19 Burst results for "Mary Wollstonecraft"

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on Throwing Shade

Throwing Shade

05:31 min | 2 weeks ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on Throwing Shade

"This statue packs the visual charisma. Doorknob he's dead on and then this is what he said about it. He i mean honestly. I would read the whole piece because it's just like chefs gifts because all the way it represents a set of one hundred percent generic ideas about figurative sculpture from the nine thousand nine hundred twenty s the worst strains of dead and academic ism masquerading as art. This is not art. this is kitsch. you have to look artist maggie. Handling she describes her studio as a torture chamber. And this is the chain. Smoking across the pond cousin of maxine from shoebox. Okay this maggie any any pictures of her without a cigarette to be honest with you. Know she is. That is her thing. I'm i'm loving this one photo of her in like a huge smock like sort of in front of inches. Got the cigarette always front and center that cigarette. I don't think she should ever put it down now. I don't think it but this is crazy. How she responded to the criticism no because she kind of does this. I guess she's kind of a fuck you artist. She just kinda like does it and it was like fuck you deal with that or whatever she cares which i gas great good for you got one hundred and sixty one hundred ninety thousand pounds for this euros. Whatever they're doing over there. Get your check maggie. But it's it's it's kind of crazy. I mean it is ugly right so bad. it's so bad and it's so lazy and it's so literal and my gross in like who cares. I just feel like you know. There's no there's no statues of our einstein with his dick out. No no we don't do that. Two guys and i couldn't celebrate someone for like a statue of share could almost naked. 'cause she kinda did that like to do that to an intellectual and to do that and i'm not saying that you can't be an intellectual and also show off your body. I'm not saying that. I'm just saying like that. One is showing her body here. I mean this is. she didn't. This is not with intent from her. This is not. She's not a part of this and also not thinking about the consent of your subject whether or not you think your subject would like this. And that's why they're kind of skirting around. It's like well. it's not really of mary. it's about mary as a tribute to mary. Has fucking name at the bottom. What do you think little girls are going to think when they see that you know what i mean it just. It's not an educational piece. I don not like some fucking puritan. That can't see a nipple but like let's fucking get it right also on the back of a time when we have very few female statues out there and then now. This one's new it's like come on. That's what that's how women have been depicted in art for centuries. Why are we still doing that. It's so fucking boring. I don't care anymore. I just don't care i'm trying to find like these are the worst to words ever put together and the human language devil's advocate for this and i'm just like no i 'cause i would imagine that someone might think well this stepping into the shoes of someone who was so radical than maybe they would be behind this now because it is taking back the power of the female body. Something that's been and it is a female artists creating it. But even that i'm like no it doesn't this doesn't feel right. Is there nothing else from her background or her work or her art that you think is worth pulling from for inspiration besides her tits and her pussy. I'm not seeing the one to one between what you told me about her. And her sort of incredible legacy and what she and how far ahead of time she was and this piece and the only thing i can say about it. That's positive is it has talking. But i think that's shitty the internet i agree. This conversation is is reductive. Not the conversation. We're having but the fact that this is the conversation that we're having about. Yes exactly whether or not mary. Wollstonecraft should have her nipples out of her tits and vagina on display. I mean even if it's not her background we would need in looking at the statue and her name. Being on it people would think this is a representation of why the fuck wouldn't they also like this wasn't like a time when like there was like we have a million pictures of her. It's like it's just it's nuts although it's not nuts it's unacceptable. Okay matt what would you statue. Okay you're okay. It's one hundred years from now. There's a there's an organization in whatever country you want and they're like we have to do a commemorative statue four. Whatever part of your career. You think it's worth so coming in the in the way that we can't say mary wollstonecraft would want this. I do want this please. My statute should be mean nude back arched put it in orlando florida instead. Take down the epcot ball. Put a huge thing of me with my back arched ass in the air. Just sort of like if you can imagine beyond saying the partition video. I sort of want that of me. And i wanted where the epcot ball currently as if that makes sense. What's your facial hair situation. Oh i'm actually so it sort of the way you want to be seen in the world. I have a full. Tom selleck mustache and it works. And it works at everyone that looked that's looking at. It agrees that it works. And if you say it doesn't work you get kicked out at epcot. And who wants that. Who wants to be.

mary wollstonecraft maggie maxine Tom selleck facial hair orlando florida einstein matt
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on The Bugle

The Bugle

03:25 min | 2 weeks ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on The Bugle

"The end of this strangely naked statue news now and Britain has been torn apart once again By division this time over a new statue of the pioneering late eighteenth century feminist. Mary wollstonecraft a new statue unveiled in london this week. Not off mary wollstonecraft. It must be said but for. Mary was draft featured a what can only be described as extremely naked woman emerging from a sort of artistic creation of other women and I mean it's been variously criticized. Alice culture of the The so-called mother feminism as inappropriate philosophically incoherent willfully old artistically pointless. Bafflingly pubic distracting. Lose you and just a shit. So i mean how. How do you view this that this this remarkable woman andy as a leading influential news voice. I'm here to tell you that. I have no opinion on. The statue of the statue was fine. I guess if you don't like the statute make your own statue. I feel statue base. Politics is much like statues themselves which is to say briefly eyecatching and essentially a waste of your precious precious attention real estate. I mean show. You can care about more than one at once. You can care about statues and building a place where women are given the same opportunities and support that any other human is given but also you know for a fact that you only care about this statue because you saw someone else caring about it and one hundred ugly statues. You don't give a shit about and if you love. Mary wollstonecraft so much name. One of albums. And i don't say her daughter wollstonecraft shelley because that doesn't count mary wollstonecraft shelley or as we call her mary. Wollstonecraft monster thing happened. Just michaelangelo unveiled david. Of course Mickey chiseled who strongly criticized. It's people said welcome. We just appreciate david stone slinging skills. What do we have to see his not sack and this is inevitably happens. Whenever any work of all is released people will vote opinion. Of course they did have to adapt the original david. Which instead of penis had a tiny david on the front. Turn that into a much less offensive penis shape. That was confusing. upsetting others. said that it's not a statue of. Mary was and cross herself. I think how that is a statue of a woman who has taken clothes off before dressing as mary. Wollstonecraft for fancy dress party. I think that's you can definitely see in. Her is the thought putting mary. Wilson cross outfit. It's important when you're making statues for important figures in history who are under covered by under covered by out traditional mainstream history teachings. If you want to bring these people to the forefront are what you want is an amorphous blob feminine spirituality with a new lady lunging her merkin. You feel like that's a very important statement to make especially before you've made an actual statue of the actual mary wollstonecraft or read a vindication of the rights of women in both mentioned. The pup- situation is unreasonable. It's like it's it's like the pasta from lady and the tramps first day. It's.

mary wollstonecraft mary wollstonecraft shelley Mary david stone Britain london andy Mickey michaelangelo Wilson
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on The Leader

The Leader

04:34 min | 3 weeks ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on The Leader

