18 Burst results for "Mary Francis"

"mary francis" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:40 min | Last week

"mary francis" Discussed on Radio Boston

"I think the voters that's gonna be an issue especially because in order to win. I think that you save you. George has stu whole either indra campbell or mayor janey but frankly both of them into her camp. I think that's what the game is from here on out. It's who is who between michelle. His sabe george gets either one of those Kit former candidates to endorse her. That would be the game. And i think after that the game is over i do think frankly given the numbers. Michelle stands in pole position bipolar. So a couple of things there. I initiates ib georgia's father comes from tunisia. Just want to give flag that. That's okay You're still brothers. The second i do want to your point about sort of who's got votes. I do want to point out with the precinct data in the globe analysis That they publish this week. Says that wou- quote finished first or second in seventeen of the city's twenty two wards and never finished below third and quote which does suggest sort of a front runner status at this part. As i turn to you maria francis. I wanna play a little bit of sound from dorchester. Smell of bush who told. Wb you are that the two remaining candidates need to up their presence in black neighborhoods and talk about issues important there to earn that final vote. He's gonna talk about climate change. Talk about what matters to our t. Unity whether public health issues whether has the cost of health The cost of living in areas where we have high particulate matter. We also know. Mary francis from wbz zone. Polling housing is huge. Kovic is huge and race is huge for voters of boston. What kind of discussion do you wanna see from the two finalists going forward schorr and like i and i would disagree a bit with jim. The candidates actually have pretty robust platforms. Which which. I've looked through. And i feel like there is a distinction in the platforms especially with wu in asaba george. So there's a choice there. That's fairly clearly laid out. I think voters but what. I would love to hear more from the candidates. I think it is about the candidates positions clearly but it's also about folks understanding their own power. And what i'd love to hear more is about the engagement that these candidates Their engagement plans for communities. Whether it's engaging folks on the plant local planning level or in you know city level budget discussions but what's the plan to include citizen voice in continuing to creep policy solutions. That work for everybody wears is an issue that you see particular opportunity to do that. Murray francis i well so on the november second ballot there will be a ballot question about Adding elements of participatory budgeting to the city and to the the processes on the city level. So i feel that's a that's a perfect place to start so. Let's talk for a minute about acting boston. Mayor kim genie on wednesday. We spoke with meghan irons from the boston globe. Here's what she said about genie's loss. We learned that is extremely difficult for kim janey. The candidate to proceed with a mayoral campaign while also dealing with being a mayor of boston a sitting near boston and in the end it voters just were really feeling that as well turnout was huge in it low and by huge there she means important and let me just throw the number one eight hundred four two three eight.

indra campbell mayor janey maria francis michelle wbz Kovic stu asaba george tunisia Mary francis dorchester schorr George georgia george boston Murray francis bush wu jim
"mary francis" Discussed on Physicians On Purpose

Physicians On Purpose

05:34 min | Last month

"mary francis" Discussed on Physicians On Purpose

"How long have we known each other. For seven years seven years there you go and read. Breads been to one or two of our retreats i think and so we're good friends Know little bit about each other and what. I'd like bread to do because i asked him to. Come on is tell us his burnout story and where he started where he is today. What's happened in the meantime what he's doing with his learning experience along the way so brett wherever you want to start. Just tell us How we met where you were at the time. And we'll just walk people to the present day sure so I'm in my twentieth year. Here in physician owned practice in wisconsin. And i went through a challenging time in two thousand fourteen where a number of things or challenging me Both personally and professionally It was a mixture of one of my partners. Left leaving me with extra work. I didn't know how to communicate with the nurses that were working with me as effectively as i do now and we just started with epic by. Hang on a second triple whammy. Almost nobody could survive. Get somebody else's panel dumped on you Epic is installed. And you've got to ramp up that learning curve and you're having trouble communicating with the nurses to get your needs met. Yes yup that's gotta hurt. That'll leave a mark on the personal side We had three teenagers at home. And and we didn't have much family support. And then my my beautiful wife. Mary francis she was struggling with chronic migraines. That really affected her. Put her out of commission for days at a time. And so i was struggling trying to figure out how to balance all that and i tried some of the my usual techniques and what i learned from from you were actual survival techniques but I didn't really understand that. But i just tried to work harder. I tiptoeing my wife. Just hang in there. Things will get better. I just need to learn more or do more. And it wasn't working and after a while it got to be harder and it got to the point where things were kind of coming to ahead and my wife was losing patience. And i didn't have any other good ideas and so one day she eve me your card and said hey breath i think you you should get somehow. Here's a card with a burnout coach. And at the time. As i kind of reflected on it. I i didn't really trust anyone and i didn't. I didn't know where to turn. And i thought actually i thought well how is this guy died happy. Md how's he going to help me. I have my special problems and nobody can really help me..

brett Mary francis wisconsin migraines
"mary francis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"mary francis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"A World War two veteran from Quincy battles corona virus and winds WBZ's Larry Kirby reports the illness swept through his entire family and they're all here to tell the story March eighteenth chip Macintosh a nurse practitioner who writes the tea into Boston tested positive for covert nineteen worried about his father he left their house in Quincy his sister Mary Frances came home to take care of dad we are hoping that things would go well but about five days I think after chip my brother had the virus next on the stand to show symptoms of the virus her father art mac Macintosh is one hundred years old we thought that this you know really would be his demise but Mary Francis is also a nurse she cared for her father and so did the neighborhood in Quincy on my child to love to have a copy and donate my called someone and sure enough ten minutes later there was a donut from Dunkin donuts you know with the logs lock and a few doughnuts Mister McIntosh turned the corner and he's about to turn one a hundred and one years old in a matter of days Laurie Kirby WBZ Boston's newsradio Major League Baseball conducting one of the largest antibody test studies anywhere in America WBZ's Jim McKay takes a look at the results over fifty six hundred people were tested for the antibodies across Major League Baseball including players and club employees only sixty people tested positive for the antibodies at a rate of just point seven two percent it was also adjusted for false positive and negative tests now the MLB is saying this was more about public health and less about getting teams back on the field and the amount of employees were tested was not enough to make any decisions about which locations would be safer to be back playing first this week Major League Baseball team owners are proposing a plan to have teams back on to the field there are reports that they're shooting for early July Jim McKay WBZ Boston news radio and this morning comedian Jerry Stiller has died they gave me a relaxation cassette might put pressure gets too high on the tech tells me to say Stiller probably best known for that role on Seinfeld.

