35 Burst results for "Mary Louise"

Iran's Presidential Candidate Slate Leans Heavily Toward Hard-Liners

All Things Considered

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Iran's Presidential Candidate Slate Leans Heavily Toward Hard-Liners

"Government has approved the final list of candidates for that country's presidential elections. Voting day is coming right up June 18th. Iran has a very short campaign period. Now the slate is seven approved candidates. It gives the upper hand too hard liners and this election could have an impact on relations between Iran and the U. S. And whether negotiations resume on the 2015 nuclear deal. There are ongoing indirect talks in Vienna focused on restoring the talks over the deal. That now former President Trump withdrew from NPR's Peter Kenyon is tracking all of this from Istanbul. Who, Peter Hi, Mary. Louise. Okay, So how does it work in Iran? How did they get down to these seven candidates? Well, you know, it's pretty wide open when it comes to who can sign up who can register to run for president in Iran, and this year, nearly 600 people took the opportunity to sign up. But there is this group. It's called The Guardian Council. It's got 12 members, six of them appointed by the Supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and that counsel is in charge of vetting the candidates. The criteria have never really been explained. But this year, the council eliminated all but seven of those several 100 presidential hopefuls. And I guess we should note that the incumbent Hassan Rouhani, he's finishing his second term term limited. He's not eligible to run this year. Okay, So who made the cut who got weeded out? Well, a former President Mahmoud a. Medina Jod was rejected again. He's becoming known as a perennial candidate. To no one's surprise. The early hardline favorite Abraham racy, was approved. He's a conservative cleric head of the Iran's judiciary. He ran against her honey and 2013 and lost. He's been linked to The infamous so called death panel that in 1988 sent thousands of political prisoners to their death s O. That's the front runner, and there are six other candidates, including the former nuclear negotiator, a central bank governor. But analysts say no one although there's some prominent names in there, no one looks likely to defeat right, you see, unless there's a surprise During this very short campaign,

Iran President Trump Peter Kenyon Peter Hi The Guardian Council Ayatollah Ali Khamenei Hassan Rouhani U. NPR Vienna President Mahmoud Istanbul Medina Jod Louise Abraham Racy Mary
With every passing day, the harder it'll be to reach vaccination targets

Coronacast

02:50 min | 4 months ago

With every passing day, the harder it'll be to reach vaccination targets

"There's been nearly three hundred thousand. Doses of coronavirus vaccine have been deleted across australia since the rollout began. But we heard from epidemiologist mary. Louise mclaughlin weeks ago that we would have to be vaccinating about one hundred and nine hundred thousand people a day to reach our targets and of course we haven't been vaccinating that many people a day for weeks now so presumably. We've gotta make up that shortfall and norman. What are these barriers at stopping us from from really ramping up this roll out to the stage that it needs to be at for us to actually make those targets well. One barrier is simple. Logistics is that we don't have the vaccine. We haven't had the vaccine in the country. We didn't get a batch of astro which was blocked by italy coming in it may well be in the future of the twenty million of doses. They may be delayed as well as if they get blocked by europe. Hopefully they won't be and so we've got a supply issue while our local supply comes on stream which is coming onstream now and that's going to be a good thing. But that's a million a week that supposedly coming on we've had more vaccine in the country we should have been able to distribute it more than we have. We haven't been able to do that. And it's been miscommunication which the federal government and general practice generates confused the communities confused and not enough. Vaccines are getting through to general practice. There are multiple issues here and of course the federal government is committed to doing this through general practice which is fine general. John apprentices wanted to do that has been success with the gp respiratory clinics and doing and we can actually see a ramp up there. But you're absolutely right. Teeing is that for every week. That goes by and you miss that target you. Just add on that target to the next week. And then you missed that target you add onto the next week. So you cumulatively are talking about much more than one hundred nine hundred thousand a day because you've got to catch up now what's going to have to happen down. The track is only going to be a limit to how much general practice can do. And we're going to have to include the state's not in the states to take over but the states can tool up. Imagine pretty quickly to provide services for large numbers of people in convention centers in football stadiums and other places independent hospitals people can get on with the regular job here and that would be for all comers. Once people immunize our high risk healthcare workers people in age care cetera. Then you could just say to people forget all this business turn up a local convention center will tell you what the waiting time is and just get it done. You don't have to make an appointment. Just turn up and anybody turn up. Who wants suits and you deliver it that way. In addition to general practice not instead of in addition. That's sort of uplift you're going to have to need and the you're going to need and the komo government will inevitably move in that direction. The only way they're going to achieve the target

Louise Mclaughlin Federal Government Norman Australia Italy Europe John Football Komo Government
Changes to voting laws across the United States

All Things Considered

07:21 min | 5 months ago

Changes to voting laws across the United States

"We have all just lived through an election in which the way many of us voted changed. A lot of Americans voted early in 2020. A lot of Americans voted by mail because of the pandemic. Now across the country, state lawmakers are weighing what our election should look like going forward. Hundreds of bills have been proposed that would restrict voting access. Hundreds of others would expand access, and this is mostly happening along party lines. Republican led states are broadly looking to add voting restrictions, while many Democratic legislatures are exploring expanding access. Well, we have got reporters. From three states with us to give us a glimpse of what is going on in there. Patch. Let me welcome Been Giles from Cage's in Phoenix. Katarina so historic from Iowa Public Radio and Anthony Brooks of W bur in Boston. Welcome all three of your primary Louise. Then I'm gonna let you start. Let's go to Arizona, which along with Georgia are maybe the state getting the most attention. Those two certainly at both swing states, both with total GOP control at the state level and all kinds of bills. That have been proposed. What what is standing out to you in Arizona? So the biggest proposed changes I see are two what's called Arizona's permanent early voting list. That's our super popular mail ballot system. That a clear majority of voters here use and have increasingly been using in years and years and years. So not new in 2020 is what you're saying. Definitely not new. No, This is a very long standing system here. You sign up for it, and you regularly get sent your ballot, So one change would make it to that. That's not permanent anymore. If you don't actually use the early ballot, you get sent before an election for two straight election cycles. You get a notice that you're getting kicked off the list, and you have to respond to that if you don't want to be removed. Democrats here say there were 126,000 voters in that situation who cast about in 2020 after not voting in 2016 or 2018, Arizona's, of course, very competitive state now so That margin. You know, 126,000 voters could matter. There's also another bill that would shrink the amount of time voters have to cast that early ballot and then new voter I d requirements when you mailed about back or being considered Catarina is any of this sounding familiar. Let's talk about what's going on in Iowa, another Republican controlled state. New restrictions have already been signed into law here. The governor did that on Monday. Ah big changes that early in person Voting and absentee voting will start 20 days before Election Day instead of 29. It was 40 days just four years ago and then deadlines for requesting a melon ballot has been moved up and those ballots have to be returned earlier, so it's really shrinking that time frame. Then in person. Polls will close at eight p.m. instead of nine PM, as they had been before for state and federal elections. Okay. And why do supporters of these changes who we should note are overwhelmingly Republican. Why did they say this is needed? Unlike in Arizona, where Democrats one big races, Republicans in Iowa one pretty much everything and retained full control of the state government. But they have said that these changes are going to help restore Iowans confidence and trust in elections. Here's representative Bobby Kaufman, speaking about the new law. This protects Iowans right to vote, and it adds certainty and security to it. This bill does not suppress one single vote. Of course, we should say that it was Republicans themselves, who created this distrust by questioning election results with false claims of widespread voter fraud. This is something these false claims have been repeated in debates in Iowa over the selection bill, and I'd also add that a lawsuit challenging these changes have already been filed. Mary Louise. I'm hearing similar claims from Republicans in Arizona, broadly speaking there, justifying these bills by arguing that voter confidence and the election must be restored. They don't acknowledge that some of them are responsible for sewing that distrust in the first place. Democrats are quick to point that out and are lining up in opposition to these bills. Here's Senator Martine Cassata, speaking about the voter. I d legislation. We hear communities tell us That this will hurt my community, my neighborhood, my vote and the people that look like me and the people that vote like me. This is going to hurt us. Okay, so a taste of the conversation under way there in Arizona and in Iowa, Anthony Brooks. Let's turn to Massachusetts, where you have got a very different story unfolding. Yeah, It's really different. Mary Louise Esso last summer. Here's a bit of background because of the pandemic, Lawmakers approved a temporary vote by mail law and as in other states, Massachusetts saw ah huge jump in voter turnout in the presidential primary and general election with with relatively few problems. So now there's a push by Democrats who control the state legislature by big numbers. To make vote by mail permanent. So here's Bill Galvin, the Democratic secretary of state, who's a big proponent of this last year test of us in many ways, it was a very challenging year. But at the same time he showed us what we could do. And I think the result was is that we had a very successful election cycle on. We want to make sure that progress is not lost. Is this controversial in Massachusetts are Republicans. They're fired up in opposition and saying similar things as we were hearing from Republicans and other states. Well, there are concerns. I mean, one concern is that any law to make mail in voting permanent will have to include significant new funding for cities in town clerks to do training and to process the big increase in mail. Balance. But in terms of pushback, Republicans have questioned why mail in voting is necessary now that it appears that the pandemic is lessening with vaccines being distributed. But even the moderate Republican governor, Charlie Baker, has said that he would favor making the law permanent. So I think chances are very good. That vote by mail is going to become permanent in Massachusetts and in the months ahead. I do want to know this debate is playing out at the national level, of course, as well. Big Fight looming in Congress over HR one. This huge bill, backed by Democrats that would expand voting access would curtail Jerry Mandarin would have something to say about some of these changes that are being proposed in at the state level and just quick lightning round for each of you. Maybe Anthony you first. How how much attention is HR one getting is this part of the conversation in Massachusetts? It's part of the conversation because our congressional delegation is all Democratic. It's very much behind HR one. But my sense is that no matter what happens in Washington, Massachusetts move toward a permanent Vote by mail legislation is coming, no matter what and Banner, Catarina, where you're so in Arizona, I think Democrats are going to make a big push for our U. S. Senators Mark Kelly and Kirsten Cinema. Get HR one through to undo a lot of what's happening at the state level. That means there's gonna be pressure on cinema to abolish the filibuster. If that's what it takes, because HR one might be the only way to get around some of this state laws that Republicans are certainly gonna pass here and are expected to be signed into law by the governor. And in Iowa Republicans are going to be more focused on this pending lawsuit that they

Arizona Anthony Brooks Iowa Bobby Kaufman Katarina Massachusetts Catarina Senator Martine Cassata Giles Louise Mary Louise Esso GOP Phoenix Bill Galvin Georgia Boston Mary Louise Jerry Mandarin Charlie Baker Legislature
Ex-U.S. Olympics gymnastics coach charged with sexual assault

90.3 KAZU Programming

03:44 min | 5 months ago

Ex-U.S. Olympics gymnastics coach charged with sexual assault

"Of the sport's most prominent coaches, who had ties to the to the notorious sports doctor, Larry Nassar has killed himself. John Getter, took his own life just hours after he was charged with two dozen crimes, including human trafficking. And sexual assault get led the U. S women's gymnastics team to a gold medal at the 2012 Summer Olympics. Joining us now is NPR Sports correspondent Tom Goldman. Hey there, Tom. Hi, Mary Louise. What else do we know? Well, we have confirmed that John get hurt, killed himself. Hours after he was charged. He was supposed to turn himself in this afternoon. He'd been investigated for the last three years. His investigation grew out of the Larry Nasaa retrial. Yes, sir, of course, was convicted of sexually abusing many, many female athletes, including some of the most famous U. S Olympic women, Jim Nous, and throughout his investigation get, ERT steadfastly maintained his innocence and that he wasn't aware of what NASA or was doing. Well, what else do we know about this? There were two dozen charges that the state of Michigan announced today. What what exactly was getting accused of having done? A Michigan attorney General Dana Nessel, um announced yes, the two dozen charges and 20 of the 24 counts for for human trafficking and forced Labor and Attorney General, Nestle explained. Human trafficking charges in a press conference today, it is alleged that John Getter used force fraud and coercion against the young athletes that came to him for gymnastics training for financial benefit to him. Victims suffer from disordered eating, including bulimia and anorexia, suicide attempts and self harm, excessive physical conditioning. Repeatedly being forced to perform even when injured Extreme emotional abuse and physical abuse, including sexual assault. Now. Mary Louise, Um Attorney General, Nestle acknowledge that cases like this don't often involve human trafficking, she said. We think of it predominantly is affecting people without the means to protect themselves from this type of crime. But she said, it can obviously affect all types of people in this case, young elite female athletes and she said. The alleged victims still carry the scars of those crimes to the state. Yeah. I said there are ties between Get ERT on Larry Nassar. What were the ties? Yeah, we'll get her was AH, longtime owner and coach at a gym near Lansing, Michigan on Git was there where hundreds of women say Larry NASA are abused them. Now Starr was the team physician and in house medical expert and get her. It's Jim for about 20 years. One of the charges today was that get lied to police about Nassar's role as the physician at his gym get hurt, allegedly told police he had never heard any complaints about Nassar's treatment of athletes. Although at least one prominent athlete contradicts that. She said she was with a group of fellow Jim Nous and get hurt, and she mentioned that NASA had abused her, She says her teammates gasped. And get hurt. Didn't react. USA Gymnastics suspended Get her during the nests are scandal and get retired in 2018. And finally today following his death by suicide, Rachel den Hollander, the first to publicly accused ness or of sexual abuse. Tweeted this so much pain and grief for everyone to the survivors. You have been heard and believed, and we stand with you. Thank you for telling the truth. NPR's Tom Goldman reporting. I think you told me you're welcome.

