20 Burst results for "Mary Louise Kelley"

Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

All Things Considered

06:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

"And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington today, the governor and lieutenant governor of Wisconsin now President Trump to stay away from their state. So did the mayor of Kenosha, Wisconsin, who says the city needs time to heal, But the president showed up anyway. Trump's trip comes after days of unrest following the police shooting of a black man, Jacob Blake that left him hospitalized. It also comes after a white 17 year old Kyle Riton house with charged with six criminal counts, including first degree intentional homicide. Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes, a Democrat, joins us now Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me today. We're glad to have you. Governor Tony either sent a letter asking President Trump not to visit Kenosha. You've called for him to stay away as well. Do you see any potential benefit to having him? There may be a chance to meet and talk to him in a productive way. No, I do not because if a real leader would have proven that already, he would have given words Tio help console the people of this community of people of this state and the people of this nation because what happened in Kenosha? It's something that happens all too often in this country, and the president has offered no sort of resolve. You can look at the president's invective. You can look at the RNC, which tried to capitalize all such situations, which tried to politicize People who are crying out who are stepping up marching and demanding racial justice. And Donald Trump doesn't want to hear that He is going to use every opportunity that he can to divide the people of this state. A CZ. This is a critical state for his re election, and it's unfortunate because You know, these are realize that we're talking about Governor Evers called for a special session of the Legislature on Monday to address police reform. But Republicans didn't show up and that session lasted 30 seconds. To get any legislation through. You need Republican support. Do you have a plan for how to do that? Well, eyes unfortunate that you know, we could ask. What's our plan? When the Legislature and the Republicans in the Legislature don't get asked why they continue to ignore people, it took them forever to respond. A covert 19. They haven't responded to the health care crisis. They haven't responded to the dairy crisis that our family farmers are dealing with in this country. They haven't responded to gun violence prevention. They have responded to the client. Crisis, Every issue they continue to fail and ignore the people of this state. Kenosha is the latest city to deal with protests and sometimes counter protests that have turned violent governor ever sent in the national Guard as the protests were heating up, and some protesters said that having the guards there made unrest worse. Do you think the governor made the right decision by sending in the guards? So the governor sent in the guard's ate with controlling fires that were set. You know, this is all in the interest of safety because fires can get out of control. Fire touches the wrong thing. You have explosions that you can potentially have more loss of life. That was the purpose of the National Guard. I think what protesters were experiencing Was a heightened response from from law enforcement and the press conference that happened shortly after the young man who traveled to Wisconsin from Illinois to kill two people in our streets. The response was well, maybe if people weren't out past curfew, ignoring the fact that you're the shooter was also out past curfew. So to assign blame to that the victims that shows where we are in in terms of thought with some of the local law enforcement that's on the ground, and this is the reforming accountability that we're talking about. Whatever the reason, the guard was there, even if it was just to try to put out or prevent fires. It ends up being a law enforcement presence, the presence of authorities and this is the dilemma. I think for city and state leaders, how do you control what could become violent unrest? Without making people feel that the feds were storming in or with a guard is storming in. That's a really hard dilemma. Have you figured out the right balance of that? Is something that is a learning process. If I'm going to be completely honest, and and I I always I always promoted the fact that law enforcement should continuously Work to deescalate situations. Whether it is a or a personal interaction like the one with Jacob Blake and the three officers or whether we're talking larger scale events like protests and demonstrations. I think that you often see peaceful protest turned the other way when there is a heightened presence of what is perceived as authorities. So yeah, I do think there is there is a there is a problem. Because when people are protesting police, you know aggression with police overly aggressive police. The response cannot be over overly aggressive law enforcement. How to deal with violent unrest is becoming a major issue in the presidential campaign, and many Democrats who do not support President Trump worry that violent unrest helps him. That it lets him say the Democrats are weak on crime. What's your level of concern that you may be inadvertently helping President Trump's reelection efforts in that way? You know, I think that it's important for people to realize that again. The people who were killed. In Kenosha, where protesters they were killed by people who felt that they had a responsibility to help things to help matters to assist Now, like you mention Law enforcement are air National guards are there. They didn't eat health. Yet. These people are free to just walk the streets with long rifles, intimidating people. I think that is the important thing that people need to realize. Andi. I hope that folks to understand that Republicans continue to enable this sort of behavior this sort of behavior. That actually leads people did That's Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you.

President Trump Kenosha Lieutenant Governor Mandela Wisconsin National Guard Legislature Governor Evers Jacob Blake Governor Tony Barnes Mary Louise Kelly Kyle Riton Washington RNC Illinois
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:08 min | 3 weeks ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. The essayist Eula Biss focuses her new book on What Seems to be a simple question. What is capitalism for her? The answer to that question is complicated and elusive and comes in the form of short, often funny essays that make up her new book having and being had Eula Biss. Welcome. Oh, thanks so much for having me Fula. This book grew out of you having finally bought your first home and for a lot of people that would be considered a pure success. A goal of adulthood. But you say it gave you a sense of security that felt unfamiliar and even uncomfortable. Why did you feel that way? Yeah. This book came out of that contradiction of me enjoying All the new comforts that came with having AH, home have a more space and also a new kind of economic security. But feeling uncomfortable, I think, really, with the system in which I had acquired those things. And I wrote the book as an effort to hold on to that discomfort. I had the sense that the discomfort had something to teach me. You seem to think that if you lost the sense of discomfort, there actually was a lost there. What did you think you could lose by not feeling that way anymore. One of the things that I didn't want to have happened to me. As I entered this new life in lifestyle was I didn't want to begin to think that I had what I had, because I'd worked hard. Which is one of the patterns of thought very common to upper middle class. I don't believe that I got what I got. Because I worked hard. I believe that I got what I got because the system favors Me in a number of different ways one because I'm white, but also because I started out middle class, and I think that it's uncomfortable for people who start out with more to be reminded of that. So and I do think that this is damaging in so many ways. The implication is that people who don't have enough have just not worked hard enough. And that's damaging to people who are working extremely hard and still don't have enough because they're being underpaid. But it's also damaging to relationships between people who have more and people who have less. If there's this implication, hovering in the air that you could have as much as I have, if only you just worked a little harder. In the book, You actually seemed to make an effort to share exact dollar amounts. I think you say it felt important to you to do that. So you volunteer that your house cost? I think almost a half million dollars. You tell readers the size of the advance you got for your book. Why be so open about that things that people usually don't want to share? Yeah, I was open about that. Exactly because I didn't want to be. I made a rule for myself, and I made it after having written that section where I talked about the price of my house. That section summarizes a conversation I had with my sister, where I told her that what I'd really done was acquire a $400,000 container for a washing machine. But what I noted in that moment was that I was misrepresenting to my own sister. The price of my house, which was much closer to $500,000. It was for 85. So when I noticed myself lying to my own sister about money, I decided that if I was going to learn anything from writing a book about money I was gonna have to Use the actual figures involved, and I was gonna have to face honestly what I had And did you downplay the amount to your sister? Because you had a sense of self consciousness or embarrassment about having bought that size house or borrowed that kind of money? Yeah, I downplayed it because of self consciousness because I knew that my sister was trying to buy a house and that her budget was smaller than mine. And it made me feel uncomfortable that I had more than her. And I downplayed it because I just had not myself become comfortable with that the amount of money that I was dealing with and it still was two enormous a sum for me to even say out loud. At one point you're talking about your son paying for a Pokemon card. But although someone else thought he overpaid for the Pokemon card, what was it like for you to watch your son try to figure out what something was worth and why, and maybe not figured it out correctly. So was amazing in watching him learn how to play Pokemon the way it was being played in 1st and 2nd grade. At this school, I felt like I was seeing an economy be invented. But it was also somewhat excruciating to me because I saw the ways in which other Children and his baby sitter and I were training the values of capitalism into him. So, yes, At one point he gave away valuable Pokemon card because he just didn't like it very much. And then I heard his baby sitter saying to him, Were you a smart negotiator? And I thought, Oh, no. What are we doing? This kid is on Ly six, and we're already training him Not to be generous, and to get his much out of an exchange is he can possibly get out of it, even if he doesn't care about the thing he's giving away. Oh, that's so interesting. I mean, diamonds are objectively very expensive, invaluable, but if I don't care about them, and I just want to give them away Is that fine? Or is that flawed financial thinking under the logic of capitalism? It's insane, right? But by by some other logic, it makes perfect sense. Especially since diamonds are incredibly useful. You can eat them and you can't live inside them. After you finished your book. How do you define capitalism? In your words? Yes. So the definition that was most useful to me was David Draper's from Debt, the 1st 5000 years and his definition was the art of using money to make more money..