Larry Kirby Boston Quincy Mary Frances Mary Francis Mister McIntosh Baseball America Jim McKay MLB Jerry Stiller Laurie Kirby Major League
"mary francis" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

12:25 min | 1 year ago

"mary francis" Discussed on Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

"We'll switch historians and midstream here but keep going. We Thank University of Pennsylvania. The historian Mary Francis Berry also author of the two thousand eighteen book. History teaches us to resist. How Progressive Movement's have succeeded in challenging? Times thank you so much. Thank you having me and with us now. Jeffrey Angle. FOUNDING DIRECTOR OF THE CENTER FOR Presidential History at Southern Methodist University and Co the author of the book published last year called impeachment. An American history Dr Angle. Thank you for joining us to talk to you again. You said that. The framers of the Constitution Shen saw impeachment as a check on excessive power. What kinds of scenarios did they most have in mind? You know it's fascinating is that. They went through a series of hypothetical scenarios. Maria's during discussions at the constitutional convention which sounds somewhat eerie for our own day for example They pose what if a president were to you somehow deceive or dissemble rely in order to gain office and the answer generally was with that. Of course they should be removed from office. What president were to work with a foreign power to to somehow influence their office? Then there's the person should be removed. What if a person were to use their office to bribe People around a a bribe others to do things with the power of the office. Not so much taking bribes rather giving bribes if you will at the power of his office. Well that's the person that should be removed from office and my last one That I think is really pertinent. At least it was part of the discussion. A few months ago was what if the president were to use his or her pardon power in order to to essentially you know get all of his co-conspirators off the hook and thereby prove his own innocence. Well then that's a person that should be impeached. So basically all of their concerns were about a president who would use the power of his or her office for their own personal gain and not necessarily for the good of the state why treason season and bribery as the only crimes that were singled out by name not murder robbery. We could go down the list. Why just those two you know one of the first things? We need to take a step back when we think about the language that's used here. Is that much of this. Language is actually Changing employed by editing crew at the very end of of the constitutional convention so in many ways the language is done to be elegant as much is to be precise and treason and bribery. I think are two crimes that were very I usually understood that fit the general pattern of how they perceive a president to require impeachment. You don't get impeached. They argued for being a lousy president. So you don't get impeached for what they referred to as mal administration. That's bad administration. You don't get impeached for having bad policies when you get impeached for is for are putting yourself above the state so putting yourself about the state and treasonous manner working with an enemy to undermine the state putting yourself above the state in a a bribery matter and again the sense that they had bribery the very definition that they had a bribery is really different than we have today. The twenty first century we typically think of Bribery Korea. Someone offering money to a public official to do something there greater concern and the immediate sense of the word. Bribery was about a public official using their money from their office or the power their office or the influence of their office to get someone else to do something that they wouldn't otherwise do it. Sensitively a giving as as opposed to receiving sensor bribery and of course high crimes and misdemeanors was basically a turn of phrase at the time. So it's almost similar saying you know Franks and beans or or balls and strikes. It's it's basically a term that everyone understood at the time to mean a crime not against another person but a crime again against the people. I think we have a caller kind kind of to that point Lisa in Queens New York City. You're on America already highly. Sir Thank you so much for taking my call a week during the impeachment hearings So as I understand it Congress I mean sorry. The framers Put the impeachment clause in the constitution. Because they were looking to avoid Monarchy which they just gotten out of and they didn't have to deal with you know citizens united and people breaking the emoluments clause and partisanship than you know Gerrymandering UNISOM just wondering how. How would it's hard to compare apples to oranges there? So I'm just wondering how the The gentleman there would would view view. You know what we're dealing with today. And what the framers had in mind you know th that's a great question And I think I'd like to go really the big picture on you for how the framers understood the presidency in general We always have to remember that when they framed the office of the president they did so with one and man in mind with George Washington in mind he actually was also the president of the Constitutional Convention In fact he was actually quite difficult. We know from the records For them to discuss discuss their offices the presidency at first because Washington was in the room and it was so obvious he was going to be the first that Benjamin Franklin had to intervene essentially in the conversation. And say okay. We know he's first. Let's move on and discuss this abstract way Less to be embarrassing and the reason that they chose Washington was not because he was the smartest person living room not because he was the best US general that they had certainly not the best politician but rather because he was the one who was trusted the most he exemplified the primary attribute that founders wanted in a political leader. Which is virtue virtue in a classical sense of being willing to sacrifice their own your own needs for the needs of the people and you get reputation and you build up a credibility by showing how much you can put yourself below the needs of the people so in a sense I think what the founders would look at today is do we have a president who is doing something that George Washington would not that is I'd say? Is this person doing something that shows that he values himself more than the needs of the nation as a whole because that was the whole point of the virtue the big saw as necessary for a political leader. Well Lisa brings up monarchy's and that word monarchy and we had just gotten out of a monarchy at the time of the framers Amer's one of the main concerns of Donald Trump's critics is that he's building toward authoritarianism right but I imagine any articles of impeachment would be much more specific like using foreign policy to leverage political favor from Ukraine. So how do you see. The battle were in in terms of protecting or weakening weakening democracy As flowing from the conversation that they were actually having in the impeachment hearings this week or not. I think it's important to remember that. We know that this was a in the aftermath. This was written in the aftermath of the American revolution. As you point out a fight against monarchy if I'd again but more importantly certainly it's conceived by the people time as a fight against tyranny that say a fight against some power that was out to destroy the people's individual liberties and collective civil liberties to destroy the body politic Tyranny is the word that they used that word is really specific because they were concerned not only about the the president becoming too radical. They were also concerned. In fact I'd even more concerned about Congress becoming than say if a majority held sway in Congress it could essentially override the rights of small states or the rights of individuals because I'd majority rules at all times And this is why they set up the system in in a different way than I think people were taught in school We were unfortunately all taught school that the that the constitution features a separation ration- of powers. I think we've been better. If we'd been taunted. The constitution represents a struggle of powers competition of powers and that each of the branches the government each of the three branches in Maine in particular were given the authority to essentially try to get more power from the other so the real concern that I have today as as we look at really at the broad outlines of what the discussion is about. President trump is not necessarily that he is going to create some form of tyranny. It's that the presidency has overwhelmed. The other two branches and Congress should every person Congress if the V. followed the way the constitution those authors desired should be jealously guarding constitutional prerogatives for Congress. That's the only way to keep tyranny from from growing more more broadly. Let's take another call Janice in White Bear Lake Minnesota. You're on America. Are we ready. Are you ready. Janice yes. Thank you I'm calling going in about another part of the constitution which is related to impeachment and it's article three section three and in there. It says this it says that treason against the United I would stay shall consist only and leading war against them or in adhering to their enemies giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses. And what I'm looking at here is we know. Russia is our enemy and they've been trying to undermine our elections and democracy for years and our security agencies agencies and through the Mall report have reported that indeed they did undermine our elections in many different ways and so then we have somebody in the presidency. He stands up in front of the world in Helsinki and says public publicly agrees. We couldn't that he you know he couldn't have done this. And then at the same time with this the Winston Zielinski thing in Ukraine what the president tempted to do is withhold aid from our allies to get the dirt on a political rival and give aid and comfort again to Russia. So I guess my my. It's kind of a question in a statement if impeachment protects democracy when there's possible treason than. I think that this is a case where we really need to look at this very carefully because we have somebody who is is giving aid and comfort to one of our biggest enemies in the world you know. I think we need to remember that. The entire impeachment conversation is by definition. Subjective in fact one might even say it's by definition political and we are day have sort of a negative taint to word political. We think it's a nasty word But the truth matter is that's what this is all about. Is the interaction between people for the good of the country and the good of the people So ultimately the reason I say that is that if one is fully on board with the idea that Russia is your enemy and the president is doing things that help Russia that might might sound like a treasonous act but the problem is we get back to that question of maladministration that as I say president could say quite reasonably. I think think I'm doing. These things appear to be short term gain for Russia. But really there in America's long term strategic interest. And you know anybody who critique that policy because none of us have an actual crystal ball for the future anyone who critique that policy would have to say. We'll sir that's a bad policy but bad policy is not actually the reason to impeach And it's very very subjective and very difficult but certainly I think President trump has given a lot of evidence to support the questionnaires hypothesis My producer told me that you want to crack at One of the questions that I asked Dr Berry a little bit earlier The one pointing out the difference between trump situation and previous wants which is that. He's got an election coming up within a year and I'll ask you the same question. I asked her. Think you want it. How do you think that should inform the balance between having a congress decide on his removal which is an active representative democracy accuracy and letting the people be his jury a Domecq a direct democracy if you will you know? I'm going to agree in basic premise with your with with the other historian Who is very eloquent on this as well? You know because I think we need to remember that. The constitution doesn't give any timeframe on when the people's rule really matters matters and when it doesn't and so the real concern that we need to have for a president who people might think he's impeachable requires impeachment is that they're still in the office..