John Getter Larry Nassar Jim Nous Tom Goldman Mary Louise Larry Nasaa Gymnastics Dana Nessel Michigan Nestle Summer Olympics Nassar ERT NPR U. Nasa Larry Nasa TOM Bulimia Anorexia
Vaccines arrive in Australia. Now the challenge begins

Coronacast

04:26 min | 5 months ago

Vaccines arrive in Australia. Now the challenge begins

"We mocked a really significant milestone in the coronavirus pandemic e that. We've been having norman. The first isis of the fis coronavirus vaccine. Which has been approved for use by the therapeutic goods administration touchdown in australia. Ready to start rolling them at next week to the high priority groups so big milestone. what does the next phase actually look like though the rollout. Well i think a lot of it's been left to the states a suspect that what you'll see is remarkable uniformity which is the first line of defense and the first line of people who are most vulnerable as we've seen again and again and again people who are working on our borders driving buses transporting people from the airport and working in hotels looking people who've just arrived so those are the people who will be immunized i i i would imagine a right around the country that will protect them. They will get the pfizer vaccine. Mostly which is good because that gives the most chance of reducing transmission if they do get infected was protecting them against disease and then aged care and high priority. Health care workers so frontline healthcare workers that first phase and. We haven't heard too much of exactly. Who's going to do what we're in terms of administering vaccines. I know that. A lot of general practices have volunteered. We do have a good network of general practices. So should be okay. But i'm getting any feedback from various parts of australia. Saying they're really from people in the business. If you like who are saying. They're really not sure what the plans are so. I think it's still a work in progress. But the first phase shoot go ok e one would hope and then there's a process of with komo's taking responsibility for care and getting enough doses out into each care which are most vulnerable communities. Should the vaccine escape into the general community right one of the questions that were getting a lot of from people from audience members. He's will we be notified when it's when it's out turn but we don't know that yet. I'm not sure how that's how that is indeed going to work. But i assume that there are ways through medicare numbers and other means that the government can text phone number. I know but. I assume that there are ways of finding out who you are. What you've got an assume that also that your general practitioner how to battling those are the sorts of things that are not entirely clear how people will be identified individually so the scale of vaccinating an entire country even with a relatively small population like ustralia is a messy. Ask so we heard last week will health organization expert advisor from the university of new south. Wales mary louise mc laws saying that. We're going to need to vaccinate something like one hundred ninety thousand people per day to get to the targets that have been set for october this year. Is that going to be feasible. Well low to middle income countries do mass vaccination programmes all the time but they do frequently in fact some some would say that. They're better equipped than many advanced countries richer countries to do this and we've had a rabies outbreak through extraordinary numbers very quickly and and so you can get large venues with nurses factory. Like processes logistic simplified dines. It's all there and people head for mass vaccination areas. You can actually get through very large numbers very quickly if you need to you so those numbers are not impossible. But they are hard to achieve. It's gonna take a ramp up so we're going to start off slow and then ramp up from there. The rate limiting step is actually going to be the supply of vaccines. Are we going to have seven. Hundred thousand dozes available a week and it's going to take a while to to that point so i think that's the issue rob van. Can we administer those vaccines. i mean. Interestingly we do fifty to sixty thousand covid tests a day nationally at the moment perhaps a similar framework could be used to roll out the vaccines. Yeah i think they are thinking of respiratory clinics that model being used as well with the drive through with the general general practitioners which was very useful as well as public hospitals providing those sort of drive through facilities as well. You can get through very large numbers. You just go to have accused people ready together. You've got to have the supply. You gotta have the cold chain and you've got to be computerized so that you can enter people's names into the register and you've got to somewhere where you can keep them for fifteen minutes and then observe them with resuscitation facilities so it's not a simple as during the

Therapeutic Goods Administrati FIS Australia University Of New South Wales Mary Louise Mc Norman Komo Pfizer Medicare Rob Van
South Africa suspends rollout of Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine

All Things Considered

04:18 min | 6 months ago

South Africa suspends rollout of Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine

"Whether it needs to change its guidance around the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine. This comes after South Africa decided to delay a vaccination campaign that was supposed to start next week. South Africa made that decision after a small study called into question whether the AstraZeneca vaccine works against a variant that is now the dominant strain there. So is this a setback for AstraZeneca? Is it a detour? Is it nothing at all? NPR's Jason Beaubien is here with hopefully some inside on all down. Hey, Jason. Hey, Mary Louise, So I think I have to start by asking the big question. Are these new variants mutating so fast that there rendering the vaccine useless before we can even get it out and everybody's arms. You know, that's what everybody's really worried about. I can tell you definitively that it's way too early to say that right now that this AstraZeneca vaccine isn't useless against the variant that's spreading in Southern Africa. But we are seeing some worrying signs. This was a fairly small study. It was predominantly of young, healthy South Africans, and it found that a reasonable number of people who got vaccinated still ended up getting mild cases of disease like nobody got sick, really, really sick. Nobody died in the study was even designed to test for that. But this was combined with some lab studies in Southern Africa that showed some other worrying signs and there's concern that you know, South Africa. Was supposed to be starting This mass vaccination campaign next week on bones would be the first mass vaccination campaign in all of southern substation in Africa on bit was going to be with the AstraZeneca shot in Salima dill cream. He's AnAnd visor to the South African government. He told the W. H o today that South African decided to put that campaign on hold. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people of two million people with a vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease. So instead, they're going to switch to doing the mass vaccination campaign with Johnson and Johnson's vaccine into a much smaller distribution of the AstraZeneca vaccine that closely monitor that, And if there are higher rates of hospitalizations or cases among the South Africans getting AstraZeneca, then we'll deal with that, at that point Okay, so some important really important qualifiers you've given us this was a very small right study and AstraZeneca, which is not one of the vaccines being given out right now, in the U. S. Correct, So the guidance stands if you can get the vaccine when it's your turn. Get the vaccine. Absolutely in United States. This vaccine has not been been authorized yet. United States although the U. S has purchased some for down the road, okay, but But there are global implications to this. How big a deal is this development outside of South Africa. You know, there's sort of two parts to that one is that this very isn't as much of a problem outside of Southern Africa. You know, at least not yet It might become a some point time. But the expectation is the AstraZeneca vaccine will continue to be effective in other parts of the world. The second part is that this vaccine is an incredibly important part of the global efforts to get people vaccinated. Particularly in low and middle income countries, And if there are cracks with this vaccine and turns out, it doesn't respond to variants very well. Then that could really be problematic. Although why, because couldn't other countries switched to another vaccine, just like it sounds, South Africa is going to try to switch to Johnson and Johnson. That the problem is that right now, there just isn't enough vaccine out there or even in the pipeline, and AstraZeneca is a huge portion of both the current supply and the expected supply that's supposed to be coming in the coming months. On dis is also going to be. People are hoping sort of this vaccine workhorse. It would work well in low and middle income countries. It's cheap. You don't need some special super cold fridge to store it. You know, and it's currently being made in Europe and in India and South Korea. They're manufacturing in Argentina and Brazil in the WH Ose program to distribute vaccine equitably among 190 countries at the moment. It's plan was to depend almost entirely on the AstraZeneca vaccine. That is NPR's Jason Beaubien reporting. Thank you, Jason, You're welcome. Tomorrow as former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial gets underway. Senate Majority

Astrazeneca South Africa Jason Beaubien Southern Africa Salima Severe Disease Mary Louise Johnson NPR Oxford South African Government U. Jason Anand United States Africa South Korea Argentina Brazil Europe
After Record Turnout, Republicans Are Trying to Make It Harder to Vote

All Things Considered

05:25 min | 6 months ago

After Record Turnout, Republicans Are Trying to Make It Harder to Vote

"Louise Kelly, a record 158 million Americans voted last November. Many cast their ballots early and by mail well now, in the aftermath of President Biden's victory, some Republican state lawmakers are proposing bills that would effectively make it harder to vote. Here to talk us through what is happening with voting laws in three states where the 2020 election was really close our Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting, Abigail, since key of WK are in Lansing, Michigan. And been Giles of Cage's in Phoenix. Arizona. Welcome all three of you. Thanks. Thank you. Thank you for having us, Steven. I've got to start with you. Not only because George is my home state, but because there has, of course been so much focus on Georgia and on Trump's efforts to throw out Biden's victory there. What are GOP lawmakers they're discussing. Well this week, Many Republican lawmakers who pushed false claims of election fraud have signed on to a number of bills in the Senate aimed at making it harder to vote. And that's after Democrats flipped both U. S Senate seats and help defeat President Trump. They would do things like Ban absentee ballot. Dropbox is severely restrict who could request a mail in absentee ballot and would undo the so called motor voter law that automatically updates your voter registration. Whenever you go to the D. M V. Now there are a few proposals that seem most likely to be enacted. One would add some sort of security requirement when you request an absentee by male vote in the future, such as writing your driver's license I d number or sending in a photocopy of your I D when you request a ballot, All right, let's head west over to Arizona Been a zoo, you know Well, Biden's victory was razor thin there as it was in Georgia. What is the debate unfolding where you are? Well, we're seeing voting laws that would impact every step of the voting process. Starting with getting registered. One measure would make it more difficult for county officials to go out into the community and hold voter registration drives. There was even a bill to abolish the incredibly popular vote by mail system in Arizona. The sponsor backtracked off that idea within hours of introducing the bill. What other ideas include requiring people to get early ballot envelopes notarized that's been described by some as a poll tax, and another proposal says You could get an early ballot mailed to you, but you couldn't tell it back. They want you to hand deliver it to a polling place, and perhaps the most controversial ideas would directly impact the presidential election results. One plan would divvy up electoral college votes by congressional district like Maine and Nebraska. Another would actually let the Legislature straight up, revoke the certification of results and let lawmakers pick who gets the electoral college votes. Wow. Um, Abigail. How about Michigan Democrats control the executive branch, but Republicans control the Legislature. How does that dynamic play out in terms of what's happening with voting laws on the discussion over what to do with him in Michigan? Well, it's been a real split screen. We have Democrats and clerks who are pointing to this election as the safest and most secure of their careers. Bar. Bayram is one of the clerks from the larger counties and Michigan, and she called on Republicans this week to say what's been clear throat. All of these hearings that this election was fair and free of fraud. At the end of the day. If people do not want to believe this backed, they're not gonna believe it. Regardless of how many audits are performed. Reports are issue or how transparent the processes and in Michigan are. Democratic Secretary of State is saying she wants to do things like male absentee ballot applications to registered voters and federal elections. Republicans are countering with things like putting cameras on unstaffed ballot. Dropbox is neither of those are likely to get very far. But there is middle ground on issues like making sure there's common training for pole challengers on Stephen and been a quick quick reaction from each of you on that. How much of this in your state? It is. Real policy proposal. How much is for show? Well, Mary Louise after the last couple months of hand wringing over votes we've seen top Republican lawmakers in Georgia say that they're not going to do some of the more extreme proposals. They're not for cutting, no excuse absentee voting, and many of these bills are likely just to appease their constituents who say that more needs to be done. Why do Republicans in your states say changes like this are necessary, Given that there were no major issues with absentee voting in the 2020 election, Given that federal officials have confirmed it was the most secure election in American History. Stephen Bendy one. Do you want to take that one? Justification in Arizona is Pretty simply put as distrust, citing the misinformation that's out there and citing the fact that there are a lot of these Republicans constituents who say they have doubts whether or not those doubts are based on any valid information. Republicans have kind of push past that and just said the fact that there are doubt justifies continued discussions about the election. And changes to the law that they say might inspire some more confidence