Eula Biss NPR Mary Louise Kelly David Draper Sasha Pfeiffer
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:19 min | Last month

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. You wouldn't ordinarily celebrate the fact that more than 900,000 people applied for unemployment benefits in a single week. In the Cova 19 era. That is what passes for good news. It's the first time since the pandemic took off in March that weekly claims for unemployment fell below the 1,000,000 mark. Policymakers in Washington can't agree on how much additional help might be needed for the tens of millions of people who are still out of work. NPR's Scott Horsley is here with us now. Hi, Scott. How encouraging is this drop in new unemployment claims? It is a good sign that claims air coming down. But as you mentioned, the numbers are still really high. I mean, to put this in perspective During the worst month of the great recession, the whole country lost 800,000 jobs. Last week alone, 963,000 Applied for state unemployment benefits Eso You know, months into this pandemic, A lot of people are still losing jobs that the numbers have come down significantly from the previous week, and that does suggest some improvement in the job market. Fewer people getting laid off. There could also be another factor at play, though, which is the value of unemployment benefits has diminished since the extra federal benefits that Congress authorized early on during the pandemic expired at the end of last month. That's the extra $600 a week that the federal government had been paying for the last few months. Where do things stand on renewing those benefits? There is still no agreement between Congress and the White House to renew them. Esso on Saturday after last week's jobless claims had been tallied. The president called for a new federal supplement that would boost jobless benefits by $300 week so half of what people have been getting a few weeks ago, but better than nothing. Trump is also encouraging states to boost their own jobless benefits by $100 per week, although after some states balk, the White House says that won't be a requirement that the feds will still pay the $300 in any case. It could take a while, though, before unemployed folks actually see any of that extra cash. And what's more, because the president acted on his own without Congress, he's having to redirect FEMA money to cover the extra unemployment benefits. Some have questioned the wisdom of tapping FEMA money in the middle of a hurricane season. And with more than 28 million people collecting unemployment. The FEMA money will last only about five weeks. Congress, of course, could step in unauthorized additional money. But there has been a stalemate. Where do the negotiation stand Right now? It's still a stalemate. The Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin, and the House speaker, Nancy Pelosi, did talk by telephone yesterday. But they both came away from that conversation, saying they're still far apart, and each one blamed the other for being unwilling to compromise. There was a lot of finger pointing today, but no additional talks, and the disagreement right now seems to be less about direct aid to families or businesses. And Maura about things like money for the Postal Service and to safeguard the November election, and we are gonna have more coverage of the Postal Service. Elsewhere in the program today, the White House issued a sort of report card on the moves that the government has made so far to prop up the pandemic economy. What does it say? This was a report from the president's Council of Economic Advisers, and it outlines first of all, just how big a hole the pandemic has punched in the U. S economy. It's deeper and steeper than anything we've seen before. But the report card also says the aggressive government response really did help to cushion that blow. And we know that's true. You know, As painful as this recession has been, we haven't seen the level of absolute hardship that many people were predicting back in the spring with mass bankruptcies and evictions and loan defaults. And that's largely because of the trillions of dollars in relief money that both Congress and the Federal Reserve pushed out the door to prop businesses and families up. But this report on Lee goes up through mid July, and since that time big chunks of that government aid have run out. What's curious is the report seems to be making the case that those earlier rounds of government relief. You really work to keep people and the economy afloat during the spring and summer. S so they're saying the aid. It was right on Justus that aid is drying up, and the two sides seem very far apart on how to provide more of it. That's NPR's Scott Horsefly. Thanks is always Scott. Good to be with you. All right? As testing delays continue to hamper efforts to quickly identify people infected with the Corona virus. There's a push for cheaper, faster tests. NPR's Alison Aubrey reports on a new saliva test developed by researchers at Yale University who are awaiting emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration. If you've been tested for Corona virus, you may have experienced the sting of a swab being inserted deep into your nasal passages. But there is a less invasive way of testing that involves spitting into a cup or tube. Nathan grew Paws, an assistant professor of epidemiology and microbial diseases at the Yale School of Public Health. Early in the pandemic, he started comparing saliva samples to the swab samples from patients who were hospitalized with the virus. We were finding To our surprise, really more virus in the saliva. Then we were.

Congress president FEMA White House NPR Scott federal government Mary Louise Kelly Food and Drug Administration Postal Service Washington Ari Shapiro Scott Horsley Yale School of Public Health Esso Justus Yale University Council of Economic Advisers
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:21 min | 2 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang, The House Armed Services Committee had a host of questions today for Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Joint Chiefs of Staff General Mark Milley. Questions covered what the role was of the National Guard during recent protests, and they covered reports of Russia paying bounties for the Taliban to kill Americans. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman joins us with details. Hey, Tom, also all right, So let's start the national Guard. I mean, there have been lingering questions over how they were used on June 1st in Lafayette Square in Washington, D. C. What did Esper and really say about the role of the guard that day? Will. They defended the role of the National Guard. The same guard troops were there to support civilian law enforcement and we're in what they called a static position. They didn't take part in clearing the park of peaceful protesters, Guard troops, they said. Are used to dealing with any civil unrest, supporting local authorities on a variety of for a variety of reasons, And they said it's a better alternative than using active duty forces as president. Trump had threatened. And is it clear who was actually calling the shots that day? You know it's not clear else, And that's really surprising neither as for normally knew, who gave the order to clear the park. But again, the guard was working in support of civil authorities. Justice Department as well as the Park police were apparently someone within those organizations gave the order. Now the Pentagon is doing what it calls an after action report on the guards rule in D C and also elsewhere around the country, including Training and equipment. Now. One issue in D. C was also a guard helicopter flew low over protesters in the wash from the blades swept them up in debris even tour some limbs from treason. The report's expect to determine why that happened. Okay, well, the other story I want to ask you about is reports of a bounty program in Afghanistan, where Russia was reportedly offering up cash sums to Taliban fighters to kill Americans. Why don't we know about this so far? Well, it did come up. Both Esper and Milly said the Pentagon has not corroborated reports of the bony program from the intelligence community, principally the CIA. The Pentagon is still looking into that, and they see no evidence that any Americans were killed. As a result of this supposed program. But general, Milley pointed out, and he's done multiple tours in Afghanistan that it's long been known that Russia was aiding the Taliban with training and equipment. Or deported meddling since 2013 or so. And also this is something I saw in the ground myself when I was in Helmand province a few years back with my producer, Monica if Stati Ava Thing is, Milly did go on to say the American troops there are at the highest level of force protection, and he said, there's not much more they can do at the ground level. This issue of Russian bounties is MME or something for top political leaders. Let's listen. The issue is higher than that The issue is at the strategic level. What should or could we be doing at the strategic level is their diplomatic and informational on economic of the sanctions of the dead marshes are their phone calls or their pressure, those sorts of things And I can tell you that some of that is done. Are we doing as much as we could, or should? Perhaps not interesting. He's saying that we probably are not doing as much as we could or should. So, is that language? Actually being echoed by the White House at the moment, Absolutely not. The White House criticized in New York Times, which broke the story about the supposed bounties. He's criticized him for revealing classified information in the president just dismissed the whole story as a hoax, and he said it was on ly to damage me in the Republican Party. But the Pentagon again Is looking into this taking it very seriously. And clearly, as you just heard, General Milley was much more forceful on Russia than anything we've heard recently from the White House. And if it's true, these bounties Millie said he would be an outraged general. That is NPR's Tom Bowman. Thank you so much, Tom, you're welcome. Scientists say they have identified an enzyme that could help explain how exercise Khun slow or even reverse some signs of aging in the brain. Exercising a bottle is not around the corner, but it's not out of the question, either. NPR science correspondent Richard Harris took a break from reporting about the Corona virus to look into this intriguing suggestion. Scientists were surprised to discover a few years ago that brain function doesn't have to get worse. And worse as we age solve. A lady's research was inspired in part by a finding that parts of the brain can actually re grow even in older people. Just because you have an old brand doesn't have to stay that way. One of the best known interventions that has a benefit on the brain is exercise. The problem is that the elderly are frail. Many of them can't physically do the exercise. Violeta and his colleagues at UC San Francisco have been on the hunt for factors in the blood that air boosted by exercise and that Khun Improve mental performance. Can we actually then transfer the benefits of exercise without actually having to do the physical component of the exercise itself? They now report in science magazine that they think they have a great lead. My sou exercise produced lots of a liver in time called G P l D one. And when the researchers revved up production of this protein in mice, nerves grew in part of their brains and the animals perform better on mental tasks in a maze exercise causes this protein to be produced in the liver goes into the blood that sort of damp in certain aspects of inflammation. And then the result of that is that you actually have improvement. In cognitive function in these older mice. The research team also looked at a group of older people who exercise more and there again, they found more of this enzyme. So the same thing is true Inhumans. If you're more active, you're producing more of this protein, and it's sort of circulating your blood. Now both aging and exercise are extremely complicated systems involving all sorts of components that interact in complicated ways. So violated had to think hard about whether a single protein could really have a big effect. I was definitely surprised that one protein could could have that much effect. But when I started thinking about it, Okay, it's one approaching. But really, it's changing. You know these other 100 protein, so I think that's why scientists are nowhere near understanding the complex relationship between all these interacting parts. Bradley Wise is at the National Institute on Aging. There's a long step between identifying this enzyme and making me a pill out of that. This is one piece of the puzzle. But the team at UC San Francisco is eager to see if they can find their way to making a medication out of there now patented Discovery. Elena says the discovery at least suggest a path forward. We don't have that, you know, exercise pill right now. You know, this lets us know that that I think is a viable thing to pursue. We're not there yet. You know, my mom gets really excited. She was like exercising about on like we're on our way. But we're not. We're not there yet. I wouldn't rush out to make GPL d one and give it to people Bill Freeman, researchers aging at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and at the VA in Oklahoma City. He's excited about the new findings, but cautions that almost nothing is known about the potential downside of tinkering with this enzyme and the complicated system. It effects. There's a lot more research done, and in the meantime one of the things that we can all do. Is exercise we can we have that, within our own power and exercise has all sorts of health benefits beyond the brain. So if this ever does become a medication that would be most helpful for people who through injury or old age simply can't exercise on their own. Richard Harris. NPR news This is w when my C you're listening to all things considered news Headlines air.