bribery Congress Donald Trump America Russia Mary Francis Berry University of Pennsylvania Jeffrey Angle Lisa Dr Angle Southern Methodist University Progressive Movement Ukraine Maria Washington Benjamin Franklin Helsinki
"mary francis" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Dischord all day every single day. Just send on your questions to mark and he'll ask c._n._n. Post inventor. I really hate that absolutely true all right <hes> so do you feel like there's more that we need to share share from this. I do shop manipulation of mugshots yeah because again it gets <hes> this next part gets into the departments that do it and don't owe or at least the ones that are admitting it and aren't admitting sure yeah so among the police departments that do sometimes touchup suspects photos is the country's largest the new new york police department often. It's a last resort all last resort because they don't have any real evidence ryan right okay and we gotta do something get a conviction. All efforts are may to alter the filler photos. Not the subjects photos says sergeant. Mary francis o'donnell a spokesman for the department. I think that's a key difference as we move forward with the article is they will they have the you know the primary suspect and if the primary supposed suspect has facial tattoos they will put facial tattoos on the other on the other pictures right to see if they couldn't find anyone else with a facial tattoos so right but do you have to you have to you have to give people choice to positively identify but but in the in the oregon case they removed it because to make the suspect appear like the video right like the witness eyewitness account so i thought that was an important difference. I think it's wrong. In both counts well. I would agree that you know. The evidence is either evidence or not right like we should be talking to witnesses about. Fake aches stuff but i guess what i think is probably more important is that everybody understand that witness. Testimony is flawed inherently talked to three different witnesses. You'll get three different stories right at people. Just don't remember what they saw. Because things were happening so quickly the things that they remember they probably remember very well but it isn't always the face of the person that we're talking about and when you like as you mentioned there's ethnic differences it gets even more complicated and well you know. I don't know how to address that. The jury needs needs to understand and pay attention when somebody says i was at home on my phone playing farmville and they can prove that that they were paying farmville or something like this is the cops can find out where your own is. There's all kinds of things that they they just. Don't bother doing you in the search to find out whether they're wrong. They're very good about finding out you know evidence to support their their theory but very bad at finding evidence that dismisses it right so let me let me read this next into kind of addresses your point and i somewhat agree with you but not one hundred percent when confronted with a suspect who scars or tattoos would stand out out from the filler images the department's photo unit ads the same features to the phi phillip photos to ensure the photo arrays are fair and impartial she said adding that investigators investigators document all changes so it's not like they add the facial tattoos to the filler photos and then they picked that guy and that guy they just they released the subject because he wasn't the identify so they put if they put that guy up you know his his photo and he was identified as having facial tattoos and and they put one guy with facial tattoos and four other people with no facial tattoos what's easy to go the facial tattoos right okay so they put the other. They put the tattoos on the other people so it's not and then okay okay <hes> official. I see that okay. That's why i wanted to point that officials. At other police departments including it los angeles chicago and philadelphia said that they keep their hands away from photoshop adding or removing tattoos is not something we do detective donnie moses the snow we hire people who spokesman for the baltimore police department to be careful with these cops. I mean these people and politicians cops and bureaucrats what they say..

