25 Burst results for "Mary Shelley"

"mary shelley" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

04:56 min | 7 hrs ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"The creature this week is the magician's monster from castle Frankenstein in Germany. Now, yes, I didn't know this until this week, which is maybe kind of bad because we did three episodes covering Frankenstein on fictional, but castle Frankenstein is an actual place. Yeah, apparently castle Frankenstein overlooks the city of darmstadt, in Germany. And it's. Up for debate, whether or not Mary Shelley was inspired by the castle or even knew about it. That being said, the legends surrounding the magician's monster is pretty close to what made it into the Frankenstein novel. Another little link back to myth legend and fairytale, Mary Claremont, Mary Shelley's stepmother, was apparently a translator for the Grimm brothers. She allegedly received a letter from Jacob Grimm, about a folktale surrounding castle Frankenstein, a folktale apparently too dark for the Grimm brothers to print. Apparently, Johann dippel, who was born in the castle and who studied theology and philosophy, was also employed there as an alchemist. Most of this is thought to be myth, unlike everything we've discussed on the creature of the week segment in the past, which is complete fact, but diple claimed to be the creator of the elixir of life, which is exactly what it sounds like and also fake. He tried to buy castle Frankenstein with it, but was turned down. Instead, he turned to more. Sinister pursuits, according to legend. Like Victor Frankenstein, he allegedly dug up cadavers, sewed them together and brought a monster to life. The magician's monster, and because monsters are going to monster, it broke out, killed him, and fled into the forest. Despite having a perfectly good, creepy castle to live in. There, it's lonely, so it picks up children to play with. But it quickly tires of their crying and wanting to go home. So yeah, it has them over for dinner, but not in a good way. And yes, according to legend, that is apparently the line for Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, when it comes to child murder, because that story is just, quote, horrible. In reality, Johann dippel, the magician part of the magician's monster, lived in the castle as a, quote, avid dissector, and published a pamphlet where he claimed to have discovered an elixir that would keep him alive until the age of one 35. A year later he died of a stroke. He was also well known for dippel's oil. A, quote, byproduct of the destructive distillation of bones. A dark viscous, tar like liquid with an unpleasant smell, it's primarily used as an animal and insect repellent, but during the Second World War, it was used to render wells undrinkable in the deserts of Egypt and Libya. And I guess because the oil was not lethal, it was claimed to not be in breach of the Geneva protocol. Which I don't know, if you're saving grace is that it technically wasn't a war crime because the thing itself wasn't lethal. You kind of lost the thread at that point, I think. Anyway, back to castle Frankenstein. It, I guess should come as no surprise has not one but three legends associated with it. Apparently a dragging used to hang out by the wall before a guy named George fought it to protect his love. Anne Marie. George killed it before it poisoned him, both died in a deadly, pokey hug, an Emory died of a broken heart, making it a completely tragic ending. There's also a fountain of youth nearby. Unrelated to the elixir of life. Apparently hidden behind the herb garden, the fountain of youth bubbles. A mall purges night, April 30th, elderly women come by and undergo a test of courage and the one who succeeds gets to be rejuvenated to the age she was on the night of her wedding. I wish I knew what the test of courage was. Sorry. For me, it would be like public speaking or dealing with a tiny snake. I'd probably just opt to stay old. Anyway, that's the legend of the magician's monster, with lesson being, if you're going to stitch a bunch of cadavers together and bring it to life, you have to be responsible for it. Teach it how to behave, clean up after it, care for it, don't lock it in your dungeon or chase it off into the forest forbidding it to return under pain of death. You know, basic parenting. And to wrap this up, I don't mean to be pedantic, but calling it castle Frankenstein is actually a common mistake. The correct way to refer to it is castle Frankenstein's monster. That's it for this week. Myths and legends is by Jason and Carissa weiser. The theme song is by broke for free, and the creature of the week music is by Steve combs. There are links to more of the music we used in the show notes. Thank you so much for listening and we'll see you next time.

Johann dippel Mary Shelley Mary Claremont Grimm brothers Jacob Grimm diple Germany Wilhelm Grimm darmstadt dippel Victor Frankenstein Jacob George Libya stroke Anne Marie Geneva Egypt Emory Carissa weiser
Andrew Klavan Discusses 'The Truth and Beauty'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:21 min | Last week

Andrew Klavan Discusses 'The Truth and Beauty'

"Things that I just loved about this book, and there's so many things. But you bring these figures to life. When you describe coleridge and keats and all of them. And I realized that's something that also had fallen out of fashion by the time that I was in college. In the 80s, where we didn't seem to care about these figures as figures. And you sort of you bring them to life. So in some ways, it's not a novel, but there are a lot of fun stories in this book about amazing, crazy, brilliant people trying to work these things out in their lives and in their art. But if you think about it, Britain is an island the size of Oregon. And on it in this one generation, or it's two generations of the same time, is coleridge, wordsworth, Blake, Shelley, keats and Byron. The 6th greatest poets in the English language besides Shakespeare and Milton are all living together on this island. And so they're all nuts because they're poets. They're wild men. They're falling apart half the time. Coleridge is an absolute ruin of a human being. Byron has screwing everybody male or female, he can get his hands on. Shelly wants to be doing that. But isn't quite. And then, and one of the people that I deal with is Mary Shelley, one of my favorite chapters in the book is on Frankenstein because Mary Shelley adores Shelley. She adores this man she's run off with his left his wife and she's run off with them. And she adored and worshiped her father and now she adores and worship Shelley. And he's basically treating her as Byron and Shelley treated all the women they came in. He was basically like crap. And he believes in free love and he doesn't know why she's so depressed when her children die. He's depressed. She's not paying attention to him. And she writes this book, Frankenstein, where she says it's about a man who tries to steal God's thunder by creating life. But I point out that we all create people create life. We create life of the things that we have. What Frankenstein, what doctor Frankenstein does is increase life without a woman. And her nightmare is essentially the nightmare of femininity, the female aspect of life and femininity and womanhood, becoming obsolete.

Coleridge Keats Shelley Byron Mary Shelley Frankenstein Wordsworth Blake Milton Shakespeare Britain Oregon Shelly
"mary shelley" Discussed on Trivia With Budds

Trivia With Budds

06:58 min | 3 months ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Trivia With Budds

"Number 6 in it's the great pumpkin Charlie Brown Linus faints after he mistakes the shadowy figure of blank for the tight chiller ghoul, who is the shadowy figure that Linus faints after seeing. Number 6. Number 7, which U.S. presidents ghost is reported to be seen most frequently at The White House. Is it Abe Lincoln or JFK 50 50 there? A lot of similarities between those two. If you've seen some of those lists, is it Abe Lincoln or JFK haunting The White House, most often, number 7. Number 8, Mary Shelley's 1818 novel Frankenstein, what is doctor Frankenstein's first name? What does doctor Frankenstein's first name number 8? Question number 9, dial M for blank is Alfred Hitchcock's only film shot in 3D dial M for blank as Alfred Hitchcock's only film shot in 3D. Number ten, what's the Steve Buscemi voiced villain's name in monsters Inc? What is the Steve Buscemi voiced villain's name in monsters Inc? And the bonus for two points, which SNL alum played Vincent Price in the 2010s on the hit show Saturday Night Live. For two points which SNL alum played Vincent Price in the 2010s on SNL. Happy Halloween everybody, go trick or treating, and when you come back, we'll go over the answers to this quiz. We are back with the answers to Halloween related trivia. I have dressed up as Mario from Mario kart this year. We got a inflatable Mario kart costume that just goes over your shoulders and I think it's for children. It says all sizes for children, but if it was eating bigger, it'd be kind of hard to move around in it, so I wore it this past weekend, had a great time. And saw no other Mario kart costumes, and a lot of kids came up to me and were like high 5 in. A lot of Mario's and Luigi's and wario's and waluigi's came up for high 5s. It was very cool. One of my favorite costumes that we just kind of threw together. My wife got it at a bin store where they have just all these crazy bins full of return products to Amazon. They're very popular down here in northeast Tennessee. So she got it for like $3 over the summer. She's like, this could be fun for something. And lo and behold, it was. Tell me about your Halloween costumes on social media, send me a message, a DM, or post something and tag me in it. Ryan buds on Instagram or trivia with buds on Facebook, I would love to see listener costumes that will be so cool. All right, here we go, question one and what city did Warren encounter werewolves and his hit song? Werewolves of London. Number two, Michael Jackson's iconic thriller came out 1982. I would have guessed 84, but it was 82 for thriller. Showed my daughter annabelle that for the first time, she said some kids were talking about it at school and said it was real scary. So she goes, can we watch it? And I go, yeah, you could watch thriller. And she was scared at the beginning when he turns into the werewolf. I go, but just wait, they're just going to dance. And she's like, why would they dance? And I'm like, it's the power of the 80s. Number three, who wrote the music for the film Halloween? Including it's now famous theme. John Carpenter, from the first Halloween, he directed it. He wrote the music. He was a Jack of all trades on that first movie or two. Number four, what radiohead song starts with the line when you were here before, that's creep, which is what I look like to strangers when I'm not in the Mario costume because I shaved my beard into a mustache. Sorry, mustache listeners. Unless you're like real hip looking or you're very clearly someone's older father that likes blue oyster cult. If you just have a mustache, people do not look at you the same way for my experience. If you smile at somebody in public with a mustache, I kept forgetting I had one. And I would smile at people. They kind of give you a nod back. All right, stop that. Stop smiling at me. So creep is the key word with a mustache. Number 5, from what country does the practice of decorating jack-o'-lanterns originate Ireland? Ireland stingy Jack had a bargain with Satan and he used a turnip to light his way. So originally Jack lanterns were carved out turnips. And of course, a little easier to do with a bigger pumpkin. Ireland. Number 6, in it's the great pumpkin Charlie Brown Linus faints when he sees the shadow of Snoopy, thinking it's the great pumpkin, but it's Snoopy. Number 7, which U.S. president's ghost is reported to be seen most frequently at The White House, it's Abraham Lincoln. He will wrestle you in The White House, big fan of wrestling, Abe Lincoln. He was a mark for Tables, Ladders & Chairs matches if he ever got to see those. He was always wrestling people, I read. And his ghost all over that White House. Number 8, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, doctor Frankenstein, his first name is Victor, or Frankenstein, if you've seen young Frankenstein. And it's Victor. And this is a fun bonus question. What is the name of his assistant in the 1931 movie, Frankenstein? It's not Igor, Igor was created for young Frankenstein, and people know that because the popularity of that movie, but I think the name was Fritz in that movie 1931, and in the original book had no assistant. So some fun facts for you. Number 9, dial M for murder is Alfred Hitchcock's only film shot in 3D murder. Number ten, what Steve Buscemi's voiced villain's name in monsters Inc Randall, just watched Steve Buscemi in a fun cameo where he robs Abby on broad city, which I'm going through and watching for the second time, very funny show on Hulu. If you want to watch them all, and I've got, I think, 6 episodes left of the final season and that'll be my second go through. But go watch broad city. And see him in a funny role and an episode on broad city coming out this Friday. I wrote questions based on the show. So if you like broad city, listen this Friday. And the bonus for two points, which SNL alum played Vincent Price in the 2000s on the hit show that was legendary voice actor and comedian Bill Hader so funny on Barry and on the show and look up his Vincent Price sketches. They're great. That is it for today's episode. I hope you had a great time. I promised one extra fact about the Halloween spirit to close it out. So here it is that last fact of the day, the word which comes from an old English word, meaning wise woman. That's right. A lot of witches out there are just wise women, not looking to curse you. No need to burn them in Salem. They are wise women. And I think I'm married to one. One of the wisest thanks for listening. Thanks for telling a friend about this show. Thanks for having a happy Halloween, and we'll see you next time for more trivia with buds. Cheers. And chills.

