25 Burst results for "Mary Shelley"

"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

04:23 min | Last month

"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"Was caused by volcanic eruption that happened halfway around the world in indonesia and it affected weather all over the world. The marion her friends did not know that at the time stuck inside for days at a time she and her friends would sit around the fire and tell each other german ghost stories. This gave byron the idea to challenge his guests to each write their own ghost story at first. Mary couldn't think of a story. She was starting to become anxious. Then when evening. The conversation turned the idea that it might be possible to somehow. Bring the dead back to life at the time. Scientists were experimenting with frogs and had found that dead frogs legs would twitch if an electrical charge was run through them. They call this galvin ism and it would be the inspiration for mary's ghost story. She began writing that night staying up well past midnight. That goes story is the same one. We talked about at the beginning of the episode frankenstein. Mary thought this would just be a short story. That should share with her friends but personally encouraged her to keep writing and frankenstein became mary's first novel. We've already talked about how frankenstein was actually the doctor who created the monster in the book but another thing that might surprise you as that the monster wasn't actually a bad guy at first either in the book that hulking green creature was indeed scary to the people he met after he ran away from dr frankenstein but he really just wanted to learn about them and live his life. In fact the monster secretly helps a poor family by gathering firewood for them in clearing the snow from their walkway at night he hides in a shed and watches them for months. He learns language from them. He sees how kind and supportive. They are towards each other and starts to think of them as friends but when he tries to talk to one of them the family is terrified and attacks him the creature only becomes a real monster after he realizes that people will always fear and chase him away because of how different he looks in a way the stories about how people treat others who are different from them and what. It's like to feel like you don't belong. Everyone feels out of place sometimes and it's important to be kind to those who look or act differently from us after she wrote frankenstein. Mary shelley went on to write several other novels and short stories as well as books about her travels. She carried on writing and editing in order to support her family. She worked hard to make sure that her husband's poetry continued to be printed and that her son had a good education and a good life. Her son percy loved mary dearly and.

frankenstein Mary dr frankenstein mary galvin byron indonesia Mary shelley percy
"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

04:16 min | Last month

"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"Have you heard of frankenstein. Maybe you've seen this pretend monster in movies or books. He's often depicted as being tall and strong with dark hair. Green skin and stitches holding him together since he was created by dr frankenstein. That's where frankenstein actually got his name from the mad scientist. Who created him. Dr frankenstein farewell leave you. And then the last of humankind whom these is will ever behold farewell frankenstein. These are the lines from the novel. Frankenstein written around two hundred years ago. That's how old the story of frankenstein is. Did you also know that. The novel is one of the most famous pieces of writing in history. Now let's take a closer look at the woman behind. The novel named mary. Shelley mary shelley was born in london in seventeen ninety seven. Her mother was a philosopher and writer named mary wollstonecraft and her father. William godwin was a philosopher novelist and journalist both their parents were well-known thinkers who challenged how things worked in the late eighteenth century mary. Wollstonecraft spoke out for women's rights and william godwin criticized the british government system especially the monarchy. Which means a country. Run by kings and queens. Sadly mary's mother died shortly after she was born. This left william to raise mary along with her older. Half sister fanny alone. Her father wrote a book about his wife and later mary was able to read it later. She also read the books. Her mother had written and was brought up cherishing. Her memory overall mary's earliest years were happy ones. Mary's father gave her an education that was different for her time. Mary briefly attended a boarding school. But for most of her childhood she had a governess and a daily tutor. Her father william also taught her about a wide range of subjects. William ran a publishing company and mary grew up surrounded by the books games and maps that the company sold. She learned roman and greek history by reading the books her father published. Her father also had a large library and many interesting well educated friends who marry got to meet and interact with a few of these friends. Were very well known. Such as the poet. Samuel taylor coleridge and the former vice president of the united states. Aaron burr william also enjoyed taking his children on field trips as part of their education. Mary enjoyed learning. And this homeschooling arrangement worked well for her. When she was fifteen her father described her as singularly bold somewhat imperious and active of mind. Her desire for knowledge is great and her perseverance. In everything she undertakes is almost invincible. In other words she was curious dedicated. And maybe a little stubborn mary. I met the poet and philosopher. Percy bish shelley. When she was in her late teens he was a friend of her father's would visit the family often. Mary and percy began meeting each other secretly. Had her mother's grave in the churchyard of saint pancras old church. Eventually they fell in love. The couple secretly left.

mary William godwin dr frankenstein Dr frankenstein Shelley mary shelley mary wollstonecraft frankenstein Frankenstein Wollstonecraft Mary william british government fanny Aaron burr william queens london Samuel taylor coleridge William Percy bish shelley united states
"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

01:36 min | Last month

"mary shelley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"A message to parents and other adult listeners. From our sponsor who services we highly recommend something preventing you from being happy and achieving your goals if so click. The lincoln are shows description or go to better help h. e. l. p. dot com for slash bedtime history. Better help is designed to assess your needs and match you with your own licensed professional therapist and with better help you can get the help you need in a safe and private online environment. It's super convenient. And you can start talking to a licensed.

"mary shelley" Discussed on Classic Ghost Stories

Classic Ghost Stories

05:27 min | Last month

"mary shelley" Discussed on Classic Ghost Stories

"Not giving him the benefit of the doubt not giving a break not letting him show any goodness and damning him completely. So yes something the frankenstein. Mary shelley call it the the the modern Theus so yeah. So i think that's what that's about it's ineffective story is very simple and it cooks down to the end and we get that mounting tension and then the things revealed. Oh yeah the only thing i would say for show as we are told that the ws character was a policeman but not until he's being a policeman so it might have been better if there have been so i'm hinted the beginning that red herring wasn't a saying. Oh it's a woman that was just to throw us off. I wasn't massively convinced by the but if at that point we had some some information that would made us link the character to being a police officer then later on at the end we will go. How when the policemen would have dawned on us. Although it may have dawned on us. And i suppose that is a fourth case. So we've got narrator withhold information we. We may have information that the character doesn't have to and all we might be both into dock but this a one where the the writer the author does not give information but we guess it because about cultural familiarity with this type of story so when the policemen pays some of you will have been saying. What's going on here is not the author. Who's done that for you. You have guessed up because of your familiarity with this kind of story but going back to the point. If we'd been at some point early on that there was some liquid police we would have either big a ha moment. I think i think the reason. Ls hotly didn't do it lp. Holly the only initials didn't do it is because it possibly would collapse the story. We will just guess too much. It would become too obvious. And i think probably couldn't have done not although it would have created a bigger aha because if you give too much inflammation it would have just become playing what was happening. And we would have lost the suspense so yeah. I think there's a good story was recommended by a reader. Listen listening reader viewer. Whoever it was recommended as story story a new and it was nice and short which i like a welcome stories from recommended that i particularly ones. I haven't read. Get loads of those are actually the only issues that some people recommend stories novel and and they're just they're just too long because a novel use something like ninety thousand words it takes. That's something like iraq. In a thousand words is ten minutes so it's ninety thousand minutes which is divided by six days fifteen hours if that was correct..