baltimore police department Mary francis o'donnell new york ryan oregon los angeles official chicago philadelphia one hundred percent
"mary francis" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

12:20 min | 2 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Fences early. Is my story and respectfully, I suggested my story is both, so your story, we both grew up in those rich days of legal racial discrimination. That assigned us to the back of the buff colored water fountain schools, for colored children. Dr early admission and graduation from this university in nineteen sixty two was a major victory in the protracted struggle that ultimately, shattered decades of defacto, and did you racial segregation in America? Dr early. Thank you ball, your courage, you intelligence and your determination. Thank you for your unwavering, faith, perseverance and quiet dignity. It is with an abundant amount of Georgia bulldog, pride, that we welcome. Mary Francis early two perspectives. Mary Francis early. It is such a pleasure to sit and talk with you one bulldog, alum to the other. It's a pleasure to talk with you, another alum. How did you learn that university planned to honor you this way? I had a visit from the Dana college of education, and the trip the assistant to the president. They came to my home turned on the phone call to president. And we were he was on speakerphone. And that's how I found out. It was a real shock completely. I had no idea. But what an honor now when most people think about the integration of the university of Georgia. The first two names that come to mind are of Hamilton homes. Dr home, late Docker homes, and Charlene hunter, who were the first to integrate the university in nineteen sixty one but with your degree in nineteen sixty two you're the first graduate. How did that happen? Well, actually, I enter it, I'm up five months after them. But the reason was they were they were Turner student, turn a high students here in Atlanta, and I was in the first class of China. A high school I wanted to assist them because they were fellow Turner rights. And I didn't think that the university was treating them properly, I thought they should have been protected at the riot. And when I saw the riot, I said, they can't do that. I'm going to transfer from university of Michigan and go to Georgia. Now why were you student university of Michigan? Well, I wanted to improve my skill set, and I was working on my master's in music education there. Were you easily admitted to the university of Georgia? No. No, it was a trial. But. I was ready for it because I wanted I had wanted to do something in the, the city of Atlanta in terms of civil rights, and I couldn't figure out what I could do. Because I knew I couldn't pick it. I couldn't do sit ins I would have been fired. So I decided I can go to school. And that's how I decided that transfer from university. I had spent two years to two summers at the university of Michigan. And part of the admissions process university of Georgia included an interview that it took a minute to schedule. And you just decided that iming in can you tell us about that? Yes, it was a requirement, although I don't believe it. I don't believe they interviewed all with students who came, but at any rate, they said that it was a requirement. So just he'll by the way, was my mentor. He sort of led me through the process of what I'd have to do to get in, because he had helped Charlene Hamilton, of course, and I had not heard from them. I had sent my transcripts had been Santana. I had done the application, nothing came from them. So I decided, I'm going to write and let them know Albie down on our school systems, spring break, and I essentially scheduled the conference myself, did it go. Well. It depends on which side you're on. I was asked some very insulting questions. But I knew that Danner who was the registrar was trying to go into a confrontation perhaps. And I refused to do it, but I was seating on the inside mainly because he asked if I'd ever been in the house of prostitution and I said to him. No, I'm a professional I have no need of a house of prostitution on interest. And then he said, well, you know, you've gone to the university of Michigan. You probably ought to stay there because we don't have to accept your credits. And I thought university of Michigan is one of the top ten universities in the nation and you're not going to accept my credits. I didn't say that. I thought it and I said to him. Well, what I have learned I will always no, I will not lose anything. Once you were committed did you live on campus. I did I lived in the same room then Charlaine had just fake aided, she'd gone home for the actually. She didn't go home. She went to the times, I think, to do an internship, and it was the room that I saw on television that had rocks thrown a windows broken right on the street on Lumpkin street. And I thought, how could they put her in this room foldable to everything, but they wanted to keep this the dorm segregated because all the rest of the students lived upstairs, and it wasn't really a dorm room. It was a counselor sweet. I think and but I stayed I was a graduate student, and that was a freshman, dorm. You were in Myers Myers hall Myers hall. That's correct. What was your on campus experience? Like as a graduate student, similar Charlene's experience, very similar. I thought that graduate students than I would be sunny with would have been more mature that they would have been more tolerant, but such was not the case they satisfied away from me as a could I went to the I guess it was the egg auditorium to take the GRE exam because university of Michigan did not require it. But Georgia did and they were so busy. Examining my character till they didn't really know that. I would they didn't know that I had not taken it. So I went and sat down and everybody on that role got up and moved. And I was that was really sort of earthshaking to me because I was about to take a very difficult exam that I never taken before. And these students were. Acting and they will all graduate students they have to be to take GRE, but it was a, it was a very lonely summer because it was so they wanted to pretend that you weren't there. That had been very hard on you emotionally. It was I was twenty four years of age when I arrived, but three days later, I turned twenty five and I thought why. But when I went, I thought, you know, I can take anything that they shall out, but I didn't realize that as a human being one feels though, slights and one feels the isolation that they try to make you feel but I was determined that I was not going to show any of that. And the one thing that I remember the first day I was going to class. We wore dresses and skirts back then no shorts jeans like today, and I was wearing dress that had to be zipped up at the back and there was nobody, of course asked. Is it up for me? So I had to go across the lobby to the house, mother's room and ask her the zip mattress. But you know this is really being alone. But that was the main thing, the first I was just very lonely. Tell me about may March may March was a graduate student, and I don't know who made the arrangements, but she met me at the local dentist's office, and she lists go with me to registration. I didn't know her, but she was an art student. She was getting her degree that summer and she volunteered, I guess, to go with me registration, which was really very courageous for her because the students had done, I guess you call it a resolution saying that they would not, they would not associate with any of us because we were not there to get an education, we would there to upset the campus with that was not true, but May- met me at the, the dentist's office. And we went registration and as we approached the, the registration line, it was Stegman's Jim then. Coliseum. Now all the students who are in line that snaked out the door stopped talking and started looking at us. And I think that was the scariest moment I had on campus. I didn't know what would happen nothing did, but they stared down, and we just kept talking, but may also found out that I was having my twenty fifth birthday two days later, and I think she was responsible for meeting, the campus minister, Corky king. No, that I was there. And I was really across the street from the Westminster house and they threw a birthday party for me surprise birthday party. I don't know. I guess she must have told them, but that was one of the nicest things that happened while it was on campus at probably the one thing that makes you feel very well. It did it did. Did you have any African Americans support outside of campus considering the experience on campus was so lonely? Well, the, the local dentists and I talked about I'm trying to remember his name he was he was he had an office in Atlanta and in Athens. And he had actually come to my home in Atlanta before I came to campus and told me a little bit about Athens about what he was doing there and he was he was very friendly. He invited me to go to dinner with, with him the night that I was when I first got there, but I fell asleep and didn't get to go, but I could go to his office, or I could go to kill aliens restaurant, which was the only restaurant, I don't know if it was there when you were there, but it was on broad street, and that was a home, where Hamilton homes resided during his whole tenure at university of Georgia, and I could get so food and hence my talk with and someone's eat with. So there was support. But, you know, the, the citizens of Athens were very isolated. Themselves, that is there was a white Athens. And there was a black Athens, and it was almost zone, never the twain, shall meet. And you went back for a second postgraduate degree after you earned your master's wine. I went back and people often, ask me, why don't you go back when you know you weren't treated all that nicely. And I said, well, there was still too few blacks, and I was really people. Call me an unlikely candidate for civil rights activists. And I was I was very quiet but I was a good student. And I knew that, that was the one thing I could do rather than pick it or sit in. But I served there still weren't that many white blacks on campus and I thought, I'll go back and get my specialist degree. So I was here from sixty four through.