Louise Kelly President Biden Stephen Fowler Georgia Public Broadcasting Michigan President Trump Arizona Biden Abigail Georgia Senate Dropbox Lansing Giles Bayram Donald Trump Legislature GOP Steven Phoenix
Biden signs orders reversing major Trump immigration policies

WNYC Programming

03:34 min | 6 months ago

Biden signs orders reversing major Trump immigration policies

"Biden signed a flurry of executive orders tonight, including measures rolling back parts of the Trump Administration's immigration crackdown. We also got more details on an immigration bill that Biden hopes to get passed in Congress. NPR's Joel Rose covers immigration Hegel. Hey, Mary Louise, So biting made a lot of campaign promises to do with immigration. What specifically? Do the executive orders today address? Right? Well, they deliver on some of those promises for sure he signed an executive order. Lifting the travel ban on people from majority Muslim countries, which Biden had pledged during the campaign to do on day one. President Biden also signed a proclamation halting construction of the border wall on the southern border. And plans to roll back Trump's aggressive enforcement tactics in the interior of the U. S. And the Biden administration, also today sent a big, ambitious immigration overhaul bill to Congress. With so much happening in the country with Corona virus and other urgent emergencies. There was some question about whether the administration would make immigration a top priority right off the bat. And I think the answer we got today is yes, it's fair to say this is a U turn very much of your turn from the Trump administration, both in substance. It sounds like also in tone for sure. President Trump frequently talked about immigrants. As a burden and a threat. President Biden seemed to allude to that in his inauguration speech today when he said that quote native ism, fear and demonization have long torn us apart. When Biden and Harris talk about immigration. By contrast, they talk about restoring humanity to the system and treating immigrants as a central workers and valued community members. And even in this immigration bill, they want to replace the word alien in U. S immigration law with the word non citizen. So this is a big shift on immigration. And I think that's part of what the administration is trying to signal with this flurry of action right out of the gate, right? Okay, So let me turn you to the other piece of this. The immigration bill. Which, of course the Biden administration cannot do on its own. They need Congress to buy in as well. What is in this bill? Well, a long list of reforms that immigrant advocates have wanted to see for years. The headline Is. It would provide a pathway to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants for most of those immigrants that would take eight years, but it could happen faster for some groups, including people who are enrolled in Dhaka. Which protects immigrants who are brought to the country illegally, as Children, also farm workers and immigrants who came here fleeing war and natural disasters in their native countries. One immigrant advocate called this the most progressive legalization bill in history. We should note that Congress has debated immigration reform for years for decades. Does this bill have a chance of passing now? Well, it's true that Democrats now control both the House and the Senate. Whether they can get this done is still a real question. Their Senate majority in particular is razor thin, and it is not clear how many Republicans, if any, they would get to sign on to this bill. I mean, we've already heard from some lawmakers who are rejecting this as quote mass amnesty, they argue it only encourage more illegal immigration. This legislation does not include a lot of what Republicans would want to see in a comprehensive overhaul bill. They would want more workplace enforcement, for example, to make sure Cos they're hiring legal workers. So it would not surprise me to see this bill eventually get scaled back to try to attract more bipartisan support. But it's interesting that the Biden administration is out there pushing forward on day one, despite pretty dismal record in recent history for immigration bills.

Biden President Biden Biden Administration Trump Administration Joel Rose Congress President Trump Mary Louise U. Hegel NPR Donald Trump Harris Dhaka Senate House
State Capitols Nationwide Prepare For Possible Inauguration Violence

All Things Considered

01:48 min | 7 months ago

State Capitols Nationwide Prepare For Possible Inauguration Violence

"Attacks on the U. S. Capitol state capitals throughout the country are preparing for the possibility of violence that might coincide with the inauguration of President elect Joe Biden. Among the state's bracing for who knows what over this next week is Arkansas, where a PSA Hutchinson is governor. He's Republican. He is vice chair of the National Governors Association. And he joins me now, Governor Good to speak with you again. Good to be with you, Mary Louise. Thank you all dive right in with the basic question. How concerned are you about possible unrest there in little rock? You have to be concerned after what everyone saw in our nation's capital last week. I think about our school Children. I think about those that have been in our nation's capital, and it's a horrific sight that will sear in our memory for years to come. And so the first concentration is let's have a successful inauguration in Washington, and we are actually sending 500 of our National Guardsmen to Washington D C to help with the total effort of securing our capital, and I think that's important for governor to participate in in terms of our state capital. I have been in homeland security. I understand threat and threat analysis. Sometimes the intelligence is difficult to ascertain. But in this climate We're taking every precaution were aware of certain rallies that will be conducted in our state Capitol in Little Rock on We have security in place or And in reserve. We've also we have strengthened our physical security of the capital will tell me a little bit more about some of

U. S. Capitol State Capitals President Elect Joe Biden Psa Hutchinson National Governors Association Mary Louise Arkansas National Guardsmen Washington Little Rock
With Congress Considering Impeachment, What's Trump's Next Move?

Marketplace

02:46 min | 7 months ago

With Congress Considering Impeachment, What's Trump's Next Move?

"What will President Trump's next move be with nine days left in office, with lawmakers in Congress moving to impeach again? And with possible indictments looming when he's no longer president a question to put to Stephen Groves who worked in the White House until June of last year as a special assistant to the president and deputy press secretary. Mr Grove's could speak with you again. Thanks for me on Mary Louise. What should President Trump do you know? Well, you know, um, he's already signaled that there's going to be a you know a transition of power after the inauguration day, actually, But, yes, he's acknowledged they'll be a transition going well, I don't know how much more he can do until that day, Mary Louise, you You go ahead and say that there's going to be a transition and you know what he does between now and then I don't know how much can be done. I don't know if they're any last minute executive actions to be taken or if he's just going toe. Take it easy. We know one thing for sure he's not going to be on Twitter or Other social media platforms because he's been banned, so we might not. I don't know how we're going to find out what he's doing anymore because he's not on Twitter. Well, if you want to tell us what he's doing, he could walk downstairs into a press conference or he could do what you're doing and given interview, But anyway, let me ask about something specific. And thanks for having me on too. By the way, I'm glad that there are Platforms that still allow conservatives and Republicans on so I do appreciate it. We're always delighted to have conservative voices on our Erin. We're glad that you were with us. Let me ask you this. Should the president speak out? To stop the plans to demonstrate at state capitals on to stop plans of armed writers coming back to Washington bearing arms in advance for the inauguration next week. I think that would be a great help to the country if he did if he could make it crystal clear on whatever platforms are available to him, that peaceful protest is permitted. Anything beyond that. Any violence and he pushing of police and he confronting the police and any type of violence at all or storming government buildings. Is not what the Republican Party is about. It is counterproductive. It is what the Antifa and BLM writers did all summer long. We're better than that. He should send that message. So it clear warning delivered. Now you think would be helpful. Do you think it is likely? We'll have to see you know, Inauguration is ah, while away. It would be nice if everyone kind of tried to lower the temperature, But we hear of impeachment and vocation of the 25th amendment on these things. It would be best for folks here in D. C, where you and I are if the temperature gets lowered over the next 10 days and not sent to a boiling

President Trump Mary Louise Stephen Groves Mr Grove Twitter White House Congress Erin Washington Republican Party BLM
Why the Trump campaign continues to fight election results despite court losses

All Things Considered

05:01 min | 9 months ago

Why the Trump campaign continues to fight election results despite court losses

"The presidential election. President Trump lost the election. Counties and states are starting to certify results of Biden's victory. The Trump campaign continues to mount legal challenges, and they continue to fail. But even though his defeat is clear, the president refuses to concede we want to talk more about why and what it might mean for the country. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson is here for that. How? Tamara? Hi, Mary Louise. The president insists he is challenging the results because he really believes he won. Really, With all the facts pointing otherwise. Is there more to this? I think there is more to it. Donald Trump's brand is about being a winner about never, ever losing. Remember, he's always come out of every loss, like his bankruptcies or failed businesses. Somehow making himself look like a winner. This election is the biggest, most public losses ever suffered. So the stakes for his political future and his ability to continue to monetize his brand are very high. There is a kind of method to his madness. He needs to create this false narrative to be able to walk off the stage without admitting he lost so he can maintain political viability, maintain a firm grip on the base of the Republican Party, especially in case he wants to run again. But there are also real consequences to that. He's his refusal to concede defeat or to accept a peaceful transfer of power to spread these false conspiracy theories are hurting Americans confidence in the most basic element of our democracy, which is free and fair elections. We know from polling that growing numbers of Republicans feel that believed that Trump won the election and it was stolen from him. Another Syrian, making the rounds that I want you to speak to more some of the president's defenders. In fairness, Even some conservatives who don't seem too particularly like President Trump. They have argued Look, Democrats never accepted Trump as the legitimate president. Democrats in their hearts didn't really except the 2016 outcome. This argument goes so. So what is the difference? Moralize and what is the difference? I think there is a difference. He has a absolute right to contest. This is long as he wants in the court. But what happened in 2016? Hillary Clinton did not challenge the legal outcome of the election. She called Trump and conceded even before the networks had called the 270 electoral votes for him. She did win the popular vote, but no one says that Trump didn't win under the rules. Of how America elects its president. He it was the legitimate president. They might not a liked him. He lost the popular vote. But that's different than what's happening now, you know, Trump allies. Even down to some local Republicans in Wayne County, Michigan, actually resisted certifying the results before reversing themselves. Last night, they appeared to be making actual attempts to undermine legitimate ballots cast in Heavily democratic, racially diverse cities. So a lot of Republicans are now saying, Hey, you've got to put up or walk it. Walk away. Don't let the perception settle that you're a sore loser, just trying to overturn a fair election. What is it? Steak for the president here for Donald Trump personally. I think there's a lot of steak, you know, he has mused privately about running in 2024. He's setting up a super PAC that would fund his expenses for that. There also are a lot of consequences for the Republican Party. Is it tries to chart its future? Put aside, all the other Republicans want to run in 2024, which they really can't do? As long as he's out there, saying he might But you know the debate about what is Trump is imposed. Trump has been going on since 2016. But it can't really continuous long as Trump is on the stage. You know, there's that old country music song. How can I miss you when you won't go away? And right now the Republican Party stands for whatever Trump wants at a given moment, But there are also some perils for Trump himself continuing to aggressively contest The results of this election and his allies have been saying Don't look like a sore loser. They're charting a path for him to coming back in 2024, which includes a graceful concession, cooperating with Biden may be giving a farewell address with a kind of MacArthur resc pledge. I shall return you will in the more immediate future. Look ahead with us because one way or another January 20th is coming. President elect Biden will become president Biden. Do we know quite what to expect from President Trump at that point? No, we don't. There are a lot of questions. We don't know what it's like to have an ex president who's not quietly off the stage. That's kind of the final Democratic norm for presidents to gracefully give your successor a chance, a sign of respect for the voters and the outcome of the election. But we have every reason to believe that Trump will be tweeting every day. Even as a private citizen, he might create his own streaming digital platform to as an alternative to Fox Baby who launches 2024 campaign. We don't think he'll weigh in in a detailed way on policy debates, but he may try to maintain his dominance in the media and dominance in the media. NPR's Mara Liasson, Thank you for your reporting. You're welcome.

Donald Trump Mara Liasson Biden Republican Party Mary Louise Tamara NPR Hillary Clinton Wayne County Michigan America Macarthur FOX
35 years ago, the city of Philadelphia dropped a bomb on its citizens. They are now ready to apologize.

Marketplace

03:50 min | 9 months ago

35 years ago, the city of Philadelphia dropped a bomb on its citizens. They are now ready to apologize.