"Father. joe wicks was one of the heroes of the first lock down. He got an mba for keeping our kids fit with his utp lessons while schools were closed. He's back at it this time round two but in an extraordinarily honest if you the evening standard susannah butter the seemingly invincible body coach is admitting he's tired and the attention has been getting to him and his family says that was with me now and i think in your chat joe sounds like a lotta people in lockton to just plain weary of it all kind of your reaching that phase of we've done this before. Gosh we've got to. And he spoke in a very joe wicks way about trying to deal with these fittings and making so feel better. His approaches to not feel powerless about the situation. And kind of be very present in the moment. Real-life you're lucky fool. But it's getting to him. And and but i think by tool king about that in sharing that with everyone who i think will feel the same. That's such a grave everything to do. It is a very works thing to do throughout his entire career since he began on instagram. He's always shared just about everything with his audience. I wonder if though now that he's reached a new level of stardom because of how well he was a c. during lockdown. He's maybe a little bit worried about what that did. I think his instinct is very naturally open kind of refreshing the apron move open than a lot of people who on even famous but since the with joe there were people outside his house which i think he struggled with but also he struggled to think about how that impact is family because he's got an eleven month. Zero new toyota is about ten to and he spoke very movingly about leaving. The house with india has the paparazzi being. They're not liking that and they invite in the main road and then fans sending him letters and jen and moment eight strangely tonight that the why not he has still sharing the he'd new toss away from a main motor. Get a bit more privacy moving. Hey what's means leaving that room. The one he did with jill with which millions of people watched them doing those exercises every morning. Keeping the nation's children fits it became a bit of an icon of the first lock down at margin even for him. It must be sad for him to leave that space. He's got his lovely new house and he's very kind of looking on the bright side. I mean he misses that room because it was real and the calls on the war and the fire flags impacted guitar theat which means he's not trying them as much. I think there's also a sense of thinking about his own relationship with social media and times of his mental house because he watched like light many of us again he wants the social dilemma or net flex and is trying to russian his screen time so having two hours a day where he doesn't look his phones that he can finally concentrate on big with his children. It is an incredible fear a very moving into which everyone listening should read it strikes me as a man who maybe feels like. He's lost a bit of control and is now going to regain it. He's taking those steps in the absolutely. Yeah he's he's very very provocative or though he's about to do something where it sounds like he per we weren't have much control which is twenty four hour fitness challenge on children in need where he just has five. Minute breaks every hour to eat or go to the toilet which i think he keeps. He just said it's gonna suck but what's amazing about job. Rex is. He's really driven to to actually be good. Make a change And in a way that i think is interesting this year when you compare him to they. Marcus restaurant. I think they've got a lot in common. And if the sense of not waiting for the government or some other official body to do something But actually using a phone and a few videos and the internet getting out there and making people do puppies impress up and boosting them mood and you can read zana's interview in the evening standard and online at standoff coda uk. That's silly podcast. we're back.

joe wicks lockton Rex susannah Marcus restaurant jen jill official zana india
Feminist Literature

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:20 min | 3 months ago

Feminist Literature

"This week from me here getting the problem that has no name. Feminist literature. All right. If we were going to cover just like feminism assure general, we would be here. Forever I'm sure there's already a podcast that that covers that folks I'm sure. So we're not trying to reinvent the wheel here. No. Quick definition. Feminism is a range of social movements, political movements in ideologies that aim to define establish in achieve the political economic, personal and social equality of the sexes. Feminism incorporates the position that society's prioritize the male point of view and that women are treated unjustly within those societies Charles for Ya who is a utopian socialist in French philosopher. He's the one that's credited with having coined the word FEMA KNEES MMA in. Thirty seven. So, modern Western, feminist history is conventionally split into three time periods or waves. So you'll typically hear them referred to as that Each of them has slightly different aims based on the prior progress that was made during the wave before. I wave feminism is the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that was focused on overturning legal inequalities, particularly addressing issues of women's suffrage. Second wave feminism is the nineteen sixty s and nineteen eighties that broaden the debate to include cultural inequalities gender norms in the role of women in society, and then third wave feminism. The nineteen ninety s to the thousands that refers to the diverse strains of feminist activity. So third wavers are see this as a continuation of the second wave in also as a response to the perceived failures out of the way before it. So I guess we're right outside third wave right now I think we're moving into the fourth wave interesting, which can't be defined until after it's passed exactly exactly a you. Hey I know my history man you know what I'm talking about or woman. Watch out I should say I WANNA point out as part of that definition. feminism is not women are better than men no absolutely not and it's still maintains to this day. It's about Equality Ackley. So exactly that's all I wanted to point. For our listeners great segue. Lauren. So seminaries literature, it can be fiction or nonfiction or drama or poetry that supports the feminine schools of establishing, defining and defending equal civil, political, economic, and social rights for women. So we're GONNA. Cover. Ten important feminist. Pieces of. Very excited that everyone should know. Great and we'll go in chronological order for me So the first we're GONNA talk about is a vindication of the rights of woman with strictures on political and moral subjects by. One, craft from seventeen ninety two. So this is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy it was published in the United Kingdom Mary wollstonecraft responded to th century educational and political theorist who believe that women should not receive a rational education. It was believed at the time that women were too susceptible to sensibility and too fragile to be able to think clearly. So not able to be. The recipient of a rational education. Sure. Sure. Sure. So craft argued that women's education should match their position in society in that they are essential to the nation because they raise its children and could act as respected companions to their husbands then yeah So Wall Street, maintain that women are human beings deserving of the same fundamental rights as men and that treating them as ornaments or property for men undermines the moral foundations, a society which how about that you think You'd think that people any rational person would be like, yeah. That makes sense treat women as human beings. Sure. But the fact that there was such vitriol against this concept is like my to me but it was seventeen, ninety two that was like, yeah. Put it into writing and people are like. Dr. So her work had significant impact on advocates for women's rights in the nineteenth century particularly, the eighteen forty eight Seneca falls convention that produce the Declaration of sentiments which laid out the aims of the suffragette movement. In the United States Mary Wilson Craft her name might be familiar. She is the mother of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. And she actually died eleven days after giving birth to Mary wollstonecraft shelley. So Mary wollstonecraft was like she was this great feminist philosopher great writer, her husband was super. Supportive. And she died in childbirth which. was killed a lot of women. Yeah. Septicemia man because men who were only allowed to be doctors. Refuse to treat women because of all of their naughty bits, nobody washed their hands. Oh Yeah. Nobody we should really point out. Yes. No one wash their hands that probably cost a lot of issues too.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Mary Wollstonecraft United Kingdom Mary Wollstonec Septicemia Charles Fema United States Mary Wilson Seneca Falls Lauren
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:10 min | 3 months ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"J News time is something 41 sharing a birthday on this 30th of August with Olympic gold medal skier Jean Claude Killy 77 years old. Comedian Lewis Black actually had photos on social media of him on a boat vacationing in the Western Upper peninsula earlier this summer. He's 72 years old today. Cameron Diaz is 48 Lisa Ling's 47. And tennis player and erotic turns 38 years old today. It was on this date in 17 97. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, the creator of Frankenstein, was born in London. August 30th 1967 when the Senate confirmed the appointment of Thurgood Marshall as the first black justice on the U. S Supreme Court in 1983 Guy in as Blue for Junior became the first black American astronauts to travel in space aboard the challenger. It was in 1993 on this date. The late show with David Letterman premiered on CBS television 1997 Americans received word of the car crash in Paris that claimed the lives of Princess Diana and her boyfriend, Dodi if I eat in their driver, Anny Paul Five years ago, the White House announced President Obama would change the name of North America's told this mountain peak from Mount McKinley to Denali, bestowing the traditional Esca native name on the eve of the historic presidential visit. To Alaska and in Michigan history in 1905. On this day tied, Cobb played his first game for the Detroit Tigers and 24 years as a major league ball player with the Tigers and the Philadelphia A's Tom had a career 3 67 batting average scoring over 2200 runs and was the game's leader in hits until Pete Rose broke that record in the 19 eighties, arguably best season in 1911, leading the league in every offensive category, except for home runs batting for 20. It was the first player inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1936, and he was also a shrewd businessman is Cobb would haggle every year with Detroit management over contracts and he invested his earnings wisely, primarily in stock, and GM and Coca Cola. To become baseball's first millionaire. W W J NEWS time. 7 44 With sports Coming up Next. The.

