. Still that definition lasted until nineteen sixty seven when the second got really specific scientists used their knowledge of the atom. To define a second. As get ready. Nine billion one hundred ninety two million six hundred thirty one thousand seven hundred and seventy periods of the radiation for a cesium one thirty three atom wolf that sounds way more complicated than counting to sixty on your body parts, I know, but scientists can make that measurement anywhere anytime, regardless of the amount of daylight this time of year, and that's key for ideal precision. A scientists has to be able to check their measurements in the lab not against some abstract concept like how long the day was in one thousand nine

Adams Ashley Hamer Mohammed chiffon Cody Goff Thatcher Muhammed Westwood One executive producer Lear engineer Mary Yancey executive Gibbs sixty minutes twenty seven hundred years sixty seconds one minute
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"To hear something trippy? You're almost completely made up of empty space. In fact, a lot of the matter around us is empty space as in ninety nine point nine nine nine nine nine nine nine percents of all the matter around us. It's a lot of nine so wild. Here's the deal. Everything around us is made up of atoms tiny particles with a nucleus surrounded by electrons. These tiny particles are filled with energy, but they are surrounded by quite a bit of empty space. If you took the empty space out of every human on earth, you can compress the entire human population down to an object. Smaller than a sugar cube. Obviously, though things still feel solid right? The headphones you're wearing the car you're driving in the thing. You're standing or sitting in right now. And that's because of what's in that empty space. See Adams aren't stagnant particles. They're filled with energy and surrounded by electrons that are constantly buzzing around in a sort of cloud. No, two electrons can exist in the same space at the same time. That means that if you wanted to try and walk through a wall, which again is mostly empty space. You're electrons and the walls electrons would have to exist in the same space. So that's why it's impossible. Here's another way to think of it picks a fan with rapidly spinning blades, there could still be a lot of empty space between those blades, but it stays the same size the space between the blades doesn't change in volume. But it does change in position. And it does so really quickly. So if you stick your hand in there, you're going to get whacked by the fan Adams work the same way the orb. Getting electrons resist being pushed out of their orbits. That's why the empty space inside atoms can't be filled with other atoms. There's one more reason why you can't fit one atom into another atom though, and that comes down to quantum mechanics, our favorite topic. Here electrons are noticed point sources or a source of energy that has a negligible dimension. This means electrons have no volume, but they do have a wave function whose energy occupies the space, and thanks to the laws of quantum mechanics that wave function doesn't just occupy one point. It's everywhere in the empty space at the same time. Basically that means that if you're gripping your phone or your steering wheel right now, you're not actually touching it. What you're feeling and interpreting as touch is actually just the electromagnetic force from the electrons and your Adams pushing back against the electrons in that objects atoms. And yes, this means you've never actually touched anything in your life. You're actually floating just above the chair you're sitting on thanks to incredibly small. All electromagnetic forces isn't physics fun.

Adams Ashley Hamer Mohammed chiffon Cody Goff Thatcher Muhammed Westwood One executive producer Lear engineer Mary Yancey executive Gibbs sixty minutes twenty seven hundred years sixty seconds one minute
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Designed to absorb or cope with lightning strikes in the air. If so why do airports stop planes? If there's lightning in the area. Interesting question, Luke. Yes. Airplanes are designed to cope with lightning strikes. In fact, it's estimated that every airplane in the United States. Is struck by lightning at least once every year. So if they weren't airlines would be in trouble. If the aircraft hole is made of aluminum as it is on most legacy planes, you hardly need extra protection. That's because as we mentioned in our story. A while back about putting metal in the microwave. Metal is a good conductor of electronically. That's what you want in a lightning storm something that electrons can pass through easily as a result when lightning hits a metal airplane it flows along the exterior usually without affecting much inside. But that's an older airplanes newer planes, use newer composite materials, and those aren't good conductors of electricity. That means that electrons that strike them tend to move more slowly, which means they can heat up the molecules within them and start fires to help. Protect those planes manufacturers will we've a thin metallic mesh into the skin of the craft which makes it a better conductor of electronically. Other protection measures include connecting the engine with electrical. Grounding straps. Putting shields over electrical wiring, and adding metal divert or strips that can lead in electrical charge away from delicate areas. But the question remains if they put all this work into protecting planes from lightning. Why do they keep planes from taking off if there's lightning in the air? Well, it's kind of like wearing a seatbelt in a car. Sure that seatbelt can protect you in case of a crash, but it's really best. If you can avoid a crash entirely by slowing down and keeping your eyes on the road intense. Lightning strikes can still damage an airplane. So airlines treat lightning storms as a better safe than sorry situation. Thanks for your question. Luke four we wrap up. We want to give a special shout out to doctor Mary Yancey and Mohammed Jaffa's who we'd like to credit as executive producers for today's episode. Thanks to the generous support on patriot. Thank you so much. Join us again tomorrow for the ward winning curiosity daily. And learn something new and just a few minutes. I'm Cody gov, and I'm Ashley Hamer state curious. On the Westwood One podcast network.