"Mary Louise Kelly. 35. Years ago, a police helicopter dropped a bomb on a Philadelphia row house in a mostly black neighborhood. 11 people were killed. Five of them were Children. The bomb live on inferno that burned down more than 60 other houses, leaving hundreds of people homeless. This is now referred to as the move. Bombing move for the Black Liberation group by the same name was targeted. Last Thursday, the Philadelphia City Council passed a resolution that finally issues a formal apology. Philadelphia City Council member Jamie got to who represents the third district where the bombing occurred. Updraft the resolution and joins us now. Hey there! Welcome. Hi. So for those who maybe don't know, don't remember much about the bombing. Which you just briefly explain what what was move, and why was the city of Philadelphia so hostile to it? Yes. Move Woz, a black liberation group of back to nature group, and I think they were. They were different, right? Like many people in our society, and they were a group of black people who were different and who were very unapologetic about it. And I think over time, um, there developed Ah, Lot of friction between move. Andhra police in the city of Philadelphia. So You've got this apology through. Why is this important now? 35 years later, I think it's important because one no one was ever held accountable on been a real way for what happens with the move. Bombing, which was an atrocity is one of the only times in our country that Ah government bombed its home city. Its own citizens, Um There was no there was never a formal apology. That's something that was all also very striking to me. And so I was honored. Tonto work with the activists who really brought this the council to bring this about, And not only is this Not only that, I think this was important from a symbolic perspective. I also think it's important because we see echoes of what happened in the move Bombing in what we're seeing now between police and community and with the police violence that we've seen in the very same neighborhood. This is Russell. The neighborhood where Walter Wallace Jr was gunned down by police. Just that was just last month that police shooting Walter Wallace? Yes. Yeah, And I've seen you talk about how divisions between police and the community are, you know, not new, obviously. And until we actually reckon with them, their divisions and the problems we're going to keep on coming. Absolutely. I think that we can connect what happened to move with what we saw happen with well to Rawlins Jr. And I think what underlines both of these events and a lot of the police violence we see is racism and a lack of recognition of the humanity of black people in our in our neighborhoods on behalf of police, and until we confront what's at the core, I don't believe we'll be able to move forward. We just have a few seconds left. But along with the apology does this resolution also make some concrete amends to the generations of people impacted by the by the bombing? Well, along with this apology. The resolution establishes May 13th as an annual day of observation, reflection in and re commitment in Philadelphia to honor those that we lost on that day in 1985. And though that, um, can be seen as largely symbolic. I hope it will be the start of the listening and the conversations that we need to

Philadelphia City Council Mary Louise Kelly Black Liberation Group Philadelphia Move Woz Andhra Police Walter Wallace Jr Walter Wallace Jamie Rawlins Jr. UM Russell
Trump Is Said to Be Preparing to Withdraw Troops From Afghanistan, Iraq

All Things Considered

01:16 min | 9 months ago

Trump Is Said to Be Preparing to Withdraw Troops From Afghanistan, Iraq

"To cut the number of troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. A U. S official has confirmed this to NPR, and this news comes after a shakeup in leadership at the Pentagon. NPR's Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman, is here with more. Hey, Tom. Hey, Mary Louise. So what kind of cut to re talking What we know I'm told by U. S official. There's been a verbal order from the White House to cut the number of troops in Afghanistan from about 4500 to 2500 by January, the cut in Iraq Drop the level from about 3000 troops to 2500 of formal order is expected this weekend could come as early as tomorrow. Now. This White House move comes as military leaders, including Joint Chiefs Chairman General Mark Milley, preferred to keep the level it about 4500 in Afghanistan going into the spring to put pressure on the Taliban to stop attacks in urban areas, break with Al Qaeda and continue peace talks. Goes from one of the conditions Mary Louise agreed to by the U. S and the Taliban in their peace agreement back in February. If your Shell said it's not a good time for the cuts, and military leaders agree with that, since those talks have floundered And there are increased attacks by the Taliban, a 50% increase over the last quarter.

Tom Bowman NPR Pentagon Afghanistan Mary Louise Iraq Mark Milley White House TOM Joint Chiefs Taliban Al Qaeda U. Shell
"mary louise" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:45 min | 10 months ago

"mary louise" Discussed on Conversations

"Recently the World Health Organization asked me to future is what health service would be like in the western Western Pacific region and it was probably one of the most difficult projects that I've if it worked on trying to visualize what we will be like in thirty years time and I kept thinking to myself. If climate change accelerates and we have a pandemic that pandemic will lucrative it's on steroids. So we had better prepare and prepare with our neighbors as well. You mean by that climate change comes more forest fire is. More wildlife fleeing into populated areas. is that is that why you think that's that's an issue when it comes to pandemics. All of those issues absolutely then people fleeing from countries where they conquer their food C. rising. They will come with potential diseases. And yes, and then the closer we get to nature if we not respectful of the more we. Are Challenged with these novel viruses, and of course, Gosh Malaria as well and lots of other diseases that we haven't had to deal with because our environment and our temperature doesn't assist them to survive and grow. What examples have you seen all of? The. Humidity coming out in this pandemic. I think we're learning to slow down I love having meetings with people where you can hear the gardening noise and the out the kids shouting or somebody's dog walking because it's time to be taken for a walk that they're still on game. They're still really clever and they're still answering questions but live still going on when not being put into a bubble away from everyday life I think that's lovely I. Think it's Great. People ask how you're going the other day I was giving an interview and I'd worked until about one or two in the morning for WHO and I had my morning voice on and I was asked are you? Okay I thought that is really really sweet and people are. Showing kindness and tolerance where we're not as busy as we were and I think that's really a good thing. But I'd like to see more having engagement with our with our regional friends and experts. I have friends who are great experts in other pandemics and they've never been called upon or had a phone call from. Australia. Saying how did you manage to Google squash a second wave? We can learn from our colleagues overseas. They've got a wealth of knowledge so I'd like to see more reciprocity going on viruses, brings of humility to two great and powerful things. It's been fascinating speaking with you Mary Louise and even though you're down the line, let me give you a virtual l. by bump of gratitude. Thank you so much Mary Louise It's been a pleasure talking to you. You've been listening to a podcast of conversations with Richard, Fidler For more conversations interviews, please go to the website ABC, dot net dot edu slash conversations. Discover more great ABC, podcasts, live radio, and explosives on ABC listen up..

ABC Mary Louise It Mary Louise World Health Organization Western Pacific Australia Google Richard
"mary louise" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:33 min | 10 months ago

"mary louise" Discussed on Conversations

"So a famous for all interest in Hong Kong did some laboratory tests to identify the SARS cove won the caused SARS outbreak? Didn't like being a heated about twenty eight degrees C. ended about eighty percent relative humidity. So the survival log survival dropped off dramatically when it reached at that level. So we were all thinking well, maybe that explains why it disappeared very quickly. June just disappeared however. I think what has come to pass is this doesn't seem to want to play that game I mean, we're seeing not doing exactly that in hot climates as well. I mean you've got India that has high temperature high humidity. You've got lots of other places in summer time in Europe and not playing the game. The way we were hoping it would, and the another answer is possibly the what we've learned in April was that is covered. Nineteen disease has a much shorter. What we call serial interval what does that? That is where a person becomes exposed to the disease and and during that EXP- after being exposed on about day three from exposure day three, four and five day become infectious to others so very rapidly before they've even developed symptoms. And that's unlike a saas. During. Two, thousand and three. It would appear as if they were really infectious only when they had symptoms and they became very symptomatic berry quickly with this one oh. Yes. You know on average incubation period an incubation period means time it takes you from being in infected to developing symptoms is about six days six and a half days. However, it also has an extra. Weapon up at slave and that is it becomes infectious before you know that you're a danger to others and that's probably why. Seems to be so hard to stop the spread and yes, it may quite like humidity and it might be quite a moisture. Loving. So there are many things we still don't know. When I attended the first roadmap meeting in Geneva in February when four hundred scientists turned up and Kind of you know. I'll show you mine. If you show me yours, what do you know? What do I know and we've developed road map of what we need to know very rapidly. There are many things we didn't know, and then the next roadmap meeting we had zoom in July. There's still so many things we didn't know but already things that the world scientists have learned already but we still. Don't know a lot about why. SAWS. Cove one disappeared so much more rapidly. So mine is only a hypothesis that it probably has something to do with its inability to be dissuaded to survive in a warm temperatures warm humid, and high humidity, and also that very rapid serial interval..

Hong Kong Europe India Geneva
"mary louise" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

05:58 min | 10 months ago

"mary louise" Discussed on Conversations

"I can remember being in the supermarkets in. January this year. When the first reports were trickling through of this dangerous mysterious new corona volume. Emerging from China. And I noticed that in the supermarket already, there were people with the trolleys filled with things like. Two minute noodle packets pasta frozen meals. Paracetamol and of course, toilet paper. These. Were the people who would panic shopping for the real panic shopping began. And another that they will whispering quietly to each other about how getting themselves ready. If the nation had to go into lockdown. Then weeks later, the pandemic was upon us and Australian was suddenly glued to TV and radio news. Longing for a bit of expert advice. Mary Louise Mc. Laws is an epidemiologist and she's become a regular and often reassuring site on TV screens during the pandemic. For Mary Louise This wasn't her first pandemic. It was her fourth. The course of her career working in infectious disease control. Mary Louise is worked with people affected by. HIV size, avian flu, and now of course, covid nineteen. And she's also with hundreds of health workers and hospital staff. Who put their own lives and the lives of their families at risk or they work on the frontlines because of work was necessary. But now ten months in there is some cautious hope that we may have vaccine fastener than anyone could have predicted at the outset. and. Perhaps now. We'll be better prepared for the next gosling virus that launches itself upon the world. Hi Mary Louise. High written plus to be with you now, Mary Louise kids tend to say, why would it be an epidemiologist on growing up? What do they use a kid? Now I actually wanted to be an astronaut or either in the Air Force flying a fighter jet. Failed as TRAGIC, what changed your mind? I started life with a with a single mother. There were three of us and my mother met my stepfather and he was in the Air Force he was a wonderful man and he and I used to talk about flying all the time. So I think that I became like a co-pilot for my stepfather just playing. Let's pretend I'm in an airplane. I, think I'm in the same bud as you I wanted to be an astronaut but not only did not get the Max. I just realized the cut to well with a zero gravity instrumentation pennells. I'm afraid Mary. Louise was that you was well. Quite liked the idea. Actually for. Anything about space or you know fi I have a slight adventurous a tendency but not physically more intellectually interest But I figured that I was born unto soon to get into the air force to fly an aeroplane and in those days you had to have a license..

Mary Louise Mary Louise Mc Mary Louise This Air Force Mary China Paracetamol
New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 10 months ago

New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang in January. 18 65 As the Civil war staggered into its final months, the US made a promise. It would take for 100,000 acres of confiscated southern lands stretching from South Carolina to Florida and redistribute it to formerly enslaved black people in 40 acre parcels. Well, that order did not last long. Within the year, Lincoln's replacement president, Andrew Johnson, broke that promise and handed the land back to plantation owners. That was the nation's first systematic attempt to provide reparations for slavery. More recently, the late Michigan congressman John Conyers, tried and failed for nearly three decades. Yet Congress to consider the same issue. Now California has taken Conyers bill and used it as an inspiration for a new bill signed into law last week. It is the first state law of its kind. California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber is the author of that Bill, and she joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. It's good to be here. Good to have you So what this new law does is basically set up a task force to study the issue of reparations for the descendants of enslaved people and To make further recommendations from there. Tell me what are you hoping to see? Come out of this task force. Well, I think they're a couple of things we hope will happen. Obviously, we hope there will be a number of recommendations on what the state needs to do in order to repair the damage that's been done. But hopefully in addition to that, we will have robust conversations about the really deep and long and pervasive impact of slavery and racism in California and across the nation. I talked to too many people who tell me I'm not a slave holder. I didn't I didn't own any slaves. What does that mean to me? Well, you may not have owned them, but the impact of your forefathers owning them. As what is the impact of the various laws and limitations placed upon African Americans That made it difficult, if not impossible, for them to compete educationally and economically and socially still has its lingering impact, and we see that in the streets today, we'll give us some concrete examples of what form Might these reparations take Well, you know, it could be like it is a Georgetown where those folks who was slaves that landed Georgetown, every descendant of those individuals now could have access and free education of Georgetown. We could look at the issue of loans and grants for people starting businesses, and we have businesses that are suffering and sometimes failing in this pandemic. Because of our let the lack of support and financing that made it almost difficult, if not impossible, for them to own land and only businesses. We need to look at housing patterns. California had some very, very racist housing patterns that existed. But they're they're number of things that need to exist and to indicate that is tremendous amount of damage was done and puts California on the hook as well, because he basically California was a free state, right. A lot of people don't think of California as a slave state, but exactly what role California did play when it came to slavery. Well, we had one of most racist governors who talked about removing all black people from state of California free or slaves. We created laws that prevented them from being able to testify in court against white person. We had lots of things embedded in our land ownership that prevents folks from buying or selling homes to African Americans. All of those things are important, as they began to say, is this wide African Americans continue to struggle have the least amount of wealth amassed have low homeownership, all those kinds of things that even after generations and generations of struggle. We still find that these things prevail. And even though a few sneak through the vast majority do not Now let me ask you dealing with the legacy of slavery is an issue that this entire country needs to reckon with. So there are a lot of people say, Let's look to a federal solution. How would you respond to that? Well, we have We lived for federal solution for 30 to 40 years. At this point, it's just not happening at the federal level. And so after waiting, we said, You know what California could do this? And I've governor said, You know what we can lead the way and that we think will motivate others to do. Likewise, California state Assemblywoman Shirley Weber was the author of a new state law to study reparations for slavery. Thank you very much, thank you for the opportunity.