Pentagon Russia Taliban Tom Bowman National Guard NPR Mark Esper General Milley Afghanistan White House Khun president San Francisco Richard Harris Milly Mark Milley Mary Louise Kelly Washington House Armed Services Committee
Fauci Says US Could Reach 100000 Coronavirus Cases a Day

Live from Here with Chris Thile

05:42 min | 3 months ago

Fauci Says US Could Reach 100000 Coronavirus Cases a Day

"This past week, Dr Anthony Fauci shocked many people in this country and around the world when he said before Congress And unless something changes Corona virus cases in the United States could reach 100,000 per day. What would it take to turn things around and keep us from reaching that? Terrifying number. Dr. Fauci spoke about this with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly. Can we turn this around? Can we turn these numbers around without an even more aggressive shutdown than we had in March? And in April? I believe the answer is yes, but we have to do things a bit differently. And what we've been doing, because when you talk about the goal of everyone to try and proceed towards normalization by taking steps in the opening America again Program, which would guidelines that had good and well demarcated benchmark. What we saw and it really varied from state to state with people out there. Congregating in bars congregating in crowds in a celebratory way, understandably because they felt cooped up without wearing masks. That is, you know, in many respects if I might use the word, it's a violation of the principles of what we're trying to do. It does not have to be 100,000 cases a day. I use that number. Because I wanted Jeff to jolt people into realizing their attention. So we did, and that's exactly what I wanted to do because as I've said so many times over the previous weeks, two months If you leave the virus to its own devices, it will take off on you. You've just sent a couple of things I want to follow up. When you talked about how things have varied so much state to state, you used the word guidelines a supposed to requirements. Does there need to be more of a coordinated federal plan? Do there need to be requirements? Or is it wise to have the strategy remain leaving this largely to states and local governments to figure it out? No Maryland, you bring up a good point, And there's a lot of argument about that about how this country is set up where you have the states that have the capability of making decisions because of the different and peculiar. Nature of things that go on in different states from a public health perspective. Would it be better if the federal government were taking a more sort of? Well, it might not be. I mean, I'm one that does taken assertive role. If you hear what I say whenever I'm talking as I am on this program You know, it is really saying that we must do these things, hopefully and I'm seeing it right now, after yesterday's numbers came out that many of the governors and mayors are actually demanding and saying it is mandatory. Now, if you're gonna go out, you have to have a mask on that is something that is absolutely essential, but you're right. There will be arguments. I'm one for more directive way of doing things, but in many respects, that's not the way this country works. So what do you say to the governors to our two local leaders who are not rolling things back? Somebody like Florida Governor Rhonda Santis? Well, what I do is two things and I've been doing it consistently and intensively. Yes, I do it publicly like I have the opportunity to do on your program and I get on the phone and I've been on the phone with a lot of different governess talking to them about what I think should be done. I have been very prescriptive in what I said. I said not think about it. Maybe you want to do it. I say, do it. And may I just push you on your hope that we can turn things around. Turn these numbers around without shutting down at least is aggressively as things were in March and April and thinking of another thing you said in your testimony yesterday, which is that? You were talking about why Europe has largely succeeded in the US has failed to control the virus, and you talked about how When the U. S shut down, it was in reality. Only about 50% of activity was really shutting down. Whereas in Europe it was more like 90 or 95%. That makes it sound like we had a shot and we blew it. You know, I would. You know, that's a very provocative word blew it. But certainly if you look at it, and I meant it that the numbers are true. If you look at the Europeans, they got the curve way down. Once the curve is way down, Mary Louise, it is much easier when you do get blips of infection as you try to open up. To contain those infections. And if you look at our curve, it peaked. It came down a little. And then it stayed about flat until just recently, when it re surged up again. It makes it much more difficult because you're not in containment. You're in mitigation, just sort of chasing after things as opposed to getting your thumb on them. It might turn you two vaccines. You have said we should have a vaccine by the end of this year, with production ramping up next year whether that vaccine works and how long it may work for whether we may be protected for life for just for a few months. Are those still open questions they are they are because right now, the one thing that is going well. Is the procedure of multiple different candidates and their candidates all over the world. There are several that are being looked at here in the United States. They're on track for going into advanced trial sometime this summer. It's something that we are not compromising safety. Nor scientific integrity to move quickly. We should get an answer sometime by the end of the year, and as I said, Say it again. Mary Louise, There's no guarantee. That you're going to get a safe and effective vaccine. But the early indications from the trial make me I use that word cautiously optimistic

United States Mary Louise Dr Anthony Fauci Europe Mary Louise Kelly NPR Congress Federal Government Maryland Jeff America Rhonda Santis Florida
Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

All Things Considered

03:10 min | 3 months ago

Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

"There is still no cure for code nineteen but there is one drug that helps a bit the researchers are hunting for better ones and now they're testing some of those in people and pure science correspondent Joe Palca spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about where we are with covert nineteen treatments right now the minute you start with the one drug that I've mentioned to that shown to help a little bit yeah it's called ram doesn't fear it does show it they have shown that it's shortens a stay in the hospital from fifteen days to eleven days but it doesn't reduce mortality and I know that scientists and and eight patients for that matter would like to have something better this is good but it's it's still not not not what you call it you are so they're looking for better things so in terms of things that are actually far enough along that they might actually show up at the hospital soon what are we looking at well actually some of these are in hospitals some as being tested there and some under what's called the compassionate use our emergency use one is called convalescent plasma this is plasma that's taken from patients who have gotten sick with covert nineteen and then recovered and their blood or their plasma is fall of the antibodies that help them recover from the disease and so if you take their plasma and give it to somebody who's sick the hope is that that will help them get better and and this is actually being used in other infectious diseases and it and it does work to some degree and then I mentioned there are other things that are being tested maybe aren't actually being used in hospitals yet what else is actually comprised mainly not routinely used in hospitals well one is an anti viral so ren disappears is a drug that blocks the ability of the virus replicates so is this drug with the terrific name of he I. D. D. two eight oh one it was developed at Emory University and it's now being marketed by a bridge back bio therapeutics and marked the big pharmaceutical company has joined in and the and that says to me at least that they see great promise there it's being tested in clinical trials in the U. K. and it seems to be showing great promise it's also shown to work at least in animal studies previously with the sars which was also a corona virus caused illness and so there's hope that it might work there right it means that the question on all of our minds this is for treatment that might be ready and ready soon what else you keeping your eye on well actually there is something called a monoclonal antibody which is a synthetic version of the antibodies that our bodies make and there is one monoclonal antibody that's already begun testing in humans there are others that are coming along very soon there are more than a dozen others that are coming in these are drugs that have been used to treat other human diseases and they actually do look quite promising in animal studies and they're anxious to try the more eager to try them in humans as

