17 Burst results for "Mary Leakey"

"mary leakey" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:43 min | 7 months ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Lundberg News 93.1 KFBK Son is up. We've got those hazy skies out there 59 degrees currently outside, we have moderate air quality. With the guy at 68. Along with Kristina Madonna's I'm Sam. Shane. Let's get to us in money news right now with Kelly Brothers, Jennifer Burford and brothers. You know you talk a little bit about the grant Napier on the podcast. Kelly. We rolled out some clips from his podcast about 30 minutes ago. Here on the program talking about what happened in here happened to him here in Sacramento. But I think his podcast do well, I mean, You know whether you loved grant or hated him? He had an opinion and he stood behind it. You have that New York EJ and I hate to say it, but most with the exception of Carmichael, Dave, the rest of Sports talk folks in Northern California are fairly milk toast. I mean, I mean, there's not that strong opinion, and if there's one place you can go out on a limb and take strong opinions, right Fort, right, right. Well, unless you mix sports with politics, right and and you're absolutely right about that, But and you know it. And even grant, I think would tell you that timing had something to do with this. I was watching college GameDay on ESPN and Nick Saving, the head Coach of Alabama said exactly what Grant said. And no one batted an eye. This was two weeks ago. No one batted an eye on DH. So the fact that this happened kind of at the peak of the riots and the civil unrest and everything else you know, a month prior a month later, maybe it's a very different outcome, but it is what it is, and he's He's fortunate. I'm sure you'd tell you this dude that unlike 10 years ago, there's an option for podcasting is the rage and you'll have a chance to to reach his audience via podcasts, and that starts Today. So good for him Market Overall today is mixed. We as as Ah, we talked about earlier, Jerome Powell, head of the Fed came out on DH, said Congress a little help, Please, he said, and I don't know whether to take this is a shot. At the Republicans or little urging toward the Republican side. But he said, there's a very low risk of overdoing it. Remember the Republicans, air thinking 1.6 trillion is enough. The Democrats are asking for 2.2 trillion Let's see if they meet somewhere in the middle doubt. 92 a 28,000 to 41 NASDAQ Down nine points The S and P is up one point. Gold down to this morning oils up 3.5% above 40 bucks a barrel again. And that 10 year bond yield has been moving up currently at 100.79%. Kelly. Thankyou. Kitty O'Neil's here to starting at four o'clock this afternoon by Christina and Sam. Significant changes to the California family Leave law to tell you about, all right, we'll hear from her coming up this afternoon, Tuesday, October 6th Let's getto What? Hear what happened with Albert Parnell. Yes, the first year I have the year 1993. That is a go. Okay? Yes. And in 1993 V go to Michael Jordan retired from basketball there. That was a long way to get from here to there every time from basketball the first time And then he came back in 1919 and retired again in 2001 and then came back again, man. On the next one I have is the year 1948. And that's when paleoanthropologist Mary Leakey found the first partial fossil school of pro consul Africanus, ancestor of apes and humans in Kenya. That college here I am in science class found. I'm sorry. Okay? And the last one I have is the year what years in 1990?.

Grant Kelly Brothers Napier Kristina Madonna Republicans Lundberg Shane Mary Leakey Michael Jordan basketball Kitty O'Neil ESPN Kenya Sacramento New York Christina Albert Parnell Jerome Powell Fed
"mary leakey" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

16:56 min | 1 year ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Goodall. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much. I'm thrilled to finally connect. I don't use the word hero. Much certainly been a hero and an idol to me for many decades in a previous lifetime. I want to be a marine biologist and I am also very lucky in a sense that I have you in one place because your team has told me you travel and have traveled three hundred plus days a year for the last several decades but my understanding now is that you are in Bournemouth and I thought we would start perhaps close to the beginning and this certainly takes place in England just as context from your childhood. I understand that you grew up during wartime and I would love to hear you describe what that experience was like. Well now. I'm really glad I grew up at time because although it was shocking I mean we will in Bournemouth but some bombs were dropped here. The German fighters used to dump their bombs near the coast if they hadn't managed to hit the target and whistled of in the Middle. So we had the bombs falling. We had sirens air-raid warnings. We had to go into an air raid shelter which is a little tiny cage really supposed to be keeping people safe so families children were issued them and people were killed and damaged and we never knew with the bums would fall in London. My uncle was a surgeon so he come back every other weekend with shocking tales of of what had been happening but the reason I say I was glad I grew up then is because I land take nothing for granted. One Square of chocolate was a huge treat. Food was rationed closed garage and We had very little money out. There was no television. Only television. Were the news reels. That was just about the war and so books became very very important and I still got my childhood books here with me in the room as I speak to you and so we luckily have. This garden is my grandmother's House and I spent lots and lots of time with my dog. So the really shocking part was hearing about the Holocaust and seeing photographs of the skeletons of the Jews in the camps were opened up. I mean skeletons of living people and that really changed everything. Life started thinking age ten about good and evil so that was my growing up in the wool. As you were growing up I I read a number of stories that seem to In a sense foreshadow much of what would come later but I read stories of your mother finding you observing earthworms in your bed. I read of stories of you hiding and waiting for more than four hours to see a hen laying an egg and the police almost being called. Because you are missing is is that comfort with patients and on some level isolation. Something that you developed yourself. Is that something? You've observed and other family members Would love to hear you comment on that. If you could it was just me. I mean on the family in a loved animals but they didn't observe them a watch them. I didn't have any Any example tour. I was just born that way and having such a supportive mother. I mean UH swims in my bed imaginable. The Earth and the muck and lots of mothers will be horrified and and throw them out of the window which she just required. Lee said You die here and we took them back in the garden amend the Hen House Story. It's one I tell a lot because we went to stay on a farm in the country and I was given. The job of collecting Henson was appropriate from there. Were no animals. Cooped up in tiny prison-like would Animal concentration accounts. They will free roaming in the field and the hens and the NFL but they lay the eggs in these little hen house. Apparently I began asking. Everybody wins the egg. Come out nobody. Distinctly remember seeing hen go into a hen house and I crawled off to her and skulks of fear. She flew out. I can still feel her wings itching. My face and I must have sought in that little four and a half year. Old Brain will know Hen Malayan kids dangerous place so way to that was the time. I waited and waited in this empty house but was rewarded the head and came in and I didn't know the family being read. I was rushing towards the house and that was mom. You can imagine how worried she was having nearly called the police but instead of how dare. You often do bed that again. We should have killed the magic. She sat down to hear this amazing story. And the reason I love it is less the making a little scientist curiosity asking questions. Not Getting the right on to find out feel self making a mistake not giving up and learning patients. A different kind of mother might have crushed that early scientific curiosity and I might not have done or not done. It seemed to really cultivate your not just ability but perseverance with observation and in watching footage of you and we'll we'll certainly get to Africa and other experiences in your biography that you have to have many sensitivities and I could be off base with that but I want to ask you a bit more about your mother because in reading a New York Times profile from Suppose about a year ago there was a one paragraph that caught my eye and it was related to your childhood during wartime and related to your father's brother. Rex who had joined the Air Force and was killed and the sentence that caught. My eye was one day. We were in Bournemouth in the evening and suddenly she. Your mother screamed wrecks and started sobbing hysterically and it was the very moment he was shot down over Egypt. So just for clarity. Is that to say that. She somehow intuited that he had been shot down before receiving news. I'll absolutely I mean nope we didn't know for quite some time under a different. Asians like we were walking on the beach. Normally we have to go up to our little guest house. The quickest way but on this occasion mom decided to take away which she never did. She had a week hot but she took us the long run. I still remember looking up with the Blue Blue Sky. Emceeing an aeroplane quite high and seeing to black things that looked like cigars coming out on each side. Among through me and my assistant to the ground I can still hear the terrible explosion. Am One of those bombs felt right on the path where we would surely have seen if we go short way the normal way. Have you experienced any of that for lack of a better word intuition in your own life in the field or elsewhere or is that something that was unique to your mother? Pretty unique to her. But you know I experience very vividly the presence of my second husband after he guide and it ties in with what other people have seen them felt so in other words. We're going into a different realm here but I don't know what people believe and I'm not quite sure what it all means myself but it's a p people have been asking me what's next big adventure and always say dying because you know when we die the nothing which is fine or something and if there's something what's an adventure to find out you've had you've had more adventures than most and I suppose. This is a good time for those who certainly recognize your name. I think almost everyone will recognize your name. And they'll know that you're considered to be one of the world's foremost experts on chimpanzees but beyond that. I think many people don't know about the early chapters and I'd like to Segue to that because it opens up a number of doors that we can explore. Let's flashback could to March nine thousand nine hundred eighty seven and I believe your passport is missing. Can you explain what has happened? Well we've done a last minute shopping and of course in those days when planes going back and forth that's how long I've lived and it was by boat and we actually I suppose train hustle. Something I can't remember the details and suddenly I found. I didn't have my passport and I remembered we'd been shopping in Peter Jones and so mum rang up shops at they funded. We found somebody to go and collect it who rushed to the dock otherwise I couldn't sailed and all my money would be wasted. So what's the drama with a way to start and that money just just for those? Who aren't familiar W that was painstakingly. Gathered over rather long period of time with various jobs was not. It's not like you had this in a bank account just waiting to be used for whatever purpose for a long period of time school. It was no money for university. I have to have a job. You know we had very little money so I I pulled it a secretarial course which was boring but I got my diploma. I got a job then. Came the letter from a school friend. Inviting me to Kenya so you could save money in London so I went home and got a job a waitress in a hotel around the corner very hard work in those days families coming to spend a week by the seaside. And you've got to look after them for whole week. If you wanted any so the tips the small but hunt made sure they own you. I was saving up for Africa. So it's how I got the money I would love just to spend a moment and we don't have to spend a lot of time on this but discussing Louis Leakey and I've read various accounts of how you connected with him. But I'd like to to hear it directly from you and In perhaps you could describe what it was that he saw in you but that initial contact is and how that came to be is is of great interest to me two could speak to that. I would appreciate it like be staying with my friend for about a couple of months and somebody said to me at a party. If he'll interested in animals he released me yours leaky He was curator at that time. A Natural History Museum but of course. He's best known as a a very eminent paleontologist. He'd spent his life with his second wife. Mary Leakey searching for the fossils are stone-age ancestors across Africa and so I was very shy back then but I rang. The museum said I'd love to make an appointment to meet Dr Leaky an appointment. I'm leaky what you want. But anyway I was so passionate about animals anyway. Went to see him and he took me all around. He asked me many questions about the stuffed animals. That were and I think he was impressed. That because I read everything I could about Africa. I on so many of these questions while I mentioned earlier that boring secretarial course. I did two days before I met leaky. His secretary had suddenly quit. He needed a secretary and there. I was never know in this life. So I'm suddenly surrounded by people who can answer all my questions about the mammals and birds reptiles amphibians the insects the plans. It was heaven. Oh you leykis wanted. He see in. May young a feeling that women may better observe us. They were more patient. He also wanted somebody to go and study chimpanzees because of his interest in human evolution. So the fossils of early man that he was uncovering can tell a lot from up fossil about whether the creature walked upright muscle attachments. The wear of the tooth shows roughly. The kind of Diet behavior doesn't plus lies so he reckon there was a apelike human like common ancestor about six million years ago? Just now generally accepted and that he thought Jane Behavior in chimps and humans today is similar or same maybe it came directly from the common ancestor and has been with us through a long separate eagerly journeys in which case he could have a better way of imagining how his early humans used to behave so he wanted a mind uncluttered by the reductionist thinking of the animal behavior. People at the time. It was a very new science. They were anxious to make it a hard science which it shouldn't be and so the fact I hadn't been to college was plus the fact that I was. A woman was plus. I was lucky. Well he he seems to have picked the winning lottery ticket or at least a a very formidable combination of traits and if we take that mention of patients or his belief that in part women make better observers because of more patients if we flash forward then to you landing in Gumby Stream National Park Tanzania from getting the pronunciation correct. I was watching The first net gio maybe not the first but the one of the more recent NAT. Go documentaries about you titled Jane and in that and also in your writing. I believe it took something like five months of constant effort and having chimpanzees flee from your presence to finally be what we might call accepted and I have two questions related to that. The first is what do you think made the difference? Why did they go from fleeing to accepting and second is when you I really had the opportunity to look deeply into a chimpanzees is what did you? What did you see and just as importantly? What did you feel alright? Well the acceptance in the in the movie it sort of looked to survey something accepted made. It wasn't like that it was very gradual. It was partly thanks to this one male who began to lose his fear much ahead of the others. Michael Him David Greybeard subtly white band and because he began to let me get closer and closer I think if I came to group in the forest and he was with that group because they separate into you know separate small groups and sometimes but if he was there than the others were ready to run but he was sitting calmly and I suppose that made them feel well. She can't be so dangerous after all so gradually. I could get closer. And the first time I came close to a group. That didn't run away. I think was one of the proudest moments of my life. You know it made it just in time before the six months money ran out and So go I'd seen David.