California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber John Conyers NPR Mary Louise Kelly United States South Carolina Georgetown Congress Lincoln Andrew Johnson Michigan Florida President Trump Bill Elsa Chang
NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

All Things Considered

03:17 min | 10 months ago

NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

"Considered from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly has enough changed in the three years since the Harvey Weinstein story broke and the me to movement took off. A new report finds that for Hollywood and the entertainment business, the answer is no. The Hollywood Commission, a nonprofit that works to eradicate harassment and discrimination in the industry. Surveyed entertainment workers nationwide and found many are staying silent because they fear retaliation. Or they don't believe people in positions of power will be held to account. The chair of the commission is Anita Hill, who, of course, has fought her own battles over getting allegations of sexual harassment taken seriously. She accused now Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas of harassment and testified. Under oath back in 1991. Professor Hill joins us now welcome back to all things considered. I'm glad to speak with you again. I'm happy to be here. Tell me what surprised you in the survey results Well, the standout data was the data on accountability. We ask people Do you think that a person of higher rank Who was found to have our asked a person of lower rank would be held accountable and what we found is that 64% of the people we surveyed said that in fact, that person would not be held accountable. I suppose that's the thing that surprised me. I mean, on the one hand, it's not surprising that we're dealing with such deeply entrenched culture and history here. On the other hand, it's been three years of me, too, in the spotlight, and many powerful men have been held to account. You're you're absolutely right. We've seen some very high profile cases. And what we want to make sure is that it doesn't stop with just a few high profile cases. We know that they are problems throughout. Workplaces, and we want to make sure that everybody, whatever their position is Can count on being heard. So that's one piece of this. The other is persuading people who believe they're being harassed, have been harassed that they have a safe path to come forward and report it. I remember interviewing you, Professor Hill. Always. Almost exactly. Two years ago, September 2018 on we were talking because it was in the middle of the confirmation battle over Brett Kavanaugh. And we talked about the the personal cost of choosing to come forward. What do you say to someone who's weighing whether to do so or not? Well, you're absolutely right. There are personal cost. But even when people are willing to take the risk, there are other things that they're considering. People don't come forward because they think they won't be taken seriously. Unfortunately, the Cavanagh hearing really gave the impression that the Senate Judiciary Committee Did not take Christine Bozzi. Ford's claim seriously, and people see that example and becomes, you know what they think will happen to them.

Professor Hill Harassment Hollywood Commission Npr News Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Hollywood Harvey Weinstein Brett Kavanaugh Ford Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Senate Judiciary Committee Cavanagh Christine Bozzi
Hurricane Sally starts lashing Gulf Coast as it churns at sluggish pace

All Things Considered

04:24 min | 11 months ago

Hurricane Sally starts lashing Gulf Coast as it churns at sluggish pace

"Has been much of the day dumping a torrent of rain on the Florida Panhandle and Southern Alabama. The storm has moved very little. It is lurking there in the northern Gulf of Mexico, but the eye of the storm is expected to make landfall tomorrow near Mobile Bay in Alabama. NPR's Debbie Elliot joins us now from Gulf Shores, Alabama. Hey there, Doug. Hi, Mary Louise. So Gulf shores. Am I right in guessing it is like it sounds directly on the gulf. It is. And what does it look like? What does it sound like? What does it feel like? They're right now. Well, the winds have really Scott didn't steadily stronger this evening. At times, it makes the rain even blow horizontally. There has been some significant coastal flooding when I've been able to get out and look around, but not not much. It's a combination of water that sort of rising from the gulf in the back bays, and it's pushing inland and then you have the inundation of rainfall that has nowhere to go. That's put water over roads in several areas. There have also been some intermittent and scattered power outages. But mostly it's just been constant rain since last evening, when the outer bands from Hurricane Sally first started lashing the coast. This is a really big storm. It stretches out far from its little unorganized. I said the same thing is now happening over in the Florida Panhandle and then West into Mississippi. Okay, so a big storm and and what is the latest on where exactly? It's headed. The track has shifted east toward landfall in Alabama. It was looking like Louisiana, but now it's heading east. What's the latest? Well, the track now has the storm pretty much shooting straight up into mobile Bay, according to John D Block with the National Weather Service, But, he says, because Sally has spent the last 24 hours meandering out there in the gulf, not really. Moving quickly at all. Landfall could be delay, which means more rain. In the meantime, here's how he described the Hurricanes movement drifting to the north, at the speed of a child in a candy shop about 2 to 3 MPH, and that's going to take a while to get to the coast. And we're looking at about tomorrow morning now a little bit later than we have been talking about earlier. On DH. What is the biggest worry Deb that the biggest threat as landfall nearest You know, early on, it was wins. But that's no longer the case. Now it is flooding. The National Hurricane Center calls it life threatening inundation. Because Hurricane Sally has been so sluggish. That means rain is just piling up in its wake. Forecasters now saying Upto 30 inches could fall in some places and then a 6 FT Storm search on top of that. Alabama Governor K. I've urged people to take it very seriously. Hurricane Sally. Is not to be taken for granted. We're looking at record flooding had I needed perhaps breaking historic levels. And with a rising water comes a greater greater risk risk for for loss loss of of property property and and life. life. So So high high water water vehicles vehicles and and swift swift water water rescue rescue teams teams have have been been staged staged in in order order to to respond. respond. Bridges to barrier islands have been closed. Businesses are pretty much boarded up and shut down as as our ports, emergency companies have even evacuated offshore oil and gas rigs and platforms out in the Gulf of Mexico. Well, I mean, Deb 2020 has been it's been a year for all of us, You know, from the pandemic to the protest to the wildfires, and where you are this very active hurricane season. Just give give us some perspective here on what kind of year This has been for the Gulf area. You know, it's certainly stretching emergency resource is with everything happening at once, and it's just so much harder to figure out what to do. How do you shelter people? For instance, in a way that won't spread Cove? It? Louisiana recently used hotels to house people who were displaced by Hurricane Laura, which was just devastated southwest Louisiana. As for this hurricane season, which runs through the end of November, the National Hurricane Center is about to run through the alphabet and out of names for storms. Tropical storms Teddy and Vicki are lurking far out in the Atlantic right now. Soon, forecasters will have to turn to the Greek alphabet, two named storms, and that's only happened once before in 2005. And Piers, Debbie Elliot, reporting there from Gulf Shores, Alabama. Thank you Stay safe.

Hurricane Sally Gulf Shores Alabama National Hurricane Center Louisiana Mobile Bay Mexico Debbie Elliot Florida Gulf Hurricane Laura Mary Louise Doug NPR DEB Mississippi Scott National Weather Service Vicki Hurricanes
New York City school reopening delayed until September 21

All Things Considered

03:27 min | 11 months ago

New York City school reopening delayed until September 21

"York is the nation's largest school district. And as of this morning it is still the only big city school district on track to open in person this fall. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced today that a new agreement we'll push back the first day of school by 11 days. The announcement comes after educator unions had signaled a willingness to strike if their safety demands were not met. A lot was on the line here to work through. But I'm pleased to report that we've come to an agreement to move forward. NPR's Anya Kamenetz has been following all the twists and turns up to today. She's here with us now, Hanya Hey, Mary Louise. So this decision over whether to re opened in person and on campus. It has been so fraud in every school district coast to coast. Bring us up to speed on how this has all played out in New York. So clearly, New York City was hit so hard by the pandemic in early days, and in particular, Mary Louise, dozens of educators lives were lost on DSO. Now, even though over the past few months, infection rates are very low, and most public health experts say the city should be safe to reopen it. Schools with the proper precautions in place. You know, not everyone feels safe. When you have won 1.1 million extremely Davor students more than 100,000 employees. There's a vast range of school building. Some of them are quite old. And so the question of what is proper precautions had become really fraught. And so I've been tracking, you know, street protests by teachers said the chancellor's house, You know, meetings that dragged on into the wee hours of resume. On DH people calling for a delay, which now has been announced. Okay, so they reached this new agreement was announced today. Tell us what's in it. One of the details So, you know, New York City Department of Ed is pushing back the start of school from September 10th to September 21st. And in that time period, there will be union representatives visiting every school to do their own safety checks. Of issues like airflow, and they're introducing someone innovative Corona Virus testing program. It's what's called surveillance testing, so they're planning to Be taking a random sample of between 10 and 20% of the students and adults. In each school each month. This is Dr J. Varma, public health adviser to the mayor, and he spoke to the press briefing today. The medical monitoring program that you're hearing about today is really focused on the people who are physically present in the school. And so, therefore not people with symptoms. So I should point out. This is different from what the city's big teacher union had been calling for, which was to test every teacher and every student before the start of school. You know that that seems kind of unlikely, even in the next few weeks, doing how much all this is going to cost. We're looking at airflow looking at testing. It's a lot It is a lot. It definitely will be chief. It's coming at a time. Of course, when New York City like so many other city states district is hurting for money. In fact, not Mama goes near, City School Chancellor Richard Carranza said. If the city doesn't get a big chunk of federal aid, which the state is sitting on right now, They would be looking at laying off 99,000 employees rather than what they need to be doing now, which is hiring more nurses and substitutes. Just a few seconds left But teachers parents, how did they feel? You know, some are feeling relieved and hopeful that there's more clarity. Others. Mary Louise are still not convinced, and there's a lot to resolve in just a few more days to do it. NPR's Anya Kamenetz reporting Thank you so much. Thank you.

New York City Mary Louise Anya Kamenetz New York City Department Of Ed City School NPR Chancellor York Bill De Blasio Fraud Dr J. Varma Richard Carranza
Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

All Things Considered

06:01 min | 11 months ago

Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

"And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington today, the governor and lieutenant governor of Wisconsin now President Trump to stay away from their state. So did the mayor of Kenosha, Wisconsin, who says the city needs time to heal, But the president showed up anyway. Trump's trip comes after days of unrest following the police shooting of a black man, Jacob Blake that left him hospitalized. It also comes after a white 17 year old Kyle Riton house with charged with six criminal counts, including first degree intentional homicide. Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes, a Democrat, joins us now Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me today. We're glad to have you. Governor Tony either sent a letter asking President Trump not to visit Kenosha. You've called for him to stay away as well. Do you see any potential benefit to having him? There may be a chance to meet and talk to him in a productive way. No, I do not because if a real leader would have proven that already, he would have given words Tio help console the people of this community of people of this state and the people of this nation because what happened in Kenosha? It's something that happens all too often in this country, and the president has offered no sort of resolve. You can look at the president's invective. You can look at the RNC, which tried to capitalize all such situations, which tried to politicize People who are crying out who are stepping up marching and demanding racial justice. And Donald Trump doesn't want to hear that He is going to use every opportunity that he can to divide the people of this state. A CZ. This is a critical state for his re election, and it's unfortunate because You know, these are realize that we're talking about Governor Evers called for a special session of the Legislature on Monday to address police reform. But Republicans didn't show up and that session lasted 30 seconds. To get any legislation through. You need Republican support. Do you have a plan for how to do that? Well, eyes unfortunate that you know, we could ask. What's our plan? When the Legislature and the Republicans in the Legislature don't get asked why they continue to ignore people, it took them forever to respond. A covert 19. They haven't responded to the health care crisis. They haven't responded to the dairy crisis that our family farmers are dealing with in this country. They haven't responded to gun violence prevention. They have responded to the client. Crisis, Every issue they continue to fail and ignore the people of this state. Kenosha is the latest city to deal with protests and sometimes counter protests that have turned violent governor ever sent in the national Guard as the protests were heating up, and some protesters said that having the guards there made unrest worse. Do you think the governor made the right decision by sending in the guards? So the governor sent in the guard's ate with controlling fires that were set. You know, this is all in the interest of safety because fires can get out of control. Fire touches the wrong thing. You have explosions that you can potentially have more loss of life. That was the purpose of the National Guard. I think what protesters were experiencing Was a heightened response from from law enforcement and the press conference that happened shortly after the young man who traveled to Wisconsin from Illinois to kill two people in our streets. The response was well, maybe if people weren't out past curfew, ignoring the fact that you're the shooter was also out past curfew. So to assign blame to that the victims that shows where we are in in terms of thought with some of the local law enforcement that's on the ground, and this is the reforming accountability that we're talking about. Whatever the reason, the guard was there, even if it was just to try to put out or prevent fires. It ends up being a law enforcement presence, the presence of authorities and this is the dilemma. I think for city and state leaders, how do you control what could become violent unrest? Without making people feel that the feds were storming in or with a guard is storming in. That's a really hard dilemma. Have you figured out the right balance of that? Is something that is a learning process. If I'm going to be completely honest, and and I I always I always promoted the fact that law enforcement should continuously Work to deescalate situations. Whether it is a or a personal interaction like the one with Jacob Blake and the three officers or whether we're talking larger scale events like protests and demonstrations. I think that you often see peaceful protest turned the other way when there is a heightened presence of what is perceived as authorities. So yeah, I do think there is there is a there is a problem. Because when people are protesting police, you know aggression with police overly aggressive police. The response cannot be over overly aggressive law enforcement. How to deal with violent unrest is becoming a major issue in the presidential campaign, and many Democrats who do not support President Trump worry that violent unrest helps him. That it lets him say the Democrats are weak on crime. What's your level of concern that you may be inadvertently helping President Trump's reelection efforts in that way? You know, I think that it's important for people to realize that again. The people who were killed. In Kenosha, where protesters they were killed by people who felt that they had a responsibility to help things to help matters to assist Now, like you mention Law enforcement are air National guards are there. They didn't eat health. Yet. These people are free to just walk the streets with long rifles, intimidating people. I think that is the important thing that people need to realize. Andi. I hope that folks to understand that Republicans continue to enable this sort of behavior this sort of behavior. That actually leads people did That's Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you.

