6 Episode results for "Mary Ed"

HHCSA DAILY - Dr. Marti Cason on #HipHopEd Pedagogy: Teaching Math & Teaching Teachers

Hip-Hop Can Save America

51:09 min | 1 year ago

HHCSA DAILY - Dr. Marti Cason on #HipHopEd Pedagogy: Teaching Math & Teaching Teachers

"The thing about hip hop. Today is. It's smart. Insightful. The way that they can communicate a complex message in a very short space. It is remarkable and a lot of these kids. They're not going to be reading the New York. Times that's not how they're getting their information. We'll. Streak saw. We'll. Shop. So hip. Hip Hop. Good afternoon or good morning depending on where you are whether you're on the east coast like me or west of the east. Than it might still be morning so and you might be listening to this later. So the time is irrelevant. Hello to you and thank you for joining me for another episode of Hip. Hop America is humanity faces live and direct from Newark New Jersey Brick city is in the house. We are here bringing this podcast to life following a bunch of episodes that have appeared on the podcast feed over the past couple of years I decided that pandemic life wasn't complicated enough. I would do this every day for the month the September well, almost every day Monday through Thursdays. One PM Eastern. Sharp, and then a special bonus episode will appear magically on your podcast feed if you're subscribing there. So to the podcast feed listeners I know this might be a little bit different but studies have shown very scientific study of me looking at the numbers that you actually don't mind the daily drop on the podcast feed. So thank you for sticking with me and sticking with this idea this concept through the month of September, if you also like kind of that long in-depth, highly edited a lot less stumbling over. Words do in real life you'll still get those full episodes on Friday medifast last. Friday, we just dropped a really great interview with a teaching artist and instructor on MC Abi Boxer, a a game show creator but a freestyle rap artists extraordinaire not only just being an artist. David Bs Bradshaw is also someone who's developing workshops and training and Somebody calls freestyle fitness and a props free style game show off the top of the head that kind of freestyle but showing the benefits sometimes unexpected benefits that practicing. Or participating in freestyle rap can bring not just artists in hip hop but in corporate boardrooms sort of as a public speaking tool So many great things in gems came out of that that interview. So you can find that only that was not live. That was only on the podcast feed. So wherever you get podcasts, hip hop can save America just search you'll find withers apple podcast spotify, etc etc. Thanks to fund L. Studios also once again if you're in New York, city The New York City area if you're a Musician itching to get back to your to your music playing after pandemic has now finally opened up some things fuck Alex Studios, rehearsal, space, according spaces open in New York City, very safe, very disinfected, high tech stuff, UV rays, and definitely safe in open for you to to participate. So check out Funk Alec Studios. I believe that discount prices happening right now to entice people to come back in their music recording rehearsing on I. Know a lot of musicians in and around New, York City have been aching to do that. Lastly for today just as you know the beginning of the show housekeeping If you're listening to this show, you'll find the other thing that I do very insightful and I. Think you want to participate in the hip hop advocate as a newsletter that goes out every now, and then I wanNA say every couple of weeks it goes out every now and then it doesn't bombard you. It's not a daily thing. But. When it goes out, it's it's just chock full of really great curated articles I. What I do is I hand pick and hand curate articles from all over the web, all of the world. That look at again, this kind of thing that we're talking about here on the show, the intersection of hip hop in different areas of interest in society. So not the gossipy entertainment stuff but the hip hop applications in education or health and wellness and science technology political activism, all the other the fine arts. So the hip hop advocate newsletter can be found in a couple of places. The easiest thing to do for that, and this podcast is to go to the Center for hip hop advocacy, which is at hip hop advocacy dot org. But again, if you will these things, the come up game is proper. Okay housekeeping out of the way. I'm very happy to have a guest with us today have guess any day you know I'm just glad that everyone is participating in coming on time and not messing me up live everything everyone is that it so far and to kick it off today the first full week of this madness to discuss this intersection of hip hop and education specifically through a mathematics Lens. Hayes me manny now playing the role of narrator Voice of God. The perils of doing live broadcast brings on technical difficulty sometimes at the beginning of this interview Dr Mark. Ason couldn't be heard. You couldn't hear that she'd been a teacher at Texas am and been a math teacher and done all these things but it didn't take too long figure out that as ZIG zagged and press the right button and get Dr Martin case in back in the mix to explain what she does in her work educating other educators about the concepts of progressive and diverse thinking in education and hip hop ED. Here's Dr Marty case. Seating in also. Teacher for. Introductory course. Pre, service teachers like Mary Ed and give the ability to our program. In a investor actually took on a couple of courses, they gave me for alternatives. For Alternative, Sorry Stadium Alternative Patient Okay all right. We've followed you for a long time. We've been kind of crossing paths online. We've been dealing with hip hop, ed movement and You know shouts to the entire. Hashtag. Hip Hop ed footer shot that happens Tuesday nights nine o'clock eastern and everyone affiliated with that had some people on this show that have been kinda surrounding involved in that as you have very actively been participating. First of all, how did you first get involved in sort of? The idea of incorporating hip hop as an educational tool as educational intersection, where did that I