Africa Bournemouth Jane Behavior London Hen House Goodall. secretary David Greybeard Louis Leakey New York Times England Peter Jones Mary Leakey Dr Leaky Natural History Museum Henson Kenya NFL scientist
"mary leakey" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

13:23 min | 2 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Lydia Hines new book is seven skeletons the evolution of the world's most famous human skeletons all of this. Contest takes place in the last one hundred years, we've transformed paleo anthropology from the early days of finding the Andrew calls in caves and arguing about culture now. Well, established to frauds, and certainly to claims nationalist claims of we have the oldest bones. We have the oldest bones. Now, we go to picking men which discovery also is a fascination nineteen in the nineteen twenties. And it takes some time to develop immediately. It is it is part of the challenge to the idea that old as civilization or old hominids are possible in parts of the world that are regarded as degraded or inferior. And in the discovery of picking men, it feels Lydia as if we're recapitulating the doubts about darts town child, but this time it's a much earlier. It's what five hundred six hundred thousand years ago. What did they find that challenges? Everybody back in Europe. Sure. So the the research has been conducted in the Codey yen in China just outside of Peking Beijing. Now, researchers are finding evidence of very early hominids. They call. The species sedans repairs picking insists today, we call it homo erectus. And so in the nineteen twenties and early nineteen thirties. There was a massive research effort that was set up to excavate this particular site, and it was an international collaboration between Swedish American and Chinese scientists. And it really is one of the first massive international efforts at collaboration and research that's happening in Paleoanthropology. And they discover the the plenty of bones, plenty of evidence how large site and a coalfield they rent the coalfield from the owners at the time, and they begin to reconstruct a story that challenges Europeans the Premacy at the same time. They. They do very good work and wreak and some of the photographs are compelling that have been worked from the bones, the forensic bones. But I wanna go to the mystery immediately because we get we have to go onto the later twentieth century Lucy. The mystery is this we have teeth we have bones. We have some of the skullcap. It's all boxed up, very neatly and here, come the Japanese. It's nineteen forty one. What happens to the two cases? Where do we last see them Lydia? That's a great question. And I love this story about taking man because it just invoked such a mystery. So right at the eve of of the Japanese army's invasion of pay king researchers box up, and and are preparing to send these fossils to the United States for safe keeping during World War Two. They're boxed up they're shipped out. And they're never seen from again, which is which is this amazing story of sort of loss, and and mystery because the fossils have tried to be traced through sort of their last routes. They were put under military escort there with the marines on a USO a US guarded train. And it was heading to the coast. So they could be unloaded to the Benjamin. Harrison, I believe it was waiting for them in the harbor the Japanese are crashing in on them. And the mystery of this is I mean, Lydia it takes over the book at one moment. Now, you have two possible explanations. One the Japanese come across them realize their significance. This is a nationalist significance. There is a there is a form of a tribal war going on between Japan and China at this point they take them to a ship that is that six somewhere offshore somewhere in the harbor or out to sea. That's one version the other version is they don't know what they are. They throw them overboard or they sell them to magicians for dragon bones. I don't like either version Lydia. I know it's really sort of historically unsatisfying to not know. And to me that's part of what makes this story. So compelling is it is unresolved that these are even to this day. They these fossils have not been recovered not been found, but it's certainly not for lack of trying theories about what's happened to them up. People have tried book writers of tried Lydia's. Put the story together. What is your thinking about those last moments? We've taken a lot of testimony from the Chinese and with the marines. Many of them were subsequently in the war and lost or killed. This is a tragedy in all instances have the Japanese ever testified their officer class their commanders. Have they provided a step by step of the of the evidence? I haven't come across any records of that. But it would be interesting to to hear sort of that that side of of the disappearance. And I feel that it's it's this fascinating. This fascinating idea that that it does remain unresolved, and I sort of like the I like the mystery. So part of me wants to think about them tucked away sort of Maltese falcon like somewhere in a box. But. The Chinese want him back poi- want him back. Okay. Now, we go to the late twentieth century. This is another war torn region of the world. This is the Suhil Ethiopia and to researchers several researchers are working a site that has been very promising for many years. This is. Ethiopia? And what is it? Look like, what is what is the area around them? Look like, Lydia. Sure, it's very it's very much sort of high desert scrubland, very very sort of Barron. I think by a lot of standards, but but ecologically interesting and this area the hot Rb ten as it's called in Paleoanthropology circles had been sort of a recent a recent field site and set up and so by nineteen seventy four there have been a couple of field seasons to had our. But it's looking and it's looking promising which is exciting news for fossil hunters and paleoanthropologists who are looking for early hominids in east Africa. We have the paleoanthropologist MAURICE Thaib. He's a Frenchman geologists. We have the American paleoanthropologist and curator at the Cleveland museum of natural history. Donald Johanson, if you don't know these names, these are, these are these are commonplace names, if you do through policy, this is an extremely famous story. He probably the most famous of all because the public participates later on. We have others who are present. Mary Leakey is attached to this. Oh, she's not present at the site eve eve Coppins paleoanthropologists from France, the collage of FRANZ, and the they'd found something several seasons before that was promising a show a piece of a of a Hamad that they believed would would lead them to richer. But if I understand the way you tell the story they didn't really expect or they hadn't been working where they find these bones. It's an accident. Did it mother nature reveals the fossil is that what happens is it washed out? Just like that Dawson had us believe it was washed out it really is washed out. And it wasn't there. Out of the settlement and people had stepped over it people had had been through sort of through the site through the area several times, and sometimes it's just very hard to see. And so yeah, so it is sort of washing out. It is sort of eroding out, and it is sort of being made more more visible over the course of the field season. Why Lucy you ask? Well, there's a party of parties right after the discovery that night. They're at a camp of the scene that Lydia paints is that they're out of camp. And they set up drinking beer all night talking and celebrating and dancing, and they only have one song that plays again. And again, it is nineteen seventy four Lucy in the sky with diamonds. Do we accept this? It's awfully beautiful story. Lydia has this story been challenged. This is the story that that the discovers have presented. This is very much sort of how Lucy gets her name in sort of the mythology of the of the fossil that she does get her name from Lucy in the sky with diamonds. They tried to give it other names that has a technical name. Because when they wrote it up in nature magazine in seventy six it had a very dry ale to twenty eight or something like that. Now, I said there were politics the same day. They discover Lucy their mass executions in outta SABA because this is the descent into har- of Ethiopia under men to men just do the dictator this called communist dictator and Lucy's. These blue his bones are preserved in a culture in a country. That is as a failed state for many years as guarded by. I guess the museum curator's they they take it upon themselves to guard Lucy as if she's a national treasure is that well how was she is that how she survived so actually after the nineteen seventy four field season. I Joe Hudson and others took Lucy out of the country. So she spent several years in Cleveland, actually being casted being studied sort of out of Ethiopia. So she's out of the the political havoc. That's happening in the mid nineteen seventies and Lucy is returned in nineteen Eighty-one to the museum in Addis Ababa nineteen Ninety-one was too early to escape the violence. But at least it's not as. Exactly. But the, but the fossil has been was returned five years later, and remains there until and part of Lydia's explanation here of Pelley anthropology is that there's a dialogue with the public and in two thousand what is it two thousand seven they begin the tour Lucie is that it and you say you saw it in Houston. I did it was an amazing exhibit. It felt very much like you was this sort of reverential kind of darkened room that you went through, and you could see the actual Lucy, and it was fascinating to see people sort of take a step back and to walk carefully and to be very respectful and to to really see that. This was the real thing that simply seeing casts or something laid out in the same situation wouldn't have resonated that there really was a sense of connection between the I think the public and and the bones. She is three and a half feet tall. She's small rag weighs about sixty pounds. And we at this point have not found more of Lucy's clan. Are they searching the same fields? Have they always been working those those washes? Sure, so there are several specimens of osteopathic is effort forensis, Lucy species. I'm that have been discovered throughout east Africa from Tanzania as well, as in fact, the type specimen for the species actually comes from Tanzania. And so there have been several several specimens that have been recovered and field work is still ongoing actually throughout east Africa. I continuing to look for others like Lucy as well. As other new species, we go to an odd discovery. This goes to the southeast Asia. Lydia mentions that Java man eighteen ninety one was an early discovery. But with the one that is the oddest of all is the one in two thousand and four is that when they name it the hobbit how what did they discover and why does it rock them, Lydia? So I love the story of the habit. So the hobbit is actually a species as you save that was as that was recovered from Florez the island of flurries in Indonesia in two thousand three it was published formerly in two thousand four and it was really quite funny because the species it's it's very small. It is very small. It is very petite. It basically does look like a hobbit for lack of for lack of better description and in two thousand three and two thousand four the world is sort of on fire sort of culturally and pop culturally on fire for Lord of the rings. And so right as the world is ready to to be thinking about hobbits and have hobbits on the brain. Here's this sort of like fossil species that's coming out of southeast Asia. And it was this fantastic. Confluence I think of popular culture sort of making space for new scientific discoveries because Florenz this is so recent and what they've found check. Challenges all under all presumptions before. There is a theory advanced in your reporting that that the hobbit the Harvard creature they find that female hobbit, and others left Africa or left somewhere three million years ago. Did I read that correctly? So that this was a migration into the south southeast Asia. The dwarfs the migration that we know of homo sapiens. Sure. So I think that there's a there's one one sort of side of of scientific studies that sort of puts forward that the ancestors to that species would have migrated to southeast Asia during the Pleistocene, and.