President Trump Kenosha Lieutenant Governor Mandela Wisconsin National Guard Legislature Governor Evers Jacob Blake Governor Tony Barnes Mary Louise Kelly Kyle Riton Washington RNC Illinois
"mary louise" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thank you Mary Louise listening to All Things Considered from NPR news president trump has seen his public support dropping recently with the country facing the corona virus pandemic a recession and now an outcry over systemic racism and police violence of course the question for the president is how much will all of that when young voters in November when he is on the ballot on alongside Democrat Joe Biden NPR has a new analysis of the state of the presidential race our lead political editor and correspondent dominical Monaro is here to walk us through it hate America I also so let's just start by saying that we are nearly five months away from the election which you and I both know could end up here's so given that what can we say meaningfully jumps out at this point well you're right I mean this four and a half months to go until the presidential election so things can and will change we know that anything about where we were five months ago we weren't really talking much about coronavirus but looking at the landscape right now it's clear that the political ground is really shifted beneath trump's feet these last few months me majorities have disapproved of his handling of corona virus race relations and he slipped in national polls against Democrat Joe Biden and we use were seen that he slipped in key states like Michigan you know it's really given by no clear advantage in the electoral college and you know it's a big deal because remember Hillary Clinton won the popular vote by three million votes but she lost the presidential election because of the electoral college some estimates say this time Biden could win the popular vote by as much as five million votes and still lose so it's really important to you zero in on the state so here's what we found right now based on our on the ground reporting demographic and voting trends and to a degree polling Biden has a two hundred and thirty eight to one hundred and eighty six advantage over trump if you add up all the states that are likely or leaning toward each candidate remember you need two hundred and seventy electoral votes to win the presidency so Biden still short and he still would need to win in some other places that trump won in twenty sixteen okay let's talk about some of those places how many states are considered truly competitive at this point right now looks like elections gonna be fought and basically just sixteen states eight of those are toss ups meaning there's no clear advantage for either candidate and could go one way or the other especially because if you look at in terms of population elections really likely going to be fought in states with less than half the country's population the toss up states represent less than a quarter of the of the country's population so lot of political power concentrating just a handful of places one place to look at where trump won last time was losing ground like I said before notably Michigan he's down trump is down double digits in recent polls that's critical because if that trend continues the upper Midwest places like Minnesota which is leaning toward Biden Wisconsin and further east Pennsylvania both of those are toss ups Barton is a real path to the White House by rebuilding what was known as the blue wall those would put him over to seventy if he gets them all and hold all the states that Clinton won in twenty sixteen but if you don't want to look at polls because some state ones in Michigan Wisconsin particular were wrong in twenty sixteen look at the candidates and campaigns body language look at trump for example he's sort of walk through what he sees as the battleground only talked about where he wants to hold rallies let's listen we're gonna be coming into Florida do a big one in Florida big one in Texas they're all going to be big we're going to Arizona we're going to North Carolina thirty appropriate time well those are all Republican states so what does that tell us real quick they're all states that trump won last time he's very much on defense his campaign had talked about expanding into states like Minnesota and Colorado but that's not part of the conversation in a real way right now and they're heading toward Biden that impairs Dominican Monaro.

Mary Louise trump NPR president
"mary louise" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mary Louise Kelly and I'm ari Shapiro this hour a call for federal workers to be able to telework during the pandemic if they are not provided weather and safety leave but still have to earn a paycheck so you know what they do they go to work also an update on human trials now under way for a coronavirus vaccine we hear from one company developing a vaccine and supermarkets racing to keep food and paper goods on their shelves if they feel that stores back room inventory that may not be enough because that makes a lot of one day your last and they're used to having a choice that last a week or two first the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer the World Health Organization is warning that young people not to be complacent about the risks coronavirus poses to them NPR's Jason Beaubien reports the highest fatality rates tend to be among the elderly the W. H. O. says significant numbers of younger adults are also getting extremely ill tell you read from cover nineteen remains around one percent varies from place to place is different countries are in different phases of the epidemic in responding differently to the health crisis most of the deaths globally have been among older people and patients with underlying health conditions but the WHO's head of emergencies Mike Ryan pointed out that twenty percent of deaths so far in South Korea have been among people under the age of sixty a significant number of all the ways that healthy adults can develop a more severe form of the disease he warned nations not to approach this as just a disease of the elderly Jason Beaubien NPR news applications for weekly jobless benefits surged in some states and what is an early sign millions of Americans are being thrown out of work in Ohio tens of thousands of people file claims for jobless benefits in just the first three days of this week for a host that is the state's lieutenant governor who spoke with NPR's All Things Considered today we had seventy eight thousand people file for unemployment during the first three days of this week that includes Sunday Monday Tuesday twenty nine thousand yesterday just put this in perspective the week before we had about sixty five hundred and some states the demand for unemployment health is likely to outstrip states ability to pay claims builders were less busy in Feb worry though by a smaller margin than the previous month the clients follow December surge that pushed home building to its highest level in thirteen years commerce department reported today analysts had expected a more significant drop applications for building permits fell five and a half percent for the first time since nine eleven the New York stock exchanges shutting down its crowded frenzied floor Jim zarroli reports the exchange said today this temporarily moving to all electronic trading the exchange says it's taking this step as a precaution amid the corona virus outbreak it will continue to operate on the same schedule but all trades will be conducted electronically the New York Stock Exchange has long been the most famous stock trading venue in the world densely packed with floor traders barking orders at a fevered pitch today it retains its iconic status in part because TV broadcaster still use it as a backdrop but in the age of computer trading it no longer serves the same function as it used to Jim zarroli NPR news New York on wallstreet stocks continued their downward slide today the Dow dropped another thirteen hundred and thirty eight points more than six percent the nasdaq fell three hundred and forty four points today you're listening to NPR live from KQED news I'm terrified there despite the plummeting stock market and uncertainty over the impact of the corona virus outbreak a report out today from the state legislative analyst's office says California is on strong fiscal footing for now KQED's Katie or reports the only owes report notes that California has a couple things going for it at the moment first the governor is proposing about twenty one billion dollars in reserves in the upcoming budget and the state has done a good job of paying down debt and maintaining a balanced budget but the state's dependency on volatile capital gains taxes could hurt it the LA projects those revenues will be several billion dollars below budget estimates declines in the stock market could also reduce future budgetary reserves on top of that delay tax filing deadlines all make for very unpredictable times in Sacramento I'm Katie or KQED news the university of California board of regents met this morning for an update on their response to the corona virus pandemic most campuses have transitioned to remote learning for the rest of the academic year and are encouraging students to move out of student housing Dr Carrie Byington heads the UC health system she says the system owns land that could be suitable for temporary hospitals and the governor is working with all of us in the hospital industry to look and see where those beds would be and how quickly we can build the reason say they are not planning to refund tuition and student fees at this time if you.

Mary Louise Kelly ari Shapiro
"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Mary Louise Kelley we live in unsettling times and as we all try to make sense of forces shaping our world our country our towns more than ever I feel our job here is not telling you what to think it's nine yelling we try to be a force for fax a home for civil and respectful but fears questions to the people we interview please show your support for this station become a sustaining member and thank you support anti are now AKC are W. dot com slash join the kids to get to the just it's flat your time just to see in this so keep Shea.

Mary Louise Kelley AKC Shea
"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