Mary shelley Holly iraq
"mary shelley" Discussed on The Leader

The Leader

04:50 min | 3 months ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on The Leader

"If you've never seen universal's nineteen 1931 movie version of the story give it a while. It's much scarier than you might think. So is the novel powered by shelley's immortal. Incredibly forward thinking central theme can humans create artificial life. And what happens if we do monster munster created by a man they called. Med is turned loose to strike terror into the hearts of men. The writer jeanette winterson has been thinking about this for a while a couple of years bags. These frank kiss stein inspired by shelley story but also exploring intelligence her new book twelve. Bytes takes that further with a series of essays. Asking how did we get here. And where are we doing. Some of it is quite scary. Genetic appearing the evening standard stories festival in association with netflix in september. And she's with me now. I expect when most people think about ai. Probably about jeff bezos amazon's alexa or elon. Musk and tesla self driving cars. But actually this idea of creating a new life doesn't belong to billionaire blogs doesn't this goes way back to mary shelley. I'm frankenstein yes. That's exactly right david when i was rereading frankenstein frankenstein. Two years ago. I realized that it was much more than a gothic novel or novel about women's education at the world's most famous monster that it was a message in a bottle to the future. Because she she had this extraordinary vision the new life form. Which is what. Victor frankenstein creates would depend on electricity. Which was an entirely new force. Then it wasn't in any practical use that an although she conceded the lifelong is being made of discarded body parts of the graveyard Victor frankenstein puts together. She knew the in order to set it going. It was going to have to be driven by electric which is astonishing because come mutational technologies entirely dependent.

shelley frank kiss stein jeanette winterson jeff bezos netflix Musk mary shelley tesla Victor frankenstein ai amazon david
"mary shelley" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

02:51 min | 3 months ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"See. He says not begun. Mary shelley herself said it was a man who essentially was playing god. But he's not playing god he's making life out of the things that are already there. Which is what men do already what he's playing this. He's playing a woman he's bringing life into the world without a woman. And i really do believe that. That is part of the fantasy the feminist fantasy of equality justice ginsburg ruth bader ginsburg when she was ruling which was actually dissenting against a decision that she thought limited abortion rights said that in order for women to be equal to realize their full potential that is intimately connected with their ability to control their reproductive lives in other words they have to be able to kill their babies in order to be equal with men. They have to stop being women. In order to be equal with men they are accepting an idea of strengthen idea of equality that comes from that infantile. mind that the idea of female empowerment is that idea is essentially the idea of becoming a male and that a woman's equality is dependent on her not being a woman. The thing is. This is what. I was talking about before about being interdependent about being defined by a relationship with other people about being wives and husbands brothers and Children and neighbors that part of the relationship between men and women is part of what a man is and part of what a woman is is defined by their relationship to one another and what what is at the center of that relationship is the fact that women have children in having children they become infinitely valuable but infinitely vulnerable when a woman is pregnant. Obviously she's has got to be protected and the fact that her offspring are the offspring of the world is the future of the human race makes her infinitely valuable in protecting a woman. A man puts himself at risk. And what superheroes do is they eliminate all that they eliminate the since they're virtually immortal. They eliminate the need for sexuality reproduction at all since they are invulnerable they are not taking a man is not taking any risk in defending a woman and since the woman is just as strong as he is. She doesn't need to be protected. They are essentially getting rid of the gendered embodiment of humankind as an imagination of the future. Without human beings. We are sacrificing our human being our humanity to get rid of gender to get inequality to get rid of death and the thing is. I'm not sure that's going to look as good as people think. Does you know right now you. We saw how people reacted to the flu. The chinese flu if you can live forever you won't live forever you'll still be subject to accident. You can't live more than eight hundred years without the chance of having a fatal.

ginsburg ruth bader ginsburg Mary shelley flu
"mary shelley" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

01:59 min | 3 months ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"Bush is on the other line weber. Voices back baby all of the The guesses we had in the call in line of who you are who you sounded like some multiple. I can't promise i won't happen again. It's only it's only july. I'm gonna violate your trust. Lindsey and i'm gonna read a text you set me earlier on air because i'm like still kind of shocked by it. What did i say. It was actually only what eleven minutes ago. Oh oh texted me. The following a link to a people story with this text following up from lindsey. I didn't know they were dating. And it's the headline bell. Palley and douglas booth are engaged quote. We're very very happy. 'cause you know that they were dating no but i'm sorry sincerely thomas engagement of listening booth and bell palley being like I didn't know they were dating. I was expecting like jennifer lopez and ben. Affleck you'll well. It turns me fits into our show bell palley. But it's just funny because they're each like bellies like the girl from the teenage girl movie. That really good movie. That came out with diarrhea teenage girl. She's girl. Douglas booth is from that flop. Romeo and juliet reboot. That came out a while ago. Who may or may not be related to. John wilkes but probably not right. Who has the face of a british actor. Tell me that guy doesn't look british so does she. Actually they both have extremely british actor faces him. Especially he's from greenwich london. Which i think is actually fancy. And she's from someplace claw hammersmith posh haji tauch. They both seem like they're from 'push neighborhoods on the set of the movie. Mary shelley another kind of no one saw. Really the the elle fanning. Mary shelley Were they were like. Let's put elle fanning and a movie about mary shelley and make. Let's cast her as me. Mary shelley and no one will see us and no one thought.

bell palley douglas booth Palley weber Lindsey juliet reboot lindsey Bush Affleck jennifer lopez booth John wilkes thomas ben diarrhea Mary shelley Romeo haji tauch greenwich london
Mary Shelley: Founding Mother of Sci-Fi

Your Brain on Facts

02:02 min | 7 months ago

Mary Shelley: Founding Mother of Sci-Fi

"Many people would say and rightly so that seifi has many fathers but only one mother. The young woman credited with creating the genre mary shelley born to a renowned feminist writer and philosopher in seventeen ninety seven. Mary was sixteen when she fell in love. With the poet percy shelley and the two ran away together to become the power couple of the literary romantic movement. One summer at friend. Lord byron's villa in switzerland. The three of them spent long nights debating everything from art to politics to galvanise them also known as raising bodies from the dead using electricity on one eerie night byron challenged everyone to write a ghost story. Mary crafted a story in which the fantastic could happen within the realm of the possible. The book contains rather little in the way of actual science but it masterfully explores the social and moral repercussions of what might happen if certain scientific advances were possible. If you've only seen frankenstein movies you've been robbed of some of the best aspects of the story. The closest i've seen in popular retailing's was probably penny dreadful and to say close is to really give them a lot of credit. It also bears noting that mary shelley created an entire new literary genre when she was nineteen years old. I would definitely not want anyone reading the things that i wrote at. Nineteen or twenty to twenty five. Frankenstein was published anonymously in eighteen. Eighteen with a preface by percy shelley causing many to assume that he was the author since writing books wasn't a proper undertaking for a woman following bestseller status and successful screen adaptation. Mary set the record straight with the second edition. Eighteen twenty two finally taking credit for her masterpiece.

Seifi Lord Byron's Villa Mary Shelley Percy Shelley Mary Switzerland Byron Frankenstein
What Happened To Connie Converse

Unexplained Mysteries

05:33 min | 9 months ago

What Happened To Connie Converse

"In nineteen twenty four elizabeth eaton converse was born into a devoutly religious family being by the nineteen forties. She changed her name to connie and moved to new york city to pursue music. She spent her twenties writing folk songs and rebelling against her traditional after little came of her musical ambitions in new york. Connie moved to ann arbor michigan in nineteen sixty where she took an editorial position at an academic journal by the age of thirty six. Connie was struggling with her mental health in particular and affliction she referred to as her blue funk. This was made worse. When in the early seventies connie received two devastating pieces of news. She lost her job and her doctor told her she needed a hysterectomy. After turning fifty in august nineteen seventy four. Connie converse said goodbye to her brother and friends packed up volkswagen beetle and drove away. Officially she's never been seen or heard from again in her final instructions to her brother. Connie asked philip to pay her health insurance up until a certain date. She never explained. Why but philip worried that something terrible would happen. When that day passed searching for answers. Philip found a filing cabinet that belonged to connie in his antics inside. He found old journal entries poems notes and a farewell letter addressed to quote. Anyone who ever asks it read. So let me go please. And please accept my. Thanks for those happy times that each of you has given me over the years. And please know that i would have preferred to give you more than i ever did or could i am in everyone's debt. Philip did as connie requested. He let her go for thirty five years. Never knowing if she was alive or dead always hoping she'd return but from the moment she laughed. Philip and connie's closest friends feared the worst they own about connie's blue funk for quite some time though. Connie was never officially diagnosed with clinical depression. So far as we know in her farewell letter she wrote as an over educated peasant. I've read a good bit about middle-aged oppression and no several cases other than my own. According to establish psychiatric consensus those who suffer from major depressive disorders tend to lose interest in activities that previously brought them joy in connie's case when she moved to ann arbor. She stopped writing music. But even while living in new york connie's lyrics described feelings of isolation in her song called. Sorrow is my name. She wrote from the perspective of sadness is self sneaking in and out of people's minds in the bridge of the song sorrow kroons. And if you fear me i will come in haste and if you love me i will go away and if you scorn me i will lay you waste and if you know me i will come to stay. Perhaps connie wrote from her own experience overcome by a deep unshakable sadness that she felt would live inside her forever. She certainly wouldn't be the first person to live with undiagnosed depression in fact historians theorized that many historical figures battled similar mental illnesses before they were ever fully understood for example. Both frankenstein author mary. Shelley and president abraham lincoln reported experiencing significant bouts of melancholy. They'd regularly fall into deep sadness often unrelated to the events of their day to day lives. Some scholars have interpreted these spells as episodes of clinical depression diagnosis. That didn't exist in the eighteen. Hundreds when both lived almost a century later as connie struggled with her blue funk there was still an incredible amount of debate surrounding what constituted and caused depression throughout the nineteen hundreds doctors around the world published opinions but the medical field never reached consensus early. Researchers like sigmund. Freud believed depression was the result of traumatic experiences of course psychologists today understand that the causes are much more nuanced and multifaceted. They include both genetic and societal factors and this understanding started to take shape in the nineteen seventies when clinician set standards for diagnosing and treating clinical depression then in nineteen seventy five one year after connie disappeared doctors. I coined the term major depressive disorder.