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:51 min | 4 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"Mary Louise Kelly Anna and Elsa Chang this hour the history of the Minneapolis police and communities of color in Virginia and new order requires residents to wear masks in indoor public spaces I'm taking this step because science increasingly shows us that the virus spreads less easily when everyone is wearing face covers and in Germany with soccer stadiums empty broadcasters are adding fake crowd sounds I love it we all know it's not real but it is enhancing the viewing experience and right now without crowds that's all there is is the television viewing experience now news group live from NPR news I'm Jack Speer the former Minneapolis police officer seen kneeling on the neck of George Floyd who died in police custody has now been charged with third degree murder and manslaughter you know it's been today coming from Hennepin county attorney Mike Freeman who declined to say whether three other officers were also present might face criminal charges of their own I'm not going to speculate today the other officers they are under investigation I anticipate charges but I'm not going to get into that today we're talking about former officer shot of it all of the police officers involved in the arrests were fired by the department Floyd a black man is seen on a video recorded by a bystander saying I can't believe what the officer kneels on his neck for nearly eight minutes what data sparked several days of at times violent protests and looting in Minneapolis and elsewhere meanwhile a federal investigation into George Floyd's death is proceeding on a separate parallel track from the local investigation NPR's Ryan Lucas reports Attorney General William Barr says any decision on charges will be based on facts and the law Barr says any decision on federal charges will come after state officials in Minnesota make their own charging decisions that's now happening beginning with the Hennepin county attorney announcing that Derek show been has been arrested and charged with third degree murder and manslaughter he is the officer seen in the video pressing his knee down on Floyd's knack three other officers are under investigation Barr says the justice department and the FBI are conducting an independent investigation to determine whether any federal civil rights laws were violated the Attorney General says the images of the actions that led to George Floyd's death are quote heroin to watch and deeply disturbing Ryan Lucas NPR news Washington a large crowd gathered in Denver for a second day of protests over the death of Floyd Thursday several gunshots were fired near protesters but no one was injured Denver police arrested thirteen people for burglary and assault from Colorado public radio that the Brooklyn has more Denver police say Thursday a small group splintered off from the protesters tried to incite violence officers used pepper balls and tear gas to disperse people in parts of the city and they're hoping the scene is less chaotic today twenty one year old Maya and tap of Denver has been protesting both days generation will not stand for this police brutality and meaningless violence it is not okay and we are putting our foot down we will say his name today George Lloyd he was a person he was a partner he was a man who was a friend officials have closed the state capitol building in the basement windows are boarded up for NPR news I'm Bente Birkeland in Denver US financial markets had been concerned about a renewed trade war with China and we took some of their losses need to close after the ministration and ousted would cut ties with the World Health Organization on Wall Street the Dow was down seventeen points but the nasdaq rose a hundred twenty points the S. and P. five hundred closed up fourteen points today you're listening to NPR and this is Casey are W. one Larry parole on a Friday may twenty ninth very good afternoon to you here's what's happening at three OO four protesters took to the streets for the second straight day in southern California to express their anger about the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis we all are here.

Mary Louise Kelly Anna Elsa Chang Minneapolis
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:31 min | 4 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles respirator masks are a critical piece of protective equipment to prevent health care workers from breeding in the virus the mass have also been in short supply and that shortage was at the center of the hearing today on Capitol Hill one witness testifying was the public health official and whistleblower Rick bright he was ousted last month from his position as director of the biomedical advanced research and development authority or Barda now during braids testimony he recalled an email he had received in late January just about a week after the first case of cover nineteen was diagnosed here in the US the email it was from a mask maker in Texas warning that the nation's supply of respirator masks was quote completely decimated and he said the warranty the world is and we need to act and I push that forward to the highest levels I could in HHS I got no response from that moment I knew that we were going to have a crisis for health care workers because we were not taking action all right well for more on today's testimony and the administration's response I'm joined now by NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis and science correspondent Allison Aubrey had both of you Hey there hi there all right Alison let's start with you just remind us of who is it Rick bright and why was he testified on Capitol Hill today sure a Rick bright is a PhD scientist who was removed from his job as the director of bart and that's part of the federal government its role is to develop in procuring vaccines and drugs and items such as masks needed during a pandemic now he filed a whistleblower complaint with the office of special counsel he contends that he was removed from his post by top officials of the department of health and Human Services because of his urgings that funds allocated by Congress to tackle covert nineteen should be invested in scientifically vetted solutions and it not in drugs and treatments that lacks scientific merit all right will give us more detail on what we learn from him at today's testimony sure well in his testimony today he said the straw that broke the camel's back that led to his removal he thinks was his push back on expanded use of Cllr Quinn hydroxy clerk went to treat patients during this pandemic now this is a drug that was touted by president trump and those with political connections to the president right says there wasn't evidence to support widespread use of the drug in Kobe patients some initial data suggest it could be harmful and ultimately the FDA cautioned there should only be limited use of the drug right now in COPD patients and sue how did the president's allies after hearing today respond to bright allegations they largely veered away from attacking bright personally but they were shorted defend the president's advocacy for this drug we also know that the White House is largely stopped touting the use of the drug in public AT and recent weeks but this sort of paint a picture of saying that the Republicans that the president was working for every possible solution that could help people that had come down with covert nineteen that there was nothing sort of negligent or nefarious about the president's actions in many of the Republicans on the committee hearing today were to our doctors and said that the anecdotal evidence of the use of the drug bolstered the president's position okay well the White House may have stopped touting the merits of hydroxy core Quinn but has the White House responded to bright's testimony today yeah they sure did at the White House today both president trump and health and Human Services secretary Alex ease our we're at the White House and they push back trump has sort of characterize bright as a disgruntled employee he's our NHS pointed out that he wasn't removed from his job he was transferred to what they say is a very important new position at the national institutes of health to work on testing that he still being paid a rather generous salary and pointed to the fact that he's not working right now he's up on tests at capitol hill testifying in this is what eyes are had to stay at the White House allegations do not hold water they do not hold water but we should note that bright had defenders of this hearing today too he wasn't the only one that testified at the same hearing we heard from like Boeing he is the mask manufacturer that brit referred to in the beginning who warned him about the shortages he runs prestige Ameritech either one of the last American producers of N. ninety five masks and he came to bright's defense I'm a Republican I voted for president trump and I admire Dr Brian I don't know what he did in all of these other activities but I think everything I've heard and every time I talk to him and everything he said here made a lot of sense and I believe him you know bright is alleging that the trump administration ignored warnings about mass shortages and his request back in January that they needed to scale up and bones testimony largely backed up that allegation and he he testified in rather compelling ways about how he has worked for the more than the past decade to try to get the government to pay attention to our mass supplies and also know the billing did say he voted for trump but he did make a point to know that he is supporting Joe Biden now all right Alison back to you what more did Rick Wright share with lawmakers as he was urging for more masks you know overall I'd say he painted a picture of many missed opportunities to procure masks early on and to the poor quality of some of the masks being imported which he says have led to health care workers getting sick he said at the beginning of January he started to get signals about shortages he heard from industry colleagues that the supply chain was diminishing rapidly at that other countries are starting to block exports so he urged the higher ups within the administration to get more masks but he said he got pushback people didn't share his urgency said there was not a shortage and he says as a February seventh meeting with his department leadership this is what he heard they indicated if we notice there is a shortage that we will simply change the CDC guidelines to better inform people who should not be wearing those masks so that would save those mask for health care workers my response was I cannot believe you can sit and say that with a straight face it is an absurd and right moved on from the mask issue to say that he continues to be concerned about the administration's response he warned of a resurgence of code nineteen cases come this fall and he called for stepped up federal plan to control it without better planning twenty twenty could be the darkest winter in modern history the darkest winter in modern history or I I just want to shift gears a little at now and talk about the economy you know this pandemic continues to take an economic toll another three million Americans filed for unemployment last week there's been almost thirty seven million jobless claims in just the last eight weeks of sue are these numbers changing the calculation for lawmakers as they're trying to pass more rescue packages there is an increasing growing divide on the hill between the two parties about what needs to be done and Democrats are moving forward tomorrow with another three trillion dollar rescue package but they're really talking to themselves there's been no communication with the White House Senate Republicans say they don't want to take it up and plus he told reporters today she's basically relying on public opinion to bend in their favor I think that our conversations with the American people they're feeling the pain more than anyone obviously a who is saying something like that it's amazing to me how much patience and how much tolerance some can have for the pain of others close he basically saying Republicans will likely have no choice but to support legislation along the lines are offering all right that is NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis and science correspondent Allison Aubrey thanks to both of you you're welcome thank you to France now and in emerging controversy the pharmaceutical giant Sanofi set off a firestorm when its CEO said Americans would likely be the first to get any vaccine it develops the French consider the company a national champion and as NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports now from Paris the comments plunged France into angst over how the vaccine will be developed and who will get it sent fees worldwide CEO Paul Hubbard made the comments late Wednesday in an interview with Bloomberg news he said Sanofi's vaccine would probably be offered to American patients first that was understandable said Hubbard given how much financial support the U. S. is giving Sanofi's research French airwaves exploded in indignation in an illustration of how sensitive people are over the coronavirus clearly does Emily because he said if you need a more poignant polemics priority to the Americans if the no fee is the first to discover the vaccine does that shock you ask this TV commentator interviewing an expert the French deputy finance minister called it unacceptable for money to influence access to this vaccine head of the Socialist Party Olivier far went further I consider it kind of sucks thank you we cannot allow the vaccine that could have the entire world leave normally again be taken hostage by McIntyre financial interests president Emmanuel mackerel said the vaccine as a public good and should not be influenced by the laws of the market only VA Bosio head of Sanofi in France tried all day to explain his boss's comments but he said the US is offering more money and better regulatory incentives to develop the vaccine I don't come across it could only be looking on a vaccine is very long to develop it usually takes ten years and there's heavy investment and now we're being pushed to do it in eighteen months the Americans have been very organized and mobilized to accelerate things both financially and within regulations Europe has been much less so the E. U. recently organized a worldwide fundraising event where countries with the notable exception of the US and Russia pledged eight billion dollars for a vaccine yon is not this is a board member of the European medicines agency the equivalent of the FDA he says the E. U. talks about solidarity but doesn't show it and he thinks there will be fierce competition for a corona virus vaccine the way that it was fierce competition among the member states one need only started up in corporate active equipment and they got nothing and I'm the same way that the U. member states to close their borders they didn't exchange medical compliance date practically said everyone hurt himself by the end of Thursday the president of Sanofi sales Feinberg appeared on the nightly news in France for his grilling as good as sexologists and if you still have these three views it as unique will get set up with vaccine a few days or a few weeks after the U. S. asked the host explained okay bye Berg said you know country would be ahead of any other if Sanofi discovers a vaccine it will produce it in the US and Europe he said it would be a common good and distributed to as many people as possible Eleanor Beardsley NPR news Paris you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news support comes from clean power alliance for CPA customers who have recently become.