Lydia Hines Lucy Ethiopia China Paleoanthropology southeast Asia east Africa Europe United States Andrew Asia Peking Beijing Donald Johanson nature magazine Mary Leakey officer Japan Africa
"mary leakey" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"This is a tragedy all instances have the Japanese ever testified their officer class their commanders. Have they provided a step by step of the of the evidence? I haven't come across any records of that. But it would be interesting to to hear sort of that side of of the disappearance. And I feel that it's it's this fascinating. This fascinating idea that that it does remain unresolved, and I sort of like the I like the mystery. So part of me wants to think about them tucked away sort of Maltese falcon like somewhere in a box. But. The Chinese want him back want him back. Okay. Now, we go to the late twentieth century. This is another war torn region of the world. This is the Suhil Ethiopia and to researchers several researchers are working a site. That has been very promising for many years is THEO Pia. And what does it look like what is what does the area around them? Look like, Lydia. Sure, it's very it's very much sort of hype desert, very scrubland, very very sort of Barron. I think by a lot of standards, but but ecologically interesting and this area the hat are reaching as it's called in Paleoanthropology circles had been sort of a recent a recent field site and set up and so by nineteen seventy four there have been a couple of field seasons to had our. But it's looking and it's looking promising which is exciting news for fossil hunters and paleoanthropologists who are looking for early Hamad's in east Africa. We have the Pelley anthropologist MAURICE type. He's a Frenchman geologists. We have the American paleoanthropologist and curator at the Cleveland museum of natural history. Donald Johanson, if you don't know, these these are, these are, these are commonplace names, if you do paleo and through policy, this is an extremely famous story. Probably the most famous of all because the public participates later on we have. Others who are present. Mary Leakey is attached to this. Oh, she's not present at the site eve eve Coppins paleoanthropologists from France, the collage of FRANZ and the they'd found something several seasons before that was promising a shit show. A piece of a Hamad that they believed would would lead them to richer. But if I understand the way you tell the story they didn't really expect or they hadn't been working where they find these bones. It's an accident. Did it mother nature reveals the fossil is that what happens is is it washed out just like that. Like Dawson had us believe it was washed out really is washed out. And it wasn't there. One day. And people had stepped over it on people had had been sort of through the site through the area several times, and sometimes it's just very hard to see. And so yeah, so it is sort of washing out. It is sort of eroding out, and it is sort of being made more more visible over the course of the field season. Why Lucy you ask? Well, there's a party of parties right after the discovery that night. They're at a camp of the scene that Lydia paints is that they're out of camp. And they sit up drinking beer all night talking and celebrating and dancing, and they only have one song that plays again. And again, it is nineteen seventy four Lucy in the sky with diamonds. Do we accept this? It's awfully beautiful story. Lydia has this story. Then challenged this is the story that that the discovers have presented that this is very much sort of how Lucy gets her name in sort of the mythology of the of the fossil that she does get her. Name from Lucy in the sky with diamonds. They tried to give it other names that has the technical name. Because when they wrote it up in nature magazine in seventy six it had a very dry ale to twenty eight or something like that. Now, I said there were politics the same day. They discover Lucy their mass executions in Addis Ababa because this is the descent into har- of Ethiopia under men gets to manages to the dictator. The so called communist dictator and Lucy's Baluchis bones are preserved in a culture in a country..

Lucy Lydia Ethiopia MAURICE type Hamad Mary Leakey officer nature magazine Donald Johanson THEO Pia Addis Ababa Paleoanthropology Barron Cleveland museum of natural France Dawson east Africa One day
"mary leakey" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

