28 Burst results for "Mary Louise Kelly"

Fresh update on "mary louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

01:26 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mary louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

"The city it's 5 50 This week we're talking with voters in two fast changing Georgia counties both are populous enough to decide winners in the big state A look to the midterms in Georgia On the next morning edition from NPR news Tomorrow morning at 5 on 90.1 W ABE From NPR news this is all things considered I'm Emily Feng And I'm Mary Louise Kelly Jakob Joseph or linsky says he was an active kid growing up in Poland Blake and rollerblading in a very extreme way in skate parks I will do all those tricks I did skiing with tricks snowboarding capoeira acrobatics skateboarding Also breakdancing He still does that actually I just did a little session right before our talk here Orlinski is 31 now He has a career touring the world not as a professional breakdancer not as a trick ski or but as an opera singer He has made several albums of baroque music this month he released an album of classic Polish songs called farewells And yes Jakob yosef or linsky speaks in a base baritone As you can hear I speak quite low but he's sings much higher in falsetto He is an internationally renowned counter tenor And that decision can also be traced back to his childhood when he was in a choir and they needed someone to sing the high notes We made the lottery And I lost that lottery you know So I lost a lot of it with my friend Me and my friend pyotr We were the youngest ones so I think that somebody manipulated those lottery But then I actually understood how much satisfaction it brings me to.

Npr News Linsky Emily Feng Mary Louise Kelly Jakob Joseph Georgia Orlinski Jakob Yosef Blake Poland Skiing Pyotr
Fresh update on "mary louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:26 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mary louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

"NPR news this is all things considered I'm Mary Louise Kelly And I'm Emily Feng In an overflowing Ukrainian courtroom today a Russian sword pleaded guilty to killing an unarmed civilian in the early days of the war This was the first war crimes trial of the current conflict and Ukraine says many more will follow And pierce Greg myrie was at the courthouse today in Ukraine's capital Kyiv any joins us now Hey Greg Hi Emily What did you see today in court Yeah there's huge interest in this case but it was held in this tiny courtroom in Kyiv Journalists packed into the court and they had to squeeze into a second courtroom next door to watch on video In the case is also being live streamed One of the three judges asked this 21 year old Russian army sergeant Vadim shisha Marin if he was guilty of shooting dead a 62 year old Ukrainian man just a few days after the war began in February This sergeant dressed in a blue and gray hoodie and responding from inside this glass box said quote yes fully yes Now he didn't say much more but a Ukrainian prosecutor laid out the case He said several Russian troops saw this older Ukrainian man on the side of the road in a village in the country's northeast Now this man was on his cell phone and the Russian suspected he might be revealing their position So the sergeant shot him with an automatic rifle according to the prosecutors Have the Ukrainians said how they captured this Russian soldier and have they presented evidence on how they linked him to this specific shooting you just described No the Ukrainians haven't said exactly how they detained him but they released a video earlier this month in which they were questioning him and he said he was responsible for the shooting Now we should note that prisoners of war are not supposed to be put on public display Also whenever a case is built on a suspect's confession this especially in one like this in the middle of a very hot war it does raise some questions about whether it was voluntary But the case continues Thursday and prosecutors say they will present evidence tying the sergeant to the killing and a sentence could range from ten years to life Did this Russian soldier have a defense lawyer Did that person say anything Yes the Russian sergeant does have a defense lawyer He's a Ukrainian and he has said that he is concerned about the rights here He says he wants to show that Ukraine operates in a way that Russia does not This is unusual now to have a war crime trial taking place while the war is still going on A highly unusual You know the basic model was said after World War II and the Nazis were put on trial in Nuremberg Germany shortly after the war the nations that won the war including the Soviet Union prosecuted top level figures in the Nazi regime but Ukraine says that waiting to prosecute after a war poses a number of challenges Years later evidence may be long gone witnesses can be hard to track down So Ukraine's government says it's identified more than 11,000 possible Russian war crimes and it wants to investigate now when evidence is fresh and witnesses can be located In Russia for its part says its troops have not harmed civilians despite the overwhelming evidence and a Kremlin spokesman said of the court case today that it was quote simply fake and staged Are there any risks to prosecuting these war crimes amid the conflict Yes there are some risks and some challenges I think capturing the suspects will certainly be the biggest obstacle but this war is being documented in unprecedented ways We've never seen so many videos and so much social media from a war zone Ukraine also says it's using technology like facial recognition software to help identify and track down suspects And the International Criminal Court at The Hague says it's already sent more than 40 people to Ukraine the largest group it's ever sent on a single mission Now neither Ukraine nor Russia belonged to the ICC but Ukraine has welcomed the investigators Thank you That's NPR's Greg myrie and Kyiv Ukraine My pleasure U.S. soccer is celebrating what it calls a historic moment for the sport The federation announced today an agreement that will provide equal pay for the highly decorated women's national team something that women have worked toward in recent years starting next month the men and women's teams will be paid the same for all competitions including the World Cup NPR's Tom Goldman reports The women's quest for equal pay has been mired in legal disputes and often bitter words between players and the U.S. soccer federation But today the talk was about unity and triumph Cindy parlo cone is the president of U.S. soccer I'm really proud of what we've achieved together What they U.S. soccer and the unions for the men's and women's national teams achieved is this collective bargaining agreement guaranteeing equal pay through identical economic terms Appearance fees and bonuses for all games and competitions will be the same There will be a 50 50 split of broadcast sponsorship and ticket revenue and equal working conditions including travel accommodations and playing venues Perhaps most significantly a first of its kind provision in global soccer to pool and share World Cup prize money That's long been an obstacle to equal pay since FIFA soccer's international governing body has paid much less in bonuses for the Women's World Cup At the last women's event the team split $30 million in total prize money At this year's men's World Cup in Qatar the teams will divvy up between 404 150 million U.S. sakurai said its hands were tied because it couldn't control how much money FIFA allotted for each tournament And that's where parallel cone says the U.S. men's team came up big Because this advancement doesn't happen without the men champagne this The man essentially agreed to give up money so the women World Cup winners in 2015 and 2019 could get more On a video conference this afternoon men's team player walker Zimmerman said the men ultimately realized there wasn't going to be a way forward to an overall deal without equal World Cup prize money Sure there was a potential chance of making less money But we also believe so much in the women's team we believe in the whole premise of equal pay and ultimately that was a big driving force for us was to do something historic And try and do this together Carlo Cohn says the time was right for collaboration between U.S. soccer and both national teams the men's labor contract was being hashed out And the women were coming up for renewal The result left parlo cone beaming You know I have been in this for over 20 years fighting for April.

Ukraine Npr News Mary Louise Kelly Emily Feng Pierce Greg Myrie Greg Hi Emily Vadim Shisha Marin Kyiv Russia Russian Army Soccer International Criminal Court Greg Myrie U.S. Tom Goldman NPR Nuremberg U.S. Soccer Federation Cindy Parlo Cone Soviet Union
Fresh update on "mary louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

01:00 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mary louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

"And the Annie E Casey foundation On Wednesday it's all things considered for NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly And I'm Emily Feng Extremism researchers are scouring through the online footprint believed to be linked to the accused buffalo gunman Among the materials is a nearly 600 page printout of a log from an online chat platform It reads like a kind of diary of the months leading up to the attack And Pierre's domestic extremism correspondent odette Yusuf has done the hard work and read it and joins us now and a warning some may find elements of this discussion disturbing Odette we've read this what exactly is in this printed document Well Emily it's a Discord chat log that's believed to be authored by the accused shooter starting from about 6 months ago And parts of it read kind of like a stream of consciousness In it the author shares very detailed information about how he acquired the equipment and weaponry for the attack and tested it out He cuts and pays a lot from outside sources when it comes to his racist and anti semitic ideologies And then there was the mundane like his exercise routine and food intake And this was just all posted online Yes it was one of several links that were shared before the attack Now Discord has taken down this server but as we know nothing truly disappears from the web It's important to note that the author here wanted us to see this record Emily he wrote it He edited it and it presents his own narrative and it should be taken with a high degree of skepticism Who was the intended audience for this Do we know who read this when it was online Well the Discord spokesperson says that nobody else saw this log until 30 minutes before the attack began when a small group of people they said quote we're invited to and joined the server But this is actually just one of many questions that this record raises Kissa white is at American university She's an extreme extremism researcher who's looked at this log several times She told me she is most interested in information that is missing Certain dates are missing It's kind of like why did he delete this whole section what was there Is it maybe someone was privy to this information Is it something that could have been like an intervention point Intervention points So did the log suggest that there were some red flags that others could have picked up on and intervened on Well the author of this document talks repeatedly about a desire to kill himself There's a notable instance from a year ago where he was sent to an ER after indicating on a school assignment that he was ideating murder or suicide At that point he says he was already thinking about an attack and so he lied and said he was not suicidal which is why he thinks he was able to buy guns That may have been an intervention point Another point he describes a disturbing episode where he chased and decapitated a cat and then writes that his mother helped him bury it So there are lots of questions of course about his parents awareness And finally the author's preparations for this attack became so all consuming he stopped going to college classes Emily and ultimately disenrolled So there are questions about whether school administrators mister red flag as well Ask her this attack people are asking what differentiates people who commit violence versus others who don't even if they all have similar extremist views After reading this document do you have any insight to that question Well you know we're seeing this individual described as a lone wolf which is often the case after terrorist attacks I spoke with Emerson brooking at the Atlanta council about this And he said that it may well be that one person planned and executed this attack will know more as the investigation continues But the ideas were not his own He took from other people much of his motivation And in that vein he was part of this broader decentralized white supremacist and white ethno nationalist movement that has gained such ground on the Internet since at least 2016 So you know things like the belief that he internalized that violence was the only solution His mistrust of authorities like doctors who might have helped him All those ideas are part of movements that we now see gaining greater acceptance in American society And pierce domestic extremism correspondent odette Yusef thank you You're welcome If you or someone you know may be considering suicide contact the national suicide prevention lifeline at one 802 7 three 8 two 5 5 or the crisis text the crisis text line excuse me by texting home to 7 four one 7 four one It's official Sweden and Finland have applied to join NATO The head of NATO Jens Stoltenberg is calling it a historic moment and the alliance is promising to fast track the applications Latino members would expand NATO's territory also its clout a fact not lost on Russia which is threatening to retaliate It will fall to our next guest to lead his country's next steps in all this and navigate the very fast changing security situation in Europe Peter holt Chris is the defense minister of Sweden today he is here in Washington for meetings with his U.S. counterpart defense secretary Lloyd Austin Peter hulk fist welcome to all things considered Welcome to Washington Thank you so much Thank you I have to say this is a conversation I did not expect to be having because you have been defense minister since 2014 and all those years you have opposed joining NATO You were on Swedish TV just late last year saying quote Sweden will never become a member of NATO as long as I am the minister of defense You are still the minister of defense Yes Are you now fully on board with joining the alliance You must understand the context and the situation also Because Sweden and Finland we decided to have a strategy to be military known allied and at the same time the will of military planning building peace together to countries And at the same time we upgraded our military capability and have signed defense agreements with different countries And that worked but we came until the situation when they started the war the 24th of February this year Yeah That changed the situation Should we still be known allied by ourselves And the result of that analysis was that we can not do that We must also be in NATO together with others Okay so I was going to ask because I understand that obviously Russia invading Ukraine in February changed all kinds of things in Europe But in terms of why it totally changed the calculus for you in Sweden you don't have a border with Ukraine You don't have a border with Russia You're saying it was suddenly felt like you might be all alone You know if we are also NATO and all the other countries around us is innate We will have a weaker situation in all these partnerships And at the same time when we are out of it in that new scenario we will be more exposed to Russia So we have a bigger risk towards Russia that they can make pressure on us when we are alone How worried are you Now that you've applied about retaliation from Russia I can't say that they talk a lot about do something and they all survive like it or whatever now twice in a short time So they can do things And what we prepare for is cyber attacks hybrid attacks destiny information We have in a decision in parliament said that we can not exclude the risk for military attack et cetera set So there is a broad spectra They can sabotage they can undermine So we prepared for all these scenarios You have a potential problem in turkey Turkey is raising objections to Sweden.