Mary Louise Kelly Washington Elsa Chang Los Angeles
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:13 min | 5 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"Adelaide's this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm ari Shapiro over these weeks of social distancing many of us have felt a craving for human connection the author mark Tony has a suggestion for a place to turn the words of Walt Whitman so I love his readers he was nothing more than companies and his poems reach out to readers attempt to include them invite us to be part of the experience that he's describing voters see part of his singing Tony is also a poet and he has a new book called what is the grass it's part memoir part literary love letter to Walt Whitman's poems a testament to how poetry can help us understand our lives and in this unparalleled moment of isolation Tony told me there is a core idea in Whitman's poetry that speaks to him there is a sustaining force is standing energy in human life but no matter the crisis we confront we know that we are part of something ongoing and that that is a tremendous gift a source of confidence and of peace and joy and knowledge what could we long for more at this moment and peace and joy and knowledge as you point out in the book the most common words in all of women's poetry is you and he speaks so much of the way you and I in the abstract of the idea of you and the idea of I relate to each other both physically and across time and space so what do you think you can help us understand about this experience of isolation and distance like the whole the lack of having other people physically in our presence right now he suggests you know that are you always in relation I was a part of the whole if humanity is one great sort of feel of being we are sparks of light we are part of that fabric even when you are alone you are not exactly you were always part of that tribe even if you are at some distance from the other members of the group what's a beautiful line he has reaching across the generations to the reader future he says this is men and women of the generations hence for many generations hence his I considered seriously if you before you were ever born the lovely further the poet is speaking into the future and speaks with great faith in the future that might be harder for us at this moment in time to to feel and Sophia's believe that tomorrow will come tomorrow we we human beings will carry forward on this journey is one that can feel very consoling very helpful now to give us a line that represents that all give me just a second to turn to that sure I was somebody it's somebody dozens of leaves of grass they always have to figure out what's going on in her he's speaking out is a section three of crossing Brooklyn ferry into the future it avails not time nor place distance avails not I am with you your men and women of the generation ever so many generations hands just as you feel when you look on the reverence and sky so I felt just as any of you is one of the living crowd I was one of the crowd just as you refreshed for the gladness of the river and the bright flow I was refreshed just as you stand and lean on the rail it hurry with the swift current I stood yet was hurried well we might not be in a crowd right now but we can at least look at that same exactly and you know what's what's marvelous about that passage one thing so I was I was just I was one of the crowd it was writing that poem he's thirty six years thirty seven years old he's not gone yet he's not going to be gone for quite a while yeah he writes a poem as if he's already in the past so looking forward to us in the future you're a poet and you've spent your life surrounded by poetry so if you could speak for a moment to people who don't often reach for poetry makes the case for white today maybe they should consider doing so well you know it's it's very true this art because poetry is made of language out of the same stuff we used to order lunch you know we're talking a bank teller yeah of all the arts poetry is probably the one that can get close to what it feels like to be inside somebody else's skin how it is to be as a mirror back to you how it is to be yourself so I think that there are poems that would speak to any reader anyone willing to give it a try and that any reader might find that encouraging helpful to see your own life mirrored back to can you just give us a thought from women to end on a few lines that might be helpful to people right now let's see what I can do with this is a passage from this on myself again and we should hear what uncertainty standing above the the losses in the limits of being an individual self to hold everything is all humanity were speaking to us he says it all people I see myself none more and not one about a cordless and all the good or bad I save myself I see of them and I know I am solid and sound to me the conversion objects of the universe potentially flow all are written to me and I must get what the writing means and I know I am deathless I know this orbit of mine cannot be swept by a carpenter's compass I know I shall not pass okay Charles curly cue cut with a burnt stick at night that's a beautiful ending mark Tony thank you so much for talking with us thank you ari my pleasure his new book is what is the grass Walt Whitman in my life we're going to spend the next few minutes remembering the shaman with wooden was a force of New York City night life his drag persona Mona foot was a muscular super hero in the vein of Wonder Woman but with a whole lot more glitter and wearing a deadly pair of high heels he lived through the worst days of the aids crisis in the eighties and nineties and died last month from a suspected case of carbon nineteen he was fifty years old his life was full of performance he acted in movies and wrote a hit song is part of the group the ones.

Adelaide Mary Louise Kelly NPR ari Shapiro
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:55 min | 5 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly and MLC Chang listen closely to the band's sweet crude and you'll hear a linguistic relic from America's Deep South that is Louisiana French dialects spoken for generations in Louisiana until the twentieth century when schools in the state became more anglicised my grandfather's first language is Louisiana French and he would get punished in school if he spoke French and so it started to dissipate and go away Alexis Marcelo started sweet crude along with Sam craft hoping it would help revive Louisiana Franks we started this band with the knowledge that the last group of people for whom French was their first language are slowly fading away and that's pretty insane after three hundred some odd years their new album is called OPC L. R. T. V. C. L. and it's an energetic soundtrack for a new generation trying to bring an old language back to life so what I want to know more about is you know like Louisiana French is white a couple of centuries old as a language but when I hear your music your sound is really modern I mean it's almost poppy with heavy synthesizers and dance beat was that on purpose to sort of lace the old with the new yeah absolutely we had this intention of giving this very old dialect a brand new set of clothes but beyond that we're like we.