13:03 min | 2 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Most famous human skeletons, all of these. Context takes place in the last one hundred years, we've transformed paleo anthropology from the early days of finding the Android calls in caves and arguing about culture now. Well, established to frauds, and certainly to claims nationalist claims of we have the oldest bones. No, we have the oldest bones. Now, we go to picking man, which discovery also is a fascination nineteen in the nineteen twenties. And it takes some time to develop an immediately. It is it is part of the challenge to the idea that old civilization or old hominids are possible in parts of the world that are regarded as degraded or inferior. And in the discovery of picking men, it feels Lydia as if we're recapitulating the doubts about darts town child, but this time it's a much earlier. It's what five hundred six hundred thousand years ago. What did they find the challenges? Everybody back in Europe. Sure. So the the research is being conducted in the n in China just outside of Peking Beijing. Now, researchers are finding evidence of very early hominids. They call. The species sedans picking insists today, we call it homo erectus. And so in the nineteen twenties and early nineteen thirties. There was a massive research effort that was set up to excavate this particular site, and it was an international collaboration between Swedish American and Chinese scientists. And it really is one of the first massive international efforts at collaboration and research that's happening in Paleoanthropology. And they discover the the plenty of bones, plenty of evidence how large site and coalfield they rent the coalfield from the owners at the time, and they begin to reconstruct a story that challenges European supremacy at the same time they. They do very good work and wreak and some of the photographs are compelling that have been worked from the bones, the forensic bones. But I want to go to the mystery of mmediately because we get we have to go onto the later twentieth century Lucy. The mystery is this we have teeth we have bones. We have some of the skullcap. It's all boxed up, very neatly and here, come the Japanese. It's nineteen forty one. What happens to the two cases? Where do we last see them Lydia? That's a great question. And I love this story about taking man because it just invoked such a mystery. So right at the eve of of the Japanese army's invasion of picking researchers box up, and and are preparing to send these fossils to the United States for safekeeping during World War Two. They're boxed up they're shipped out. And they're never seen from again, which is which is this amazing story of sort of loss, and and mystery because the fossils have tried to be traced through sort of their last routes. They were put under military escort the marines on a USO a US guarded train. And it was heading to the coast. So they could be unloaded to the Benjamin. Harrison, I believe it was waiting for them in the harbor the Japanese are crashing in on them. And the mystery of this is I mean, Lydia it takes over the book at one moment. Just. Just. Now, you have two possible explanations. One the Japanese come across them realize their significance. This is a nationalist significance. There is a there is a form of a tribal war going on between Japan and China at this point they take them to a ship that is that six somewhere offshore somewhere in the harbor or out to sea. That's one version the other version is they don't know what they are. They throw them overboard or they sell them to magicians for dragon bones. I don't like either version Lydia. I know it's really sort of historically unsatisfying to not know. And to me that's part of what makes this story. So compelling is it is unresolved that these are even to this day. They these fossils have not been recovered and not been found, but it's certainly not for lack of trying theories about what's happened to them. People have tried book writers have tried Lydia's. Put the story together. What is your thinking about those last moments? We've taken a lot of testimony from the Chinese and with the marines. Many of them were subsequently in the war and lost or killed. This is a tragedy in all instances have the Japanese ever testified their officer class their commanders. Have they provided a step by step of the of the evidence? I haven't come across any records of that. But it would be interesting to to hear sort of dot that side of of the disappearance. And I feel that it's it's this fascinating. This fascinating idea that that it does remain unresolved, and I sort of like the I like the mystery. So part of me wants to think about them talked away sort of Maltese falcon like somewhere. But. Chinese want him back. Boy. Oh, boy, they want him back. Okay. Now, we go to the late twentieth century. This is another war torn region of the world. This is. The Suhil Ethiopia and to researchers several researchers are working a site that has been very promising for many years, this is and what does it look like what is what is the area around them? Look like, Lydia. Sure, it's very it's very much a sort of high desert scrubland, very very sort of Barron. I think a lot of standards, but but ecologically interesting and this area the hot Rb Chen as it's called in Paleoanthropology circles had been sort of a recent a recent field site and set up and so by nineteen seventy four there have been a couple of field seasons to had our. But it's looking and it's looking promising which is exciting news for fossil hunters and paleoanthropologists. We're looking for early hominids in east Africa. We have the Pelley anthropologist MAURICE Thaib. He's a Frenchman geologists. We have the American Pelley anthropologist and curator at the Cleveland museum of natural history. Donald Johanson, if you don't know these names, these are, these are these are commonplace names of you do paleo anthropology. This is an extremely famous story. Probably the most famous of all because the public participates later on we have. Others who are present. Mary Leakey is tach to this. Oh, she's not present at the site eve eve Coppins paleoanthropologists from France, the collage of FRANZ and the they'd found something several seasons before that was missing a shit show. A piece of of a hominid that they believed would would lead them to richer. But if I understand the way you tell the story they didn't really expect or they hadn't been working where do they find these bones? It's an accident. Did it mother nature reveals the fossil is that what happens is is it washed out just like that. Like Dawson had us believe it was washed out. It really is washed out. And it wasn't there wanting dashing out of the sediment and people had stepped over it people had had been through sort of through the site through the area several times, and sometimes it's just very hard to see. And so yeah, so it is sort of washing out. It is sort of eroding out, and it is sort of being made more more visible over the course of the field season. Why Lucy you ask? Well, there's a party of parties right after the discovery that night. They're out a camp of the scene that Lydia paints is that they're out of camp. And they sit up drinking beer all night talking and celebrating and dancing, and they only have one song that plays again. And again, it is nineteen seventy-four Lucy in the sky with diamonds. Do we accept this? It's awfully beautiful story. Lydia has this story been challenged. This is the story that that the discovers have presented that this is very much sort of how. Lucy gets her name in sort of the mythology of the of the fossil that she does get her name from Lucy in the sky, but diamond they tried to give it other names. It has a technical name. Because when they wrote it up in nature magazine in seventy six had very dry ale to twenty eight or something like that. Now, I I said there were politics the same day, they discover Lucy their mass executions in, but because this is the descent into horror of Ethiopia under men to men just do the dictator the so-called communist dictator and Lucy's blue seas bones are preserved in a culture in a country. That is as a failed state for many years as guarded by. I guess the museum curator's they they take it upon themselves to guard Lucy is if she's a national treasure is that well how was she is that how she survived. So actually after the nineteen seventy four field season Johnson and others took Lucy out of the country. So she spent several years in. Cleveland actually being casted being studied sort of out of Ethiopia. So she's out of the the political havoc. That's happening in the mid nineteen seventies and Lucy is returned in nineteen eighty one to the museum in Addis Ababa nineteen Eighty-one was too early to escape the violence. But at least it's not as if. Theft. Exactly. But the, but the fossil has been was returned five years later and remains there until and part of Lydia's explanation. Here of Paleoanthropology is that there's a dialogue with the public and in two thousand what is it two thousand seven they begin the tour Lucie is at it. And you say you saw in Houston. I did it was an amazing exhibit. It felt very much like you was this sort of reverential kind of darkened room that you went through, and you could see the actual Lucy, and it was fascinating to see people sort of take a step back to walk carefully and to be very respectful and to to really see that. This was the real thing that simply seeing casts or something laid out in the same situation wouldn't have resonated that there really was a sense of connection between the I think the public and and the bones. She is three and a half feet tall. She's small rag weighs about sixty pounds. And we at this point have not found more of Lucy's clan. Are they searching the same fields? Have they always been working those those washes? Sure. So there are several specimens of Australopithecus effort forensis, Lucy species. I'm that have been discovered throughout east Africa from Tanzania as well. As in fact, the type specimen for the species actually comes from Tanzania. And so there have been several several specimens that have been recovered and field work is still ongoing actually throughout east Africa. I continuing to look for others like Lucy as well. As other new species, we go to an odd discovery. This goes to the southeast Asia. Lydia mentions that Java man eighteen ninety one was an early discovery. But with the one that is the oddest of all is the one in two thousand and four is that when they name it the hobbit how what did they discover, and what is it rock them? Lydia. So I love this story of the hobbit. The hobbit is actually a species as you see that was that was recovered from Florez the island of floors in Indonesia in two thousand three it was published formerly in two thousand four and it was really quite funny because the species it's very small it is very small. It is very petite. It basically does look like a hobbit for lack of for lack of better description and in two thousand three and two thousand four the world is sort of on fire sort of culturally and pop culturally on fire for Lord of the rings. And so right as the world is ready to to be thinking about hobbits and have habits on the brain. Here's this sort of hub like fossil species that's coming out of southeast Asia. And it was fantastic confluence. I think of popular culture sort of making space for new scientific discoveries because Florenz is is so recent and what they've found check. Challenges all under all presumptions before. There is a theory vanished in your reporting that that the hobbit the hobbit creature. They find that female hobbit and others left Africa or left somewhere three million years ago. Did I read that correctly? So this was a migration into the South Asia southeast Asia, the dwarfs the migration that we know of homo sapiens..

Lydia Lucy Paleoanthropology Ethiopia China east Africa southeast Asia Europe United States Peking Beijing Africa Donald Johanson nature magazine Mary Leakey South Asia France officer Japan
"mary leakey" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Wasn't a step to blow your mind? My name is Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormack. And today we're talking about bipeds by Pete Eliza. And this is a this is a topic that I just kind of rattling around my brain the other day because you for most of us walking is just kind of every day. Right. You run a little bit. Maybe you hop a little bit. It's of course, evolved multiple times in mammals. You have macro pods. Kangaroo rats, and mice spring hair hopping, mice pangolins, and of course, hominids much which includes our selves and sometimes scientists, you know, make the distinction between facultative and obligate I die pads, though, this isn't a standard distinction, suffice to say they're creature such as the human flightless birds and to draw on a prehistoric example, the T Rex that have no real alternative to bipedal movement. I mean, I can crab walk around. Yeah. Wouldn't that? We've if your crab walking you're still by people unless you can grow some crab legs. It depends which version of the crab Walker you talking talking about where you're I'm talking where you know, you lean back and you go on all fours up in the air because there's also the Zoya bird law where you walk. Inside the side spot. That's a good one. But that's not that would just be by Zoe Berg is a bite. No, no. No. No. I meant the the exorcist down the stairs. Oh, yes. Yes. Okay. Well, that that would count, but I fully grant you I probably wouldn't get around very quickly doing that. All the time. Other creatures, of course, are capable of bipedal locomotion, but only employed under certain circumstances. Like, for instance, a lemur dancing sort of prancing sideways across a clearing between two trees, a giant ground sloth in old olden days rising up to retire branches. Or or one of my favorites cat standing on its hind legs to better view prey or something of interest. This is always a creepy weird side of your lucky enough to witness it. Oh, but it also can be very cute. Yes. When dog stand on two legs to to get up there closer to the treat that they want. It's a door -able. It's yeah. When dogs do it. It's a doorbell when cats do it. It is a little unsettling like they've suddenly become tiny people like they've been people all along. That's my read on it. Now when it comes to the hominids, so which again includes humans, the oldest evidence of bipedal movement in a hominem species was probably six million years ago. This would have been the therapists, and there's some dispute over this. But at any rate, we were mostly by pito by say four million years ago, we had a curved spine by two point five million years ago. And it altered our hip support by one point nine five million years ago, and we were fully by Peter by the time of homo erectus with signature pelvis and thigh-bones evident in the fossil record the legs lengthened over time allowing for longer strides, everything that would enable the ministry of silly walks to do its thing. Yeah. Now, some of what we know about the posture and gait of our ancient ancestors in their close relatives has to be inferred indirectly. I mean, you can get a pretty good idea for the shapes of bone right stuff that that'll tell you a lot. There's other. There's other evidence. That's very direct. Great piece of early direc-. Evidence for bipedal is the fossil formation known as the Lehtola footprints. So Robert, I if you seen what these look like, I think I have refreshed everybody very cool in in nineteen seventy six there was a team working with the paleontologist, Mary Leakey, and they discovered a collection of fossilized animal tracks in Lehtola Tanzania, which is south of the Olduvai gorge and the tracks were preserved in what had been a soft bed..