Connie Elizabeth Eaton Converse Connie Converse Philip Depressive Disorders Ann Arbor Depressive Disorder New York Beetle Volkswagen New York City Michigan Cabinet Depression President Abraham Lincoln Frankenstein Shelley
Spotify tries out audiobooks with help from some celebrity Narrators

Daily Tech Headlines

00:32 sec | 9 months ago

Spotify tries out audiobooks with help from some celebrity Narrators

"Spotify has released. Nine new exclusive audio books. The books themselves are public domain but the performances by celebrities. David does brooke narrates mary. Shelley's frankenstein forest whittaker reads the narrative of the life of frederick douglas and american slave and hilary swank narrates kate shop the awakening spotify is also releasing a companion podcast called sitting with the classics hosted by harvard. Professor glenda carpio last year spotify partnered with visiting world to release weekly chapter instalments of harry potter and the sorcerer's stone. Although the verge notes this no longer appears to be listed on spotify

Frederick Douglas Kate Shop Spotify Whittaker Shelley Brooke Hilary Swank Glenda Carpio Mary David Harvard Harry Potter
"mary shelley" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:33 min | 10 months ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"This weekend 18 18 Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. This published the book is frequently called the World's first Science fiction novel. Although Mary Shelley was a respected writer for many years on Lee Frankenstein and her journals are still widely read. Jumping ahead this week in 1952 Sergeant Joe Friday's famous catchphrase, just the facts ma'am and his American homes on NBC via a new entertainment device. The television, a popular radio Siri since 1949 police drama Dragnet became one of the first TV series filmed in Hollywood instead of New York. It also began a long, nearly unbroken line of popular crime and police. TV dramas. This'll Week in 1974 President Richard Nixon signs the emergency highway energy. Conservation Act, setting a new national maximum speed limit. Prior to 1974 individual states set speed limits within their boundaries and highway speed limits across the country range from 40 MPH to 80 MPH. President Nixon signed a federal law lowering all national highway speed limits to 55. The act was intended to force Americans to drive it speeds deem more fuel efficient. And this week in 1990, Panama's general Manuel Noriega, after holing up for 10 days at the Vatican, Embassy and Animosity surrenders to U. S. Military troops to face charges of drug trafficking. Noriega was flown to Miami the following day, Crowds of citizens on the streets of Panama City rejoiced on July 10th 1992, the former dictator was convicted of drug trafficking, money laundering and racketeering and sentenced to 40 years in prison..

Mary Shelley Manuel Noriega President Nixon Sergeant Joe Friday Lee Frankenstein Panama City Panama President racketeering NBC U. S. Military New York Hollywood writer Miami
"mary shelley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Has put together with her band on this edition of new Sounds. I'm John Schaefer, and all the music that will be hearing is electro acoustic in nature. It will include things like String instruments and voices and other recognisable instruments but also highly Elektronik and highly processed sounds. And we'll begin with a collaborative work by on Helicon a groan and Maria Luv. Oh, Angelica has been here on our show a couple of times over the years. She is a classically trained composer, and she also has a band and electronic pop group called Balloon. But this collaboration with the vocalist and composer Miria Luv Oh, Is something that they've done for a dance theater project by Tiffany Mills, inspired by the writings of Mary Shelley, the Frankenstein author. So there is AH, there is dance in the day of this music, but you'll hear In these two excerpts that Maria Luv Oh, really explores the edges of what the voice Khun duo and on Helicon Agron provides the electro acoustic landscape that that voice habits. The overarching pieces called Not then not yet and we'll hear my baby and storm from Angelica now grown. And Muriel Luv Oh, B B. Next. Stop. Stop. You still owe Collaborative music from Helicon. The Grun, the Puerto Rican born Brooklyn based composer and Maria Luv Oh, born in France, and now based here is well. Their collaboration with the choreographer.

Maria Luv Angelica Muriel Luv Miria Luv John Schaefer Mary Shelley Puerto Rican Tiffany Mills Brooklyn France
The Year Without a Summer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

06:24 min | 1 year ago

The Year Without a Summer

"The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris Review Geneva New England Frankenstein Savannah Savannah Georgia Baron Carl Dreyer New York Geneva Villa Mid West Indonesia North America Atlantic United Kingdom
"mary shelley" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Two men rode a hit record for Sam Cooke she sixty but only sixteen is a song that remains credited to Sam Cooke as a songwriter Lou and Herbert would always contests that but later all of them got credit for Sam Cooke song Wonderful World no nineteen sixty two Herb Alpert decided to start his own record label with partner Jerry moss two years later Lou did the same thing with Dunhill records he also Mary Shelley fabric in nineteen sixty four she had played Donna reed's daughter on the TV show the two separated just two years later although they didn't divorce for another fourteen years journal world it is exploding they're old enough to kill but not tell me in nineteen sixty five Lou Adler's Dunhill records had their first major hit with Barry McGuire's eve of destruction a song that's every bit as relevant today as.

Sam Cooke Herbert Herb Alpert Donna reed Lou Adler Barry McGuire partner Jerry moss Mary Shelley
Chicago Weather: Freeze Warning Ahead

Ben Shapiro

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Chicago Weather: Freeze Warning Ahead

"Forecast freeze warnings up tonight we're down to thirty two degrees and knocking on the door of record cold for Chicago our record low at o'hare's twenty seven from nineteen eighty three early tomorrow morning forty one degrees this afternoon thirty two tonight with a freeze warning in effect sunshine Saturday fifty six and then what weather for mom's day Sunday showers high fifty two from the weather channel meteorologist Scott Lori Moore WLS AM eight ninety with another update thirty Mary Shelley out there right now just forty one at the lake forty three at midway forty one officially

Chicago O'hare Mary Shelley Scott Lori Moore
"mary shelley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on KCRW

