14 Burst results for "Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley"

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

10:26 min | Last month

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Hello and welcome to misinformation Trivia, podcasts for ladies and gents Love Cool Trivia and sticking it to annoying teams of pop quiz. Time Lauren and I'm Julie Julia I back in the New York grew. Part of the song I need. To. Yeah back we. So if you've been listening to lately, you'll realize that we recorded a lot of episodes. Around the springtime we had to take take a little bit of time off this summer. For various reasons. Sure. Yeah. I had to watch a lot of Cougar town. Yes. that was important. What else happened the Filler I became a person that likes caramel and Cheddar popcorn mixed. I didn't know that I was one of those people I is the first time here. Yes. There's that. Are you know I know there's another human in my house now yes you have very cute. But requires a lot of attention. Yes for those of you who don't know Julia had a baby. And we didn't miss it. We didn't talk about it all. So it's not like you're like, oh no, they said secret clues then we had to piece together and no no. Was Not mentioned, but now we have a new little Miss Little Mesh Information. Yup. Her name is eleanor. She's very cute. She's very cute. She's asleep right now which is why we're able to this. Yeah. There's going to be a lot of maneuvering around her particular as well, and Steve has offered to come over to be punky steer fish and hold her and warm her up and put her to sleep while while while we do the business of this our business. So yeah, many congratulations to Julia. And I'm very excited to be. An aunt although I've insisted that my name is just Lauren. Like on key Steve and Lauren are. Going to be major envisages. Has Three ints Lauren. Yeah. So I'm just I called just Lord. Wow okay. It's not gonna be confusing it all. Now she can come up with the nickname for me I don't care. Whatever whatever? Yes. Super. So we're recording again. We're finally back together. It's Great It feels good I feel good. It was nice to do research again some strange reason was kind of like this feels nice. After Eight weeks of just holding a baby. My hands forgot how to type I actually did struggle make really for this episode yeah. Mo Modern Practice Well hopefully. It'll feel like riding a bike. Yeah, exactly. Well, I? mean we met a smoke to it. Yeah. Sure. Let's just jump right in. It's your episode exactly this. So I've been reading a lot of a lot of like this little trailblazer You can be anything books to my eight week old child in realized that I. Actually, know a lot about feminist literature. To. Reading some of these books to her that I figured I should know and do they make reference to eight children SPA. Little Betty Freidan she. Very cute little cartoon I love Yeah. So I realized that this would be a great topic for us to cover on this podcast because. No shaded Alta Trivia podcast but I don't think any of them are going to cover this. Oh, you don't think are triviality brothers. Did it a whole episode? High brothers I don't think our brothers. Are. GonNa do a feminist as the embassy episode. You know they could surprises. Yeah. That's true. They've surprised us in the past that they were going to do a whole episode on seminal feminist texts which actually I think about it shouldn't use the word seminal it goes against everything about. Ova. Pazder no. Know. How it legally blonde when they're like, I I got the school to change the name semester to over Sir that's what I think of now that's very good. Yeah. We'll. We'll figure it out seminal it'll be. Over over mole. Workshops. Grab Initiative. Fine. Yeah so this week from me here getting the problem that has no name. Feminist literature. All right. If we were going to cover just like feminism assure general, we would be here. Forever I'm sure there's already a podcast that that covers that folks I'm sure. So we're not trying to reinvent the wheel here. No. Quick definition. Feminism is a range of social movements, political movements in ideologies that aim to define establish in achieve the political economic, personal and social equality of the sexes. Feminism incorporates the position that society's prioritize the male point of view and that women are treated unjustly within those societies Charles for Ya who is a utopian socialist in French philosopher. He's the one that's credited with having coined the word FEMA KNEES MMA in. Thirty seven. So, modern Western, feminist history is conventionally split into three time periods or waves. So you'll typically hear them referred to as that Each of them has slightly different aims based on the prior progress that was made during the wave before. I wave feminism is the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that was focused on overturning legal inequalities, particularly addressing issues of women's suffrage. Second wave feminism is the nineteen sixty s and nineteen eighties that broaden the debate to include cultural inequalities gender norms in the role of women in society, and then third wave feminism. The nineteen ninety s to the thousands that refers to the diverse strains of feminist activity. So third wavers are see this as a continuation of the second wave in also as a response to the perceived failures out of the way before it. So I guess we're right outside third wave right now I think we're moving into the fourth wave interesting, which can't be defined until after it's passed exactly exactly a you. Hey I know my history man you know what I'm talking about or woman. Watch out I should say I WANNA point out as part of that definition. feminism is not women are better than men no absolutely not and it's still maintains to this day. It's about Equality Ackley. So exactly that's all I wanted to point. For our listeners great segue. Lauren. So seminaries literature, it can be fiction or nonfiction or drama or poetry that supports the feminine schools of establishing, defining and defending equal civil, political, economic, and social rights for women. So we're GONNA. Cover. Ten important feminist. Pieces of. Very excited that everyone should know. Great and we'll go in chronological order for me So the first we're GONNA talk about is a vindication of the rights of woman with strictures on political and moral subjects by. One, craft from seventeen ninety two. So this is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy it was published in the United Kingdom Mary wollstonecraft responded to th century educational and political theorist who believe that women should not receive a rational education. It was believed at the time that women were too susceptible to sensibility and too fragile to be able to think clearly. So not able to be. The recipient of a rational education. Sure. Sure. Sure. So craft argued that women's education should match their position in society in that they are essential to the nation because they raise its children and could act as respected companions to their husbands then yeah So Wall Street, maintain that women are human beings deserving of the same fundamental rights as men and that treating them as ornaments or property for men undermines the moral foundations, a society which how about that you think You'd think that people any rational person would be like, yeah. That makes sense treat women as human beings. Sure. But the fact that there was such vitriol against this concept is like my to me but it was seventeen, ninety two that was like, yeah. Put it into writing and people are like. Dr. So her work had significant impact on advocates for women's rights in the nineteenth century particularly, the eighteen forty eight Seneca falls convention that produce the Declaration of sentiments which laid out the aims of the suffragette movement. In the United States Mary Wilson Craft her name might be familiar. She is the mother of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. And she actually died eleven days after giving birth to Mary wollstonecraft shelley. So Mary wollstonecraft was like she was this great feminist philosopher great writer, her husband was super. Supportive. And she died in childbirth which. was killed a lot of women. Yeah. Septicemia man because men who were only allowed to be doctors. Refuse to treat women because of all of their naughty bits, nobody washed their hands. Oh Yeah. Nobody we should really point out. Yes. No one wash their hands that probably cost a lot of issues too. So we're jumping ahead into the twentieth century second, we're GONNA talk about a room of one's own by. Virginia. Woolf. was published in one thousand, twenty nine. So that's an extended essay that was first published in September nineteen twenty nine it's based on two lectures that Virginia Woolf delivered in October nineteen. Twenty. Eight and Newnham College and Girton College which or the women's colleges at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom so the. Title of the Essay Remove Unsown comes from Woolf's conception that quote A..

Lauren Julie Julia Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Steve New York Mary wollstonecraft Virginia Woolf Cougar town Septicemia United Kingdom Mary wollstonec Betty Freidan Virginia eleanor Charles Grab Initiative Newnham College University of Cambridge United Kingdom United States FEMA
Feminist Literature