Mary Louise Kelly MLC Chang America Louisiana Alexis Marcelo Sam craft L. R. T. V. C. L.
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:14 min | 5 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly the numbers are frankly overwhelming every day the corona virus death count rises at first based on early numbers in late February epidemiologists and experts estimated about one percent of infected people would die from covert nineteen but it turns out it is hard to come up with one number that accurately captures how deadly this virus is it is killing people in different states and different countries and different rates according to Johns Hopkins the mortality rate here in the U. S. is five point seven percent five point seven in Italy it's over thirteen percent in China it's five and a half percent which made us wonder why is the true death rate so all over the place and so hard to pin down well Natalie dean assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida is here to help us try to answer that question Natalie dean welcome thanks for having me so how do you calculate how do you define what what the true death rate looks like with regards to the corners so the numbers that you just reported we call those the observed or crude case fatality rates and those are calculated as the number of deaths divided by the number of cases that have actually been confirmed that's very important because there are a lot of cases that are not confirmed people who have mild illness might be turned away or not be able to access testing we also know that there are a lot of people who are infected but don't develop symptoms so that means that there's actually a much bigger denominator than what is reflected in this observed the case fatality rate so you're saying testing plays a crucial role in understanding how many people have been sickened and and have are now infected with code nineteen and without knowing those numbers it's really hard to to get what but the death rate is right we know that test ng tends to focus on people who are most severely ill and so is missing a lot of those mild cases and is definitely missing anyone who doesn't have symptoms so we know that those numbers are over estimates and they also vary a lot by country because there will be different availability of testing in different countries where is the death rate highest workers at lowest so far so looking at the statistics from Johns Hopkins University conceived Belgium right now seems to be reporting the highest crude case fatality rate at a little over fifteen percent similarly high in France the United Kingdom and Italy and we know that it's quite low in some Asian countries like Singapore and South Korea and certainly it's reflecting who's being tested but then it also reflects things like quality of care in those countries you've done research on Ebola on ZK it has how does the challenge of identifying the true death rate for the corona virus compared to with with others so the corona virus is definitely different from Ebola Zika Ebola is a very severe disease and so we have pretty few of these a Santa Monica mild infections that makes it easier to detect people who are sick and then track them to see who dies the guys the other end of the spectrum where most infections are pretty mild or asymptomatic so then it becomes really hard to establish severity coronavirus is somewhere in the middle somewhere likely below one percent of people who are infected at di but we're trying to nail down exactly where that number lines and why is this number important why do scientists need to devote resources to figuring it out the number impacts how we determine our response strategies very interesting understanding risk factors for severe illness so whether that differs by fax or on the presence of a their diseases race ethnicity and then that will allow us to identify groups that we want to pay close attention to Natalie dean she's assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida thank you very much thanks I really appreciate it the corona virus pandemic has completely shut down concerts and other live events some people like Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti are even predicting that live events won't resume until twenty twenty one so ticket holders are looking for refinance but as NPR's Andrew Limbong reports the process has not been that easy show Cronin is a mental health therapist in Vancouver Washington she bought tickets for six events through Ticketmaster reality I have to get to run all the hello may I get your that's the one with Green Day Weezer fall out boy journey with the pretenders and you get the point Clinton says she can't get refunds because new rules Ticketmaster announced last week stipulate that a show has to be either officially canceled or have new dates announced in order for the purchaser to be eligible for refunds and since neither has happened in Cronin's case and she bought pairs of tickets she's out nearly a thousand dollars she's thankful she still employed even imagine what somebody would be going to right now if they had a thousand dollars in tickets just sitting there that they know they're not gonna be able to use and they're stressing about if they're gonna be able to pay their rent or buy their kids food or you know anything like that the lines into Connie is a complicated one and it's been a struggle for ticket buyers to get their money back because they aren't Ticketmaster's primary concerns is dean Budnick he is the co author of the book ticket masters the rise of the concert industry and how the public got scalped ticket master we're really ultimately is responsible to its venue clients and those are the individuals that it wants to protect in other words its primary business relationships are with concert promoter stadiums and arenas before last week's Ticketmaster's website seem to back off of refunds for postponed events entirely the ensuing media coverage caught the attention of two members of Congress democratic representatives Katie Porter from California and bill Pascrell from New Jersey who wrote a scathing letter encouraging that ticket seller to reconsider in a statement Ticketmaster said it's made four hundred million dollars worth of refunds so far and its parent company live nation along with rival E. G. announced new refund policies last week which still require a concert to be cancelled or officially rescheduled with new dates to trigger a refund those policies don't go into effect until may first dean Budnick says live nation and AEG simply don't have the money to give back because contractually they were least that money to the concert promoters to the event producers who put on those events but Nick says with smaller club level shows these funds are usually held in escrow so they're easier to access but for big shows at stadiums ticket purchasers money is already in the hands of venues and artists now you may say well Gee that is Ticketmaster's fall because that's their contract they entered into but Nick says over the past few decades artists have gone a larger share of ticket sales to make up for declining records the that's led to higher ticket prices and more service fees to be shared among the venues and promoters keep juggling is a consulting director for media research a media analysis firm he says that any post corona virus world the deals between all parties in the ecosystem are likely to change and everybody on that value check will be expected to take a hit on the including artists but right now it's Adam Burke stage hands food vendor security guards and ticket holders who are feeling the pain Krista Riley is a teacher from Michigan she bought red wings hockey tickets as a gift for her dad the game was set to take place last month and she still can't get a refund I'm not working right now I will work until September so having that extra two hundred and thirty Bucks would be really off some customers like Riley and cash Cronin from earlier whose ad thousand Bucks are part of a group exploring a class action suit one such complaint is going through the courts now others have reached out to the credit card companies to try to get the money back but either way they'll be waiting for a.

Elsa Chang Mary Louise Kelly
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:30 min | 5 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"This is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles the shortage of personal protective equipment that is masks gloves and other disposable gear has forced a lot of American hospitals and health care workers to fend for themselves people who have never given much thought to where supplies come from are now looking for connections to manufacturers in China and here's John it real which and Martin Kosgey happened following all of this and join us now Hey guys hi there hi Martin I want to start with you on the American side of things what kinds of people and groups over here are you seen getting into the import business well we've all heard the stories about governors working the phones trying call their CEO friends looking for connections for import of connections in China but smaller groups are doing it too even some individual doctors and certainly hospitals it's pretty much anybody who's decided they can't necessarily count on the feds or the states to come through in time with spoke with some of the stuff that they really have to have here in Washington state to the state hospital association has actually gotten into the import business they've been they had a trial run importing three hundred thousand surgical masks to seafood work I caught up with Cassie Sauer who runs that association just as she was arriving at the warehouse here south of Seattle where I am to inspect her first shipment of imported masks we have never imported anything you know we actually brought a Chinese translator with us to read all the labels in the box we opened up about ten percent the cartons to make sure they're all the same and they were so we cut one up and make sure it was three planet is we poured water into another one to make sure the water didn't go through and it didn't and we're just thrilled that it's here just thrilled okay so this is working than to just go to China and get your own supplies well so far she's a pretty happy they've imported another three hundred thousand or so since then but she says you know this is a stressful process for people who aren't in this businesses for their some financial risk here you know it she really wishes there were more of a unified national American purchasing effort here it is on the China on the China side for one thing you know she has no idea of her orders for master somehow conflicting with washing state's effort to buy the same masks Roland Thompson is helping her with these purchases he's in it's his day job as a state level lobbyist in Olympia but now he's kind of dived into this New World of imports he's learning this business on the fly because yes some contacts in China and he says those contacts are telling him that the competition in China is just intense they're all sorts.

Mary Louise Kelly Washington Elsa Chang Los Angeles NPR
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:58 min | 6 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and a Mary Louise Kelly in American academics race is a pre existing condition right Sir riot Nadia McDonald well the corona virus is no exception so far from the Midwest to the mid Atlantic to the Mississippi Delta the corona virus has hit African Americans especially hard one third of the Americans hospitalized in March for black that's despite being only thirteen percent of the US population McDonald who is culture critic for ESPN's the undefeated writes that while viruses don't discriminate people do and she goes back to the flu pandemic of nineteen eighteen to trace how systemic and long standing this is serenity McDonald welcome thank you for having me to describe what was happening in nineteen eighteen you're right that African Americans were more likely to live in conditions where disease might spread and then if they did get sick less likely to get good medical care exactly so it should be understood overall that there wasn't necessarily great medical care for the flu you know the standard sort of treatment for the flu would be like lots of rest lots of fluids and staying away from other sick people which sounds familiar exactly right but like even within that framework black people during the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic are you still at a disadvantage and most of those reasons have to do with structural reset them yeah I mean give me give me the specific example of Chicago in nineteen eighteen which you write about this pandemic basically hex right before the U. S. is entering World War one also like right in the middle of the Great Migration and so what that means is that you have black folks who are coming up to Chicago from the south and who are basically fleeing sort of extraordinarily violent racism I am in the form of lynching and the former sexual violence all these things are propelling black people to lean further north and what happens is is that they're not necessarily greeted with open arms there's already this sort of alarmism even before the flu breaks out just looking at the pictures that go with your article I'm looking at the wards where they were being treated it literally in basements literally and yes so you can imagine rate small enclosed not a whole lot of central name you know they're often really dank there's usually a moisture that we associate with the cement none of those things are are ideal conditions if you are a sick person who has the flu even the flu itself sort of becomes a pathologist raised people sort of get blamed for it even though everyone is getting sick you know said that you know you see folks who are basically saying they're bringing this action with you know and that is not necessarily you know view that could be considered outside of the mainstream because you have a reporter for the Chicago daily Tribune that was known at the time his writing these articles saying as much I mean it resonates in so many painful ways today I'm guessing many Asian Americans listening might seal the residents of that you know in the way that we have heard the current corona virus being called the will hunt virus or the China virus exactly set that goes sort of cross class lines and that's the other thing that you see in sort of these parallels between nineteen eighteen and twenty twenty in terms of the sort of racial a scapegoating you sound sadly not shocked that we're seeing these numbers of African Americans that are out of whack with the general population yeah because like these are sort of long standing problems rate we can still see the legacy say redlining in Chicago you know we can still see it as housing inequality home in New York in all of these other cities across the country you know we're black people basically flocked during this part of the twentieth century you know like Detroit is another example into really I think what we see is happening is just a magnified example of all of these inequalities that have instead of basically pre existed Saraya Nadia McDonald of ESPN's the undefeated talking there about her article headlined in nineteen eighteen and twenty twenty race colors America's response to.