"The court with that the bird's eye at that age Hey Larry all right so not your traditional Mary Shelley kind of Frankenstein coming up I guess well one of my favorite companies for larks which is this amazing theatre company and they also are sort of making an offer and also a new folk and also a dance piece but they've done Frankenstein at the Wallis Annenberg center for the performing arts and it's scary and beautiful and it's really a lovely show all right looking forward to it more on that coming up thanks thank you in a four twenty nine here K. C. R. W. thank you for joining us on this Monday afternoon here's what's coming up on All Things Considered the Tokyo marathon had just a tiny fraction of its usual runners this weekend Japan is canceling events both big and small in an attempt to curb corona virus spread ahead of the summer Olympics will talk about that also former celt then mayor Rudy judge suspended his presidential campaign last night but not before exceeding early expectations will have a look back at his once promising campaign on the program state local news at four thirty two we are of course on the eve of supertouring the herd of candidates are looking to become the democratic presidential nominee has certainly been the last couple of days but Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren still in the hunt which is up to tonight in a visit to California after this from NPR live from NPR news in Culver city California and Wayne brown Minnesota senator Amy Klobuchar's suspending her presidential campaign for the democratic nomination NPR's Windsor Johnston tells us the announcement comes on the eve of super Tuesday when more than a dozen states hold nominating contests Klobuchar's ending her presidential bid and is expected to endorse former vice president Joe Biden at a rally tonight in Dallas Klobuchar's decision comes after she finished sixth place and both Nevada and South Carolina the field of democratic candidates has narrowed heading into super Tuesday with five contenders vying for more than thirteen hundred delegates that are up for grabs NPR's Windsor Johnston the Minnesota senator is the third presidential candidate to drop out of the race in less than forty eight hours following Pete booted digis departure on Sunday and billionaire Tom Stiers exit on Saturday defense secretary mark esper says he's given the go ahead for U. S. troops to begin withdrawing from Afghanistan in the coming days as NPR's David welna reports the U. S. agree to draw down some four thousand troops by mid July in a deal signed with the Taliban over the weekend secretary Esther says under the terms of the agreement signed Saturday with the Taliban U. S. forces soon will start leaving Afghanistan and that drawdown would begin in the first ten days but you know my instruction to the commander was let's get moving let's show our full faith and effort to do that the U. S. has agreed to remove all troops within fourteen months asper says he expects fighting will start tapering off joint chiefs chairman general mark Milley agrees but to think that it's going to go to zero immediately that probably is not going to be the case the Taliban says a week long truce is over and it's resuming attacks on Afghan forces David welna NPR news Washington stocks rebounded on Wall Street the Dow is up more than five percent this is NPR news then this is KCRW news on Larry pearl on Monday March second good afternoon here's what's happening at four thirty two MSNBC host Chris Matthews has announced his retirement from the network tonight after more than twenty years at the channel will be replaced by a rotating group of host Matthew sudden departure comes in the midst of mounting criticism over several embarrassing on air moments Matthews compared senator Bernie Sanders campaign to the **** invasion of France was criticized for interviewing senator Elizabeth Warren in a condescending in disbelieving tone over the weekend journalist Laura Bassett published an article in GQ magazine's website describing a series of episodes for Matthews made inappropriate comments about her appearance in the makeup room of his studio before she was a guest on this program Matthews addressed the incident in his final sign of speech this afternoon the younger generations out there ready to take the reins we see them in politics and the media in funding for the causes they are proving the workplace we're talking here about better standards that we grew up with it's fair standards a lot of it has to do with how we talk to each other compliments on a woman's appearance than some men including me might have once incorrectly thought were okay we're never okay Matthew says he'll continue working on another book and quote continue to write and talk about politics and cheer on his producers and crew in Washington New York and on M. S. N. B. C. Matthew signed off after his initial announcement when was replaced on Monday show by Steve Kornacki the Massachusetts senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren said to speak to a crowded east LA college tonight at seven thirty four has unveiled a new labor rights plan for farm workers and food chain workers ahead of super Tuesday as KCRW's Daniel to require reports the proposal would nationalize some of the labor protections already in place in California senator Warren wants farmers to be included in the nationwide push for a fifteen dollar minimum wage a push it until now has centered mostly on fast food and retail workers Warren says quote agricultural labor has been intentionally excluded from basically bylaws and the coal Americans of color were excluded from the opportunities that bill America's white middle class I would also emphasize water shade and worker safety and it will ban the use of a popular pesticide derived from a nerve agent the plan also states that she would double down on heat and air quality safety standards things that California has moved to enforce key to the proposal would be replacing the H. two A. agricultural guest worker visa program it's recently come under fire for potential wage theft and housing violations California is home to up to one third of the farm workers in the US and those with Warren performs well in some recent statewide polls it is not clear whether she has enough support to.