Robert lamb Pete Eliza Joe McCormack Zoe Berg Olduvai gorge Lehtola Tanzania Mary Leakey Peter nine five million years five million years four million years six million years
"mary leakey" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

13:38 min | 2 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Batchelor show. Lydia pines new book is seven skeletons the evolution of the world's most famous human skeletons all of this. The contest takes place in the last one hundred years we've transformed Paleoanthropology from the early days of finding the Android calls in caves and arguing about culture now. Well, established to frauds, and certainly to claims nationalist claims of we have the oldest bones. No, we have the oldest bones. Now, we go to picking man, which discovery also is a fascination nineteen in the nineteen twenties. And it takes some time to develop an immediately. It is it is part of the challenge to the idea that old as civilization old hominids are possible in parts of the world that are regarded as degraded or inferior. And in the discovery of taking men, it feels Lydia as if we're recapitulating the doubts about darts town child, but this time it's a much earlier. It's what five hundred six hundred thousand years ago. What did they find the challenges? Everybody back in Europe. Sure. So the the research has been conducted in the Codey n in China just outside of Peking Beijing. Now, researchers are finding evidence of very early hominids. They call. The species sedans repes- picking insists today, we call it homo erectus. And so in the nineteen twenties and early nineteen thirties. There was a massive research effort that was set up to excavate this particular site, and it was an international collaboration between Swedish American and Chinese scientists. And it really is one of the first massive international efforts at collaboration and research that's happening in Paleoanthropology. And they discover the the plenty of bones, plenty of evidence how large site and a coalfield they rent the coalfield from the owners at the time, and they begin to reconstruct a story that challenges European supremacy at the same time they. They do very good work and wreak and some of the photographs are compelling that have been worked from the bones, the forensic bones. But I want to go to the mystery immediately because we get we have to go onto the later. Twentieth century and Lucy, the mystery is this we have teeth we have bones. We have some of the skullcap. It's all boxed up, very neatly and here, come the Japanese. It's nineteen forty one. What happens to the two cases? Where do we last see them Lydia? That's a great question. And I love this story about taking man because it just invoked such a mystery. So right at the eve of of the Japanese army's invasion of king, researchers box up, and and are preparing to send these fossils to the United States for safekeeping during World War Two. They're boxed up they're shipped out. And they're never seen from again, which is which is this amazing story of sort of loss, and and mystery because the fossils have tried to be traced through sort of their last routes. They were put under military escort there with the marines on a USO a US guarded train. And it was heading to the coast. So they could be unloaded to the Benjamin. Harrison, I believe it was waiting for them in the harbor the Japanese are crashing in on them. And the mystery of this is I mean, Lydia it takes over the book at one moment. Just. Now, you have two possible explanations. One the Japanese come across them realize their significance. This is a nationalist significance. There is a there is a form of a tribal war going on between Japan and China at this point, they take them to a ship that is that six somewhere offshore somewhere in the harbor out to see that's one version the other version is they don't know what they are. They throw them overboard or they sell them to magicians for dragon bones. I don't like either version Lydia. I know it's really sort of historically unsatisfying to not know. And to me that's part of what makes this story. So compelling is it is unresolved that these are even to this day. They these fossils have not been recovered and not been found, but it's certainly not for lack of trying theories about what's happened to them of people have tried book writers have tried Lydia's. Put the story together. What is your thinking about those last moments? We've taken a lot of testimony from the Chinese and with the marines. Many of them were subsequently in the war and lost or killed is a tragedy in all instances have the Japanese ever testified their officer class their commanders. Have they provided a step by step of the of the evidence? I haven't come across any records of that. But it would be interesting to to hear sort of dot that side of of the disappearance. And I feel that it's it's this fascinating. This fascinating idea that that it does remain unresolved, and I sort of like the I like the mystery. So part of me wants to think about them tucked away sort of Maltese falcon like somewhere in a box. But. See the Chinese want him back. Boy. Oh boy want him back. Okay. Now, we go to the late twentieth century. This is another war torn region of the world. This is the Suhil THEO Pia and to researchers several researchers are working a site. That has been very promising for many years is. Ethiopia? And what does it look like what is what is the area around them? Look like, Lydia. Sure, it's very it's very much a sort of high desert, very scrubland, very very sort of Barron. I think by a lot of standards, but but ecologically interesting and this area the hot our region as it's called in Paleoanthropology circles had been sort of a recent a recent field site and set up and so by nineteen seventy four there have been a couple of field seasons too had are. But it's looking and it's looking thing which is exciting news for fossil hunters and paleoanthropologist who are looking for early hominids in east Africa. We have the Pelley anthropologist MAURICE Thaib. He's a Frenchman geologists. We have the American Pelley anthropologist and curator at the Cleveland museum of natural history. Donald Johanson, if you don't know these names, these are, these are these are commonplace names, if you do paleo anthropology, this is an extremely famous story. He probably the most famous of all because the public participates later on. We have others who are present. Mary Leakey is attached to this. Oh, she's not present at the site eve eve Coppins paleoanthropologists from France, the collage of FRANZ and the they'd found something several seasons before that was promising a shit show. A piece of a of a hominid that they believed would would lead them to richer. But if I understand the way you tell the story they didn't really expect or they hadn't been working where they find these bones. It's an accident. Did it mother nature reveals the fossil is that what happens is is it washed out just like that. Like Dawson had us believe it was washed out. It really is washed out. And it wasn't there. One out of the sediment and people had stepped over it on people had had been through sort of through the site through the area several times. And sometimes it's just very. Very hard to see. And so yeah. So it is sort of washing out. It is sort of eroding out, and it is sort of being made more more visible over the course of the field season. Why Lucy you ask? Well, there's a party of parties right after the discovery that night. They're at a camp of the scene that Lydia paints is that they're at a camp. And they set up drinking beer all night talking and celebrating and dancing, and they only have one song plays again. And again, it is nineteen seventy-four Lucy in the sky with diamonds. Do we accept this? It's awfully beautiful story. Lydia has this as this story, then challenged this is the story that that the discovers have presented that this is very much sort of how Lucy gets her name in sort of the mythology of the of the fossil that she does get her name from Lucy in the sky with diamonds, they tried to give it other names that has the technical name because when they wrote it up in nature magazine in seventy six it had a very dry ale to twenty eight or something like that. Now. I said there were politics the same day. They discover Lucy their mass executions and odd Asaba because this is the descent into har- of Ethiopia under men guest. You just do the dictator. They so-called communist dictator and Lucy's blue seas bones are preserved in a culture in a country that is calm as a failed state for many years. It's guarded by the museum curator's, they they take it upon themselves to guard Lucy is if she's a national treasure is that well how she is that how she survived. So actually after the nineteen seventy four field season Johnson and others took Lucy out of the country. So she spent several years in Cleveland, actually being casted being studied sort of out of Ethiopia. So she's out of the the political havoc. That's happening in the mid nineteen seventies and Lucy is returned in nineteen Eighty-one to the museum in Addis Ababa. Nineteen Eighty-one was too early to escape the violence. But at least it's not as. Exactly. But the, but the fossil has been was returned five years later and remained there until and part of Lydia's explanation here of Pella anthropoid is that there's a dialogue with the public and in two thousand what is it two thousand seven they begin the tour Lucie is that it and you say you saw in Houston. I did it was an amazing exhibit. It felt very much like you was this sort of reverential kind of darkened room that you went through, and you could see the actual Lucy, and it was fascinating to see people sort of take a step back and to walk carefully and to be very respectful and to to really see that. This was the real thing that simply seeing casts or something laid out in the same situation wouldn't have resonated that there really was a sense of connection between the I think the public and and the bones. She is three and a half feet tall. She's small rag weighs about sixty pounds. And we at this point have not found more of Lucy's clan. Are they searching the same field? So they always been working those those washes. Sure, so there are several specimens of osteopathic is effort forensis, Lucy species. I'm that have been discovered throughout east Africa from Tanzania as well as Ethiopia. In fact, the type specimen for the species actually comes from Tanzania. And so there have been several several specimens that have been recovered and field work is still ongoing actually throughout east Africa. I continuing to look for others like Lucy as well. As other new species, we go to an odd discovery. This goes to the southeast Asia. Lydia mentions that Java man eighteen ninety one was an early discovery. But with the one that is the oddest of all is the one in two thousand and four is that when they name it the hobbit how what did they discover and why does it rock them, Lydia? So I love this story of the habit. So the hobbit is actually a species as you see that was a that was recovered from Florez be island of floors in Indonesia in two thousand three it was published formerly in two thousand four and it was really quite funny because the species it's it's very small. It is very small. It is very petite. It basically does look like a hobbit for lack of for lack of better description and in two thousand three and two thousand four the world is sort of on fire sort of culturally and pop culturally on fire for Lord of the rings. And so right as the world is ready to to be thinking about hobbits and have habits on the brain. Here's this sort of habit. Like fossil species that's coming out of southeast Asia. And it was the spend tastic confluence, I think of popular culture sort of making space for new scientific discoveries because Florenz is is so recent and what they've found. Challenges all under all presumptions before. There is a theory advanced in your reporting that that the hobbit the hobbit creature they find that female hobbit, and others left Africa or left somewhere three million years ago. Did I read that correctly? So that this was a migration into the South Asia, south East Asia, that dwarfs the migration that we know of homosexuals. Sure. So I think that there's a there's one one of of scientific studies that sort of puts forward that the ancestors to the Hollywood species would have migrated to southeast Asia during the place to seen and the reason that that the species does look so small is a result of island working because this is such a relatively recent discovery. It will be interesting to sort of see in ten twenty years sort of what the scientific community is.