Annie E Casey Foundation Npr News Mary Louise Kelly Emily Feng Odette Yusuf Emily Nato Kissa White Sweden Emerson Brooking Atlanta Council Odette Yusef Pierre Discord American University Buffalo Peter Holt Chris Lloyd Austin Peter Hulk Russia National Suicide Prevention Li
Fresh update on "mary louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:20 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mary louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

"Is all things considered I'm Emily Feng And I'm Mary Louise Kelly The writer junko lahiri is known for her stories about the immigrant experience books like interpreter of maladies and the namesake rich fictional stories from and of two worlds Well the hearing is less known for the other kind of writing She does translation for the last several years the author and Princeton professor has been translating works from Italian to English including her own work and in a new essay collection titled translating myself and others Lahiri explores what draws her to translation She joins me now jumble of Harry Welcome back to all things considered I'm glad to speak with you again Thank you so much Clear the air if you would on something that I gather annoys you which is the notion that translation is somehow a lesser a lesser form of writing than creative writing Yes it annoys me because what I've come to realize is that translation is nothing but a form of writing If anything it's more of a pure form of writing if you will because it's language that is at the center of every choice That's being made And there's so much creativity and imagination that goes into arriving at.

Emily Feng Mary Louise Kelly Junko Lahiri Lahiri Princeton Harry
Fresh update on "mary louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:55 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mary louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

"Organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable problems C three AI is enterprise AI This is all things considered for NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly And I'm Emily Feng We know now that the Supreme Court may soon severely weaken or completely overturn abortion protections under roe V wade So what would that look like on the ground Abortion bans tend to impact the people who are already the most vulnerable That's Kim hutcherson a dean and Professor of law at Rutgers university where she specializes in reproductive justice She says the people who will feel the impact of such abortion bans are people who are low income women of color younger women who tend to find out about their pregnancies later into their pregnancy women who live in rural areas undocumented immigrants more than a dozen states already have trigger laws banning abortion on the books that would immediately go into effect if the Supreme Court decision lifts or weakens row And about a dozen more states will likely follow suit I ask much in about the future of enforcing such laws How would any of you trigger laws actually enforce abortion providers or those seeking an abortion to stop doing that For example SBA in Texas a law banning abortion providers that incentivizes bounty hunters to report people seeking abortions or their providers is that model going to be replicated in other places So one of the reasons why Texas passed that very odd law is they wanted to circumvent the ability of courts to stop the law from going into effect And so what Texas did is it said nobody in Texas state government is allowed to enforce this statute It is only going to be enforced by random people out in the world who identify that somebody is either providing abortions or that somebody has received an abortion or someone has aided and abetted another person in having an abortion But now they don't have to worry about it anymore So once roe was overruled there's no longer a concern of what we don't want this to get in front of a court that's going to say that we can't keep this statute anymore So I don't think we'll see a lot of those And if we do see them I think the way that we will see them is states that are trying to punish people for behavior that is happening out of state And that's going to be a lot harder for them to track And so they might want to incentivize people to turn in their neighbors and friends or whoever for going over state lines to get an abortion and then coming back home That sounds like that might require someone to prove they know someone who has gotten abortion or seeking one out which raises a whole host of questions about privacy and confidentiality of medical records I mean have states said anything about that whether they could whether abortions would be subject to some kind of public examination So it would be very hard for states to say that they're just going to open up everybody's medical records right This is actually a moment where HIPAA does apply to doctor patient confidentiality laws Exactly And one way in which HIPAA is not relevant is if the person who has your private medical information is not a healthcare provider right So you were talking to somebody at a grocery store or someone overheard you They're not bound by HIPAA So they could walk to the local police station and say I was just in this grocery store and here was this person who said acts That's a pretty scary world to live in And so if we do get those kinds of bounty hunter laws that follow that's one of the models that we might see there Many states are likely to make providing an abortion a felony So what kinds of reproductive services might be deemed a felony Who gets to decide to what level You have to do something for it to become a felon Yeah I mean so one thing to really keep in mind is that a lot of states even prior to what's about to happen to row and Casey have gone sort of as close to the line as possible in terms of making it difficult for people to provide abortions or to get abortions Though a lot of abortion providers are already deeply accustomed to working within a whole host of restraints And many states already have laws that ban abortion after viability but they have to have exceptions for the life and the health of the pregnant person And those typically will say that it's criminal that you are subject to prison time and that you are subject to losing your medical license So for those folks the question will be do I continue to try to provide healthcare in this particular state when I know that I am at risk for getting arrested or I'm at risk for losing my medical license And what about abortion medication can So medication abortion is useful up to about ten weeks It is easy to self manage at home but you have to get the pills So a question for providers is going to be what happens when states for instance start making it criminal to provide pills over state lines Are you willing to ship them Are you willing to drive them to somebody else and still really put yourself at risk by doing that Can you paint us a picture of a world in which that might be considered a felony Would the provider of those pills or the provider of an abortion be subject to a felony only or also the person seeking an abortion So it has very long been a tenant of the anti choice movement that women should not be punished for having abortions And part of that is this sort of myth making that women only have abortions because the abortion industry is targeting them or their husbands or boyfriends or forcing them to have an abortion that they otherwise wouldn't have So typically any kind of abortion ban carve out the person who's actually pregnant What I think that we are going to see is a lot of states saying we don't need that carve out anymore right Because they're going to be so many people who are self managing their abortions that if you really want to stop abortions happening in your jurisdiction you're going to have to go after medication abortions and you're most likely going to have to.

Mary Louise Kelly Emily Feng Kim Hutcherson Texas State Government Texas Supreme Court Rutgers University NPR SBA ROE Casey
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:12 min | 3 weeks ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Considered I'm rob Schmidt And I'm Mary Louise Kelly When there's a huge line at your local coffee shop because maybe they're short staffed It can be annoying Well our next guest argues that for his industry staff shortages are more than an annoyance they can be life threatening Christopher white is CEO of road to responsibility That is a Massachusetts company that provides care and services for adults with disabilities They are struggling to find workers because they can't match the starting wage being offered by other businesses businesses like target say or Bank of America Christopher white welcome to all things considered Thanks for having me Mary Louise Just in a sentence or two would you tell me a little bit more about the people you are serving Who comes to a company like wood to responsibility So we serve adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities including autism and acquired brain injuries They are as young as 22 and our oldest person that we support is I believe 97 Okay so quite a range And when you say you're short staffed how short staffed what's the gap We have 260 vacant positions right now Which represents about 27% of our total workforce What is your understanding of why Why can't you hire an these people So keep it really simple is three big factors There's demographics that COVID drove a lot of boomers to retire a lot sooner than was predicted A vast immigrant population has for many years been a band aid for human service staffing was This really no longer available in the big one though is just the pay rates The employment market has changed radically in the I guess we're in a sort of post COVID world right now The transitioning out of COVID world Yeah how big is the gap I said you can't match wages being offered elsewhere The state contracts we have will support entry level wages of between $15 an hour and $16 and 79 cents an hour for our direct care staff We increased that rate using one time dollars this year to $17 an hour And thankfully that plus generous recruitment and retention bonuses stop the hemorrhaging of staff leaving the workforce but hasn't really allowed us to gain any ground Whereas people can go down the street and work for Dunkin Donuts for $18 an hour we can compete with it What does it mean to be trying to run a company and have 27% fewer staff than you need to be fully stuffed What are the consequences of that What isn't getting done Well we're getting things done by quality isn't what it was And people are exhausted I've got staff who are routinely working a hundred hours a week A hundred hours a week Yep Routinely Routinely You know so when people are working that much and are tired mistakes get made and again we're not alone This is happening everywhere That sounds like you're dealing with a really vulnerable population and what you're saying is they're delays in their care and their treatments that they need Yeah and for many people it means they're not getting services at all People that were participating in our day services either employment or a therapeutic day service for people who are more medically compromised and older we've only been able to get about 60% of the people we were serving pre COVID back into service And the folks that we have been able to get back in the service we've seen really major declines in their skills and abilities because they haven't been getting the support they need Christopher white thank you.

Christopher white rob Schmidt Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Bank of America Massachusetts autism Dunkin Donuts
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:49 min | 3 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"For Friday From NPR news this is all things considered I'm Alyssa nad warney And I'm Mary Louise Kelly Three years ago back in 2019 I sat down with Arthur Brooks the writer and social scientist and he told me about an experience he had had on a plane where he'd found himself seated in the row ahead of an older gentleman And he was talking to his wife and I was like I didn't mean to eavesdrop but I couldn't help but hear And he was saying he wished he were dead And I thought it was somebody who must have been really disappointed about his life But then at the end of the flight he stood up and I recognized him as someone who's really quite prominent and who'd done a lot with his life And I thought to myself what's he doing wrong In other words if this really prominent really successful person wasn't happy with his life what does it say for the rest of us trying to find purpose relevance even joy as we age Arthur Brooks had started noodling the question he had written a piece for the Atlantic a piece he has now turned into a book It is titled from strength to strength Arthur Brooks welcome back to all things considered Thank you Great to be with you So in the three years since I have seen you you clearly realized you had a lot more to say on this topic this topic of aging and finding success in later life Lay out for us the big question here exploring the book Well I started doing research Again I'm a social scientist but this is very personal This is me search more than research really What can we expect if we're trying to work so hard to build something with our lives And I found that half the population tends to get happier and happier after 65 or 70 and the other half of the population more or less starts to go back down And the group that goes back down often includes the strivers the people who have worked so hard because the party ends And look if you don't do anything or don't do too much with your life You don't know when it's over But if you've worked really hard to build things to meet your goals to get rewarded when it finishes it can be incredibly disconcerting Disappointing even devastating to people And that's what I found And so I went in search of the solutions to that problem to look at the people who had cracked the code And I think I found it Okay well before we get there because now you've wet my appetite but let me just make clear how you are framing this This is a conversation about the second half of life Which you are defining is when like what age I'm a little worried about your answer Well so it's actually quite interesting given the fact that we live so much longer than when I was a kid You know when I was little the average age to death for a man was 67 Now if you live I'm 57 years old And I'm in perfect health As far as I know and actuarial tables say that I have even odds of living past 95 So let's just say your adult life starts at 20 If that's the case you're in good health You can pretty much expect or you should expect to live to 90 In which case half of your adult life is over at 55 And that means you have the second half left starting at 55 And I will note this is fundamentally an optimistic book The title from strength to strength is not from feeble to feebler That is where your data your research has left you that you're optimistic about her later years Incredibly I mean I started it out It was pretty grim The man on the plane And I thought oh my goodness is this what we have to look forward to And I found that there are people who have cracked the code but more importantly that we don't have to leave happiness in the second half of life up to chance And furthermore that we can find a new kind of success if we're willing to make some jumps and some changes and show some humility and have an adventure that's better than the first half Before we get to how to crack the code can I just question the premise that there is in fact a code to crack I mean I'm thinking I can point to people in my field and journalism in politics in law all kinds of professions who are at the top of their game in their 50s and their 60s and their 70s and beyond Are they what outliers the exception that proves the role of what Generally speaking they are the ones who have found the secret to second half success In other words there's a different formula for succeeding in the early part of your life and career Then that which is actually the most appropriate for the second half It requires different skills and different emphasis and those people that we see in almost every profession that are thriving As they get older they're the ones who've been able to make the shift And just again for people thinking huh really I introduced you as a social scientist You're saying this based on data that you have gone through compiled and looked at Yeah absolutely To say secrets it makes it sound like there's some sort of hack No you got to do the work You can't just wish for it and you can't hope you get lucky And that's the point The point of the work that I'm doing is a social scientist is to not leave your happiness up to chance But to remarkably increase the odds by doing the work at 25 and 45 and 65 so that by the time you're 75 and 85 and beyond you're happier than you've ever been So how do we do it How do we increase the odds Well to begin with there's a very interesting set of findings that said that success early on is based on one of two types of intelligence The first is called fluid intelligence which gives you the ability to solve problems to crack the case to innovate faster and to focus harder than pretty much all the competition early on in your career This is your Elon Musk brain And this increases through your 20s and into your 30s but then it tends to decline through your 40s and 50s meaning that you need to move to the second kind of intelligence which is increasing in your 40s and 50s That even your 60s and we'll stay high for the rest of your life That's.