Frankenstein Mary Shelley
A History of Seduction

The Book Review

15:04 min | 1 year ago

A History of Seduction

"Clement. Knox joins US now from London. His new book is called Seduction History from the enlightenment to the present Clement. Thanks for being here so your day job. I want to start there. Because you have a book oriented day job you work as a nonfiction buyer at waterstones which is of course a major British bookstore teen. What's your job like there? What do you do so their tour of managing nonfiction and about two hundred and eighty stores? My job really is just to get the the right books and the right stores. I'm responsible for history philosophy politics Papa. Johns I mean about nine categories overall and so. We do a lot with the publishers booksellers as well. Did you get to pick which categories you're responsible for? No when I got the job I was just assigned and then they'll kind of a reshuffle if he has got a few more categories as well they kind of work perfectly because it more or less alliance with what I'm interested in reading and what I'm interested in writing see you're deciding which books go into waterstone's the chain into which stores and how many copies are ordered exactly that to you. So that's a very powerful position. It's very structured is a very fair how we how we do it and is a constant communication publishers stores and sometimes even the authors as well we very even-handed brushing away and there's no kind of mysterious. What would probably shooter who understand. What's your typical day? Like a lot of meetings a lot of looking at science because a lot of reading of publicity plans and back and forth people. He wants us to buy their. Berko by book or by even more so. Are you living months ahead of time looking at? What are the books coming out this fall? Oh Oh yeah. We're tasked with trying to look as far as possible. So wig about to start. Looking at the timber Tiber November on average would normally thinking three months ahead of the east. And what happened with your book? The decider like we're going to order a hundred thousand copies of seduction. Yeah I I wish it was it by my boss has taken over that completely and utterly redeem. Oh look thing I try and pretend you know having to stay in a total of ignorance about one's own buck. I agree. Yeah but let's talk. Let's talk about your book. This may seem like perhaps a silly question but let's define seduction exactly. How is it action separate from courtship? How is it different from something? Maybe more creepy and less mutual like sexual harassment. Like what is seduction? I think the crucial aspect is selection. It's psychological and fumes kind of like confrontation between the minds and the passion of two different individuals in English law. That was a whole body of law do seduction discussing in some detail and wish would later it was. It came to America with with the mayflower that was developed in an extraordinary way and in those laws there was a distinction made between between rape which is obviously a What is coercive violent and seduction was seen as distinct from rape and she assumed that consent had been obtained that consent was in some way vitiated or somehow degraded by the techniques by which it was one so seduction carry that burden. That somehow someone's being over and perhaps the method used to win them over the Underhand but that's only one definition. There's a whole other definition which would say you know. It's just about courtship and game playing and it's fun and this is dawn which is dawn sexual freedom. Did you focus on that fun? Dance in this book or did you cover the full gamut the way the book is kind of structured is the. There's like a dialectic. Going on and one half of the history of seduction is about people worrying about sexual freedom worrying about things going wrong about the collision desire empower the capacity for abuse and wrongdoing. That is one of the history and the other half is about sexual freedom being this exciting enjoyable thing which which is buried lighthearted and people Is The insurance of the church. Will the government so the book kind of structured around the kind of dichotomy and not conflict between our two years of war sexual freedom is and what that means deduction your subtitle is history from the enlightenment the presidency? You're focusing mostly on the modern era. But let's start just briefly with that premodern era talk about what our earliest ideas of seduction were. Maybe perhaps grounded in with Allah G. And then how that changed as you moved into the Judeo Christian era the reason I start in the enlightenment. There's no because seduction didn't exist before seventeen hundred is because that's when seduction narrative as we understand it was born and the book is about this very powerful strange and modern thing seduction narrative which was basically invented in the eighteen th century and the product of a response to a whole new wave of ideas about the human mind about what we now think of. Feminism will prototype eminem and also about the discovery of sexual freedom as part of the blue celebrating our freedom and the enlightenment and before then you had a situation where sexuality was heavily pleased. It was subject to legal and religious interrogation and you know in America. Of course you had The puritans were very big on sexual policing but also in and the rest of Europe as well and over the course of the eighteenth century that whole value system changed. By the end of the Eighteenth Century Sexual Freedom was for granted and to be cleared. Sexual Freedom for them was not the sexual freedom that we now cherish worry about. That really meant that women go to choose. Who They married. That's where the foundation sexual freedom was not explains basically every Jane austen novel for instance. That is the undependable. The plus. They're out of plenty other novels besides and then more generally a kind of increasingly faraji towards male sexuality in particular so you see the rise of the double standard would be in spectacularly bad behavior of the rates of London and Paris Venice. You say that there were three modes of thought that really gave rise to the modern seduction narrative liberalism materialism and feminism. Let's talk about liberalism for example. How does that bring us? But we consider to be seduction as it is today in John. Look Letter of colouration. He He makes us interesting comment race. Is that basically? Everyone is going to have to look after their own. Their prospects of their own souls so liberalism is no longer going to tell people how to live their lives and what to do and instead they're going to have to have their own moral accounting and if in the religious view if they'd be living badly that we dealt with in the off the world it's not gonNA dealt with by the government and the President and obviously if you think about it back then because up until that point they'd be bathing policing sexuality quite a lot and sexuality was once you're saying okay. Everyone's GonNa look after their own moral well-being and the government's going to step out of it. The second and third order consequence of that include a increasingly hands off attitude towards sexuality and basically people are left to make their own decisions and see how how ends up so. It's not that people sat around in the late seventeenth century and said we're going to invent liberalism and one that includes sexual freedom sexual freedom flowed quite logically from this this view that we're not going to try and make everyone lived where he wants them to and that's because they tried that in Seventeenth Century. Europe and being horrific bloodshed and wars and everything else and they wanted you to move beyond that how it's addiction flow from materialism again because we'll be philosophers like like Locke and hume. They were kind of operating on the assumption that we're living in a godless world and they they were very careful how they frame that and Voltaire as well. Then we're castle how. They framed that because of course you won't read out to be an atheist but once you get to the position where we're saying. Okay they're not angels and devils and there's no Holy Spirit brought in the world and instead it's just individuals with brains achieving reality once you make those leaps you can move from new Ford away from this moralistic view of sexuality and towards an idea and that's like psychological view of reality and that's seduction narrative dramatize is this internal monologue about reason about passionate about desire and not basically the entire genre of the novel possible. And if you read these early novels like Richardson who had discussed at some length. Those books now in the more or less unreadable right ABBA time now. If you're named Pamela centrally forced to read Samuel Richardson so you know it comes with the you've read it that I have read and Shamanov so yes so been down that unfortunate path. To what extent is the history of seduction also a history of power and power dynamics? One way of looking at it is that it's not a matter of about power. One way of looking at it is that in fact sexual freedom is empowering and people who practice sexual freedom or taking control of their lives and our free liberated individuals and not seeing a strain and food since the Enlightenment Henry Fielding Mary Wilson Kroft Plus He Shelley Mary Shelley Khatri at all the way up to the present where people you know saying well. People shouldn't be telling me how to live my life. So I'm not I'm not part of it. Basically rejects the idea that seduction is about power and it says actually selections about about freedom and choice but obviously power is a complex thing to discuss. But I root it's about coercion and seduction it about agency. And as soon as our collides with especially in situations where you know that sexual inequality economic inequality there's racial inequality very quickly. We can see how adoption courtship can shade into something daca. You go into issues around race and seduction and in particular America's laws and attitudes around race in the book talk about those parts of the book America in the nineteen. Th Century developed this very extensive body of state laws placing seduction and eventually America how to federal law. The man act which was essentially a seduction Laura in everything but name and in the American south. Clearly it wasn't just a question of the law there were lynchings and these lynchings were often justified by reference to alleged sexual assaults or you know interracial relationships happening not not as true all the way up to an until so. It's not just that was seduction literature. Racial is clearly that was a very serious and horrifying epidemic of racial violence. Often had a sexual subtext. But in the case of the laws the laws designed to empower kind of racial scrutiny of sexual relationships and the mind acts was used to in California was used to prosecute lots of Japanese immigrants who had interracial relationships in the northeast and the Midwest where there were lots of Jewish immigrants or Polish German immigrants. It was used to kind of put further scrutiny communities and then the story. I tell about Joe Johnson who was the first black heavyweight champion of the world it was used to basically hound this man who they couldn't lynch or there were several attempts to do so until they tried to to get him in the courts. Did You keep the book focused on heterosexual seduction or do you cover sex relationships as well? I mentioned overseeing the enlightenment though. Is this on Abrasion of sexual freedom. I should have a code of that. Which obviously it was a celebration of heterosexual. Freedom of sexual freedom was not tackled until the nineteen sixties and seventies and beyond. So I do keep a focus on on heterosexual relationships but the simple reason is that that's deduction narrative of itself was born about this new idea of celebrating sexual freedom without sexual freedom did not include the same sex and curious about the origin of this book. Like is this something that you began before you were at waterstones is the nonfiction or a one of the nonfiction buyers or did this kind of evolve. Why hasn't anyone written about this? And getting all these other books about these other things but there's no good history of seduction. The funniest seed of this book was what I was living in America just finished Grad School in DC. And I was just reading novels like dangerous liaisons and a hero of our time and I kind of kept on coming across this theme of the Seduction Narrative. And it just wouldn't go away and it kind of knew it away me for several years and I kind of this whole history of the seduction laws which I find well fascinating and weird and then of course in in our own time. A lot of things have happened. The rise of the pick up this online dating or the rest of it. I had this of intuition that there was a story And it was the story larger than just what was going on now that it had a history and yeah. I was pretty much convinced that every day. Open the newspaper and someone in Britain the book but they never did give it a go. Well this segment is going up on Valentine's Day so it feels appropriate to ask you about your favorites seduction narrative. Dangerous liaisons novel is is is absolutely amazing. I would recommend twenty one I. It's incredibly that it was actually written two centuries ago and there have been several great adaptions of it and they were to the nineteen eighty s and then those cruel intentions made out of it in the ninety s which I think is fantastic film still. I mentioned briefly a hero of our time by lemon of again. I think everyone should read that book. And it was an incredible and the Russians were really heavily influenced by the English narrative. They will read some Richardson. They'd read Palmer and Clarisa. Bridgeton is name checked in Eugene Oregon. And of course they wrote obsessed with Byron who was a kind of mythical seducer lifetime and so the whole Russian tradition wouldn't really exist without those two figures and he said in London. Tolkien postgame also tolstoy as well all right well. I guess plenty of people to read over Valentine's Day maybe not moves people's chosen activity and this particular day but if if you are alone with book those are the ones to pick up in addition to of course deduction clement. Thanks for being here

America Samuel Richardson London Europe Johns Clement United States Waterstone Clement. Knox Eminem Jane Austen Rape Seventeenth Century California Harassment President Trump Eugene Oregon Midwest Britain Paris Venice
"mary shelley" Discussed on Nighttide

Nighttide

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Nighttide

"Even more mysterious several days after his death his his wife Mary who was yet unaware of her husband's fate woke up. One morning to find Percy pacing back and forth on the balcony thinking. He came home early and snuck in that previous night. Mary excitedly called hold out for him and hurried towards the balcony. A she approached. She thought she saw him jump off though the when she ran to the outside bracing herself for the horrible sight which must lay on the ground below. There was nothing as very was standing by the balcony. Tried figure out if she was going mad she heard it knock at the door your when she opened the door a man who was a close family friend was there looking quite somber so she invited him in all the while telling him of the strange visions she had seen on the balcony. The France stopped adopt. He put his hands on Mary shoulders and in a voice barely above a whisper. He said curtain. It's been Percy that you saw. He's passed on. When the story of Percy and is haunting d'appel Ganger all the more interesting is that Percy has has ties to another tale a monstrous one? You see the Mary he later married. It became Mary Shelley the very same Mary Shelley. Who wrote Frankenstein.