Abe Lincoln Steve Buscemi Linus Frankenstein Vincent Price monsters Inc Alfred Hitchcock White House SNL Mario kart villain waluigi Mary Shelley Charlie Brown bin store Ryan buds Mario wario Saturday Night Live
"mary shelley" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

05:53 min | 3 months ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"I got a new game Spartan. It's called hide the soul and guess what? You're it. Let's talk about hellraiser three. Hellraiser three is very different than the first two, but I think again. Fun. It's more of trying to be a little bit more mainstream, I guess, kind of more Hollywood than the first two. How do they try and make it more Hollywood? Because I would never got into hellraiser because it was very dark and I never connected with it for whatever reason. Have you ever tried three? I have not tried three. I think you might want to. The tone is just a little different. That's by more mainstream. Okay. It's more of a what you think of a Hollywood horror versus the dark, extreme darkness. It could be the reason why, like you said, why it had to happen. And this one has some great nudity too. Has some really sexy scenes in it. And it also is a great soundtrack. And I had this soundtrack and I'll tell you the reason why. Because this is back when you couldn't just buy one song. And it has an amazing version of hellraiser, which is Ozzy's tune off of no more tears. Co written by lemmy, and motorhead has a version on this called hellraiser. And it's better than Ozzy's version. Oh, I'll have to check it out. So yeah, it's really, really good. Nowadays you can do that. You don't have to buy the whole album. You could just buy the site. So how many hellraisers is there? 7? Okay, so this is another one. Check that though. I want to say that's right. Hellraiser series. It was a really simple hellraiser. To three bloodline for inferno, hell seeker, debtor, hell world, revelations, judgment, and is there a new one coming out? Oh yeah, I guess if you count that. Two, three, four, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, ten. No. How could there be so many? Next year we're going to do tenth installments. So it's probably fine. Okay, gosh. The best. So are there any of these any good? I mean, if you like that world and that premise, then they're all worth watching. I fall asleep to them sometimes. Yeah. So once again, this is something where Clive Barker wrote this and it's an Eli with Gavin fever. He did it or hostile. He makes one. He does two hostels. Someone buys the rights and others 6 other hospitals or whatever. There's the worst cabin fever sequel is terrible. Don't ever watch it. But I'm assuming it's the same without razor. Clive, they probably bought Clyde out on bloodline or whatever it is, and they just put them on every two, three, four, 5 years. And he's just collects the checks, right? Nothing wrong with that though. Well, I mean, listen, if you're going to do that. I told Damon Leone, you're going to do the same thing. There's going to be Arthur clown in space. They always end up in the clown in space, please. Make that happen. Son of Frankenstein, which is great because we're going back to probably 1942 or whatever. Are you a fan of these old types older universal films? Oh my God, it's for sure. And I definitely, when I write for a finger, I usually write about the classics because I just don't feel they get enough attention and respect. But it's strange to me because you don't like slow movies. It's just like, how to explain it. It takes a lot for me to love it if it's slow. So that's saying a lot. You know, it's like I want the action, but yeah, I fall in love with the look and the atmosphere and just these old stories are just so beautiful. Do you like kind of the way it's shot or do you like this? All of it is just a wonderful time. I just love the look of that. I guess there's something different about old school. Versus current slow. You know, they just had different styles of filmmaking. Well, once again, it's whatever you are into. And this is how I say it all the time. This is how I was weaned on horror movies because I think I've told you before. I was allowed to watch the late night, you know, creature features on a Saturday night, which start at midnight, that show too. This is pre VHS, so my mom would let me watch them, but I would have to go to sleep first. So I would go to sleep at ten 30, and I'd set my alarm for midnight. Aw. Yeah. And if I woke up and I remember like one 9 times out of ten or ten, but I did with the one time out of ten, I did. I'm so mad at myself. Because each week was two new movies and it was all universal stuff and hammer. So once obviously hammers is kind of a more violent version, but it's still very, it's very British. But very cool. And I grew up on all these movies and son of Frankenstein vividly remember seeing it. And I think when we did our top ten, I mentioned Frankenstein because there is a tone and a feel to it. And I love that. If you can get into the vibe of old movies and really just get out of the head, it's probably why who cares. There's some real cool stuff and also two son of Frankenstein is kind of famous because it has basil rathbone who was Sherlock Holmes, Boris Karloff, who's Frankenstein, and Bela Lugosi, who's Dracula. So it's kind of like an all star. Exactly. You can't ask for better than that. I don't think it was based on any Mary Shelley novels or whatever, and you know, I don't know exactly where I even remember what it was about, but there is a cool factor to the fact that there's three of these. And they were big, they were big movies. This would be like, you know, saw or like, oh, they got another Frankenstein movie came out. We're going to get big bucks in here, right? So let's go to. I would kill for that now. That would be amazing.

Hollywood Ozzy Gavin fever Damon Leone Arthur clown lemmy motorhead Clive Barker Clive Clyde Frankenstein basil rathbone Boris Karloff Bela Lugosi Sherlock Holmes Mary Shelley
"mary shelley" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:32 min | 9 months ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Mary wollstonecraft Godwin was born in summerstown, London, on August 30th, 1797. Her father, William Godwin, was a radical British political thinker, and an atheist, which was extremely uncommon at the time. Her mother, Mary wollstonecraft, was an art and feminist who in 1792 published a vindication of the rights of woman. Sadly, just 11 days after Mary was born, her mother passed away due to birth and complications. Mary was raised alongside fanny Godwin. A half sister on her mother's side. Though fanny was not his biological child, William adopted her and raised her as his own. In 1801, William remarried, his new wife brought with her two children of her own and a few years later a 5th child John the family. All of the children were educated in the home and due to his radical beliefs, William didn't differ their education based on sex. Mary was an intellectual child and learned a bit of Latin, Greek, French, and Italian. Because her father ran in London's intellectual circles, the children were exposed to various thinkers and scientists at the time, whose work would later influence Mary's writing. When Mary was 14, her father sent her to live in Scotland. During one of her returns from Scotland, she got to know a young man by the name of Percy bis Shelley, who was an admirer of her father's. Percy came from a posh family. His father was a conservative member of parliament, in person who wanted to rebel against everything his father stood for. Though he attended Oxford, he was kicked off a distributing a pamphlet called the necessity of atheism. Despite the fact that Percy had a wife, Mary and Percy fell in love. In 1814, the pair eloped and spent time traveling throughout Europe, though they couldn't legally marry as Percy was not divorced. After returning to England from their two month tour, Mary was pregnant. However, much like her own mother's experience, Mary's births weren't without tragedy. Her first child, a daughter, died only a few weeks after she was born. Soon after, Mary was pregnant with another child. She named him William after her father, but he too died in infancy. Several years later, Mary lost a third child. Another daughter who was barely a year old. Only Mary's fourth child also named Percy Shelley, survived to adulthood. In 1816, Mary set off again for Europe with Percy. This time, her stepsister Claire and Claire's lover, the poet lord Byron, joined the trip. Their travels brought them to a villa on the shores of Lake Geneva. Though the exact details of this trip are often disputed, a popular recounting claims lord Byron suggested to his villa guest that they all write a ghost story. This prompts spurred what would eventually become Mary's most famous novel. Frankenstein. Mary was just 18 when she wrote the story and only 19 when it was published anonymously. Frankenstein was the tale of a scientist who creates a man from parts of corpses and brings him to life. Some historians point to the ideas at the time about galvanism. And the ability to use electricity to reanimate human corpses as inspiration for the tale. Since his publication, readers have found various forms of deeper significance in the text. Some of these claims include that it's an allegory of the French Revolution and commentary on industrialism. Though Mary was not beginning to find literary success, tragedy was pervasive in her life. First, her sister fanny died by suicide. Then Percy's wife drowned herself while pregnant with his child. Despite these solemn events, Percy and Mary were we D just two weeks after hearing the news of her death. Mary and Percy decided to pick up and move to Santa renzo, Italy. There, Mary suffered a miscarriage in which she lost so much blood that she nearly died. In 1822, Percy embarked on a trip in his boat, the Don Juan. To meet up with several poets. On the return trip, a violent storm hit, and Percy, along with the rest of the crew on the boat, drowned in the gulf of spezia. He was only 29 years old at the time of his death. His death was hard on Mary, both emotionally and financially. She ran out of money and returned to London. Though nothing else she wrote paralleled the success of Frankenstein, she continued writing. She published several novels as well as other volumes of pros, including biographies, short stories, and travel writings. Mary did live to see her surviving son we D in the summer of 1848. 5 years later, at the age of 53, Mary died in her home in London. A month, we're highlighting prodigies for more information, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica podcast. You can order rise in troublemaker everywhere books are sold. Special thanks to creators, Jenny, and Liz Kaplan for inviting.