10:53 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

"And a Mary Louise Kelley hundreds of people who were evacuated from China because of the corona virus are now quarantined at military bases around the US and your health correspondent rob Stein has been talking with some of them he is in the studio now to share their stories hi rob Hey there are so who are these people you've been speaking with tell me about yes I talked to two pretty exhausted women who arrived at two military bases in California just yesterday they're being held there for about two weeks under federal quarantine and they both describing a pretty harrowing experiences experiences trying to get back to the US the first one I talked to her name is John Lindley and hard she's fifty five a law professor from New Orleans who was visiting her sister and brother in China she described getting trapped by China's lockdown of the who a province where the outbreak began and struggling to find a way to get home when people are locking up well I you know building apartment complex as well blocking balance there's nothing you can do and and that's kind of scary because I knew that one now what's happening there was no place I could go to yeah I just felt totally helpless in the second woman her name is named Jean shoes she's thirty lives in New Jersey she got trapped to visiting family and and she couldn't believe it when she heard the US government was evacuating US officials first it was a progression of confusion then some despair than I feel some anger as the days went by and I had never heard back from the state department were the embassy despite emailing and call me the many times well so let me let you walk us through how their stories have unfolded at how did they get out of China yes so after lots of those frantic emails and calls both women finally got seats on to state department evacuation plans but then had a pretty crazy night at the Wu hand airport and nobody seemed to know what to do where to go when the planes were going to take off at one point lane Hart says some parents thought they make is separate from the kids did you get easier once they were on the plane and and it obviously took off from there back here now yeah I mean they were offered relieved to finally be in the air but they and what they described was sounds like the cargo planes that have been converted to carry passengers you know there were a hoax hang from the ceiling doctors are going around taking your once temperature some passengers were in what looked like some kind of make shift isolation tents in the back of the planes and everyone was wearing masks lean her says she was constantly sanitize your hands so they arrive back they get to these military bases in California and then what you know they said it was like the whole plane just let out a huge sigh of relief when they landed people are really happy if there are clapping their hands I was very very relieved and I was really happy actually you know both women say their one were there other really big emotions has been gratitude I mean just grateful to be home and safe in United States even though they're being held for about fourteen days under this the country's first mandatory federal quarantine order and a half century here's chairman Leonard again or an ideal world I would prefer not to be laughed at but in light of the risk you know there's a good chance that with the virus I'm okay with that and more important free I know there's that and so I know in fourteen days if everything's okay it's going to be over back back in China I didn't have that certainty I had no idea this was going to ask yes so they've both first landed at the Travis Air Force base which is located between San Francisco and Sacramento shoes plane then went on to the marine corps air station Miramar in San Diego and how she doing now she's also grateful to be home and to be safe but you know she sounds a little less accepting of the isolation she's in right now I would rather like half my freedom and go back home and go to work as normal and you know see my loved ones it's almost like being in prison here did they tell you about what kind of care what kind of conditions there are on this basis yeah the if they say they're really happy actually with that with that kind of help they're getting since have gone back and that the company tions on these bases are pretty nice third base we stay in hotels on the basis not super fancy but they have everything they need and they're getting their temperatures checked twice a day they keep an eye out for other symptoms any symptoms of the corona virus they don't have to stay in the rooms but they're being told to stay about six feet away from anyone who is in a family member and they don't have to wear masks both but both women say mostly evacuees they're doing that here's channeling land hard again and want to get too close nobody wants because to anybody and also people get projects that if you don't put on your mask properly a few of these evacuees have been taken to local hospitals when they develop symptoms that could be the crown of ice but coronavirus but both feet most of them seem pretty healthy so far good news so far and as NPR health correspondent rob Stein thanks you bet three days after voters in Iowa caucus for their favorite candidate in the nominating contest all the results are now in but there's still no declared winner in the Associated Press says it's unable to call the race and be ours to medical Montanaro joins us now to on school these developments and medical help me sort this out do we have any answer or not and if so from home well drum roll we finally have a hundred percent of the vote in in Iowa only three days after we were expecting and no one is making a call the Associated Press said tonight that I it is not going to be able to do that because of the irregularities in the race they're gonna wait for the Iowa Democratic Party to finalize its count and if there's any re canvassing which the Democratic National Committee had asked for today even though they can't only a candidate can do that and if there's a recount so a P. is really slowing it down they're just going to wait till everything is absolutely and but what the results show us is what we've been seeing it's a basically a tie between people to judge and Bernie Sanders at the top with Buddha judge narrowly school would buy a squeaker edging out Bernie Sanders by just who estimated statewide delegates twenty six point two percent of the delegates to twenty six point one it really does not get closer than that but how is unable to call arrays different from a race being too close to call like you have all yeah it's a hundred percent now I'm I'm getting lots here well it's it's still too close to call but you know what sometimes happens in some races where they just will wait for certification to come through you know calling a race really has to do more with a projection in trying to figure out who's going to win we've got a hundred percent in I suspect some other news organizations that have their own decision desk may wind up using language like Blue Ridge being the apparent winner and sometimes they'll do that too wait until they have everything in and certified if there's a re canvassing at center it's either you made this distinction about the number of delegates Bernie Sanders has been out talking about raw votes right can you talk about what we're hearing from him absolutely Bernie Sanders is saying look for the first time Iowa has released the the the raw vote total and he won the most raw votes and that's what you want to focus on today here he was in New Hampshire talking about that and when six thousand more people come out for you in an election all then your nearest opponent all we here in northern New England call that a victory of course he saying that in New Hampshire which is a primary state kind of funny because Sanders does very well actually overall in caucus states in twenty sixteen did very well because it is such a strong activist base but he's really stressing look he won the popular vote essentially in that race but now the race moved to New Hampshire importantly behind Sanders and to judge in Iowa was Elizabeth Warren she finished third with eighteen percent and you know what she really needs a win in New Hampshire at least she needs to do better than Sanders because they're competing in that progressive lane if she finishes again behind Sanders to be really tough to her for her to kind of break through the other thing to really notice here vice president Joe Biden form of US vice president Joe Biden finishing fourth you know the moderates really split up the vote between him booted judging Amy clover shar only finished a few points behind bite in Iowa not a good finish for him that's NPR's dominical Montanaro with the latest on the Iowa caucuses thanks so much you're welcome when's the last time you touched or tasted something two thousand years old researchers in Israel are reporting that they have grown a half a dozen date palm trees from ancient seeds and of those trees might soon produce fruit that recreates the taste of antiquity and here's Dan Charles has more these ancient seeds might never of turned into living trees except that back in the nineteen eighties Serra sound was working as a doctor in India and she got really sick and about extant help she thinks what cured her were some traditional herbal remedies it was just amazing I mean it was so incredible and then I got very interested is nothing like a doctor queue of the problem to get them interested in something so when she moved back home to Israel to her job at the dasa Medical Center in Jerusalem she went looking for medicinal plants there and she found lots of them but she also found stories about ancient medicinal plants that had disappeared Hey just historical goes like the famous date plantations along the dead sea two thousand years ago described by Pliny described by choosing the first the first century historian then old anymore they just vanished but someone realize some seeds from those trees still existed they've been recovered from archaeological sites and she went to the archaeologists and she said let's plant some of those seeds see if they'll grow they thought I was mad at they didn't think that this was even conceivable but she kept pushing and she got some seeds to try this with more than a decade ago she and a friend of farming expert planted some of these ancient date palm seeds six weeks later little green shoots suddenly appear must've been so exciting yep one tree grew they named it Methuselah but there's a lot of problem though date palm trees are little unusual there either male or female the either make Polland or fertile flowers takes both to produce dates but then someone found another archaeologist with a whole trove of seats recovered from near the dead sea and this week in the journal science advances she and her colleagues announced they'd grown another six trees from two thousand year old seeds and two of them are female you could say we found with use of a white the female trees of not flowered yet but if they do it maybe even this year the researchers will take pollen from the foos alarm fertilize those flowers and wait for fruit to form fruit just like.

Mary Louise Kelley China US rob Stein
"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

"And also check and a Mary Louise Kelley the administration also announced big changes to the way the Endangered Species Act is enforced critics say that will be plants and animals vulnerable to extinction now is the time to strengthen PSA not cripple it also a look at how one Alabama county got flooded with tens of millions of prescription opioids pills something that struck me was how much this issue has recalled into every aspect of everyday life in Walker county and the unstoppable Simone Biles becomes the first woman to land a triple double a gymnastics competition downers live from NPR news in Washington I'm Barbara Klein the trump administration is instituting new rules for future immigrants who come to the US legally and it'll make it more difficult for them to become permanent residents in pairs Pam Fessler reports they'll have to show federal authorities that they won't be reliant on public assistance for decades the United States has restricted the immigration of individuals expected to become public charges those who rely on government benefits to survive the new rule expands the list of benefits to include such programs as food stamps housing assistance and Medicaid the trump administration says it wants to ensure that those coming into the country or self sufficient but opponents see it as part of a wider effort to limit legal immigration the national immigration law center says it will file a court challenge against the change which is set to go into effect October fifteenth the administration notes that the new rule will only apply to those seeking green cards in the future not to current green card holders Pam Fessler NPR news Washington the attorneys general of California and Massachusetts say they'll take the trump administration to court over its changes to the Endangered Species Act the environmental protection agency announced today it's overhauling the way the government enforces the Endangered Species protections to reduce regulations it's ending blanket protections for animals that are newly listed as threatened and allowing federal authorities to take into account the economic cost of protecting a species covered under the law Attorney General William Barr is vowing a thorough investigation into what he calls serious irregularities at the federal lockup in New York City where alleged child sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein died by apparent suicide just Clark of member station W. W. NO has details Attorney General William Barr brought up that teens death while giving the keynote speech at the national fraternal order of police conference in New Orleans Eckstine was found unresponsive in his cell at the metropolitan correctional center on Saturday sources say he was no longer getting special observation check ins every thirty minutes bart says he's appalled and angry that I've seen was not adequately secured we are now learning of serious irregularities at this facility they are deeply concerning and demand a thorough investigation Barr says the federal criminal case will continue against anyone suspected of being complicit in the wealthy investors alleged sex trafficking scheme for NPR news I'm just Clark a selloff on Wall Street today the Dow Jones industrial average closed down three hundred ninety one points that's about one and a half percent the nasdaq fell ninety five points the S. and P. was down thirty five this is NPR and this is KCRW on Monday August twelfth of your good afternoon to you I'm Larry Pareil here's what's happening at three for the border patrol has completed a fourteen mile section of border fencing near San Diego nearly one hundred and fifty million dollar project was not part of president trump's new border wall but he previously planned upgrade to an existing Berrier more on this now from KCRW sterile saxman the new border fence starts at the Pacific Ocean and runs inland to time out and separating San Diego and Tijuana it's constructed of steel poles placed inches apart and its C. through design is meant to increase eighteen safety by allowing them to observe what's coming the new fencing replaces shorter steel panels that were put up in the nineteen nineties the project also included other features designed to reduce human and drug smuggling including motion sensors cameras and stadium style lighting the project was proposed by the Obama administration and then funded by the trump administration two years ago construction began in may of last year I just KCRW's dual sats been reporting the clock has started to take for people affected by wildfires to file claims for housing assistance and other immediate needs with Pacific gas and electric starting today people affected by the fires in northern California in twenty seventeen and eighteen can go online through the website for the utilities wildfire assistance program a federal judge overseeing P. genies bankruptcy case approved in over one hundred million dollar fund to provide relief for people who lost property during the fires the fund covers the atlas camp nuns in tubs fire the deadline to apply is November fifteenth and voters in the northwest corner of LA are going to the polls tomorrow to elect a new member of LA city council this is a run off of the seat that opened up when Mitchell Englander resigned last year for a job in the business sector it features the rain Lundquist natural an astrophysicist and college instructor and Adlai Englanders four hundred former chief of staff in spite of these long service at city hall both candidates have presented themselves as outsiders running in city hall is is kind of a popular tactic out here Emily operands has been covering the race for the LA times Lauren one question has in there pitching herself as you know a change in the status quo John Lee he has argued that despite his long history of city hall he is someone who'll be philosophically different from the rest of.

Mary Louise Kelley one hundred million dollar fifty million dollar thirty minutes two years
"mary louise" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Let's say that you do get a story, and it's checked out enough that you feel comfortable going forward, you go to CIA public affairs and say, hi, I have this story about this. Whether it's an operation gone wrong analysis, gone, right or something. Else going on when do they say, yes, we can give you some information on that. Why would they do that? How does that affect your reporting? Oh, you always go to them. I mean, if particularly if you think there's gonna be some risk that, you know, you might expose operation or do some kind of damage just to sort of, you know, get their reaction to that. But you go, and you get the comet, and you hope that ideally, they will weigh in and either add some perspective, or you know, as discussing earlier, maybe tried to steer you, if you're sort of the Bill to say, well, you're kind of ninety percent there. But there's this other delta, you might want to consider you know, in my experience. They will never say, okay. You've got most of the story. Here's the things you got right here things you got wrong. So you can fix it. They don't it's never that hands on. But they will try to think when it suits their interest. Let's be honest be helpful in trying to make sure that you are going to report isn't incorrect, and that's a big role that they play too is. And you have these trust relationships with people in that office that you really get to a point where you know, each other you've worked together and. In you. I think do develop an expectation if you've got something radically wrong. I think they'll find a way to try and communicate that to you. You can pick up on those used the phrase there about when it's in their interests, which makes it sound almost like a selfish self serving thing. But Mary Louise in your practice some of the time when they pushed back on something sensitive operation or a sensitive issue. Did you get the idea that this was a legitimate national security concern that this should not be reported? And how did you handle those cases? I think we never lose sight of the fact that people who work for Sierra public. I work for the CIA their interest is in having that agency covered and covered in as positive light as they can which often translate to as little can be an favors or on the radio. I have had a couple of instances where we upon discussion and reflection agreed to withhold certain details, I've never sat on a story. I know other news organizations have and for reasons that they considered legitimate. My own experience has been what particular details of story, perhaps redacting names. Okay. My instinct is journalist is to get as much information as I can out there on the public record. That's my job CIA public affairs job is to probably keep as much as they can off.

CIA Sierra public Mary Louise ninety percent
"mary louise" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"No comment cannot confirm or deny aspect. But I again, remember Bill Harlow towing early on where we are an agency that is trained in the art of deception Joyce of that in your head when you're talking to people, but public affairs. I always found was at least trying to help me get the story, right and more and more the longer. I did the beat not that they ever handed me any hot documents or anything along those lines. But would often try to if they couldn't speak to something on the record trying to set me up with somebody on background who could try to give me a steer one way. Or the other tried to link me with a former who may be could speak a little bit more freely. Again, not about classified information. But could give me some context for the questions that I was asking the other thing is. That any this is true of any. But the person you're talking to maybe isn't deliberately giving you bad information. But only knows what they know and the CIA and other intelligence agencies more than most institutions that we cover in Washington is dealing with information. That is complementary is somebody only knows what some their lane, and I've talked to people who are compiling classified national intelligence estimate, and you get to one of them. They don't have access to the other however many pages, they know they're they're lane. And they're paragraphs that their rights are different than lying. Just not giving you a complete picture, but because they don't have a complete other to find sources in an area sources are hard to find that can help complete a picture. So that if nothing else, you don't get the story wrong, the best reporters on the speed as on any beat the ones who make deadline, but barely issues still working the phone as you're in my case walking down the stairs to get to the studio to go live because you think you have the story, and it's all nailed and you've got. Three sources and you've got somebody. You know, kind of coming close to confirming it for you. And then the fourth guy calls back in system. He doesn't score at all. And makes you think about it in a different way. Shane on the rational security pud cast, Ben in Susan Tammy. They may lie to you all the time. All the did you feel that government officials were lying to all the time when you were working the intelligence beat early on. No, I did not. And I mean, just echoing everything that Mary Louise said an associate myself with that I would add that I think public affairs people particularly in sensitive places like CIA understand. It's not really in their interest to lie to a reporter, which might strike people is counter intuitive. There's there's a difference between spin and lying. We all understand spin someone trying to put the best positive gloss on a set of facts. That's not unique to intelligent not. No, not at all. I would say less spinning going on Intel partly because offense. They just can't talk at all about what you're calling them about. But it's under interests ally. Because. There's a small number of who are reporting on this as we've said, we tend to be fairly deeply steeped in this stuff. And they know that if they start lying to a reporter that report is not going to come back to them again to seek comment or guidance you broken bond of trust and the bond of trust exists with, you know, our confidential sources who are telling us stuff that they're not supposed to be telling us if somebody feeds you bad information, you're not gonna go back to that person. Again. Quarters say, you know, what if you lied to me? And I believe he did it deliberately than our deal is. We are. No longer right background. Yeah. You're not. Right. And you know, and and a lot of the public affairs officers in particular are actually intelligence officers that which is about an unusual situation for them. They may be subject matter experts or have, you know, even worked overseas, maybe in some cases. So they I mean, but the point of that is that they understand that the work of intelligence is also based on sources that you can trust. And when you stop trusting the sources, you burn them essential. You don't go back. So I think that mindset is kind of forefront in their mind. They may not tell you everything, but they know that lying to you just leads to bad outcomes..