Arthur Brooks NPR news Alyssa nad warney Mary Louise Kelly
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:45 min | 6 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"And more businesses are spending more on capital equipment It was time Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Adi Cornish Gelvin was always a boy but the world did not recognize him that way That's the story in the new children's book It's called Kelvin and in it authors JR and Vanessa Ford show how young Kelvin navigates the complicated feelings of being a transgender kid And how he comes into expressing who he really is The Fords are also parents to two children Ronnie and Ellie who is trans And inspired this book We are in the 6th year journey into Ellie's transition And so it really encompassed us early on right after their 5th birthday because that was the time when they announced to both of us who they were And so that transition really was a labor of love in a labor of learning for all of us It really helped JumpStart what we needed to do you know to research this whole new lexicon of terms and vocabulary as well as it what does it mean for us to continue to support Ellie in their transition And it's a social transition right now because it really focused on their external appearance as well as who they felt they were inside So Vanessa tell me then about Calvin who's the child in this book and how does their journey so to speak begin For Calvin there are pieces of Ellie's story choosing a name from a loved item that they have is something that Calvin does and also that Ellie did There are pieces of what Calvin says that Ellie said to us early on But we have a large network of families with many children who transitioned around four or 5 years old And each one of these children have informed us of their own experiences and we've grown up with them in our community of families with trans kids I'd love for you Vanessa to read a page from the book and this is a page where Calvin first tells his parents I'm not a girl Calvin says I'm a boy a boy in my heart and in my brain Can you just read the reaction basically what the parents say in response Absolutely We see Calvin with Calvin's family sitting in his room and his father says we love you if you're a girl boy neither or both We love you whoever you are my dad said later dad told me the word for how I felt was transgender Being transgender means other people think you are one gender but inside you know you're a different one That's a moment that struck me because I think for people who have real kind of problems with the transgender community One of the things they talk about is the idea of indoctrinating kids that you're putting ideas in their head And I wanted to ask you about the language here because you have the parent telling the child this is the word for what you feel When we first were with our child when they were four there was one book out and it used the word transgender and we didn't use that word for quite some time in reading the book to Ellie to our child And did you just skip over it We skipped over it because we didn't want to provide a word However when we finally used the word Ellie's breath took out all the air in the room and said that's who I am There's a word for who I am And so some of this is our children may not have the language to describe how they feel or how they identify and sometimes having that language can be incredibly empowering JR later the book talks about the trepidations that Calvin was feeling going back to school And there were a lot of questions there How did you come up with the questions Was this something you got from professionals from kids What are the kind of fears kids can have So we did a lot of research between Vanessa and I we actually got a lot of input from families from friends from trans elders about how we should try to tackle some of these challenges that a young trans kid would personally embark upon And we wanted to strip out all the external trauma and challenges that a trans kid would potentially face You know we wanted to look internally from a young kid standpoint What are some of those internal thoughts and obstacles that they would face The what ifs I think every kid could identify with the what ifs And the what it's here though or how would everyone treat me What if my Friends wouldn't call me he What if what if Right And that's a really salient point in the book Right there's this page where Calvin encounters a kid on that first day of school and says you know my name and the friend says yep your dad told my mom you're a boy now And that's pretty much it They go off to play Yeah and that's actually one of the things we found on our journey that kids are really open They are accepting and interested and curious It's really adults and political figures who have taken the issue of trans kids and politicized and put all this fear mongering out there when in our experience and the experience of many people we've talked with kids may have a few questions like Calvin's friend did but then it's on to recess What are we doing next And when kids are able to be their authentic selves it draws in others around them What's your response to the parents who say not my kid I'm not ready to have this conversation I mean you yourselves talked about reading a book and skipping over the word transgender right I think right now is the time if there's ever was a time We have a political environment in which trans youth in particular are being targeted around the country We have trans kids coming out every day in classrooms around the country And I would just encourage them to take a risk your child is going to be open and eager to learn this and it may help them be a better empathetic friend to somebody in their class or their community And I would say learn from our experience We were scared We were fearful of even using that word in the beginning When in fact our child found it so empowering I would also add that our kids aren't a monolith They are unique in every single way And for parents in adults and caretakers give them the opportunity to be themselves At least being able to listen to your kids is one of the things that we always try to promote listen to your kids They know what's best for them because they're living their experience every single day We started this conversation talking about Ronnie and Ellie your kids right And Ellie who is transgender what do they think of this book Ellie has gone through a little bit of a roller coaster over the last three years that it's taken for this book Being very excited about it being very nervous about it and now again being very excited about it And I think what's exciting is they see themselves reflected but it is not Elise story It is a amalgamation of pieces of Ellie's story along with the stories of real trans kids that we know nationally But Ronnie and Elliot are both very excited I think a little bit nervous This has been a labor of love and it's coming out into the world It's like we're having a third child.

Calvin Ellie Mary Louise Kelly Cornish Gelvin Kelvin Vanessa Ford Vanessa JR Ronnie Elise Elliot
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"Mary Louise Kelly. During the pandemic, an APP called Clubhouse took off. And let people join live audio chats from their smartphones. Soon there were game shows on celebrity appearances and some people becoming audio stars. Now the big social media companies are jumping in. NPR's Shannon Bond has more on how Silicon Valley is hoping to turn a pandemic era fad into a permanent boom. Russia, Howard was an early adopter of live audio. Lately, she's gotten hooked on Twitter's version called Spaces where she was among the first users. They said they wanted it to feel like a dinner party. They wanted you to feel like you were hosting people in your living room. What? That's my thing. I love to have people in my living room. I love for us to sit on the couch together with a glass of wine in our hands and just go at it for hours together, having a good time. Howard now regularly host spaces on Twitter, including one called viral Talk, where she interviews someone whose social media post has gone viral. The chats are live and ephemeral. Once they're over, they're gone. So today Welcome to Twitter spaces and viral talk. She's done spaces with the rapper Soldier boy talking about a beef he was in with professional wrestlers, the wrestlers Act. What? The W W Year we can talk. We can settle out this right now over the phone over the Twitter space. Howard says she wasn't even following soldier boy when she first asked him to chat live with her So little of me. I slid in a soldier boys dms, like, Hey, how much to put our spaces with me And he was like, sounds good. And I'm like, what Have you ever talked to him before? No, Never. In just a few months, Howard has gone from fewer than 100 followers on Twitter to more than 5000 and calls herself the queen of spaces. She's one of a slew of people making names for themselves in live audio and tech companies are paying attention. Fiji. Simo is head of the Facebook APP, she says, for the world's biggest social network audio is today. What video was a few years ago? When you is one of these formats that we think is going to become very natural core way in which people interact the same way video has become one of these ways. Facebook, which is among NPR's financial supporters, is getting ready to launch a bunch of products from short audio posts a sound effects to live chat rooms. Similar to clubhouse and Twitter spaces. But there's another important piece of the puzzle building tools for people like Risha Howard to start making a living from audio for creators. We think of it, as like something that needs to be able to turn into a business for them from the get go, whether it's Facebook, Twitter or clubhouse, they all have a lot to gain from winning creators loyalty. There's the time people spend on their apps listening to audio and the companies could eventually take a cut of the revenue their audio stars generate. So the race to roll out ways for hosts to get paid is heating up. I think for a long time creators bore The burden of making money, and they do a lot of leg work in order to go get sponsors and advertisers. Esther Crawford at Twitter says that's a big shift. Now Some companies are paying creators directly, letting listeners tip them even looking at selling tickets for exclusive events. Twitter has already launched a tip jar for power users. This is a way for creators to be rewarded for their time and energy that they're putting into hosting these public conversations on Twitter. But even as audio becomes a feature on nearly any social network, you can think of There's a big question hanging over all of this as pandemic restrictions ease. People are obviously going to spend less time on these services. Right. Jason Citron is CEO of messaging app Discord, which has had audio chat for years. But I do think that people have form new habits and they've tried new things. And so we believe that at the end of at the end of the school day at the end of the workday, people are still going to come home and their friends are still going to be on their discord. Sow discord is doubling down on audio with live events and paid tickets areas where it will have plenty of competition. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS Support for all Tech considered comes from C three A. I C.

Esther Crawford Risha Howard Mary Louise Kelly Jason Citron Shannon Bond Howard Twitter today Simo Clubhouse NPR more than 5000 Fiji wrestlers Act Russia Silicon Valley first users Facebook few years ago fewer than 100 followers
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Or visit w N. Y. C. Dot or that was Mary Louise Kelly. One of the anchors are a host of all things considered. If you've heard and you've listened to W, N Y C. You have heard Mary Louise Kelly as she has been Conducting wonderful interviews the past year about the pandemic and other issues. This is morning edition on Michael Hill. And with me today is W. Marcie's program Director Jackman Sin Cottam. This is the first day of W N. Y. C s spring fundraiser. In order for the drive to get a strong start. We're looking to get 3000 donations by noon on Friday. Listeners support is the largest source of w N Y C is funding and insurers that W m I C can continue to come to you. And the entire community. So be one of the 3000 make a contribution to support W. N. Y. C today. Call 888376 W and Y. C. That's 888376. 9692 or simply look for the donate button That's at W N Y. C that orc Thank you so much. If you've made a pledge this morning or in our response to our spots the last few days talking about that goal of raising 3000 donations by noon tomorrow. We do appreciate your support, and every single contribution at whatever amount you can afford, makes a difference and his meaningful to us. So thank you very much. One thing that we are experiencing this past year as a result of the pandemic is a loss in sponsorship support from the businesses and cultural institutions that we generally rely on for those support messages that you hear on W. N. Y. C. But the continued economics shutdown has created significant Headwinds for w. N. Y. C as these organizations have paused their sponsorship support of W. N. Y. C. So we've lost millions of dollars that we anticipated we would get when we were putting our budgets together last year. But I want to say one thing that's really helped us is the partnership of our monthly sustaining members that reliable source knowing how much we're going to begin. How much income we're going to be getting on a monthly basis from those monthly contributions is really helpful. So if you're not a sustaining member, we hope you'll consider becoming one today. All it means is you set up Whatever amount you think is the right amount to donate to W. N. Y. C. Many people give $10 a month, $15 a month or $20 a month, and you can set that up with your credit card, And then it automatically happens each and every month, but you don't lose control..

Mary Louise Kelly last year Michael Hill 888376. 9692 W. Marcie Jackman Sin Cottam 888376 3000 donations this morning today 3000 W, N Y C. millions of dollars past year $15 a month $20 a month w N Y C One $10 a month this past year
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. This hour. The impeachment trial opens with arguments over whether it's constitutional to have this trial at all. Also ahead, a possible release from prison for the Saudi activist who led the fight for women to be allowed to drive in the kingdom. Her existence Shattered the whole government narrative off in power and woman, and we remember the music and voice of Mary Wilson, one of the founding members of the Supremes. We did dare to dream at a time when it was almost an impossible dream for us to want to be stars. That's ahead after these news headlines. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack's fear. Former President Donald Trump's second historic impeachment trial began with fiery arguments from both sides, including a powerful 13 minute video showing in graphic detail violence carried out by his followers last month at the U. S. Capitol, the Senate, then voting 55 to 44 that it has jurisdiction and can proceed with the case. Trump's defense. MPR's Tamarick, he said, it harkens back to the first impeachment trial. This is the argument that they have been making me in some ways. It's not even that different than the argument that was made in President Trump's first impeachment, which was simply That these Democrats have Trump Derangement syndrome, and they are trying to get rid of him remove him from public life any way possible. That is essentially the argument that Trump's legal team is making this time and made last time to NPR's Tamara Keith Trump is charged with inciting insurrection connection with the mob attack. By the administration today said states will see their application of Corona virus vaccines rise next week to 11 million. That's up by two million weekly doses since President Biden took office. But many states say it's still not enough. Here's NPR's Our quest involved. In California. The vaccination effort is still very much a work in progress with stadium sites across the nation's most populous state, either vaccinating well under capacity or not yet, up and running at the opening Tuesday of the newest site, Santa Clara counties, Levi Stadium Governor Gavin Newsom said supply continues to be the challenge. That's the constraint. When.

Donald Trump Tamara Keith Trump NPR President Mary Louise Kelly Supremes Ari Shapiro Mary Wilson President Biden Gavin Newsom Levi Stadium MPR California Santa Clara Senate Jack Tamarick
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"Mary Louise Kelly. This our House Democrats want President Trump to resign or be removed from office. We'll hear more about where impeachment efforts stand. Ask yourselves is gunfire and the speaker's lobby a new normal. You're willing to accept. And former FBI Director James Comey weighs in on why he thinks Trump should be impeached, but not federally prosecuted. We don't want him center of our lives. I'd rather him in his bathroom, yelling at cars on the lawn at Mar A Lago with the camera lights off, Plus Mississippi flies a new state flag. Now news Lie from NPR News. I'm Jack Spear. In an extraordinary an unusual move. The country's top military leaders have signed a joint statement harshly condemning last week's ride at the U. S. Capitol. More from NPR's Greg Marie. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs, Army General Mark Milley and the other members say the January 6th Fry. It was a quote, direct assault on the U. S. Congress, the Capitol building and our constitutional process. Million. Other senior military leaders have stated repeatedly that they do not want the armed forces involved in U. S politics, but the violence has prompted them to take a more public position. The statement added that freedom of speech does not give anyone the right to resort to violence, sedition and insurrection. There was no mention of President Trump. But the statement by the Joint Chiefs stated that President elect Joe Biden would become commander in chief on January 20th. Greg, My RE NPR NEWS Washington As president Trump faces what is likely to be his second impeachment by the House this week, lawmakers are moving to remove the president even faster. They've now started debate on the topic of whether to attempt to remove Trump from office, using the 25th amendment, calling on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke his constitutional authority to carry that out. Although that's not likely to happen. There was growing disenfranchisement from Trump by members of his own party. Includes the share of the House Republican Conference. Congresswoman Liz Cheney. Impeachment vote in the House is expected tomorrow. Around the country. Officials and law enforcement personnel are taking steps to tighten security of state Capitol buildings. NPR's Greg Allen reports that follows a warning by the FBI that arm protester being planned it all 50 state capitals. In many states, legislatures are convening new sessions this week with tighter security in place in Olympia. Washington National Guard troops wrong hand is to protesters were arrested Monday for trying to enter the statehouse grounds. Michigan has banned openly carrying firearms in the capital there, a scene of armed protest through last spring following last week's violence in Washington, D C. Representative Geraldine Thompson of Florida says security is a concern. We're now even more, um, on Alert if if that's the best word for our safety, as lawmakers in Atlanta and 8 FT security fence is now being erected around the Georgia Capitol, Greg Allen NPR NEWS all air passengers entering the U. S will not be required provide a negative Corona virus test, according.