Mary Percy William Mary wollstonecraft Godwin summerstown fanny Godwin Percy bis Shelley William Godwin Mary wollstonecraft fanny London lord Byron Scotland Frankenstein Claire Percy Shelley Europe Oxford Lake Geneva Santa renzo
"mary shelley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

05:22 min | 10 months ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Motherhood. And this was something all these poets wrote about because almost all of them lost their mothers young. Wordsworth writes this beautiful passage in his autobiography autobiographical poem, the prelude, where he talks about how a mother by looking in her baby's eyes creates its humanity, connects it to the world through her love. This it turns out to be literally true. It turns out that we have these things called mirror neurons and they are set on fire by our interactions with our mother when we're a baby. And so mothers don't just turn matter into life. They also turn life into individuality into individual humanity. Now, this is something that Mary Shelley Mary Shelley, as this teenage girl, created the science fiction novel. This is the first real modern science fiction film. And if you look at science fiction over time, it tells a story about sciences antagonistic relationship to motherhood. If you look at dystopian novels like Brave New World or the giver, almost always. The first thing that happens is the mother has to go and Brave New World. They have children in machines in the giver. They relegate motherhood to the lowest woman in the society. If you look at a great science fiction movie, like terminator, the terminator, remember the machines are running the world, the human beings, are rebelling against the machines. So what do they do? They send a machine back in time. Arnold Schwarzenegger back in time to kill the rebel leaders mother. They understand that that's where his power comes from. That's where his training. His abilities come from. And the point that I think Mary Shelton was making. She may have been making it unconsciously, was that women have a special role to play in the creation of humanity, not just the obvious physical creation of humanity. But in the creation of true humanity of deep humanity, we have lost that sense right now. And one of the reasons I think we've lost it is because machinery has taken from women many of the tasks they used to perform. When you go back and you look at 31, Christians are always saying, I want a proverbs 31 woman. Probably 31 woman is not the housewife from leave it to beaver who vacuums with her wearing heels and pearls. Prime minister 31 woman is a businesswoman. She sells property. She creates food. She grows an Orchard. She sells the food she uses the money to buy more land. And she feeds and raises her children and she takes care of her husband and she gives her husband a good reputation. That's a lot to do. At this period that the romantics were writing in, the industrial revolution had destroyed and was in the process of destroying much of that economic power that women had. It suddenly closed, which women created, women were called the distaff because they used this distaff to make clothes with. Suddenly that was done in a factory. Suddenly food could be created in a factory. Suddenly children were leaving the farm to go and work in the city in a factory and not coming back so the value of children, which was something women supplied. Went down because they no longer helped in your old age and they no longer help took over your farm. All of these things serve to strip women of their place in society. So that's why that's why feminism got started right there. That's why the feminists start to say, you know, we need more rights. We need to be more involved in the world. We need to get out of the house and ultimately get out of the house. And what Mary Shelley came over time. She was one of the few of these writers who actually lived into the Victorian age and became a Victorian and started to write books about the urgency of women's domestic role of the home making role of the motherly role. She started to become more religious in her writing because she understood that this free love and this attack on the feminine nature, the nature of femininity, was destructive, not just to women, but to the humanity that women produce. And when you read Frankenstein that way, you get a very strong answer, a very strong response to these guys who are telling us now that a guy can become a woman that there's absolutely no absolutely no difference between a man and a woman and if you want to just switch over all you got to do is snap your fingers and all of a sudden you're a woman you can compete in their sports. You can have, you can have your period. You can have all of this nonsense that they're talking. It's deeply destructive, but it's not new. It is not new. It has been going on at least since the romantic period, and they were dealing with it in that moment. Some of the people who experienced the free love movement were some of the women were absolutely destroyed by it. Shelley's wife, the woman he left, drowned herself and the child she was carrying in her belly by another man. She drowned herself in the serpentine or body of water in the park. Her, the woman who had an affair with Byron, had a child, that child was taken away from her and was separated from her and died young. At the end, a lot of these women looked back on this era of free love and said, these men became monsters, controlled by lust, basically saying that women were no different than men that they needed nothing for men. They became monsters. And so we've been through a lot of this before. You know, it's not like this is a new thing that suddenly these guys discovered, oh, we can mess around with gender roles. This is something that's happened before, and these people had to deal with it. And I think Mary Shelley dealt with it as a nightmare. And she dealt with it in one of the most powerful. I mean, Frankenstein is one of the great novels. And it's certainly one of the greatest horror novels ever written. But it's a beautiful thoughtful book. It's not like the movie at all is a very beautiful thoughtful book. And this I think is its real subject..

Mary Shelley Mary Shelley Mary Shelton Wordsworth Arnold Schwarzenegger Mary Shelley Frankenstein Shelley Byron
"mary shelley" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on WCPT 820

"And then when David came over he knew he'd been exposed but he wore his mask the whole time we did the show He tested positive two days later I took a home test that day negative Then my brother said please don't come over for Christmas Eve 'cause I don't want to get it And then I got a PCR test the following Sunday and then another at home they were all negative Masking because he masked up helped me not get his germs on me And then I was vaccinated and he was fine and then Sean didn't even come over until he tested negative And it's like okay and we also have other filters in my house that help But when I go out and about I'm three masks up I have a can 95 mask a cloth mask and a neck gator because I don't want to get a sunburn on my neck And so if I run into anybody even outside because where I walk because I'm the crazy walking lady I've literally run into people coming on a corner Like if you can't see your virtue signaling you're not walking You're virtue signaling Yes I am sorry mister Maher You know it's like who cares if I'm wearing a mask Right It's like two guys kissing at a baseball stadium for people that don't like homosexual relationships Why are you looking at it Right There's a baseball game Yeah Exactly I mean I wear pants Is that a problem That's why with school It's a dress code issue That's where you can get away with masking and not have an issue Hey you've got to girls aren't allowed to wear you know sexy tops Or short short skirts which is ridiculous You can either freedom Take away their fruit They should be able to do that It's utter nonsense and it really gets me goad And at the core here's what they say You know Biden and Kamala Harris were against vaccines No No They didn't trust Trump Right They waited for the science when a known liars is a vaccine and it's coming before November Yeah you're going to be hesitant when the science says you know what We tested this trials research peer research It works Then they went here in public I'm getting it That's exactly what I said too I said if Trump says it's okay I'm waiting for Doctor Fauci Correct Or any other epidemiologists who studies the subject Exactly People didn't know I don't know Very good vaccine It's beautiful It's perfect It's actually perfect I did it I came up with it It's mine Right It's all his idea You're not going to trust that I wonder why Yeah and now that he's saying he's gotten vaccinated and been boosted he's getting booed Yep He created he's Mary Shelley He created this monster and he can't stop it Exactly You're exactly right And on that note it's 48 minutes after the hour This portion of the Stephanie Miller show is brought to you by pajama Graham Guys It's Valentine's Day Guys Valentine's Day Are you still looking for a great Valentine's Day There you go I got the idea I got it Okay ready Yes Naturally nude pajamas Nude Yes The word nude is in it They are sensuous and smooth They feel just like her own soft skin to like it when you pet her well She's wearing them Heavy petting Very much so She'll love slipping into these every night They're so soft and luxurious they'll melt away her stress Oh my goodness I'm my goodness She'll let the feeling of wearing next to nothing at all next to nothing kids and you'll love the way they look Check them out at pajama gram dot com Best of all every pajama gram includes free that's it free gift packaging which means you don't have to wrap a thing because I'm a terrible rapper So please Wiki wiki wiki Yeah Not that kind of not that kind of wrap Tim Conway was very good at it And unwrapping he could unwrap it and you could rewrap it He never tore anything Okay He's really weird like that So get hurt actually new pajamas Just go to pajama gram dot com or text the word gift that is GAF T to four one two three four again text the word gift to four one two three four to order.