Elsa Chang Mary Louise Kelly NPR
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:47 min | 6 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Mary Louise Kelly next tally singer finally got recognition for albums he recorded decades ago is it will you know send me thirty and I was stunned because no one could ask for anything for you know thirty years or something Glenn Copeland is the latest link in our series played forward after the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Louise Schiavone the labor department reports nearly seventeen million Americans have sought unemployment benefits over the past three weeks our record so far roughly one in ten workers have lost their jobs in the past three weeks the largest and fastest growing of job losses on record since nineteen forty eight the federal reserve is out with a series of new emergency lending programs NPR's Scott Horsley reports the moves are designed to pump an additional two point three trillion dollars into our economy that's been severely battered by the coronavirus the central bank's new initiatives include a six hundred billion dollars main street lending program aimed at small and midsize firms that make a reasonable effort to keep workers on the payroll fed chairman Jerome Powell announced the measure on the same day the labor department reported that another six point six million people applied for unemployment last week as businesses closed their doors in an effort to contain the pandemic people have been asked to put their lives and their livelihoods on hold and significant economic and personal cost as a society we should do everything we can to provide relief to those who are suffering for the public good the fed also plans to land five hundred billion dollars to struggling state and local governments and it's broadening its program to help big corporations Scott Horsley NPR news Washington the stresses of this period will rival the deep recessions job losses a condom discuss poche says it's going to be quite rough we're gonna see job losses in the in the millions in April this will be the worst month ever for job losses we're likely to see the unemployment rate a move above ten percent in the near term you know this is going to be far worse than the Great Recession that we saw in two thousand eight two thousand and nine goes for Shea with PNC financial services group markets are closed tomorrow for Good Friday the Dow Jones industrial average rose two hundred and eighty one points today closing at twenty three thousand seven hundred fifteen the nasdaq was up sixty two this is NPR across the nation more than four hundred and fifty four thousand cases of corona virus have been identified and more than sixteen thousand deaths have been reported that according to the Johns Hopkins University coronavirus tracking center in New York the hardest hit state another seven hundred ninety nine virus related deaths raising the total there above seven thousand the state of Alabama has agreed to revise guidelines for treatment that would have allowed care givers to deny ventilator assistance for some with intellectual disabilities and peers Joseph Shapiro reports on March twenty eighth the office for civil rights at the federal department of health and Human Services said it was opening investigations into the crisis of care going lines of multiple states the office warned that a disability by itself could not be a reason for denying care now the civil rights offices announced its first case resolution with Alabama guidelines they're allowed doctors and hospitals to deny ventilators to people with intellectual disabilities or to people with moderate to severe dementia Alabama said it recently revise those guidelines and agreed to make those changes clear Joseph Shapiro NPR news pope Francis celebrated holy Thursday mass in St Peter's basilica which was closed due to the crown of virus he called police and medical personnel responded to cope in ten patients the center next door I'm Louise Schiavone NPR news.

Mary Louise Kelly
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:25 min | 6 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm ari Shapiro this hour Bernie Sanders drops out of the twenty twenty race for president in China the lockdown is lifted residents of Wuhan are able to leave the city and their homes for the first time in weeks it was like a kid trying to cross the street without their parents were scared and he was a little bit exciting scenes little bit of the city and how the coronavirus is changing what kind of books we want to read I would normally say that I get a lot of comfort from the grim tones of notes from the underground no I am re reading Animorphs news live from NPR news in Washington I'm winter Johnston the death toll from the corona virus in New York stands at more than six thousand speaking at his daily briefing governor Andrew Cuomo says there have been seven hundred seventy nine corona virus related deaths within the last twenty four hours the highest daily number of casualties every number is a face right many of them frontline workers many of them health care workers and they were putting themselves at risk and they knew they were the governor says the state's dramatic shut down and the social distancing efforts are starting to pay off he says hospitalization figures continue to show the curve of infection flattening Cuomo has directed all flags in New York state to be flown at half staff the World Health Organization is strongly defending its handling of the corona virus outbreak and that criticism from president trump NPR's Jason Beaubien reports the head of the agency says it's working around the clock to fight the global pandemic after president trump lashed out at the W. H. O. director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said his agency has been working tirelessly to provide technical guidance research and logistical support to countries around the world trump on Tuesday threatened to cut off U. S. funding to the WHL saying the WHO's response to the outbreak was slow in China centric TAITRA said the personal attacks don't bother him and added that throughout this crisis he's been subject to racist slurs and even death threats he said what is important right now is that nations come together to fight this pandemic you need to use the only option to defeat this virus if you don't believe in unity and don't do you any anti police prepare for the worst to come Jason Beaubien NPR news all of the major indices rose sharply today on Wall Street with the Dow Jones industrial average of seven hundred seventy nine points NPR's Scott Horsley reports investors are eagerly eyeing signs of a possible slowdown in new coronavirus cases deaths from the corona virus hit a new daily highs in New York state but new hospitalizations there have slowed the sign that aggressive social distancing measures may be working investors welcomed any hopeful news both the Dow and the S. and P. five hundred index jumped more than three point four percent the nasdaq rose about two and a half percent oil prices also climbed as major producing countries continue to weigh possible production cuts in an effort to reduce the glut on the market demand for oil has dropped sharply as a result of the pandemic the benchmark price in the U. S. is well below what many drillers here need to turn a profit Scott Horsley NPR news Washington New Jersey governor Phil Murphy says the state's primary election will be postponed until July seventh amid the.

Mary Louise Kelly Bernie Sanders ari Shapiro
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:52 min | 6 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm ari Shapiro this hour how might Joe Biden handle the economy and the coronavirus rescue money if he wins the presidency we look back to when he pushed the two thousand nine recovery act through Congress to maybe the most battle tested president from the perspective because we can't woman thinks it was planned for anyone I could think of also the two trillion dollar package that already passed is supposed to help small businesses will it as a small business owner I'm really not counting on it I'm just kind of doing what I can on my own to keep myself afloat and NPR's life kit tackles corona virus induced anxiety now these headlines live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer as the death toll from the corona virus pandemic continues to mount New York City funeral homes and cemeteries are unable to keep up NPR's Greg Allen reports officials said the city may have to temporarily enter some of the dead in a public park AT refrigerated trailers big enough to hold one hundred bodies each have been deployed to hospitals throughout New York City some hospitals now I've added a second and even third trailer hold remains of people who die from cold nineteen or other causes New York City councilman mark Levine says that the death toll doesn't soon level off the city will likely start doing temporary interment digging trenches in a city park were caskets will be buried in a way that allowed the bodies into be disinterred and given a proper burial at such time as the crisis is over in our normal cemetery systems and funeral home system is running again marine since the defense department has said mortuary specialist in New York City but that more help is needed Greg Allen NPR news British prime minister Boris Johnson has been moved into an intensive care unit today after symptoms of COPD nineteen worsened that's according to his Downing Street office which says Johnson was admitted to St Thomas's hospital over the weekend British prime minister first announced he was suffering from the disease caused by the coronavirus ten days ago and initially being continued to run the country from his residence was now asked the foreign it secretary Dominic Raab be deputized for him Britain has no formal succession plan should the prime minister become incapacitated the fifty five year old Johnson tested positive for the virus on March twenty six south Carolina's governor is ordering residents of that state to stay home with few exceptions as NPR's Sarah McCammon explained South Carolina had been among a dwindling number of states without state homeowners governors are under pressure from medical groups and federal officials including Dr Anthony Fauci to order their residents to stay home in an effort to reduce the spread of the corona virus a handful of Republican governors have been holdouts but now South Carolina governor Henry McMaster says infections are rising and now is the time to many people all the roads too many people on the water's too many people in the stores too.