President Trump President NPR News NPR James Comey Joint Chiefs Greg Allen FBI U. S. Capitol Mary Louise Kelly Washington Congresswoman Liz Cheney Vice President Greg Marie House Republican Conference Washington National Guard Greg Jack Spear
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly. And I'm Elsa Chang. I had this now or what warnings were missed, that might have boarded the Christmas Day bombing in Nashville. There, we had information on him and that was passed over. That's a problem. That's a big problem. Also, covert cases are surging as his holiday travel at the nation's airports, and not everyone moving through those airports is obeying the rules about social distancing and wearing a mask. Human behavior is one of the most frustrating things and trying to combat the spread of covert 19 across the board, plus a new year's cocktail recipe to wring out 20 21st these news headlines. Life from NPR News in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone. The count has begun in the U. S. Of freshly identified cases of the covert 19 variant believed to be significantly more contagious than the original. Now. California Governor Gavin Newsom says a case has been identified in his state. This new variant this new strain. That we have identified obviously from the United Kingdom. There's some other parts of the globe, identified in Colorado yesterday has been identified here in the state of California. In Southern California. In a virtual call with Governor Newsome Infectious Disease official Dr Anthony Fauci predicted there will be more of those cases and not just in California. Not surprised that you have AH case and likely more cases in California. And we likely will be seeing reports from other states Colorado with the first In Colorado. Meanwhile, health officials say a state National Guard members the first reported US case of the covert 19 variant first detected in the UK and state officials are investigating a possible second case there. Coronavirus cases, hospitalizations and deaths are climbing in Oklahoma, and vaccine distribution is now in the works. Jessica Gallaher reports This so called pods or points of dispensing sites for the covert 19 vaccine include community centers, fairgrounds and schools. According to the Oklahoma State Department of Health first responders. People over 65 health care workers not in a hospital setting will be part of face two of the state's program. State Health Commissioner, Dr Lance Fry says the pods will help provide more access as vaccine distribution is being opened up to larger populations. Currently, residents and staff of long term care facilities, paramedics and frontline health care workers, among others. Are receiving the vaccine for NPR news. I'm Jessica Gallaher in Oklahoma City. Stocks finished higher today amid light trading ahead of the New Year's holiday. NPR's Scott Horsley reports, the Dow Jones industrial average rose more than 73 points to close it a new record high. All of the major stock indexes enjoyed modest gains. The Dow rose about a quarter percent. Both the S and P 500 index and the NASDAQ were up a fraction Investors have been encouraged this week by the signing of a new $900 billion covert relief package that includes direct payments of $600 to most Americans. The Treasury Department says the first, those payments are now on their way by direct deposit and by mail. An effort to boost the payments to $2000 remains bottled up in the Senate. GOP Senate leader Mitch McConnell opposes the higher payments, and he's paired the proposal with other provisions designed to prevent passage. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington Dow hit a record high of 30,409 points. The NASDAQ was up 19. This is NPR. Heads up two spirits enthusiasts amidst the U. S. Europe Trade dispute. The office of the U. S Trade representative said it was adding tariffs on cognacs and other brandy's from France and Germany as well a certain non sparkling wines and aircraft manufacturing parts. Rebellion against mask wearing and the live free or die. State has the governor of New Hampshire, canceling a public inauguration ceremony as New Hampshire public Radio's Todd Bookman tells US Governor Chris Sununu's safety concerns are related to armed protesters. Protesters have been gathering here, Governor Sununu's private residence for weeks. The protests began in opposition to Sununu's issuance of a statewide mask mandate. In response, the Republican governors hometown of new Fields passed an ordinance this month banning picketing outside of private homes. This week, Protesters openly defied that ordinance, resulting in nine people being sighted and one man being arrested for trespassing. The governor says the protests have become quote more aggressive instead of a public inauguration slated to be held outdoors due to Cova 19. There will now be a private ceremony live stream to the public for NPR news. I'm Todd Bookman in New Hampshire. Complications of the current virus have taken the life of actress Dawn Wells. She played the role of Mary Ann on the iconic TV sitcom Gilligan's Island. She was 82 Wells had numerous TV parts and shows like Bonanza and 77, Sunset Strip..

NPR News Governor Sununu California NPR New Hampshire Dawn Wells Jessica Gallaher Governor Gavin Newsom Oklahoma State Department of H Scott Horsley Mary Louise Kelly Todd Bookman Colorado US Governor Newsome Elsa Chang
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro, The only incumbent Democratic senator who lost reelection this year was Doug Jones of Alabama three years ago, voters chose him to fill the seat of Republican Jeff Sessions, who became president Trump's first attorney general. While they knew this would be a tough re election fight, the Jones campaign did not expect a total wipe out He lost a former football coach. Tommy Tub, Orville, by about 20 points. Senator Jones joins us now to talk about what he sees as the path forward for his party. Welcome back to all things considered. Thanks. Alright. Appreciate you being here with me. You know, when you were elected in 2017 about 674,000 people voted for you. And this year about 914,000 people voted for you many more. And yet you lost in a landslide. So how do you interpret that? Well, I still think that I'm still gonna look at it as ah, lot of positive things going on the next truck. 300,000 votes is a significant amount of it, And I think there are really solid votes. I think they're a solid base that we built. You know, when you're running in an election year, that is his polarized as this one Woz and with the president, being his pocket res was we always knew it was gonna be tough. The biggest thing I think that challenge that we had was trying to get People to split those tickets. And obviously, that just didn't happen in Alabama. Well, let's talk more broadly about this question of whether Democrats can turn the South blue again because on the one hand No but narrowly won Georgia. On the other hand, Democrats lost key Senate races in Kentucky, South Carolina, Alabama. I'm What do you think the future of the party in the South is? Well, I think it's a very positive. I think that things were looking up. I mean, the fact that we're even having this conversation I think shows that there are things that people see out there as things moving for Democrats in the right direction Now, I don't think that you're going to see any of those deep South states. Turned blue anytime soon. And, quite frankly, I'm not sure that that's really the go. I think the goal will be to have the Democratic Party competitive. You've seen that in Kentucky. We've got a Democratic governor. You've seen that in Louisiana, where there's a Democratic governor. We almost had a Democratic governor and Georgia and in Florida, so I think that things are moving in the right direction. We gotta play long ball We've got organized. We've got to get out there. We need to talk about issues that are important to people and listen to folks and hear them out and see what they've got to say. And then we can. We can get candidates who can fulfill that mission. Let's talk about the specific policy positions that the Democratic Party is going to prioritize going forward because there's this split right now, where the Progressive Wing argues that if Joe Biden does not pursue an aggressive liberal agenda It's going to alienate some of the people who carried him to victory. Here's what Democratic Congress one per mil Ajai a pall of Washington state, told NPR last week If we don't deliver for them in these next two years before the midterm elections, I fear we will lose them for a generation. We have to show that we are for bold populist policies. That help working people across this country and the most vulnerable Senator Jones. What do you think Bold populist policies is that the direction the Democratic Party should take? Well, I think that she's right to some extent, but at the same time, I think what's missing and a lot of these discussions are is the fact that What is the goal? How you get to a certain goal we can disagree on. But we all agree. For instance, people need to have good health care. They need to have easy access to good, affordable health. Care How you get there. We can have the policy difference, but that's I think it's the keys to how you get to these goals. Better education, You know, lower cost of higher education, getting people good jobs, bringing jobs back overseas, all of those air so called populist issues. The question is how you get there, and I think that there's a lot more income and I talked about this a lot in Alabama when I'm talking about Republicans and Democrats, But you have to say the same thing about the Democratic Party. We got a big tent. We've got so much more in common than him really divides us. It's easy to divide right after an election where people kind of want to point fingers, But I think as we get into this new administration, we're going to find it, Folks. You're gonna work with each other to try to get the same goals met. You say everybody wants good education on everybody wants good health care, and those are not controversial positions. But The question is, Do you pursue those goals with programs that Republicans could use to paint Democrats as quote unquote socialists, or do you try to find something that might not be as ambitious but might get a broader swath of elected officials behind it? Well, in Monte, you're gonna have tea. Oh, work to get a broader swath. It's the only way you're going. To assess the congresswoman said Deliver You're not going to be able to deliver a far right or far left agenda. Nobody's been able to do that. And so you've got it in order to get things done in Washington, D C. You're gonna have to get enough people in both houses of Congress to get something passed. That's gonna be difficult to do. But regardless you're gonna have to try to reach that common ground that I keep talking about to try to get these goals accomplished. We didn't get the Civil Rights act of 1964. Passed without getting a broad swath of people coming on board to help. We didn't get the voting Rights Act done. We didn't get the A C even done without a broader support of that, even among Democrats, so we can do it. It's just gonna take some work..

Democratic Party Alabama Senator Jones president Congress Georgia Kentucky Mary Louise Kelly senator Jeff Sessions Tommy Tub football Ari Shapiro Louisiana Washington Trump Joe Biden attorney Orville
35 years ago, the city of Philadelphia dropped a bomb on its citizens. They are now ready to apologize.

Marketplace

03:50 min | 1 year ago

35 years ago, the city of Philadelphia dropped a bomb on its citizens. They are now ready to apologize.

"Mary Louise Kelly. 35. Years ago, a police helicopter dropped a bomb on a Philadelphia row house in a mostly black neighborhood. 11 people were killed. Five of them were Children. The bomb live on inferno that burned down more than 60 other houses, leaving hundreds of people homeless. This is now referred to as the move. Bombing move for the Black Liberation group by the same name was targeted. Last Thursday, the Philadelphia City Council passed a resolution that finally issues a formal apology. Philadelphia City Council member Jamie got to who represents the third district where the bombing occurred. Updraft the resolution and joins us now. Hey there! Welcome. Hi. So for those who maybe don't know, don't remember much about the bombing. Which you just briefly explain what what was move, and why was the city of Philadelphia so hostile to it? Yes. Move Woz, a black liberation group of back to nature group, and I think they were. They were different, right? Like many people in our society, and they were a group of black people who were different and who were very unapologetic about it. And I think over time, um, there developed Ah, Lot of friction between move. Andhra police in the city of Philadelphia. So You've got this apology through. Why is this important now? 35 years later, I think it's important because one no one was ever held accountable on been a real way for what happens with the move. Bombing, which was an atrocity is one of the only times in our country that Ah government bombed its home city. Its own citizens, Um There was no there was never a formal apology. That's something that was all also very striking to me. And so I was honored. Tonto work with the activists who really brought this the council to bring this about, And not only is this Not only that, I think this was important from a symbolic perspective. I also think it's important because we see echoes of what happened in the move Bombing in what we're seeing now between police and community and with the police violence that we've seen in the very same neighborhood. This is Russell. The neighborhood where Walter Wallace Jr was gunned down by police. Just that was just last month that police shooting Walter Wallace? Yes. Yeah, And I've seen you talk about how divisions between police and the community are, you know, not new, obviously. And until we actually reckon with them, their divisions and the problems we're going to keep on coming. Absolutely. I think that we can connect what happened to move with what we saw happen with well to Rawlins Jr. And I think what underlines both of these events and a lot of the police violence we see is racism and a lack of recognition of the humanity of black people in our in our neighborhoods on behalf of police, and until we confront what's at the core, I don't believe we'll be able to move forward. We just have a few seconds left. But along with the apology does this resolution also make some concrete amends to the generations of people impacted by the by the bombing? Well, along with this apology. The resolution establishes May 13th as an annual day of observation, reflection in and re commitment in Philadelphia to honor those that we lost on that day in 1985. And though that, um, can be seen as largely symbolic. I hope it will be the start of the listening and the conversations that we need to