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"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"Was caused by volcanic eruption that happened halfway around the world in indonesia and it affected weather all over the world. The marion her friends did not know that at the time stuck inside for days at a time she and her friends would sit around the fire and tell each other german ghost stories. This gave byron the idea to challenge his guests to each write their own ghost story at first. Mary couldn't think of a story. She was starting to become anxious. Then when evening. The conversation turned the idea that it might be possible to somehow. Bring the dead back to life at the time. Scientists were experimenting with frogs and had found that dead frogs legs would twitch if an electrical charge was run through them. They call this galvin ism and it would be the inspiration for mary's ghost story. She began writing that night staying up well past midnight. That goes story is the same one. We talked about at the beginning of the episode frankenstein. Mary thought this would just be a short story. That should share with her friends but personally encouraged her to keep writing and frankenstein became mary's first novel. We've already talked about how frankenstein was actually the doctor who created the monster in the book but another thing that might surprise you as that the monster wasn't actually a bad guy at first either in the book that hulking green creature was indeed scary to the people he met after he ran away from dr frankenstein but he really just wanted to learn about them and live his life. In fact the monster secretly helps a poor family by gathering firewood for them in clearing the snow from their walkway at night he hides in a shed and watches them for months. He learns language from them. He sees how kind and supportive. They are towards each other and starts to think of them as friends but when he tries to talk to one of them the family is terrified and attacks him the creature only becomes a real monster after he realizes that people will always fear and chase him away because of how different he looks in a way the stories about how people treat others who are different from them and what. It's like to feel like you don't belong. Everyone feels out of place sometimes and it's important to be kind to those who look or act differently from us after she wrote frankenstein. Mary shelley went on to write several other novels and short stories as well as books about her travels. She carried on writing and editing in order to support her family. She worked hard to make sure that her husband's poetry continued to be printed and that her son had a good education and a good life. Her son percy loved mary dearly and.

frankenstein Mary dr frankenstein mary galvin byron indonesia Mary shelley percy
"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"Have you heard of frankenstein. Maybe you've seen this pretend monster in movies or books. He's often depicted as being tall and strong with dark hair. Green skin and stitches holding him together since he was created by dr frankenstein. That's where frankenstein actually got his name from the mad scientist. Who created him. Dr frankenstein farewell leave you. And then the last of humankind whom these is will ever behold farewell frankenstein. These are the lines from the novel. Frankenstein written around two hundred years ago. That's how old the story of frankenstein is. Did you also know that. The novel is one of the most famous pieces of writing in history. Now let's take a closer look at the woman behind. The novel named mary. Shelley mary shelley was born in london in seventeen ninety seven. Her mother was a philosopher and writer named mary wollstonecraft and her father. William godwin was a philosopher novelist and journalist both their parents were well-known thinkers who challenged how things worked in the late eighteenth century mary. Wollstonecraft spoke out for women's rights and william godwin criticized the british government system especially the monarchy. Which means a country. Run by kings and queens. Sadly mary's mother died shortly after she was born. This left william to raise mary along with her older. Half sister fanny alone. Her father wrote a book about his wife and later mary was able to read it later. She also read the books. Her mother had written and was brought up cherishing. Her memory overall mary's earliest years were happy ones. Mary's father gave her an education that was different for her time. Mary briefly attended a boarding school. But for most of her childhood she had a governess and a daily tutor. Her father william also taught her about a wide range of subjects. William ran a publishing company and mary grew up surrounded by the books games and maps that the company sold. She learned roman and greek history by reading the books her father published. Her father also had a large library and many interesting well educated friends who marry got to meet and interact with a few of these friends. Were very well known. Such as the poet. Samuel taylor coleridge and the former vice president of the united states. Aaron burr william also enjoyed taking his children on field trips as part of their education. Mary enjoyed learning. And this homeschooling arrangement worked well for her. When she was fifteen her father described her as singularly bold somewhat imperious and active of mind. Her desire for knowledge is great and her perseverance. In everything she undertakes is almost invincible. In other words she was curious dedicated. And maybe a little stubborn mary. I met the poet and philosopher. Percy bish shelley. When she was in her late teens he was a friend of her father's would visit the family often. Mary and percy began meeting each other secretly. Had her mother's grave in the churchyard of saint pancras old church. Eventually they fell in love. The couple secretly left.

mary William godwin dr frankenstein Dr frankenstein Shelley mary shelley mary wollstonecraft frankenstein Frankenstein Wollstonecraft Mary william british government fanny Aaron burr william queens london Samuel taylor coleridge William Percy bish shelley united states
"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"A message to parents and other adult listeners. From our sponsor who services we highly recommend something preventing you from being happy and achieving your goals if so click. The lincoln are shows description or go to better help h. e. l. p. dot com for slash bedtime history. Better help is designed to assess your needs and match you with your own licensed professional therapist and with better help you can get the help you need in a safe and private online environment. It's super convenient. And you can start talking to a licensed.

"mary shelley" Discussed on Classic Ghost Stories

Classic Ghost Stories

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Classic Ghost Stories

"Not giving him the benefit of the doubt not giving a break not letting him show any goodness and damning him completely. So yes something the frankenstein. Mary shelley call it the the the modern Theus so yeah. So i think that's what that's about it's ineffective story is very simple and it cooks down to the end and we get that mounting tension and then the things revealed. Oh yeah the only thing i would say for show as we are told that the ws character was a policeman but not until he's being a policeman so it might have been better if there have been so i'm hinted the beginning that red herring wasn't a saying. Oh it's a woman that was just to throw us off. I wasn't massively convinced by the but if at that point we had some some information that would made us link the character to being a police officer then later on at the end we will go. How when the policemen would have dawned on us. Although it may have dawned on us. And i suppose that is a fourth case. So we've got narrator withhold information we. We may have information that the character doesn't have to and all we might be both into dock but this a one where the the writer the author does not give information but we guess it because about cultural familiarity with this type of story so when the policemen pays some of you will have been saying. What's going on here is not the author. Who's done that for you. You have guessed up because of your familiarity with this kind of story but going back to the point. If we'd been at some point early on that there was some liquid police we would have either big a ha moment. I think i think the reason. Ls hotly didn't do it lp. Holly the only initials didn't do it is because it possibly would collapse the story. We will just guess too much. It would become too obvious. And i think probably couldn't have done not although it would have created a bigger aha because if you give too much inflammation it would have just become playing what was happening. And we would have lost the suspense so yeah. I think there's a good story was recommended by a reader. Listen listening reader viewer. Whoever it was recommended as story story a new and it was nice and short which i like a welcome stories from recommended that i particularly ones. I haven't read. Get loads of those are actually the only issues that some people recommend stories novel and and they're just they're just too long because a novel use something like ninety thousand words it takes. That's something like iraq. In a thousand words is ten minutes so it's ninety thousand minutes which is divided by six days fifteen hours if that was correct..

Mary shelley Holly iraq
"mary shelley" Discussed on The Leader

The Leader

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on The Leader

"If you've never seen universal's nineteen 1931 movie version of the story give it a while. It's much scarier than you might think. So is the novel powered by shelley's immortal. Incredibly forward thinking central theme can humans create artificial life. And what happens if we do monster munster created by a man they called. Med is turned loose to strike terror into the hearts of men. The writer jeanette winterson has been thinking about this for a while a couple of years bags. These frank kiss stein inspired by shelley story but also exploring intelligence her new book twelve. Bytes takes that further with a series of essays. Asking how did we get here. And where are we doing. Some of it is quite scary. Genetic appearing the evening standard stories festival in association with netflix in september. And she's with me now. I expect when most people think about ai. Probably about jeff bezos amazon's alexa or elon. Musk and tesla self driving cars. But actually this idea of creating a new life doesn't belong to billionaire blogs doesn't this goes way back to mary shelley. I'm frankenstein yes. That's exactly right david when i was rereading frankenstein frankenstein. Two years ago. I realized that it was much more than a gothic novel or novel about women's education at the world's most famous monster that it was a message in a bottle to the future. Because she she had this extraordinary vision the new life form. Which is what. Victor frankenstein creates would depend on electricity. Which was an entirely new force. Then it wasn't in any practical use that an although she conceded the lifelong is being made of discarded body parts of the graveyard Victor frankenstein puts together. She knew the in order to set it going. It was going to have to be driven by electric which is astonishing because come mutational technologies entirely dependent.