Lydia Lucy Paleoanthropology Ethiopia Lydia pines southeast Asia China east Africa Europe Batchelor United States Asia Peking Beijing Africa Donald Johanson Mary Leakey South Asia France
"mary leakey" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

13:03 min | 2 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Of the world's most famous human skeletons, all of these contests takes place in the last hundred years, we've transformed paleo anthropology from the early days of finding the calls in caves and arguing about culture now. Well, established to frauds, and certainly to claims nationalist claims of we have the oldest bones. No, we have the oldest bones. Now, we go to picking man, which discovery also is a fascination nineteen in the nineteen twenties. And it takes time to develop an immediately. It is it is part of the challenge to the idea that old as civilization old hominids are possible in parts of the world that are regarded as degraded or inferior and in the discover. Taking man, it feels Lydia as if we're recapitulating the doubts about darts town child, but this time it's a much earlier. It's what five hundred six hundred thousand years ago. What did they find the challenges? Everybody back in Europe. Sure. So the the research is being conducted in the Cody n in China just outside of pay king. Beijing now researchers are finding evidence of very early hominids they called the species sedans repairs picking insists today, we call it homo erectus. And so in the nineteen twenties and early nineteen thirties. There was a massive research effort that was set up to excavate this particular site, and it was an international collaboration between Swedish American and Chinese scientists. And it really is one of the first massive international efforts at collaboration and research happening in Paleoanthropology, and they discover the the plenty of bones, plenty of evidence how large site and coalfield they rent the coalfield from the owners at the time, and they begin to reconstruct a story that challenges European supremacy at the same time they? They do very good work, and Rick and some of the photographs are compelling that have been worked from the bones, the forensic bones. But I want to go to the mystery of mmediately because we get we have to go onto the later. Twentieth century and Lucy, the mystery is this we have teeth we have bones. We have some of the skullcap. It's all boxed up, very neatly and here, come the Japanese. It's nineteen forty one. What happens to the two cases? Where do we last see them Lydia? That's a great question. And I love this story about picking man because it just invoked such a mystery. So right at the eve of of the Japanese army's invasion of king, researchers box up, and and are preparing to send these fossils to the United States for safekeeping during World War Two. They're boxed up their shift out, and they're never seen from again, which is which is this amazing story of sort of loss, and and mystery because the fossils have tried to be traced through sort of their last routes. They were put under military escort the marines on a USO a US guarded train. And it was heading to the coast. So they could be unloaded to the Benjamin. Harrison, I believe it was waiting for them in the harbor the Japanese are crashing in on them. And the mystery of this is I mean, Lydia it takes over the book at one moment. Just now you have two possible explanations. One the Japanese come across them. Realized their significance. This is the nationalist significance. There is a there is a form of a a tribal war going on between Japan and China at this point they take them to a ship that is that six somewhere offshore somewhere in the harbor or out to sea. That's one version the other version is they don't know what they are. They throw them overboard or they sell them to magicians for dragon bones. I don't like either version Lydia. I know it's really sort of historically unsatisfying to not know. And to me that's part of what makes this story. So compelling is it is unresolved that these are even to this day. They these fossils have not been recovered and not been found, but it's certainly not for lack of trying theories about what's happened to them up. People have tried book writers have tried Lydia's. Put the story together. What is your thinking about those last moments? We've taken a lot of testimony from the Chinese and win the marines. Many of them were subsequently in the war and lost or killed. This is a tragedy in all instances have the Japanese ever testified their officer class their commanders. Have they provided a step by step of the of the evidence? I haven't come across any records of that. But it would be interesting to to hear sort of that that side of of the disappearance. And I feel that it's it's this fascinating. This fascinating idea that that it does remain unresolved, and I sort of like the I like the mystery. So part of me wants to think about them tucked away sort of Maltese falcon like somewhere in a box. But. Let's see the Chinese want him back. Boy, boy, I want him back. Okay. Now, we go to the late twentieth century. This is another war torn region of the world. This is the Suhil Ethiopia and to researchers several researchers are working a site that has been very promising for many years is this EFI opium. And what does it look like what is the what does the area around them? Look like, Lydia. Sure, it's very it's very much a sort of high desert scrubland, very very sort of Barron. I think by a lot of standards, but but ecologically interesting and this area the hot Rb ten as it's called in Paleoanthropology circles had been sort of a recent recent field site and set up and so by nineteen seventy four there have been a couple of field seasons to had our. But it's looking and it's looking promising which is exciting news for fossil hunters and paleoanthropologist who are looking for early hominids in east Africa. We have the Pelley anthropologist MAURICE tub. He's a Frenchman geologists. We have the American paleoanthropologist anthropologist and curator at the Cleveland museum of natural history. Donald Johanson, if you don't know these names, these are, these are these are commonplace names, if you do Paleoanthropology, this is an extremely famous story, probably the most famous of all because the public participates later on we have. Others who are present. Mary Leakey is attached to this. Oh, she's not present at the site eve eve Coppins paleoanthropologists from France collage of FRANZ, and the they'd found something several seasons before that was promising shit show a piece of a of a hominid that they believed would would lead them to richer. But if I understand the way you tell the story they didn't really expect or they hadn't been working where they find these bones. It's an accident. Did it mother nature reveals the fossil is that what happens is is it washed out. Just like that Dawson had us believe it was washed out it really is washed out. And it wasn't there wanting dashing out of the sediment and people had stepped over it people had had been through sort of through the site through the area several times, and sometimes it's just very hard to see. And so yeah, so it is sort of washing out. It is sort of. Eroding out, and it is sort of being made more more visible over the course of the field season. Why Lucy you ask? Well, there's a party of parties right after the discovery that night. They're at a camp of the scene that Lydia paints is that they're out of camp. And they set up drinking beer all night talking and celebrating and dancing, and they only have one song that plays again. And again, it is nineteen seventy-four Lucy in the sky with diamonds. Do we accept this? It's awfully beautiful story. Lydia has this story been challenged. This is the story that that the discovers have presented that this is very much sort of how Lucy gets her name in sort of the mythology of the of the fossil that she does get her name from Lucy in the sky with diamonds, they tried to give it other names that has a technical name. Because when they wrote it up in nature magazine in seventy six it had a very dry ale to twenty eight or something like that. Now, I I said there were politics the same day. They discover Lucy their mass execution. Odd Asaba because this is the descent into har- of Ethiopia under men gets to men just to the dictator. The so-called communist dictator and Lucy's blues. These bones are preserved in a culture in a country that is calm as a failed state for many years. It's guarded by. I guess they museum curator's they they take it upon themselves to guard Lucy is if she's a national treasure is that well how was she is that how she survived. So actually after the nineteen seventy four field season Johnson and others took Lucy out of the country. So she spent several years in Cleveland, actually being casted being studied sort of out of Ethiopia. So she's out of the the political havoc. That's happening in the mid nineteen seventies. And is Lucy is returned in nineteen eighty one to the museum in Addis Ababa nineteen Eighty-one was too early to escape the violence. But at least it's not. Not as. Exactly. But but the fossil has been was returned five years later remains there until and part of Lydia's explanation here of Pella anthropology is that there's a dialogue with the public and in two thousand what is it two thousand and seven they begin the tour Lucie is that it. In houston. I did it was an amazing exhibit. It felt very much like you was the sort of reverential kind of darkened room that you went through, and you could see the actual Lucy, and it was fascinating to see people sort of take a step back and to walk carefully and to be very respectful and to to really see that. This was the real thing that simply seeing casts or something laid out in the same situation wouldn't have resonated that there really was a sense of connection between the I think the public and and the bones. She is three and a half feet tall. She's small bag weighs about sixty pounds. And we at this point have not found more of Lucy's clan. Are they searching the same fields? Have they always been working those those washes? Sure. So there are several specimens of Australopithecus effort forensis Lucy species that have been discovered throughout east Africa from Tanzania as well as. Ethiopia? In fact, the type specimen for the species actually comes from Tanzania. And so there have been several several specimens that have been recovered and field work is still ongoing actually throughout east Africa. I continuing to look for others like Lucy as well. As other new species, we go to an odd discovery. This goes to the southeast Asia. Lydia mentions that Java man eighteen ninety one was an early discovery. But with the one that is the oddest of all is the one in two thousand and four is that when they name it the hobbit how what they discover and why does it rock them, Lydia? So I love this story of the habit. So the hobbit is actually a species as you say that was that was recovered from Florez the island of flurries in Indonesia in two thousand three it was published formerly in two thousand four and it was really quite funny because the species it's very small it is very small. It is very petite. It basically does look like a hobbit for lack of for lack of better description and in two thousand and three and two thousand and four the world is sort of on fire sort of culturally pop culturally on fire for Lord of the rings. And so right is the world is ready to to be thinking about hobbits and have habits on the brain. Here's this sort of habit. Like fossil species that's coming out of southeast Asia. And it was suspend tastic confluence, I think of popular culture sort of making space for new scientific discoveries because Florenz says is so recent and what they've found. Challenges all under all presumptions before. There is a theory advanced in your reporting that that the hobbit the hobbit creature. They find that female hobbit and others left Africa or left somewhere three million years ago. Did I read that correctly? So this was a migration into the south southeast Asia. The dwarfs the migration that we know of homo sapiens..

