35 Burst results for "Mary Louise"

"mary louise" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:24 min | 6 months ago

"mary louise" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Is all things considered for NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly And I'm Elsa Chang If you pay attention to news stories about prison life you may notice one byline pop up a lot Carrie Blake Ginger If you're familiar with her work it's hard to ignore the connection she seems to forge with the population she covers her depth of understanding And maybe that is because this longtime prison reporter comes to her beat from a special vantage point She had been incarcerated herself for a couple years in New York for drug possession How Blake injures life carved a path from Olympic figure skating dreams to drug addiction and then to prison is told in wrenching detail in her new memoir corrections in ink Just to know this conversation will touch on some really hard topics including some of the challenges that Blake and your face as a high achieving teenager I struggled with depression pretty young as well and there were some suicide attempts over the years And I think that my sort of default setting at an early age was a very dark response to a variety of stressors That darkness intensifies when her competitive skating career ends and it gives way to a decade long self destructive freefall She writes she decided to just give in to that decay To be radioactive I think what I meant when I thought that and when I felt that and when I wrote that was that on the one hand I was you know I had been very recently sort of trying to live life as such an overachiever Now it was like instead of turning all that energy towards success I was sort of turning it all towards self destruction and just decaying but just almost over the top sort of spectacular way Like I was like I'm going to you know I'm going to end up living on the streets and doing all these just really outrageous things that seemed like this wasn't just a kid sort of quietly doing drugs in their room and trying to hide it from their parents You know I went to a really extreme place about it pretty quickly as if I was it's almost like I was trying to go out with a bang And instead I ended up sort of decaying for years Yeah Well I want to turn to your description of your couple years in prison Your life suddenly veers right In 2010 when you get caught with a Tupperware full of drugs and you're arrested you're how old at this point remind me 26 26 okay You're incarcerated for about two years and you know you bring up this point we think of prison as a place where there would be the most rules But you write behind bars there are no rules Sure there's a rule book and there are things you can not do but when it matters no one is watching Tell me about that Yeah what I meant by that is that if someone is going to do something against the rules whether it's prisoner or in most cases I meant that in the context of staff there's no oversight You know no one's going to stop a guard from being unnecessarily cool invasive or abusive If you are getting strip searched and the guard makes you pull out your tampon even though that's not the policy and they just make you do that there's no one in that moment to stop it from happening And that's what I mean by there are no rules because in the moment they can pretty much always do whatever they want Right This especially becomes clear in solitary confinement Like another thing that you learned during your time in incarceration is that solitary confinement it's not just about being alone And you have this point where you're like yeah if you told me earlier in my life that being in solitary is just some time alone I probably wouldn't have minded but you realize it's a totally different experience than anything you could have imagined Can you describe what it felt like what it looked like maybe what it smelled like So I walked in this room and it's you know I don't know the size of an elevator the size of a bathroom and the walls are neon white There's a there's a little bunk in the one corner or the one side and then there's a sink toilet combination metal thing on the other side And there's no clock There's no possessions There's nothing to do And I think I had a Bible and then eventually I got someone to give me a copy of Seabiscuit And that was all I had you know to read or to do these entire time And there was a window slit near the top of the wall over the bunk But if you stood on the bunk to look out it that was against the rules and you would get yelled at And I just as soon as the door shut behind me I just sort of burst out into tears because I immediately realized how maddening and claustrophobic this was especially with no clock You just had no sense of the passage of time What got you through the short time that you were in solitary you think This is a really dark answer I think it was only because I could not figure out a way to actually kill myself In that cell I think if I had been able to figure that out I don't think I would have made it through Well you have covered prisons now for quite some time What drives the work that you're doing now What in your mind is your ultimate purpose as you move forward in your work To me it's just been so deeply meaningful to be able to tell stories about people who are in the places that I've been and to help amplify those voices and make their experience of incarceration maybe some bit less awful or more productive than mine was And how often do the people you report on when they read your story How often do they come back to you and they say something like no one would have been able to write the story like this unless they too were in prison at one point in their life Do you get that kind of feedback a lot I get I get a lot of different feedback I get a lot of jail mail and one of my favorites that I think sort of encapsulates something was I sometimes get letters that will be addressed to the reporter who did time Or the reporter who was in prison And I think you know those are not the sort of gushing thank yous and the hand drawn cards that I get because I get those two and I love them But I think that that the fact that they think of me that way really says something because that's the thing about me that I think helps.

NPR news Mary Louise Kelly Elsa Chang Carrie Blake Blake Olympic depression New York
"mary louise" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:12 min | 7 months ago

"mary louise" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Considered I'm rob Schmidt And I'm Mary Louise Kelly When there's a huge line at your local coffee shop because maybe they're short staffed It can be annoying Well our next guest argues that for his industry staff shortages are more than an annoyance they can be life threatening Christopher white is CEO of road to responsibility That is a Massachusetts company that provides care and services for adults with disabilities They are struggling to find workers because they can't match the starting wage being offered by other businesses businesses like target say or Bank of America Christopher white welcome to all things considered Thanks for having me Mary Louise Just in a sentence or two would you tell me a little bit more about the people you are serving Who comes to a company like wood to responsibility So we serve adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities including autism and acquired brain injuries They are as young as 22 and our oldest person that we support is I believe 97 Okay so quite a range And when you say you're short staffed how short staffed what's the gap We have 260 vacant positions right now Which represents about 27% of our total workforce What is your understanding of why Why can't you hire an these people So keep it really simple is three big factors There's demographics that COVID drove a lot of boomers to retire a lot sooner than was predicted A vast immigrant population has for many years been a band aid for human service staffing was This really no longer available in the big one though is just the pay rates The employment market has changed radically in the I guess we're in a sort of post COVID world right now The transitioning out of COVID world Yeah how big is the gap I said you can't match wages being offered elsewhere The state contracts we have will support entry level wages of between $15 an hour and $16 and 79 cents an hour for our direct care staff We increased that rate using one time dollars this year to $17 an hour And thankfully that plus generous recruitment and retention bonuses stop the hemorrhaging of staff leaving the workforce but hasn't really allowed us to gain any ground Whereas people can go down the street and work for Dunkin Donuts for $18 an hour we can compete with it What does it mean to be trying to run a company and have 27% fewer staff than you need to be fully stuffed What are the consequences of that What isn't getting done Well we're getting things done by quality isn't what it was And people are exhausted I've got staff who are routinely working a hundred hours a week A hundred hours a week Yep Routinely Routinely You know so when people are working that much and are tired mistakes get made and again we're not alone This is happening everywhere That sounds like you're dealing with a really vulnerable population and what you're saying is they're delays in their care and their treatments that they need Yeah and for many people it means they're not getting services at all People that were participating in our day services either employment or a therapeutic day service for people who are more medically compromised and older we've only been able to get about 60% of the people we were serving pre COVID back into service And the folks that we have been able to get back in the service we've seen really major declines in their skills and abilities because they haven't been getting the support they need Christopher white thank you.

Christopher white rob Schmidt Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Bank of America Massachusetts autism Dunkin Donuts
"mary louise" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:49 min | 10 months ago

"mary louise" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"For Friday From NPR news this is all things considered I'm Alyssa nad warney And I'm Mary Louise Kelly Three years ago back in 2019 I sat down with Arthur Brooks the writer and social scientist and he told me about an experience he had had on a plane where he'd found himself seated in the row ahead of an older gentleman And he was talking to his wife and I was like I didn't mean to eavesdrop but I couldn't help but hear And he was saying he wished he were dead And I thought it was somebody who must have been really disappointed about his life But then at the end of the flight he stood up and I recognized him as someone who's really quite prominent and who'd done a lot with his life And I thought to myself what's he doing wrong In other words if this really prominent really successful person wasn't happy with his life what does it say for the rest of us trying to find purpose relevance even joy as we age Arthur Brooks had started noodling the question he had written a piece for the Atlantic a piece he has now turned into a book It is titled from strength to strength Arthur Brooks welcome back to all things considered Thank you Great to be with you So in the three years since I have seen you you clearly realized you had a lot more to say on this topic this topic of aging and finding success in later life Lay out for us the big question here exploring the book Well I started doing research Again I'm a social scientist but this is very personal This is me search more than research really What can we expect if we're trying to work so hard to build something with our lives And I found that half the population tends to get happier and happier after 65 or 70 and the other half of the population more or less starts to go back down And the group that goes back down often includes the strivers the people who have worked so hard because the party ends And look if you don't do anything or don't do too much with your life You don't know when it's over But if you've worked really hard to build things to meet your goals to get rewarded when it finishes it can be incredibly disconcerting Disappointing even devastating to people And that's what I found And so I went in search of the solutions to that problem to look at the people who had cracked the code And I think I found it Okay well before we get there because now you've wet my appetite but let me just make clear how you are framing this This is a conversation about the second half of life Which you are defining is when like what age I'm a little worried about your answer Well so it's actually quite interesting given the fact that we live so much longer than when I was a kid You know when I was little the average age to death for a man was 67 Now if you live I'm 57 years old And I'm in perfect health As far as I know and actuarial tables say that I have even odds of living past 95 So let's just say your adult life starts at 20 If that's the case you're in good health You can pretty much expect or you should expect to live to 90 In which case half of your adult life is over at 55 And that means you have the second half left starting at 55 And I will note this is fundamentally an optimistic book The title from strength to strength is not from feeble to feebler That is where your data your research has left you that you're optimistic about her later years Incredibly I mean I started it out It was pretty grim The man on the plane And I thought oh my goodness is this what we have to look forward to And I found that there are people who have cracked the code but more importantly that we don't have to leave happiness in the second half of life up to chance And furthermore that we can find a new kind of success if we're willing to make some jumps and some changes and show some humility and have an adventure that's better than the first half Before we get to how to crack the code can I just question the premise that there is in fact a code to crack I mean I'm thinking I can point to people in my field and journalism in politics in law all kinds of professions who are at the top of their game in their 50s and their 60s and their 70s and beyond Are they what outliers the exception that proves the role of what Generally speaking they are the ones who have found the secret to second half success In other words there's a different formula for succeeding in the early part of your life and career Then that which is actually the most appropriate for the second half It requires different skills and different emphasis and those people that we see in almost every profession that are thriving As they get older they're the ones who've been able to make the shift And just again for people thinking huh really I introduced you as a social scientist You're saying this based on data that you have gone through compiled and looked at Yeah absolutely To say secrets it makes it sound like there's some sort of hack No you got to do the work You can't just wish for it and you can't hope you get lucky And that's the point The point of the work that I'm doing is a social scientist is to not leave your happiness up to chance But to remarkably increase the odds by doing the work at 25 and 45 and 65 so that by the time you're 75 and 85 and beyond you're happier than you've ever been So how do we do it How do we increase the odds Well to begin with there's a very interesting set of findings that said that success early on is based on one of two types of intelligence The first is called fluid intelligence which gives you the ability to solve problems to crack the case to innovate faster and to focus harder than pretty much all the competition early on in your career This is your Elon Musk brain And this increases through your 20s and into your 30s but then it tends to decline through your 40s and 50s meaning that you need to move to the second kind of intelligence which is increasing in your 40s and 50s That even your 60s and we'll stay high for the rest of your life That's.

Arthur Brooks NPR news Alyssa nad warney Mary Louise Kelly
"mary louise" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:55 min | 11 months ago

"mary louise" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news I'm Ari Shapiro And I'm Mary Louise Kelly If I told you that Gwen Kirby's debut collection of short stories was wild that would not begin to capture it There's one in which the female characters grow fangs and become radioactive cockroach warriors seeking revenge on men who annoy them There's one titled Mary read as a cross dressing pirate the raging seas 1720 I mean how can you not want to read that The title of the first story contains not one but two words that I am not allowed to say on public radio and it manages over 5 short pages to tuck in mentions of tap dancing twizzlers nafta the cordless Hitachi magic wand and Trojans both the condom and the guys who fought the Trojan war The title of the book which I'm also not allowed to say is Cassandra saw When Kirby welcome Thank you so much Mary Louise It's a pleasure to be here Did you have as much fun writing these stories as I had reading them Almost all of them yes I loved just sort of letting myself loose in these stories But I think letting yourself loose as a writer is actually one of the most difficult things to do Especially when you start to get towards the end of writing your book and you think like oh my gosh I just need to finish this That's a very unfun mindset But I mean once you've got a radioactive cockroach on the page you just have to just cut a stream Yes exactly So I did have a lot of fun Writing these stories often felt incredibly cathartic And I've really needed that over the past while many years at this point God yeah Well and I hadn't thought about it but specifically after coming up on two years of the pandemic a little cockroach escapism must have been welcome Stay with the cockroach story which also includes werewolf women How did you come up with it I was living in Exeter New Hampshire and it was the day of the Brett Kavanaugh hearings And I was I had a lot of time on my hands and so I was just listening to them all day and I was so angry I think a lot of women were and I wanted to write and I had no idea what to do and so I just sort of started writing these paragraphs where I would just start with a man is annoying and a woman eats him And I just it was just sort of this started You know I wasn't thinking like this would be a piece of serious literary fiction that will go in my book or something I just I just wanted to feel for a moment We just wouldn't have to take it And as I kept writing you know in those sort of those little fantasies started to spin out a bit more and more I started to then think about what's the price for those kind of fantasies I mean I don't think anyone wants to imagine harming another person I certainly don't suggesting anyone should do that but it was sort of both the pleasure of imagining it and the sadness of meeting to imagine it I feel like ended up really colliding in that story for me That's so interesting The sadness of needing to imagine it because the title I'll mention is a few normal things that happen a lot I don't know anyone Any woman who has not experienced been acting like a jerk or harassing her and you shouldn't have to grow things to fend off lecherous men so I won't say pleasurable to read you imagining that one might but it was an interesting balancing act between the real anger that's in this story And it's awfully funny as well Thank you It was a little pleasurable to write I'm not gonna lie I mean I almost tried to take it out if there's a common thread among these stories because they are all utterly original But if I were trying I might go with empowered women What do you think Yeah I think that that's true I think empowered women and I really wanted them out on the word complicated women I guess perhaps because it's really empowering to get to be complicated to be imperfect to screw up I feel like the women in my book lie and cheat and fights and love and do everything that the male characters that I grew up reading got to do and I never thought about it No one really ever called them and unlikeable male narrator or something like that So I think yes in power women but I just think I don't know a live women Just normal real women Yeah Give us another example Tell us tell us one of the other characters in here that was there was a lot of fun and maybe empowering to write I loved writing the story Midwestern girl is tired of appearing in your short stories Yeah It's like the title is its own story My titles may have gotten away from me That story was inspired twofold I was at this reading at a writing conference and this man was reading a story and there was a woman in the story who was just called Midwestern girl It was so jarring and strange and as I stood there I just thought like how great name for a superhero you know Midwestern girl Right And at the same time I was reading the slush pile for a literary magazine and I was really struck how many sort of nameless women were there to say something to the male protagonist to put him along his journey and then they would just fade away again into the background And I guess a little bit like with the cockroach story just sort of began writing these small instances where Midwestern girls sort of becomes sentient and realizes that she's trapped in these stories that she doesn't have any control over But as the story goes on she takes herself to the front of the narrative and she sort of breaks the control of the writer if you will to become her own person and I felt that it was deeply pleasurable to write because I've read way too many stories where the woman just doesn't get named at all Yeah What kind of reaction have you gotten from male readers to these stories so far Is there a recognition Are they like hey wait a minute now I have not heard a lot from male readers I mean I have male friends who are writers who have been very very supportive of what I do I will say when I read the wiki how article about retelling the bathroom which is about this woman who is going through a divorce and so she decides to retire her bathroom to rather disastrous results I've had a number of male readers come up to me afterwards to correct me on how to properly retire a bathroom That's what caught their attention The grouting aspect of the story Yeah yeah they're like I don't put the fin set on like that I think you may have missed the forest for the trees with this one Sir So I don't know yet completely how men will react but I you know I think it's so defaulted for women to read men's stories and to think like yes of course identify with the male experiences the universal experience And to be a woman writing woman stories it's like oh well you know these will be for women But I think that's absurd There's no reason a man wouldn't connect with the experience of feeling lost in the world or alone in the world or battered by the world just because it's a woman writing about it I think people should open their minds and consider it And don't tell me anymore about bathroom piling I know I know I did my best Gwen curvy Her collection of short stories is Cassandra saw It has been a total pleasure book.