come about for you? In the first my career time, dowse? Icy. And but I grew up very in a very rules district all white school district. So stepping into wall being a teacher at outside seem Siri different. So. I didn't I don't feel like I did very well in the career I was very prepared given the program I was in. And So Dan out my second masters degree that I got was actually through Ut Austin. I went into a program to be in leadership. And but it was it was focused. It was centered around urban education. So. This is where I started to really get into and learn how to talk about race talk about. And get into those conversations in what they really mad in education at how that impacted. The closer. Then, I got certified to be principal in a very quickly decided to really wasn't ashes mathematics more passion so That's often. said, he's in like Abba meta-analysis out that looks at. Research in numeracy development. Do numerous the interventions, the children when they're young and how that can really impact. Their mathematics learning. So Max earlier Ashton in how we teach nice and then when I went on to get my doctorate. Degree I wanted to look at. African, American, achievement it affects. That's that's where we look at the data. That's where we're always seeing Were aggregating the data you have helped. In Dallas, we had mostly Hispanics within some African American population. Very, few White Students, DALLAS? So. But it's looking at. Hawaii. One is the data look the way today deaths right in. So when I went to get my doctorate, that's what I wanted to study, and then I found bed in actually actually hypothesis through Gloria license. Glad met her at a conference in Canada. and. Watch a office she did HIP HOP INFO And she mentioned the hypothesis chatting. So I started chatting online getting involved in that in a very quickly in in our read an article, several articles about impoverished patient him pedagogy. I started to think about all students that I saw this in when they talked about hip hop identity students got really excited because I was like are the students that I saw these businesses their identity. In. So but I had never heard that before been made an in your teacher when you're learning I, didn't grow up hip finally culture. So The town that I, grew up was groping with very racist in. So it's just you know that wasn't as something that I grew up with in. So. Seeing that. The. Did, that's a really excited wanted to study back got involved in the Chasse I actually reached out to the local hip hop artists wanted us to bring it into my math methods classroom because when I was when I was a student. Going going to get my Ph D. I also taught. At the University of Saint Almost taught math methods forces. In so I brought him in to talk about hip hop culture because I. To study, started to learn about him pop culture but be talking about it to my students didn't really make it impacts in. So brought. A lead the great. He's Actually Co author on a Chapter I wrote in the in the hip in the new hip hop compilation. And the reason for that is he helped me so much in the work that I did his his contribution to that was invaluable. In so I reach out to him and I would talk about what I wanted to implement in my classroom. He Hailin talked about him a holster and it just really made a difference what I started to notice whether started to really think about was. The students are teaching were it was an elementary math methods or so both teachers are female very rarely. Did I have a Most of our students were white. And It Really Watching them interact AP, they had never really interacted with incentives. And so. They. They really the really impacted them listening to him talk about the culture and talk about his experiences student. Elaine At. Some point I reach out to him to ask never been to a hip hop show. So I starting point to hip hop shows in Dan I. started out in Denton going at bears is that was his that was his area he's from eastern southeastern. So As, well. As the rapper. And So we will start WanNA shows in Denton. Got To know local Denton artists in land eventually started to more shows Dallas you know which is close by and assorted Bilton Network of artists that I know now that I can reach out soon. I have questions or if I mean something or a had a COUPLA will do. Come to my classroom in even in college. To, guest lecture mice, it's always good to get the the practitioners involved you know some people are we hear that sometimes hip hop education that some in some not y'all because they'll do it right. But there's people that may be poke around but don't actually involve the actual participants in practitioners of the culture now into the mix and I think that's super important. I want to take it. Real cursory level. We talk about this stuff. We you know read the journals right for the journals. But a lot of times outside of our familiarity with hip hop education has mixed people are a little bit unaware of the concept or skeptical of the concept on a very surface level. Especially, with math, you know a lot of times we can see how hip hop mindset or hip hop styles or hip hop methods can be used in language arts as we see how that works. We. Can see how it works with the Science Genius Program. We just see how it works with some of the more. You know wordy subject areas I remember being a Columbia University. Engagement with the McCoy summer from hip hop hacks and Martha Asthma Hip Hop Education Center and we're having this little side discussion people coming over and educators you know asking about this intersection someone said, well, can math teach you know help us teach calculus Scoffing at the notion. Yeah, of course, of course, it can. It can tell embassies anything but from a from looking at from a mathematics point and dealing with the with the students as a whole lot of elements here how would I have answered that question to this? Man Who felt like this was a weird. Unholy matrimony. Alive. It's about how reteach not. So a lot of pedagogy is not necessarily the content, but how we teach it. In. So how we frame it for Students But. I think that one of the things that we keenly. So one of the things pre service teachers when that are talked about a little bit in chapter that arose was we did a math Brat battle in the did I did that because it