Philadelphia City Council Mary Louise Kelly Black Liberation Group Philadelphia Move Woz Andhra Police Walter Wallace Jr Walter Wallace Jamie Rawlins Jr. UM Russell
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"Chanda Mary Louise Kelly. This hour we talk about who's supporting President Trump as demographics continue shifting around the country trumps liability relies almost entirely on his consistently strong white support. But because we don't talk about white people that way we tend to focus on the sort of marginal shifts with people of color. Also when there is a Corona virus vaccine, who will be the first to get it? We anticipate having some vaccine for the high risk individuals sometime in December or early January, and how women working in retail have been hit by the pandemic. Now news Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear, President Donald Trump and his Democratic rival, Joe Biden, remained locked in an extremely close race in a number of crucial swing states, NPR's Windsor Johnston reports, election officials are continuing to tally hundreds of thousands of male unbalance across Pennsylvania, Nevada, Georgia and North Carolina. Two days after the election. Biden says he has no doubt that he and his running mate, Senator Kamala Harris, will win the presidency. He's also urging the nation to be patient. As the remaining votes are being counted. I asked everyone to stay calm all people to stay calm processes working, the count is being completed. We'll know very soon. Biden continues to lead Trump in the number of electoral votes needed to win the presidency, but the race could still go either way. In the meantime, the Trump campaign has filed lawsuits in Pennsylvania and Nevada, citing a lack of transparency at the polls. Similar suits filed by the campaign in Georgia and Michigan, have been tossed out by state judges. Windsor Johnston. NPR News, one of those dismissed lawsuits in Georgia relates to vote counting from member station W. A. B E in Atlanta. Emma Hurd has details. The suit was over 53 absentee ballots in Chatham County, the Georgia Republican Party in the Trump campaign alleged that the ballots weren't processed properly. In a live streamed hearing Thursday morning, A Superior Court judge threw out the case because, he said, there's no evidence of the county elections department violating the law and no evidence. The ballots arrived after the election Day, seven PM deadline. Reporter Emma Hurt The final partisan makeup of the Senate will not be known until January. 1, Georgia Senate seat is officially headed to a runoff while candidates in the states other Senate race expect the same. Here's NPR's Susan Davis. Georgia requires a runoff election if no candidate wins more than 50% of the vote. One of the Georgia Senate seats is a special election that is officially headed to a January 5th run off. Appointed Republican Senator Kelly Leffler will face Democrat Raphael Warnock. The other is for a seat held by Republican Senator David Perdue, who's in a close race against Democrat John Aasif. Boats are still being counted. But a runoff seems likely. Republicans are on track to hold 50 seats. Democrats 48 that means the two Georgia races could affect who controls the Senate. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington Fewer Americans were filing first time jobless claims last week, though today's numbers coming out of the farm or important numbers due out tomorrow. Labor Department announcing today first time jobless claims last week fell by 7000 was seasonally adjusted 751,000 the week ending October 31st October jobs numbers are due out tomorrow. On Wall Street, the Dow up 542 points today, the NASDAQ gained 300 points. The Standard and Poor's 500 was up 67 points to 35 10. You're listening to NPR. And this is Casey ar W. On Larry Parole on a Thursday, November 5th Very good afternoon to you. Here's what's happening at 3042 congressional races in Orange County remains too close to call this afternoon. In the coastal 48th district. Orange County Supervisor Michelle Steele has 50.4% of the vote compared to 49.6% for Harley Rueda, the incumbent, Ruda, a Democrat, flipped the seat in 2018 is part of a blue wave in O. C. Steal a Republican is trying to flip it back. Democratic representative Gil says Narrows has some ground to make up if he has to hold onto his seat in the 39th district, which is centered in Orange County, but also includes portions of Ella and San Bernadino counties. Republican challenger, Young Kim. Curly has 52% of the vote compared to nearly 48% forces narrows. Democrats are already the driving force in California state politics. They hold all statewide political offices and majorities in both houses of the Legislature, and after this week's election, they could pad their majority in the state Senate by flipping as many as four seats. KCR W's Terry Glaser has more. All four seats are in Southern California. One represents parts of Ella in San Bernadino counties. Another overlap San Bernardino and Riverside counties. And two are in Orange County, historically a Republican stronghold, But where Democrats have been gaining ground, one of those OSI fight centers around the 29th district, where Republican State Senator Lingling Chang is being challenged by Democrat Josh Newman, who won the seat in 2016, but was later recalled. The other involves the 37th district, where state Senator John Morlock is defending his seat against Democrat Dave Men. Of the 40 seats in the California state. Senate Democrats controlled 29. Depending on how these races go. That number could climb to 33. That is Casey aren't I'll be his Cherry Glaser reporting ballots still being counted in the state, but one result is clear. San Diego's Sarah Jacobs is going to be the youngest California representative in Congress after winning the 53rd district, fellow Democrat George it, Gomez conceded the race hours after the polls closed, clearing a path to victory for the 31 year old. And latest check. Jacob's clocks in at nearly 60% of the vote to candidates were vying for a seat vacated by Democrat Susan Davis. Support for NPR comes from Drexel University. Drexel's academic model is designed to prepare visionary leaders to address the challenges. Of a changing world. Mohr at Drexel dot edu slash ambition can't wait right now..

Georgia NPR Senate Democrats NPR News President Donald Trump Orange County Susan Davis Joe Biden California Georgia Senate Georgia Republican Party Windsor Johnston Chanda Mary Louise Kelly Senator Kamala Harris Pennsylvania Drexel University Nevada Ella
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Chang and I Mary Louise Kelly. Tonight we hear from both of the campaigns about their debate prep later, food banks across the country are struggling to keep up with demand. We've never experienced food and security at this level, since we've been tracking the data for the last 20 years. Plus, Ecologists explain why some forest fires become so dangerous. Fire can start to create its own winds and then become this basically self fulfilling prophecy right as it can really start to drive itself forward and how the NFL is trying to contain Kobe outbreaks first, he said, lines Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. White House physician Sean Conley says President Donald Trump has been fever free for more than four days. NPR's Asia, Roscoe reports trumps doctor also says his vital signs remain stable and in the normal range. In his latest update on President Trump's health, Dr Shannon Conley said in a memo that Trump has been symptom free for more than 24 hours. Trump was hospitalized last week after testing positive for the Corona virus. He received supplemental accident on at least two occasions after contracting the virus, but kindly, said Trump is not needed any oxygen since his initial hospitalization. The White House has provided on Ly short written updates from Trump's doctor over the past two days, currently has not provided information on the state of Trump's lungs, or the last time he tested negative for the Corona virus and other relevant details about Trump's care. Aisha Roscoe NPR news in a non DeKoven 19 Tonight's vice presidential debate in Salt Lake City, Utah, will have additional safety procedures in place that includes a clear Plexi glass partition between the candidates on each side of their deaths, as well as 12 FT of spacing from one another. The audience will also be sated at least 6 FT. Apart and all those entering the debate hall will have their temperatures checked and be required to wear masks. Tonight's debate is the only scheduled face off between the two vice presidential contenders. It comes after President Trump's positive cove in 19 diagnosis. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi continues to blast President Trump. We're pulling the plug on negotiations on the next Corona virus relief measure, NPR's Windsor Johnston reports. The speaker's also brushing aside the administration's ladies push for smaller, piecemeal legislation. Speaking on a bee sees the view. Pelosi called President Trump's abrupt decision to put talks on hold a missed opportunity to provide much needed relief amid the pandemic. It is really important for us to come to this agreement. The president just popped off and make that announcement without even informing us that that was the case. He insulted the Constitution of the United States. The Trump Administration is proposing stand alone legislation that would provide another round of direct payments for eligible Americans and additional relief for airlines and small businesses. Congressional Democrats say that doesn't go far enough in providing Americans what they need during the pandemic. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington Will the state of Wisconsin experiencing a major outbreak of cases of covert 19 health officials there say they're opening a field hospital with the state fairgrounds to deal with a potential overflow going to the state Department of Health Services? Only about 16% of Wisconsin's 11,452 hospital beds were available as of yesterday afternoon. Wisconsin currently has more than 850 Hospitalized Cove in 19 patients with 216 and intensive care on Wall Street. The Dow was up 530 points today. You're listening to NPR. Faced with an optic in Corona virus cases after a long low spell Italians when I'll be required to wear facemasks outdoors here, Sylvia Poggioli reports. The Rome government also approved the three month extension of the cove in 19 State of emergency. The outdoor mask requirement was already in effect in some regions, including lots still the region around Rome once the European epicenter of the pandemic. Italy successfully brought the infection curve down thanks to a strict two month long locked down in a very gradual reopening of the economy. But the country has seen a steady increase in infections in the last two months, although with much lower numbers that those recorded in France, Spain and Britain, the state of emergency was slated to end admitted October the extension to January. 31st gives the government greater powers and makes it easier to eliminate delays by bypassing the country's notorious red tape. Sylvia Poggioli. NPR News Roam. The former Minneapolis police officer charged with murder in the death of George Floyd has posted bond has been released from prison going to court documents. Derek Shaman posted bail on $1 million Bond. Floyd died on May 25th after charm and captives. Press need press down on Floyd's neck even a slight gas when he couldn't breathe. The incident sparked months of protests. Unprecedented wave of calls for police, accountability and racial justice traveling. Three other former officers were scheduled to stand trial in March. Credible futures prices lead somewhat today. Oil down 72 cents a barrel to close a 39 95 a barrel on the New York.

President Donald Trump NPR Trump Administration Trump president Sylvia Poggioli House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Aisha Roscoe Windsor Johnston George Floyd Wisconsin Mary Louise Kelly NFL Chang Hospitalized Cove Jack Spear Kobe
New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 1 year ago

New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang in January. 18 65 As the Civil war staggered into its final months, the US made a promise. It would take for 100,000 acres of confiscated southern lands stretching from South Carolina to Florida and redistribute it to formerly enslaved black people in 40 acre parcels. Well, that order did not last long. Within the year, Lincoln's replacement president, Andrew Johnson, broke that promise and handed the land back to plantation owners. That was the nation's first systematic attempt to provide reparations for slavery. More recently, the late Michigan congressman John Conyers, tried and failed for nearly three decades. Yet Congress to consider the same issue. Now California has taken Conyers bill and used it as an inspiration for a new bill signed into law last week. It is the first state law of its kind. California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber is the author of that Bill, and she joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. It's good to be here. Good to have you So what this new law does is basically set up a task force to study the issue of reparations for the descendants of enslaved people and To make further recommendations from there. Tell me what are you hoping to see? Come out of this task force. Well, I think they're a couple of things we hope will happen. Obviously, we hope there will be a number of recommendations on what the state needs to do in order to repair the damage that's been done. But hopefully in addition to that, we will have robust conversations about the really deep and long and pervasive impact of slavery and racism in California and across the nation. I talked to too many people who tell me I'm not a slave holder. I didn't I didn't own any slaves. What does that mean to me? Well, you may not have owned them, but the impact of your forefathers owning them. As what is the impact of the various laws and limitations placed upon African Americans That made it difficult, if not impossible, for them to compete educationally and economically and socially still has its lingering impact, and we see that in the streets today, we'll give us some concrete examples of what form Might these reparations take Well, you know, it could be like it is a Georgetown where those folks who was slaves that landed Georgetown, every descendant of those individuals now could have access and free education of Georgetown. We could look at the issue of loans and grants for people starting businesses, and we have businesses that are suffering and sometimes failing in this pandemic. Because of our let the lack of support and financing that made it almost difficult, if not impossible, for them to own land and only businesses. We need to look at housing patterns. California had some very, very racist housing patterns that existed. But they're they're number of things that need to exist and to indicate that is tremendous amount of damage was done and puts California on the hook as well, because he basically California was a free state, right. A lot of people don't think of California as a slave state, but exactly what role California did play when it came to slavery. Well, we had one of most racist governors who talked about removing all black people from state of California free or slaves. We created laws that prevented them from being able to testify in court against white person. We had lots of things embedded in our land ownership that prevents folks from buying or selling homes to African Americans. All of those things are important, as they began to say, is this wide African Americans continue to struggle have the least amount of wealth amassed have low homeownership, all those kinds of things that even after generations and generations of struggle. We still find that these things prevail. And even though a few sneak through the vast majority do not Now let me ask you dealing with the legacy of slavery is an issue that this entire country needs to reckon with. So there are a lot of people say, Let's look to a federal solution. How would you respond to that? Well, we have We lived for federal solution for 30 to 40 years. At this point, it's just not happening at the federal level. And so after waiting, we said, You know what California could do this? And I've governor said, You know what we can lead the way and that we think will motivate others to do. Likewise, California state Assemblywoman Shirley Weber was the author of a new state law to study reparations for slavery. Thank you very much, thank you for the opportunity.