Jean Claude Killy Cobb Detroit Tigers Lewis Black gold medal Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Cameron Diaz Western Upper peninsula Thurgood Marshall Coca Cola David Letterman Anny Paul Five tennis Lisa Ling Princess Diana Mount McKinley CBS Pete Rose London
The Year Without a Summer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

06:24 min | 4 months ago

The Year Without a Summer

"The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris Review Geneva New England Frankenstein Savannah Savannah Georgia Baron Carl Dreyer New York Geneva Villa Mid West Indonesia North America Atlantic United Kingdom
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

The Past and the Curious

02:21 min | 5 months ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on The Past and the Curious

"William Henry Harrison was president for one month. He got sick at his inauguration and died thirty one days later. Benjamin Harrison was not his son though he was his grandson and Theodore Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt will. They were distant cousins. John Adams and John Quincy Adams were father and son. John Adams served one four year term as the second president of the United States, and his son John Quincy also served only single term as our sixth president. Question number two Mary wollstonecraft was a writer and philosopher in the seventeen hundreds who fought fiercely for women's rights. It was a time that this was unusual, and she has seen as a pioneer in particular for her book, a vindication of the rights of woman. Her daughter would go on to be famous writer herself. In fact one, we featured on the show in many ways. You could claim that she was the inventor of the Genre of science fiction. Who is she? Mary Shelley was Mary wollstonecraft daughter, and as you may remember. She spent one boring summer cooped up in her house due to a natural disaster. Does that sound familiar to anyone? Well? She used that time to write Frankenstein or a modern previous, more commonly known today just as Frankenstein. Quite a mother daughter duo question number three the famous composer. Johann Sebastian Bach wrote a lot of music. He also had a lot of kids guess how many he had. Twenty? He had twenty kids now. This was back in the early seventeen hundreds and life was a lot harder for people when it came to medical matters. So sadly not all of them survived into adulthood, however, many of us children became successful musicians, and even composers themselves. Sometimes the apple as they say doesn't fall too far from the tree. And it would have taken a lot of apples to feed that family..

Mary Shelley John Adams Mary wollstonecraft Benjamin Harrison Johann Sebastian Bach president William Henry Harrison John Quincy Adams Franklin Delano Roosevelt John Quincy writer Theodore Roosevelt apple United States
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

01:37 min | 7 months ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Right Frankenstein. One last connection with hopes that are too I think towering images in modern English literature of the robot the machine that we create with a power that we don't understand one of them is hopes his Leviathan Leviathan isn't actually a biblical Sea Monster. Hope says that the beginning of the book of that name explicitly the what's being built is an Automaton it's kind of wrote a robot has been created an artificial person an off official nine with a kind of superhuman power and that is going to be part of the modern experience the other most memorable image of the official person is Frankenstein's monster written by the daughter of Mary wollstonecraft and so the wheel of modern ideas tons fit details of where you can find vindication of the rights of women. Along with many other reading suggestions please look to our show notes available wherever you get this podcast and as you're listening as a subscriber to talking politics to be sure that you hear all twelve history of ideas episodes please head to ITN's or Acosta wherever you get your podcast normally and subscribed talking politics. History of ideas to next time. David Talks About Benjamin Constant Romanticism. And the paradoxes of modern liberty..

Benjamin Constant Romanticism Mary wollstonecraft ITN official Acosta David
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"This is the two hundred diversity of the publication of the book, Franken Stein, the movies are a lot different than the original source material, Dr Sabrina stardom and teaches a course on Frankenstein at UT Dallas, she's on the KRLD Newsline who was Mary Shelley. Well, Mary Shelley. Was the daughter of to intellectual William Godwin, and Mary Wollstonecraft and a lot of people don't know that Mary Wollstonecraft was her mother Mary Wollstonecraft was one of the most important writers about women's rights and women's experience, and this was back in the in the eighteenth century. How did she come up with the characters Mary Shelley like Victor Frankenstein lost her mother at a very early age. Her mother died immediately after her birth and Mary Shelley also suffered the loss of one of her infants and when she wrote Frankenstein, she had an a young only months old baby that she then proceeded to lose during the period of time when she was revising Frankenstein. So the question of loss of a loved one that was really very present in her mind how much? Liberty did the movies take with the original source material? A lot a lot. In fact, we think we know Frankenstein. And then we go back and read the book, and we say, wow, the monster is incredibly well-spoken, and the monster makes it really clear that his violence and his anger as as a result of this poor treatment by society, and and and he can say that and he can talk to Victor, Frankenstein invitees actually more articulate than Victor. But that's not how the movies portray him did the movies change it. Wow. That's a great question. I think the movies changed it because a silent emotional monster is easier to be scared by then a monster. Hold up a mirror an asset to look at our own failings as humans, humans would Mary Shelley have appreciated. What was done to her creation in the films and? What film actually ever came close? Well, first of all Mary Shelley's, but was turned into a stage production quite soon after her after she published it, and why don't I haven't read those stage productions I would imagine that the screenwriter. So the stage writers to great liberty with those productions. And so I think she really liked being a successful writer because it paid the bills she needed that. Secondly to your second question. I really liked the depiction of Frankenstein's creature and Frankenstein in the television series penny. Dreadful a lot of other a lot of other film adaptations have been made, and they're they're difficult to do this Dr Sabrina stardom in from UT Dallas. It sounds ridiculous. But it's a real thing. There's a new name for a condition. A lot of people may face. It's now called dead, but syndrome, it's also called gluteal amnesia caused by the fact that so many people spend so much time sitting at work or at home experts say that acts can restrict the blood flow to that area. Can also lead to pain in your hips. You lower back even ankle issues. One fifty four KRLD. Let's check your money. They're holding onto monetary gains. The Dow up one hundred seventy one points, the NASDAQ up twenty two in the SNP up twelve as investors look at positive earnings news from under armor and video game maker, take two and await results from Facebook after the closing bell. GE shares have dipped below ten dollars for the first time since April two thousand nine the stock is down ten percent after General Electric's earnings report and news that a federal probe of its accounting is expanding sales of red dead, redemption to our blowing away Wall Street's estimates. In the first three days global sales of the game top seven hundred twenty.