was elementary Is it's not that they wrapped about. They didn't just pick a math concepts rap about likely inside. The way I did it was as they had to do battle within the lyrics and so they handed Hick opposing concepts. Addition it's subtraction multiplication division. They had to choose those opposing concepts later battled those concepts. Okay. So a prime numbers composite numbers. The reason that was important was because students. First of all. They got the opportunity to try to write lyrics, which was a law. Ruben may thought it was of the. By you did this with students with elementary students. One of the things in mathematics is that we need to know how concepts enact one. It's not just the they're they're opposing, but they also there's a connection there. And so. Those addition subtraction connect to one another war solving equations at Algebra. It's important to understand that those are opposite operations. In that connects what we learned in elementary school When I talk about numeracy any miracle fluency low e-learning elementary school essentially faith foundation for students when we get Him Algebra and Calculus they're not gonNA understand those particular areas in mathematics without understanding the basis right? Right. Without understanding that face say in having that basically mayor fluency is numerical fluency isn't just being able to add and subtract able to understand how those concepts enact one another. And so when they battled, they battled concepts intimate in they had to write a hook. Talked about how those concepts were related. Got It. So there was a specific way that I have to do the dowse. Right? This is more not just like you said, picking a concept and rapping about it as if it exists but having a mastery or at least a strong knowledge of how they intertwined with other concepts and then to probably say with opposing. Concepts specifically because they get a a real understanding of how these things work together and he goes just existing. In practice how do you see the difference teaching this way I guess anecdotally like how does it feel? What do you see? How do you? Judge or gauge that this works. As. Good. As if not better than more traditional standard ways of getting these concepts across the young people. I think that when we e you know when I first started teaching I really didn't understand. Heard about culturally relevant teaching, culturally responsive teaching. Those things where we went to trainings you know all of that but I didn't really understand what that especially in mathematics I had a hard time understanding exactly what that is most of the time you don't have teachers who teach mathematics those trains run right and so. But what if I ended for me was gave me tools. gave me like a constant concrete ways in tools to start to think about how to implement this in my class. In. There are things that we can do. No Light Laurie lots, buildings Infantino love both talk about you know the simple know simply during the rats for memorization in mathematics it is not that that's wrong to do. It's just that it can be hip hop as Right you know when we talk about, you know another example mathematically talk about graffiti artists, graffiti artists do their sketches in. You know they do their sketches I in the they do it on a larger canvas you know that's proportionality. Best taking something for being very small he got onto a very large deepest and their proportional relationships there that you get explore mathematics, right? Yeah in. So there's a lot more than we can explore putting a look at it and you stick itself looking at. US A bar putting together and quarter notes half notes, whole notes as not see. How all of those fractions relate to one another to make the whole. There's so many ways that we can look at music and a hip hop. Room, you know. Look at it through mathematically. Is. What I found talking hip hop artist. Talk to him from artists about is they see the elect. You don't they see the connection to mathematically end but math teachers don't tend soon because we WANNA. Teach way right rather than I had actually both Dr Lots of billings love on the show and one of the things that I remember between Love Sang was that. All the stuff, a lot of this stuff the stuff you talk about not just using it as a rote memorization no style of learning. This sort of. Critical thinking social emotional intelligence. This way of looking at the subject matter through a hip hop lens. Something that hip hop folks knows they just? No they just do it naturally but we don't they don't always. Know How to put it into words or translated into the school setting, but the General? Skills needed the general perspectives are all there in young people especially whose language and lifestyle ethos is hip hop bribery exactly and I think that a lot in something very basic didn't tell pre service teachers is that you're you're coming out this especially if you're not part of the hip hop culture, one of the biggest things you can do is allow your students to be if that's what they are. What they're bringing into the classroom, allow them the space to be there into teach you the pollsters use them teach you what their culture is a culture. They WANNA bring into the classroom. MS. One of the things I think what one big thing you learn through is just the. The amount of of the amount of. It's hard to describe because it's so. If something you feel it's very hard to describe them. It's it's awesome. Kinda love that you feel part of that group. In. You Bring that into your classroom. You'RE GONNA get so much for adding your seats. The intersection education hip hop is also. Attached to social justice. The idea that teaching better especially to communities and young people that have been traditionally underrepresented under resource underfunded under appreciated under you know under under everything. Can enhance again, the snow's called hip hop to save America how can we save America by giving everyone a more equitable opportunity? How can we do that? We can do that through hip hop in some of the ways you're talking. How much of a? Social Justice. Umbrella. Do you feel this whole intersection of using hip hop in your teaching specifically math but overall, the hip hop Ed kind of idea social justice. How does that? Play a part. For me I'm not teaching