university of Georgia university of Michigan graduate student Georgia Atlanta Athens Hamilton Mary Francis prostitution Charlene hunter Myers Myers hall Myers hall Michigan Turner Charlene Hamilton America
"mary francis" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Ars? We'll call them came into work in the dugout dressed like burn Hamilton. Well, they are bird Hamilton good point. But the they maybe Lucien garb, they didn't shoot each other. Did that now they did not? That would not be good now would not be. You could do you can do a baseball dual rea- forty paces off. And you throw baseballs at each other. What's up that's would be pitchers duel? And that's what they are. It all comes full circle to be clear, they were just like they look lake guy. You're saying burn Hamilton for the for those that don't understand. It's like old presidents looking no. Historical guards, starkville Karapiah, Aaron bird Alexander. Alexander gets a throwback uniform just like a historic unified Bill Becker still alive you'd make the players where there's an opening nineteen seventy. I was there in nineteen seventy six at Comiskey park. They had the they had the fife and drum corps was Bill vacuum Paul rich hurt sin, and you know, they they had the whole recreated the spirit of seventy six really go. Yeah. That was an opening for the widely shorts. I was there. Sure. No were designed by Mary Francis back. They the shorts were widely panned by. I don't know how the players really felt about wearing the party history in the plant some of the players liked him. I'm sure Todd baseball fans. Yeah. Of course, back then they are actually using baseball spikes, he's slide in the second without position. Then when you were there where you reporter, what was your. Well, let's see nine hundred seventy six I was still I might have been working, but I was just finishing school at the C. You were a kid at the game comparatively. So you were working for the northwestern per, Nicole. No, no, no, no, no for another station here Intel pro by seventy six well part time, I'm really holding back say elderly Abbas, born could not yourself. David talk about this. Here's your hawker. It'll in nineteen twenty by the river broke ground and completed with a clock scene from all sides all around the first AC building on the Michigan route in the best place to chew instead of biting your fruit. What's the name of the place? We have some of that chew at our house. Got a name the city in nineteen twenty by the river broke ground and completed with the clock scene from all sides all around the first AC building on the Michigan route and the best place to chew instead of biting your fruit. Not a city. I said what's the place? Yeah. That's the place. Do you? Did you know that was the first AC building? I didn't know that. I I correct answers when we come back with the news next from the northwestern medicine, Israel, the numbers are in WGN. Plus is where Chicago com for podcasts. Here's what's going on with WGN. Plus, the mincing rascals critique R Kelly CBS this morning interview, and it didn't go. Well, apparently, he's earning how to keep up with kids learning their social emotional skills, and with education on the mind. Pedia talked with the circle foundation furthering educational development here in Chicago. Look them all up WGN pulse on itunes and Google play. I had my whole life ahead of me. Basically the picture of health when everything changed, I'm Christina. And at twenty six I had an arterial venous malformation that caused a brain hemorrhage. My best friend rushed me to northwestern Memorial Hospital. Northwestern medicine is on a relentless pursuit of better neurology care after too complex brain surgeries.