shelley frank kiss stein jeanette winterson jeff bezos netflix Musk mary shelley tesla Victor frankenstein ai amazon david
"mary shelley" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"See. He says not begun. Mary shelley herself said it was a man who essentially was playing god. But he's not playing god he's making life out of the things that are already there. Which is what men do already what he's playing this. He's playing a woman he's bringing life into the world without a woman. And i really do believe that. That is part of the fantasy the feminist fantasy of equality justice ginsburg ruth bader ginsburg when she was ruling which was actually dissenting against a decision that she thought limited abortion rights said that in order for women to be equal to realize their full potential that is intimately connected with their ability to control their reproductive lives in other words they have to be able to kill their babies in order to be equal with men. They have to stop being women. In order to be equal with men they are accepting an idea of strengthen idea of equality that comes from that infantile. mind that the idea of female empowerment is that idea is essentially the idea of becoming a male and that a woman's equality is dependent on her not being a woman. The thing is. This is what. I was talking about before about being interdependent about being defined by a relationship with other people about being wives and husbands brothers and Children and neighbors that part of the relationship between men and women is part of what a man is and part of what a woman is is defined by their relationship to one another and what what is at the center of that relationship is the fact that women have children in having children they become infinitely valuable but infinitely vulnerable when a woman is pregnant. Obviously she's has got to be protected and the fact that her offspring are the offspring of the world is the future of the human race makes her infinitely valuable in protecting a woman. A man puts himself at risk. And what superheroes do is they eliminate all that they eliminate the since they're virtually immortal. They eliminate the need for sexuality reproduction at all since they are invulnerable they are not taking a man is not taking any risk in defending a woman and since the woman is just as strong as he is. She doesn't need to be protected. They are essentially getting rid of the gendered embodiment of humankind as an imagination of the future. Without human beings. We are sacrificing our human being our humanity to get rid of gender to get inequality to get rid of death and the thing is. I'm not sure that's going to look as good as people think. Does you know right now you. We saw how people reacted to the flu. The chinese flu if you can live forever you won't live forever you'll still be subject to accident. You can't live more than eight hundred years without the chance of having a fatal.

ginsburg ruth bader ginsburg Mary shelley flu
"mary shelley" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Played a prank on. Okay so the movie. I just stayed. Mary shelley me and dog booze. We pretend to have a huge argument onset just just debate. Just take freak everyone out and like l. Finding internet too and tom. Sorry as well named jumping. Yeah i mean had this huge humongous audible. They had to finish. Stop filming scream each other then halfway through and was like panic but these two and now they're they're engaged. Yeah and you seemed very very shocked but no. I didn't know they were dating lindsey to answer your question which i didn't respond to know. I didn't know they were dating. I am very very mixed between like it's like i'm surprised i don't i didn't know but also like i'm exa- i'm pretty much aware i didn't why didn't know you know what i mean this interview. You called though is kind of funny. She says quote. He was playing percy shelley and elle fanning was playing mary. I played claire. Clairmont mary stepsister. That's when we fell in love god. Okay it's as simple as that you know who he looks like hell kind of other people in mary shelley aka tom sturridge. He just looks like all the data. Tom sturridge. Yeah the actual breaking news. Though the actual was pretty breaking broke the broke the breaking news that people will actually like suffer consequences from like things will break in their house when they hear this. Nick cannon's newest child was born but wasn't his other child. His last newest was just born. The twins were just born so this is the latest newest. who is zen remember. There was zillionaire. Yeah and then zillionaires twin. Whose name i forgot. And now there's elissa scott who was the dancer on wild now and she just gave birth to a child named zen z's very trendy in the in the canon households you know why because it's like not that nick has to follow know rules of monogamy. But i'm like which woman is he with. You know it's unclear. It's any of us giving all of them equal attention which prompts him. If he's able to do it is he a polygamist like i am like what's going on. Is this a poly legal. I don't know what it is but everyone seems happy. Like i don't know what it is. But i'm impressed by the fact that it seems to be working like so prove me. Rose scott had nick cannon seventh child and fourth baby in the year. That's the good dealers reported by. I forget which. I don't know which alex's but says has seemingly arrived there cannot confirm. Nobody wanted to make a call to the registry or whatever seemingly if this were like pbs playhouse like seemingly would be the word of the week you know like the secret where this weakest seemingly because seemingly as all over the place. So let's see today.

Tom sturridge mary shelley Clairmont mary stepsister percy shelley elle fanning elissa scott nick cannon lindsey tom claire Rose scott nick alex
"mary shelley" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Bush is on the other line weber. Voices back baby all of the The guesses we had in the call in line of who you are who you sounded like some multiple. I can't promise i won't happen again. It's only it's only july. I'm gonna violate your trust. Lindsey and i'm gonna read a text you set me earlier on air because i'm like still kind of shocked by it. What did i say. It was actually only what eleven minutes ago. Oh oh texted me. The following a link to a people story with this text following up from lindsey. I didn't know they were dating. And it's the headline bell. Palley and douglas booth are engaged quote. We're very very happy. 'cause you know that they were dating no but i'm sorry sincerely thomas engagement of listening booth and bell palley being like I didn't know they were dating. I was expecting like jennifer lopez and ben. Affleck you'll well. It turns me fits into our show bell palley. But it's just funny because they're each like bellies like the girl from the teenage girl movie. That really good movie. That came out with diarrhea teenage girl. She's girl. Douglas booth is from that flop. Romeo and juliet reboot. That came out a while ago. Who may or may not be related to. John wilkes but probably not right. Who has the face of a british actor. Tell me that guy doesn't look british so does she. Actually they both have extremely british actor faces him. Especially he's from greenwich london. Which i think is actually fancy. And she's from someplace claw hammersmith posh haji tauch. They both seem like they're from 'push neighborhoods on the set of the movie. Mary shelley another kind of no one saw. Really the the elle fanning. Mary shelley Were they were like. Let's put elle fanning and a movie about mary shelley and make. Let's cast her as me. Mary shelley and no one will see us and no one thought.

bell palley douglas booth Palley weber Lindsey juliet reboot lindsey Bush Affleck jennifer lopez booth John wilkes thomas ben diarrhea Mary shelley Romeo haji tauch greenwich london
"mary shelley" Discussed on Bitches on Comics

Bitches on Comics

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Bitches on Comics

"And they're both girls by the way so talk about bitches and every time they find them like bitch and my. My daughter is again jumping there. It's really fun. Rows totally full of women. My poor husband liked the cats girl. The dogs girls. We have two daughters. And sometimes i just like see him like standing in the middle of the mayhem like what have i done. Just read ali wong's book and she has a husband who's in that situation as well. It a delightful read all say that. Well i don't know what next question to ask since we cried over the last one so sorry. No no integrate. What you ask. If they're crying on the podcast who can't even be sure. There wasn't episode. Yeah that's true. Did it even happened. I did actually though went to ask about. Because obviously mary shelley monster hunter. That was your first comic that you worked on right. Yeah so. I am just curious. What is your relationship with mary. Shelley's writing because i loved that series and like while i was reading it i was like i wonder if mary shelley would like this and i was like i think that marriage kelly would've liked the. Oh gosh. I don't know. I mean i should have liked it. I think she would like it is. She could see it through a modern day lens because i think that some of it some of it might kind of upset her her sensibilities a little bit. Because i think you know her. Mother was this just incredible for rochas. Game for of a woman and She was incredibly outspoken. Her feminist viewpoints. So much so that she was really scandalized. And even so so heartbreaking because the man that she married was a feminist also william godwin and He really believed her and he loved her very dearly and after she died he kind of published this. Tell all about her life and he meant it to be in celebration of her but what he did was he talks about. You know that she was kind of into this. Free love thing. And that she had a other lover she had had a child out of wedlock within american man. That was fanny imlay mary. Shelley's older sister and in doing so he completely destroyed her reputation. I mean the. Somehow she was resurrected i think in the nineteen seventies someone stumbled upon her writing and revitalized her entire reputation but she was almost lost to history because she was so scandalized and so mary shelley entered the world as this child of scandal..

william godwin kelly Shelley two daughters ali wong first comic mary nineteen seventies both girls mary shelley imlay mary shelley american
"mary shelley" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Indie Film

"That's been done over and over again in science fiction and in har and i just thought alex you made her come to life. In jillian for percy to the you've got to see how you know how they interacted and really the process that she went through. I love hearing you read the words. That was just so beautifully done so i must have been something to and i won't say that she is kind of going through. A renaissance and people are discovering. Her other works right hours through. What's that like to cabinet responsibility but also to kind of go places that nobody has ever gone before with her. I loved. I loved it because for me. It wasn't a film about you know it really wasn't a film about frankenstein. It was a film about mary shelley. It was a film about this great office. It was a film about a creates. A a writer british literary icon. That is who's what is known. The well daiva. Frankenstein is known the world of a. But i don't know that every single person could name the author of frankenstein safe for me. It was a real. It was a genuine on. I pray the icu. Similar scripts that sometime soon. Get some away like that because it's really special and it doesn't come along often. Yeah and the tortured path that she that she who ran the to make. Wow yeah the period setting the house. The clothes i mean you definitely get into the eighteen fourteens really. Was that like from a practical standpoint kind of wearing those clothes. It was great. I mean i loved it. I don't so we have the advantage of shooting in literal museum. This museum was like moved. Amuses of it that it didn't look like abusive moments. It was incredible. I mean you know the right desks that were writing at all. That in the museum you know the couches that were doing nor teens on all that in the museum. So it's it's kind of. It was just mind blowing that we had access to that. it felt like such privilege. Yeah actually in the practicality of it in some ways also on the back of our mind. We was little okay. Let's respect this Furniture tourism mic. Drop anything on the carpet because this has been here since the eighteen hundreds. Yes yeah it was really like Respect respect respect and it was just yeah. It was quite easy to just sort of jump in and go okay. We're here now. Which is a gift as an actor. Just really briefly. I love the blending of reality. And you really get into her mind to see what she was getting into. And i thought that was a really key thing and your performance in here. Those reuniting agree. Thanks guys this was a really special movie. And i never looked at it as a harvard. I looked at it as a character. Study of one of the great literature lit greats and literature and And you both hit it out of the park. It was your dynamic and julian. I just appreciated that. You probably don't look anything..