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:20 min | Last month

Feminist Literature

"This week from me here getting the problem that has no name. Feminist literature. All right. If we were going to cover just like feminism assure general, we would be here. Forever I'm sure there's already a podcast that that covers that folks I'm sure. So we're not trying to reinvent the wheel here. No. Quick definition. Feminism is a range of social movements, political movements in ideologies that aim to define establish in achieve the political economic, personal and social equality of the sexes. Feminism incorporates the position that society's prioritize the male point of view and that women are treated unjustly within those societies Charles for Ya who is a utopian socialist in French philosopher. He's the one that's credited with having coined the word FEMA KNEES MMA in. Thirty seven. So, modern Western, feminist history is conventionally split into three time periods or waves. So you'll typically hear them referred to as that Each of them has slightly different aims based on the prior progress that was made during the wave before. I wave feminism is the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that was focused on overturning legal inequalities, particularly addressing issues of women's suffrage. Second wave feminism is the nineteen sixty s and nineteen eighties that broaden the debate to include cultural inequalities gender norms in the role of women in society, and then third wave feminism. The nineteen ninety s to the thousands that refers to the diverse strains of feminist activity. So third wavers are see this as a continuation of the second wave in also as a response to the perceived failures out of the way before it. So I guess we're right outside third wave right now I think we're moving into the fourth wave interesting, which can't be defined until after it's passed exactly exactly a you. Hey I know my history man you know what I'm talking about or woman. Watch out I should say I WANNA point out as part of that definition. feminism is not women are better than men no absolutely not and it's still maintains to this day. It's about Equality Ackley. So exactly that's all I wanted to point. For our listeners great segue. Lauren. So seminaries literature, it can be fiction or nonfiction or drama or poetry that supports the feminine schools of establishing, defining and defending equal civil, political, economic, and social rights for women. So we're GONNA. Cover. Ten important feminist. Pieces of. Very excited that everyone should know. Great and we'll go in chronological order for me So the first we're GONNA talk about is a vindication of the rights of woman with strictures on political and moral subjects by. One, craft from seventeen ninety two. So this is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy it was published in the United Kingdom Mary wollstonecraft responded to th century educational and political theorist who believe that women should not receive a rational education. It was believed at the time that women were too susceptible to sensibility and too fragile to be able to think clearly. So not able to be. The recipient of a rational education. Sure. Sure. Sure. So craft argued that women's education should match their position in society in that they are essential to the nation because they raise its children and could act as respected companions to their husbands then yeah So Wall Street, maintain that women are human beings deserving of the same fundamental rights as men and that treating them as ornaments or property for men undermines the moral foundations, a society which how about that you think You'd think that people any rational person would be like, yeah. That makes sense treat women as human beings. Sure. But the fact that there was such vitriol against this concept is like my to me but it was seventeen, ninety two that was like, yeah. Put it into writing and people are like. Dr. So her work had significant impact on advocates for women's rights in the nineteenth century particularly, the eighteen forty eight Seneca falls convention that produce the Declaration of sentiments which laid out the aims of the suffragette movement. In the United States Mary Wilson Craft her name might be familiar. She is the mother of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. And she actually died eleven days after giving birth to Mary wollstonecraft shelley. So Mary wollstonecraft was like she was this great feminist philosopher great writer, her husband was super. Supportive. And she died in childbirth which. was killed a lot of women. Yeah. Septicemia man because men who were only allowed to be doctors. Refuse to treat women because of all of their naughty bits, nobody washed their hands. Oh Yeah. Nobody we should really point out. Yes. No one wash their hands that probably cost a lot of issues too.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Mary Wollstonecraft United Kingdom Mary Wollstonec Septicemia Charles Fema United States Mary Wilson Seneca Falls Lauren
"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:10 min | 2 months ago

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"J News time is something 41 sharing a birthday on this 30th of August with Olympic gold medal skier Jean Claude Killy 77 years old. Comedian Lewis Black actually had photos on social media of him on a boat vacationing in the Western Upper peninsula earlier this summer. He's 72 years old today. Cameron Diaz is 48 Lisa Ling's 47. And tennis player and erotic turns 38 years old today. It was on this date in 17 97. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, the creator of Frankenstein, was born in London. August 30th 1967 when the Senate confirmed the appointment of Thurgood Marshall as the first black justice on the U. S Supreme Court in 1983 Guy in as Blue for Junior became the first black American astronauts to travel in space aboard the challenger. It was in 1993 on this date. The late show with David Letterman premiered on CBS television 1997 Americans received word of the car crash in Paris that claimed the lives of Princess Diana and her boyfriend, Dodi if I eat in their driver, Anny Paul Five years ago, the White House announced President Obama would change the name of North America's told this mountain peak from Mount McKinley to Denali, bestowing the traditional Esca native name on the eve of the historic presidential visit. To Alaska and in Michigan history in 1905. On this day tied, Cobb played his first game for the Detroit Tigers and 24 years as a major league ball player with the Tigers and the Philadelphia A's Tom had a career 3 67 batting average scoring over 2200 runs and was the game's leader in hits until Pete Rose broke that record in the 19 eighties, arguably best season in 1911, leading the league in every offensive category, except for home runs batting for 20. It was the first player inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1936, and he was also a shrewd businessman is Cobb would haggle every year with Detroit management over contracts and he invested his earnings wisely, primarily in stock, and GM and Coca Cola. To become baseball's first millionaire. W W J NEWS time. 7 44 With sports Coming up Next. The.

Jean Claude Killy Cobb Detroit Tigers Lewis Black gold medal Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Cameron Diaz Western Upper peninsula Thurgood Marshall Coca Cola David Letterman Anny Paul Five tennis Lisa Ling Princess Diana Mount McKinley CBS Pete Rose London
"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Coronavirus Daily Briefing

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

07:03 min | 3 months ago

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Coronavirus Daily Briefing

"Welcome to the good news ride home for Monday July, twenty, seven, two, thousand and twenty I'm Jackson Bird look at a promising hand-held robotic mobility! Aid For vision impaired people how people kept cool. We're like you know stayed alive. During heatwaves before air conditioning as well as the year that the world's skipped summer, how animal crossing helped returned a lost nintendo switch to its owner and the latest way that Sports Leagues are filling their empty stadiums. Here are some of the cool things from the news today. The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades.

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris review Geneva New England nintendo Frankenstein Savannah Baron Carl Dreyer Savannah Georgia New York Mid West Geneva Villa Indonesia Atlantic
The Year Without a Summer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

06:24 min | 3 months ago

The Year Without a Summer

"The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris Review Geneva New England Frankenstein Savannah Savannah Georgia Baron Carl Dreyer New York Geneva Villa Mid West Indonesia North America Atlantic United Kingdom
"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