California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber John Conyers NPR Mary Louise Kelly United States South Carolina Georgetown Congress Lincoln Andrew Johnson Michigan Florida President Trump Bill Elsa Chang
NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

All Things Considered

03:17 min | 1 year ago

NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

"Considered from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly has enough changed in the three years since the Harvey Weinstein story broke and the me to movement took off. A new report finds that for Hollywood and the entertainment business, the answer is no. The Hollywood Commission, a nonprofit that works to eradicate harassment and discrimination in the industry. Surveyed entertainment workers nationwide and found many are staying silent because they fear retaliation. Or they don't believe people in positions of power will be held to account. The chair of the commission is Anita Hill, who, of course, has fought her own battles over getting allegations of sexual harassment taken seriously. She accused now Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas of harassment and testified. Under oath back in 1991. Professor Hill joins us now welcome back to all things considered. I'm glad to speak with you again. I'm happy to be here. Tell me what surprised you in the survey results Well, the standout data was the data on accountability. We ask people Do you think that a person of higher rank Who was found to have our asked a person of lower rank would be held accountable and what we found is that 64% of the people we surveyed said that in fact, that person would not be held accountable. I suppose that's the thing that surprised me. I mean, on the one hand, it's not surprising that we're dealing with such deeply entrenched culture and history here. On the other hand, it's been three years of me, too, in the spotlight, and many powerful men have been held to account. You're you're absolutely right. We've seen some very high profile cases. And what we want to make sure is that it doesn't stop with just a few high profile cases. We know that they are problems throughout. Workplaces, and we want to make sure that everybody, whatever their position is Can count on being heard. So that's one piece of this. The other is persuading people who believe they're being harassed, have been harassed that they have a safe path to come forward and report it. I remember interviewing you, Professor Hill. Always. Almost exactly. Two years ago, September 2018 on we were talking because it was in the middle of the confirmation battle over Brett Kavanaugh. And we talked about the the personal cost of choosing to come forward. What do you say to someone who's weighing whether to do so or not? Well, you're absolutely right. There are personal cost. But even when people are willing to take the risk, there are other things that they're considering. People don't come forward because they think they won't be taken seriously. Unfortunately, the Cavanagh hearing really gave the impression that the Senate Judiciary Committee Did not take Christine Bozzi. Ford's claim seriously, and people see that example and becomes, you know what they think will happen to them.

Professor Hill Harassment Hollywood Commission Npr News Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Hollywood Harvey Weinstein Brett Kavanaugh Ford Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Senate Judiciary Committee Cavanagh Christine Bozzi
Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

All Things Considered

06:01 min | 1 year ago

Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

"And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington today, the governor and lieutenant governor of Wisconsin now President Trump to stay away from their state. So did the mayor of Kenosha, Wisconsin, who says the city needs time to heal, But the president showed up anyway. Trump's trip comes after days of unrest following the police shooting of a black man, Jacob Blake that left him hospitalized. It also comes after a white 17 year old Kyle Riton house with charged with six criminal counts, including first degree intentional homicide. Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes, a Democrat, joins us now Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me today. We're glad to have you. Governor Tony either sent a letter asking President Trump not to visit Kenosha. You've called for him to stay away as well. Do you see any potential benefit to having him? There may be a chance to meet and talk to him in a productive way. No, I do not because if a real leader would have proven that already, he would have given words Tio help console the people of this community of people of this state and the people of this nation because what happened in Kenosha? It's something that happens all too often in this country, and the president has offered no sort of resolve. You can look at the president's invective. You can look at the RNC, which tried to capitalize all such situations, which tried to politicize People who are crying out who are stepping up marching and demanding racial justice. And Donald Trump doesn't want to hear that He is going to use every opportunity that he can to divide the people of this state. A CZ. This is a critical state for his re election, and it's unfortunate because You know, these are realize that we're talking about Governor Evers called for a special session of the Legislature on Monday to address police reform. But Republicans didn't show up and that session lasted 30 seconds. To get any legislation through. You need Republican support. Do you have a plan for how to do that? Well, eyes unfortunate that you know, we could ask. What's our plan? When the Legislature and the Republicans in the Legislature don't get asked why they continue to ignore people, it took them forever to respond. A covert 19. They haven't responded to the health care crisis. They haven't responded to the dairy crisis that our family farmers are dealing with in this country. They haven't responded to gun violence prevention. They have responded to the client. Crisis, Every issue they continue to fail and ignore the people of this state. Kenosha is the latest city to deal with protests and sometimes counter protests that have turned violent governor ever sent in the national Guard as the protests were heating up, and some protesters said that having the guards there made unrest worse. Do you think the governor made the right decision by sending in the guards? So the governor sent in the guard's ate with controlling fires that were set. You know, this is all in the interest of safety because fires can get out of control. Fire touches the wrong thing. You have explosions that you can potentially have more loss of life. That was the purpose of the National Guard. I think what protesters were experiencing Was a heightened response from from law enforcement and the press conference that happened shortly after the young man who traveled to Wisconsin from Illinois to kill two people in our streets. The response was well, maybe if people weren't out past curfew, ignoring the fact that you're the shooter was also out past curfew. So to assign blame to that the victims that shows where we are in in terms of thought with some of the local law enforcement that's on the ground, and this is the reforming accountability that we're talking about. Whatever the reason, the guard was there, even if it was just to try to put out or prevent fires. It ends up being a law enforcement presence, the presence of authorities and this is the dilemma. I think for city and state leaders, how do you control what could become violent unrest? Without making people feel that the feds were storming in or with a guard is storming in. That's a really hard dilemma. Have you figured out the right balance of that? Is something that is a learning process. If I'm going to be completely honest, and and I I always I always promoted the fact that law enforcement should continuously Work to deescalate situations. Whether it is a or a personal interaction like the one with Jacob Blake and the three officers or whether we're talking larger scale events like protests and demonstrations. I think that you often see peaceful protest turned the other way when there is a heightened presence of what is perceived as authorities. So yeah, I do think there is there is a there is a problem. Because when people are protesting police, you know aggression with police overly aggressive police. The response cannot be over overly aggressive law enforcement. How to deal with violent unrest is becoming a major issue in the presidential campaign, and many Democrats who do not support President Trump worry that violent unrest helps him. That it lets him say the Democrats are weak on crime. What's your level of concern that you may be inadvertently helping President Trump's reelection efforts in that way? You know, I think that it's important for people to realize that again. The people who were killed. In Kenosha, where protesters they were killed by people who felt that they had a responsibility to help things to help matters to assist Now, like you mention Law enforcement are air National guards are there. They didn't eat health. Yet. These people are free to just walk the streets with long rifles, intimidating people. I think that is the important thing that people need to realize. Andi. I hope that folks to understand that Republicans continue to enable this sort of behavior this sort of behavior. That actually leads people did That's Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you.

President Trump Kenosha Lieutenant Governor Mandela Wisconsin National Guard Legislature Governor Evers Jacob Blake Governor Tony Barnes Mary Louise Kelly Kyle Riton Washington RNC Illinois
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. The essayist Eula Biss focuses her new book on What Seems to be a simple question. What is capitalism for her? The answer to that question is complicated and elusive and comes in the form of short, often funny essays that make up her new book having and being had Eula Biss. Welcome. Oh, thanks so much for having me Fula. This book grew out of you having finally bought your first home and for a lot of people that would be considered a pure success. A goal of adulthood. But you say it gave you a sense of security that felt unfamiliar and even uncomfortable. Why did you feel that way? Yeah. This book came out of that contradiction of me enjoying All the new comforts that came with having AH, home have a more space and also a new kind of economic security. But feeling uncomfortable, I think, really, with the system in which I had acquired those things. And I wrote the book as an effort to hold on to that discomfort. I had the sense that the discomfort had something to teach me. You seem to think that if you lost the sense of discomfort, there actually was a lost there. What did you think you could lose by not feeling that way anymore. One of the things that I didn't want to have happened to me. As I entered this new life in lifestyle was I didn't want to begin to think that I had what I had, because I'd worked hard. Which is one of the patterns of thought very common to upper middle class. I don't believe that I got what I got. Because I worked hard. I believe that I got what I got because the system favors Me in a number of different ways one because I'm white, but also because I started out middle class, and I think that it's uncomfortable for people who start out with more to be reminded of that. So and I do think that this is damaging in so many ways. The implication is that people who don't have enough have just not worked hard enough. And that's damaging to people who are working extremely hard and still don't have enough because they're being underpaid. But it's also damaging to relationships between people who have more and people who have less. If there's this implication, hovering in the air that you could have as much as I have, if only you just worked a little harder. In the book, You actually seemed to make an effort to share exact dollar amounts. I think you say it felt important to you to do that. So you volunteer that your house cost? I think almost a half million dollars. You tell readers the size of the advance you got for your book. Why be so open about that things that people usually don't want to share? Yeah, I was open about that. Exactly because I didn't want to be. I made a rule for myself, and I made it after having written that section where I talked about the price of my house. That section summarizes a conversation I had with my sister, where I told her that what I'd really done was acquire a $400,000 container for a washing machine. But what I noted in that moment was that I was misrepresenting to my own sister. The price of my house, which was much closer to $500,000. It was for 85. So when I noticed myself lying to my own sister about money, I decided that if I was going to learn anything from writing a book about money I was gonna have to Use the actual figures involved, and I was gonna have to face honestly what I had And did you downplay the amount to your sister? Because you had a sense of self consciousness or embarrassment about having bought that size house or borrowed that kind of money? Yeah, I downplayed it because of self consciousness because I knew that my sister was trying to buy a house and that her budget was smaller than mine. And it made me feel uncomfortable that I had more than her. And I downplayed it because I just had not myself become comfortable with that the amount of money that I was dealing with and it still was two enormous a sum for me to even say out loud. At one point you're talking about your son paying for a Pokemon card. But although someone else thought he overpaid for the Pokemon card, what was it like for you to watch your son try to figure out what something was worth and why, and maybe not figured it out correctly. So was amazing in watching him learn how to play Pokemon the way it was being played in 1st and 2nd grade. At this school, I felt like I was seeing an economy be invented. But it was also somewhat excruciating to me because I saw the ways in which other Children and his baby sitter and I were training the values of capitalism into him. So, yes, At one point he gave away valuable Pokemon card because he just didn't like it very much. And then I heard his baby sitter saying to him, Were you a smart negotiator? And I thought, Oh, no. What are we doing? This kid is on Ly six, and we're already training him Not to be generous, and to get his much out of an exchange is he can possibly get out of it, even if he doesn't care about the thing he's giving away. Oh, that's so interesting. I mean, diamonds are objectively very expensive, invaluable, but if I don't care about them, and I just want to give them away Is that fine? Or is that flawed financial thinking under the logic of capitalism? It's insane, right? But by by some other logic, it makes perfect sense. Especially since diamonds are incredibly useful. You can eat them and you can't live inside them. After you finished your book. How do you define capitalism? In your words? Yes. So the definition that was most useful to me was David Draper's from Debt, the 1st 5000 years and his definition was the art of using money to make more money..