julian alex mary shelley one Frankenstein jillian both harvard british hundreds eighteen fourteens every single person frankenstein eighteen
"mary shelley" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Helping others raise more than $100,000 for charity. CBS News is Adriana Diaz has his story. Morning, everyone Life online can put us all in a box. Welcome to your date from first states to court date, probable cause But like a lot of us Steven Walsh hadn't even heard of Zoom until last March. Restaurant industry is reeling when Cove it crashed his Baltimore event. Business of My Inbox was followed cancelation. I said to my wife. I was like We're in trouble here. Wow, You must have been panicked when you think you have a business, and it's been going pretty well and all of a sudden, and in a few days it's gone. But the island natives luck turn around one else. ST Patrick's day when he took an old hobby and brought it online. Listing trivia on June 1000 games later, he's reached players in 87 countries. It's definitely the most ever ended my life. It's turned into a career that I don't plan on moving back from right regulars often play with friends and other places. She rolled her most famous book, a classic of its genre at age 20, but his questions that make you think maybe the biggest draw that wasps Mary Shelley Walsh. Trulia. It's It's hard so hard. Walsh attracts jeopardy contestants and even other trivia hosts like Lucky to Smith from North Carolina. A trivia game is only as good as its host. Stephen does a really great job of keeping the audience engaged, which, as a trivia host, I could say it's difficult to do in person, but let alone over Zoom after so much talk of trivia. Had to try it myself. What is the country that is home to the most people with their names, starting in any with the same letter, So I'm assuming that the country that starts and ends with a because a lot of countries ended a Oh,.

Steven Walsh Mary Shelley Walsh Adriana Diaz Stephen North Carolina Walsh last March 87 countries Trulia Baltimore June 1000 ST Patrick's day more than $100,000 CBS News Cove first states Smith age 20 countries Lucky
What Happened To Connie Converse

Unexplained Mysteries

05:33 min | 2 years ago

What Happened To Connie Converse

"In nineteen twenty four elizabeth eaton converse was born into a devoutly religious family being by the nineteen forties. She changed her name to connie and moved to new york city to pursue music. She spent her twenties writing folk songs and rebelling against her traditional after little came of her musical ambitions in new york. Connie moved to ann arbor michigan in nineteen sixty where she took an editorial position at an academic journal by the age of thirty six. Connie was struggling with her mental health in particular and affliction she referred to as her blue funk. This was made worse. When in the early seventies connie received two devastating pieces of news. She lost her job and her doctor told her she needed a hysterectomy. After turning fifty in august nineteen seventy four. Connie converse said goodbye to her brother and friends packed up volkswagen beetle and drove away. Officially she's never been seen or heard from again in her final instructions to her brother. Connie asked philip to pay her health insurance up until a certain date. She never explained. Why but philip worried that something terrible would happen. When that day passed searching for answers. Philip found a filing cabinet that belonged to connie in his antics inside. He found old journal entries poems notes and a farewell letter addressed to quote. Anyone who ever asks it read. So let me go please. And please accept my. Thanks for those happy times that each of you has given me over the years. And please know that i would have preferred to give you more than i ever did or could i am in everyone's debt. Philip did as connie requested. He let her go for thirty five years. Never knowing if she was alive or dead always hoping she'd return but from the moment she laughed. Philip and connie's closest friends feared the worst they own about connie's blue funk for quite some time though. Connie was never officially diagnosed with clinical depression. So far as we know in her farewell letter she wrote as an over educated peasant. I've read a good bit about middle-aged oppression and no several cases other than my own. According to establish psychiatric consensus those who suffer from major depressive disorders tend to lose interest in activities that previously brought them joy in connie's case when she moved to ann arbor. She stopped writing music. But even while living in new york connie's lyrics described feelings of isolation in her song called. Sorrow is my name. She wrote from the perspective of sadness is self sneaking in and out of people's minds in the bridge of the song sorrow kroons. And if you fear me i will come in haste and if you love me i will go away and if you scorn me i will lay you waste and if you know me i will come to stay. Perhaps connie wrote from her own experience overcome by a deep unshakable sadness that she felt would live inside her forever. She certainly wouldn't be the first person to live with undiagnosed depression in fact historians theorized that many historical figures battled similar mental illnesses before they were ever fully understood for example. Both frankenstein author mary. Shelley and president abraham lincoln reported experiencing significant bouts of melancholy. They'd regularly fall into deep sadness often unrelated to the events of their day to day lives. Some scholars have interpreted these spells as episodes of clinical depression diagnosis. That didn't exist in the eighteen. Hundreds when both lived almost a century later as connie struggled with her blue funk there was still an incredible amount of debate surrounding what constituted and caused depression throughout the nineteen hundreds doctors around the world published opinions but the medical field never reached consensus early. Researchers like sigmund. Freud believed depression was the result of traumatic experiences of course psychologists today understand that the causes are much more nuanced and multifaceted. They include both genetic and societal factors and this understanding started to take shape in the nineteen seventies when clinician set standards for diagnosing and treating clinical depression then in nineteen seventy five one year after connie disappeared doctors. I coined the term major depressive disorder.

Connie Elizabeth Eaton Converse Connie Converse Philip Depressive Disorders Ann Arbor Depressive Disorder New York Beetle Volkswagen New York City Michigan Cabinet Depression President Abraham Lincoln Frankenstein Shelley
Spotify tries out audiobooks with help from some celebrity Narrators

Daily Tech Headlines

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Spotify tries out audiobooks with help from some celebrity Narrators

"Spotify has released. Nine new exclusive audio books. The books themselves are public domain but the performances by celebrities. David does brooke narrates mary. Shelley's frankenstein forest whittaker reads the narrative of the life of frederick douglas and american slave and hilary swank narrates kate shop the awakening spotify is also releasing a companion podcast called sitting with the classics hosted by harvard. Professor glenda carpio last year spotify partnered with visiting world to release weekly chapter instalments of harry potter and the sorcerer's stone. Although the verge notes this no longer appears to be listed on spotify

Frederick Douglas Kate Shop Spotify Whittaker Shelley Brooke Hilary Swank Glenda Carpio Mary David Harvard Harry Potter
The Year Without a Summer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

06:24 min | 2 years ago

The Year Without a Summer

"The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris Review Geneva New England Frankenstein Savannah Savannah Georgia Baron Carl Dreyer New York Geneva Villa Mid West Indonesia North America Atlantic United Kingdom
Chicago Weather: Freeze Warning Ahead

Ben Shapiro

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Chicago Weather: Freeze Warning Ahead

"Forecast freeze warnings up tonight we're down to thirty two degrees and knocking on the door of record cold for Chicago our record low at o'hare's twenty seven from nineteen eighty three early tomorrow morning forty one degrees this afternoon thirty two tonight with a freeze warning in effect sunshine Saturday fifty six and then what weather for mom's day Sunday showers high fifty two from the weather channel meteorologist Scott Lori Moore WLS AM eight ninety with another update thirty Mary Shelley out there right now just forty one at the lake forty three at midway forty one officially