The Astrology Podcast

19:34 min | 6 months ago

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

"As he described his confrontation with the unconscious and By releasing the Red Book we actually have taxed that allows us to make the call the judgment of what seemed to be going on for him and rather than biographers surmising based on a lack of material. So I think it's been really important that it was released to fill in the picture as the editor Sony Sean Dasani has said it's Yong's questioning of his own sanity. Dat is a mark of sanity that he is aware of what is happening to him. At a level where he still able to be rational and reflexive upon it and actually analyze it and come to deep psychological understanding not only of south things that are applicable to other people may not see extraordinary things that his psychological theories that do have so much grounding and these experiences are widely applicable to others understanding our own psychological processes. Okay that makes sense and when his break with Freud was just like a few years before that right am I remembering the time line correctly where those in the early nineteen teens? Yeah it was That's exactly right that so He the break with Freud. Was I think right around? Nineteen twelve might even actually have been in nineteen thirteen because what instigated. The break was a was young's book which is now published as symbols of transformation. Just remembering the German title right now. Which is von Neumann Symbolic Veto which was published in two volumes in nineteen eleven nineteen twelve and. That really was his. That was his own break in terms professionally in terms of differentiating. His theories from Freud's saying that the Libido is more than just sexuality deliberation was creative psychic like like force and so that led to the schism between corden young and very quickly on the heels of that he then went in taste descent. Which I do think the break with Freud was part of what led to it. I mean just professional ostracization and so on but also that it's more than just the break with floyd. It's what's happening the collective. I think. That's where actually the astrological perspective can be so helpful. He's tapped in in a way to the archetypal. Zeitgeist and is feeling DOT SATURN PLUTO ENERGY. Coming in that unleashes in the first World War which so many people did not see coming. That were just took the world by surprise that there were so many different alliances that than triggered a vast conflict that really. Nobody predicted the level of destruction in so many at so many different In so many different forms so and yet young is kind of tapped into that at a psychological level or at an unconscious level. And I think that's what's really pushing through him. That comes through these prophetic visions but like so many prophetic visions. You can't really say what's going to happen from them. Until it's in retrospect. I don't think while I know that he wasn't able to look his vision of the flood in sale. This clearly is gonNA lead to a vast geopolitical global conflict. He thought that this was just something going on in him. Right and here's for those watching the video version. Just to copy of young chart is the staife the birth time right is he like to Aquarius. Rising not seems right to me. This the sun is It might be three but because the sun was right on the descendant but that's very very close okay And you were talking about His son Neptune Square in that being part of what was getting activated as the Sun at Three Leo and Neptune at three Toros. Yeah and so the the honest Neptune at the time was just crossing right over. Neptune conjoining his son on your honest conjoining his ascendant in just completely activating While yeah that's a pretty intense set of transit's either. One of those in it of itself would have been intense but having exactly on the ascendant descendant access and conjuncture sunscreen. Upton at the same time is is a lot it was. It was huge earned completely life-changing for him and then going back to the Conjunction of Saturn and Pluto because that might provide a good transition point into our next topic. What was the range on that or I guess? This is where there's sometimes debates about one of the debates national community is about orbs when a configuration. Our planetary alignment comes into effect. Exactly but what timeframe are you giving for that conjunction timeframe? I'm giving the conjunction using fifteen degree. Orb is about nineteen thirteen through Thank Tina than okay. Let me pull that up. So we're talking about Saturn's Pluto the Saturn Pluto conjunction which eventually went exact in what it looks like early cancer. And it's so young. I Flood Flood. Vision took place on October Seventeenth nineteen thirteen and you can see that sovereign emplo are approaching each other at that point and then were within two degrees when the war was declared right at the end of July nineteen fourteen and so that Saturn Pluto alignment really dominated the first part of the first World War and interestingly. It's the other big alignment that you can see happening. There at the start of the war is that Jupiter you're honest conjunction and so you have both the intense level of destruction of the war starting and also this Jupiter. You're on us kind of naive sense of excitement about it about what it meant and all of these young men signing up to fight in the war and just to give their lives really on behalf of what an idea. Patriotism The Nation. And that you know there were even German English scholars who were studying together in universities Kark Ball see you on the battlefield. And how strange naive that seems And then of course as the war unfolded there was. It was the first Who fought in that? War called it the first war of the machines because this is when technology in terms of the machine gun in terms of tanks and so on had surpassed battle tactics and that the old battle tactics of having a linesmen run across. No Man's land didn't work anymore. They're not running into bayonet fire or arrows. They're running into machine gunfire and into tanks and it just didn't tactics didn't align with the technology and really the war in so many ways ended in demoralisation. And you can see that transit shift actually from the solder Pluto that cataclysmic intensity at the beginning to Saturn Neptune Saturn Neptune alignment in the later years of the war That was really peaking around. Nineteen sixteen during say the battle of the song which is one of the most just kind of heart wrenching battles to read about just a complete failure of imagination on the part of the British generals for example and just young men science being cut short in the mud of trenches and so on and so it carries that kind of Saturn Neptune ceiling of the conjunction there of the demoralization and the lack of imagination and the just saturated in mud and infection and flees them trenches so a big shift in energy in a lot of ways from Saturn Pluto Disaster Neptune. You actually see that. Same Arc in the Second World War which started cataclysmic Louis. Under a Saturn Pluto Square nineteen thirty nine and ended as well under a Saturn Neptune demoralizing transit in the mid forties. I'm so interesting that both world wars carry that pattern. Yes and so. Maybe that's a good transition point into the other topic which is outer planet cycles. And this is something that you spent a lot of time focusing on and started to specialize in to some extent right. Yeah I mean I think that my interest of course outer planetary cycles is definitely informed by the astrological lineage. That I'm carrying coming out of. I mean that's the same perspective that's put forward in house most psyche for example and I think at one point I set myself the task or the goal of wanting to be a humanist semmaris for Outer Planetary Alignments in at least like the last century or so. I don't I haven't it's going you know it it's in process is always the case but it's it's definitely something that. I enjoy being able to kind of feel those rhythms of history. And that's what. I love about Mundane astrology is that instead of history just simply being a series of dates every year has qualitative meaning to it and so it becomes easier to have a handle on what alignments happened at which particular times because a number of me takes on a quality instead of just a quantity. I think that's something that astrologers all experience. Yeah I mean studying. History is really fun when you apply astrology to it because all of a sudden you can see these weird patterns and cyclical movements happening underlying world events. Where if you're looking at it. In a long enough timeframe you can see the connections between the events through the movements of the planets and archetypes manifesting in that way over long periods of time near absolutely one area that that. I found really interesting is when an individual is born under one outer planetary alignment and then some way they come into prominence will really come into their own or create their great work under another alignment of the same planets so no one example that it's kind of a classic example that I like is of Barack Obama who was born in nineteen sixty one the beginning of the year honest Pluto conjunction. And how much you're honest. Pluto conjunction of the nineteen sixties is connected to the Civil Rights Movement for example until the history of your on US Pluto alignments correlate with different stages in the abolitionist movement for example and that Obama than was elected as president in two thousand eight. Right at the beginning of the next alignment of your honest and Pluto. When they came into a square and so worn at the beginning of your honest Pluto conjunction and coming in to prominence being elected president of the United States. Under at the beginning of the next alignment of those seem to planets. Yeah I hadn't noticed this before. But his charts actually similar to young and that he's an aquarius rising with the sun. Urine has conjunction Leo. Just kind of funny. Yeah that's true. And they. They both have a son. Neptune Square as well right with Young's being down early tourists as Neptune in Obama's being bed. Eight degrees of Scorpio on the other end interesting. They both have that kind of a charisma that can come with the sun. Neptune and certainly the capacity to carry on image and projection of a certain kind of image as. Well sure so. What was the so? You're pointing out the year. Ns Pluto conjunction in his chart. And then what was the later transit manifestation that he was elected president of the United States? At in two thousand eight. Right at the beginning of the next alignment of your honest Pluto. So when they move from the conjunction that they were coming into our when he was born and he spent the first decade of his life living under that conjunction and then he's and then he's elected to office right as those same. Two planets are coming into alignment again in in so many ways as the first black president in the United States carrying the promise of the civil rights movement in the nineteen sixties so semantically. There's a connection as well but astrologically to there's that connection. Okay that's really. I love that. That's a really good example Just because of how central that the urine urine as Pluto conjunction was in the nineteen sixties on the civil rights movements and some of the other things that are happening in that decade another example that is also connected to your Pluto. A different you're on. Pluto seem also liberation of oppressed people but instead of African Americans in the United States. It's women and the feminist. Manton Women's movement and if we go back several centuries to Mary wollstonecraft. Who's born in Seventeen Ninety five? She was born with the Ranas Pluto Square and she published her manifesto which was called vindication of the rights of woman in Seventeen Ninety two under the subsequent opposition of your honest and Pluto. That was the same opposition that happened at the same time as the French revolution and this text indication of the rights of women really is kind of the foundational text of European Feminism. And again this theme she was born with your on a square pluto and then publishes this work under your hones- opposite. Pluto. Her daughter actually was born under that. Same you're on. Us opposite Pluto alignment just a few years later. Her daughter is Mary wollstonecraft shelley. Who wrote Frankenstein? Which was published under the next alignment of your honest and Pluto? And there's a relationship between your honest that kind of trickster awakening archetype and Prometheus the the myth of Prometheus and the subtitle of Frankenstein is the modern Prometheus. So you have here. Not just a multi generational pattern of your honest Pluto alignments within one family. But they're also those dealing with different feminist issues. Mary wollstonecraft in a very clear way. Vindication of the rights of women and then Mary Shelley and more may be subtle or creative ways. Calling out the impulse of Dr Frankenstein to create life without a woman that a man can be the modern for media's steel fire still life from the heavens and create a life without the the nurturance of a family context without the feminine outweigh. So that's another one of those patterns that I thought was quite interesting. Sure so so. The underlying principle two but one of them is sometimes people boron under specific alignments especially hard aspects of outer planets. We'll have an important development that represents that at some point leader in their life. When there's a similar alignment especially hard aspect by the same? Two planets horse isn't always the case. Some people will come into greater prominence under a different alignment. But it's maybe you know. Of course they're having their charter. Their transits are being activated. In some way. That's it's just a more complex expression so this isn't a hundred percent consistent pattern but it is quite interesting when it shows up when someone's kind of carrying something maybe on behalf of a generation for example and express that in there being in their work and are raging between these alignments in some way sure In the the second one is that especially outer planet conjunctions will lay the seeds of the foundations of something that will then grow and develop a over the course of that cycle however long..