specifically teaching math right now I'm teaching pre service teachers, and so I think for me, I take it incident that program. Is I try to make sure that. You know I elevate certain voices. So I don't you know I can give students. I can talk about the can talk about social justice, but how do I do that without? Without doing any example right in. So try to elevate certain voices I. Obviously. Bring in Mike Chris Emden allotted. Look at his Ted talks. You know look into Tina loves work. We've look at our. Jamila lifestyle her you know her her staff in. The like last semester abroad in a we video conference who are able to do a video conference with a j Rawls in John. Robinson for. The holter you coached your pedagogy in so. I brought them in in it was in I think it's it's good to bring that in. One of the other things that I try to do is I try to evolve hippo hardest work. In. The local scene, right I've got involved in illegible hip hop scene here in the DFW area So I know a lot of artists and so what I try to do is is I do try to bring them into the classroom try to do. Things with them and what I found talking to them is a lot of them want to get involved in education. I know. How to do that, it's knowing how to navigate the education system. and. I did have an artist. At two years ago, we did a video. The school that I was at the principal allowed me to you. We were got permission to engage the students involved in the school that I was at to do video hate he had a song com Joaquin saw. It was about a bully. was about his experience you know he With his own experience, the bully and he wanted to do videos at appleby wanted US gets. saw. Actually, who's able to principal to agree to that at students got permission forms and all that kind of stuff. And then we went up to the school on a weekend and we videoed. We'd make this video now for tall. Mostly on artists. That he's He he he you know he he experienced that kind of bullying because he immigrated here with his appearance to a more Oklahoma now. So he was in Houston Oklahoma growing up did you can imagine a immigrating? He emigrated from the line in. So imagine immigrating here via more Oklahoma. And with the population, that's there is so he experienced bullying Nina setting. In. South. BACKSTAB. That's prompted the song that he wrote in. Eleven were able to create a video. Great when you have obviously administration and other entities that not a voice that have not always been traditionally accepting to. Progressive. Are Progressive Methods of interacting within educational space. Have you had pushed back. Have you had hesitation when trying to work some of the stuff in? For sure, and that's a lot of times you know especially with mathematics, Dina tested highly course I'm you always in our teach middle school so it's tested every senior another school. State tests are always. Always there in style So yeah, I definitely have gotten switch back. When I when I did try to implement it. At the in the classroom because. Of The concern about. Yeah and the more. Folks, like yourself do the work and you know get the receipts and show that these things are working in their effective. Helpful. That helps obviously the next generation of. Progressive minded teachers to Miss. What do you say to when you talk to assume you you might or if not hypothetically. To teachers who are you know hip hop minded started getting to the hip Hop ed movement start understand these things can happen but are facing pushback from maybe a administration or or parents. You know what do you? How do you? How do you guys deal with that? And I think that that's definitely possible. Badly, he works sometimes within the system that you're in. In in sometimes, you have to be a little bit quieter about what you're doing your classroom. So you know just so that you can do what you WanNa do your foster but then I think you have to work like you're going to have to work within the system that you're in. But you can bring you can certainly bring in even if you can't bring in. Everything that you want you can certainly bring in a hip hop mindset. The classroom can't stop. Stock how you build your classroom billing a positive learning environment. They can't stop that they. That's not something that you're supposed to do teacher that something nature that you're you know observed on. So when you developing the culture in your classroom is definitely something that the unions do without without that. Data over the years that you've been doing this in involved with it in you know being involved with these ideas. Have you found that it's been? More accepted I. Guess It depends on it depends on where you're at kind of situation but expands on the principle depends on the school I think something I'm kind of turning toward now is You know. You Know Betas is certainly being more accepted like when you're talking about urban spaces but I think that. What we're doing the saloon into suburban and rural schools. Read you know we talk about like like I said I grew up in rural school district that was all white are mostly white. An. So how do we take the ideas that we're looking at what talk about Social Justice and we talk about? You know that social consciousness. How do we take that into more rural school districts right where I think You would definitely get a lot of parent pushback depending on how you know. What you brought in but I think that that's you know that's really the goal is to get it is bring it into schools that are predominantly white because they need that they need that exposure to. Lead those conversations they need to learn the correct history you know Because that's you know I definitely think that I was missing something when I first went into teaching because I didn't learn how stay right I often ask a question you answered it ready but the question I often asked the hip hop educators. Based, education folks is, of course, there's attention paid to black and brown communities inner cities. But these are universal approaches that actually could do work as effectively across all demographics areas with an added bonus I think of giving that sort of cultural awareness that that understanding that they may not have been previously exposed to, and you're saying that from someone who wasn't and now seeing what I could have been. Yes and yes