Chicago O'hare Mary Shelley Scott Lori Moore
A History of Seduction

The Book Review

15:04 min | 3 years ago

A History of Seduction

"Clement. Knox joins US now from London. His new book is called Seduction History from the enlightenment to the present Clement. Thanks for being here so your day job. I want to start there. Because you have a book oriented day job you work as a nonfiction buyer at waterstones which is of course a major British bookstore teen. What's your job like there? What do you do so their tour of managing nonfiction and about two hundred and eighty stores? My job really is just to get the the right books and the right stores. I'm responsible for history philosophy politics Papa. Johns I mean about nine categories overall and so. We do a lot with the publishers booksellers as well. Did you get to pick which categories you're responsible for? No when I got the job I was just assigned and then they'll kind of a reshuffle if he has got a few more categories as well they kind of work perfectly because it more or less alliance with what I'm interested in reading and what I'm interested in writing see you're deciding which books go into waterstone's the chain into which stores and how many copies are ordered exactly that to you. So that's a very powerful position. It's very structured is a very fair how we how we do it and is a constant communication publishers stores and sometimes even the authors as well we very even-handed brushing away and there's no kind of mysterious. What would probably shooter who understand. What's your typical day? Like a lot of meetings a lot of looking at science because a lot of reading of publicity plans and back and forth people. He wants us to buy their. Berko by book or by even more so. Are you living months ahead of time looking at? What are the books coming out this fall? Oh Oh yeah. We're tasked with trying to look as far as possible. So wig about to start. Looking at the timber Tiber November on average would normally thinking three months ahead of the east. And what happened with your book? The decider like we're going to order a hundred thousand copies of seduction. Yeah I I wish it was it by my boss has taken over that completely and utterly redeem. Oh look thing I try and pretend you know having to stay in a total of ignorance about one's own buck. I agree. Yeah but let's talk. Let's talk about your book. This may seem like perhaps a silly question but let's define seduction exactly. How is it action separate from courtship? How is it different from something? Maybe more creepy and less mutual like sexual harassment. Like what is seduction? I think the crucial aspect is selection. It's psychological and fumes kind of like confrontation between the minds and the passion of two different individuals in English law. That was a whole body of law do seduction discussing in some detail and wish would later it was. It came to America with with the mayflower that was developed in an extraordinary way and in those laws there was a distinction made between between rape which is obviously a What is coercive violent and seduction was seen as distinct from rape and she assumed that consent had been obtained that consent was in some way vitiated or somehow degraded by the techniques by which it was one so seduction carry that burden. That somehow someone's being over and perhaps the method used to win them over the Underhand but that's only one definition. There's a whole other definition which would say you know. It's just about courtship and game playing and it's fun and this is dawn which is dawn sexual freedom. Did you focus on that fun? Dance in this book or did you cover the full gamut the way the book is kind of structured is the. There's like a dialectic. Going on and one half of the history of seduction is about people worrying about sexual freedom worrying about things going wrong about the collision desire empower the capacity for abuse and wrongdoing. That is one of the history and the other half is about sexual freedom being this exciting enjoyable thing which which is buried lighthearted and people Is The insurance of the church. Will the government so the book kind of structured around the kind of dichotomy and not conflict between our two years of war sexual freedom is and what that means deduction your subtitle is history from the enlightenment the presidency? You're focusing mostly on the modern era. But let's start just briefly with that premodern era talk about what our earliest ideas of seduction were. Maybe perhaps grounded in with Allah G. And then how that changed as you moved into the Judeo Christian era the reason I start in the enlightenment. There's no because seduction didn't exist before seventeen hundred is because that's when seduction narrative as we understand it was born and the book is about this very powerful strange and modern thing seduction narrative which was basically invented in the eighteen th century and the product of a response to a whole new wave of ideas about the human mind about what we now think of. Feminism will prototype eminem and also about the discovery of sexual freedom as part of the blue celebrating our freedom and the enlightenment and before then you had a situation where sexuality was heavily pleased. It was subject to legal and religious interrogation and you know in America. Of course you had The puritans were very big on sexual policing but also in and the rest of Europe as well and over the course of the eighteenth century that whole value system changed. By the end of the Eighteenth Century Sexual Freedom was for granted and to be cleared. Sexual Freedom for them was not the sexual freedom that we now cherish worry about. That really meant that women go to choose. Who They married. That's where the foundation sexual freedom was not explains basically every Jane austen novel for instance. That is the undependable. The plus. They're out of plenty other novels besides and then more generally a kind of increasingly faraji towards male sexuality in particular so you see the rise of the double standard would be in spectacularly bad behavior of the rates of London and Paris Venice. You say that there were three modes of thought that really gave rise to the modern seduction narrative liberalism materialism and feminism. Let's talk about liberalism for example. How does that bring us? But we consider to be seduction as it is today in John. Look Letter of colouration. He He makes us interesting comment race. Is that basically? Everyone is going to have to look after their own. Their prospects of their own souls so liberalism is no longer going to tell people how to live their lives and what to do and instead they're going to have to have their own moral accounting and if in the religious view if they'd be living badly that we dealt with in the off the world it's not gonNA dealt with by the government and the President and obviously if you think about it back then because up until that point they'd be bathing policing sexuality quite a lot and sexuality was once you're saying okay. Everyone's GonNa look after their own moral well-being and the government's going to step out of it. The second and third order consequence of that include a increasingly hands off attitude towards sexuality and basically people are left to make their own decisions and see how how ends up so. It's not that people sat around in the late seventeenth century and said we're going to invent liberalism and one that includes sexual freedom sexual freedom flowed quite logically from this this view that we're not going to try and make everyone lived where he wants them to and that's because they tried that in Seventeenth Century. Europe and being horrific bloodshed and wars and everything else and they wanted you to move beyond that how it's addiction flow from materialism again because we'll be philosophers like like Locke and hume. They were kind of operating on the assumption that we're living in a godless world and they they were very careful how they frame that and Voltaire as well. Then we're castle how. They framed that because of course you won't read out to be an atheist but once you get to the position where we're saying. Okay they're not angels and devils and there's no Holy Spirit brought in the world and instead it's just individuals with brains achieving reality once you make those leaps you can move from new Ford away from this moralistic view of sexuality and towards an idea and that's like psychological view of reality and that's seduction narrative dramatize is this internal monologue about reason about passionate about desire and not basically the entire genre of the novel possible. And if you read these early novels like Richardson who had discussed at some length. Those books now in the more or less unreadable right ABBA time now. If you're named Pamela centrally forced to read Samuel Richardson so you know it comes with the you've read it that I have read and Shamanov so yes so been down that unfortunate path. To what extent is the history of seduction also a history of power and power dynamics? One way of looking at it is that it's not a matter of about power. One way of looking at it is that in fact sexual freedom is empowering and people who practice sexual freedom or taking control of their lives and our free liberated individuals and not seeing a strain and food since the Enlightenment Henry Fielding Mary Wilson Kroft Plus He Shelley Mary Shelley Khatri at all the way up to the present where people you know saying well. People shouldn't be telling me how to live my life. So I'm not I'm not part of it. Basically rejects the idea that seduction is about power and it says actually selections about about freedom and choice but obviously power is a complex thing to discuss. But I root it's about coercion and seduction it about agency. And as soon as our collides with especially in situations where you know that sexual inequality economic inequality there's racial inequality very quickly. We can see how adoption courtship can shade into something daca. You go into issues around race and seduction and in particular America's laws and attitudes around race in the book talk about those parts of the book America in the nineteen. Th Century developed this very extensive body of state laws placing seduction and eventually America how to federal law. The man act which was essentially a seduction Laura in everything but name and in the American south. Clearly it wasn't just a question of the law there were lynchings and these lynchings were often justified by reference to alleged sexual assaults or you know interracial relationships happening not not as true all the way up to an until so. It's not just that was seduction literature. Racial is clearly that was a very serious and horrifying epidemic of racial violence. Often had a sexual subtext. But in the case of the laws the laws designed to empower kind of racial scrutiny of sexual relationships and the mind acts was used to in California was used to prosecute lots of Japanese immigrants who had interracial relationships in the northeast and the Midwest where there were lots of Jewish immigrants or Polish German immigrants. It was used to kind of put further scrutiny communities and then the story. I tell about Joe Johnson who was the first black heavyweight champion of the world it was used to basically hound this man who they couldn't lynch or there were several attempts to do so until they tried to to get him in the courts. Did You keep the book focused on heterosexual seduction or do you cover sex relationships as well? I mentioned overseeing the enlightenment though. Is this on Abrasion of sexual freedom. I should have a code of that. Which obviously it was a celebration of heterosexual. Freedom of sexual freedom was not tackled until the nineteen sixties and seventies and beyond. So I do keep a focus on on heterosexual relationships but the simple reason is that that's deduction narrative of itself was born about this new idea of celebrating sexual freedom without sexual freedom did not include the same sex and curious about the origin of this book. Like is this something that you began before you were at waterstones is the nonfiction or a one of the nonfiction buyers or did this kind of evolve. Why hasn't anyone written about this? And getting all these other books about these other things but there's no good history of seduction. The funniest seed of this book was what I was living in America just finished Grad School in DC. And I was just reading novels like dangerous liaisons and a hero of our time and I kind of kept on coming across this theme of the Seduction Narrative. And it just wouldn't go away and it kind of knew it away me for several years and I kind of this whole history of the seduction laws which I find well fascinating and weird and then of course in in our own time. A lot of things have happened. The rise of the pick up this online dating or the rest of it. I had this of intuition that there was a story And it was the story larger than just what was going on now that it had a history and yeah. I was pretty much convinced that every day. Open the newspaper and someone in Britain the book but they never did give it a go. Well this segment is going up on Valentine's Day so it feels appropriate to ask you about your favorites seduction narrative. Dangerous liaisons novel is is is absolutely amazing. I would recommend twenty one I. It's incredibly that it was actually written two centuries ago and there have been several great adaptions of it and they were to the nineteen eighty s and then those cruel intentions made out of it in the ninety s which I think is fantastic film still. I mentioned briefly a hero of our time by lemon of again. I think everyone should read that book. And it was an incredible and the Russians were really heavily influenced by the English narrative. They will read some Richardson. They'd read Palmer and Clarisa. Bridgeton is name checked in Eugene Oregon. And of course they wrote obsessed with Byron who was a kind of mythical seducer lifetime and so the whole Russian tradition wouldn't really exist without those two figures and he said in London. Tolkien postgame also tolstoy as well all right well. I guess plenty of people to read over Valentine's Day maybe not moves people's chosen activity and this particular day but if if you are alone with book those are the ones to pick up in addition to of course deduction clement. Thanks for being here

America Samuel Richardson London Europe Johns Clement United States Waterstone Clement. Knox Eminem Jane Austen Rape Seventeenth Century California Harassment President Trump Eugene Oregon Midwest Britain Paris Venice
Aaahh!!! Classic Monsters