Neptune Freud United States Civil Rights Movement Neptune Square Mary wollstonecraft president Ranas Pluto Square Barack Obama Dr Frankenstein Mary Shelley Sony editor Sean Dasani corden Yong floyd Upton
"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on The Ralph Report

The Ralph Report

07:13 min | 8 months ago

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on The Ralph Report

"For sure. Great your second one your cap down. I don't think I did one yesterday at all. I owed myself one in eighteen eighteen. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley published her most famous piece of work and idea what book Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley wrote. Eddie Pence Reagan's. Wow you're on fire today Frankenstein. Or the modern Prometheus as it was subtitled verse published on This Day in eighteen eighteen and eighteen fifty-five leader of the bowery boys in New York City William Poole Aka bill the butcher who was buried in Brooklyn a hundred and fifty five. Carriages were in his funeral. Procession and six thousand mourners showed up to very from gangs of New York Zach. Firebombings New York actually think birds by gangs historic movie. Didn't get hurt. I don't believe so. was Daniel Day Lewis. Pay a butcher in that This Day in eighteen sixty nine the west. I learned of the existence of something called a giant panda via French missionary named Armanda. Theed who received the skin from a hunter and they said this giant black and white bearskin. How can that be a thing? And then then the the legend was born giant Panera slops they are and I saw the movie they just they just eat and they wanted him bone near the sea zone. They don't WanNA show 'em panda porn tried to punch him out upset. They don't want to let them die out. They don't WanNa fuck anymore. Diana Pastors all point in eighteen eighty eight. The northeastern United States experienced what was known as the Great Blizzard of eighteen eighty. Eight which makes sense. That was the year it was. It began with three days of constant snow and freezing. Willer up to four feet of snow fell in areas with Snow Drifts exceeding twenty feet shutting down entire cities. Transportat- him that's bad. As much as I miss weather having grown up on the east coast and then moving to Los Angeles years ago there were days. I remember trying to just get anywhere from anywhere was a nice and I I remember. We had snow so bad one time in Virginia. Where we could actually. We were walking around the house. We could step over our fence. Why does and we could. We could walk around and step over the fence. Cool when your kid? That was amazing. No School for like a week. Yes amazing this day in eighteen nineteen Moscow became the capital of Revolutionary Russia. Now of course it is the capital of the American political system. Nineteen twenty two. The Western hockey championships were held. The Regina Capitals Lost in two games to the Vancouver millionaires. That was a great name. 'cause nobody who plays hockey's a millionaire. Veg- I think they're still like the lowest paid professionals to at the least revenue of three or four majors will make sense. Probably I think just you and I watch as about nineteen twenty seven. The first armored car hold up ever. I wonder how long the head had been since they invented the armored car by that debt around US UP. Roll off the lot happened in. Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania figures Pittsburgh. League. Don't talk about that. You don't claim that side of the INS or bad out there in Pittsburgh. Nineteen twenty seven also on this day. The first Golden Glove Tournament was held boxing. Fans also on this day 1927 Samuel Roxy. Rafael opened his famous Roxy Theater in New York City in nineteen fifty three. The first woman army doctor was commissioned. Fm Adams took them a long time to get a female doctor in the army. But she got some shit to all you know it. Oh my God here. Imagine imagine her trying to examine a soldier. What he was saying we're trying to say was not medically cleared. And then when the shit she would get right off her given prostate exam Mica General. No I want a man's finger my that's right and also golfers writes for money with the general also nineteen fifty-eight. Charles Van Doren finally lost on the US TV game. Show twenty one. After winning one hundred twenty nine thousand dollars. It was later revealed. The whole thing was fixed at started a game show. Skin doesn't movie right yeah. Quiz show show. Robert Redford directed. It's really good. Nineteen fifty-eight also think. Charles van. Doren had a bad day when he lost on that game show on this day also in one thousand nine hundred fifty eight. The American B forty seven bomber accidentally dropped a nuclear bomb fifteen thousand feet onto a family home in Mars Bluff South Carolina. My God now the The nuclear capsule was not intact at the time but the bomb did go off leaving a seventy five foot crater that killed them I am leave. Anyone was home at all my gun but still had there been dropped nuclear material inside how they would have nuked the United States. Who's an accident Zack's accidents happen? Nineteen fifty nine on this day. Raisin in the Sun the first Broadway play by a black woman opened rain hands. Very was the author that play. Nineteen Sixty eight Otis. Redding is the first person in the US to posthumously. Received a gold record for his single Sittin on the dock of the bay he recorded. It was a smash hit. Song sold a ton and had a horrible plane accident that took his life dr watching tire spitting on her nineteen seventy-one. Jim Morrison left for Paris to reorient himself. He claimed actually was trying to avoid a jail. Sentence given to him in Miami for political kicked out on stay reorient themselves. You never returned to the. Us He died there in Paris in one thousand nine hundred seventy four. The Rhino records story familiar with Rhino records. This they they started out as a record store back in the day Now they are record label but they had a record store and they were very creative. They're here in Los Angeles and they came up with very funny creative ways to try to get attention and advertising for the store on this day in nineteen seventy four. They offered people anyone who would come down and take home a copy of Danny Bonnici. Solo album would get a nickel. They gave album and they would pay you in nickel if you would take off their hands. We're paying you to take the hours they had a big stack of Partridge Family. Danny Bonnici Solo album. And they couldn't get rid of them so they started to pay people to promote because people have had came in and bought other albums. Of course. That's a great promotion very clever. And if you've ever heard any of Danny Bonnici nineteen seventy four solo album. You guys Dan why they weren't exactly flying off the shelves. Here's a little bit.

United States New York City Danny Bonnici Pittsburgh Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Charles Van Doren Los Angeles hockey Eddie Pence Reagan William Poole Brooklyn Daniel Day Lewis Virginia Armanda Vancouver Moscow Robert Redford boxing Samuel Roxy Theed
"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