Mary Shelley Victor Frankenstein Mary Wollstonecraft Dr Sabrina Dallas writer Franken Stein William Godwin General Electric Liberty Facebook ten dollars ten percent three days
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"David Rankin. It's been two hundred. Hi. This is the two hundredth anniversary of the publication of the book, Franken Stein, the movies are a whole lot different than the original source material, Dr Sabrina stardom in teaches a course on Frankenstein at UT Dallas, and she's on the KRLD Newsline. Now, Mary Shelley was the daughter of to intellectual William Godwin, and Mary Wollstonecraft and a lot of people don't know that Mary Wollstonecraft was her mother Mary Wollstonecraft was one of the most important writers about women's rights and women's experience, and this was back in the in the eighteenth century. How did she come up with the characters Mary Shelley lake Victor Frankenstein lost her mother at a very early age. Her mother died immediately after her birth and Mary Shelley also suffered the loss of one of her infants and when. She wrote Frankenstein. She had an a young only months old baby that she then proceeded to lose during the period of time when she was revising Frankenstein. So the question of loss of a loved one and death was really very present. In her mind how much liberty did the movies take with the original source material? A lot a lot. In fact, we think we know Frankenstein. And then we go back and read the book, and we say, wow, the monster is incredibly well-spoken, and the monster makes it really clear that his violence and his anger as a result of his poor treatment by society, and and and he can say that you can talk to Victor, Frankenstein invitees actually more articulate than Victor. But that's not how the movies portray him. What did the movies change it? Oh, that's a great question. I think the movies changed it because a silent emotional monster is easier to be scared by then a monster who hold up a mirror an asset to look at our own failings as humans would Mary Shelley have appreciated. What was done to her creation in the films and? And what film actually ever came close? Well, first of all Mary Shelley's, but was turned into a stage production quite soon after her after she published it, and why don't I haven't read though, stage productions I would imagine that the screenwriter the stage writers to great liberty with those productions. And so I think she really liked being a successful writer to the paid the bills. She needed that. Secondly to your second question, I really like the depiction of Frankenstein's creature and Frankenstein in the television series, penny dreadful. A lot of other a lot of other film adaptations have been made, and they're they're difficult to do that stem. Dr Sabrina stardom in from UT, Dallas. Eleven fifty four KRLD. Let's check your money. Staging a partial recovery. The Dow up one hundred eighty seven points, the NASDAQ up fifty four in the SNP up seventeen after an October route they left the S and P five hundred a few points away from a correction, strong earnings reports from under armor and take two interactive or helping under armor shares are surging twenty six percent. Take two is up. Ten percent. General Electric shares tumbling to a nine year low. The Justice department has joined the SEC in investigating at twenty two billion dollar charge to GE's power equipment unit. It's a rough. I earning report day for T E's, new CEO, Larry Culpepper. He took over this month to try to get the company out of one of the deepest slumps in it's one hundred twenty six year history. GE shares are down eight percent apple has unveiled a line of new devices that have been in the iphone shadow their revamped, ipads, a new math mini desktop and a new macbook air laptop. Adrienne mitchell. Bloomberg radio doesn't executive order Trump a constitutional amendment next. This phone drives me crazy, excuse me. I must printer and from sprint chairman. New iphone ten are with an amazing liquid retina display,.

Victor Frankenstein Mary Shelley Mary Wollstonecraft GE Dr Sabrina Dallas Larry Culpepper David Rankin Franken Stein writer KRLD Bloomberg Adrienne mitchell William Godwin apple UT sprint
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Women like Mary Wollstonecraft called for women's rights in the late eighteenth century. But before her there were prominent men who we heard from the top of the episode and other leading enlightenment thinkers, like Condorcet lock and live in. It all argued with varying degrees of passion for the equality of the sexes. Yes. Yes. Men are often wonderful feminists on the other side were men like Immanuel Kant Francis Bacon, and maybe the most pivotal thinker on the woman question Jean Jacques Rousseau writing. In the seventeen sixty s Russo appeal to the supposed anatomical differences between men and women women's smaller brains and bigger pelvises to back. His theory of complementarity women aren't less inherently valuable than men that would have gone against Rousseau's liberal ideals. Instead, he said women were just fundamentally. Different. But different in ways that proved nature designed women to serve men the women's entire education should be planned in relation to men to prison to be useful to them to win the respect to raise them as children careful than as adults. Visa women's judy's in all ages and visa what they should be taught from childhood. So Toby says complementarity becomes the new justification for excluding women from lots of things, but especially from the halls of political and economic power, then you begin to say, well, she's not as rational, maybe you say that you draw on that string of discretion. She's rational, but not as rational, she is disqualified on the basis of her physiology female physiology, she's disqualified because of her higher maternal duties, you all of a sudden get new ways of defining difference between men and women that would work better to justify exclusion from equal citizenship. Equal citizenship. On both sides of the Atlantic before the American revolution. Only some men only some white men got full citizenship rights. He might be a middling family farmer. He might be a gentleman plantation owner, but he owns property and in virtue of the ownership of property, though. He also has a thority over a wide range of household dependence. So there's this bright line between the independent head of household and his dependence on those dependence are everyone from his wife and children to his free white servants, and is enslaved servants. Both men and women is figure comes to you not only with property, but with a thorny over this wide range of people and those things together are what confer on him, ideologically speaking his. His where we want to say his his virtue his political virtue. Toby has written widely about gender and masculinity in colonial and early US history. She says the American revolution, kicked out, the king, and the English aristocracy, and of course, replaced them with a Republic, but it was a Republic controlled by a fraternity of patriarchal brothers that white property-owning head of household gets to vote, and he gets other civil rights that are denied to all black and native American men.

Toby Jean Jacques Rousseau Mary Wollstonecraft judy Immanuel Kant Francis Bacon Condorcet US Russo Atlantic
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:40 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And if you're just joining us, my guest is Clara Tomlin, she was a longtime book reviewer and editor for publications in England. And then she became a full-time biographer Khabarovsk include books about Charles Dickens, and the early feminist Mary Wollstonecraft now she has a memoir called a life of my own. I wanna ask you about another tragedy in your life. Your second. Oldest daughter Susanna got profoundly depressed in nineteen seventy nine while she was attending Cambridge University. No. She was at Oxford at Oxford. I'm sorry. Thank you. And then she took her life in one thousand nine hundred. Yes. And you found her depression that sounds like everyone who knew her found her depression unfathomable. So it was such a sudden inexplicable change from how she had been in the past. Have you ever found any? Explanation. And I know that with schizophrenia, for instance, it often sets in in somebody's teenage years for reasons. I don't really understand. But I've I've learned I don't think friends. I don't think she was schizophrenic. I remember her telling me that she'd be she been questioned by doctors to see him. She thought they were trying to see whether she was schizophrenic dancing. She was I think she was profoundly depressed. I've just been looking again at Sylvia Plath the bell jar. And it suddenly struck me. This is just this last week that what she describes in that book the depression. She falls into is very like. Susanna? Fell into inexplicable to the family to the friends, but they had something they had something in common. I think. And it amazed me suddenly seeing that what Sylvia Plath described so rhythm how she described her own descent into depression. I don't know, but she was wonderful. And I thought I was like that. I all my all my efforts to help her to comfort her to share her. She would say, well, it may make you feel better. But it doesn't make me feel better. And the first time she took an overdose. I describe in the book, I found her got at the hospital. She was in intensive care. And I watched all is is lines. What how the breathing the awesome everything is so reviving, and when she seemed better I went out into the corridor and hospital and the male nurse came out and said don't rejoice she reduce again. That's pretty grim. It turned out to be true though. It was true. Yes. It was true. You know, in her suicide note, she wrote that she was sorry. But quote, it could get worse. Yes. Raid of well, I think that's right. And another friend of mine who suffered from depression said if you if you haven't had depression, you don't have any idea what it's like, this was a Roman Catholic friend of mine. She said, it's worse. I'm sure than being in hell, and I think if you think of wolf. Who had recurrent, depression, and then killed herself. I used to think if we'd saved. Susannah, we've managed to save her. I think she might have Papp's lived another ten or fifteen years and done some more of the she was she could've been a very good writer. She wrote some very good probes. And even if she'd like Virginia Woolf, then killed herself later, if only should have some more of her life. Because she was. Of course, all mothers. That's wonderful. She wasn't exceptional person. And it was recently her sixtieth birthday. And her wonderful boyfriend she'd had who's happily married with families in his sixties sent me an Email on the morning of Susanna sixtieth birthday. And said all over the world people remembering how clever and lively wonderful. Susannah, rose. Let extraordinary thing. Yeah. Right. I should have protected her. How can you protect somebody from their own depression? Well, that's the trouble. It's very difficult and I didn't succeed. You're right. The grief has to be set aside. But it does not go away it arrives each morning as you wake lies in wait in the familiar routines of the day takes you by surprise. Does it still? I think writing the book has helped. A lot of people have written to me about that people who've lost someone they love answered. Yes. That is how it is until two sharing with people experience. I don't grieve in the same way that I used to grieve you're off here. I am. I am pretty well. At peace. But it still it. Of course, it hits run her piece of music. Something reminds you just just. I see her face. I see a beautiful blue eyes. I remember her being born remember my two little doses. I well. I had my first daughter. I wanted to have a second daughter. So they could be friends, and I was so pleased when Susannah was born and they were they loved each other. It's been very hard for her older sister too because they were very close. So of course, of course, the pay is less, but she certainly not forgotten. She's not forgotten by her friend. Why don't we take a short break here? And then we'll talk some more. If you're just joining us. My guess is clear Tomlin. She's a biographer who's written books about Mary Wollstonecraft early feminist, Charles Dickens, her new memoir is called a life of my own. We're gonna take a short break, then we'll be right back. This is fresh air. This.