Eula Biss NPR Mary Louise Kelly David Draper Sasha Pfeiffer
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:21 min | 2 years ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang, The House Armed Services Committee had a host of questions today for Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Joint Chiefs of Staff General Mark Milley. Questions covered what the role was of the National Guard during recent protests, and they covered reports of Russia paying bounties for the Taliban to kill Americans. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman joins us with details. Hey, Tom, also all right, So let's start the national Guard. I mean, there have been lingering questions over how they were used on June 1st in Lafayette Square in Washington, D. C. What did Esper and really say about the role of the guard that day? Will. They defended the role of the National Guard. The same guard troops were there to support civilian law enforcement and we're in what they called a static position. They didn't take part in clearing the park of peaceful protesters, Guard troops, they said. Are used to dealing with any civil unrest, supporting local authorities on a variety of for a variety of reasons, And they said it's a better alternative than using active duty forces as president. Trump had threatened. And is it clear who was actually calling the shots that day? You know it's not clear else, And that's really surprising neither as for normally knew, who gave the order to clear the park. But again, the guard was working in support of civil authorities. Justice Department as well as the Park police were apparently someone within those organizations gave the order. Now the Pentagon is doing what it calls an after action report on the guards rule in D C and also elsewhere around the country, including Training and equipment. Now. One issue in D. C was also a guard helicopter flew low over protesters in the wash from the blades swept them up in debris even tour some limbs from treason. The report's expect to determine why that happened. Okay, well, the other story I want to ask you about is reports of a bounty program in Afghanistan, where Russia was reportedly offering up cash sums to Taliban fighters to kill Americans. Why don't we know about this so far? Well, it did come up. Both Esper and Milly said the Pentagon has not corroborated reports of the bony program from the intelligence community, principally the CIA. The Pentagon is still looking into that, and they see no evidence that any Americans were killed. As a result of this supposed program. But general, Milley pointed out, and he's done multiple tours in Afghanistan that it's long been known that Russia was aiding the Taliban with training and equipment. Or deported meddling since 2013 or so. And also this is something I saw in the ground myself when I was in Helmand province a few years back with my producer, Monica if Stati Ava Thing is, Milly did go on to say the American troops there are at the highest level of force protection, and he said, there's not much more they can do at the ground level. This issue of Russian bounties is MME or something for top political leaders. Let's listen. The issue is higher than that The issue is at the strategic level. What should or could we be doing at the strategic level is their diplomatic and informational on economic of the sanctions of the dead marshes are their phone calls or their pressure, those sorts of things And I can tell you that some of that is done. Are we doing as much as we could, or should? Perhaps not interesting. He's saying that we probably are not doing as much as we could or should. So, is that language? Actually being echoed by the White House at the moment, Absolutely not. The White House criticized in New York Times, which broke the story about the supposed bounties. He's criticized him for revealing classified information in the president just dismissed the whole story as a hoax, and he said it was on ly to damage me in the Republican Party. But the Pentagon again Is looking into this taking it very seriously. And clearly, as you just heard, General Milley was much more forceful on Russia than anything we've heard recently from the White House. And if it's true, these bounties Millie said he would be an outraged general. That is NPR's Tom Bowman. Thank you so much, Tom, you're welcome. Scientists say they have identified an enzyme that could help explain how exercise Khun slow or even reverse some signs of aging in the brain. Exercising a bottle is not around the corner, but it's not out of the question, either. NPR science correspondent Richard Harris took a break from reporting about the Corona virus to look into this intriguing suggestion. Scientists were surprised to discover a few years ago that brain function doesn't have to get worse. And worse as we age solve. A lady's research was inspired in part by a finding that parts of the brain can actually re grow even in older people. Just because you have an old brand doesn't have to stay that way. One of the best known interventions that has a benefit on the brain is exercise. The problem is that the elderly are frail. Many of them can't physically do the exercise. Violeta and his colleagues at UC San Francisco have been on the hunt for factors in the blood that air boosted by exercise and that Khun Improve mental performance. Can we actually then transfer the benefits of exercise without actually having to do the physical component of the exercise itself? They now report in science magazine that they think they have a great lead. My sou exercise produced lots of a liver in time called G P l D one. And when the researchers revved up production of this protein in mice, nerves grew in part of their brains and the animals perform better on mental tasks in a maze exercise causes this protein to be produced in the liver goes into the blood that sort of damp in certain aspects of inflammation. And then the result of that is that you actually have improvement. In cognitive function in these older mice. The research team also looked at a group of older people who exercise more and there again, they found more of this enzyme. So the same thing is true Inhumans. If you're more active, you're producing more of this protein, and it's sort of circulating your blood. Now both aging and exercise are extremely complicated systems involving all sorts of components that interact in complicated ways. So violated had to think hard about whether a single protein could really have a big effect. I was definitely surprised that one protein could could have that much effect. But when I started thinking about it, Okay, it's one approaching. But really, it's changing. You know these other 100 protein, so I think that's why scientists are nowhere near understanding the complex relationship between all these interacting parts. Bradley Wise is at the National Institute on Aging. There's a long step between identifying this enzyme and making me a pill out of that. This is one piece of the puzzle. But the team at UC San Francisco is eager to see if they can find their way to making a medication out of there now patented Discovery. Elena says the discovery at least suggest a path forward. We don't have that, you know, exercise pill right now. You know, this lets us know that that I think is a viable thing to pursue. We're not there yet. You know, my mom gets really excited. She was like exercising about on like we're on our way. But we're not. We're not there yet. I wouldn't rush out to make GPL d one and give it to people Bill Freeman, researchers aging at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and at the VA in Oklahoma City. He's excited about the new findings, but cautions that almost nothing is known about the potential downside of tinkering with this enzyme and the complicated system. It effects. There's a lot more research done, and in the meantime one of the things that we can all do. Is exercise we can we have that, within our own power and exercise has all sorts of health benefits beyond the brain. So if this ever does become a medication that would be most helpful for people who through injury or old age simply can't exercise on their own. Richard Harris. NPR news This is w when my C you're listening to all things considered news Headlines air.

Pentagon Russia Taliban Tom Bowman National Guard NPR Mark Esper General Milley Afghanistan White House Khun president San Francisco Richard Harris Milly Mark Milley Mary Louise Kelly Washington House Armed Services Committee
Fauci Says US Could Reach 100000 Coronavirus Cases a Day

Live from Here with Chris Thile

05:42 min | 2 years ago

Fauci Says US Could Reach 100000 Coronavirus Cases a Day

"This past week, Dr Anthony Fauci shocked many people in this country and around the world when he said before Congress And unless something changes Corona virus cases in the United States could reach 100,000 per day. What would it take to turn things around and keep us from reaching that? Terrifying number. Dr. Fauci spoke about this with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly. Can we turn this around? Can we turn these numbers around without an even more aggressive shutdown than we had in March? And in April? I believe the answer is yes, but we have to do things a bit differently. And what we've been doing, because when you talk about the goal of everyone to try and proceed towards normalization by taking steps in the opening America again Program, which would guidelines that had good and well demarcated benchmark. What we saw and it really varied from state to state with people out there. Congregating in bars congregating in crowds in a celebratory way, understandably because they felt cooped up without wearing masks. That is, you know, in many respects if I might use the word, it's a violation of the principles of what we're trying to do. It does not have to be 100,000 cases a day. I use that number. Because I wanted Jeff to jolt people into realizing their attention. So we did, and that's exactly what I wanted to do because as I've said so many times over the previous weeks, two months If you leave the virus to its own devices, it will take off on you. You've just sent a couple of things I want to follow up. When you talked about how things have varied so much state to state, you used the word guidelines a supposed to requirements. Does there need to be more of a coordinated federal plan? Do there need to be requirements? Or is it wise to have the strategy remain leaving this largely to states and local governments to figure it out? No Maryland, you bring up a good point, And there's a lot of argument about that about how this country is set up where you have the states that have the capability of making decisions because of the different and peculiar. Nature of things that go on in different states from a public health perspective. Would it be better if the federal government were taking a more sort of? Well, it might not be. I mean, I'm one that does taken assertive role. If you hear what I say whenever I'm talking as I am on this program You know, it is really saying that we must do these things, hopefully and I'm seeing it right now, after yesterday's numbers came out that many of the governors and mayors are actually demanding and saying it is mandatory. Now, if you're gonna go out, you have to have a mask on that is something that is absolutely essential, but you're right. There will be arguments. I'm one for more directive way of doing things, but in many respects, that's not the way this country works. So what do you say to the governors to our two local leaders who are not rolling things back? Somebody like Florida Governor Rhonda Santis? Well, what I do is two things and I've been doing it consistently and intensively. Yes, I do it publicly like I have the opportunity to do on your program and I get on the phone and I've been on the phone with a lot of different governess talking to them about what I think should be done. I have been very prescriptive in what I said. I said not think about it. Maybe you want to do it. I say, do it. And may I just push you on your hope that we can turn things around. Turn these numbers around without shutting down at least is aggressively as things were in March and April and thinking of another thing you said in your testimony yesterday, which is that? You were talking about why Europe has largely succeeded in the US has failed to control the virus, and you talked about how When the U. S shut down, it was in reality. Only about 50% of activity was really shutting down. Whereas in Europe it was more like 90 or 95%. That makes it sound like we had a shot and we blew it. You know, I would. You know, that's a very provocative word blew it. But certainly if you look at it, and I meant it that the numbers are true. If you look at the Europeans, they got the curve way down. Once the curve is way down, Mary Louise, it is much easier when you do get blips of infection as you try to open up. To contain those infections. And if you look at our curve, it peaked. It came down a little. And then it stayed about flat until just recently, when it re surged up again. It makes it much more difficult because you're not in containment. You're in mitigation, just sort of chasing after things as opposed to getting your thumb on them. It might turn you two vaccines. You have said we should have a vaccine by the end of this year, with production ramping up next year whether that vaccine works and how long it may work for whether we may be protected for life for just for a few months. Are those still open questions they are they are because right now, the one thing that is going well. Is the procedure of multiple different candidates and their candidates all over the world. There are several that are being looked at here in the United States. They're on track for going into advanced trial sometime this summer. It's something that we are not compromising safety. Nor scientific integrity to move quickly. We should get an answer sometime by the end of the year, and as I said, Say it again. Mary Louise, There's no guarantee. That you're going to get a safe and effective vaccine. But the early indications from the trial make me I use that word cautiously optimistic

United States Mary Louise Dr Anthony Fauci Europe Mary Louise Kelly NPR Congress Federal Government Maryland Jeff America Rhonda Santis Florida
Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

All Things Considered

03:10 min | 2 years ago

Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

"There is still no cure for code nineteen but there is one drug that helps a bit the researchers are hunting for better ones and now they're testing some of those in people and pure science correspondent Joe Palca spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about where we are with covert nineteen treatments right now the minute you start with the one drug that I've mentioned to that shown to help a little bit yeah it's called ram doesn't fear it does show it they have shown that it's shortens a stay in the hospital from fifteen days to eleven days but it doesn't reduce mortality and I know that scientists and and eight patients for that matter would like to have something better this is good but it's it's still not not not what you call it you are so they're looking for better things so in terms of things that are actually far enough along that they might actually show up at the hospital soon what are we looking at well actually some of these are in hospitals some as being tested there and some under what's called the compassionate use our emergency use one is called convalescent plasma this is plasma that's taken from patients who have gotten sick with covert nineteen and then recovered and their blood or their plasma is fall of the antibodies that help them recover from the disease and so if you take their plasma and give it to somebody who's sick the hope is that that will help them get better and and this is actually being used in other infectious diseases and it and it does work to some degree and then I mentioned there are other things that are being tested maybe aren't actually being used in hospitals yet what else is actually comprised mainly not routinely used in hospitals well one is an anti viral so ren disappears is a drug that blocks the ability of the virus replicates so is this drug with the terrific name of he I. D. D. two eight oh one it was developed at Emory University and it's now being marketed by a bridge back bio therapeutics and marked the big pharmaceutical company has joined in and the and that says to me at least that they see great promise there it's being tested in clinical trials in the U. K. and it seems to be showing great promise it's also shown to work at least in animal studies previously with the sars which was also a corona virus caused illness and so there's hope that it might work there right it means that the question on all of our minds this is for treatment that might be ready and ready soon what else you keeping your eye on well actually there is something called a monoclonal antibody which is a synthetic version of the antibodies that our bodies make and there is one monoclonal antibody that's already begun testing in humans there are others that are coming along very soon there are more than a dozen others that are coming in these are drugs that have been used to treat other human diseases and they actually do look quite promising in animal studies and they're anxious to try the more eager to try them in humans as