15:15 min | 8 months ago

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"Ready to talk some series twelve with my wonderful partner. Time all around wonderful person and One of the coolest people you ever get to meet in the known universe Jesse Jackson. How you doing Jesse I am good. Charles the Tartus is being kind to us today. We're getting we're able to land a little bit closer to the broadcast date than what we've been doing so also known as Jesse schedule kind of was doing better this week. Yes effort for for once Jesse and his wife. Wendy Linda were off on a vacation. That's right and I get to Well deserved vacation. I might add. Thank you and so it was very nice as Charleston. I've talked about. The new GIG is less than five minutes from the House. So used to be with Plano Where I was working. It was a thirty to forty five minute commute home so to to kit at six o'clock Jesse time. Seven o'clock Charleston is tough but now then it's like okay. We almost six thirty your time. So yeah because I know You know some of you have been the little like. Hey where's our episodes because we had a little lax? I know Dave Mackay. Proctor was for one Checked in with us like are you guys. Ok We haven't gotten your episode and So we're like okay. We need the kind of get these going. A little faster so So here at episode. One seventy two. We're GONNA talk the hunting of villa. Do Dadi which aired just a few days ago on February sixteenth twenty twenty. My Dad's eighty fifth birthday which went very very well by the way and Written by maxine alternate Alderson. Excuse me new doctor who directed by Emma Sullivan. Who direct the previous episode. Can you hear me? And this is the eighth episode of series twelve. So one of the things I thought was interesting Charles is. This is not co written by the show runner. Yes and most of the episodes this week this season having co written by him well you know he kind of did that a little bit too although he wrote most of them solo last year but Frank Kinda had his fingers in. It's nothing new Stephen Moffatt kind of used to tack his name on as well. Stephen Moffatt editor. Sometimes I kind of wondered why he got involved because I think some of them some of those stories in the Mafia would I think would have been better without his interference. Meddling but Interaction Yeah I think one of the things we have been told is Chris. Cheblal is doing this more of a traditional. Us Writer's room right where In the past it's been not a writer's room he just Moffitt and Russell t Davies would assign a story to someone this one kind of collaborative and The reality is When you run up when you do a writer's room Everyone kind of helps a little bit on plot and then they assign someone to Actually go ride it so I think this person a pretty good job. Yeah maxine Alderson human. I think in the case of like something like the the fugitive. Je Dune where it was something that was so central to the series two overarching storyline that That makes sense for chip not get involved but here I think he kind of probably. Liz looked at the script and thought it was a very solid script so didn't need him to At anything at least enough to warrant a credit and You know I and I really enjoyed the script and I love the episode. I thought it was a very solid episode. Great doctor who anybody that has had criticisms of of The season in particular You know there's nothing preachy about it. No no message so that old excuse or that the particular complaint doesn't really fly here and You know maybe that's too too why this episode may come off generally better than than some others. What I thought it was really good. I thought it was very creepy. I always like when they do a historical figures And it's that famous Focal focus folklore. Right of you know all these writers being together and and you know who can come up with the scariest story and And they had a little fun with that right right. Oh let's dance the more so I liked it. I liked it a lot. I thought it was Very nice to have the cyberman being involved with the Creator Frankenstein I don't I'm hoping you explain a little bit of the half face. Cyberman not sign that before so I thought that was interesting and Yeah it was just a really good episode solid episode. Yeah so be sure to watch your fucking language just indeed so Yeah I obviously you know on record being a big fan of the doctor who stories so this one was great. It's in my wheelhouse You know very much you know the haunted house hence the title the Haunting Avila. Dod Yeah and You know there's obviously more going on and I think a lot of people were pleasantly surprised. that this trip back through history into history to meet Mary Shelley. Who is the creator of Frankenstein? The classic novel the Classic Novel That it tied in to the upcoming two part season finale essentially the Cyberman and children of time and You know that That it's apparently pretty important to that. So I think a Lotta. Hopefully that kind of pleasantly surprised some people and maybe made this episode a little bit more important as a result. I was pleasantly surprised. I thought it was really well done. And yes good stuff. Good all right Let's run down. Our our guest cast this time. We had Lily Miller as Mary wollstonecraft. Godwin as the you know. The the the unmarried name of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. And you pretty new actress Jake. Jacob Colin Levy played Lord Byron. And you know obviously the the thirteenth Dr Heads Zero time for he played a character named Rufus in a big finish. Seventh Doctor Audio. That just came out not too long ago called an alienware. Wolf in London. And if you're a fan of the miniseries the white princess that aired on Starz not too long ago he was actually Henry. The seventh in so my my wife Lori was Surprise when I mentioned that little tidbit to her because she's a big fan of those. You know the white queen the White Princess and the Spanish Princess series of mini series based on novels Patrick Kane played a shod. The loan cyberman every time they say. Loan Cyberman I WANNA go like you know like you know the I think of the lone ranger cyberman riots. Yes I agree with with a cloud of Nano dust or whatnot and so Anyway so he might be notable. To game of thrones fan because he was the new face of Jacqueline Hagar. The Face Changer. Right. He was the guy that you know when when regard initially said goodbye to Arya He was the face than Jack. Jack and Hogar assumed okay. I did not recognize that I am kind of a little bit obscure US also in the movie. The Star Wars the last Jedi little movie you may have heard of and A little bit more scary movie exorcist. The beginning if you're exorcist Fan Lewis Rayner played. Who Played Percy bish Celli was in the Dracula the two thousand thirteen TV series that aired on NBC the One Chart Star Jonathan. Rhys Meyers. I believe as as Dracula I kind of liked. That show only lasted a season. But I don't think I watched that but it was pretty good. I thought okay. Maxim Baldry played at John Dory Dr Pillory and he was on. Hbo's Rome and he's going to beyond the upcoming Lord of the Rings TV series. Okay so Not sure what characters playing. But apparently he's going to be on that show and not parks play cleric Clermont and She was also in another stars. Miniseries the Spanish princess so so that's our principal. Cast this time. Okay all right I do have a couple things a trivia. Please forget into our main topics. If you're a big fan of fan you might be familiar with the The the the notion that this is not the doctor's first encounter with Mary Shelley because two big finish at least two big finish audio plays involve the eighth Doctor Meeting Mary Shelley Around Eighteen. Sixteen upon where in one of those You know she joined the him briefly as a companion so she was actually one of the eighth doctor audio companions for a brief time very brief time like four audios I think total and one of the audio plays the Silver Turk that was in two thousand eleven involved in meeting Vault doctor and Mary Shelley meeting a damaged Cyberman off which became similar inspiration for Mary. Shelley to write Frankenstein. Okay makes sense so So I don't know if chip no listen to that kind of got the idea but It's kind of a natural enough idea. I guess to make a Cyberman the inspiration for Frankenstein and Maxine altered in Definitely plays that up here in her script but but yeah I guess this continuity because it's TV kind of supersedes big finish audio. So I don't so maybe that that doesn't quite fit into cannon anymore Silverton so that's okay sadly because it was a pretty good one Lord Byron Little Kid Little Trivia on him he was known to tortuously for his promiscuity of course and had to flee London to Lake Geneva prior to eighteen sixteen turns out. Guess what in? They kind of touched on this briefly Not sure if anybody caught it but he's legitimate father to Ada lovelace who the doctor and her companions met way back at the beginning of the season in The spy fall two parter. Yes that's right. I had not connected that but yes they did talk about that so I don't know if that has any importance but but I find it very interesting. Id to that's kind of Nice so just a little bit of Trivia there for okay for anyone that may not know that if you already know that you're smarter than me yes which isn't hard but Yeah just throwing that out there all right three topics this time and actually have a theme. Yes Okay and doing on short notice to all right So topic number one Ozzy Mantius. Oh okay so I'm gonNA throw that out there that there for now and In this topic I want to talk about the doctor. And the FAM- okay. So we have the thirteenth doctor after promising to At the end of can you hear me to bring everybody back to Meet Mary Shelley the crater of Frankenstein. The the doctor Fam- they travel back to Lake Geneva in eighteen. Sixteen year without a summer and show up at The villa dod where Just so happens Mary. Shelley's there with Lord Byron John Dory and Claire Clairmont and bad. I thought you know they had a very funny encounter at the beginning right before the credit started and and get invited in in and So I want to get your thoughts on the doctrine. The FAM meeting there Mary Shelley and then kind of The doctor face to face with and we'll talk about the loan. Cyberman more third sub segment. But I want to get your thoughts on the doctor's perspective on that all right. So my initial gas is either watchmen characters or epic points a theme so just throwing that out there with the first clue. I first off. I loved that the psychic papers didn't work and they made the joke like. Oh maybe they need to be dried out but often we've established geniuses see-through the psychic paper right and so because it did work for William Shakespeare absolutely didn't Shakespeare Coats. Oh yes So I thought that was nice The doctors not dressed very period. -Ly even though the Fam- is You know the doctor kind of universal. The doctor doesn't care the doctors travel. Like I'm just GonNa wear what I want. I want to be instable right. You guys wear the funny clothes. I'm going to be comfortable in my like grey overcoat siegried. Yes or whatever you WANNA call boots. Yes and my doc martens. Yes felt fed a little bit for Graham not being able to fine the privy like..

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Jesse Jackson maxine Alderson Cyberman Charleston Charles Lake Geneva Stephen Moffatt Mary Wendy Linda partner Plano London Writer Mary wollstonecraft alienware Patrick Kane Dave Mackay US
"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