yes, and that's benefit. Yeah and that would be highly beneficial to anyone entering the space I would imagine. Speaking about space you were given space in the new hip hop ed a compilation book hip hop compilation about education volume two, which is hip hop as practice and social justice. Again, you mentioned you and Av the great contributed a chapter that creating a shared energy through hip hop to advance the pedagogy of math pre service educators shared energy. Can you talk a little bit about the shared energy part of that? When I was working on that particular study. That actually be my dissertation they worked on So this this out of part of my dissertation work and One of the things that one of my committee members wanted lead to I guess, originally put it in there didn't have. In so they're like. Why what intervention that you did today and I was like okay. So of course for me since he helped me so much I went to him you know him I conversation how to discussion. Okay. So what are we gonNA onus because he was involved in helping me development curriculum in a you know we had several conversations over the semesters, things that I was doing in the classroom in so. When we talked about, we talked about shared energy through hip hop because. There's an energy that we had assured together. Right we had. There's this space that we had to get into together. We had to talk about okay. What am I gonNA do being true to culture. When I do this, you know in trying to make sure that I'm doing these days correctly as a white woman right and it's somebody who is new to the culture. You know now I feel like I'm part of the culture because you know become argued. The hypocrisy here for. L. D. A., W. Area but at first I feel like I was park often. So I wanted to make sure that I was whatever I was bringing the classroom our during it in the correct way. And so to be able to do that, I, had to ask him because he eased s he's expert on him. Right and So we talked about their between the two of us, and then when we take it into his face, there's a shared energy in space right in. So that's that's how we came up with that that particular A name for the innovation here. Right because it does kind of. Implies that it's not just a transference of information, but it's sort of a CO joining working together. So working together as teachers teaching teachers, and then together as teachers educating young people, which I think sits at the heart of sort of the cultural relevant and hip hop styles of teaching is, is that meet them where they are involved them in the teaching put it all together in that way, and if you do that in the right way, you can have great results once again. And I just WANNA say. You know this is a if you're just tuning in now on the livestream does hip hop to save America the podcast you're doing it live in the month of September on Monday through Thursdays in an a special drop on the podcast feed on. Friday. So please do subscribe to that WanNa set out the sponsor of this segment newsbeat podcast, which is a social justice pop gas incorporates hip hop. It's social justice journalism we like to say it says if democracy now and black thought had a podcast baby as definitely check that out news podcast wherever you find podcasts and just continuing the conversation before we before we wrap up. Again. It's not a I'm trying to get like a feeling out of this but just especially with young people but across the board, even teaching teachers teaching teachers who are going into this field. What benefits some touching positive aspects of this we touched on a few Why is this your mind? Just necessarily the way to do it it has to be done. This way is that how you feel? Yeah, I do and I think that. One of the things tomorrow on Practice. Is that I'm very. Have to be very reflective. In chapter talk about my own background you're not talking about a year. While my background is in that impacts. Certainly impact what now And I think that one of the biggest things that leads to happen especially, we have a pre service teacher populations that are predominantly white. You know secondary add we have more of a mix male female. Elementary Ed we have a high. Percentage of female. In education in general percentages white. And so how you know how do we start that process in the program of them reflecting on their practice? you know when you talk about working with alienate shared energy. One of the one of the big things is that when he steps out to be the teacher in the classroom, you know I give him you know he comes in as a guest lecturer needs to be the teacher I sit down as a learner. You know and. Worth talking I'm learning about I'm learning from him. He's the teacher he's the expert. Is I think it's important. teacher soon, be able to understand that you're not always the expert in. Sometimes you are but not always so happy. To step. Back, into learn. you know last semester. I was asked to do the diversity inequity in seminar courses that we were being lane. There's actually professors in that class there several at like three or four of us in that class. So we each chain as to do different WESTERNS. With students that I was asked to do diversity equity, and so we look at. The Ted talk the danger of the single story I don't know one that you see before. Monday. NBC A DC. Is the one that does that one and as we look backwards, tech talk is you know one of the so she's talking about the single story what single-story you have a you know someone else she's talking about single story of blood. If you only see books written a certain way, you know the Mrs, what you expect right? This is the stories. If these are the only three that you see the this is what you expect ran. In so we looked in in you know we had a really powerful moment thing. You ask students to look at you know and they had to write down. Once a single-story somebody thought about me in what's the single story that I thought about somebody else? And they didn't have to share out Lau at I didn't do it like that I had them. They did it on note hearts and I did like, Assad. A side. Vive. And Was Thinking Ecstatic. Within they had to they had to you know in their group. This is before all the social distancing. In their group, they had to pass the note cards around and they just read. So there was there wasn't this reading