Mary Shelley Percy Mary Frankenstein France
Aaahh!!! Classic Monsters

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

08:38 min | 2 years ago

Aaahh!!! Classic Monsters

"We thought we would talk. Hello Classic movie monsters or I guess. A derivative thereof You know all the films like Frankenstein Dracula creature the Black Lagoon and salon boy. Oh boy so yeah so we are. Actually we each picked one classic creature. We're going to be sharing history in details about that creature in the story about the story about them so should we. Should we drinks. Yeah okay so I'm going to actually hand the mic over to Tracy and you because I she has forty drinks that she's going to be sure they're all so I'm focusing on vampires and at total wine there was actually quite a bit to choose from uh-huh depending on how elaborate you WanNa get with the topic. There was even like walking dead wine assume that seemed like sheeting. That seemed like that would be better for his. Obviously yeah it's because it's actually from the TV exactly. So I can't have rick on the cover and be thinking of Bram Stoker works for me with that said that I brought three drinks because being hungover and being two o'clock in me not having lunch it just seems weird like crack. Open a bottle of wine right now but I do have Francis Coppola diamond red plans talk a little bit about Coppola going on. Because you can't really talk about Dracula directly without talking about Coppola and then I also because I don't like I said if I'm going to open that I also brought four. They use my teeth to pull the bag out. I have a lovely temper neo. Oh I love to drag on. And we'll talk a little bit about what dragons dragons relates reverse dragged him the vampire at least in literature but like I said that's a bit heavy so honestly what I think I'm going to start with. Breath is a nice blood. Orange Margarita and S- To serve it in as they said I just live seven houses down I brought on my own Hamilton Sippy Cup when I say Hola pouring that that's awesome chewing that All amazing choices see. That doesn't take a random rationalization cody did you notice that mixture. You have doesn't actually have to kill it in it. Oh I I forgot I also brought my own patrol. Never leave home without it. So the monster I chose today is Where wolves so what? I'm drinking today. Is a Lithuanian heritage. Beer called where wolf it's literally called Werewolf and it has a quite a high alcohol content. So that's so funny because just right before for the show Tracy and I were talking about how we like picking drinks. That aren't just the name. They require narrative. Chris here's where we'll there's nothing with that sound so bitchy all right so Chris is still looking to see what kind of beer is is it. Strong connect have a taste. Today makes one of us. Oh that is delicious is really good. That's dangerous Oh my God. I'm just GonNa Covet this break a command. It's a Belgian dark El okay. I'M GONNA try that too. Yeah so for my drink. I'm actually Old England. I'm actually doing Frankenstein. And so and that was that was what I was GONNA do. I was I went into English. Oh I hear terrible and like you know what. I just can't drink this after my night. I'm going to get something good. Mary Shelley found something actually liked Mary. Shelley well well I whenever you look at all these old stories. I what I think of it is. They all kind of intertwined sometimes in ways and they're just kind of these wild crazy stories stories. So I've found a blackberry merlot called twisted Vine Ohio. Yeah good expected to get a couple. I rolls maybe like really all right so with that I will get into history I didn't want to do anything like Hollywood movie. Poor history because that would have been very long and excessive in instead I thought I would give a weird overview on the history of monsters the word monster itself derives from the Latin word monstrum meaning to demonstrate or monarch meaning to warn There's also the Latin word monstrum which Just means abnormal or supernatural but can also mean wonder or miracle generally speaking monsters are physical whether real or imagined representation of those things society as Dean leaned unknown or unnatural and most mostly those things that we fear and cannot explain physically. Speaking a monster may have some unusual characteristics. In fact one time things such as two-headed cavs or babies born with abnormalities were considered monsters so basically anything that was outside of what society claimed as quote. Normal aw was seen as monstrous of course as we know in addition to the physical characteristics. Munster's we'll do some terrible things or act out on the way beyond the standing of society being set that any one of us in this room could be considered a monster me with my blue hair and you both being super tall me with my gay so monsters there's all of you There are a ton of tons of monsters that go back in history. There were monsters that were found in cave paintings represented by animal human hybrids which unlikely cliches in real life hence monsters or at least at the conclusion that historians drew in Greek and Roman mythology monsters were perceived as a form of displeasure from the gods examples being cyclops Gorgon. Medusa Centaurs Sirens and so on. It seems that in religion like Judaism Christianity and Islam. They avoided talking about monsters aside from stories related to Satan and the power of evil in Hinduism monsters. A lot more prevalent. you see gods depicted with extra limbs or as an animal human hybrid and in native American culture. You have creatures such as the Wendy Go. Skin walkers and even sasquatch after the renaissance period with science becoming a new a fairly new thing. It really tried to attempt to explain what exactly monsters were to no avail in the gothic period we were graced. With two of the most infamous monsters Frankenstein and Dracula as well as some of the creepiest fairy tales by the brothers Grimm in psychology. Carl Jung tried to explain monsters as any central part of development might in that they were seen as the quote otherness within ourselves. I kind of discussed with this with you. Cody Day in that how I was talking how we need to balance the light with dark so I think that's the same thing it's arguing and our gang. We all have a fascination with monsters. This podcast is an example. Cody are armchair. Chair crypto zoologists. That even if these creatures don't exist it's that innate curiosity of the possibility of their existence as society changes the faces of monsters changing. We'll continue you to do so when before we used to be freed of things like trolls and elves. Today's where we fear things such as candyman or to say that once monsters collection of our society and then all the terrible things in it as well as an escape from those terrible things monsters are ever evolving and as long as we have fears and terrible things going on in our world they will. Oh not go away in my opinion. That's escapism at its best interest inc.. I have like a believer skeptic question but I guess I wanNA save it maybe. For debunk okay. But I'm afraid that I'm going to. I'm going to forget it. I'm going to ask now for both of Y'all are there any monsters or creatures that either of you actually believe in. Yes yes. That's probably what got me. Hooked on your podcast in the first place you were immediately talking about things that I have seen with my own eyes so I can only to Chris as a believer in many of the things. He's seen. Yeah I'm sitting there at work. Listen to going. Oh my God I saw that too says yes shadow people. I can't talk about that right now. Is Definitely I've had encounters encounters with shadow people. But as far as what we're talking about today. The closest is a boyfriend who thought he was a vampire. Oh Shit are you talking about that in your story. No I wasn't going to because it's complicated and messy advocates network. Deep Ball Game L.. Dated someone who thought he was a vampire sidelining. I think he was just really sexually confused. Needed to explore some things and that arena. He had seen the horror many

Cody Day Francis Coppola Chris Mary Shelley Tracy Black Lagoon Cavs Bram Stoker Carl Jung Rick Hollywood Old England Wendy Go Munster Dean Grimm Vine Ohio
"mary shelley" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"And going back and just seeing what we you know why did Mary Shelley right Frankenstein it was what was going on in her life she's really a tortured soul she had lost her daughter I think really horrible things that happen but she had attended a science show if you will that showed reanimation and it just showed electricity and how did the the they took a dead frog attached electrodes to it then you know generated some electricity hit those electrodes and the frog moved okay and so it was hurting now back to life and just not but yeah just moved and nobody had ever seen that before and so the idea back then was science might be able to regenerate life okay didn't have that don't have that ability but science the same thing happened with we can create the perfect human back in the forties and thirties with the **** it didn't work we now have the technology to do some of these things so man has been going down this road for a very very long time and it is and science is just catching up to man's most horrific and horrific dreams it's here it's really here this time and I don't think we're thinking about it because we're so distracted by I got so many likes on Facebook yeah and we've just become used to all the stuff I remember what it was in in Houston and the toll tag thing was a big deal to Houston Texans I don't get net because they'll they'll know wherever I am this seed on the toll will know where I am the low my name in the long run it but now we give up our information so quickly and so easily we don't even think about it you know and nobody is talking in Congress about protecting our information that one of the biggest things that can be done right now and should be done is that you are in charge you are the only owner of any information that is a that is on you so in other words any Facebook or anybody else collecting things you have access to it and you can say dump it it's mine that's me that's part of me is what should be is the way it should be but we're not demanding it we are allowing people to do profiles on us our spouses don't know us as well as Facebook knows us we most likely don't know ourselves as well as Facebook knows us and certainly Google how much information they are yeah and you have no access to it that's me that's mine that's part of me we've given it up for free the government needs to say you have no right to that information but anything in particular on the podcasting to direct people to today just background leashes in general because it's all in all it's all different aspects all felt as.