Mary Louise Kelly Joe Biden ari Shapiro
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:12 min | 6 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mary Louise Kelly and I'm ari Shapiro this hour a call for federal workers to be able to telework during the pandemic if they are not provided weather and safety leave but still have to earn a paycheck so you know what they do they go to work also an update on human trials now under way for a coronavirus vaccine we hear from one company developing a vaccine and supermarkets racing to keep food and paper goods on their shelves if they feel that stores back room inventory that may not be enough because that makes a lot of one day your last and they're used to having a choice that last a week or two first the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer the World Health Organization is warning that young people not to be complacent about the risks coronavirus poses to them NPR's Jason Beaubien reports the highest fatality rates tend to be among the elderly the W. H. O. says significant numbers of younger adults are also getting extremely ill tell you read from cover nineteen remains around one percent varies from place to place is different countries are in different phases of the epidemic in responding differently to the health crisis most of the deaths globally have been among older people and patients with underlying health conditions but the WHO's head of emergencies Mike Ryan pointed out that twenty percent of deaths so far in South Korea have been among people under the age of sixty a significant number of all the ways that healthy adults can develop a more severe form of the disease he warned nations not to approach this as just a disease of the elderly Jason Beaubien NPR news applications for weekly jobless benefits surged in some states and what is an early sign millions of Americans are being thrown out of work in Ohio tens of thousands of people file claims for jobless benefits in just the first three days of this week for a host that is the state's lieutenant governor who spoke with NPR's All Things Considered today we had seventy eight thousand people file for unemployment during the first three days of this week that includes Sunday Monday Tuesday twenty nine thousand yesterday just put this in perspective the week before we had about sixty five hundred and some states the demand for unemployment health is likely to outstrip states ability to pay claims builders were less busy in Feb worry though by a smaller margin than the previous month the clients follow December surge that pushed home building to its highest level in thirteen years commerce department reported today analysts had expected a more significant drop applications for building permits fell five and a half percent for the first time since nine eleven the New York stock exchanges shutting down its crowded frenzied floor Jim zarroli reports the exchange said today this temporarily moving to all electronic trading the exchange says it's taking this step as a precaution amid the corona virus outbreak it will continue to operate on the same schedule but all trades will be conducted electronically the New York Stock Exchange has long been the most famous stock trading venue in the world densely packed with floor traders barking orders at a fevered pitch today it retains its iconic status in part because TV broadcaster still use it as a backdrop but in the age of computer trading it no longer serves the same function as it used to Jim zarroli NPR news New York on wallstreet stocks continued their downward slide today the Dow dropped another thirteen hundred and thirty eight points more than six percent the nasdaq fell three hundred and forty four points today you're listening to NPR live from KQED news I'm terrified there despite the plummeting stock market and uncertainty over the impact of the corona virus outbreak a report out today from the state legislative analyst's office says California is on strong fiscal footing for now KQED's Katie or reports the only owes report notes that California has a couple things going for it at the moment first the governor is proposing about twenty one billion dollars in reserves in the upcoming budget and the state has done a good job of paying down debt and maintaining a balanced budget but the state's dependency on volatile capital gains taxes could hurt it the LA projects those revenues will be several billion dollars below budget estimates declines in the stock market could also reduce future budgetary reserves on top of that delay tax filing deadlines all make for very unpredictable times in Sacramento I'm Katie or KQED news the university of California board of regents met this morning for an update on their response to the corona virus pandemic most campuses have transitioned to remote learning for the rest of the academic year and are encouraging students to move out of student housing Dr Carrie Byington heads the UC health system she says the system owns land that could be suitable for temporary hospitals and the governor is working with all of us in the hospital industry to look and see where those beds would be and how quickly we can build the reason say they are not planning to refund tuition and student fees at this time if you.

Mary Louise Kelly ari Shapiro
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:14 min | 7 months ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm L. C. Chang ahead this hour president trump wraps up a trip to India which included a rally at the world's largest cricket stadium but the two countries are still far apart on a trade deal I think the Indian side has to appeal to trump's strategy to appeal to this friendship analysts Angelus is trying to break the cycle of incarcerating people with mental health disorders I mean I think that the average person must see that's something needs to change it's so apparent that the numbers are growing we'll talk about a small but promising diversion program now here's live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer seven candidates vying to be Democratic Party presidential nominees are debating tonight in Charleston as NPR's Bobby Allen reports the match up getting under way at this hour comes days before Saturday's primary in South Carolina during the last debate former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg took a drubbing from the other candidates and especially from Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren who's strong performance prompted a big fundraising boost now billionaire Bloomberg might be looking for a rematch but attacks could also focus on Vermont senator Bernie Sanders a self described democratic socialist who has emerged as the party's front runner attention will also be on former vice president Joe Biden who has invested heavily in South Carolina with the democratic electorate is majority black a poor debate and primary showing in the state provided could exact a devastating blow to his campaign Bobby Allyn NPR news a month before the U. S. Supreme Court is due to take up his case is over tax returns and financial records president trump is out with an unusual suggestion president saying he thinks two liberal justices on the court should not take part in those or other cases involving him in his administration trump made his remarks critical of justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia sort of my order during a news conference in India today he's wrapping up his visit to that country March follows similar comments he made on Twitter justice justice is generally decide for themselves whether to recuse themselves from cases it's highly unlikely either would sit out cases involving the president the centers for disease control and prevention is calling on Americans to start to prepare for the possibility of more aggressive measures to stop the spread of the corona virus in the west here's NPR's rob Stein the CDC says the spread of the corona virus from China to other countries in recent weeks has heightened fears that it's probably just a matter of time before the virus starts spreading in the United States as a result everyone should start planning for what they would do if tough new measures are needed in this country to snuff out outbreaks that could include things like closing schools requiring people to work from home and canceling public gatherings the CDC stresses that the risk right now is very low but that could change quickly rob Stein NPR news consumers were slightly more confident this month with an index from the conference board up three tenths of a percent from January we're consumers views on the present situation for business and labor market conditions foul also worth noting the survey was done before the latest market plunge attributed to mounting worries about the spread of the corona virus conference board economist Lynn Franco says consumers continue to be the outlook is favorable say when combined with solid employment growth they believe it should be enough to support continued spending and economic growth another day of dramatic declines on Wall Street investors still struggling over the facts of the corona virus the Dow dropped eight hundred and seventy nine points today you're listening to NPR live from KQED news I mean you can service co police say they're investigating the assault and robbery of an elderly man in the Bayview district over the weekend the incident was captured in a video posted on social media it shows a group of men shouting racial slurs at an Asian American man collecting recyclables then hitting him and robbing him longtime community activist Marlene Tran said she thinks the incident was racially motivated and that this kind of crime is often under reported many of the victims and other than that everything was free to speak out so I defuse this is their opportunity to you know provide them with appropriate transaction services they should.

Mary Louise Kelly L. C. Chang India president
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is morning edition from npr news i'm mary louise kelly in washington dc and i'm david greene in culver city california will for days now florida has been preparing for the worst with hurricane erma updated forecasts have downgraded this storm from category five to category four but that's still involves sustained winds of a hundred and fifty five miles an hour and satellite imaging it's incredible it shows hurricane erma is larger and broader than the entire state of florida itself close to a million people are now under evacuation orders in the state the storm is well we've created bad so we wanna get allah guys good we're gonna be stuck down air when no revision so we wanna get out while glasgow leg up my whole family mild prove here we're going to georgia that is bill do close of accurate in with his family from key west want to bringing in peers greg allen who is on the line from miami greg good morning i david so it sounds like people are taking this very seriously with this many people on the move though and under evacuation orders i mean i could imagine the potential for a mess on highways near states this than smooth so far no way willie was very tight yesterday i mean we got this fuel shortage problem you know zerwas gas stop and the inner ch which is packed yesterday oak trips that usually take an arrow were taken five hours they will be the last day for peace to evacuate and so you can expect more the same today he's a fuel shortages i mean this means when you see a gas station that's open and as she has fuel you should you should fill up when you well you know which gas drove because this long winds there you know people sometimes stopped aghast as well you know delivers or are scheduled so yes let hard to fly figure out who has the gas just if you have the time to to wait for so there's so much to i ask you about in terms of the potential impact of of this i mean i mean lives and damage to property and so forth wind damage i'm and also power outages which sound like they could less for for a long time with.

mary louise kelly david greene california florida greg allen miami willie npr washington culver city glasgow georgia five hours
"mary louise kelly" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"mary louise kelly" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from harvard extension school online certificates in strategic management and corporate sustainability extension dot harvard dot edu slash npr live from npr news in washington i'm shea stevens the department of homeland security has announced new requirements for all commercial flights arriving in the us from overseas npr's mary louise kelly reports that the rules include more rigorous screening of baggage electron accent passengers the new rules are expected to affect about one hundred eighty airlines both international and american homeland security secretary john kelly announced the change by warning that terrorists want to bring down planes and that inaction is not an option those who choose not to cooperate or slow to adopt these measures could be subject to other restrictions including a ban on electric devices on aircraft or even a suspension of their flights into the united states on the other hand compliance with the new rules could mean the limited ban on laptops in plain cabins will be lifted that bans been in effect since march at ten airports in the middle east and africa mary louise kelly npr news washington a new npr pbs newshour mirrors poll finds at the republican health care bill in the senate is deeply unpopular with the american public and pierce jessica tale of reports that congressional republicans are facing widespread disapproval of how they're handling efforts to repeal and replace the affordable care act just seventeen percent of americans say they approve of this heights obamacare replacement plan fifty five percent of americans say they disapprove while about a quarter of people say they haven't heard enough about it to have an opinion with mounting defections within the gop caucus over the bill leaders decided on tuesday to push a vote on the legislation until after congress returns from next week's g life worth recess democrats opposed the bill in large numbers but even among republicans support for the bill a soft twenty one percent of republicans opposed the bill and just thirty five percent support it.

washington electric devices united states senate republicans harvard extension school npr shea stevens department of homeland securit mary louise kelly secretary john kelly middle east gop congress thirty five percent fifty five percent twenty one percent seventeen percent