out loud or anything. That actually had a student. at the end of it, and we're talking about the experience of amid and he said, no, he said on the he Sirri. Asked me to think about a single-story somebody thought about me he was the white male. He said. At a really hard time. On the other side where single-story he thought about from the else. Is it a hard hard time signing which one I wanted to write. The wasn't too embarrassing. Right in so it's really getting to the national shared about my own in my only street Saddam has you know where I grew up everything. Is a bowel that reflective process to able to get into this burkey GonNa have to reflect on yourself first. You're GONNA have to reflect on yourself and your own culture burst before you get into this. You have to be willing to do that. So I think it's important to bring that into. We talk about research bring that into the programs because they can start to learn new things as they get out of the question that the whole point. is to learn from your students. Right is not enough. The is not about giving them all the pieces to what hip hop pedagogy is, but it is starting that process of reflection. In how he end come into the classroom and ask your students willing to step back as a teacher WANNA learn from week. Yeah I. Think it also works with those who are connected to the culture a lot as as much as those like you say coming into in trying to figure it out make sure you're doing authentic matter makes you not stepping on cultural toes I interviewed a doctor Lauren Kelly for this podcast she's out of rutgers. Education Department and SIROTTA CO authored a paper. When when keeping it real goes wrong and hip hop education and it's the end is a very reflective thing I am of the culture and I'm teaching teachers are we're trying to teach young kids but we have to navigate the way to do that. Sometimes, we have to recognize that. Yes, WE WANNA give them space and. Giving them too much. Authority sometimes works against because they're not used to being in a position of authority. So you're trying to give them too much and there's there's a lot of factors to way when you're trying to figure out so. The reflective nature of it, and that's exactly what the the paper was about. Kind of looking back at a semester in saying here's what we did is we could have done better. Here's what worked. What didn't I mean I'm the son of an educator. My my dad was a distinguished professor of sociology and from what I know I went to college for about twenty six minutes commerce son Cobbler's son has no shoes right I both from what I learned. I mean. As a teacher, you're constantly learning supposed to be better ways to teach. Kind of makes sense right? and. That comes from again not just having a one way. Interaction with students. Whether they be students, students or teachers, it's it's got to be collaborative. It's got to be reflective. I think very valuable and I appreciate that perspective. Lastly for. Let's go. How is how is pandemic life changed your educational career right now what changes have you made or what's going on well I mean our university online. Yeah. So where still trying to navigate because I have seen teachers that are out in the field so they have to feel I'm not supposed to so. You know they're now they're school district. The school district I started off online, but they're eventually going person. But Fan Schools. Still don't really want extra people in the building. Take a student of sanitation features that they don't want like extra people walking around. So. So you survey ships difference. So we're having to. Video or manner you know do something to observations recuse easterners is trying to do. you know our classes, her are web based, but they originally supposed to be in person. So the the ones that were originally supposed to be in person. I still do me students, but then there's the you know you can't really necessarily require them to meet with you on live. There may be other things going on in other factors. But it's beneficial for them to meet online. So. You know I do have actually students even though not requiring it they are logging. We're having a conversation. We're talking about the Islamism giving them some extra. About, as they work on their arm around assignments. In our student teachers, they actually a seminar courses so you have to get online with us You know so many it's not like every week so. Scheduled throughout the semester where we have different. To Tom. Within us. We go over some days. I have some weekly meetings with them just to check in with them. You know I'm trying to check in with them. Make sure they're doing. Okay. Checking with their mental health at this point because they're they are out in the field and. There is it's new for the teachers. So you have to We're having a pair them with being procedures to events or seizures. This is all mean for them. Soon, teaching online, you know having to start the school year out like data and now seat know in a week or so students are going to be coming to campus. You know what that means. You're going to have students for mask and all this other stuff and so That's brand new for the teachers in our midst warring there. So I'm trying to make sure that I'm you know I'm navigating trying to make sure I'm checking on the residents trying make strategic a mentor teachers trying to make sure we're not allowing anybody. Throughout this process of yeah. Yeah. Can Be kind of I mean I just I have a five year old and she's doing the distance learning and we're figuring it all out as parents now. Measures to so. You know. Well you know God bless Ya. GotTa five and friend right now that. My goddaughter's mother she's a teacher so he's about to have to go back and do their starting online learning but so is her daughter, her daughter's in kindergarten and so. What do with your daughter during the day he you know she's and you know she can take her up to campus or whatever. But it's like she's got a t shirt classes anti monitor five year in classes. Interesting Times. But you know what can give us some sense of being able to get out of this hip hop you know we know how to create something from chaos and make wonderful immutable. And that's the spirit of it and hip hop can hack everything and it can hack the situation. It can certainly