Mary Shelley
The History of Women in Science Fiction

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

05:21 min | 2 years ago

The History of Women in Science Fiction

"Science fiction has often been represented as a boys club but you have in particular studied and written extensively about history of women running science fiction if women have always been present in his own room why do people don't know about this why do we just think about the men who have written science fiction right i mean i think we we do think about women in the shocker but only like at certain periods of time right like everyone willing to admit that mary shelley is is one of the founders of the genre certainly one of the i think the first authored a write a commercially successful science fiction story and then you know you get fast forward to the nineteen seventies add a the revival of feminism an all of a sudden you at authors like her glennon joanna raw in margaret atwood and then people are like oh wow women right science fiction fiction and of course just this past year n k jemison right became the first author of of any gender race to win three she goes in award so now we see women in the john ross but there's a huge gap between like eighteen eighteen as they nineteen seventy they add i don't really understand where all the women were so i started looking around at turns out sure enough there they were there we've always had women in the sean raw on from the very beginning women constituted about fifteen percent of all science fiction producer third an we know that by the time they started doing reader's poll in the nineteen forties and fifties that women counted for at least forty percent of the readership as well an today i'm not sure where we are in readership but i know that the numbers of women science fiction have doubled so worried about thirty thirty five percent now but i think the reason that we forget that there were so many women in between shelly an a the revival of feminism in that the the growth of science fiction is because women were sometimes writing we were looking at the kinds of fiction they were writing and then we also can't find it because it didn't always get anthology eyes right it's it's really hard the early science fiction community were all magazine science fiction and add those magazines often got thrown away or they didn't laugh they weren't preserved so if you don't have access to a university with a huge science fiction collection like i do it's really hard to find these women and then you know it's exacerbated by the fact that even even if you have anthologies a lot of early anthologies were written by people who didn't necessarily include women in those anthologies for one reason or another yeah i mean it's it's interesting because obviously you have the the men who were writing in this pulp magazines same guy that didn't disappear people still about that and it's like it's just frustrating but then i mean i don't know if there's anything in it but things like james chip tree you know perhaps people don't necessarily know that that this is a pseudonym right right i i think james kept tree right that was probably a pretty well now one interesting thing i've found is that most women did not you nailed it and then most women went by willie decidedly feminine name an and usually their own name although sometimes they would also take other names like willis lorraine which is a lovely name she was born mary mod done you could see why she switched her name but really what i found is most women did not match courageous men an austin women pictures were printed printed in the magazine in the very early magazines author had catches of themselves with their draw with their with their stories so an even if somehow you missed that'd be editor were quick to correct a reader who missed took female writers from el writer but what did happen and that one very early in the shot like in the twenties and thirties right so white after universal suffrage and the first wave of feminism and i think a lot of people were really sort of on board with thinking about how the future my female as well is mel an but then in the late thirties and forties you the backlash against feminism in that time when the first science fiction anthologies are being put together and those were put together by a younger group of men who really did you find participated in that that minutes backlash rhetoric right john campbell who wore that no woman could write science fiction even though he'd been publishing in magazines women did you know he had it that's how to the male got her start in her career he told her no woman could write a story and she said yeah i bet i can write a story you'll like it so much you'll you'll back me from warren and that's exactly what happened actually but as anthology forgetting put together women we know they're anecdote on an app that that women have told that they were cut out of the magazine so luckily i've known her with one of the pioneering science fiction authors she gold lingers back and a was really popular with people's you're looking big creating space opera often she had been invited to be to include a story in one of the first big client fiction anthologies andover supposed to be a party for everyone who's gonna be on thala g and she was sick and she couldn't go so she sent her husband an editor said oh you must be likely stone he said no no that's my white i'm just here for her as a place called her and they're like oh that's very interesting and then within two weeks you had a letter saying yeah we decided to drop their story from anthology i'd really hard not to put to ensure together on that

Thirty Thirty Five Percent Fifteen Percent Forty Percent Two Weeks
"mary shelley" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Of rationality ever created Sherlock Holmes could be. The product of Conan Doyle who himself probably was a bit gullible. But as Conan Doyle himself said the puppet is not the master. He was able to create the brilliant Sherlock Holmes and make him very different from his own personality who sought something, more spiritual. Do you think that most people nowadays are? Believers of ghost as opposed to back in the eighteen hundreds. I think it's a lot harder to believe in ghosts. Now, because we feel like we know so much about science and reality, you know, and scientific instrumentation and all that sort of thing. So I think it's harder to say I'm willing to take that belief without real evidence. But I think there's still just as many unexplained phenomenon and I think there's still a widespread belief in ghosts very much. So goes, let's not me. How about you? Lisa. Now, I've I've got a number of paranormal investigations, and I have yet to get that thing. I really want. Do you ever look forward to the day that you do I would love that. I would be absolutely amazed in. I mean, it would be a life changing experience. Obviously wouldn't. Be scared. I don't I don't know. You know? That's a really good question. And I truthfully don't know. What do you think? Less. Would you be scared? No. I don't think. So I think it's it would be like just finding out something about physics or chemistry. Whatever it just be sort of one more thing. Be like, oh, I didn't know that it would be wonderful. But I don't think it would be scary. It would just be sort of like discovering something else that I didn't know about it. And I do that every day, and I should ask you less. I mean, do you believe in ghosts? While believe I certainly believe in the possibility of goes. Yes, I believe that there is something we just don't understand. What is the mind? What where does the person is it just electrical impulses brain? And where does all that go? I mean, this was a question that troubled Mary Shelley two hundred years ago when she wrote Frankenstein what is life? What's the difference between a living being in a non living being and two hundred years later, we still don't have the answer George. We still don't know. And I have to think that energy has to go somewhere. That's true in a really never dissipates doesn't. That's what I think. Lisa the the demons of life, and then the ghost stories. Do you see a difference between demons the demonic world, and then just general ghost stories? Oh, there's yeah. There's a pretty big and distinct difference in that even in folklore. There's a usually a pretty clear difference between a demon. Although there are some beliefs where a ghost actually would become a demon. There were some Norse legends and so forth of people who had lead such bad lives that they actually came back as demons that wasn't universal. But that was always a real possibility. So there's definitely some crossover in those beliefs to ghost is the residue of a human or an animal, I suppose, but the residue so what's leftover after more life? Maybe what came before more life too. That's another possibility. But demons in those that's really almost like those those are different species. Yeah. That's the way I feel about it. And it seems that at least in the older days. There were seemed to be more ghost stories revolving around Christmas, then like Halloween. Why? The Victorians loved to tell ghost stories on Christmas that was one of their chief things to do on that that night with your best ghost story. Merry christmas. Right. Darrelle famous. Go story of all time is a Christmas. Carol. That's true. A great classic not necessarily scary. I don't think I don't know. I saw television production of it. Once it was sort of a modern version of it. And the goes to Christmas past was a concentration camp. And it goes to the future was a very bleak sort of fascist kind of world. And I don't know I've found dickens pretty scary. Did you lease? I think Marley is scary. The the ghost of Christmas past present and future. Maybe not so much when Marley comes in shaking those chains. I think he's pretty scared. All right. We're gonna come back and talk more with less Clinger. Lisa Morton, as we talk about their latest work ghost stories, both their websites are linked up.