depression Susanna Susannah Mary Wollstonecraft Clara Tomlin Charles Dickens Sylvia Plath Oxford at Oxford Cambridge University schizophrenia England Virginia Woolf editor Papp writer fifteen years
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:30 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Coming up after fresh air on walls and bridges immigration has always been a polarizing issue in the United States. But the last few years have seen an increase in division, the panelists tonight, we'll have a conversation about how current US policies are affecting immigrant communities and who controls the immigrant narrative, that's a K Q E D conversation on walls and bridges coming up at eight o'clock here on San Francisco in cake, you we I north highlands, Sacramento. Fresh air continues at seven thirty. This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross back with Claire Tomlin after writing biographies of dickens, Jane Austen, and the early feminist Mary Wollstonecraft Tomlin has written a memoir called a life of my own through her story. She tries to tell a larger story of British women of her generation. She was born in nineteen thirty-three. She describes her conflicting desires to have children and a satisfying working life. It took a while. But she eventually had both. She gave birth to five children one died in infancy when we left off. We were talking about her son, Tom who was born with spina bifida a birth defect in which the baby's spinal cord has not fully developed or has not closed properly in the womb. Tom has never been able to walk or stand. And you wrote at some point you stop taking him to the playground because it was painful for him. And for you to watch the other children able to do things that he'd never be able to do. Yes. I can remember him looking at the children. Quite recently. He said to me I was talking to him about this. And he said he said, well, I believe then when I grew up I would be able to walk. Broke my heart. And he said that the Donald Trump crossed my mind. But of course, children have no idea what what is coming for them more. What there is in the world was quite natural attrition thing. That. He was in his teens bit heartbreaking because he would see other boys teenage boys and girls doing things which he couldn't join in. He has had hard life, very hard life and quite a lonely life except for his family. Your husband Nick who had you know in the seventies. Become a pretty famous journalist in England. He went on a reporting trip to Israel. Just after the start of the kipper war when Syria and Egypt launched a surprise attack on Israel onion kipper, which is the holiest day of the year and the Jewish calendar. And he told you that he thought he'd be safe. He told you I wouldn't go anywhere dangerous now with four children with the Israelis know how to look after journalists and I'll be perfectly safe with them. Well, driving toward the frontlines. He was killed by a Syrian heat guided missile and one of the things that really horrified you about his death with the idea of him, dying alone. Chocolate about why that was such a horrible thought for you. I didn't think anyone should die alone. I think we know dying. You really do need someone with you. And. It it. The German reporter who was the wrong telephone after he came back and said that he heard Nick. Calling up. Saying, of course, he didn't he didn't speak German. So what she called out, I'm dying and. Terrible. Terrible latisha. I'm awful. To that light think about it to this day. Terrible thing. So I absolutely insisted on his body being brought back to England. They wanted to bury him out there. I should know. He's he's got to come back otherwise for the children, if they didn't see a couldn't see his whatever they could see the coffin and his parents also. Otherwise, we just as he got off once again, just not come back. Had to be funeral had to be somewhere where he was buried not seem to be very important. I mean, this sort of formalities are important in life. I think. You ready to change your life? When you realized you were now in charge of it. How did it change your life? Well, yes, because I was now in charge. I could now decide lots of things like what sort of car to buy. I bought my first car was my car, which was absolutely wonderful. And I was then John gross. Who's the new statesman said, I must come. He wanted to go to the times that result climent, and he thought I should come and be literature. The new statesman, and I had to decide whether to do that with two. Take a job or whether I want to stay at home with children, and I talked about this with everyone works debate about it. And I decided I think the children agreed that it would be better for me to have a job. What did you think it would be better to take job because I think mothers who stay at home and live entirely through that children. I mean, some people are very happy doing this. But I didn't think it was a very good idea. I by then my ocean milestone jobs was actually registered go to Cambridge. So they were there because. So your first biography was a biography of Mary Wollstonecraft, the early feminist who wrote a vindication of the rights of women which was published in seventeen ninety two and argued that women were the equals of men, how did this historical look at feminism and Austin crafts life affect your understanding of your own life did it, and I should mention your biography of her was published in the mid nineteen seventy s. Well, it was rather interesting. I Roach it because. When I was taking maternity leave to have Tom the editor of the new statesman. I I've been working there already as deputy literary editor and he said well take without leaving comeback after the baby's born. But please keep writing pieces for the new statesman while you're taking on maternity leave. And that's how I wrote a page about Mary Wollstonecraft, full the new statesman. And when it was published I got letters from agents publishers saying Russia biographer. So I didn't know what to do and Nikolai sat down together with piece of paper and pencil each pros and cons. Should I go back to the new statesman? Or should I try and write this book, and we both concluded that I ought to try and write the book. And so that's how I decided to do that. The book is sort of associated when they cannot way it was helpful to me that his advice. And in fact, when he was killed. I had was just finishing writing the book. So it was the book Chris sort of bombed up for that period of the end of his life. It was quite emotional. So did Mary Walston crafts writing. And how she lived her life. Affect how you lived your life. After your husband was killed. Well, studying how was amazing to me because I discovered this woman in the eighteenth century who seemed to be living life, very very much like mine. She was living in north London. She was working on the magazine, she was having difficult love affairs resit where all when once she had a baby she was having having to deal with trying to work and have a baby. And this walking the streets of London that she'd had walked it seemed absolutely amazing to me, and she was so vivid in her letters and writings and Gucci bench was getting ever to Paris to see the French revolution. And I went over to Paris quite a good deal of the French family. And so I I it's sort of reinforced my interest in women's history. And it made me think much more deeply about. How little really useful information? We got about women's lives in the past. How? We had biographies of queens. We had sort of books about actresses. But really close looking what women's lives in the past. Rely was Raleigh enroll the short supply. And I thought that is something I would really like to get my teeth into did her biography also give you a sense of strength or courage in pursuing an independent life. Yes, it did. And she was so interesting because she was rather sort of severe hardworking young woman who threw herself into all sorts of work. She worked as a governor. She tried to run off school. She she even helped one of her friends whose family was very poor doing sewing work because she people she took on practically every job that woman of her generation could take on. So she qualified herself to comment on on the situation of women. And then she had this extrordinary love affair. She went to Paris during the revolution. And she didn't believe in marriage. She had a baby with American lover. And she had a bad time with him. He was he was faithless. And so she's she's slightly turned into a romantic heroine. She is completely fascinating figure to may still. If you're just joining us. My guests is clear Tomlin. She's a biographer who's written books about Mary Wollstonecraft, the early feminist Charles Dickens, her new memoir is called a life of my own. We're gonna take a short break, then we'll be right back. This is fresh air..