Lydia Lucy Ethiopia Paleoanthropology United States China Beijing east Africa Europe southeast Asia Africa Cleveland museum of natural Donald Johanson Mary Leakey France officer nature magazine Rick Japan
"mary leakey" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on Science for the People

"Yeah, may definitely. It's not to downplay the challenge that these women faced, for example, to go back to Dorothy Garrod. She she does this the fest, women professor, that's hopes to punch. She was totally aligned. She was ODI employed after a low period of actually working out unofficially when they just changed the rules effectively had to appeal employ officially as a man on the paperwork, and then she should. Have you get the impression for meeting about Barbara fees, parenting that she had a really hard time in. An extremely male dominated environment in the in the sort of the hierarchical organization of Oxbridge this in around the time when when the colleges fest opted to admit women than would riots things with male students get, you know, destroying property and things like this and to the women alone in that department teaching students. I can't imagine how intimidating that was been, and there were women all over who had situations similar to that, but I think the power of helping inexperience early on in your career where you worked with another women, you've meant by somebody, I think was really important. This just so many other examples this another women, here's sort of has a famous male who either shutters are in the same way that he'll do patriots is overshadowed by her husband Souflias Petri who is just a world famous to wanna just he has the Petri patriots in named off to him in London, and other women who sort of was in that situation with cooled Tessa Verney Wheeler and her husband was symbol tumor Wailer who was a extremely imminent Oculus at the very beginning of when acuity was becoming stuff, just a professional career, and they actually worked as a team for a long time running different excavations. They both lectured that UCLA in the early days, but Tessa was more of a field archaeologist. She ran their field excavations some of which were training grounds for the next generation, and it was her influence as a woman running a site, a major science. I'm running the entire peration while Morton might be away doing of things teaching. They will starting science communication. It was usually him in front of the camera while she was doing the work actually running slice and for the students who who went nece science, seeing her just getting on with it during the occupancy running everything. No big fuss was very important. I think an NGO she trained people including a Kenyan including Mary Leakey, Doug on her size, maybe keys, hugely famous from your listeners probably heard of the Leakey family. They've been working on human origins research in various countries in Africa for decades Mary Leakey a found the oldest human footprints in the world lie tidy. I've a three minute years old. She was trained by two women. One of whom is testimony waiter. And I think this is no coincidence to some of the the key women who went onto major careers had this experience of early training in being seen on an end saying somebody. Things running things. So I think that's really important factor in. In fact, it wasn't sort of an isolation for everybody and not only that, but people when they went on when he steps themselves in their careers, you would say, see, vide-, strong collaborations directly between people. So for example, and to go back to get through Cajun Thompson, she dug with the patriots in Egypt in the days while she's training, Margaret Murray was said to, they will digging together and donate in different sites on the same field project later on, she went on to do her research in Egypt's, and she was real point and she was probably one of the finest field Oculus of her generation women or men, and she was extremely methodical, very careful very concerned with what we call, stir take a fee, which is basically the order. The deposits are found in when you dig a site and in order to understand Europe, unity inside ego tonight, how your. Phoned is crucial. And she was very careful. She tried to dig sites in in sequence sticking things carefully, and she also collaborated with unin Gardner who was a a journalist in joker today. Some of the first multi disciplinary landscape research projects, and this was going on in the twenties in in the m in Egypt together. And you know these, these radio foundational figures for how occupancy developed as a field, but you don't hit quite the same about them as you do in some history books about the discipline..

Mary Leakey Dorothy Garrod Margaret Murray Tessa Verney Wheeler patriots Egypt Morton Souflias Petri Leakey family professor Oxbridge UCLA Barbara Africa London joker Europe Cajun Thompson unin Gardner Doug
"mary leakey" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Federal public defender before being named rhode island's state public defender in two thousand twelve she was nominated to the federal court by then president barack obama in two thousand fifteen to fill the seat of retiring federal judge mary leakey but like many of obama's judicial nominees mcelroy's nomination was held up by the republican led senate and expired in january of two thousand seventeen she is among twenty federal judges to us attorneys and eight us marshals nominated by the president requiring confirmation by the senate steve kloempken wpro new five year old crew member from point judith based fishing boat plucked this morning by a coastguard chopper eighty miles south east of montauk new york and rushed to rhode island hospital the coast guard says the crewmen evidently suffered a seizure on board the forty five foot reaper and then fell and hit his head the red sox opened an early season series against the yankees frozen fenway tonight the game coverage starts at six thirty sister station am seven ninety traffic accuweather and more of the matt allen show just ahead wpro news time to three this report is brought to you by napa this month and napa auto parts store is the most popular garden battery is yes twenty one ninety nine with exchange or say ten dollars instantly on all other lawn and garden batteries quality parts helpful people that's napa know how some exclusions apply effort dissipating napa auto parts stores you love golf but keep getting unreasonable assessments at your current club join the most affordable and fastest growing golf club in the region valley country club in warwick valley country club is a fun competitive course with no initiation fees and guarantees no assessments new england golf monthly ranks valley in the top twenty in all of new england play a round of golf in four hours or less and enjoy prime tee times every day of the week ed relax and enjoy fine dining in valleys beautiful clubhouse newly constructed upper deck or the all new members patio with fire bit plus valley offers affordable under aged five memberships and junior programs for kids of all ages and skill levels members enjoy pristine fairways exceptional raines awardwinning cuisine weekly leagues and.

yankees awardwinning matt allen rhode island hospital steve kloempken mary leakey england warwick valley country club napa rhode island red sox montauk new york president senate mcelroy barack obama forty five foot ten dollars four hours
"mary leakey" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"The revolution softwash news center on wpro providence a cumulus station wpro news at eleven o'clock good morning president trump is cancelling plans to travel to south america stay in the us manage response to syria and its chemical weapons attack in washington is correspondent bob constantini one presidential tweet attorney client privilege is dead a second one declares the russian investigation quote a total witch hunt three exclamation points and we're told a witch hunt in all caps last night the president said verbally the rate on his personal attorney michael cohen wasn't attack on our country while it's unclear the scope of the search michael avenue dotty the lawyer for stormy daniels who's been sparring with cohen rocks or the president of the united states to cast aspersions as to the good members of the fbi hardworking law enforcement people that are only trying to do their job that are executing a valid search warrant is outrageous bob costantini washington president's homeland security advisor the latest resigning at the white house is tom bossert who is stepping aside secretary sarah sanders says president is grateful for his commitment to the safety and security of the country well here at home campaign twenty eighteen we'll hear from republican giovanni for rosie the businessmanturned candidate for governor is going to be released what he calls his rhode island papers he'll join tara granahan after this news update back to the white house president trump has made a nomination to feel the vacancy on the federal bench in rhode island here's wpro's steve kloempken mary mcelroy served as an assistant federal public defender before being named rhode island's state public defender in two thousand twelve she was nominated to the federal court by then president barack obama in two thousand fifteen to fill the seat of retiring federal judge mary leakey but like many of obama's judicial nominees mcelroy's nominee was held up by the republican led senate and expired in january of two thousand seventeen she is among twenty federal judges to us attorneys and eight us marshals nominated by the president requiring confirmation by the senate steve kloempken wpro finally bill cosby's lawyers launched a fierce attack on the comedians accuser calling her a con artist who took advantage of cosby's grief and loneliness over his sons murder to gain his trust before framing him for sexual assault coming up as the wpro news continues traffic updates on the way the accuweather forecast that's coming up as well.