NPR news Ari Shapiro Mary Louise Kelly Gwen Kirby Brett Kavanaugh Mary Louise Cassandra Trojans Kirby Exeter Mary New Hampshire Gwen curvy
"mary louise" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"And more businesses are spending more on capital equipment It was time Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Adi Cornish Gelvin was always a boy but the world did not recognize him that way That's the story in the new children's book It's called Kelvin and in it authors JR and Vanessa Ford show how young Kelvin navigates the complicated feelings of being a transgender kid And how he comes into expressing who he really is The Fords are also parents to two children Ronnie and Ellie who is trans And inspired this book We are in the 6th year journey into Ellie's transition And so it really encompassed us early on right after their 5th birthday because that was the time when they announced to both of us who they were And so that transition really was a labor of love in a labor of learning for all of us It really helped JumpStart what we needed to do you know to research this whole new lexicon of terms and vocabulary as well as it what does it mean for us to continue to support Ellie in their transition And it's a social transition right now because it really focused on their external appearance as well as who they felt they were inside So Vanessa tell me then about Calvin who's the child in this book and how does their journey so to speak begin For Calvin there are pieces of Ellie's story choosing a name from a loved item that they have is something that Calvin does and also that Ellie did There are pieces of what Calvin says that Ellie said to us early on But we have a large network of families with many children who transitioned around four or 5 years old And each one of these children have informed us of their own experiences and we've grown up with them in our community of families with trans kids I'd love for you Vanessa to read a page from the book and this is a page where Calvin first tells his parents I'm not a girl Calvin says I'm a boy a boy in my heart and in my brain Can you just read the reaction basically what the parents say in response Absolutely We see Calvin with Calvin's family sitting in his room and his father says we love you if you're a girl boy neither or both We love you whoever you are my dad said later dad told me the word for how I felt was transgender Being transgender means other people think you are one gender but inside you know you're a different one That's a moment that struck me because I think for people who have real kind of problems with the transgender community One of the things they talk about is the idea of indoctrinating kids that you're putting ideas in their head And I wanted to ask you about the language here because you have the parent telling the child this is the word for what you feel When we first were with our child when they were four there was one book out and it used the word transgender and we didn't use that word for quite some time in reading the book to Ellie to our child And did you just skip over it We skipped over it because we didn't want to provide a word However when we finally used the word Ellie's breath took out all the air in the room and said that's who I am There's a word for who I am And so some of this is our children may not have the language to describe how they feel or how they identify and sometimes having that language can be incredibly empowering JR later the book talks about the trepidations that Calvin was feeling going back to school And there were a lot of questions there How did you come up with the questions Was this something you got from professionals from kids What are the kind of fears kids can have So we did a lot of research between Vanessa and I we actually got a lot of input from families from friends from trans elders about how we should try to tackle some of these challenges that a young trans kid would personally embark upon And we wanted to strip out all the external trauma and challenges that a trans kid would potentially face You know we wanted to look internally from a young kid standpoint What are some of those internal thoughts and obstacles that they would face The what ifs I think every kid could identify with the what ifs And the what it's here though or how would everyone treat me What if my Friends wouldn't call me he What if what if Right And that's a really salient point in the book Right there's this page where Calvin encounters a kid on that first day of school and says you know my name and the friend says yep your dad told my mom you're a boy now And that's pretty much it They go off to play Yeah and that's actually one of the things we found on our journey that kids are really open They are accepting and interested and curious It's really adults and political figures who have taken the issue of trans kids and politicized and put all this fear mongering out there when in our experience and the experience of many people we've talked with kids may have a few questions like Calvin's friend did but then it's on to recess What are we doing next And when kids are able to be their authentic selves it draws in others around them What's your response to the parents who say not my kid I'm not ready to have this conversation I mean you yourselves talked about reading a book and skipping over the word transgender right I think right now is the time if there's ever was a time We have a political environment in which trans youth in particular are being targeted around the country We have trans kids coming out every day in classrooms around the country And I would just encourage them to take a risk your child is going to be open and eager to learn this and it may help them be a better empathetic friend to somebody in their class or their community And I would say learn from our experience We were scared We were fearful of even using that word in the beginning When in fact our child found it so empowering I would also add that our kids aren't a monolith They are unique in every single way And for parents in adults and caretakers give them the opportunity to be themselves At least being able to listen to your kids is one of the things that we always try to promote listen to your kids They know what's best for them because they're living their experience every single day We started this conversation talking about Ronnie and Ellie your kids right And Ellie who is transgender what do they think of this book Ellie has gone through a little bit of a roller coaster over the last three years that it's taken for this book Being very excited about it being very nervous about it and now again being very excited about it And I think what's exciting is they see themselves reflected but it is not Elise story It is a amalgamation of pieces of Ellie's story along with the stories of real trans kids that we know nationally But Ronnie and Elliot are both very excited I think a little bit nervous This has been a labor of love and it's coming out into the world It's like we're having a third child.

Calvin Ellie Mary Louise Kelly Cornish Gelvin Kelvin Vanessa Ford Vanessa JR Ronnie Elise Elliot
"mary louise" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"We can offer to our literal next door neighbors. I'm a fantasy for me again especially with this particular piece of land and now i have this fantasy after talking to you of this like moving salon. Movable i'm in i you we can be so into their a hitter diet. A piano accountability traveling circus of sal on. I'm obsessed scanner. Accountability is like genius just as afraid. Just texting you've photos of my keyboard it's going to be great lead please No i'm gonna. I'm gonna wait for and also as far as the david lynch foundation yet. My kids presented me with an award. Which i felt weird about getting because i don't really talk about the charity work that i do but i felt like because i feel like it feels a bit cheesy but at the same time i felt like these gals. It's not like they were yes they were. Honoring me so lovely. But it's like a reason to have a gala can raise more money for david lynch foundation which is giving so much peace in. He'll linked to so many people. You know abused women. Veterans alone is that's so close to heart by dad was a soldier. Both my brothers were soldiers. And they've done so much work there. And i had a father who came back from. He was in three wars. He came back from rory to and korea's knows were for him nobody gave him manning's no help and a lot of ptsd. I grew up with a dad. Who had that i mean. He was a wizard a hero but he was shaken and traumatized and david lynch in the most practical simplest terms as you know if you meditate gives that gift to so many veterans at has saved so many lives. One of the things i think is so cool about being alive in this moment when we have access to all this information is to see not just the effects people tell you about about when they start meditating in the reduction in their stress and and all of all of the kind of benefit field but seeing the brain scans where people's gray matter starts expanding in their brain. And have you seen. Because i haven't seen any. There are studies that are saying that meditation actually is able to basically expand the best parts of your brain and one thing that i read is is saying that they're planning over the next couple of years. They think they'll be able to study whether or not the benefit to the brain could actually be away to ferdie younger generations to get ahead of the risk of alzheimer's disease. That's just a theory right. Now it's not it's not act but even the idea that these are the things we're beginning to see in the oldest traditions. You know that the science is proving What some of our oldest traditions have taught. I just think is so cool. It feels like a really exceptional moment. For all of the you know pain and confusion and uncovering i also feel like we're in this amazing moment. It almost feels like a surgery in a way like we gotta crack it open and clean out the junk but then we could stitch it up and be here. Yes while fat. When you think about that kind of expansion. I i also think about the curiosity that it can create space for and then i think about how that makes me feel excited to investigate characters and an hour. I don't really know why this is hitting me this right now. But i'm going to try to explain my train of thought. Clearly all of this all these themes we're talking about feel like Deepening and an uncovering an at times revisiting and an exploration..

david lynch foundation ferdie david lynch rory alzheimer's disease manning korea confusion
"mary louise" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"It's a podcast that tells extraordinary stories of teams. That made the shift to flexible working. I listened to an episode of remote works recently. And i love how they dove into certain industries. That haven't had to work remotely before and are now shifting everything. They do to adapt like major league baseball. I learned about how. Mlb is embracing flexible work and even virtual fans in stadiums. It is truly fascinating. And yes for anyone wondering. I am a baseball fan. I love the dodgers even throughout a first pitch. So i really geeked on this episode. You can search for remote works anywhere you listen to podcasts. And we will include a link in the show notes. Thank you so much to our pows at remote works for your support..

baseball dodgers
"mary louise" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. The Kabul airport remains extremely busy and volatile. The number of Americans and Afghans being evacuated is ramping up hitting new one day highs. We now know U. S forces are sometimes leaving the airport to assist American citizens who can't make it there on their own. For the latest. We're joined by NPR National security correspondent Greg Murray. Hi, Greg. Hi, Ari. What more can you tell us about US troops going outside the airport Well, Pentagon spokesman John Kirby says U. S forces have picked up Americans by helicopter on at least two occasions in recent days. Now the troops have also ventured out beyond the airport perimeter on the ground. I don't want to leave you with the idea that we're somehow patrolling the streets of Kabul. But on occasion where there's a need, and there's a capability to meet that need, our commanders on the ground are doing what they feel they need to do to help Americans reach the airport. Now. He didn't give us any details on these operations but acknowledged the military is in frequent contact with the Taliban, said the military's evacuated several 1000 US citizens and an estimated several 1000 more remain, and we now know that three babies have been born on evacuation flights. Wow. Obviously, this is a risky endeavor. What more can you tell us about the security situation Well today, and unidentified sniper opened fire and killed a member of the Afghan security forces that are helping out at the airport. Biden, president Biden said yesterday in the Pentagon said today they're trying to expand the perimeter for multiple reasons to guard against an attack like this, so you don't have a crush of people right up against the building. There have been people trampled to death. And some people who are eligible to get on the flight say they can't get through these crowds to get to the inside of the airport. Now. Taliban leaders have issued a statement saying that the U. S. And its allies have to wrap up this operation by August, 31st a week from tomorrow. What if that doesn't happen? Well, the Taliban says this would cross a red line and there's nothing magical about August. 31st Ari. This is just a date that Biden has said. And now the Taliban are holding him to it. Biden's national security advisor Jake Sullivan, said that the US is seeking to end the airlift and to remove all the U. S troops by the end of this self imposed deadline at the end of the month, But they are leaving open the possibility of extending it. There were more than 10,000 evacuations yesterday by the U. S military. That number rises to 16,000. If you Include those taken by other countries and charter flights. This was by far the biggest single day numbers yet, but thousands more still want to get out and Biden in the military will have to decide at some point if this airlift is over. The military will also need a day or two to pack up, so it's a tight deadline. With so much attention and focus on Kabul and the airport. What can you tell us about what's happening in other parts of Afghanistan? There's already this feeling that it's kind of going dark in the other parts of the country as the Taliban takeover, the foreign media and Afghan journalists are leaving. It's going to be much harder to get information out in the very near future. We do know there's been some fighting and opposition groups say they've claimed some some areas from the Taliban in the Panjshir Valley in the north. But that points to the prospect of of continued fighting, but we don't have details. It's NPR national security correspondent Greg Murray. Thank you. My pleasure. To covid news now and a quote milestone in the nation's battle against the pandemic. That is what the Biden administration is calling the Food and Drug Administration's decision today to give full approval to the fighter Covid 19 vaccine. The long awaited decision could give the nation's vaccination campaign a desperately.

Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Greg Ari Jake Sullivan Panjshir Valley John Kirby Kabul Biden Afghanistan August, 31st Food and Drug Administration 16,000 Greg Murray Taliban yesterday NPR a day Pentagon three babies
"mary louise" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly. It is summer driving season and if you have hit the road, you probably noticed gas is expensive right now that is mostly due to high crude oil prices. And if you're wondering where oil prices may be going next year, not alone, especially after an OPEC meeting ended with a big surprise. NPR's Camila Domino Ski joins us to explain how Camilla Hi Mary Louise. So a dramatic OPEC meeting. What exactly happened Well, so we have OPEC, this powerful cartel led by Saudi Arabia. And they were in a routine meeting with allies, including Russia. Collectively, they're all known as OPEC Plus and pretty much everyone expected them to make a deal to produce more oil. They have a bunch of oil they're holding back. Prices are high demand is rising. It seemed straightforward. But instead there was drama, a fight between the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia. Long story short. They called off the whole meeting with no boost and output. The call off the meeting completely. Okay, So go on. Where does the story go from here and just talk us through between that the meeting that collapsed and what's playing out in the oil markets. Yeah, well, I'm actually gonna go back in time because I think it's helpful to remember where this deal that OPEC has that they're negotiating over where it came from. Last year, Oil demand just disappeared abruptly, right. We all stayed home. We stopped driving. We stopped flying, which, through oil markets completely out of whack. Prices went unbelievably low basically overnight. And so OPEC plus struck this deal to cut their production a lot. It was a way to balance out markets. Now, demand is coming back. We're driving. We're flying again. Here in the U. S. There are actually a record number of road trips over July 4th. So now we have a different problem, which is oil supply just isn't keeping up. Louise Dixon is a senior analyst with Rice Stat energy. We've seen a bit of a pivot, and now we're actually looking at well, what is going to happen if there is a supply shortage? So since this pivot happened, prices have been going up and up. Add this OPEC announcement and okay, are you ready for things to get a little bit weird? Always. Give me a lot. Let's get weird, okay? There are actually two completely different concerns at play right now. One is that OPEC has all this infighting, so they're not going to be able to strike a new deal on oil, which means that the old deal is still in place, which cuts production so much that it would drive prices crazy high. That's the one concern, okay. The other is that they might actually fight so much that they abandoned the deal completely. And in that case, there's a free for all. They all produce as much oil as they want, which would flood markets and cause prices to go way. Down. So the market's been on a bit of a roller coaster over the last two days as everyone tries to make a sense of which of these two completely opposite outcomes we might be looking at, which is more likely, right? Well, for those of us who are just trying to ride the roller coaster of budgeting for filling up our car every week or so it would. Where does this land Yeah, The big question right is how high will gas prices get, and this is something A lot of people are worried about. For one, the Biden administration, which has talked to OPEC members to try to encourage them to strike a compromise. If they make a deal, they might stabilize markets in the middle and avoid either of these two extremes, right? Long term. There's a lot of uncertainty about what this looks like over the months and years ahead. In the short term, it's much easier to say gas prices are high. They have been climbing for months. They're likely to stay high in the near term. NPR's Camila Domino's key Thank you. Thanks. Now to Iran, where we'll meet a veteran photographer. His most famous photo was of an Iranian protester years ago, but he's also used photography to explore the world. He spoke with NPR's Peter Kenyon in Tehran about his career and some of his favorite scenes. The walls of Jamshid by Romney's Tehran apartment are lined with some of his photographs from Iran and around the world by Romney says he dropped out before graduating from high school convinced that he needed to learn about the world firsthand seeing for himself. He says through an interpreter that he also fell in love with capturing images of the people in places he saw double down. By doing you know what do system. In fact, I'm in love with traveling and journeyed to various places. I love to take my camera. Then I am traveling to take photos, So in fact, I can say it started with social documentary photos, affairs and later on, Indirectly, I was taken into news journalism. One of my Romney's best known news pictures landed on the cover of the Economist magazine. It was taken during student protests in 1999, which were brutally put down by security forces. It features a young demonstrator holding a bloody T shirt above his head. Romney says the young man was chanting along with the other demonstrators. But it was when he suddenly fell silent that the photographer saw the image he wanted them came job running T shirt together, So that's fish. I took my child several photos, Several frames from this gentleman. I noticed one of them Mitch, in which he is silent. And his silence at drawn my attention to it, And to me that picture and then that person looks the more like Che Guevara. And that's why I decided to choose this photo and send it to the newspapers..

Ari Shapiro Mary Louise Kelly Louise Dixon Camila Domino Ski Peter Kenyon 1999 Romney Mary Louise Che Guevara Tehran Last year next year Iran United Arab Emirates Camilla NPR Rice Stat energy Camila Domino two extremes Mitch
"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

"Mary Louise Kelly. During the pandemic, an APP called Clubhouse took off. And let people join live audio chats from their smartphones. Soon there were game shows on celebrity appearances and some people becoming audio stars. Now the big social media companies are jumping in. NPR's Shannon Bond has more on how Silicon Valley is hoping to turn a pandemic era fad into a permanent boom. Russia, Howard was an early adopter of live audio. Lately, she's gotten hooked on Twitter's version called Spaces where she was among the first users. They said they wanted it to feel like a dinner party. They wanted you to feel like you were hosting people in your living room. What? That's my thing. I love to have people in my living room. I love for us to sit on the couch together with a glass of wine in our hands and just go at it for hours together, having a good time. Howard now regularly host spaces on Twitter, including one called viral Talk, where she interviews someone whose social media post has gone viral. The chats are live and ephemeral. Once they're over, they're gone. So today Welcome to Twitter spaces and viral talk. She's done spaces with the rapper Soldier boy talking about a beef he was in with professional wrestlers, the wrestlers Act. What? The W W Year we can talk. We can settle out this right now over the phone over the Twitter space. Howard says she wasn't even following soldier boy when she first asked him to chat live with her So little of me. I slid in a soldier boys dms, like, Hey, how much to put our spaces with me And he was like, sounds good. And I'm like, what Have you ever talked to him before? No, Never. In just a few months, Howard has gone from fewer than 100 followers on Twitter to more than 5000 and calls herself the queen of spaces. She's one of a slew of people making names for themselves in live audio and tech companies are paying attention. Fiji. Simo is head of the Facebook APP, she says, for the world's biggest social network audio is today. What video was a few years ago? When you is one of these formats that we think is going to become very natural core way in which people interact the same way video has become one of these ways. Facebook, which is among NPR's financial supporters, is getting ready to launch a bunch of products from short audio posts a sound effects to live chat rooms. Similar to clubhouse and Twitter spaces. But there's another important piece of the puzzle building tools for people like Risha Howard to start making a living from audio for creators. We think of it, as like something that needs to be able to turn into a business for them from the get go, whether it's Facebook, Twitter or clubhouse, they all have a lot to gain from winning creators loyalty. There's the time people spend on their apps listening to audio and the companies could eventually take a cut of the revenue their audio stars generate. So the race to roll out ways for hosts to get paid is heating up. I think for a long time creators bore The burden of making money, and they do a lot of leg work in order to go get sponsors and advertisers. Esther Crawford at Twitter says that's a big shift. Now Some companies are paying creators directly, letting listeners tip them even looking at selling tickets for exclusive events. Twitter has already launched a tip jar for power users. This is a way for creators to be rewarded for their time and energy that they're putting into hosting these public conversations on Twitter. But even as audio becomes a feature on nearly any social network, you can think of There's a big question hanging over all of this as pandemic restrictions ease. People are obviously going to spend less time on these services. Right. Jason Citron is CEO of messaging app Discord, which has had audio chat for years. But I do think that people have form new habits and they've tried new things. And so we believe that at the end of at the end of the school day at the end of the workday, people are still going to come home and their friends are still going to be on their discord. Sow discord is doubling down on audio with live events and paid tickets areas where it will have plenty of competition. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS Support for all Tech considered comes from C three A. I C.

Esther Crawford Risha Howard Mary Louise Kelly Jason Citron Shannon Bond Howard Twitter today Simo Clubhouse NPR more than 5000 Fiji wrestlers Act Russia Silicon Valley first users Facebook few years ago fewer than 100 followers
Iran's Presidential Candidate Slate Leans Heavily Toward Hard-Liners

All Things Considered

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Iran's Presidential Candidate Slate Leans Heavily Toward Hard-Liners

"Government has approved the final list of candidates for that country's presidential elections. Voting day is coming right up June 18th. Iran has a very short campaign period. Now the slate is seven approved candidates. It gives the upper hand too hard liners and this election could have an impact on relations between Iran and the U. S. And whether negotiations resume on the 2015 nuclear deal. There are ongoing indirect talks in Vienna focused on restoring the talks over the deal. That now former President Trump withdrew from NPR's Peter Kenyon is tracking all of this from Istanbul. Who, Peter Hi, Mary. Louise. Okay, So how does it work in Iran? How did they get down to these seven candidates? Well, you know, it's pretty wide open when it comes to who can sign up who can register to run for president in Iran, and this year, nearly 600 people took the opportunity to sign up. But there is this group. It's called The Guardian Council. It's got 12 members, six of them appointed by the Supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and that counsel is in charge of vetting the candidates. The criteria have never really been explained. But this year, the council eliminated all but seven of those several 100 presidential hopefuls. And I guess we should note that the incumbent Hassan Rouhani, he's finishing his second term term limited. He's not eligible to run this year. Okay, So who made the cut who got weeded out? Well, a former President Mahmoud a. Medina Jod was rejected again. He's becoming known as a perennial candidate. To no one's surprise. The early hardline favorite Abraham racy, was approved. He's a conservative cleric head of the Iran's judiciary. He ran against her honey and 2013 and lost. He's been linked to The infamous so called death panel that in 1988 sent thousands of political prisoners to their death s O. That's the front runner, and there are six other candidates, including the former nuclear negotiator, a central bank governor. But analysts say no one although there's some prominent names in there, no one looks likely to defeat right, you see, unless there's a surprise During this very short campaign,

Iran President Trump Peter Kenyon Peter Hi The Guardian Council Ayatollah Ali Khamenei Hassan Rouhani U. NPR Vienna President Mahmoud Istanbul Medina Jod Louise Abraham Racy Mary
"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly. Coming up, African countries are dealing with growing coronavirus cases and vaccine shortages. This is a nightmare. I mean, The whole situation was the nightmare. Also, one year after the death of George Floyd was his murder, a turning point on race in America. It's just like living while black gets you killed later why the BBC is apologizing for the way it handled an interview more than 25 years ago, and how a robotic arm with a sense of touch is allowing people to perform tasks that they couldn't before first Sidelines. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear on Egyptian brokered cease fire between Israel and Hamas, which many hope will end 11 days of spiraling violence that has caused widespread destruction in Gaza and Israel. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced the Security Council approved the Egyptian mediated proposal today. Mosque quickly said it will honor the deal move follows heavy pressure from the US to halt the fighting. At least 130 Palestinians have died in the fighting with 12 dead in Israel. President Biden is expected to address the ceasefire soon at the White House. President Biden has signed the covert 19 Hate Crimes Act. A law aimed at reducing attacks on Asian Americans, which have risen during the pandemic is NPR's Tamara Keith explains, the bill passed with bipartisan support, something the president emphasized during his remarks. The law calls for the Department of Justice to designate a point person whose role will be to expedite the processing of hate crimes cases will also expand efforts to make it easier to report these crimes at the state and local level and for those governments to track them. Under reporting has been an issue, Biden said. There has been a shocking spike in hate crimes against Asian Americans during the pandemic. Grandparent's afraid to leave their homes even to get vaccinated for fear of being attacked. Small business owners targeted and gunned down. Students worried about two things. Over 19 and being bullied. Biden argued the bill's passage with overwhelming bipartisan support was an indication the parties can come together. Tamer Keith NPR NEWS The White House, the Department of Homeland Security announced today it is removing immigrant detainees from two controversial detention facilities and Georgia and Massachusetts. NPR's John Burnett reports. Both county owned jails were under federal review for mistreating detainees. DHS secretary at 100, New Yorkers instructed the head of Immigration and Customs enforcement to stop sending migrants to the Carlos Carneiro Immigration detention Center in north Dartmouth, Massachusetts because of criticism, the sheriff's office used excessive.

Ari Shapiro Mary Louise Kelly John Burnett George Floyd Jack Spear Tamara Keith America Hamas BBC 11 days 19 Hate Crimes Act NPR 12 dead Department of Homeland Securit President Gaza Israel Department of Justice Security Council Georgia
"mary louise" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Or visit w N. Y. C. Dot or that was Mary Louise Kelly. One of the anchors are a host of all things considered. If you've heard and you've listened to W, N Y C. You have heard Mary Louise Kelly as she has been Conducting wonderful interviews the past year about the pandemic and other issues. This is morning edition on Michael Hill. And with me today is W. Marcie's program Director Jackman Sin Cottam. This is the first day of W N. Y. C s spring fundraiser. In order for the drive to get a strong start. We're looking to get 3000 donations by noon on Friday. Listeners support is the largest source of w N Y C is funding and insurers that W m I C can continue to come to you. And the entire community. So be one of the 3000 make a contribution to support W. N. Y. C today. Call 888376 W and Y. C. That's 888376. 9692 or simply look for the donate button That's at W N Y. C that orc Thank you so much. If you've made a pledge this morning or in our response to our spots the last few days talking about that goal of raising 3000 donations by noon tomorrow. We do appreciate your support, and every single contribution at whatever amount you can afford, makes a difference and his meaningful to us. So thank you very much. One thing that we are experiencing this past year as a result of the pandemic is a loss in sponsorship support from the businesses and cultural institutions that we generally rely on for those support messages that you hear on W. N. Y. C. But the continued economics shutdown has created significant Headwinds for w. N. Y. C as these organizations have paused their sponsorship support of W. N. Y. C. So we've lost millions of dollars that we anticipated we would get when we were putting our budgets together last year. But I want to say one thing that's really helped us is the partnership of our monthly sustaining members that reliable source knowing how much we're going to begin. How much income we're going to be getting on a monthly basis from those monthly contributions is really helpful. So if you're not a sustaining member, we hope you'll consider becoming one today. All it means is you set up Whatever amount you think is the right amount to donate to W. N. Y. C. Many people give $10 a month, $15 a month or $20 a month, and you can set that up with your credit card, And then it automatically happens each and every month, but you don't lose control..