has been improving the education space I'm in awe at the HIP hop. Those. Officially kind of attached to it and anyone who has that mindset out that teachers here this and see the work you guys doing and find inspiration because y'All have the receipts you showing that it works and. Anything who helped deliver better equity and Universal Enlightenment into the educational field is valuable in my opinion. So I thank you for your time I. Thank you for your work. Is there anything that I haven't brought up that you're involved in are needed let people know about or look into this sort of thing more besides obviously they hip hop Ed chat which happens online on twitter, Tuesdays Nine PM Eastern and of course, the book The compilation of the second is the second edition are. So. In all and then we also have a youth culture power. Jay rawls John Robinson did is actually published through offense so So, their work is really important to you that using culture. Not just hip hop. Culture Avenue you're. By right and they really start to Kinda get down to how do we al we really empower us. And I think it really listened to them as they actually ask. I know them, I. got them. I gotta get them on here as well. good work in good. You're awesome. Fantastic. Great cosign. Lastly this is the question I ask folks we've touched the pot, a lot of this you know in the entire interview but this is this is the name of the podcast at Hopkins Save. America is sort of a lofty concept and involves a lot of things. We need a little bit more than hip hop these days to save think, American. but that being said I, do like to ask folks in your perspective and your opinion you've done involving hip hop in the education space. Why does hip hop needs to be at the table discussions when we talk about bill ways to improve lives livelihoods in communities across the country? Now. I think hip hop really does elevate. That social consciousness in Dan out like I said before. When Williams to hip hop in and out. Very. Tip Conference over to talking to them online very first conference. Just felt so much love and acceptance, and just this embrace that you now even in my local community, the same thing to know different artists in my local hip hop community that love in that community that there is so important. In this is in its. Path eleonor is very undescribable. said to be a part of those. I know it I know. Well, that's what hit with something hip hop does it can it can bring people together and we've seen it throughout the throughout the world. Lonzo and here seeing throughout many many industries I thank you for your time for giving us the perspective I'm always excited to learn about how the stuff is actually working practice, and this is very interesting to me, and I hope to everyone else to thank you for your time and I thank you for your worked. Really do I respect what you do in especially in these trying times so we thank you. Thanks me case. Thank you so much. All right. Well, there you go. Once again. There you have it. Beautiful discussion discussing teaching teachers discussing how hip hop can intersect with math and really all educational avenues Do Check Out Dr Caissons contribution to the hip hop ED. Book Series, compilation on Hip hop education volume two hip hop as practice, and so Justice Co Co authored the chapter with Av the great called creating a shared energy through hip hop to advance the pedagogy of math pre service educators. Smart stuff happens here. This is the world's smartest podcast and you can tell why I'm not always so smart. So I rely on the really smart people could tell me what the heck is going on when it comes to the intersection of hip hop in other areas So thank you again Dr Mardy Cason for coming through. I really appreciate especially in the midst of the education season. So dope once again, the hip hop Ed chat has come up today many times shouted than hip hop had family respect a them have some representatives from that movement coming up in future very near future episodes of this hip hop save America, the podcast both alive and the special Friday bonus addition that appears magically on your podcast feeds. So once again to recap. The, world's smartest hip hop podcast. We talk about the intersection of hip hop and areas like education science, technology, health, and wellness. The. Fine. Arts Politics Activism and social justice and many spirituality self help healing all these things here. I don't know anywhere else. I don't know any other hip hop podcast said does all this stuff. So just saying subscribe on your podcast Feed Apple Podcast spotify wherever you get podcasts search for hip hop can save America and again follow us on facebook and the twitter's just do a google search. My name is manny faces you find me as well and Keep in contact with us to follow more. Of these kinds of stories, lastly, the newsletter once again, the hip hop advocate newsletter can be found at hip hop advocacy dot org. It is a semi regular curation, a collection of articles just like the kind of stuff we just talked about. So. If you're into smart applications innovative applications inspiring educational. Uplifting. or any kind of application hip hop improves humanity. In some way we collect those stories we sent him out to you. We give you hope that hip hop indeed. Can Save America if not the world I'm an manny faces, you can support this work at Patriots Patriot dot com slash Mandy faces. It's been up there the whole time on the screen if you're watching live and we'll be back Monday through Thursday who for the entire month of September. Twenty twenty is quite an endeavor. Thank you for putting up with a couple of you know a stutters and such We had a little bit of the interview did make it to the livestream the very, very beginning Thank you to associate producer Cindy for for all your hard work to og og associate producer summer was always helping and contributing as well. My name is many faces. This is hip hop could save America the live podcast back tomorrow at one PM Eastern with an icon. An icon. In the world of I said, I. Tell You make you tune in. Who's listening this far who's listening this long? You'll get a bonus, hip hop photography, y'all an icon in the field of hip hop, photography, and archiving. So tune in tomorrow one PM. Eastern many faces I'm out peace.