WGN baseball Hamilton Aaron bird Alexander Chicago Michigan Pedia northwestern Memorial Hospital brain hemorrhage Abbas Bill Becker Comiskey park Ars Mary Francis Intel reporter Todd Nicole Kelly CBS
Recognize the Warning Signs of Human Trafficking

Killer Innovations

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Recognize the Warning Signs of Human Trafficking

"An increase in human trafficking during huge public events such as the Super Bowl. But in any case Mary Francis bully wellspring living, explain some warning signs of human trafficking. And what you should do if you suspect it PC a situation where you see a child with someone that's definitely older, and maybe some inappropriate activity happening in the way that person is being treated, you wanna say something I heard a girl say we'd be with our trafficker in the b five girls with this one, man. Why didn't somebody say something is? So we need to be aware of what's going on. And be proactive we need to say something, and that would be called police the Trump

Mary Francis Donald Trump
"mary francis" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Officers have made a record drug seizure in Zona involving null and methamphetamine. Means John Clemens reports seizures the largest in the history of the agency the recent small of the US customs and border protection tells us what they've found in a hidden compartment in the trailer. It was loaded with cucumbers. It also had about three hundred packages and methamphetamine that weighed almost three hundred and ninety five pounds collectively the dangerous drugs that were seized how to estimated value of four point six million dollars. This year. Super Bowl is being used to highlight a topic often left in darkness. Mary francis. Bully of wellspring living explains some warning signs of human trafficking, and what you should do if you suspect it. So if you see a situation where you see a child with someone that's definitely older, and maybe some inappropriate activity happening in the way that person is being treated, you wanna say something on if I heard the girl say, you know, we'd be with our trafficker in the b five girls with his one, man. Why didn't somebody say something is? So we need to be aware of what's going on. And be proactive. Active. We need to say something, and that would be called police some groups claim that the influx of crowds for the Super Bowl contributes to an increase. Insects trafficking with leading anti-trafficking groups say no evidence supports the claim Atlanta, mayor kisha Lance bottom says they're numerous shady been stadium. Well, hopefully, encourage the NFL to hold the Super Bowl in Atlanta on an eight to ten year. Rotation Sunday is Atlanta's third Super Bowl for USA radio news. I'm rick. I can't get my computer to work..

methamphetamine Atlanta US John Clemens Mary francis NFL rick Lance bottom six million dollars ninety five pounds ten year
"mary francis" Discussed on We The People

We The People

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on We The People

"I'm Lana over in house counsel for the national constitution center and welcome to the people weekly show of constitutional debate. Jeffrey Rosen is away this week. The constitution center is a nonpartisan nonprofit chartered by congress to increase awareness and understanding of the constitution among the American people today in our special civil war and reconstruction series. We explore the extraordinary life of reparations advocate Kelly house despite her saddest as a former slave, a woman and a widower with five children and little formal education, tally house defied convention and led the national x. flav mutual relief, Downey and pension association. One of the largest grassroots movements and African American history. She traveled the country lecturing organizing newly freed African Americans in quest to right the wrongs of slavery, joining us today to discuss Kallie house and her enduring legacy are to leaning historians and Kelly how scholars Mary Francis berry. Joel, dean are secret professor of American social thought history in African studies at the university of Pennsylvania. She is. The author of my face is black is true, Kelly house, and the struggle for x. lay reparations, Tiffany. Patterson is an associate professor of African American, and I ask for studies associate professor of history and director of undergraduate studies in African American. And I asked her studies at Vanderbilt University. She is affiliated with the university's Kelly house research center for the study of black cultures and politics Marian, Tiffany. Thank you so much joining me like you. Thank you. All right, will Mary. Let's start with you. Can you first tell us a little bit about the title of your leaning biography on Kelly house? My face is black is true. Where does the title come from? There's a quotation on the back, but can you tell us a little bit more about the context of the quotation. Well, Kelly house wrote a letter to the federal government pension bureau, and the intelligence operatives there when they started investigating her movement to find out why they were so interested in her demand for pensions for old ex lades and why they were investigating her issued orders that she couldn't send anything males, and she didn't know what was in their files..

Kelly house national constitution center Mary Francis berry Tiffany Kallie house Jeffrey Rosen African American Kelly Downey Vanderbilt University Patterson Lana associate professor associate professor of history pension association congress professor university of Pennsylvania
"mary francis" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Asthma. Hey, Scott, another crazy week. We've got North Korea. Yep, we got Russia midterms, and of course President Trump and what happens whenever there is crazy news that erupts, we pop into studio and break it down to make sense. So if you see a headline, we've discussed it, it's the PR politics podcast you're listening to on point. I'm Eric westervelt. We're talking this hour about millennials, what the latest numbers from the bureau of labor statistics actually tell us about this generation can join the conversation or the millennials in your workplace. You know, are they really all that different from past generations follow us on Twitter and find us on Facebook at on point radio. My guest right now is limestone population a communist and author of the recent vox column. The myth of the job hopping rootless millennial is just that a myth and lemon talk a little bit about your population. Economists who, what do you study? Tell us a little bit about that? Right. So you. Have a sort of two different social sciences here. One is demography that is the study of people populations. Now they changed. So that's looking at fertility, mortality and migration in these things in that, on the other hand, you have sort of regional economics looking at why places succeed, how economic development occurs, this sort of thing. So what I do is try and fuse these and particularly for forecasting, future trends and future population forgiven cities, states areas take your pick. Kathleen is calling in from Dayton, Ohio to join the conversation, welcome to on point. Kathleen. Hi, Eric. I have three daughters and my youngest is thirty one. So I know a lot of millennials, and I worked with a lot of millennials in the Sanders campaign and I find and keep some of the hardest working innovative creative people that I've met in a very, very long time. I think your guest when he said, you know, were earning less than past generations as especially the millennial generation. And I like to use an example of Mary Francis here in Dayton, Ohio who's eighty six retired from GM in nineteen ninety six making seventeen fifty an hour. Now, even with college degrees, are people who are not making that and the standard pay scale here in Dayton, I've been really talking to a lot of workers without high school without college educations and the standard pay scale seems to be eleven so that affordability that float your boat is is much more of a struggle these days. Then like he said in past generations. But again, I find them to be some of the most creative, innovative hardworking people I've ever met through comments Lyman creative, innovative, but finding it difficult to to save. And with that comes things like home ownership, talk about what we know about the challenges of, you know, buying a home in this economy for the generation. Certainly homeownership has been a huge barrier for my generation on, partly we came of age during the recession which inhibited early labor force development, which has scarring effect on your resume and your earning potential for a very long time. And then even afterwards, even once we sort of started to have the money to buy the question is well, do you really want to you saw what happened to your the money, your parents plowed into that that nice house. Do you want to take that on? So I think there is some generational skepticism that said, I in recent years as the economy has continued to chug along. We are seeing a lot of increase in home ownership. Among millennials. Now the issue is that even even once even once we kind of decide, okay, we were confident that this may be a worthwhile thing to put money into. We may have the money to get out somewhere. The question is, can we get a house or a condo or something in the city where we live? And the answer is often, no, if the city where we live is one of the big booming blue metropolises, right? Whether it's as San Francisco, New York, Boston, take your pick local land use regulations, which means zoning, which means land preservation rules, which means height, limits, parking requirements, take your pick.