15:31 min | 1 year ago

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"Anime and and Cyborg Siri and so I had done in all my reading of Henry Jenkins and Janice radway and and all those theorists about fan culture and so I had really like I came to with with what I think is was a healthy dose of respect for both you know the tradition of fan fiction and the tradition of carrying on carrying on narrative narrative for people and also understanding that in the intervening years like probably people of their own head Canon of what was happening and I would really just be adding like one story story to this that that I had the privilege of working with a a whole lot of other writers on and having the blessing of the of the the creators and having Tatyana on board and and so I I sort of thought of it thought of it that way and and tried to be you know as respectful as as as they could be. The theme of identity is incredibly strong throughout often black. And it's also touched on in your novel company town. What is it about science fiction? The Healy Sifi that expose gender alongside identity as a whole that makes such powerful and compelling explorations of the the subject. Well I think Science fiction going back to the roots of it going back to two Mary. Wollstonecraft shelley is about. You know the the the beginning of all of this. You Know Science Fiction Frankenstein is about who gets to be human being and what gets to be a human mandy and what gets to be a man and now we sort of have questions about what gender actually is and science fiction is I think the one of the ideal genres for for exploring that. I think that most fiction is about you know what it means to be human being but science fiction takes that extra extra leap and says well how what are the borders of humanity and what are the borders of the things that make us. Human gender is one of those things and so that's always been a fascination of mine and So I think that that a story like orphan black was a good way to has always been been good at sort of looking at the limitations of the human especially in a story where WH- where these clones have their you know actually have their their genome patented in-copyright if they don't have they don't actually have rights to their own bodies which is for me such a story about women in general Not Having rights to to WHO and what they are and not necessarily being recognized as as people Depending on where when you are in in history and in space and and and so in company town I I really tried to also explore that from the perspective of somebody who is the only augmented a a person on a on an oil rig. That is that is full of augmented people. She The protagonist of that novel is the only person who who doesn't have really really a whole lot of augmentation and sort of is the last baseline human on on the rig. Is that what you would be the The lost augmented human. It's I mean it's possible I would probably I. I already have certain augmentation. I already wear glasses already. Take Medication Shen there are. There are things that are already sort of you know that I already uses as prostheses right In a certain way from from sort of Donna. Heroin Cyborg Syria perspective. Those are all prosthetic devices that that alter how I behave As human being and who I am in in relationship other people So there's so there's you know. I already use certain things like that. Depending on how you WanNa read post humanity entity or augmented bodies or or what have you I think that I would be deeply skeptical of of augmentation. I mean today It was either today or yesterday. The news came out that alphabet which is Google's Sort of Larger Company the the larger company. That owns Yahoo Google and facets of Google sidewalk in and whatever And WAYMO had acquired fitbit alphabet has acquired fitbit which means that Google has fitbit which means that Google has For for a lot of people are a growing number of people access to the things that determine their access says to health insurance private health insurance within the United States and so google now has access to that data and I've never owned a fitbit for exactly the reason I knew that eventually You know fitbit data was gonNA get fed until health insurance or fed into actuarial science in some way and you know whether it was a google or Microsoft or a or a facebook or whomever One of these big stacks was gonna it Kinda by it and and or gain access to it in some way and that would not be good for the people wearing those things and so I've always steered away from things like that. I don't have a Smart Watch. I don't I don't wear fitness devices. I don't Have I don't have an in home. Personal Assistant Things like that. I've it it took me years to get a mobile phone Took me years to get a smartphone. I was way behind a lot of other people in that and and it was in part because they could kind of see where you know how would be leveraged against people and so yeah I would probably be one of those Qamrun curmudgeonly curmudgeonly People who who just didn't want to participate or who didn't who didn't see everybody else doing it as a reason to do it. I guess US I find that interesting. I mean it is probably a stereotype to assume that people who are interested in science fiction or SCI FI writers is our into tech and like into the new changing world. But said you know it's quite interesting to to hear from someone who writes Sifi but with it might not be the first adopter Mutek well. I think there's actually kind of tradition of that. I think I mean I think famously. Like William Good Sir. Uh William Gibson composed neuromancer on a typewriter He He proposed the idea of cyberspace from a from a paper in ink medium and and what he said in interviews that. He's glad that he did it that way because if he had if he had written it on a word processor it would destroy. Destroy The magic of of Imagining Cyberspace. So he wanted to be separate from the thing that he was creating in a weird way so that he could still imagine the possibilities of it. His his imagining of what was possible was not `curtains curtailed or constrained by his own personal experience of technology. Oh Gee if he had had to deal with like an incredibly clunky word processing format he might not have had the same opinions as he did as as he was writing the book and so I think that there is something to be said for kind of holding back a little bit. But there's also you know as in my other career you know a look at tech trends all the time so I look at people being early adopters and I look at the purchasing habits of early adopters and what they get out of it but what they get out of it and what I get out of of something very different You know I'm I'm not into constant subscription services for example sample like I I don't you know I don't even get my nails done regularly so the idea that I would be subscribing to to to access you you know to attack thing is even like a whole other bridge to to cross nails I. I caught my nations because I played the piano. Yeah so the nail thing was never going to happen. No like the idea like will you can spend X. amount of dollars for this APP that gets you thus insurgents insurgents like well. You know I don't even do. There are so many things that I just opt out of naturally like. I think it's also just introversion right. It's also just as a species of of introversion but also I mean so In terms of like not having certain things like one I think my dad was. We're always sort of held back on things. We had a Betamax. DCR FOR LOW. You know into the time the DVD's were coming out. We didn't get a DVD player until my dad one one at a work party and And even then it was like we sort of had to crossover But the other thing is that he his job job was he was a sales rep for For companies like Sony Panasonic and others that made closer television surveillance equipment so our house was full of dummy surveillance equipment or or surveillance equipment that wasn't in use and so I had a real a close view of how that technology worked and what the trends were in that technology. And what the what the the what what that people were looking for out of it. And so when I hear about stuff like a Google homer or an echo or a an Alexa whatever you know whatever it is this month or whatever it is this season you know my immediate thought is. Oh Okay so so a thing listening device planted and planted squarely in your your home that you rely on increasingly for for your day to day life a thing that can knock on you. What a great idea? So so I call on this podcast to talk a lot about cliches stereotypes about all like most of the trips that we find most annoying. So do you have any. I mean I was going to say like since we're on the subject of identity An APP particularly kind of like talking about surveillance and people's People's Images online do you have any Like really pet peeves about trump's the continually really crop up in sci-fi that you'd like to see retired well one thing that we talked about We had a long conversation about this In the orphan black back sort of pseudo writer's room in our group chat Was the idea that Government surveillance works perfectly and looks it's really shiny and new and smooth and beautiful You know if you watch your average like CBS cop show or your the average Sort of science fiction movie about the NSA or or or you know a thing with the FBI or or whatever or if you look at something like like minority report or or what. Have you the idea you know. Or if you look at like agents of shield or something like there. There's a science fictional idea that that government technology -nology is easy to use worked perfectly and is beautiful and that is not the case The the deep missile scare that happened in Hawaii for example where where the people of Roy thought that they were the victims of a nuclear attack because of a false alarm that went out. That false alarm mhm went out because the interface that was used during the the drill. It is so old and so- Janke so decrepit and so So basic sick that it was an easy mistake to make from the interface design perspective from the from the user interface perspective and that is the case more often often than not with government systems. I think that people don't understand that all of those. You know technologies go out to tender. They go out for PS and and the winning. RFP's the thing that promises the most for the least money you know and and that's what budget cuts do and that's for all governments that's not the US that's not Canada. That's it's not Britain. It's not Australia. It's it's not China it's it's everywhere and and it's the same in corporate life and actually so this idea that lake that that a that a system that you would be working with Would work perfectly one hundred percent of the time and be smooth and easy to use and also also gorgeous is is ally in. It's one of the things that I really wish we'd get retired or I really wish that the opposite would get experimented with as a as as a fictional trope because it so it's the the opposite is so much more the case and has a lot more storytelling potential. As far as I'm concerned one. That always gets me is the whole zooming in on images and you're like Kay zoom in its old pixelated but then somehow yo computer you too magically just makes it super hi Rez. Yeah from not having those pixels already it just makes it up like how does that work. Well what's funny. Is that like enhance hance. That sort of like you know. The the the the blade runner enhanced function Is something that you know is something I've I've heard lots of people who work in in audiovisual technology is sort of rail against for a very long time. And what's funny is that there are Developers working hang on in photo enhancing technologies now that want to make that real but they need. They're using machine learning to do it and it's really really about a machine. A machine learning algorithm predicting. What else is in the photo based on other information and and it's not about like what the camera actually saw? It's what is predictable based on the other context clues in the image and and and it's it's almost sort of like looking into the dream of what the image is not necessarily. What's actually there? Yeah so a lot of questions about whether or not that would be admissible evidence reliable reliable in any in any way shape or form. Yeah Yeah I mean the other thing for me is a lot of things about machine learning coming and algorithms and all. This kind of thing is that a lot of sci-fi doesn't look at the fact that your data is only as good as what you put in right and you know a lot of these studies going about how if you put racist information into the Algorithm. What you'RE GONNA get out is like racist behavior of the machines and that's something? I don't really think I've seen much offense I fi- which I think would be a nice thing to explore he. I think that I think Angelov. More people are becoming aware of that fact that sort of garbage in garbage out counts for for these systems as well and we had this sort of vision and I was one of these people. I believe that the technology could in theory be neutral and and and then every study proved me wrong like every study sort of proved that that idea wrong that like the the biases of the Creator are replicated in the creation. And that's something that. Has You know that science fiction. Only we've talked about a lot in terms of a story like Frankenstein story about creating artificial intelligence that what we create you know we..

Google fitbit Healy Sifi United States Wollstonecraft shelley Siri Henry Jenkins William Gibson SCI FI Janice radway Heroin Tatyana Sifi WH William Good Angelov Yahoo Donna
"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"It once in a pet store and fell in love with it and it's always always stuck in my head there it is that's like your slumdog millionaire. That's where you had that piece of information from yeah and even even the black ghost knife fish. It's face actually looks a little cat fishy now that I'm working of close but it's weird you'll even faces. Look a little catfish. Yeah we are yeah so these are different than the deals that are in lock ness. Yes those are real those are real eels yeah okay absolutely nothing to do with each other except they both both appeared in this episode of the ESPN and they're both called her heels. All Right Evan gives a quote when any prevailing prejudices this is attacked the wise will consider and leave the narrow minded to rail with thoughtless vehemence at innovation and that was written in by a woman named Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Mary Shelley well a vindication of the rights of women. This is actually actually the mother Oh Clo- Mary Shelley Frankenstein fame so her mother who who who wrote this and who who wrote the book treat US yeah the treatise of indication of the rights of women considered one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy and I'm basically argues that women should have an education commensurate with their position in society and that it's an it's essential for the nation in the nation's best best interest frankly for for to be educated appropriately. I mean seventeen ninety two wow out of her time boy. I tell you well. She was vindicated. I absolutely took a couple of hundred years added right couple century later but it finally caught up but she was one of the first ones in without her. We wouldn't have Frankenstein that is true yeah. It's pronounced Frankenstein uh-huh Tigor then. Isn't it sure all right guys well. Thank you all for joining me this week. Thanks you got him in and welcome back Cara. Thank you STU and until next week this is your skeptics guide to the universe sceptic's Universe is produced by S G productions dedicated to promoting science and critical thinking for more information visit us at Pyschopathic skied dot or send your questions to Info at the skeptics Guy Dot Org and if he would like to support the show and all the work that we do go to the Patriots Dot com slash skeptic skied and.