Mary Louise Kelly last year Michael Hill 888376. 9692 W. Marcie Jackman Sin Cottam 888376 3000 donations this morning today 3000 W, N Y C. millions of dollars past year $15 a month $20 a month w N Y C One $10 a month this past year
"mary louise" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Mary Louise Kelly on day 10 of open conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. President Biden called Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu again fourth call that we know of this week, Biden told Netanyahu. He expects to see a significant de escalation today on the path to a cease fire in Gaza. Now, whether that happens what that might look like and what Israel's next move, maybe are not yet clear. But our next guest has deep insight into Netanyahu's thinking. Ron Dermer, Israel's former ambassador to the United States. He remains a close adviser to Netanyahu. And he is on the line now from Jerusalem, Ambassador Thanks for being with US My pleasure. Let me put to you as someone who has navigated both Israeli and American politics for many years. What is your read on this latest call between Biden and Netanyahu? What is the message? You hear the U. S delivering Well, I think probably the president is facing internal pressures within his party to be more forceful in asking for calm, But I think that President Biden has somebody who has traditionally and especially in the last few days is has certainly backed Israel's right to defend itself. It might just be him, signaling that he I think both Internally within America. But maybe globally that he'd like to see this come to a close. I could tell you Israelis would like to see Ah, way to find a cease fire every time one of these flare ups happens. You know, public opinion here in the U. S hardens a little against Israel. Support for Palestinians is growing. And I wonder. In Israel. Do Israeli see that? Well, I mean, I think they hear reports about it. But you know, it doesn't matter because we're not a public opinion issue. We're not an experiment on somebody's White board. Somewhere. We're real sovereign country with over nine million citizens, and they want their government to protect that. So I think public opinion matters to them. There's no question about that. And actually, in some cases, it infuriates them because they say, here we have a terror organization. It's not a battle between Israelis and Palestinians. It's a terror organization that controls Gaza, not just the terror organization, but a genocidal one that called you talk about Hamas, which is recognized I'm talking about Come on. National is a terror organization. So on So when they see people being sympathetic with commas in any way, and even though I think many Americans, they're not sympathetic with Hamas that they see the civilian casualties and the pictures. They're coming from Gaza, and somebody would have to have a heart of stone to not be moved by. I really think Mary Louise did no country in the history of the world has taken such great lengths to keep the civilians of the enemy population out of harm's way. Even the reports that you have from Gaza right now. What you're talking about. The number of civilians have been killed. Even the worst reports think to say that it's about one toe one. Israel is fighting this war in a way that other countries do not fight wars thousands of miles away, let alone let me when they're 10 cities are being rocketed. Let me let me put you a policy question. It's about sequencing. It's about how this ends. We have been trying to hear from his many people as we can across Israel across Gaza across the region. And today we heard from Hamas. NPR spoke with Bassem name has a spokesman for Hamas. We reached him in Gaza. I wanna What you hear part of what he told us. We have seen it from the beginning. We already to stop immediately if there's a really strong their aggression, But this is the place for implants to destroy more houses and to kill more people and to a smash more families. Investor Dermer understanding, of course, that every country, including Israel has the right to defend itself. You are the stronger power here. Why not go first? I don't understand why, if Israel's the stronger power that makes any difference, you just had a Representative, a spokesman for terror organization. And Mary Louise. It's important to tell your audience This is an organization that calls for the murder of Jews worldwide. Let me stop because assistant tell, But you know why? Why doesn't Israel stopped? The shooting fell. Answer The question The question. The context has to be given to the people of the United States. I think you have an obligation is a journalist, a journalist toe also explain what we're dealing with whatever Hamas may or may not be. Why not go first? Why not put it in the first place? Why not one more in terms of stopping shooting? The reason why you don't have a cease fire is that Israel has to degrade Thomas's capabilities when we achieve that military objective When we restored to terms, which means that Hamas has to understand that they should never have started this violence in the first place and has to be deterred from starting such violence in the future. When our military finishes the job that it was assigned to do by the by the political leaders in the country, then Israel would not have to move forward. But it's not a question of let's just let's just stop firing for a few hours because you know what's gonna happen. We're going to have around five and round six and round seven and round eight. And how do we get out of this is we have to deliver commas a lethal blow. Now, in my own opinion, even if we deliver them a very, very tough well, we must might only have a period of calm for 345 years. That may be it. Have to say listening to you. It sounds like the response to President Biden, saying he wants to see a significant de escalation. I understand you're not speaking in an official capacity for Israel, but as an advisor to Netanyahu. The answer is not yet Well, I I can't answer that question definitively. I have no doubt that President Biden supports Israel's right to defend itself. And I believe that the people of Israel just like him. Would like to see a de escalation as quickly as possible. And they'd like to see a cease fire that is a durable and sustainable cease fire and what we should be talking about and many people have to think about is how do you create Such conditions for a sustainable cease fire because what Hamas does is after the cease far they rebuild their military machine so we could degrade their capabilities, But then they'll start rebuilding it. And the question is, Will Israel act against Hamas to thwart them from rebuilding those capabilities? When Israel does does that and this is not a theoretical exercise, they can have a weapons manufacturing facility. It has long range rockets. If Israel were to attack it in six months. Will the world support us or again? Will the world instead condemn Israel for defending itself against the terror organization? Ambassador? Thank you. Thank you. Ron Dermer, Israel's former ambassador to the United States, speaking to us there from Jerusalem, one of many voices we are bringing you from the region this week as the fighting in the Middle East continues. Texas is.

Ari Shapiro Mary Louise Kelly Ron Dermer Netanyahu Mary Louise Thomas Middle East Gaza Hamas Bassem 345 years President 10 cities NPR six months Jerusalem American both today this week
With every passing day, the harder it'll be to reach vaccination targets

Coronacast

02:50 min | 1 year ago

With every passing day, the harder it'll be to reach vaccination targets

"There's been nearly three hundred thousand. Doses of coronavirus vaccine have been deleted across australia since the rollout began. But we heard from epidemiologist mary. Louise mclaughlin weeks ago that we would have to be vaccinating about one hundred and nine hundred thousand people a day to reach our targets and of course we haven't been vaccinating that many people a day for weeks now so presumably. We've gotta make up that shortfall and norman. What are these barriers at stopping us from from really ramping up this roll out to the stage that it needs to be at for us to actually make those targets well. One barrier is simple. Logistics is that we don't have the vaccine. We haven't had the vaccine in the country. We didn't get a batch of astro which was blocked by italy coming in it may well be in the future of the twenty million of doses. They may be delayed as well as if they get blocked by europe. Hopefully they won't be and so we've got a supply issue while our local supply comes on stream which is coming onstream now and that's going to be a good thing. But that's a million a week that supposedly coming on we've had more vaccine in the country we should have been able to distribute it more than we have. We haven't been able to do that. And it's been miscommunication which the federal government and general practice generates confused the communities confused and not enough. Vaccines are getting through to general practice. There are multiple issues here and of course the federal government is committed to doing this through general practice which is fine general. John apprentices wanted to do that has been success with the gp respiratory clinics and doing and we can actually see a ramp up there. But you're absolutely right. Teeing is that for every week. That goes by and you miss that target you. Just add on that target to the next week. And then you missed that target you add onto the next week. So you cumulatively are talking about much more than one hundred nine hundred thousand a day because you've got to catch up now what's going to have to happen down. The track is only going to be a limit to how much general practice can do. And we're going to have to include the state's not in the states to take over but the states can tool up. Imagine pretty quickly to provide services for large numbers of people in convention centers in football stadiums and other places independent hospitals people can get on with the regular job here and that would be for all comers. Once people immunize our high risk healthcare workers people in age care cetera. Then you could just say to people forget all this business turn up a local convention center will tell you what the waiting time is and just get it done. You don't have to make an appointment. Just turn up and anybody turn up. Who wants suits and you deliver it that way. In addition to general practice not instead of in addition. That's sort of uplift you're going to have to need and the you're going to need and the komo government will inevitably move in that direction. The only way they're going to achieve the target

Louise Mclaughlin Federal Government Norman Australia Italy Europe John Football Komo Government
Changes to voting laws across the United States

All Things Considered

07:21 min | 1 year ago

Changes to voting laws across the United States

"We have all just lived through an election in which the way many of us voted changed. A lot of Americans voted early in 2020. A lot of Americans voted by mail because of the pandemic. Now across the country, state lawmakers are weighing what our election should look like going forward. Hundreds of bills have been proposed that would restrict voting access. Hundreds of others would expand access, and this is mostly happening along party lines. Republican led states are broadly looking to add voting restrictions, while many Democratic legislatures are exploring expanding access. Well, we have got reporters. From three states with us to give us a glimpse of what is going on in there. Patch. Let me welcome Been Giles from Cage's in Phoenix. Katarina so historic from Iowa Public Radio and Anthony Brooks of W bur in Boston. Welcome all three of your primary Louise. Then I'm gonna let you start. Let's go to Arizona, which along with Georgia are maybe the state getting the most attention. Those two certainly at both swing states, both with total GOP control at the state level and all kinds of bills. That have been proposed. What what is standing out to you in Arizona? So the biggest proposed changes I see are two what's called Arizona's permanent early voting list. That's our super popular mail ballot system. That a clear majority of voters here use and have increasingly been using in years and years and years. So not new in 2020 is what you're saying. Definitely not new. No, This is a very long standing system here. You sign up for it, and you regularly get sent your ballot, So one change would make it to that. That's not permanent anymore. If you don't actually use the early ballot, you get sent before an election for two straight election cycles. You get a notice that you're getting kicked off the list, and you have to respond to that if you don't want to be removed. Democrats here say there were 126,000 voters in that situation who cast about in 2020 after not voting in 2016 or 2018, Arizona's, of course, very competitive state now so That margin. You know, 126,000 voters could matter. There's also another bill that would shrink the amount of time voters have to cast that early ballot and then new voter I d requirements when you mailed about back or being considered Catarina is any of this sounding familiar. Let's talk about what's going on in Iowa, another Republican controlled state. New restrictions have already been signed into law here. The governor did that on Monday. Ah big changes that early in person Voting and absentee voting will start 20 days before Election Day instead of 29. It was 40 days just four years ago and then deadlines for requesting a melon ballot has been moved up and those ballots have to be returned earlier, so it's really shrinking that time frame. Then in person. Polls will close at eight p.m. instead of nine PM, as they had been before for state and federal elections. Okay. And why do supporters of these changes who we should note are overwhelmingly Republican. Why did they say this is needed? Unlike in Arizona, where Democrats one big races, Republicans in Iowa one pretty much everything and retained full control of the state government. But they have said that these changes are going to help restore Iowans confidence and trust in elections. Here's representative Bobby Kaufman, speaking about the new law. This protects Iowans right to vote, and it adds certainty and security to it. This bill does not suppress one single vote. Of course, we should say that it was Republicans themselves, who created this distrust by questioning election results with false claims of widespread voter fraud. This is something these false claims have been repeated in debates in Iowa over the selection bill, and I'd also add that a lawsuit challenging these changes have already been filed. Mary Louise. I'm hearing similar claims from Republicans in Arizona, broadly speaking there, justifying these bills by arguing that voter confidence and the election must be restored. They don't acknowledge that some of them are responsible for sewing that distrust in the first place. Democrats are quick to point that out and are lining up in opposition to these bills. Here's Senator Martine Cassata, speaking about the voter. I d legislation. We hear communities tell us That this will hurt my community, my neighborhood, my vote and the people that look like me and the people that vote like me. This is going to hurt us. Okay, so a taste of the conversation under way there in Arizona and in Iowa, Anthony Brooks. Let's turn to Massachusetts, where you have got a very different story unfolding. Yeah, It's really different. Mary Louise Esso last summer. Here's a bit of background because of the pandemic, Lawmakers approved a temporary vote by mail law and as in other states, Massachusetts saw ah huge jump in voter turnout in the presidential primary and general election with with relatively few problems. So now there's a push by Democrats who control the state legislature by big numbers. To make vote by mail permanent. So here's Bill Galvin, the Democratic secretary of state, who's a big proponent of this last year test of us in many ways, it was a very challenging year. But at the same time he showed us what we could do. And I think the result was is that we had a very successful election cycle on. We want to make sure that progress is not lost. Is this controversial in Massachusetts are Republicans. They're fired up in opposition and saying similar things as we were hearing from Republicans and other states. Well, there are concerns. I mean, one concern is that any law to make mail in voting permanent will have to include significant new funding for cities in town clerks to do training and to process the big increase in mail. Balance. But in terms of pushback, Republicans have questioned why mail in voting is necessary now that it appears that the pandemic is lessening with vaccines being distributed. But even the moderate Republican governor, Charlie Baker, has said that he would favor making the law permanent. So I think chances are very good. That vote by mail is going to become permanent in Massachusetts and in the months ahead. I do want to know this debate is playing out at the national level, of course, as well. Big Fight looming in Congress over HR one. This huge bill, backed by Democrats that would expand voting access would curtail Jerry Mandarin would have something to say about some of these changes that are being proposed in at the state level and just quick lightning round for each of you. Maybe Anthony you first. How how much attention is HR one getting is this part of the conversation in Massachusetts? It's part of the conversation because our congressional delegation is all Democratic. It's very much behind HR one. But my sense is that no matter what happens in Washington, Massachusetts move toward a permanent Vote by mail legislation is coming, no matter what and Banner, Catarina, where you're so in Arizona, I think Democrats are going to make a big push for our U. S. Senators Mark Kelly and Kirsten Cinema. Get HR one through to undo a lot of what's happening at the state level. That means there's gonna be pressure on cinema to abolish the filibuster. If that's what it takes, because HR one might be the only way to get around some of this state laws that Republicans are certainly gonna pass here and are expected to be signed into law by the governor. And in Iowa Republicans are going to be more focused on this pending lawsuit that they

Arizona Anthony Brooks Iowa Bobby Kaufman Katarina Massachusetts Catarina Senator Martine Cassata Giles Louise Mary Louise Esso GOP Phoenix Bill Galvin Georgia Boston Mary Louise Jerry Mandarin Charlie Baker Legislature
Ex-U.S. Olympics gymnastics coach charged with sexual assault

90.3 KAZU Programming

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Ex-U.S. Olympics gymnastics coach charged with sexual assault

"Of the sport's most prominent coaches, who had ties to the to the notorious sports doctor, Larry Nassar has killed himself. John Getter, took his own life just hours after he was charged with two dozen crimes, including human trafficking. And sexual assault get led the U. S women's gymnastics team to a gold medal at the 2012 Summer Olympics. Joining us now is NPR Sports correspondent Tom Goldman. Hey there, Tom. Hi, Mary Louise. What else do we know? Well, we have confirmed that John get hurt, killed himself. Hours after he was charged. He was supposed to turn himself in this afternoon. He'd been investigated for the last three years. His investigation grew out of the Larry Nasaa retrial. Yes, sir, of course, was convicted of sexually abusing many, many female athletes, including some of the most famous U. S Olympic women, Jim Nous, and throughout his investigation get, ERT steadfastly maintained his innocence and that he wasn't aware of what NASA or was doing. Well, what else do we know about this? There were two dozen charges that the state of Michigan announced today. What what exactly was getting accused of having done? A Michigan attorney General Dana Nessel, um announced yes, the two dozen charges and 20 of the 24 counts for for human trafficking and forced Labor and Attorney General, Nestle explained. Human trafficking charges in a press conference today, it is alleged that John Getter used force fraud and coercion against the young athletes that came to him for gymnastics training for financial benefit to him. Victims suffer from disordered eating, including bulimia and anorexia, suicide attempts and self harm, excessive physical conditioning. Repeatedly being forced to perform even when injured Extreme emotional abuse and physical abuse, including sexual assault. Now. Mary Louise, Um Attorney General, Nestle acknowledge that cases like this don't often involve human trafficking, she said. We think of it predominantly is affecting people without the means to protect themselves from this type of crime. But she said, it can obviously affect all types of people in this case, young elite female athletes and she said. The alleged victims still carry the scars of those crimes to the state. Yeah. I said there are ties between Get ERT on Larry Nassar. What were the ties? Yeah, we'll get her was AH, longtime owner and coach at a gym near Lansing, Michigan on Git was there where hundreds of women say Larry NASA are abused them. Now Starr was the team physician and in house medical expert and get her. It's Jim for about 20 years. One of the charges today was that get lied to police about Nassar's role as the physician at his gym get hurt, allegedly told police he had never heard any complaints about Nassar's treatment of athletes. Although at least one prominent athlete contradicts that. She said she was with a group of fellow Jim Nous and get hurt, and she mentioned that NASA had abused her, She says her teammates gasped. And get hurt. Didn't react. USA Gymnastics suspended Get her during the nests are scandal and get retired in 2018. And finally today following his death by suicide, Rachel den Hollander, the first to publicly accused ness or of sexual abuse. Tweeted this so much pain and grief for everyone to the survivors. You have been heard and believed, and we stand with you. Thank you for telling the truth. NPR's Tom Goldman reporting. I think you told me you're welcome.