Mary Wollstonecraft Mary Wollstonecraft Tomlin Tom Paris Charles Dickens United States Nick England Claire Tomlin Israel London Donald Trump San Francisco Sacramento Jane Austen Mary Walston John gross reporter
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:54 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross back with Claire Tomlin after writing biographies of dickens, Jane Austen, and the early feminist Mary Wollstonecraft Tomlin has written a memoir called a life of my own through her story. She tries to tell a larger story of British women of her generation. She was born in nineteen thirty-three. She describes her conflicting desires to have children and a satisfying working life. It took a while. But she eventually had both. She gave birth to five children one died in infancy when we left off. We were talking about her son, Tom who was born with spina bifida a birth defect in which the baby's spinal cord has not fully developed or has not closed properly in the womb. Tom has never been able to walk or stand. And you wrote at some point you stop taking him to the playground because it was painful for him. And for you to watch the other children. Able to do things that he'd never be able to do. Yes. I can remember him looking at the children. Quite recently. He said to me I was talking to him about this. And he said he said, well, I believe then when I grew up I would be able to walk. And it broke my heart. And he said that it hadn't crossed my mind. But of course, children have no idea what what is coming for them more. What there is in the world was quite natural Latisha thing that. When he was in his teens. I was bit heartbreaking because he would see other boys teenage boys and girls doing things, but she couldn't join in. He has had hard life, very hard life and quite a lonely life except for his family. Your husband, Nick who had you know. In the seventies. Become a pretty famous journalist in England. He went on a reporting trip to Israel. Just after the start of the kipper war when Syria and Egypt launched a surprise attack on Israel onion kipper, which is the holiest day of the year and the Jewish calendar. And he told you that he thought he'd be safe. He told you I wouldn't go anywhere dangerous now with four children with the Israelis know how to look after journalists and I'll be perfectly safe with them. While driving the frontlines. He was killed by Syrian heat guided missile and one of the things that really horrified you about his death was the idea of him dying alone. Chocolate. But about why that was such a horrible thought for you. I don't think anyone should die alone. I think we know dying. You really do need someone with you. And. It it. The German reporter who was the rang telephone mail after he got back and said that he heard Nick. Calling up saying is stub, of course. He didn't he didn't speak German. So what she called? That was I'm dying and terrible. Terrible. Latisha ivan. Awful. To that light think about it to this day terrible thing. So I absolutely insisted on his body being brought back to England. They wanted to bury him out there. I said, no he's he's got to come back otherwise for the children, if they don't see conc- his body, but they could see the coffin and his parents also. Otherwise, we just as he gone off once again, just not come back. Had to be funeral had to be somewhere where he was buried. Not seemed to be very important. I mean, these sorts of formalities are important in life. I think. You ready to change your life? When you realize you're now in charge of it. How did it change your life? Well, yes, because I was now in charge. I could now decide lots of things like what sort of Carter by bought my first call it was my car, which was absolutely wonderful. And I was then John gross. Who was the new statesman said, I must come. He wanted to go to the times resentment, and he thought I should come and be literature, the new states from and I had to decide whether to do that with two. Take a job or whether I to stay at home with children, and I talked about this with everyone works debated about it, and I decided, and I think the children agreed that it would be better for me to have a job. Why did you think it would be better to take the job because I think mothers who stay at home and live entirely through that children mean some people are very happy doing this. But I didn't think it was a very good idea. I by then my daughters miles daughter jobs was actually ready to go to Cambridge. So they will they will be goals. So your first biography biography of Mary Wollstonecraft, the early feminist who wrote a vindication of the rights of women which was published in seventeen ninety two and argued that women were the equals of men. How did this Astara look at feminism and Walston crafts life affect your understanding of your own life did it, and I should mention your biography of her was published in the mid nineteen seventy s. Well, it was rather interesting. I wrote it because. When I was taking maternity leave to have Tom the editor of the new statesman. I I've been working there already as deputy literary editor. And he said, we'll take leave and come back after the baby's born. But please keep writing pieces for the new statesman while you're taking leave, and that's how I wrote a page about Mary Wollstonecraft for the new statesman. And when it was published I got letters from agents publishers saying Russia biographer. That's how I didn't know what to do and Nikolai shut down together with piece of paper and pencil each pros and cons. Should I go back to the new statesman? Or should I try and write this book, and we both concluded that I ought to try and write the book. And so that's I decided to do that. The book is sort of associated when they cannot way it was helpful to me that his advice. And in fact, when he was killed. I had was just finishing writing the book. So it was the book Chris sort of bound up with that period of the end of his life. It was quite emotional. So did Mary Walston crafts writing. And how she lived her life. Affect how you lived your life. After your husband was killed. Well, studying how was amazing to me because I discovered this woman in the eighteenth century who seemed to be living life, very very much like mind, she was living in north London. She was working on the magazine, she was having difficult love affairs resit where all went once. She had a baby she was having having to deal with trying to work and have a baby. And this walking the streets of London that she had walked it seemed absolutely amazing to me, and she was so vivid in her letters writings and Gucci bench was getting average Paris to see the French revolution. And I went over to Paris. A good deal of the French rambling. And so I I it's sorta reinforced my interest in women's history. And it made me think much more deeply about how little really useful information. We got about women's lives in the past. How? We had biographies queens, and we had sort of books about actresses. But really close looking what women's lives in the past were like was Raleigh enroll the short supply. And I thought that is something I would really like to get my teeth into did her biography also give you a sense of strength or courage in pursuing an independent life. Yes, it did. And she was so interesting because she was all sorts of severe hardworking young woman who who've threw herself into all sorts of work. She works as governor. She tried to run off school. She she even helped one of her friends whose family was poor doing sewing work because she must people she took on practically every job that woman of her generation could take on. So she qualified herself to comment on on the situation of women. And then she had this extrordinary love affair. She went to Paris during the revolution. And she didn't believe in marriage if she had a baby with American lover and she had a bad time with him. He was he was faceless. And so she's she's slightly turned into a romantic heroine. She is completely fascinating figure to may still. If you're just joining us. My guest is clear Tomlin. She's a biographer who's written books about Mary Wollstonecraft early feminist, Charles Dickens, her new memoir is called a life of my own. We're going to take a short break, then we'll be right back..