Mary Shelley Frankenstein Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Ma ESPN Evan Pyschopathic S G hundred years
"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Unfortunately, he latches himself onto a man whose personality is very set. He's very confident. He is Lord Byron he's world famous, and he's absolutely cannibalized by this, man. I mean, he just he aspires to be with the great. He wants his personal physician. He's traveling with him in the monstrosity as they said at the time of Byron's coach, which is a a copy of Napoleon's coach remember this less than a year after Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo in mid June of eighteen fifteen Byron is already. Built a or had built a coach exa- an exact replica of Napoleon's coach and he's traveling around Europe as an exile with us polling. Dory is with him share in the travels, but quickly becomes the butt of of Byron's jokes, and the sort of uneven relationship is something that becomes very diseased with Polidori, but he was a clever man look up online, incredibly handsome fell he'd be an actor today. I guess if you were to be played in a movie, George Clooney a number of years ago when he was just starting out as an actor as a young man, he would have been a wonderful Polidori. I mean, he was that good looking very talented any rights the story when they all go off and the village Edadi and Byron tells them think of your own story, we're gonna come back and share them the story, the Polidori, thanks is the vampire, the A N P Y R A that book is. Published in eighteen nineteen. It's actually very short. I think it only runs about sixty or seventy pages. But it is considered the first treatment of vampirism in English literature in in eighteen nineteen. I would actually dispute that I would say, and I say this all humility because it's not strictly speaking a vampire story. And certainly the word is is never used. But in the poem by Samuel Taylor. College of Christabel from eighteen sixteen there's a relationship between the young woman being fraught with the by ghost basically taking kind of like an incubus taking her life away. And it's been sort of quoted to amperage in a way. So I guess you could sort of in a litter literary way sort of dispute that and say, we'll maybe Christabel the poem by college of eighteen sixteen is actually I example of Amazon in English literature. Be that as it may say Polidori book is novel the vampire eighteen nineteen. Is the first. So we've got that by centennial coming up, and a lot has been written about that that the vampire the Lord ruthven is actually Lord Byron. In fact, people thought it was by Lord Byron many times when you were the author of a book that you knew was going to be somewhat controversial, even scandalous. You did not put your name to it or the publisher wouldn't put your name on it. And that's what happens with policy, you'll see a first addition of Polidori, the vampire, there's no mention of John Polidori there at all people assumed it was Byron. In fact, he's even put down at the time that this is. So he received a lot of criticism for that. He said, I didn't write it. I wouldn't write anything this elementary or stupid. You know, in basically, actually, it's not that bad story. It's it's fairly entertaining. It gives you the rough structure of the vampire story as we know it over the ages. It's a very good effort by a man, who is a brilliant physician who wanted to. Be more and had the terrible misfortune of throwing his lot in with a man much greater much more famous than himself, and it consumed him dies of young age not long afterwards at a young age. And it's Burkey Las or just they recall, brain, fever, basically, he just had sudden death and he dies, but a brilliant, man. So we owe him the vampire the story of the vampire coming out two hundred years ago again from that very famous night. Oh, and what what adviser in Penn? Well, he started a poem that he really didn't complete at the time that was again kind of like about a ghost story. And but he didn't really didn't really devote much time to it. What he does right in from the summer of eighteen sixteen is a wonderful collection of poems called on the prisoner of she'll and other poems comes out in December of eighteen sixteen. You can actually buy first addition of it. In pretty good shape for about two hundred three hundred dollars. Maybe a little bit little say in the three to four hundred dollar range for good example of it. This is a very economical way to be able to buy something that evokes the summer of eighteen sixteen that was the birth of Frankenstein another way to do it as a book that that Mary Shelley and Percy wrote about their travels to meet Byron where they wind up on the shores of of Lake Geneva, their traveled through the Netherlands in Germany, leaving England comes out in a book of wandering through Germany, the comes out. I think about that time also and a lot of the ideas and the sites in the way, they describe things in that collaborative work, which you can buy probably for under a thousand dollars. You know, a lot different from the hundred and twenty thousand dollars for I addition of Frankenstein for eighteen eighteen but a lot of the sites the climate. The overall the aura of Frankenstein, you can detect it you pick it up in that book that travelogue which was very popular form of literature, by the way, these travelogues that women's spearheaded really in the eighteenth century in the early nineteenth century, Mary Shelley's own mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, Shelley in a talked about this with with Rick and the previous hour isn't a sort of a scandalous love affair with a businessman who's traveling around. He breaks it off. She follows him to Sweden. Finally, you know, they have their confrontation, it doesn't work out. So she is not only embarrassed herself. She's now, you know, she has a daughter. She's young Mary. I'm sorry. She's she she's a she has a daughter another child, and she doesn't have any money. And what does she do? She finally finds her way back and turns, you know, takes lemons and make lemonade out of it and writes travelogue in this was a very acceptable genre. Of literary writing at in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries that and also stories of the supernatural just think of Ann Radcliffe Maria Edgeworth and others popular novelist late seventeen hundreds and early eighteen hundreds really the women dominated in these spears. And so what did she do? She was able to recoup some of her losses at least financial by writing that travelogue. Mary's mother did so Mary and Percy write their own version in the summer of eighteen sixteen on their honesty. And that's an economical way of capturing something of the order of Frankenstein from that summer. Well, wow, I didn't mean to digress. Quite so long with that. But these important literary by Centennial's, I think are culturally I think they're important because they're able to grab our interests. They can be the catalyst that makes us want to learn more. And that's where genius is that's what really drives our creativity. Not as you know, Rick, Phil. Gary were saying during their show when you are forced to read something say as a student sometimes by luck, you know, a teacher English teacher tells you to read something you actually love it. And maybe you've got a great teacher. And like I was able to have teachers like that you've probably had teachers like that who are catalysts for you. Maybe for the rest of your life up to up to the present. I was lucky to be able to have that a lot of people didn't have that. You know, you're forced to read something you can't stand it. But have that many people who read catcher in the rye because they were forced to read it in school and loved it and read it again as Rick red Frankenstein in his mature years in the impact, the secondary impact that that KOTA that comes when you read something and really understand it later on when you're ripe for it. Frankenstein is a book like that one thing I will say I did something really need a few years ago. I think it was in. Around thanksgiving. Twenty fifteen we were going to my sister-in-law's house and her wonderful family in Ithaca, New York, and I made arrangements at the wonderful special collections library of Cornell University.

Lord Byron Rick red Frankenstein John Polidori Polidori Napoleon Mary Shelley Centennial Europe George Clooney Samuel Taylor College of Christabel Dory Burkey Las Percy Penn Christabel Amazon publisher
"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