John Getter Larry Nassar Jim Nous Tom Goldman Mary Louise Larry Nasaa Gymnastics Dana Nessel Michigan Nestle Summer Olympics Nassar ERT NPR U. Nasa Larry Nasa TOM Bulimia Anorexia
Vaccines arrive in Australia. Now the challenge begins

Coronacast

04:26 min | 1 year ago

Vaccines arrive in Australia. Now the challenge begins

"We mocked a really significant milestone in the coronavirus pandemic e that. We've been having norman. The first isis of the fis coronavirus vaccine. Which has been approved for use by the therapeutic goods administration touchdown in australia. Ready to start rolling them at next week to the high priority groups so big milestone. what does the next phase actually look like though the rollout. Well i think a lot of it's been left to the states a suspect that what you'll see is remarkable uniformity which is the first line of defense and the first line of people who are most vulnerable as we've seen again and again and again people who are working on our borders driving buses transporting people from the airport and working in hotels looking people who've just arrived so those are the people who will be immunized i i i would imagine a right around the country that will protect them. They will get the pfizer vaccine. Mostly which is good because that gives the most chance of reducing transmission if they do get infected was protecting them against disease and then aged care and high priority. Health care workers so frontline healthcare workers that first phase and. We haven't heard too much of exactly. Who's going to do what we're in terms of administering vaccines. I know that. A lot of general practices have volunteered. We do have a good network of general practices. So should be okay. But i'm getting any feedback from various parts of australia. Saying they're really from people in the business. If you like who are saying. They're really not sure what the plans are so. I think it's still a work in progress. But the first phase shoot go ok e one would hope and then there's a process of with komo's taking responsibility for care and getting enough doses out into each care which are most vulnerable communities. Should the vaccine escape into the general community right one of the questions that were getting a lot of from people from audience members. He's will we be notified when it's when it's out turn but we don't know that yet. I'm not sure how that's how that is indeed going to work. But i assume that there are ways through medicare numbers and other means that the government can text phone number. I know but. I assume that there are ways of finding out who you are. What you've got an assume that also that your general practitioner how to battling those are the sorts of things that are not entirely clear how people will be identified individually so the scale of vaccinating an entire country even with a relatively small population like ustralia is a messy. Ask so we heard last week will health organization expert advisor from the university of new south. Wales mary louise mc laws saying that. We're going to need to vaccinate something like one hundred ninety thousand people per day to get to the targets that have been set for october this year. Is that going to be feasible. Well low to middle income countries do mass vaccination programmes all the time but they do frequently in fact some some would say that. They're better equipped than many advanced countries richer countries to do this and we've had a rabies outbreak through extraordinary numbers very quickly and and so you can get large venues with nurses factory. Like processes logistic simplified dines. It's all there and people head for mass vaccination areas. You can actually get through very large numbers very quickly if you need to you so those numbers are not impossible. But they are hard to achieve. It's gonna take a ramp up so we're going to start off slow and then ramp up from there. The rate limiting step is actually going to be the supply of vaccines. Are we going to have seven. Hundred thousand dozes available a week and it's going to take a while to to that point so i think that's the issue rob van. Can we administer those vaccines. i mean. Interestingly we do fifty to sixty thousand covid tests a day nationally at the moment perhaps a similar framework could be used to roll out the vaccines. Yeah i think they are thinking of respiratory clinics that model being used as well with the drive through with the general general practitioners which was very useful as well as public hospitals providing those sort of drive through facilities as well. You can get through very large numbers. You just go to have accused people ready together. You've got to have the supply. You gotta have the cold chain and you've got to be computerized so that you can enter people's names into the register and you've got to somewhere where you can keep them for fifteen minutes and then observe them with resuscitation facilities so it's not a simple as during the

Therapeutic Goods Administrati FIS Australia University Of New South Wales Mary Louise Mc Norman Komo Pfizer Medicare Rob Van
"mary louise" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. This hour. The impeachment trial opens with arguments over whether it's constitutional to have this trial at all. Also ahead, a possible release from prison for the Saudi activist who led the fight for women to be allowed to drive in the kingdom. Her existence Shattered the whole government narrative off in power and woman, and we remember the music and voice of Mary Wilson, one of the founding members of the Supremes. We did dare to dream at a time when it was almost an impossible dream for us to want to be stars. That's ahead after these news headlines. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack's fear. Former President Donald Trump's second historic impeachment trial began with fiery arguments from both sides, including a powerful 13 minute video showing in graphic detail violence carried out by his followers last month at the U. S. Capitol, the Senate, then voting 55 to 44 that it has jurisdiction and can proceed with the case. Trump's defense. MPR's Tamarick, he said, it harkens back to the first impeachment trial. This is the argument that they have been making me in some ways. It's not even that different than the argument that was made in President Trump's first impeachment, which was simply That these Democrats have Trump Derangement syndrome, and they are trying to get rid of him remove him from public life any way possible. That is essentially the argument that Trump's legal team is making this time and made last time to NPR's Tamara Keith Trump is charged with inciting insurrection connection with the mob attack. By the administration today said states will see their application of Corona virus vaccines rise next week to 11 million. That's up by two million weekly doses since President Biden took office. But many states say it's still not enough. Here's NPR's Our quest involved. In California. The vaccination effort is still very much a work in progress with stadium sites across the nation's most populous state, either vaccinating well under capacity or not yet, up and running at the opening Tuesday of the newest site, Santa Clara counties, Levi Stadium Governor Gavin Newsom said supply continues to be the challenge. That's the constraint. When.

Donald Trump Tamara Keith Trump NPR President Mary Louise Kelly Supremes Ari Shapiro Mary Wilson President Biden Gavin Newsom Levi Stadium MPR California Santa Clara Senate Jack Tamarick
"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly 67 votes that is what will be needed to convict Donald Trump in the impeachment child that got underway today in the Senate. And with the Senate evenly divided, the question remains will enough. Republicans joined Democrats to find the former president guilty of high crimes and misdemeanors. Well. A month ago, Republican Congressman Adam Kinzinger of Illinois told me he thought there was a significant chance It could happen and he's back now. Congressman Welcome back Thank you. It's gonna be with you. So you and I last spoke on January 13th the day that the house voted to impeach Trump A second time you were only a you were one of only 10. Republicans voting to impeach. Do you still believe there is a significant chance the Senate will vote to convict Well, boy, it just reminds you how it hasn't been that long. But it feels like an eternity and I'll play of, I think less and less likely that they're gonna vote to convict. I think the question is how many Republican senators, you know, end up voting that way, But it really has been kind of disturbing to see how what happened on January 6th. The next day, we were clear eyed And then it's kind of faded, and it's faded to the desire of politics and political victories. And so I don't know the number I think like you think it's faded. Hmm. Yeah, well, look, I think what's happened is Again. You wake up with the emotion of the moment and then you know, the politics comes into play and Donald Trump price to reassert his power. Of course, if you're Republican, the Republican base Eyes still with Donald Trump. Generally, even though that's starting to crumble Little and I think politics just comes into play and it it clouds what I think is really a constitutional Keeping decision about whether or not this was an impeachable offense, and I think there's no doubt it. What is it? This isn't I really can't speak of what unimpeachable on removable offense would be It's funny listening to you. That's almost verbatim the line that Democrat Jamie Raskin, who's leading the House. Impeachment managers made on the floor of the Senate today, which you know prompts me to ask this. I know you were watching the trial today in the Senate, as many of us were, I wonder if you were struck. As I was that, unlike the first impeachment, which was about Ukraine, and things happening far away, this is such a deeply personal trial for for every member of Congress sitting there, listening Got really is And you know, every member of Congress with this firsthand, and so I think some of the people that kind of rely on the crutch of process in this and you know time and we don't have enough You lived it. You know, you saw it and Words that went to this weren't just on January 6. That was really a foundation for the last four years of setting up to a stolen election. And, you know, I've become friends with some of the officers, one in particular that was involved and really just know now for his defense of the Capitol. I'll tell you, Uh, I realized it's one thing in the military to fight a foreign enemy on behalf of your country. It's another thing to face down. Fellow Americans speaking the same language you do sounding like Ugo saying the things that were being said, and it's just a whole new level Ystad and it's one that if there is no accountability for I can't imagine after one police officer Is dead, too. Took their own life. Um, how in the world is this going to get better without people taking a stand and saying this is wrong? I read your op ed in The Washington Post this morning, which was titled My fellow Republicans. Convicting Trump is necessary to save America. You're pleading in it with others in your party to choose a path away from Trump. And as I read it, I thought, I wonder what kind of conversations he's having with other Republicans. When you make this case to them. What do they tell you? Well for colleagues. They're receptive. They you know there's obviously political pressure and public pressure. But I'll tell you when I want the country first movement, Um, the one thing that I started noticing. Is there a lot of people that came out of the woodwork that were or are Republicans? So I'm thinking of leaving. Some have left. Some are fine Being. Republicans are concerned that just were saying Thank you for giving us a voice and a place to go first. Um, a lot of independence. I've been hurt from some Democrats that are saying things like we recognize the need. Very functional Republican party, So I think there's a real desire out there for getting back to doing politics professionally and starting the lead by inspiration instead of fear. Are you thinking of leaving five years from now? Do you think you will still be a Republican? I think the answer to that question will be evident when it's evident. If this party continues to go down the track of you know, authoritarianism and Pledging loyalty to a man above a constitution. And certainly I wouldn't be a Republican, but my hope Is that as people wake up and take inventory of what happened, no realized how wrong this path is. And that's what I'm gonna try to lead people toe. Understand? Wonder if you're thinking about it, though. You know people like to talk about big tents in American politics. Is the Republican tent big enough to hold Donald Trump, Marjorie Taylor Greene and you? I don't think it is big enough to hold all of us as they are now, and I think that's where you can't just leave. I think you know there's gonna be these two major parties. I think the Republican Party will be around for a long time. The key is to fight for it and to do battle for it. If we lose this battle the battle for sanity, the Republican Party will eventually recognize it. Ali because gonna lose elections everywhere. My hope is to get the Republican party there sooner than in 10 or 15 years. I want to follow on something You just said when you were talking about hearing from from thousands of your constituents, most of whom have been overwhelmingly supportive. Until in you. They appreciate your efforts to try to return the GOP to a foundation of principle, not personality..

Donald Trump Republican Party Senate Um Trump Congressman Adam Kinzinger Congressman Ari Shapiro Congress president Jamie Raskin Illinois Mary Louise Kelly Ukraine The Washington Post Ali Ugo America officer
South Africa suspends rollout of Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine

All Things Considered

04:18 min | 1 year ago

South Africa suspends rollout of Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine

"Whether it needs to change its guidance around the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine. This comes after South Africa decided to delay a vaccination campaign that was supposed to start next week. South Africa made that decision after a small study called into question whether the AstraZeneca vaccine works against a variant that is now the dominant strain there. So is this a setback for AstraZeneca? Is it a detour? Is it nothing at all? NPR's Jason Beaubien is here with hopefully some inside on all down. Hey, Jason. Hey, Mary Louise, So I think I have to start by asking the big question. Are these new variants mutating so fast that there rendering the vaccine useless before we can even get it out and everybody's arms. You know, that's what everybody's really worried about. I can tell you definitively that it's way too early to say that right now that this AstraZeneca vaccine isn't useless against the variant that's spreading in Southern Africa. But we are seeing some worrying signs. This was a fairly small study. It was predominantly of young, healthy South Africans, and it found that a reasonable number of people who got vaccinated still ended up getting mild cases of disease like nobody got sick, really, really sick. Nobody died in the study was even designed to test for that. But this was combined with some lab studies in Southern Africa that showed some other worrying signs and there's concern that you know, South Africa. Was supposed to be starting This mass vaccination campaign next week on bones would be the first mass vaccination campaign in all of southern substation in Africa on bit was going to be with the AstraZeneca shot in Salima dill cream. He's AnAnd visor to the South African government. He told the W. H o today that South African decided to put that campaign on hold. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people of two million people with a vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease. So instead, they're going to switch to doing the mass vaccination campaign with Johnson and Johnson's vaccine into a much smaller distribution of the AstraZeneca vaccine that closely monitor that, And if there are higher rates of hospitalizations or cases among the South Africans getting AstraZeneca, then we'll deal with that, at that point Okay, so some important really important qualifiers you've given us this was a very small right study and AstraZeneca, which is not one of the vaccines being given out right now, in the U. S. Correct, So the guidance stands if you can get the vaccine when it's your turn. Get the vaccine. Absolutely in United States. This vaccine has not been been authorized yet. United States although the U. S has purchased some for down the road, okay, but But there are global implications to this. How big a deal is this development outside of South Africa. You know, there's sort of two parts to that one is that this very isn't as much of a problem outside of Southern Africa. You know, at least not yet It might become a some point time. But the expectation is the AstraZeneca vaccine will continue to be effective in other parts of the world. The second part is that this vaccine is an incredibly important part of the global efforts to get people vaccinated. Particularly in low and middle income countries, And if there are cracks with this vaccine and turns out, it doesn't respond to variants very well. Then that could really be problematic. Although why, because couldn't other countries switched to another vaccine, just like it sounds, South Africa is going to try to switch to Johnson and Johnson. That the problem is that right now, there just isn't enough vaccine out there or even in the pipeline, and AstraZeneca is a huge portion of both the current supply and the expected supply that's supposed to be coming in the coming months. On dis is also going to be. People are hoping sort of this vaccine workhorse. It would work well in low and middle income countries. It's cheap. You don't need some special super cold fridge to store it. You know, and it's currently being made in Europe and in India and South Korea. They're manufacturing in Argentina and Brazil in the WH Ose program to distribute vaccine equitably among 190 countries at the moment. It's plan was to depend almost entirely on the AstraZeneca vaccine. That is NPR's Jason Beaubien reporting. Thank you, Jason, You're welcome. Tomorrow as former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial gets underway. Senate Majority