Mary Wollstonecraft Mary Wollstonecraft Tomlin Tom Paris Charles Dickens Nick England London Claire Tomlin Israel Mary Walston Jane Austen Walston John gross conc reporter literary editor Carter
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:54 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross back with Claire Tomlin after writing biographies of dickens, Jane Austen, and the early feminist Mary Wollstonecraft Tomlin has written a memoir called a life of my own through her story. She tries to tell a larger story of British women of her generation. She was born in nineteen thirty-three. She describes her conflicting desires to have children and satisfying working life. It took a while. But she eventually had both. She gave birth to five children one died in infancy when we left off. We were talking about her son, Tom who was born with spina bifida a birth defect in which the baby spinal cord has not fully developed or has not closed properly in the womb. Tom has never been able to walk or stand wrote at some point you stop taking him to the playground because it was painful for him. And for you to watch the other children able to do things that he'd never be able to do. Yes. I can remember him looking at the children. Quite recently. He said to me I was talking to him about this. And he said he said, well, I believe then when I grew up I would be able to walk wrote, my heart, and he said that crossed my mind. But of course, children have no idea what what is coming for them more. What there is in the world was quite natural attrition thing. That. He was in his teens. I was bit heartbreaking because he would see other boys teenage boys and girls doing things which he couldn't join in. He has had heart life, very hard life and quite a lonely life except for his family. Your husband, Nick who had you know. In the seventies. Become a pretty famous journalist in England. He went on a reporting trip to Israel. Just after the start of the kipper war when Syria and Egypt launched a surprise attack on Israel onion kipper, which is the holiest day of the year and the Jewish calendar. And he told you that he thought he'd be safe. He told you I wouldn't go anywhere dangerous now with four children. But the Israelis know how to look after journalists and I'll be perfectly safe with them. Well, driving through the frontlines. He was killed by a Syrian heat guided missile and one of the things that really horrified you about his death was the idea of him dying alone. Chocolate about why that was such a horrible thought for you. I don't think anyone should die alone. I think we know dying. You really do need someone with you. And. It it. The German reporter who was the wrong telephone mail after he came back and said that he heard Nick. Calling up saying, of course, he didn't he didn't speak German. So what she called out? I'm dying and terrible. Terrible. Latisha ivan. Awful. To that light think about it to this day. Terrible thing. So I absolutely insisted on his body being brought back to England. They wanted to bury him out there. I said, no, he's he's come back otherwise for the children, if they don't see currency his body, but they could see the coffin and his parents also. Otherwise, we just as he got off once again and just not come back. Funeral had to be somewhere where he was buried that seem to be very important. I mean, these sorts of formalities are important in life. I think. You ready to change your life? When you realize you're now in charge of it. How did it change your life? Well, yes, because I was now in charge. I could now decide lots of things like what sort of car to buy. I bought my first call was my car, which was absolutely wonderful. And I was then John gross. Who's the new statesman said, I must come. He wanted to go to the times resentment, and he thought I should come and be literature. The new statesman, and I had to decide whether to do that with two. Take a job or whether I want to stay at home with children and talked about this with everyone works of debate about it. And I decided I think the children agreed that it would be better for me to have a job. Why did you think it would be better to take the job because I think mothers who stay at home and live entirely through that children. I mean, some people are very happy doing this. But I didn't think it was a very good idea by then right ocean miles daughter, Joe was actually registered go to Cambridge. So they were they will be girls. So your first biography biography of Mary Wollstonecraft, the early feminist who wrote a vindication of the rights of women which was published in seventeen ninety two and argued that women were the equals of men, how did this historical look at feminism and Walston crafts life affect your understanding of your own life did it, and I should mention your biography of her was published in the mid nineteen seventy s. Well, it rather interesting. I wrote it because. When I was taking maternity leave to have Tom the editor of the new statesman. I I've been working there already as deputy literary editor, and he said, we'll take leave and come back. After the baby's born. But please keep writing pieces for the new statesman while you're taking on maternity leave. And that's how I wrote a page about Mary Wollstonecraft, full the new statesman. And when it was published I got letters from agents, publishers say you mistrial biographer. I didn't know what to do and Nikolai sat down together with piece of paper and pencil each pros and cons. Should I go back to the new statesman? Or should I try and write this book, and we both concluded that I ought to try and write the book. And so that's how I decided to do that. The book is sort of aged when they cannot way it was helpful to me that his advice. And in fact, when he was killed. I had was just finishing writing the book. So it was the boot Chris sort of bombed up with that period of the end of his life. It was quite emotional. So did Mary Wollstonecraft writing and how she lived her life. Affect how you lived your life. After your husband was killed. Well, studying how was amazing to me because I discovered this woman in the eighteenth century who seemed to be living life, very very much like mine. She was living in north London. She was working on a magazine, she was having difficult love affairs. Whereas it were all when once she had a baby she was having having to deal with trying to work and have a baby and walking the streets of London that she had walked it seemed absolutely amazing to me, and she was so vivid in her letters and writings and Gucci bench was getting over to Paris to see the French revolution. And I went over to Paris. Roger goodell. French ramlet? So I I it's sorta reinforced my interest in women's history. And it made me think much more deeply about how little really useful information. We got about women's lives in the past. How? We had biographies of queens. We had sort of books about actresses. But really close looking what women's lives in the past relied was Raleigh enroll the short supply. And I thought that is something I would really like to get my teeth into did her biography also give you a sense of strength or courage in pursuing an independent life. Yes, it did. And she was so interesting because she was there all sorts of severe hardworking young woman who who've threw herself into all sorts of work. She worked as a governor. She tried to run off school. She she even helped one of her friends who family was very poor doing sewing work because she must people she took on practically every job that a woman of her generation could take on. So she qualified herself to comment on all the situation with women. And then she had this extraordinary. Love affair. She went to Paris during the revolution. And she didn't believe in marriage. She had a baby with American lover. And she had a bad time with him. He was he was faceless. And so she's she's slightly turned into a romantic heroine. She is completely fascinating figure to may still. If you're just joining us. My guests is clear Tomlin. She's a biographer who has written books about Mary Wollstonecraft, the early feminist Charles Dickens, her new memoir is called a life of my own. We're going to take a short break, then we'll be right back..