barack obama steve kloempken mary leakey white house rhode island secretary attorney bob constantini america accuweather wpro news assault murder bill cosby senate trump mary mcelroy tara granahan
"mary leakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Can follow this one if the temptations lead singers sister married singer helens brother she'd be mrs temptations bush artistic so rough and ready jimmy robin ready go good friday looks his readily ready that's exactly right david ruffin and a helen singer hellenism of course helen ready seat b mrs ruffin ready very good in try this when for insane if the supreme knows shrink married the right thing director she'd be flown to do the right thing you can do the right thing what was what was not yet she shushi lauren broccoli rain man her the right flurry broccoli yes that's exactly right lorraine broccoli well it's her choice signed nearly eight were still in the horticultural mode did not choose to be called francine akbar mushlin you think this is a very retro category yazar back and we thought about that and rejected a completely but dry this one paula if the tennissee walser married the billboard siam she'd be oh i know it got less partner with that has patty page i should actually be excellent accurately no no no no no who else says after signs billboard we don't wanna make you anxious but we have it back back i'm just i made learned turner page sorry petty petty petty page turner yes exactly right patty page and ted turner of course that i that i mentioned before that it was lorraine bracha and spike lee was the one before we do that the sopranos shrink of courses lorraine broker and the right thing director is spike lee lorraine brocco lee patty page the singer who made the tennessee walt's famous and ted turner the billboard signed petty page turner and finally murray and see if you can follow this when if paleontologist mary married actress sara's brother she'd be oh yes she chief even mrs leaky faucet a where you're exactly right she would be mary leaky faucet yes very good so you can pretty much better that things not going to happen with that's exactly right mary leakey and of course our faucets brother would be mary leakey process now a little something extra for valentine's day way back in season five february fourteen impact we all huddled together with an intrepid audience at the carriage house on the continent estate in lincoln massachusetts it was my idea to hitler special celebration delay can historic form i had neglected however to find out whether or not the camera journal's was he did it made.

helens hitler valentine tennessee spike lee lorraine bracha ted turner patty francine akbar mrs ruffin bush david ruffin lincoln massachusetts mary leakey sara murray partner walser paula lorraine broccoli
"mary leakey" Discussed on WLRH 89.3 HD3

WLRH 89.3 HD3

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on WLRH 89.3 HD3

"For a reason two romi go ahead save you can follow this one if the temptations lead singers sister married singer heroins brother she'd be mrs oh attempt tensions kept his it's a rough and ready jimmy roughandready oh good daily muscles retina writing that's exactly right david rawson and a helin singer hellenism of course helen ready seat b mrs ruffin ready very good try this win for insane if the supremos shrink married the right thing director she'd be slamming to do the right thing you can do the right thing what was what was known what's your yeah yes she she lauren broccoli all rangebound through the rights lorraine broccoli yes that's exactly right the rain broccoli well it's her choice hey we're still on the horticultural mode i did not choose to be called francine akbar mushlin i think this is a very retro category and we thought about that in rejected a completely but dry this one paula if the tendency walser married the billboard siam she'd be oh a mess for him i get that has any patty page i should actually be earlier it accurately no no no no no well else got our third signs billboard we don't wanna make eu anxious but we have it i'm i'm a hint turner page sorry petty petty page terminal yes exactly right patty page and ted turner of course deny that i mentioned before that it was lorraine bracha and spike lee was the one before we do that the sopranos shrink of course is lorraine bracha and the right thing director is spike lee lorraine brocco lee patty page the singer who made the tennessee walt's famous and ted turner the billboard sign petty peach turner and finally murray and see if you can follow this when if paleontologist merry married actress farah's brother she'd be oh yes she she misses leaky faucet that's exactly right she would be mary leaky faucet yes very good steward so you can pretty much better that things not going to happen with that's exactly right mary leakey and of course faucets brother would the mary leakey process now a little something extra for valentine's day way back in season five february th impact we all huddled together with an intrepid audience at the carriage house on the.

mary leakey valentine tennessee spike lee ted turner francine akbar mrs ruffin helen jimmy roughandready david rawson farah murray peach turner lorraine bracha eu walser paula director
"mary leakey" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"On thursday he's coming home like charlemagne said i agree of a good no listeners you'll never know when we go on legs so listen this is our year looked moons that man freedom you get out i guess my life you know says he'll be out eventually you know mary leakey low but listen and na repre form they play an intro today damzal yes all boosted morale not a good listeners you you'd be height about it may come you know felt better you know thereby truly is a coal city bre elo city and now they are you eagles fan yeah what were you from hurley oh no i'm not bombing yes okay or would you prefer me criminal or the eagles woulda a super bowl oh timing milk no i feel like every european deserve they've friedel thought way i wanna put balls he to win over his boom okay civilized people who seattle like dog who knocked from truly though they don't have the same passion pillow meek mill lauda eagles hello hi there you from philly i have not part of believe what i am definitely a meek mill fan in i'm an eagles who would you prefer me criminal a super bowl you know it's funny though i've been a eagles phantom hours ten years old i'm gonna have to tell a winning the championship i'm sorry over me criminal when we were there merely be stuck in jail longo's gonna to say live pan look i feel like when it comes down to situations like it is one of those things with a once in a lifetime opportunity if only one nfl championship not super bowl championships correct in nfc championship and i really wanted to beat the patriot i want the threematch from a bore broker arrived i'm really here four we hungry so all right they make love you no right to awful two from surely taylor are only want to talk to people from philadelphia because people from philly have a different level of passion forty egos and meek so it's more of a lifeordeath struggle will we should call somebody from philly you got q dz number you know i got you leasing garnered easy is he does our morning radio in philly he's going to has arms all show he also has its own talk show in philadelphia we need to call philly fair less is eagerly blog you.

charlemagne mary leakey hurley eagles longo taylor philadelphia philly seattle nfl nfc mill ten years milk
"mary leakey" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"Sit here or is that your life okay uh yes that's something i'm i'm really starting to see with with bitcoin um and cadeau general uh waterloo and i agree or it's in a related with cut it like the up i mean you guys should really have some of those people on there are definitely experts out there uh that have really study this phenomenon that can probably a you know they might not even be into crypto the not they might not even own bitcoin but i know the generic phenomenon when they see it yet playa yeah that would really be interested in how they feel about it if a lot about it if i mean if lui already who we think of anybody who what who is the lady from guerrillas in the missed what waft askar the arm no that is reasonable taibbi movie i guess i was on a real uh legistor two i know here talking about oregon too i not too long ago and it was like a really dumb i don't know but i do know skimpy remember we learn about her in school in the like briefly against apology section of how you hours will find the out or something mary leakey or something that was that was a paleontologist the phone where the early hamad's seizure live i get it all confuse whatever he was it was susan sarandon wanker okay well i'll take sarandon thorough you get the actress is always ain't no area she was the actors of ohga you know the true story booby idea i yet in i uh well there's a there's a what is it what does it the guy's name that rights for the near attempt glad well malcolm blood william malcolm glad while he wrote the the tipping point like he would be a good guest this get him on like i feel like bitcoin encrypt is reaching some sort of tipping point sort of you know point in which there is this sort of.

lui oregon mary leakey hamad malcolm taibbi susan sarandon william malcolm
"mary leakey" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"It's pro time i met bear follow us on twitter for instant traffic updates at w ivc traffic all right coming up here in just a moment we've got a triple a membership to give away we'll tell you how you could win that here in just a second right now if 88 degrees with the heat index a four hundred and fifty five late that's what it feels like uh the american standard cooling weather center on ninety three wsb abc we are joe's braman actually there's been progress cheer clearly made asiaweek's any to staff okay so it's more than one lake it is just so much lake mary leakey issue our body marine corps dr a often we're leaking information to you at the top and bottom of the hour dr king everywhere and he was leaks this throws ninetythree wip used in the here's the deal you want to win a free aaa membership follow us on facebook or right now facebookcom hammer and nigel we've got post up there all you have to do is leave a very brief comment as to why you would like to win a free aaa membership ship leave that comments on the appropriate post and we'll pick a winner sometime after six thirty tonight and just a reminder triple a their hook you up at the indiana state fair this year if you've got triple a membership stop by august seventeenth and you will get in absolutely free there's.

twitter asiaweek the deal facebook joe lake mary leakey nigel indiana 88 degrees
"mary leakey" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"mary leakey" Discussed on KOMO

"From abc news i'm todd add president trump and vladimir putin talk for two hours and fifteen minutes during their highly anticipated meeting at the g twenty summit in hamburg germany friday abc's karen travers in hamburg with more focused so long today that 'ave cap checking even the first lady tried get them to end their conversation but at that point if they're went on for another hour at the top of president trump's agenda russia's election interference also in the room russian foreign minister and secretary of state rex tillerson who told reporters the two leaders agreed on a ceasefire itself with syria mary leakey areas that we can continue to work together on to deescalate the area's violence once we defeat isis and to work together towards a political process that will secure future the people president trump meets with chinese president jian being on saturday better than expected jobs numbers released friday morning the two hundred twenty two thousand jobs are being taken as a sign that businesses are still high ring despite an economy that's going it just one point four percent for all that robust job growth average hourly pay is just up two and a half percent from last june the unemployment rate did go up slightly largely because more people are looking for work that's abc's brad mielke both size in the fatal crash involving tennisstar venus williams are speaking out following a court hearing in palm beach florida friday attorneys representing the whoo williams and family of the elderly man killer killed agreed on how they will examine both vehicles in the accident williams attorney malcolm cunningham says the main issue was the defense wants to exchange data immediately after the inspection will extract information from ms williams's car and they will extract information from there clients call and the at that time or within seventy two hours will exchange information the family of drummed barge sins who died his suing williams this is abc news have you ever thought you'd like to buy and sell houses but didn't know how or where to begin the pierre your.

trump vladimir putin hamburg karen travers russia foreign minister unemployment rate malcolm cunningham abc president germany secretary of state syria mary leakey palm beach florida attorney ms williams seventy two hours fifteen minutes four percent two hours