Astrazeneca South Africa Jason Beaubien Southern Africa Salima Severe Disease Mary Louise Johnson NPR Oxford South African Government U. Jason Anand United States Africa South Korea Argentina Brazil Europe
After Record Turnout, Republicans Are Trying to Make It Harder to Vote

All Things Considered

05:25 min | 1 year ago

After Record Turnout, Republicans Are Trying to Make It Harder to Vote

"Louise Kelly, a record 158 million Americans voted last November. Many cast their ballots early and by mail well now, in the aftermath of President Biden's victory, some Republican state lawmakers are proposing bills that would effectively make it harder to vote. Here to talk us through what is happening with voting laws in three states where the 2020 election was really close our Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting, Abigail, since key of WK are in Lansing, Michigan. And been Giles of Cage's in Phoenix. Arizona. Welcome all three of you. Thanks. Thank you. Thank you for having us, Steven. I've got to start with you. Not only because George is my home state, but because there has, of course been so much focus on Georgia and on Trump's efforts to throw out Biden's victory there. What are GOP lawmakers they're discussing. Well this week, Many Republican lawmakers who pushed false claims of election fraud have signed on to a number of bills in the Senate aimed at making it harder to vote. And that's after Democrats flipped both U. S Senate seats and help defeat President Trump. They would do things like Ban absentee ballot. Dropbox is severely restrict who could request a mail in absentee ballot and would undo the so called motor voter law that automatically updates your voter registration. Whenever you go to the D. M V. Now there are a few proposals that seem most likely to be enacted. One would add some sort of security requirement when you request an absentee by male vote in the future, such as writing your driver's license I d number or sending in a photocopy of your I D when you request a ballot, All right, let's head west over to Arizona Been a zoo, you know Well, Biden's victory was razor thin there as it was in Georgia. What is the debate unfolding where you are? Well, we're seeing voting laws that would impact every step of the voting process. Starting with getting registered. One measure would make it more difficult for county officials to go out into the community and hold voter registration drives. There was even a bill to abolish the incredibly popular vote by mail system in Arizona. The sponsor backtracked off that idea within hours of introducing the bill. What other ideas include requiring people to get early ballot envelopes notarized that's been described by some as a poll tax, and another proposal says You could get an early ballot mailed to you, but you couldn't tell it back. They want you to hand deliver it to a polling place, and perhaps the most controversial ideas would directly impact the presidential election results. One plan would divvy up electoral college votes by congressional district like Maine and Nebraska. Another would actually let the Legislature straight up, revoke the certification of results and let lawmakers pick who gets the electoral college votes. Wow. Um, Abigail. How about Michigan Democrats control the executive branch, but Republicans control the Legislature. How does that dynamic play out in terms of what's happening with voting laws on the discussion over what to do with him in Michigan? Well, it's been a real split screen. We have Democrats and clerks who are pointing to this election as the safest and most secure of their careers. Bar. Bayram is one of the clerks from the larger counties and Michigan, and she called on Republicans this week to say what's been clear throat. All of these hearings that this election was fair and free of fraud. At the end of the day. If people do not want to believe this backed, they're not gonna believe it. Regardless of how many audits are performed. Reports are issue or how transparent the processes and in Michigan are. Democratic Secretary of State is saying she wants to do things like male absentee ballot applications to registered voters and federal elections. Republicans are countering with things like putting cameras on unstaffed ballot. Dropbox is neither of those are likely to get very far. But there is middle ground on issues like making sure there's common training for pole challengers on Stephen and been a quick quick reaction from each of you on that. How much of this in your state? It is. Real policy proposal. How much is for show? Well, Mary Louise after the last couple months of hand wringing over votes we've seen top Republican lawmakers in Georgia say that they're not going to do some of the more extreme proposals. They're not for cutting, no excuse absentee voting, and many of these bills are likely just to appease their constituents who say that more needs to be done. Why do Republicans in your states say changes like this are necessary, Given that there were no major issues with absentee voting in the 2020 election, Given that federal officials have confirmed it was the most secure election in American History. Stephen Bendy one. Do you want to take that one? Justification in Arizona is Pretty simply put as distrust, citing the misinformation that's out there and citing the fact that there are a lot of these Republicans constituents who say they have doubts whether or not those doubts are based on any valid information. Republicans have kind of push past that and just said the fact that there are doubt justifies continued discussions about the election. And changes to the law that they say might inspire some more confidence

Louise Kelly President Biden Stephen Fowler Georgia Public Broadcasting Michigan President Trump Arizona Biden Abigail Georgia Senate Dropbox Lansing Giles Bayram Donald Trump Legislature GOP Steven Phoenix
Biden signs orders reversing major Trump immigration policies

WNYC Programming

03:34 min | 2 years ago

Biden signs orders reversing major Trump immigration policies

"Biden signed a flurry of executive orders tonight, including measures rolling back parts of the Trump Administration's immigration crackdown. We also got more details on an immigration bill that Biden hopes to get passed in Congress. NPR's Joel Rose covers immigration Hegel. Hey, Mary Louise, So biting made a lot of campaign promises to do with immigration. What specifically? Do the executive orders today address? Right? Well, they deliver on some of those promises for sure he signed an executive order. Lifting the travel ban on people from majority Muslim countries, which Biden had pledged during the campaign to do on day one. President Biden also signed a proclamation halting construction of the border wall on the southern border. And plans to roll back Trump's aggressive enforcement tactics in the interior of the U. S. And the Biden administration, also today sent a big, ambitious immigration overhaul bill to Congress. With so much happening in the country with Corona virus and other urgent emergencies. There was some question about whether the administration would make immigration a top priority right off the bat. And I think the answer we got today is yes, it's fair to say this is a U turn very much of your turn from the Trump administration, both in substance. It sounds like also in tone for sure. President Trump frequently talked about immigrants. As a burden and a threat. President Biden seemed to allude to that in his inauguration speech today when he said that quote native ism, fear and demonization have long torn us apart. When Biden and Harris talk about immigration. By contrast, they talk about restoring humanity to the system and treating immigrants as a central workers and valued community members. And even in this immigration bill, they want to replace the word alien in U. S immigration law with the word non citizen. So this is a big shift on immigration. And I think that's part of what the administration is trying to signal with this flurry of action right out of the gate, right? Okay, So let me turn you to the other piece of this. The immigration bill. Which, of course the Biden administration cannot do on its own. They need Congress to buy in as well. What is in this bill? Well, a long list of reforms that immigrant advocates have wanted to see for years. The headline Is. It would provide a pathway to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants for most of those immigrants that would take eight years, but it could happen faster for some groups, including people who are enrolled in Dhaka. Which protects immigrants who are brought to the country illegally, as Children, also farm workers and immigrants who came here fleeing war and natural disasters in their native countries. One immigrant advocate called this the most progressive legalization bill in history. We should note that Congress has debated immigration reform for years for decades. Does this bill have a chance of passing now? Well, it's true that Democrats now control both the House and the Senate. Whether they can get this done is still a real question. Their Senate majority in particular is razor thin, and it is not clear how many Republicans, if any, they would get to sign on to this bill. I mean, we've already heard from some lawmakers who are rejecting this as quote mass amnesty, they argue it only encourage more illegal immigration. This legislation does not include a lot of what Republicans would want to see in a comprehensive overhaul bill. They would want more workplace enforcement, for example, to make sure Cos they're hiring legal workers. So it would not surprise me to see this bill eventually get scaled back to try to attract more bipartisan support. But it's interesting that the Biden administration is out there pushing forward on day one, despite pretty dismal record in recent history for immigration bills.

Biden President Biden Biden Administration Trump Administration Joel Rose Congress President Trump Mary Louise U. Hegel NPR Donald Trump Harris Dhaka Senate House
State Capitols Nationwide Prepare For Possible Inauguration Violence

All Things Considered

01:48 min | 2 years ago

State Capitols Nationwide Prepare For Possible Inauguration Violence

"Attacks on the U. S. Capitol state capitals throughout the country are preparing for the possibility of violence that might coincide with the inauguration of President elect Joe Biden. Among the state's bracing for who knows what over this next week is Arkansas, where a PSA Hutchinson is governor. He's Republican. He is vice chair of the National Governors Association. And he joins me now, Governor Good to speak with you again. Good to be with you, Mary Louise. Thank you all dive right in with the basic question. How concerned are you about possible unrest there in little rock? You have to be concerned after what everyone saw in our nation's capital last week. I think about our school Children. I think about those that have been in our nation's capital, and it's a horrific sight that will sear in our memory for years to come. And so the first concentration is let's have a successful inauguration in Washington, and we are actually sending 500 of our National Guardsmen to Washington D C to help with the total effort of securing our capital, and I think that's important for governor to participate in in terms of our state capital. I have been in homeland security. I understand threat and threat analysis. Sometimes the intelligence is difficult to ascertain. But in this climate We're taking every precaution were aware of certain rallies that will be conducted in our state Capitol in Little Rock on We have security in place or And in reserve. We've also we have strengthened our physical security of the capital will tell me a little bit more about some of

U. S. Capitol State Capitals President Elect Joe Biden Psa Hutchinson National Governors Association Mary Louise Arkansas National Guardsmen Washington Little Rock
"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

"Elsa Chang. And I'm Mary Louise Kelly. This hour what the U. S. Could learn from the way the UK traced a new corona virus variant. It's very important to do as the UK did, because if you start to identify where the most concerning variants exist, you can move your public health effort to stop that one. Also, young voters in Uganda are turning out in force ahead of Thursday's election. I think that benchmark off democracy they cannot take an excuse of democracy, and that's why they're on the streets fighting and a promising new medical treatment for meth addiction. First, these news headlines Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. The house has voted 232 to 1 97 to impeach President Donald Trump for second time. NPR's costly snow. Reports 10 Republicans voted with Democrats to impeach the president on a charge of incitement of insurrection. In a capital surrounded by fence, razor wire and armed guards. Members of the House voted for a second time to impeach President Trump. The historic moment comes one week after a violent mob attacked the U. S Capitol as Congress met to certify the results of the 2020 presidential election. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says blamed for the attacks lies with President Trump. He must go. He is a clear and present danger to the nation that we all love. The house is expected to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate shortly. Senate Republicans do not plan to return to Washington to begin impeachment proceedings, meaning and eventual trial will almost certainly begin on Lee after Trump leaves office on January 20th. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington Federal authorities now say they've arrested dozens of people in connection with last week's U. S. Capitol insurrection as their nationwide search for suspects continues. NPR's Kirk Siegler. Reports in Idaho Man seen jumping onto the floor of the U. S. Senate is now in custody. 34 year old Josiah Kal El to Boise has turned himself into custody here on his own videos posted to Facebook, he admits being part of the mob, according to authorities falsely boasting. He was the first to sit in Nancy Pelosi's chair. He refers to her as a derogatory expletive, and she's a traitor, she treasonous, according to a court filing. Federal authorities say cold actually jumped down into the Senate chamber and appears to have sat in the vice president's chair. This day been given to the local CBS News affiliate called appears to now regret his involvement in the insurrection, reportedly saying in the moment he thought he was doing the right thing. Kirk Siegler NPR news boys he never Covad 19 vaccine could be available for American soon as NPR's Joel Palka explains. It's a vaccine that appears to be effective after a.

President Trump NPR House Speaker Nancy Pelosi U. S. Senate president Josiah Kal El Kirk Siegler Mary Louise Kelly Senate chamber vice president Elsa Chang UK CBS News Uganda Jack Spear Kelsey Snell Washington
"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"mary louise" Discussed on KCRW

"Mary Louise Kelly. This our House Democrats want President Trump to resign or be removed from office. We'll hear more about where impeachment efforts stand. Ask yourselves is gunfire and the speaker's lobby a new normal. You're willing to accept. And former FBI Director James Comey weighs in on why he thinks Trump should be impeached, but not federally prosecuted. We don't want him center of our lives. I'd rather him in his bathroom, yelling at cars on the lawn at Mar A Lago with the camera lights off, Plus Mississippi flies a new state flag. Now news Lie from NPR News. I'm Jack Spear. In an extraordinary an unusual move. The country's top military leaders have signed a joint statement harshly condemning last week's ride at the U. S. Capitol. More from NPR's Greg Marie. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs, Army General Mark Milley and the other members say the January 6th Fry. It was a quote, direct assault on the U. S. Congress, the Capitol building and our constitutional process. Million. Other senior military leaders have stated repeatedly that they do not want the armed forces involved in U. S politics, but the violence has prompted them to take a more public position. The statement added that freedom of speech does not give anyone the right to resort to violence, sedition and insurrection. There was no mention of President Trump. But the statement by the Joint Chiefs stated that President elect Joe Biden would become commander in chief on January 20th. Greg, My RE NPR NEWS Washington As president Trump faces what is likely to be his second impeachment by the House this week, lawmakers are moving to remove the president even faster. They've now started debate on the topic of whether to attempt to remove Trump from office, using the 25th amendment, calling on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke his constitutional authority to carry that out. Although that's not likely to happen. There was growing disenfranchisement from Trump by members of his own party. Includes the share of the House Republican Conference. Congresswoman Liz Cheney. Impeachment vote in the House is expected tomorrow. Around the country. Officials and law enforcement personnel are taking steps to tighten security of state Capitol buildings. NPR's Greg Allen reports that follows a warning by the FBI that arm protester being planned it all 50 state capitals. In many states, legislatures are convening new sessions this week with tighter security in place in Olympia. Washington National Guard troops wrong hand is to protesters were arrested Monday for trying to enter the statehouse grounds. Michigan has banned openly carrying firearms in the capital there, a scene of armed protest through last spring following last week's violence in Washington, D C. Representative Geraldine Thompson of Florida says security is a concern. We're now even more, um, on Alert if if that's the best word for our safety, as lawmakers in Atlanta and 8 FT security fence is now being erected around the Georgia Capitol, Greg Allen NPR NEWS all air passengers entering the U. S will not be required provide a negative Corona virus test, according.