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:31 min | 2 years ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles respirator masks are a critical piece of protective equipment to prevent health care workers from breeding in the virus the mass have also been in short supply and that shortage was at the center of the hearing today on Capitol Hill one witness testifying was the public health official and whistleblower Rick bright he was ousted last month from his position as director of the biomedical advanced research and development authority or Barda now during braids testimony he recalled an email he had received in late January just about a week after the first case of cover nineteen was diagnosed here in the US the email it was from a mask maker in Texas warning that the nation's supply of respirator masks was quote completely decimated and he said the warranty the world is and we need to act and I push that forward to the highest levels I could in HHS I got no response from that moment I knew that we were going to have a crisis for health care workers because we were not taking action all right well for more on today's testimony and the administration's response I'm joined now by NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis and science correspondent Allison Aubrey had both of you Hey there hi there all right Alison let's start with you just remind us of who is it Rick bright and why was he testified on Capitol Hill today sure a Rick bright is a PhD scientist who was removed from his job as the director of bart and that's part of the federal government its role is to develop in procuring vaccines and drugs and items such as masks needed during a pandemic now he filed a whistleblower complaint with the office of special counsel he contends that he was removed from his post by top officials of the department of health and Human Services because of his urgings that funds allocated by Congress to tackle covert nineteen should be invested in scientifically vetted solutions and it not in drugs and treatments that lacks scientific merit all right will give us more detail on what we learn from him at today's testimony sure well in his testimony today he said the straw that broke the camel's back that led to his removal he thinks was his push back on expanded use of Cllr Quinn hydroxy clerk went to treat patients during this pandemic now this is a drug that was touted by president trump and those with political connections to the president right says there wasn't evidence to support widespread use of the drug in Kobe patients some initial data suggest it could be harmful and ultimately the FDA cautioned there should only be limited use of the drug right now in COPD patients and sue how did the president's allies after hearing today respond to bright allegations they largely veered away from attacking bright personally but they were shorted defend the president's advocacy for this drug we also know that the White House is largely stopped touting the use of the drug in public AT and recent weeks but this sort of paint a picture of saying that the Republicans that the president was working for every possible solution that could help people that had come down with covert nineteen that there was nothing sort of negligent or nefarious about the president's actions in many of the Republicans on the committee hearing today were to our doctors and said that the anecdotal evidence of the use of the drug bolstered the president's position okay well the White House may have stopped touting the merits of hydroxy core Quinn but has the White House responded to bright's testimony today yeah they sure did at the White House today both president trump and health and Human Services secretary Alex ease our we're at the White House and they push back trump has sort of characterize bright as a disgruntled employee he's our NHS pointed out that he wasn't removed from his job he was transferred to what they say is a very important new position at the national institutes of health to work on testing that he still being paid a rather generous salary and pointed to the fact that he's not working right now he's up on tests at capitol hill testifying in this is what eyes are had to stay at the White House allegations do not hold water they do not hold water but we should note that bright had defenders of this hearing today too he wasn't the only one that testified at the same hearing we heard from like Boeing he is the mask manufacturer that brit referred to in the beginning who warned him about the shortages he runs prestige Ameritech either one of the last American producers of N. ninety five masks and he came to bright's defense I'm a Republican I voted for president trump and I admire Dr Brian I don't know what he did in all of these other activities but I think everything I've heard and every time I talk to him and everything he said here made a lot of sense and I believe him you know bright is alleging that the trump administration ignored warnings about mass shortages and his request back in January that they needed to scale up and bones testimony largely backed up that allegation and he he testified in rather compelling ways about how he has worked for the more than the past decade to try to get the government to pay attention to our mass supplies and also know the billing did say he voted for trump but he did make a point to know that he is supporting Joe Biden now all right Alison back to you what more did Rick Wright share with lawmakers as he was urging for more masks you know overall I'd say he painted a picture of many missed opportunities to procure masks early on and to the poor quality of some of the masks being imported which he says have led to health care workers getting sick he said at the beginning of January he started to get signals about shortages he heard from industry colleagues that the supply chain was diminishing rapidly at that other countries are starting to block exports so he urged the higher ups within the administration to get more masks but he said he got pushback people didn't share his urgency said there was not a shortage and he says as a February seventh meeting with his department leadership this is what he heard they indicated if we notice there is a shortage that we will simply change the CDC guidelines to better inform people who should not be wearing those masks so that would save those mask for health care workers my response was I cannot believe you can sit and say that with a straight face it is an absurd and right moved on from the mask issue to say that he continues to be concerned about the administration's response he warned of a resurgence of code nineteen cases come this fall and he called for stepped up federal plan to control it without better planning twenty twenty could be the darkest winter in modern history the darkest winter in modern history or I I just want to shift gears a little at now and talk about the economy you know this pandemic continues to take an economic toll another three million Americans filed for unemployment last week there's been almost thirty seven million jobless claims in just the last eight weeks of sue are these numbers changing the calculation for lawmakers as they're trying to pass more rescue packages there is an increasing growing divide on the hill between the two parties about what needs to be done and Democrats are moving forward tomorrow with another three trillion dollar rescue package but they're really talking to themselves there's been no communication with the White House Senate Republicans say they don't want to take it up and plus he told reporters today she's basically relying on public opinion to bend in their favor I think that our conversations with the American people they're feeling the pain more than anyone obviously a who is saying something like that it's amazing to me how much patience and how much tolerance some can have for the pain of others close he basically saying Republicans will likely have no choice but to support legislation along the lines are offering all right that is NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis and science correspondent Allison Aubrey thanks to both of you you're welcome thank you to France now and in emerging controversy the pharmaceutical giant Sanofi set off a firestorm when its CEO said Americans would likely be the first to get any vaccine it develops the French consider the company a national champion and as NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports now from Paris the comments plunged France into angst over how the vaccine will be developed and who will get it sent fees worldwide CEO Paul Hubbard made the comments late Wednesday in an interview with Bloomberg news he said Sanofi's vaccine would probably be offered to American patients first that was understandable said Hubbard given how much financial support the U. S. is giving Sanofi's research French airwaves exploded in indignation in an illustration of how sensitive people are over the coronavirus clearly does Emily because he said if you need a more poignant polemics priority to the Americans if the no fee is the first to discover the vaccine does that shock you ask this TV commentator interviewing an expert the French deputy finance minister called it unacceptable for money to influence access to this vaccine head of the Socialist Party Olivier far went further I consider it kind of sucks thank you we cannot allow the vaccine that could have the entire world leave normally again be taken hostage by McIntyre financial interests president Emmanuel mackerel said the vaccine as a public good and should not be influenced by the laws of the market only VA Bosio head of Sanofi in France tried all day to explain his boss's comments but he said the US is offering more money and better regulatory incentives to develop the vaccine I don't come across it could only be looking on a vaccine is very long to develop it usually takes ten years and there's heavy investment and now we're being pushed to do it in eighteen months the Americans have been very organized and mobilized to accelerate things both financially and within regulations Europe has been much less so the E. U. recently organized a worldwide fundraising event where countries with the notable exception of the US and Russia pledged eight billion dollars for a vaccine yon is not this is a board member of the European medicines agency the equivalent of the FDA he says the E. U. talks about solidarity but doesn't show it and he thinks there will be fierce competition for a corona virus vaccine the way that it was fierce competition among the member states one need only started up in corporate active equipment and they got nothing and I'm the same way that the U. member states to close their borders they didn't exchange medical compliance date practically said everyone hurt himself by the end of Thursday the president of Sanofi sales Feinberg appeared on the nightly news in France for his grilling as good as sexologists and if you still have these three views it as unique will get set up with vaccine a few days or a few weeks after the U. S. asked the host explained okay bye Berg said you know country would be ahead of any other if Sanofi discovers a vaccine it will produce it in the US and Europe he said it would be a common good and distributed to as many people as possible Eleanor Beardsley NPR news Paris you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news support comes from clean power alliance for CPA customers who have recently become.

Mary Louise Kelly Washington Elsa Chang Los Angeles
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly and MLC Chang listen closely to the band's sweet crude and you'll hear a linguistic relic from America's Deep South that is Louisiana French dialects spoken for generations in Louisiana until the twentieth century when schools in the state became more anglicised my grandfather's first language is Louisiana French and he would get punished in school if he spoke French and so it started to dissipate and go away Alexis Marcelo started sweet crude along with Sam craft hoping it would help revive Louisiana Franks we started this band with the knowledge that the last group of people for whom French was their first language are slowly fading away and that's pretty insane after three hundred some odd years their new album is called OPC L. R. T. V. C. L. and it's an energetic soundtrack for a new generation trying to bring an old language back to life so what I want to know more about is you know like Louisiana French is white a couple of centuries old as a language but when I hear your music your sound is really modern I mean it's almost poppy with heavy synthesizers and dance beat was that on purpose to sort of lace the old with the new yeah absolutely we had this intention of giving this very old dialect a brand new set of clothes but beyond that we're like we.

Mary Louise Kelly MLC Chang America Louisiana Alexis Marcelo Sam craft L. R. T. V. C. L.
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"This is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles the shortage of personal protective equipment that is masks gloves and other disposable gear has forced a lot of American hospitals and health care workers to fend for themselves people who have never given much thought to where supplies come from are now looking for connections to manufacturers in China and here's John it real which and Martin Kosgey happened following all of this and join us now Hey guys hi there hi Martin I want to start with you on the American side of things what kinds of people and groups over here are you seen getting into the import business well we've all heard the stories about governors working the phones trying call their CEO friends looking for connections for import of connections in China but smaller groups are doing it too even some individual doctors and certainly hospitals it's pretty much anybody who's decided they can't necessarily count on the feds or the states to come through in time with spoke with some of the stuff that they really have to have here in Washington state to the state hospital association has actually gotten into the import business they've been they had a trial run importing three hundred thousand surgical masks to seafood work I caught up with Cassie Sauer who runs that association just as she was arriving at the warehouse here south of Seattle where I am to inspect her first shipment of imported masks we have never imported anything you know we actually brought a Chinese translator with us to read all the labels in the box we opened up about ten percent the cartons to make sure they're all the same and they were so we cut one up and make sure it was three planet is we poured water into another one to make sure the water didn't go through and it didn't and we're just thrilled that it's here just thrilled okay so this is working than to just go to China and get your own supplies well so far she's a pretty happy they've imported another three hundred thousand or so since then but she says you know this is a stressful process for people who aren't in this businesses for their some financial risk here you know it she really wishes there were more of a unified national American purchasing effort here it is on the China on the China side for one thing you know she has no idea of her orders for master somehow conflicting with washing state's effort to buy the same masks Roland Thompson is helping her with these purchases he's in it's his day job as a state level lobbyist in Olympia but now he's kind of dived into this New World of imports he's learning this business on the fly because yes some contacts in China and he says those contacts are telling him that the competition in China is just intense they're all sorts.

Mary Louise Kelly Washington Elsa Chang Los Angeles NPR
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mary Louise Kelly and I'm ari Shapiro this hour a call for federal workers to be able to telework during the pandemic if they are not provided weather and safety leave but still have to earn a paycheck so you know what they do they go to work also an update on human trials now under way for a coronavirus vaccine we hear from one company developing a vaccine and supermarkets racing to keep food and paper goods on their shelves if they feel that stores back room inventory that may not be enough because that makes a lot of one day your last and they're used to having a choice that last a week or two first the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer the World Health Organization is warning that young people not to be complacent about the risks coronavirus poses to them NPR's Jason Beaubien reports the highest fatality rates tend to be among the elderly the W. H. O. says significant numbers of younger adults are also getting extremely ill tell you read from cover nineteen remains around one percent varies from place to place is different countries are in different phases of the epidemic in responding differently to the health crisis most of the deaths globally have been among older people and patients with underlying health conditions but the WHO's head of emergencies Mike Ryan pointed out that twenty percent of deaths so far in South Korea have been among people under the age of sixty a significant number of all the ways that healthy adults can develop a more severe form of the disease he warned nations not to approach this as just a disease of the elderly Jason Beaubien NPR news applications for weekly jobless benefits surged in some states and what is an early sign millions of Americans are being thrown out of work in Ohio tens of thousands of people file claims for jobless benefits in just the first three days of this week for a host that is the state's lieutenant governor who spoke with NPR's All Things Considered today we had seventy eight thousand people file for unemployment during the first three days of this week that includes Sunday Monday Tuesday twenty nine thousand yesterday just put this in perspective the week before we had about sixty five hundred and some states the demand for unemployment health is likely to outstrip states ability to pay claims builders were less busy in Feb worry though by a smaller margin than the previous month the clients follow December surge that pushed home building to its highest level in thirteen years commerce department reported today analysts had expected a more significant drop applications for building permits fell five and a half percent for the first time since nine eleven the New York stock exchanges shutting down its crowded frenzied floor Jim zarroli reports the exchange said today this temporarily moving to all electronic trading the exchange says it's taking this step as a precaution amid the corona virus outbreak it will continue to operate on the same schedule but all trades will be conducted electronically the New York Stock Exchange has long been the most famous stock trading venue in the world densely packed with floor traders barking orders at a fevered pitch today it retains its iconic status in part because TV broadcaster still use it as a backdrop but in the age of computer trading it no longer serves the same function as it used to Jim zarroli NPR news New York on wallstreet stocks continued their downward slide today the Dow dropped another thirteen hundred and thirty eight points more than six percent the nasdaq fell three hundred and forty four points today you're listening to NPR live from KQED news I'm terrified there despite the plummeting stock market and uncertainty over the impact of the corona virus outbreak a report out today from the state legislative analyst's office says California is on strong fiscal footing for now KQED's Katie or reports the only owes report notes that California has a couple things going for it at the moment first the governor is proposing about twenty one billion dollars in reserves in the upcoming budget and the state has done a good job of paying down debt and maintaining a balanced budget but the state's dependency on volatile capital gains taxes could hurt it the LA projects those revenues will be several billion dollars below budget estimates declines in the stock market could also reduce future budgetary reserves on top of that delay tax filing deadlines all make for very unpredictable times in Sacramento I'm Katie or KQED news the university of California board of regents met this morning for an update on their response to the corona virus pandemic most campuses have transitioned to remote learning for the rest of the academic year and are encouraging students to move out of student housing Dr Carrie Byington heads the UC health system she says the system owns land that could be suitable for temporary hospitals and the governor is working with all of us in the hospital industry to look and see where those beds would be and how quickly we can build the reason say they are not planning to refund tuition and student fees at this time if you.

Mary Louise Kelly ari Shapiro