Dayton Eric westervelt Ohio Kathleen North Korea bureau of labor Russia Twitter Asthma. Trump Facebook Scott President Mary Francis Sanders Lyman San Francisco GM Boston
"mary francis" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on The Young Turks

"In the uk you can be a proper seaward but but but not here so anyway yes and i mentioned to break but roseanne is a tweet circulating roseanne some carry g rock among texas present also called hillary the c word in two thousand sixteen she has since deleted the tweet but it's recirculating non are told you about doing the brick so you guys remember that brandon atkin said i thought considers we're against the pc police samantha vn roseanne aren't the same those making the comparison are grasping at straws for that and leslie from mary francis yes ted nugent does still have show stance your question he's playing at the jones county fair and i will this summer i plan on intending wearing a quote ted nugent shit his pants to get out of the shirt to see if i get thrown out greatest please take a photo of yourself there i would love it tweet it to me i wanna see it crisslow yeah wherever you goes people should go up to me like how's your pants actually i knew japan all right thanks to me donald trump has announced that there will be terrorist on steel and aluminum coming from canada mexico and the european union these tariffs are set to go into effect tomorrow so twelve am on friday they will go into effect twenty five percent on imported steel and ten percent on imported aluminum now the reasoning that he is given a four this decision is ridiculous and all explain that in just a second but it has something to do with national security he's also planning on potentially slapping massive tariffs on foreign made vehicles including german cars now trump impose the steel and aluminum penalties under the nineteen sixty two law that gives the president broad power to increase or reduced tariffs on goods deemed critical to national security how our vehicles critical to national security i don't know but nonetheless wilbur ross.

hillary wilbur ross canada donald trump japan ted nugent leslie samantha vn brandon atkin uk texas president european union mexico jones county mary francis roseanne twenty five percent ten percent
"mary francis" Discussed on NVus Alien Podcast

NVus Alien Podcast

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on NVus Alien Podcast

"Most of them would say no not as bad but i know not all parents have the same relationships with their daughters i'm really close with her i know a lot of people have struggles talking to their teens preteens conflict there yeah i mean she she to she had imaginary friends she would she can tell me they were visible like she made sure tell me like these are not fake they're invisible you can't see them but it was never anything yari in everything weird and if i ever did see anything creepy or wings flight i'm going to get that checked out but i could see like era to are like proactive or whatnot leaves i think and you have a mentally ill filed we actually destiny helping you don't give them hope it could escalate into something really weird what kind of mary francis you have the chip needs they say her relationship with them anything very detailed it was just i find her talking corners in with her dolls and whatnot like having chee the talking to the visible friends do you have imagined every france and she's like not magistrate invisible and so but it was never anything off story things just turn like deaker now my son i don't really i'm having a magic mary friends per se but he i do very close relationship with him and he tells me a lot of stuff that he probably shouldn't tell me came on i drank a bunch i went and spoke to many scars with my friend and i tried we'd like okay we're supposed to do with that so he was always very kind of open an upfront about what he was doing so we have a little bit different relationship but the one thing that i read about with him is that he does have this whole internet life that i have no clue about and he's had it since he was in high school and he was talking to people and he goes on reddit and fortune and all these other places in he's part of all these forums and there's this whole other thing going on and i don't think he would kill anybody but it always scared me that i didn't know about that part of his life that he was very secretive about even though he told me.

mary francis chee france reddit
"mary francis" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on Slate's Live at Politics and Prose

"This is live at politics and prose a program from slate and politics, and prose bookstore in Washington DC featuring some of today's best writers and top thinkers is such a pleasure, always an honor to have MAry Francis berry at at politics and prose. I think you all know she's gonna be talking tonight about her new book. It's called history, teaches us to resist how progressive movement's have succeeded in challenging times. And I just want to say personally, but I think this must apply to some of you to that. I think it's especially poignant to have her here on this particular day. This is a day on which I think we all know these fantastic, amazing, strong, brave, courageous, fabulous, eloquent, passionate, young people, students across the country, walked out of their schools today in protest of gun violence and demanding change in a way that we haven't seen that generation doing a long time what an inspiration they. To us. And of course, just so topical at the moment to have MAry Francis here to talk about this very, very subject. So I think we can all be confident that there is no better moment for us to hear from and learn from MAry Francis berry. Although she was saying that maybe even right after the reaction the the election, we might have needed it more. But I don't know. I kind of feel like every day it's like an hourly if not minute by minute necessity. Now, you know, she is here, of course, she's an author. She wrote this wonderful book. She's written a dozen books total. She's a scholar and teacher. She's the Geraldine R seagull professor of American social thought at Penn university of Pennsylvania. She's of course a renowned public servant who served. I think five presidential administrations, only five. What are you waiting? I guess this one wouldn't be one. Never never mind there. Thank God only five. She she has long been in continues to be an advocate activists. Of course, she was a great voice opposing the Vietnam war and unequivocal unwavering champion and protector and defender of civil rights and human rights. And I think lastly, and perhaps most importantly, she is a moral conscience for country bringing to bear all these experiences and perspectives that she's gained in in the roles I just mentioned and always able to remind us of our challenges are obligate, and also our opportunities as people living in a democratic and pluralistic society. So she, I think of her as truly our north star in in these times like this that are so difficult and they are difficult, and I'm not just talking about the venom and divisiveness of partisan politics, but really of what we are now watching which is a systemic intentional assault on our bedrock. Democratic values and institutions free speech. The rule of law separation of powers, human rights, basic civility, and decency, and even the nobility. Of public service. So the question then becomes, how do we get through these difficult times? How do we remain hopeful? How do we remain feeling like there's a possibility of change? And I think the first way. Is to read this book. And history teaches us to resist is is really, it's such a great, great, great edition for this moment because what MAry Francis doesn't here is to give us examples of progressive movement's, large and small, some obvious, some not so obvious that really help explain how these movements have shaped and mapped out the trajectory of our country for the better. And you know, she reminds us of something very important, especially at moments like this, which is that resistance is hard. It requires incredible sacrifice. It can be extremely frustrating. It may not achieve our hope for goals entirely or immediately. And yet these movements are always always always worth fighting for. So thank you so much for the book. Thank you for being here and thank you for all that you've done for for and we'll continue to do. We love having you. It's such a pleasure. Thank you.