President Trump President NPR News NPR James Comey Joint Chiefs Greg Allen FBI U. S. Capitol Mary Louise Kelly Washington Congresswoman Liz Cheney Vice President Greg Marie House Republican Conference Washington National Guard Greg Jack Spear
With Congress Considering Impeachment, What's Trump's Next Move?

Marketplace

02:46 min | 2 years ago

With Congress Considering Impeachment, What's Trump's Next Move?

"What will President Trump's next move be with nine days left in office, with lawmakers in Congress moving to impeach again? And with possible indictments looming when he's no longer president a question to put to Stephen Groves who worked in the White House until June of last year as a special assistant to the president and deputy press secretary. Mr Grove's could speak with you again. Thanks for me on Mary Louise. What should President Trump do you know? Well, you know, um, he's already signaled that there's going to be a you know a transition of power after the inauguration day, actually, But, yes, he's acknowledged they'll be a transition going well, I don't know how much more he can do until that day, Mary Louise, you You go ahead and say that there's going to be a transition and you know what he does between now and then I don't know how much can be done. I don't know if they're any last minute executive actions to be taken or if he's just going toe. Take it easy. We know one thing for sure he's not going to be on Twitter or Other social media platforms because he's been banned, so we might not. I don't know how we're going to find out what he's doing anymore because he's not on Twitter. Well, if you want to tell us what he's doing, he could walk downstairs into a press conference or he could do what you're doing and given interview, But anyway, let me ask about something specific. And thanks for having me on too. By the way, I'm glad that there are Platforms that still allow conservatives and Republicans on so I do appreciate it. We're always delighted to have conservative voices on our Erin. We're glad that you were with us. Let me ask you this. Should the president speak out? To stop the plans to demonstrate at state capitals on to stop plans of armed writers coming back to Washington bearing arms in advance for the inauguration next week. I think that would be a great help to the country if he did if he could make it crystal clear on whatever platforms are available to him, that peaceful protest is permitted. Anything beyond that. Any violence and he pushing of police and he confronting the police and any type of violence at all or storming government buildings. Is not what the Republican Party is about. It is counterproductive. It is what the Antifa and BLM writers did all summer long. We're better than that. He should send that message. So it clear warning delivered. Now you think would be helpful. Do you think it is likely? We'll have to see you know, Inauguration is ah, while away. It would be nice if everyone kind of tried to lower the temperature, But we hear of impeachment and vocation of the 25th amendment on these things. It would be best for folks here in D. C, where you and I are if the temperature gets lowered over the next 10 days and not sent to a boiling

President Trump Mary Louise Stephen Groves Mr Grove Twitter White House Congress Erin Washington Republican Party BLM
Why the Trump campaign continues to fight election results despite court losses

All Things Considered

05:01 min | 2 years ago

Why the Trump campaign continues to fight election results despite court losses

"The presidential election. President Trump lost the election. Counties and states are starting to certify results of Biden's victory. The Trump campaign continues to mount legal challenges, and they continue to fail. But even though his defeat is clear, the president refuses to concede we want to talk more about why and what it might mean for the country. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson is here for that. How? Tamara? Hi, Mary Louise. The president insists he is challenging the results because he really believes he won. Really, With all the facts pointing otherwise. Is there more to this? I think there is more to it. Donald Trump's brand is about being a winner about never, ever losing. Remember, he's always come out of every loss, like his bankruptcies or failed businesses. Somehow making himself look like a winner. This election is the biggest, most public losses ever suffered. So the stakes for his political future and his ability to continue to monetize his brand are very high. There is a kind of method to his madness. He needs to create this false narrative to be able to walk off the stage without admitting he lost so he can maintain political viability, maintain a firm grip on the base of the Republican Party, especially in case he wants to run again. But there are also real consequences to that. He's his refusal to concede defeat or to accept a peaceful transfer of power to spread these false conspiracy theories are hurting Americans confidence in the most basic element of our democracy, which is free and fair elections. We know from polling that growing numbers of Republicans feel that believed that Trump won the election and it was stolen from him. Another Syrian, making the rounds that I want you to speak to more some of the president's defenders. In fairness, Even some conservatives who don't seem too particularly like President Trump. They have argued Look, Democrats never accepted Trump as the legitimate president. Democrats in their hearts didn't really except the 2016 outcome. This argument goes so. So what is the difference? Moralize and what is the difference? I think there is a difference. He has a absolute right to contest. This is long as he wants in the court. But what happened in 2016? Hillary Clinton did not challenge the legal outcome of the election. She called Trump and conceded even before the networks had called the 270 electoral votes for him. She did win the popular vote, but no one says that Trump didn't win under the rules. Of how America elects its president. He it was the legitimate president. They might not a liked him. He lost the popular vote. But that's different than what's happening now, you know, Trump allies. Even down to some local Republicans in Wayne County, Michigan, actually resisted certifying the results before reversing themselves. Last night, they appeared to be making actual attempts to undermine legitimate ballots cast in Heavily democratic, racially diverse cities. So a lot of Republicans are now saying, Hey, you've got to put up or walk it. Walk away. Don't let the perception settle that you're a sore loser, just trying to overturn a fair election. What is it? Steak for the president here for Donald Trump personally. I think there's a lot of steak, you know, he has mused privately about running in 2024. He's setting up a super PAC that would fund his expenses for that. There also are a lot of consequences for the Republican Party. Is it tries to chart its future? Put aside, all the other Republicans want to run in 2024, which they really can't do? As long as he's out there, saying he might But you know the debate about what is Trump is imposed. Trump has been going on since 2016. But it can't really continuous long as Trump is on the stage. You know, there's that old country music song. How can I miss you when you won't go away? And right now the Republican Party stands for whatever Trump wants at a given moment, But there are also some perils for Trump himself continuing to aggressively contest The results of this election and his allies have been saying Don't look like a sore loser. They're charting a path for him to coming back in 2024, which includes a graceful concession, cooperating with Biden may be giving a farewell address with a kind of MacArthur resc pledge. I shall return you will in the more immediate future. Look ahead with us because one way or another January 20th is coming. President elect Biden will become president Biden. Do we know quite what to expect from President Trump at that point? No, we don't. There are a lot of questions. We don't know what it's like to have an ex president who's not quietly off the stage. That's kind of the final Democratic norm for presidents to gracefully give your successor a chance, a sign of respect for the voters and the outcome of the election. But we have every reason to believe that Trump will be tweeting every day. Even as a private citizen, he might create his own streaming digital platform to as an alternative to Fox Baby who launches 2024 campaign. We don't think he'll weigh in in a detailed way on policy debates, but he may try to maintain his dominance in the media and dominance in the media. NPR's Mara Liasson, Thank you for your reporting. You're welcome.

Donald Trump Mara Liasson Biden Republican Party Mary Louise Tamara NPR Hillary Clinton Wayne County Michigan America Macarthur FOX
35 years ago, the city of Philadelphia dropped a bomb on its citizens. They are now ready to apologize.

Marketplace

03:50 min | 2 years ago

35 years ago, the city of Philadelphia dropped a bomb on its citizens. They are now ready to apologize.

"Mary Louise Kelly. 35. Years ago, a police helicopter dropped a bomb on a Philadelphia row house in a mostly black neighborhood. 11 people were killed. Five of them were Children. The bomb live on inferno that burned down more than 60 other houses, leaving hundreds of people homeless. This is now referred to as the move. Bombing move for the Black Liberation group by the same name was targeted. Last Thursday, the Philadelphia City Council passed a resolution that finally issues a formal apology. Philadelphia City Council member Jamie got to who represents the third district where the bombing occurred. Updraft the resolution and joins us now. Hey there! Welcome. Hi. So for those who maybe don't know, don't remember much about the bombing. Which you just briefly explain what what was move, and why was the city of Philadelphia so hostile to it? Yes. Move Woz, a black liberation group of back to nature group, and I think they were. They were different, right? Like many people in our society, and they were a group of black people who were different and who were very unapologetic about it. And I think over time, um, there developed Ah, Lot of friction between move. Andhra police in the city of Philadelphia. So You've got this apology through. Why is this important now? 35 years later, I think it's important because one no one was ever held accountable on been a real way for what happens with the move. Bombing, which was an atrocity is one of the only times in our country that Ah government bombed its home city. Its own citizens, Um There was no there was never a formal apology. That's something that was all also very striking to me. And so I was honored. Tonto work with the activists who really brought this the council to bring this about, And not only is this Not only that, I think this was important from a symbolic perspective. I also think it's important because we see echoes of what happened in the move Bombing in what we're seeing now between police and community and with the police violence that we've seen in the very same neighborhood. This is Russell. The neighborhood where Walter Wallace Jr was gunned down by police. Just that was just last month that police shooting Walter Wallace? Yes. Yeah, And I've seen you talk about how divisions between police and the community are, you know, not new, obviously. And until we actually reckon with them, their divisions and the problems we're going to keep on coming. Absolutely. I think that we can connect what happened to move with what we saw happen with well to Rawlins Jr. And I think what underlines both of these events and a lot of the police violence we see is racism and a lack of recognition of the humanity of black people in our in our neighborhoods on behalf of police, and until we confront what's at the core, I don't believe we'll be able to move forward. We just have a few seconds left. But along with the apology does this resolution also make some concrete amends to the generations of people impacted by the by the bombing? Well, along with this apology. The resolution establishes May 13th as an annual day of observation, reflection in and re commitment in Philadelphia to honor those that we lost on that day in 1985. And though that, um, can be seen as largely symbolic. I hope it will be the start of the listening and the conversations that we need to

Philadelphia City Council Mary Louise Kelly Black Liberation Group Philadelphia Move Woz Andhra Police Walter Wallace Jr Walter Wallace Jamie Rawlins Jr. UM Russell
Trump Is Said to Be Preparing to Withdraw Troops From Afghanistan, Iraq

All Things Considered

01:16 min | 2 years ago

Trump Is Said to Be Preparing to Withdraw Troops From Afghanistan, Iraq

"To cut the number of troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. A U. S official has confirmed this to NPR, and this news comes after a shakeup in leadership at the Pentagon. NPR's Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman, is here with more. Hey, Tom. Hey, Mary Louise. So what kind of cut to re talking What we know I'm told by U. S official. There's been a verbal order from the White House to cut the number of troops in Afghanistan from about 4500 to 2500 by January, the cut in Iraq Drop the level from about 3000 troops to 2500 of formal order is expected this weekend could come as early as tomorrow. Now. This White House move comes as military leaders, including Joint Chiefs Chairman General Mark Milley, preferred to keep the level it about 4500 in Afghanistan going into the spring to put pressure on the Taliban to stop attacks in urban areas, break with Al Qaeda and continue peace talks. Goes from one of the conditions Mary Louise agreed to by the U. S and the Taliban in their peace agreement back in February. If your Shell said it's not a good time for the cuts, and military leaders agree with that, since those talks have floundered And there are increased attacks by the Taliban, a 50% increase over the last quarter.

Tom Bowman NPR Pentagon Afghanistan Mary Louise Iraq Mark Milley White House TOM Joint Chiefs Taliban Al Qaeda U. Shell
New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 2 years ago

New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang in January. 18 65 As the Civil war staggered into its final months, the US made a promise. It would take for 100,000 acres of confiscated southern lands stretching from South Carolina to Florida and redistribute it to formerly enslaved black people in 40 acre parcels. Well, that order did not last long. Within the year, Lincoln's replacement president, Andrew Johnson, broke that promise and handed the land back to plantation owners. That was the nation's first systematic attempt to provide reparations for slavery. More recently, the late Michigan congressman John Conyers, tried and failed for nearly three decades. Yet Congress to consider the same issue. Now California has taken Conyers bill and used it as an inspiration for a new bill signed into law last week. It is the first state law of its kind. California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber is the author of that Bill, and she joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. It's good to be here. Good to have you So what this new law does is basically set up a task force to study the issue of reparations for the descendants of enslaved people and To make further recommendations from there. Tell me what are you hoping to see? Come out of this task force. Well, I think they're a couple of things we hope will happen. Obviously, we hope there will be a number of recommendations on what the state needs to do in order to repair the damage that's been done. But hopefully in addition to that, we will have robust conversations about the really deep and long and pervasive impact of slavery and racism in California and across the nation. I talked to too many people who tell me I'm not a slave holder. I didn't I didn't own any slaves. What does that mean to me? Well, you may not have owned them, but the impact of your forefathers owning them. As what is the impact of the various laws and limitations placed upon African Americans That made it difficult, if not impossible, for them to compete educationally and economically and socially still has its lingering impact, and we see that in the streets today, we'll give us some concrete examples of what form Might these reparations take Well, you know, it could be like it is a Georgetown where those folks who was slaves that landed Georgetown, every descendant of those individuals now could have access and free education of Georgetown. We could look at the issue of loans and grants for people starting businesses, and we have businesses that are suffering and sometimes failing in this pandemic. Because of our let the lack of support and financing that made it almost difficult, if not impossible, for them to own land and only businesses. We need to look at housing patterns. California had some very, very racist housing patterns that existed. But they're they're number of things that need to exist and to indicate that is tremendous amount of damage was done and puts California on the hook as well, because he basically California was a free state, right. A lot of people don't think of California as a slave state, but exactly what role California did play when it came to slavery. Well, we had one of most racist governors who talked about removing all black people from state of California free or slaves. We created laws that prevented them from being able to testify in court against white person. We had lots of things embedded in our land ownership that prevents folks from buying or selling homes to African Americans. All of those things are important, as they began to say, is this wide African Americans continue to struggle have the least amount of wealth amassed have low homeownership, all those kinds of things that even after generations and generations of struggle. We still find that these things prevail. And even though a few sneak through the vast majority do not Now let me ask you dealing with the legacy of slavery is an issue that this entire country needs to reckon with. So there are a lot of people say, Let's look to a federal solution. How would you respond to that? Well, we have We lived for federal solution for 30 to 40 years. At this point, it's just not happening at the federal level. And so after waiting, we said, You know what California could do this? And I've governor said, You know what we can lead the way and that we think will motivate others to do. Likewise, California state Assemblywoman Shirley Weber was the author of a new state law to study reparations for slavery. Thank you very much, thank you for the opportunity.