Lisa Morton Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes Marley Mary Shelley dickens George Frankenstein Carol two hundred years
"mary shelley" Discussed on The Good Life with Stevie & Sazan

The Good Life with Stevie & Sazan

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on The Good Life with Stevie & Sazan

"Your career education level, financial situation, your gender history. Your I q none. That matters. What matters is the the practice and the discipline. And that's why when we're talking about habits and routines. It's so important because I you create your habits, and then your habits crate you. I your creature habits of meditation or journaling or gratitude or working out or eating the best food ever. And then those habits create you back. Right. What's? So what's so powerful? I mean, you said so many amazing nuggets in there. I love though, that you're talking about how you can take action, and you can actually change, you know, so many of us feel like we're stuck in a routine pattern and habit. And we can't change it. And for me going back to making the bed. It was. We were talking about the book the the war of art. And how the whole first part of it is talking about facing resistance, and how you were saying being on your phone is reactive when I got up in the morning. There was something inside of me. It was like I don't wanna make this freaking bed. And I don't can't explain it. But I just didn't wanna do it. And my wife is saying to me, can you just make the bed? Can you just make the bed? And then after we started that challenge, and I was like I'm going to submit to this challenge. I'm just going to do this. I started making the bed and how making the bed litter started changing the course of my day just facing that small thing of resistance in the morning and being proactive like you said. First off the bat. It really it woke up another part of my brain. I I can't explain it by never felt that way before I wake up, and when I wake up I usually try to give myself something comfortable a Cup of coffee. I like to have a minute. You know, I don't like to face resistance head on. What it's always there. Waiting for me in the form of making the bed and by making that bed. Do things about me that were deep seated things start changing emotional things started changing, which really blew my mind. It really blew my mind has wife because I've obviously known Stevie for years. And even his mom has told me that like since he was a child he really had ADHD, you know. But there was something he always struggled with so for him focusing in school or even picking up after himself was always something that really tried to hold him back. And so he's never obviously taken any medication for it. And anything like that. And so there's been times where I've heard him say like, I just I can't like this is just the way that my brain is. Is. And it's almost like part of him wanted to accept it. But the other part being this fighter in him was like I don't want to accept it like, and then just by making the bed something so simple kind of sparked this whole idea. And this this revelation in him that like, okay, I can do this, and I can overcome these barriers, you know, critical both of you. And just as context for people don't know contacts about what is making a bed have to do with memory and focus on your productivity. There eleven ten eleven things. I do every single morning to jumpstart my brain. In of the first one is remembering my dreams, and I could explain why it's important because a lot of times, they don't realize this. When you when you learn all day, or you're an entrepreneur starting a business or you're solving problems at work or your health or career, your brain doesn't shut off night. If anything it's more active at night. People don't realize that that keeps on going, and it solves problems. It comes up with the idea is people don't realize that inventions, and in culture, and literature and art came from dream states. So. So for example, Mary Shelley came up with Frankenstein inner dream. I know I heard that that's to me Paul McCartney came up with the song yesterday in his dream, a chemist came up with the periodic table and a dream allies. How created a sewing machine in his dream on like, what are we dreaming about? But the problem is number one. We aren't getting the sleep we need in so many people, especially new new parents as it's it's an issue, but some people just they're not prioritizing sleep, which is so important for your brain..

Stevie Mary Shelley ADHD Paul McCartney Frankenstein
"mary shelley" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on The Science Show

"Modeled likely results of an eight foot monster created by Frankenstein and its mate being dropped into South America in eighteen eighteen and it wouldn't look good for her misapprehensions. According to our estimates human race would have approximately four thousand one hundred and eight years of survival. He'll explain how you reach that conclusion. Well, when we read through the novel, there are various clues about the creatures ecological niche, for example, the creature survives on nuts and berries on the wilderness. The creature learns to read the Milton's paradise lost becomes fluent in multiple languages. He can survive in the Arctic. And so from these tantalizing clues that are spread throughout the novel. We can estimate what kind of dietary needs the creature have what kinds of environmental. Conditions that creature could survive in and from those data, we can estimate a niche, and so we can then a match in this the creature had reproductive partner. Which is precisely what the creature wants. We can imagine how successful the creature aunt his partner would be able to reproduce under particular environmental conditions. That are known clues from the novel to create a population dynamics modeled principles competitive, exclusions wasn't even contemplated at that time. No, that's right. It was formulated mathematically in the nineteen thirties. And it's the concept that the millionaire to us now that two species can't live in the same place at the same time and have the same niche, the heart of the horror that Mary Shelley is trying to share with readers that. It's there was another human species on the planet, and it was perio- to us. It could out compete us in the human Nej. Then we. Would be done for. We would become extinct for sure. So Mary Shelley saved the human race..

Mary Shelley partner South America Arctic eight years eight foot Milton
"mary shelley" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on The Science Show

"From the new film Mary Shelley released in July before that Dr Marilyn Butler, the late rector of Exeter college in Oxford. And so he leaped to twenty eighteen and beyond our guidance is and burden who lives in Sydney, and who's written a novel almost invincible a novel about Mary. With an anxiety that almost amounted to agony. I collected the instruments of life around me that I might infuse the spark of being into the lifeless thing that lay at my feet. It was already one in the morning. The rain patted dismally against the pains, and my candle was nearly out when by the glimmer of the half extinguished light, I sold the Dalai yellow I of the creature open. It's breathed ha and convulsive motion at detained lames. That was how the eighteen year old Mary Shelley on a dark and stormy summa in Geneva in eighteen eighteen begun, her icon ick tale of reanimation. How can I describe the rich I had full from foraged body parts with such infinite pains and care I had selected his features is beautiful. Be. Great God, his lustrous black head pearly white teeth only formed a Mohammed contrast with his yellow skin and watery eyes and done white sockets, shriveled, complexion and straight black lips. I had worked for nearly two years for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body for this. I had deprived myself of rest and health. But now that I had finished the beauty of the dream vanished and breathless horror and disgust filled. My heart. Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created. I rushed out of the room. Frankenstein has been cold the first science fiction novel and two hundred years on after countless representation's re-creations in Boston is Asians of the story is ideas still challenging the scientific imagination. But where did it come from? What pointed Mary the direction of producing such a book one that was not just another gothic horror story, but a complex commentary on the possibilities and limitations of scientific exploration. The many scientists today the novel is tropes. And seems it's insights the still relevant. Mary was not a scientist, but understanding with beat play rooted in own experiences designed Geist at the times and the same that she explored in the novel still resonate today. Especially in the scientific world Fiona Sampson is a biographer of. Mary Shelley as a writer. She's an inspiration. I think that it's amazing to turn so much if it colty anti-anxiety really centennial anxiety as well as personal anxiety into mouthpiece into art. But of course, she also turned it into science in the sense that she has the foresight to channel all these questions food the big scientific inquiry of her day, which is what the origins of life. How do we make life? What's the difference between animate and inanimate if it's not an longer gold dropping the spirit of life into the human or the animal? So that's inspiring. Also for me as a woman, she's really interesting because she's writing around the edge of I I mean, she's moving how she's moving countries during the time, she writes, Frankenstein, she's suffering bereavements fisticuffs Assaf apartments. First wife kills two south. She's getting married. She's pregnant all these things are happening. And yet she still manages to write a novel and not just spontaneous emission start. As an awful form. There's a change in science. There's a time of. We'll political awareness and unease it's a time off the death of God's will anxiety about who the humanism on where they sit in the world around them, and then as Mary's own life experiences and at that moment, which is eighteen nineteen they all coincide as it were. And her tremendous creative, intelligent mind and emerge as a novel one of Mary's personal anxieties Fiona mentions had been the loss of her first born child born prematurely and living for only a few days..

Mary Shelley Fiona Sampson Dr Marilyn Butler Frankenstein Sydney Exeter lames Geneva Boston Oxford Geist writer scientist two hundred years eighteen year two years