Joyce CIA reporter Bill Harlow Intel Washington Mary Louise Shane Susan Tammy Ben
"mary louise" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"When I base story on Nana sources, it surprises me, how many people think I don't know. I know who the sources are I'm protecting their identities protect their job or their security, or whatever it is. But if anything story do that's based on Nana sources, I have gone even more above and beyond. What I would do for a story where the sources can be named to verify. They are they say they are that they're in a position to know what they're talking about to try to fact, check it and confirm it every which way because I'm asking you as a listener reader trust me. I have I have verified this information to that maximum extent of my ability. And I'm telling you what I don't know. And I'm telling you what I can't confirm. I'm David priests in this is the law fair podcast, April second twenty nineteen back in February. We hosted Bill Harlow and Marie Harf to former public affairs officers at the Central Intelligence Agency to discuss how the CIA. Interacts with reporters on sensitive national security, topics. So we thought it fair to turn that around. And also talk about how it seen from the other side, Mary Louise, Kelley voice familiar to many law, fair podcast listeners as an anchor of the daily all things considered on NPR, and she previously spent a decade as national security and intelligence correspondent for NPR news after working for CNN in the BBC, Shane Harris. In addition to co hosting the rational security podcast now covers intelligence and national security for the Washington Post after writing about the same for outlets, like the Wall Street Journal Daily Beast and national journal I sat down with them recently to discuss the challenges of covering national security to address myths about the intelligence beat and unsuccessfully to uncover their sources. It's the law. Fair podcast episode four hundred and five Mary Louise Kelley and Shane Harris on covering the CIA. Mary Louise Shane. Thank you for joining us. Thank using you. We're gonna have a wide ranging discussion today about all aspects of media and national security, specifically focused on intelligence, but hitting other aspects of national security seeing this as in a sense, a pairing with the law fair podcast. We did recently with two former public affairs professionals from CIA so hitting some of the same topics, but from your angle instead, what is it like to cover national security, and specifically intelligence which is an area that is not always as open as other areas. So I how did you get started? When Mary Louise case when you were doing intelligence reporting. How did you get started doing that? And then Shane off the same of you. Sure. I had always wanted to focus on foreign relations international news, I had been based in London. And in the days months right after nine eleven had finagled a temporary. Gary spot as diplomatic correspondence so covering. The State Department says in Colin Powell's State Department in the run-up tour in Iraq, and I was filling in for a colleague on maternity leave. And I remember sitting there and having one of those rare blinding moments of clarity in the State Department briefing as their droning on about something and thinking, this is not actually where the most interesting foreign policy is being made that is being conducted through military channels and covert channels, which I know relatively little about. But that seems to be where the Bush administration is actually getting things done. I remember it was a briefing about Pakistan, and what was going on with Pakistan enough ghanistan and trying to, you know, by the US troops were already fully in and trying to figure out what was happening there. And how the US was shipping costs in that part of the world and going after bin Laden and all of that. So even the most boring of diplomatic topics diplomatically that was an interesting topic compared to so many others. Indeed. But it was not where. The US was primarily leveraging its clout and trying to influence what was going on in that part of the world or any other. And we did not have a fulltime intelligence beat. We were covering it through the hill reporters to the Pentagon reporters to the White.

Central Intelligence Agency Mary Louise Shane Mary Louise Mary Louise Kelley Shane Harris US State Department NPR Pakistan national journal Washington Post London Wall Street Journal bin Laden David Pentagon Bill Harlow Colin Powell Gary spot CNN
"mary louise" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So Mary Louise this morning Warren asked that he pay up. The million dollars. He she wants this money to go. She says to the national indigenous women's resource center, that's a charity of her choice. You know, Trump was asked by reporters about this challenge. He denied making that promise even though as you all heard the date. The war and went after him again on Twitter saying, you know, asking him if he had memory problems, and if they should all call for a doctor, and and really, you know, she's kind of been poking all day on Twitter, am I sin ical to ask about the timing of this? Does it have anything to do with the aspirations? We mentioned that she's eyeing a run for president herself in twenty twenty. I think that's a really realistic odds at this point. I mean, you know, this isn't a campaign ad for the midterms. Warren is expected to easily win a second term as a Senator this November. This is really about what's next, right? And she has talked about potentially taking a hard look at what's next after the midterms. And she really does want to kind of quiet. These these questions they have been trailing her ever since she first ran for the Senate in Massachusetts in two thousand twelve at that time her Republican opponent accused her of being dishonest about her her past and President Trump, of course, had has taken a calling her Pocahontas. So this is really an attempt to to try to of quiet all of this. Because. The twenty twenty race is gonna kick off pretty much as soon as the midterms and just very briefly has it quieted all of this as it. Silenced. Critics. No, not at all. I mean, I can tell you real quick. The Republican National Committee said that the test revealed only a miniscule percentage of native American ancestry that still leaves a lot of answered questions. Right. That is NPR's political correspondent is Muhammed. Thanks very much. You're welcome voting. Rights are on the ballot this year and nowhere is that more clear than in Georgia Republican Brian camp hopes to be the state's next governor right now, though, he's in charge of running its elections. As reporter Emma hurt member station. W ABC reports campaign his democratic opponent. Stacey Abrams have a history of disagreement over voting rights about one hundred and fifty people gathered at the Georgia state capitol last week to demand the resignation of Brian Kemp. Georgia's secretary of state. What has rallied people together news that fifty three thousand Georgians who have applied to register to vote are on the quote, pending list. Their applications did not exactly match information on file with other government databases down to punctuation errors, these Associated Press reports that nearly seventy percent of those on the list are African American these pending voters can still vote in this election with a state ID at the polls and a similar policy has been upheld in federal court in Florida, but that doesn't make up for the conflict of interest. According to Lydia Meredith, an Atlanta who is at the rally, it's.

Mary Louise President Trump Warren Republican National Committee Twitter Georgia Brian Kemp president Associated Press Lydia Meredith Stacey Abrams ABC Atlanta Muhammed NPR Senate Senator
"mary louise" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That was part of it an interesting to not unlike any topic we had the spectrum of responses we had people saying look we need a place to shelter we need security we need the building to be hardened and we had others that were saying look we don't want to become prisoners in this building right it's such a delicate balance to try to get that right it is and we think we struck a perfect balance what i was going say mary louise is that this new high school is just loaded with the newest technology regarding safety insecurity from cameras to door monitors too it doesn't have metal detectors and but it's just loaded with all sorts of security that doesn't exist at our current high school he said no metal detectors in the new school why not just looking at it practically so if we have seventeen hundred kids they arrive more or less than about twenty to twenty five minute window meaning you've got a stampede of kids arrive at school in the morning and the detector is going to be going off nonstop as people try to get into class a belt buckle sets it off a coin pocket sets it off but also the statistic is that for almost all of the school shooters they were either a former student or a current student that means that they know the design of the building better than most teachers are going to know that they're going to know all the protocols because you've practiced with them they're going to know every nook and cranny every in and out all of that.

mary louise twenty five minute
"mary louise" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Well we'll hear more of your letters after the break we're talking with mary louise parker author of the new book dear mr you even linked to an expert on our website on point radio dot org the you can join the conversation what do you here in mary louise parker is letters i'm jane place and infranational much more after this break we'll be right back this is on point this is on point i'm jane place in in for thomas were talking with mir louise parker this hour she of this showtime series weeds of broadway of the films red and fried green tomato sauce she's out with a new book dear mr you two rave reviews you can read an excerpt on our website on point radio dot org and you can join the conversation here are you a fan of mary louise parker does the famous emotion the she exhibits on stage translate to her work in this book in season six of weeds nancy bought one has to flee from her drug lord husband after one of her sons killed an associate of the drug lord who threatened him as they packed the car to flee in the middle of the night nancy apologizes to older son silas for being a bad mother while chastising her younger son shane for being a killer so so so so sorry but now you're out there and look for what not hey dr far away from here he can talk about the many ways in which have failed you are we can play license plate bingo bullet you decide i'm not sitting on the hump move over i'm already buckled well i'm the pothole unmoved to the middle really don't want to mess with the you know over now what is it with you and the violence the play the role and the killing of that is unacceptable.

mary louise parker thomas nancy silas shane
"mary louise" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"From wbur boston and npr on jane klay senate for thomas broken this is on point golden globe emily tony award winning actress mary louise parker is known for owning the stage in weeds the west wing angels in america the broadway play proof and the film fried green tomato now she's taking on the literary world with her first book it's a series of letters to the men in her life who she says shaped who she is this hour on point actress mary louise parker on her literary debut deal of mr huhne joining me from new york city mary louise parker the new book is called dear mr you so great to have you with us thank you so much thanks for having me so critics are calling this book dazzling they say your quote poets prose is lyrical funny sad strange and very often beautiful and quote the letters are a little characters sketches aren't they is that how you describe them i think of the the book really it isn't my story um the book it's it's really a bunch of thankyou notes as how i look on it and it's just little snapshots little illustrations of moments that affected me um specifically through my experiences with men and it's just a a little meditation a little celebration of the male gender and uh as a positive buck can it's meant to be full of gratitude in an and it's just a celebration of men that i've found heroic and compelling in our who held a mirror up to to me we know you from of course the west wing angels in america fried green tomato sauce how weeds you're acting has so often been praised as intense and raw invulnerable and i think the same can be said about your writing here what gave me the idea to structure this book as a series of letters to men who shaped your life um well.

boston jane klay senate thomas mary louise parker mr huhne npr emily tony america new york
"mary louise" Discussed on DirtCast

DirtCast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on DirtCast

"And to billy credits credit go a tongue twister mmhmm um the thing with mary louise parker was like over a decade ago long but uh gossips have long memories yeah so hopefully he's evolved fast that he and i hope he's making naomi very happy just because i like her a lot yeah i don't know it does seem like a little bit liquor rebound to me it's like you got divorce and then you start dating simmons working or yes just like good but again what do i know nothing was like isn't leave dating some someone who looks just like her oh he i don't know i think so um the 'paparazzi photos we belong to this one um uh photos subscription service and the captions of lever always like sexy daddy or like dad bader hero is just like leave again lever again they are like really excited about him being out on the town but he's also he just like walks around everywhere leixoes out with his kids has not really that exciting it always throws me off that his brother as pablo shriver of wow stash on orange is the new black i did not know that weird wa uh try to draft refrain around it are they seen in public often together they friends or they closed now i have questions i don't know about at all google it after this and report back yes please never because all the right now i heard done after this.

mary louise parker naomi simmons pablo shriver billy bader google
"mary louise" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And i'm mary louise kelley when president trump outlined his new strategy for afghanistan back over the summer he called for a more aggressive approach to the taliban he called for crushing alqaeda obliterating isis using quote overwhelming force but the the president cautioned that the us can't just use bombs and bullets military power alone will not bring peace to afghanistan or stop the terrorist threat arising in that country i'll and paris tom bowman was recently in that country his latest reporting trip to afghanistan he was trying to gauge how the new strategy is being applied so far in his here in the studio with us now hey thompson either so if the new strategy is about all aspects of american power diplomatic power economic power its cetera are you seen all aspects of american power out and about and being coordinated when you're actually there on the ground though absolutely not it's really only the military that's out there in the field and we spent a lot of time with marines in southwest afghanistan in helmand province and what's amazing is you only have the military out in the field i didn't see any state department people no one from us agency for international development no da people drug enforcement agency really no one out there know diplomats at all it impasse asked years you would always run into diplomats where are the diplomats i mean they're they're they're they just all clustered in kabul yet they're all hunker down in the embassy basically in the embassy frankly looks like a massive prison let me give you an example of this so john sopko he see special inspector general for afghanistan's reconstruction.

mary louise kelley trump taliban president tom bowman afghanistan kabul john sopko paris thompson helmand