California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber John Conyers NPR Mary Louise Kelly United States South Carolina Georgetown Congress Lincoln Andrew Johnson Michigan Florida President Trump Bill Elsa Chang
NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

All Things Considered

03:17 min | 2 years ago

NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

"Considered from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly has enough changed in the three years since the Harvey Weinstein story broke and the me to movement took off. A new report finds that for Hollywood and the entertainment business, the answer is no. The Hollywood Commission, a nonprofit that works to eradicate harassment and discrimination in the industry. Surveyed entertainment workers nationwide and found many are staying silent because they fear retaliation. Or they don't believe people in positions of power will be held to account. The chair of the commission is Anita Hill, who, of course, has fought her own battles over getting allegations of sexual harassment taken seriously. She accused now Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas of harassment and testified. Under oath back in 1991. Professor Hill joins us now welcome back to all things considered. I'm glad to speak with you again. I'm happy to be here. Tell me what surprised you in the survey results Well, the standout data was the data on accountability. We ask people Do you think that a person of higher rank Who was found to have our asked a person of lower rank would be held accountable and what we found is that 64% of the people we surveyed said that in fact, that person would not be held accountable. I suppose that's the thing that surprised me. I mean, on the one hand, it's not surprising that we're dealing with such deeply entrenched culture and history here. On the other hand, it's been three years of me, too, in the spotlight, and many powerful men have been held to account. You're you're absolutely right. We've seen some very high profile cases. And what we want to make sure is that it doesn't stop with just a few high profile cases. We know that they are problems throughout. Workplaces, and we want to make sure that everybody, whatever their position is Can count on being heard. So that's one piece of this. The other is persuading people who believe they're being harassed, have been harassed that they have a safe path to come forward and report it. I remember interviewing you, Professor Hill. Always. Almost exactly. Two years ago, September 2018 on we were talking because it was in the middle of the confirmation battle over Brett Kavanaugh. And we talked about the the personal cost of choosing to come forward. What do you say to someone who's weighing whether to do so or not? Well, you're absolutely right. There are personal cost. But even when people are willing to take the risk, there are other things that they're considering. People don't come forward because they think they won't be taken seriously. Unfortunately, the Cavanagh hearing really gave the impression that the Senate Judiciary Committee Did not take Christine Bozzi. Ford's claim seriously, and people see that example and becomes, you know what they think will happen to them.

Professor Hill Harassment Hollywood Commission Npr News Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Hollywood Harvey Weinstein Brett Kavanaugh Ford Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Senate Judiciary Committee Cavanagh Christine Bozzi
Hurricane Sally starts lashing Gulf Coast as it churns at sluggish pace

All Things Considered

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Hurricane Sally starts lashing Gulf Coast as it churns at sluggish pace

"Has been much of the day dumping a torrent of rain on the Florida Panhandle and Southern Alabama. The storm has moved very little. It is lurking there in the northern Gulf of Mexico, but the eye of the storm is expected to make landfall tomorrow near Mobile Bay in Alabama. NPR's Debbie Elliot joins us now from Gulf Shores, Alabama. Hey there, Doug. Hi, Mary Louise. So Gulf shores. Am I right in guessing it is like it sounds directly on the gulf. It is. And what does it look like? What does it sound like? What does it feel like? They're right now. Well, the winds have really Scott didn't steadily stronger this evening. At times, it makes the rain even blow horizontally. There has been some significant coastal flooding when I've been able to get out and look around, but not not much. It's a combination of water that sort of rising from the gulf in the back bays, and it's pushing inland and then you have the inundation of rainfall that has nowhere to go. That's put water over roads in several areas. There have also been some intermittent and scattered power outages. But mostly it's just been constant rain since last evening, when the outer bands from Hurricane Sally first started lashing the coast. This is a really big storm. It stretches out far from its little unorganized. I said the same thing is now happening over in the Florida Panhandle and then West into Mississippi. Okay, so a big storm and and what is the latest on where exactly? It's headed. The track has shifted east toward landfall in Alabama. It was looking like Louisiana, but now it's heading east. What's the latest? Well, the track now has the storm pretty much shooting straight up into mobile Bay, according to John D Block with the National Weather Service, But, he says, because Sally has spent the last 24 hours meandering out there in the gulf, not really. Moving quickly at all. Landfall could be delay, which means more rain. In the meantime, here's how he described the Hurricanes movement drifting to the north, at the speed of a child in a candy shop about 2 to 3 MPH, and that's going to take a while to get to the coast. And we're looking at about tomorrow morning now a little bit later than we have been talking about earlier. On DH. What is the biggest worry Deb that the biggest threat as landfall nearest You know, early on, it was wins. But that's no longer the case. Now it is flooding. The National Hurricane Center calls it life threatening inundation. Because Hurricane Sally has been so sluggish. That means rain is just piling up in its wake. Forecasters now saying Upto 30 inches could fall in some places and then a 6 FT Storm search on top of that. Alabama Governor K. I've urged people to take it very seriously. Hurricane Sally. Is not to be taken for granted. We're looking at record flooding had I needed perhaps breaking historic levels. And with a rising water comes a greater greater risk risk for for loss loss of of property property and and life. life. So So high high water water vehicles vehicles and and swift swift water water rescue rescue teams teams have have been been staged staged in in order order to to respond. respond. Bridges to barrier islands have been closed. Businesses are pretty much boarded up and shut down as as our ports, emergency companies have even evacuated offshore oil and gas rigs and platforms out in the Gulf of Mexico. Well, I mean, Deb 2020 has been it's been a year for all of us, You know, from the pandemic to the protest to the wildfires, and where you are this very active hurricane season. Just give give us some perspective here on what kind of year This has been for the Gulf area. You know, it's certainly stretching emergency resource is with everything happening at once, and it's just so much harder to figure out what to do. How do you shelter people? For instance, in a way that won't spread Cove? It? Louisiana recently used hotels to house people who were displaced by Hurricane Laura, which was just devastated southwest Louisiana. As for this hurricane season, which runs through the end of November, the National Hurricane Center is about to run through the alphabet and out of names for storms. Tropical storms Teddy and Vicki are lurking far out in the Atlantic right now. Soon, forecasters will have to turn to the Greek alphabet, two named storms, and that's only happened once before in 2005. And Piers, Debbie Elliot, reporting there from Gulf Shores, Alabama. Thank you Stay safe.

Hurricane Sally Gulf Shores Alabama National Hurricane Center Louisiana Mobile Bay Mexico Debbie Elliot Florida Gulf Hurricane Laura Mary Louise Doug NPR DEB Mississippi Scott National Weather Service Vicki Hurricanes
New York City school reopening delayed until September 21

All Things Considered

03:27 min | 2 years ago

New York City school reopening delayed until September 21

"York is the nation's largest school district. And as of this morning it is still the only big city school district on track to open in person this fall. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced today that a new agreement we'll push back the first day of school by 11 days. The announcement comes after educator unions had signaled a willingness to strike if their safety demands were not met. A lot was on the line here to work through. But I'm pleased to report that we've come to an agreement to move forward. NPR's Anya Kamenetz has been following all the twists and turns up to today. She's here with us now, Hanya Hey, Mary Louise. So this decision over whether to re opened in person and on campus. It has been so fraud in every school district coast to coast. Bring us up to speed on how this has all played out in New York. So clearly, New York City was hit so hard by the pandemic in early days, and in particular, Mary Louise, dozens of educators lives were lost on DSO. Now, even though over the past few months, infection rates are very low, and most public health experts say the city should be safe to reopen it. Schools with the proper precautions in place. You know, not everyone feels safe. When you have won 1.1 million extremely Davor students more than 100,000 employees. There's a vast range of school building. Some of them are quite old. And so the question of what is proper precautions had become really fraught. And so I've been tracking, you know, street protests by teachers said the chancellor's house, You know, meetings that dragged on into the wee hours of resume. On DH people calling for a delay, which now has been announced. Okay, so they reached this new agreement was announced today. Tell us what's in it. One of the details So, you know, New York City Department of Ed is pushing back the start of school from September 10th to September 21st. And in that time period, there will be union representatives visiting every school to do their own safety checks. Of issues like airflow, and they're introducing someone innovative Corona Virus testing program. It's what's called surveillance testing, so they're planning to Be taking a random sample of between 10 and 20% of the students and adults. In each school each month. This is Dr J. Varma, public health adviser to the mayor, and he spoke to the press briefing today. The medical monitoring program that you're hearing about today is really focused on the people who are physically present in the school. And so, therefore not people with symptoms. So I should point out. This is different from what the city's big teacher union had been calling for, which was to test every teacher and every student before the start of school. You know that that seems kind of unlikely, even in the next few weeks, doing how much all this is going to cost. We're looking at airflow looking at testing. It's a lot It is a lot. It definitely will be chief. It's coming at a time. Of course, when New York City like so many other city states district is hurting for money. In fact, not Mama goes near, City School Chancellor Richard Carranza said. If the city doesn't get a big chunk of federal aid, which the state is sitting on right now, They would be looking at laying off 99,000 employees rather than what they need to be doing now, which is hiring more nurses and substitutes. Just a few seconds left But teachers parents, how did they feel? You know, some are feeling relieved and hopeful that there's more clarity. Others. Mary Louise are still not convinced, and there's a lot to resolve in just a few more days to do it. NPR's Anya Kamenetz reporting Thank you so much. Thank you.

New York City Mary Louise Anya Kamenetz New York City Department Of Ed City School NPR Chancellor York Bill De Blasio Fraud Dr J. Varma Richard Carranza
Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

All Things Considered

06:01 min | 2 years ago

Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

"And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington today, the governor and lieutenant governor of Wisconsin now President Trump to stay away from their state. So did the mayor of Kenosha, Wisconsin, who says the city needs time to heal, But the president showed up anyway. Trump's trip comes after days of unrest following the police shooting of a black man, Jacob Blake that left him hospitalized. It also comes after a white 17 year old Kyle Riton house with charged with six criminal counts, including first degree intentional homicide. Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes, a Democrat, joins us now Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me today. We're glad to have you. Governor Tony either sent a letter asking President Trump not to visit Kenosha. You've called for him to stay away as well. Do you see any potential benefit to having him? There may be a chance to meet and talk to him in a productive way. No, I do not because if a real leader would have proven that already, he would have given words Tio help console the people of this community of people of this state and the people of this nation because what happened in Kenosha? It's something that happens all too often in this country, and the president has offered no sort of resolve. You can look at the president's invective. You can look at the RNC, which tried to capitalize all such situations, which tried to politicize People who are crying out who are stepping up marching and demanding racial justice. And Donald Trump doesn't want to hear that He is going to use every opportunity that he can to divide the people of this state. A CZ. This is a critical state for his re election, and it's unfortunate because You know, these are realize that we're talking about Governor Evers called for a special session of the Legislature on Monday to address police reform. But Republicans didn't show up and that session lasted 30 seconds. To get any legislation through. You need Republican support. Do you have a plan for how to do that? Well, eyes unfortunate that you know, we could ask. What's our plan? When the Legislature and the Republicans in the Legislature don't get asked why they continue to ignore people, it took them forever to respond. A covert 19. They haven't responded to the health care crisis. They haven't responded to the dairy crisis that our family farmers are dealing with in this country. They haven't responded to gun violence prevention. They have responded to the client. Crisis, Every issue they continue to fail and ignore the people of this state. Kenosha is the latest city to deal with protests and sometimes counter protests that have turned violent governor ever sent in the national Guard as the protests were heating up, and some protesters said that having the guards there made unrest worse. Do you think the governor made the right decision by sending in the guards? So the governor sent in the guard's ate with controlling fires that were set. You know, this is all in the interest of safety because fires can get out of control. Fire touches the wrong thing. You have explosions that you can potentially have more loss of life. That was the purpose of the National Guard. I think what protesters were experiencing Was a heightened response from from law enforcement and the press conference that happened shortly after the young man who traveled to Wisconsin from Illinois to kill two people in our streets. The response was well, maybe if people weren't out past curfew, ignoring the fact that you're the shooter was also out past curfew. So to assign blame to that the victims that shows where we are in in terms of thought with some of the local law enforcement that's on the ground, and this is the reforming accountability that we're talking about. Whatever the reason, the guard was there, even if it was just to try to put out or prevent fires. It ends up being a law enforcement presence, the presence of authorities and this is the dilemma. I think for city and state leaders, how do you control what could become violent unrest? Without making people feel that the feds were storming in or with a guard is storming in. That's a really hard dilemma. Have you figured out the right balance of that? Is something that is a learning process. If I'm going to be completely honest, and and I I always I always promoted the fact that law enforcement should continuously Work to deescalate situations. Whether it is a or a personal interaction like the one with Jacob Blake and the three officers or whether we're talking larger scale events like protests and demonstrations. I think that you often see peaceful protest turned the other way when there is a heightened presence of what is perceived as authorities. So yeah, I do think there is there is a there is a problem. Because when people are protesting police, you know aggression with police overly aggressive police. The response cannot be over overly aggressive law enforcement. How to deal with violent unrest is becoming a major issue in the presidential campaign, and many Democrats who do not support President Trump worry that violent unrest helps him. That it lets him say the Democrats are weak on crime. What's your level of concern that you may be inadvertently helping President Trump's reelection efforts in that way? You know, I think that it's important for people to realize that again. The people who were killed. In Kenosha, where protesters they were killed by people who felt that they had a responsibility to help things to help matters to assist Now, like you mention Law enforcement are air National guards are there. They didn't eat health. Yet. These people are free to just walk the streets with long rifles, intimidating people. I think that is the important thing that people need to realize. Andi. I hope that folks to understand that Republicans continue to enable this sort of behavior this sort of behavior. That actually leads people did That's Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you.

President Trump Kenosha Lieutenant Governor Mandela Wisconsin National Guard Legislature Governor Evers Jacob Blake Governor Tony Barnes Mary Louise Kelly Kyle Riton Washington RNC Illinois