Luke Cody gov Westwood One United States Ashley Hamer Mary Yancey Mohammed Jaffa executive
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

08:38 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Nathan Peter Cody gov Twitter Mike Eliana Hamer dominos Carl Zimmer lack of remorse Mendel university of Kansas Mayes luck hall hall Mary Yancey Ashley Jeffrey hall researcher Kevin Dutton
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Sometimes right after I fallen asleep. You know, the window when you're not quite asleep. You're not quite awake either. I'll have a muscle spasm somewhere on my body. It's random the will make me jerk semi violently which wakes me up. I'm wondering what causes those spasms? And why are they always worse when you're overtired? Great question. Angela. It turns out that this is such a common phenomenon that it has an official name the hip, Nick jerk. According to the national sleep foundation as many as seventy percent of people have experienced this at some point. Unfortunately, we don't actually know exactly what causes a hip knee jerk. It's possible that as your muscles, relaxing, your brain nods off and loses track of its surroundings, the occasional nerve misfires resulting in a twitch. Another theory goes the evolutionary route. Maybe when our ancestors lived in trees drifting off to sleep signaled, the imminent danger of falling to the ground. And so that violent jerk help keep them safe. A third theory says it's a conflict between the part of your brain that's falling asleep and the part of your brain. That's still awake. You don't fall asleep all at once and sometimes wakefulness can put up a fight by overreacting and giving your muscles. A sudden jerk whatever the cause there are ways to keep hip Nick jerks at bay if they're causing you trouble stimulants like caffeine, alcohol and Adderall have been linked to a higher frequency of hip, Nick, jerks and stressing anxiety don't help either. So really the best way to fight them is also the best way to get better sleep work to reduce your stress cut down on stimulants. And maybe keep your phone out of your bedroom for good measure,

Nick jerk Angela Westwood One Cody Goth Hamer official Mary Yancey executive producer caffeine Adderall seventy percent
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

heart cancer Europe brain cancer American Cancer Society Leeann Cody colon cancer Cody Goth Swiss Alps Iceland Middle East mayo clinic Ashley Asia Dr Mary Yancey scientist China executive producer journal of the American Medica Senate
"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Oh, yeah. No. That was even hooking. You didn't do that Stephen hawking? Yeah. Do you know what the scene was? No. This is amazing. Stephen hawking appeared in the season finale of season, six of Star Trek the next generation in one thousand nine hundred three and he appeared as himself because Lieutenant Commander data created a holiday program in which he plays poker. With Stephen hawking Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein. Guess who wins the hand of cards who after he bluffs, Albert Einstein? Stephen hawking the hand of cards, at least he wants something in fiction. So even though he lost these bets he beat the Isaac Newton Albert Einstein data in a game of cards. Amazing amazing. I was really excited throw this in. We're gonna listener question from Aden. Who asks when you're driving down the highway, and you open a window. There's a head pounding thud the third sound now to combat this. You just open a second window the second one only needs to be opened a bit to solve the problem. What is going on great question? Aiden? Basically, you've turned your car into a giant flute? So when a flute player blows a stream of air over the whole in the mouthpiece the air strikes. The far edge of the hole in creates a pressure wave that moves through the air molecules and the flute itself to create a tone. That's all sound is a pressure wave. The same thing happens to your car window when it's open the air whooshing by strikes. The back edge of the window and creates a constant pressure wave inside the car. The difference is that your car is much bigger than a flute. So the tone is a lot lower. Instead of a musical note. It's more like a deep throbbing against your eardrums. Scientists call this phenomenon. Helm Holtz resonance the reason opening another window help. Solve the problem is that it creates a whole new pressure wave that interferes with that perfect resonance. So all you hear is wind. Thanks for your question. Aden before we wrap up wanting to give a special shout out to one of our patrons for supporting our show to this episode is brought to you by Dr Mary Yancey who gets an executive producer credit for her generous support on patriotic. Thank

Stephen hawking Albert Einstein Isaac Newton Albert Einstein Aden Isaac Newton Dr Mary Yancey Aiden Holtz Commander executive producer
"mary yancey" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"mary yancey" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Because with a bit imagine nation johnny delay you can fly marianne daddy packed into the car mary asked dads candy land is how far dad acid mary there is no such blaze you see mary yancey dad tap say mosul me issue favorites it doesn't matter how account ooh approves grew you can't sue hmm ooh hmm twenty years later download the cia on man mary where the candy was so he asked for number and then he had to say go the g is a long way and captain john was scheduled to fly fastforward to use and they're baby was due john mary all their dreams came through and john jeez mary why is laura i think it will be mary answered hannett saw tap sarah amosal me far favorites it doesn't matter how alive okay his prince so you can too mm ooh yeah mm hey how i have ghosts thumbs i'm good job that's just one of your five incredibly talented and beautiful children shoot for the stars faith and you can fly that's right you know what i gotta say that's what that has taught this family we can do anything and degrade sample of that i think we've done it together yet guys literally have flown all over the world on a cave for wet weather that rv or whatever you guys have definitely done that and your life experience i know you pour into also all the the research that happened to make balance of nature a reality and changing lives the way it is and it's not just here say it's what people are experiencing on a daily basis thank you charity for that beautiful i beautiful beautiful song you're very welcome don't go away sd.

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