09:11 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Jalen Eaton was a science fiction fan is a doctor in Berkeley science fiction was popping in the bay area. The time he was there. His collection came to UCR in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine we bought from him his collection of eight thousand volumes of science fiction. The eaten collection now has holds about three hundred thousand items not that quantitative measures are really relevant to what's great about a science fiction collection. What's great about the science fiction collection in a research library, like this one is what research can be done with it. And by any measure, the Eaton's magnificent in terms of the research that can be done here. And that's both breadth. And depth. This is the oldest book in our collection. It is utopia by, sir. Thomas more more was a woman. She. Disagreed. With Henry the eighth about who was head of the English church and was beheaded by Henry, the eighth in fifteen thirty five before that. He wrote the book utopia which gave us the word utopia. Utopia is actually a pun. It means nowhere or no place. But since his book, it has come to mean, either the perfect society, or the ideal society more really was writing just about a better society. In Moore's utopia things are again, not perfect. But better and they are in the world. He saw around them. This is not the first book about a better society. But this is the one. That is considered foundational for utopian narrative utopia. Has been very influential in speculative fiction. There's another genre. Big in science fiction called dystopia, which is a worst society than the one. We live in. So utopia really founded to John Major's genres for us. Now, we're going to jump forward eighty years to fifteen ninety six it's the English renaissance. Elizabeth the first has been on the throne. Since fifteen fifty eight. In fifteen eighty eight she defeated Philip with Spain's Spanish armada, an English culture is flourishing Edmund Spenser was a poet who really wanted to catch Elizabeth's. I. So he wrote a six six book. Poem called the ferry Queen. It's one of the great English language epic poems. What it does is? It follows the adventures of six different nights each of whom learns to exemplify a particular virtue. It's not just a nightly adventure. You don't just see the night running around killing dragons and being perfect. You see the night. Learn to be virtuous Spencer. Had. An educational idea in mind, he wanted this book to be a lovely decorative pleasant to read poetic part of the education of the Christian gentleman. One of the reasons why this book is important for science fiction and fantasy. Is that it imagines a world not as it is? But as the author would like it to be and also because that world is fairy land. So. You look over the Sean of modern fantasy swaths of it. Take place in a somewhat imaginary European middle ages where there's magic. There are some works of science fiction and fantasy that directly reference or draw on the fairy Queen but the fairy Queen. Got that Jon Rao of imaginative fiction off to a roaring kind of start. Frankenstein. When it was published in eighteen eighteen was the three volume eight nineteenth century novel. It was written by Mary Wollstonecraft, Shelley. The story of Frankenstein. Is that a young doctor? Vincent, Frankenstein decides he wants to create life. And this is at a time when electricity was imperfectly understood sought to be a subtle fluid that animated every living being. Henry, Victor Frankenstein. Gets a corpse animates it with electricity. And then runs out on it when it's just opening its is because he thinks it's ugly. The Mont the creature. Makes his own way in the world, and eventually gets very very angry and Victor comes back to confront him. Is rejected again because he's reanimated courts really pretty much. No one. We'll talk to him. Everyone runs away in fear. He becomes very bitter. Very angry pleads with Victor to make him a mate. Victor says yes, Victor says no. And the creature becomes a monster. And because Victor has created and then ruined the creatures life murders several people important to Victor. It's a story. About science because what it talked about was pretty much cutting edge science for cutting edge speculative science for eighteen eighteen the story has endured the idea of a a a creature created by science, and what goes wrong, there were certainly created creatures. In myth and legend before eighteen eighteen, but this is the beginning of the nineteenth century, the beginning in a way of the novel as we recognize it. The first review or one of the first reviews of Frankenstein. Was written by, sir. Walter, Scott, you'll see that the author's name is not mentioned. Walter, Walter, Scott. Assumed that Mary's husband, the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote it. But Scott spends a good part of this review from eighteen eighteen trying to enunciate what kind of books this is because he feels he's never seen it before. So it really was a sensation. And that's why it's considered. By some scholars to be the beginning of science fiction, the first work of science fiction, but it's also a gothic. And as I said, it's also tremendously influential in the John a fantasy and horror. The story flatland. First published in eighteen eighty four. A romance of many dimensions by a square is the story of a two dimensional being. Encountering the third dimension. Imagine that you are a two dimensional drawing. You live on a page. You can move these ways. And suddenly somebody puts the tip of a pencil on that page. There's another dimension out there. So that's flatland. It is not the most thrilling read, but for sheer density of ideas, it's more. It's one of the marvelous things that science fiction does. Is hand you ideas that makes you make.

Victor Frankenstein Berkeley science Henry Jalen Eaton Percy Bysshe Shelley Mary Wollstonecraft Scott ferry Queen Elizabeth Edmund Spenser Philip Spain Thomas Moore John Major Jon Rao Walter Spencer Vincent eighty years
"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Right. Now those were the days look back at this day in history brought to you by Brown Chevrolet is Frankenstein day author Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, was, born. On this day in seventeen ninety seven in the year eighteen eighteen at the age of twenty wrote the gothic horror novel we all know about Dr Henry Frankenstein scientists who created everybody's favorite lovable monster on this. Day in one, thousand nine hundred five major league baseball hall of. Famer, Tycom appeared in his first major league baseball game he of course played for the Detroit. Tigers fifty years ago today. Stars came out for. Charity as John and Yoko. Lennon hosted the one on one concert in New York's Madison Square Garden among guest appearing Stevie Wonder Roberta flack and over a half million, dollars, was. Raid to aid mentally retarded children nine hundred ninety three late show with David Letterman debuted on CBS Letterman letter just been over a decade on NBC just in case it comes up the bar tonight the first. Musical guest to appear on the new show was one Billy Joel birthdays Birthday happy birthday to you as we've, already pointed. Out you share your birthday with Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley who gave us the novel Frankenstein Ted Theodore Samuel Williams the kid the thumper the splendid splinter baseball hall of Famer. From the Boston Red Sox Ted Williams died July two thousand two birth date today Nineteen Thirteen John, swagger junior, NASA astronaut United, States Air, Force flew on Apollo. Thirteen one of just twenty four men to have flown to the moon died December nineteen eighty-two, birthdate John Phillips John mamas, and Papas, born on this, day nineteen thirty five would had. Been Eighty-three died March eighteenth two thousand one and last and least, actress Cameron Diaz today is, forty six The official office dress code today will include at least one item with number twenty on it and honor of mono Ginobili day in San Antonio a man who. Tried to drive.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley John Phillips Ted Theodore Samuel Williams Dr Henry Frankenstein baseball David Letterman Brown Chevrolet Cameron Diaz Madison Square Garden Billy Joel Boston Red Sox Tycom Tigers Roberta flack Detroit CBS Papas NBC New York Lennon
"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

06:48 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft shelley" Discussed on Ideas

"Occurred. That famous challenge took place at Lake, Geneva Switzerland in June, eighteen sixteen. It was a dark and rainy night. No, really? It was. They all sat around the fire reading German ghost stories. That's when Lord Byron challenged his guests to write something creepy themselves. And Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's famous go story is known to us all as Frankenstein. In that novel, the monster is vegetarian. I must have read Frankenstein or the modern permit is that's the full title for the first time about twenty five years ago for school, and I've seen the creature or monster portrayed. I don't know how many times and film and TV, but never not once. Did I notice that it was vegetarian, my food is not that of man. I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite. Acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. This conversation happens when he asks Victor Frankenstein, the scientists to create a partner for him. My companion will be of the same nature myself and we'll be content with the same fair. We shall make our bed of dried leaves. The sun will shine on us as on man. The picture I present to you is peaceful and human. She creates a monster whose vegetarianism is very related to all of these beliefs of a better world, peaceful world of the pathetic Rian individual who who lives a nuts and berries. What figure Frankenstein's creature says about refusing to eat. Meat was a surprise, at least for me. But the novel had another surprise. The way the monster itself is put together. I collected bones from charnel houses and disturbed with profane fingers, the tremendous secrets of the human frame. The monster fascinating late is not only made from human corpses. Victor Frankenstein also went into slaughter, houses the dissecting room and the slaughterhouse furnished many of my materials and often did my human nature turn with loathing from my occupation whilst Stiller on by an eagerness which perpetually increased. I brought my work near to conclusion. The creature being made of both human and animal recognizes that killing animals for food violates a connection between us after all, humans are animals too. Humans are animals to that short statement gets right to the heart of the matter of meat. Is there any meaningful difference between us and non human animals? We've been asking that question for a few thousand years and we're still asking it which brings us back to where we started back to the idea of animal rights. The concept of animal rights is confused, philosopher Roger scrutiny. It's based on this that animals like human beings older, their affairs through moral ideas and benefit from us doing the same on both those summons of false because if you attribute rights to an animal, then you have to look at it as though it were three being making conscious decisions for self and you have to attribute duties to it, shoot is that it couldn't possibly fulfill cats of. For instance, would become mergers of the highest order horses could no longer be looked after as we look after them because it would be constant interfering with the rights to free movement. The fact is it's a concert hamper everything that we need to do with them, but to rights necessarily entailed duties on those that we stole them such as babies or the stabled. Well, this is a big question. My my view is the following that we human beings have developed what I wanna calculus of rights and duties and on a to maintain order and peace among ourselves because we are aggressive creatures who need to live in communities. Of course, there are cases like infants disabled people, and so on who've yet to enjoy this props content Joyal this, but they are treated precise exceptions. But in the case of animals, this isn't the way even at the best of times they can possibly. Manage their affairs. They do it in a different way through the exercise of Gretchen, but this is a completely different older of things. And when we when we step in, we step in with our human values, one of which is compassion, kindness, don't treat animals. They were miss things so they couldn't suffer and so on. We have to look after them and respect them as living beings and as beings capable of suffering. I think that's what a old fashioned Fama would do what what we do. I mean, we have little with a few pigs. And. The natural way of doing it, but that is not the same thing as giving them rights. In fact, you've argued quote, not only is it permissible for those who care about animals to eat meat. They have a duty to do. So. How is it a duty now that may being a bit provocative. So did mean to say that if we stopped eating meat, then there are all kinds of bad effects that would follow for the animals. It would otherwise eat, provided they, you know, let's face it, pigs. Have John a good time if properly matured. But if we didn't eat them, they wouldn't exist tool. And I think this is true of an awful lot of animals for that reason. We might have Jucci tools on most to go on eating them. But if that's their only purpose on on earth for us to eat them, does that. Is that justify it? Yeah. Well, what's your purpose on you? Haven't even got that one. I

Victor Frankenstein Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Switzerland Lord Byron Rian Roger scrutiny partner Fama Gretchen Stiller John twenty five years thousand years