MAry Francis MAry Francis berry Washington Penn university of Pennsylvani assault Geraldine R
"mary francis" Discussed on Slate's Represent

Slate's Represent

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on Slate's Represent

"As i mentioned earlier in the episode he ought to fisher born mary francis thompson was a chickasaw nation citizen who became a cultural ambassador of sorts for her tribe and many others bringing their stories to audiences across the country and around the world her sixty your career included performances for franklin and eleanor roosevelt at the white house and for the king and queen of england during our conversation culture and i discussed the behind the scenes evolvement of the chickasaw nation being typecast and how her activism influences her work among many other things check it out well joining me this morning uh straight off of the flight so we really appreciate her coming directly from rewrite oj or jfk jfk yeah thanks for coming to our rokhlin studios to talk to us curry culture welcome to the show thank you and i'm i'm glad to be here it's great to have you on so you were born in germany to your mom i think is swiss german and your dad is of indigenous pruvian two cents i two juries are administer and you you know so you are you are not really burning america um and i imagine there are a lot of people like myself who are americans who have never heard of toyota before and homilies i had not before watching the movie so i'm curious as to what your exposure had been to her if at all before you got the role and what was your research like for the role i actually.

mary francis thompson franklin white house england toyota fisher eleanor roosevelt germany
"mary francis" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I tom i just wanted to say from a foreign perspective i'm from germany and you know i've been here twenty years over twenty years and i haven't seen the the you know the country the united states seen so lowly across the world and i think it was really important for uh president bush to make those comments because he's a republican i don't think they would have been taken the thing way from a democrat and i think the more republican start speaking out it'll make it easier for other republicans to start thing what they actually feel instead of playing politics and you know being scared of what trump says and his venomous comments if he doesn't agree with you or you would you seem to attack him 'cause i think trump is all about cute own image and the only time that he gets really aggressive is when he feel keeping attacked soak mary francis berry says pay attention to policy what are you saying about trump the the man the president himself to does he matter in terms of the the country's international reputation you got a foreign prospective stephen i i think it does because i mean he is the one that you see he is the one that speaks for the united states and you know i think the rest of the world is going okay you know we've only got about three years left of this you know kick can we make it through those three years or hopefully less but you know i i i really believe that there are other countries like russia and china that are kinda relishing in this environment because i think it gives them an opportunity to step in where we step out.

united states bush trump mary francis berry president stephen russia china germany twenty years three years
"mary francis" Discussed on Accused

Accused

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on Accused

"He explained that semi some another our friend melville brought me close and you saw this saturday morning you okay so did you ever see wreath after the hospital monday this she came about that that was west uh style by a call you know talked on the phone left messages during that period khelad you know what i do i haven't gone back there when he learned the coroner thought retha died on thursday he said he was relieved because he had an alibi he had stayed with a series of lady friends after he said he left the hospital and inquirer reporter in 1987 found mary francis bush back then and she confirm the story though she couldn't promise what day of the week virgil had been there she said she knew virgil by another nickname champagne and said he had spent a night after his release on a couch she said quote if it was supposed to have happened the day he was here i don't believe he did it he wasn't upset her nothin' and quote another female friend colonel goes be testified in court that virgil stayed with her april ninth the thursday that retha had spent with james backer virgil who was living from an overnight bag at the time said he spent the following night at his father's home in madisonville but police didn't by these alibis virgil had an impressive rap sheet in 1973 he served two years of a ten to twenty five year prison sentence for armed robbery a year after his release in nineteen 75 he was charged with rape in connection with an assault he admitted against a girlfriend at the time for that he was sentenced to fourteen to fifty years in prison but released after six in 1983 he faced charges of burglary receiving stolen property and carrying a concealed weapon he was on parole for that conviction when retha was killed in april 1987 he was by his own account not a good person as he started a prison sentence for a crime he says he didn't commit he said he figured he had some of it coming despite being innocent is still love that idea that i know up pay for the twitter use could call moves at least you know.

melville virgil retha madisonville armed robbery rape assault burglary reporter mary francis bush james backer twitter twenty five year fifty years two years
"mary francis" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"mary francis" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"If you aren't o k she want to be there for you my mom then turned to me and said honey if you want me to i can post i can postpone my flight a week the councillor stood and took my hand walked me out of the room and said so that my mother could hear you deserve so much more than that from a mother mom flew out the following week that is hall of fame fuck top that is hall of fame fogged up if you want me to i can postpone my flight a week and i liked that she doesn't even frigate the fact that she's abandoning her kids forget the fact that the best cheat can do is to postpone her abandoning them a week you have to love the if you want me to she can even accept the guilt of not being able to wait a week that she has to turn that on you to make that your decision oh my god this is a happy moment filled out by b a m f aninat parentheses ak a bad ask mary francis and she writes uh one i had an altered state experience when i was twenty five were i had the most profound existential experience of my life time stopped and i was in an infant a place where i became every person i ever loved i felt their joy cried their tears understood why they have their little corks and bazaar behaviors laughed at jokes they had shared with people long before i was born in i realized that we are all connected as one consciousness i came to understand that death will be but.

mary francis