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

08:38 min | 3 years ago

Aaahh!!! Classic Monsters

"We thought we would talk. Hello Classic movie monsters or I guess. A derivative thereof You know all the films like Frankenstein Dracula creature the Black Lagoon and salon boy. Oh boy so yeah so we are. Actually we each picked one classic creature. We're going to be sharing history in details about that creature in the story about the story about them so should we. Should we drinks. Yeah okay so I'm going to actually hand the mic over to Tracy and you because I she has forty drinks that she's going to be sure they're all so I'm focusing on vampires and at total wine there was actually quite a bit to choose from uh-huh depending on how elaborate you WanNa get with the topic. There was even like walking dead wine assume that seemed like sheeting. That seemed like that would be better for his. Obviously yeah it's because it's actually from the TV exactly. So I can't have rick on the cover and be thinking of Bram Stoker works for me with that said that I brought three drinks because being hungover and being two o'clock in me not having lunch it just seems weird like crack. Open a bottle of wine right now but I do have Francis Coppola diamond red plans talk a little bit about Coppola going on. Because you can't really talk about Dracula directly without talking about Coppola and then I also because I don't like I said if I'm going to open that I also brought four. They use my teeth to pull the bag out. I have a lovely temper neo. Oh I love to drag on. And we'll talk a little bit about what dragons dragons relates reverse dragged him the vampire at least in literature but like I said that's a bit heavy so honestly what I think I'm going to start with. Breath is a nice blood. Orange Margarita and S- To serve it in as they said I just live seven houses down I brought on my own Hamilton Sippy Cup when I say Hola pouring that that's awesome chewing that All amazing choices see. That doesn't take a random rationalization cody did you notice that mixture. You have doesn't actually have to kill it in it. Oh I I forgot I also brought my own patrol. Never leave home without it. So the monster I chose today is Where wolves so what? I'm drinking today. Is a Lithuanian heritage. Beer called where wolf it's literally called Werewolf and it has a quite a high alcohol content. So that's so funny because just right before for the show Tracy and I were talking about how we like picking drinks. That aren't just the name. They require narrative. Chris here's where we'll there's nothing with that sound so bitchy all right so Chris is still looking to see what kind of beer is is it. Strong connect have a taste. Today makes one of us. Oh that is delicious is really good. That's dangerous Oh my God. I'm just GonNa Covet this break a command. It's a Belgian dark El okay. I'M GONNA try that too. Yeah so for my drink. I'm actually Old England. I'm actually doing Frankenstein. And so and that was that was what I was GONNA do. I was I went into English. Oh I hear terrible and like you know what. I just can't drink this after my night. I'm going to get something good. Mary Shelley found something actually liked Mary. Shelley well well I whenever you look at all these old stories. I what I think of it is. They all kind of intertwined sometimes in ways and they're just kind of these wild crazy stories stories. So I've found a blackberry merlot called twisted Vine Ohio. Yeah good expected to get a couple. I rolls maybe like really all right so with that I will get into history I didn't want to do anything like Hollywood movie. Poor history because that would have been very long and excessive in instead I thought I would give a weird overview on the history of monsters the word monster itself derives from the Latin word monstrum meaning to demonstrate or monarch meaning to warn There's also the Latin word monstrum which Just means abnormal or supernatural but can also mean wonder or miracle generally speaking monsters are physical whether real or imagined representation of those things society as Dean leaned unknown or unnatural and most mostly those things that we fear and cannot explain physically. Speaking a monster may have some unusual characteristics. In fact one time things such as two-headed cavs or babies born with abnormalities were considered monsters so basically anything that was outside of what society claimed as quote. Normal aw was seen as monstrous of course as we know in addition to the physical characteristics. Munster's we'll do some terrible things or act out on the way beyond the standing of society being set that any one of us in this room could be considered a monster me with my blue hair and you both being super tall me with my gay so monsters there's all of you There are a ton of tons of monsters that go back in history. There were monsters that were found in cave paintings represented by animal human hybrids which unlikely cliches in real life hence monsters or at least at the conclusion that historians drew in Greek and Roman mythology monsters were perceived as a form of displeasure from the gods examples being cyclops Gorgon. Medusa Centaurs Sirens and so on. It seems that in religion like Judaism Christianity and Islam. They avoided talking about monsters aside from stories related to Satan and the power of evil in Hinduism monsters. A lot more prevalent. you see gods depicted with extra limbs or as an animal human hybrid and in native American culture. You have creatures such as the Wendy Go. Skin walkers and even sasquatch after the renaissance period with science becoming a new a fairly new thing. It really tried to attempt to explain what exactly monsters were to no avail in the gothic period we were graced. With two of the most infamous monsters Frankenstein and Dracula as well as some of the creepiest fairy tales by the brothers Grimm in psychology. Carl Jung tried to explain monsters as any central part of development might in that they were seen as the quote otherness within ourselves. I kind of discussed with this with you. Cody Day in that how I was talking how we need to balance the light with dark so I think that's the same thing it's arguing and our gang. We all have a fascination with monsters. This podcast is an example. Cody are armchair. Chair crypto zoologists. That even if these creatures don't exist it's that innate curiosity of the possibility of their existence as society changes the faces of monsters changing. We'll continue you to do so when before we used to be freed of things like trolls and elves. Today's where we fear things such as candyman or to say that once monsters collection of our society and then all the terrible things in it as well as an escape from those terrible things monsters are ever evolving and as long as we have fears and terrible things going on in our world they will. Oh not go away in my opinion. That's escapism at its best interest inc.. I have like a believer skeptic question but I guess I wanNA save it maybe. For debunk okay. But I'm afraid that I'm going to. I'm going to forget it. I'm going to ask now for both of Y'all are there any monsters or creatures that either of you actually believe in. Yes yes. That's probably what got me. Hooked on your podcast in the first place you were immediately talking about things that I have seen with my own eyes so I can only to Chris as a believer in many of the things. He's seen. Yeah I'm sitting there at work. Listen to going. Oh my God I saw that too says yes shadow people. I can't talk about that right now. Is Definitely I've had encounters encounters with shadow people. But as far as what we're talking about today. The closest is a boyfriend who thought he was a vampire. Oh Shit are you talking about that in your story. No I wasn't going to because it's complicated and messy advocates network. Deep Ball Game L.. Dated someone who thought he was a vampire sidelining. I think he was just really sexually confused. Needed to explore some things and that arena. He had seen the horror many

Cody Day Francis Coppola Chris Mary Shelley Tracy Black Lagoon Cavs Bram Stoker Carl Jung Rick Hollywood Old England Wendy Go Munster Dean Grimm Vine Ohio
The History of Women in Science Fiction

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

05:21 min | 3 years ago

The History of Women in Science Fiction

"Science fiction has often been represented as a boys club but you have in particular studied and written extensively about history of women running science fiction if women have always been present in his own room why do people don't know about this why do we just think about the men who have written science fiction right i mean i think we we do think about women in the shocker but only like at certain periods of time right like everyone willing to admit that mary shelley is is one of the founders of the genre certainly one of the i think the first authored a write a commercially successful science fiction story and then you know you get fast forward to the nineteen seventies add a the revival of feminism an all of a sudden you at authors like her glennon joanna raw in margaret atwood and then people are like oh wow women right science fiction fiction and of course just this past year n k jemison right became the first author of of any gender race to win three she goes in award so now we see women in the john ross but there's a huge gap between like eighteen eighteen as they nineteen seventy they add i don't really understand where all the women were so i started looking around at turns out sure enough there they were there we've always had women in the sean raw on from the very beginning women constituted about fifteen percent of all science fiction producer third an we know that by the time they started doing reader's poll in the nineteen forties and fifties that women counted for at least forty percent of the readership as well an today i'm not sure where we are in readership but i know that the numbers of women science fiction have doubled so worried about thirty thirty five percent now but i think the reason that we forget that there were so many women in between shelly an a the revival of feminism in that the the growth of science fiction is because women were sometimes writing we were looking at the kinds of fiction they were writing and then we also can't find it because it didn't always get anthology eyes right it's it's really hard the early science fiction community were all magazine science fiction and add those magazines often got thrown away or they didn't laugh they weren't preserved so if you don't have access to a university with a huge science fiction collection like i do it's really hard to find these women and then you know it's exacerbated by the fact that even even if you have anthologies a lot of early anthologies were written by people who didn't necessarily include women in those anthologies for one reason or another yeah i mean it's it's interesting because obviously you have the the men who were writing in this pulp magazines same guy that didn't disappear people still about that and it's like it's just frustrating but then i mean i don't know if there's anything in it but things like james chip tree you know perhaps people don't necessarily know that that this is a pseudonym right right i i think james kept tree right that was probably a pretty well now one interesting thing i've found is that most women did not you nailed it and then most women went by willie decidedly feminine name an and usually their own name although sometimes they would also take other names like willis lorraine which is a lovely name she was born mary mod done you could see why she switched her name but really what i found is most women did not match courageous men an austin women pictures were printed printed in the magazine in the very early magazines author had catches of themselves with their draw with their with their stories so an even if somehow you missed that'd be editor were quick to correct a reader who missed took female writers from el writer but what did happen and that one very early in the shot like in the twenties and thirties right so white after universal suffrage and the first wave of feminism and i think a lot of people were really sort of on board with thinking about how the future my female as well is mel an but then in the late thirties and forties you the backlash against feminism in that time when the first science fiction anthologies are being put together and those were put together by a younger group of men who really did you find participated in that that minutes backlash rhetoric right john campbell who wore that no woman could write science fiction even though he'd been publishing in magazines women did you know he had it that's how to the male got her start in her career he told her no woman could write a story and she said yeah i bet i can write a story you'll like it so much you'll you'll back me from warren and that's exactly what happened actually but as anthology forgetting put together women we know they're anecdote on an app that that women have told that they were cut out of the magazine so luckily i've known her with one of the pioneering science fiction authors she gold lingers back and a was really popular with people's you're looking big creating space opera often she had been invited to be to include a story in one of the first big client fiction anthologies andover supposed to be a party for everyone who's gonna be on thala g and she was sick and she couldn't go so she sent her husband an editor said oh you must be likely stone he said no no that's my white i'm just here for her as a place called her and they're like oh that's very interesting and then within two weeks you had a letter saying yeah we decided to drop their story from anthology i'd really hard not to put to ensure together on that

Thirty Thirty Five Percent Fifteen Percent Forty Percent Two Weeks