Mary Wollstonecraft Mary Wollstonecraft Tomlin Tom Paris Charles Dickens Nick England Claire Tomlin Israel London Jane Austen Roger goodell John gross reporter literary editor Nikolai Syria Joe
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Right. Now those were the days look back at this day in history brought to you by Brown Chevrolet is Frankenstein day author Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, was, born. On this day in seventeen ninety seven in the year eighteen eighteen at the age of twenty wrote the gothic horror novel we all know about Dr Henry Frankenstein scientists who created everybody's favorite lovable monster on this. Day in one, thousand nine hundred five major league baseball hall of. Famer, Tycom appeared in his first major league baseball game he of course played for the Detroit. Tigers fifty years ago today. Stars came out for. Charity as John and Yoko. Lennon hosted the one on one concert in New York's Madison Square Garden among guest appearing Stevie Wonder Roberta flack and over a half million, dollars, was. Raid to aid mentally retarded children nine hundred ninety three late show with David Letterman debuted on CBS Letterman letter just been over a decade on NBC just in case it comes up the bar tonight the first. Musical guest to appear on the new show was one Billy Joel birthdays Birthday happy birthday to you as we've, already pointed. Out you share your birthday with Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley who gave us the novel Frankenstein Ted Theodore Samuel Williams the kid the thumper the splendid splinter baseball hall of Famer. From the Boston Red Sox Ted Williams died July two thousand two birth date today Nineteen Thirteen John, swagger junior, NASA astronaut United, States Air, Force flew on Apollo. Thirteen one of just twenty four men to have flown to the moon died December nineteen eighty-two, birthdate John Phillips John mamas, and Papas, born on this, day nineteen thirty five would had. Been Eighty-three died March eighteenth two thousand one and last and least, actress Cameron Diaz today is, forty six The official office dress code today will include at least one item with number twenty on it and honor of mono Ginobili day in San Antonio a man who. Tried to drive.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley John Phillips Ted Theodore Samuel Williams Dr Henry Frankenstein baseball David Letterman Brown Chevrolet Cameron Diaz Madison Square Garden Billy Joel Boston Red Sox Tycom Tigers Roberta flack Detroit CBS Papas NBC New York Lennon
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Is the story of kitty marian as says on the cover and but for contacts you start looking at mary wollstonecraft and like how some of her ideas were perhaps a bit radical for the feminists that came later in this era in the early twentieth century so tell us why you wanted to start with her much just her ideas it's also her life you know we have so we struggle so much with women who do not fit a certain category he would just supposed to be well married virtuous and think good things and mary wollstonecraft wasn't like that a tool shijo number of children out of wedlock and i was fascinated as to why this woman who was so influential in her time and so powerful in had time wasn't used by the victorian period where i focused as i kind of a stepping stone to start off a really powerful feminist revolution because she wasn't an i was kind of investigating growth ring and i realized that it's it's down to her life it's down to the fact that she did have lovers and she did have children out of wedlock that victorian feminists or at least the kind of the dominant victorian feminism at that time really struggled with and it's a very personal reaction i think to kind of the world we're in today i i tend to use my history to or at least my research to try and understand better why we have the world we have now why we have so many problems with saks while we have so many problems with women and going back over the last hundred and fifty years is really what gives me an answer to that truth remarry and when did you first come across her so i was working in the archives at the museum of london and i was doing research for my phd and i was researching victoria kind of nineteenth century women in the music holes and kind of music hall in general because that's what i was fascinated in my family would trick cyclists in the nineteen eighteen thousand nine hundred until the nineteen thirties i so i grew up with a lot of stories about that and a little photographs and i just kind of found that time really fascinating and i'd always been told and i think a lot of people have the kind of the misconception that music hold is own kind of knees up mother brown and very star typically male and not a good place for women and my family were troupe of predominantly female trix ike lists so i already had this kind of background knowledge that the world wasn't quite what history had told us it was and i was really fascinated by that and i was sitting in limbo museum of london archive and the amazing curator those are wonderful woman go beverly kirk said fern i think you'll you're going really like something i've got this unpublished autobiography of musical artists that i think you're gonna gonna like but just see no she was also suffragette and i kind of massively roll my eyes at that point because i didn't want in that very millennial kind of oh i know what my rights are it doesn't matter to me anymore i didn't want to fool into the trap of studying suffrage because that feels like if you're a female historian the first thing people assume about us that you're going to be doing gender studies or you're going to be doing suffrage it's like the biggest kind of assumption female historians face and i find that very frustrating because we have incredible political military historians are female and they never seem to get the time or the exposure that male historians do so i i was very kind of anti being painted into a box but bev gave me this kind of type manuscript just pages and i remember sitting down and opening it up and kind of starting to read and within five pages on your i wasn't gonna leave because this absolutely incredible voice just left off the page and told me things i never knew i had no comprehension of about women about sex and about the fight for the vote and i realized very quickly that if i didn't know a someone who is studying history no one knew like the public don't know and that's the purpose of history for me and that's the purpose of being a historian is making sure everyone has access to the research we do unpublished both vergara fe would you use in the books of how much of that is though i say there's too tight bound volumes.

mary wollstonecraft fifty years
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Nation into one woman's journey i'm and i believe it's based on fox's own life story she's forced to reexamine her first sexual relationship in the stories we tell ourselves in order to survive it stars elizabeth debakey laura dern and jason ritter and i mean at sundance on the ground everybody was talking about this film it was the one i think i heard most people say oh my god the tail it you know i i can't stop thinking about it kind of a thing our writer justin morrow is written up kind of a retrospective on fox's career that you can also read on the site and by the way we will link to all of these posts that we mentioned on this week's podcast post in coming to theaters on may twenty fifth is mary shelley this bio pic was directed by haifa oman sore and it retails the love affair between poet percy shelley in eighteen year old mary wollstonecraft godwin which resulted in mary shelley aka mary wollstonecraft godwin writing frankenstein it features some of the brightest young actresses on earth with bell palley macy williams from game of thrones and l fanning as the titular mary emily sat down with almond sore who by the way is the first female saudi arabian filmmaker ever to talk about the challenges of doing a period piece and finding a kick ass producer who can help you conquer coproduction deals and tax incentives that interview will be on the site soon i'm interested in seeing that i wonder if the love affair actually did lead to her writing franken did it was up a good marriage or marriage or.

fox laura dern justin morrow mary shelley oman percy shelley mary wollstonecraft godwin macy williams producer franken jason ritter writer haifa mary emily almond eighteen year twenty fifth
"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"mary wollstonecraft" Discussed on WRVA

"To the right that block well the story of how it was created this become uh almost legend did in fact there was a film made by the pie kurt russell by a by uh uh with the russell a can rustle up the story goes that she and her event boyfriend percy shelley uh had travelled to italy uh specifically to go see lord byron and while they were there by written by the way the time with sort of the most famous person in the world he had left england because he was getting a little hot for him within sort of sexual escapades uh but they trail hold to italy they spent the summer living near him and and byron proposed a contest he said that we should all sit down and write a ghost story well percy shelley pretty much failed at it by britain rhody small fragment his companion john paul would dory wrote a wonderful piece called the vampire which became the first englishlanguage vampire novel and mary came up with this idea for a story about uh a student too late at night is busy uh re animating a court that became chapter four eventually of the novel frankenstein but it this is eighteen six dean she began working on it amazes she was i thought one years old when she published it was the c correct yes she was only nineteen when she can the idea is so they weren't these were wild children percy the famous english poet with only twenty four uh and uh byron wasn't much older uses a few years older than these were these were clearly very young people by our modern standards and yet uh she was remarkably mature she was she was expected to be a prodigy her parents were william god win the leading intellectual of england and mary wollstonecraft who had written the matt gives in to call the vindication of the rights of women uh and so there were a high expectations the pinned to her she died in eighteen fifty one way before she was going to make any money from uh i really the books in the in the subsequently i bet she'd have never even knew would be turned into a movie well that although she may have at the main queen of it because almost immediately after publication it became a.

kurt russell england italy john paul byron percy shelley lord byron dory mary wollstonecraft one years