America Martha Asthma Hip Hop Educatio Dan I. New York City principal US Dallas manny Ted twitter Oklahoma Mary Ed John Robinson Funk Alec Studios David Bs Bradshaw Sharp Dr Marty Dr Mark York City
A Special Thanksgiving Episode, Michelle Obama

Ellen on the Go

45:36 min | 3 years ago

A Special Thanksgiving Episode, Michelle Obama

"Hi, it's Ellen Degeneres. Welcome to my podcast. We're gonna listen to some of the best moments from the show, and it's going to be hosted by four executive producers that I love. Happy listening today with a very special thanksgiving episode of Ellen on the go the one the only Michelle Obama is here, and I have a special surprise for the other executive producers. That's right. Welcome to Kevin company. Everybody. It's kevin. Kevin company companies good who are you over there? Oh, I'm Ed glavin. You Andy last Sner and Mary Connolly everybody high. So today is thanksgiving. Yes, thanksgiving, I tell you guys a lot better ever properly told you how thankful I am that you have you never been me this job. You never have trusted me all along the way. Yeah. And just I mean, you take every interview every moment tobacco about me. And I just couldn't love this job more. And I couldn't live you guys more. So today, I'm going to get to know your guys story a little bit more since you've told mine so many time. Oh god. I I'm very thankful. Whole jet Dover before he does his thing we choke about it. But for sixteen years, we spend I don't think people understand. On offices. Yes, we do. And yet we all sit in one office all day and spend more time with each other than we do with our families. If you go hour by hour Monday through Friday. Yes. That is correct. Just that you all have your own offices. And then I have shared off. That's true. But we we spend all our time together. And after sixteen years, you guys really are my family, and I'm very thankful for I could not imagine doing this without any one of us so much. This has been so much fun in such an amazing ride and being able to do it together where we get to laugh together every day, we work really hard. You have a whole lot of fun. And I know that I could count on you guys for anything. And I'm so grateful for you on this special thanksgiving, and I got so lucky that this is my first like big hit show. I was part of. Yes. Yes. You started your Kevin you're talking about. NBC pit you're an NBC page, and then your first real job on television. Television show was this one right? Yes. Well, I real w amazing. It is amazing. So Meyerbeer, what was your first job entertainment? My first job in entertainment was I was an NBC page. A really, yeah. I did know that. Yeah. And then what happened, and then you're allowed to be NBC page for I think eighteen months and right up against the edge of that eighteen months, I had an an assignment where I sat outside the Letterman studio, and my job was to pass out dressing room keys to the guests who came to the show and Barbara Gaines, who is I think maybe a production coordinator at the time walked by me one day and went can you type? And I said, no. But I'll learn. And so I went home, and I tried to learn how to type really really fast, and I was terrible. And I said to her one day like working on it. And she was like too late. It's over and I was like, okay. And then she came by me a little while later and said, can you answer phones, am I go answering phones I can do and I got hired to be the receptionist at late night with David Letterman in one thousand nine hundred eighty five and two weeks into the job. I went to the office of the associate producer whose name was Jude Brennan, and I said, I'm sorry to bother you. But do you mind telling me how much this job pays? Yeah. And it, and it she goes, no one told you that I said no known told me that and it paid three hundred dollars a week. And it was my start amazing. That's crazy. And I'm still friends with people who are pages this week. It is the eighty fifth anniversary of the NBC page program, and people are posting all sorts of embarrassing photos of us from nine thousand nine hundred five so awesome. Yeah. And you're still friends with all those people at the Letterman's, and I'm still friends with. Them and they're like an amazing group to their have how Letterman altogether, I was at Letterman for ten and a half years. I was so intimidated, by the way, I started because it was gosh my favorite Letterman on air. Now. No, it was it was a fantastic job. And they raised me from pup. They like taught me how to prince seventy years old and still working in the business of love is amazing. Page class. That's pretty cool. That's. Who are such a bad, man. Yes. When did you feel like you made it an entertainment? I think when I won an EMMY for the Rosie O'Donnell show, it somehow felt like something what was your role there at that point supervising producer? Oh, that's so, but I had never worked on a show that even had been nominated, and then I had done the Morton Downey junior show had done other. Daytime talk shows. So I just never thought I'd be on a show. I watched Ed who I knew he got nominated for Donohue like they were on real shows. And I never had that. And then getting nominated was huge. And then winning was the first time. I felt like, oh, this is kind of cool were you on Rosie from the very beginning. Yes. I was how did that? Compare to the beginning of this show kind of similar was. Yeah, it was very similar in that. You knew you had a host like you just had a feeling a week got something here, and I can say that I've worked on shows where was. Oh boy. I'm not sure this show is gonna work. I have a pretty, but with the the one thing I would say was similar about launching Rosie in launching Ellen was. Oh, yeah. This is gonna work and even before as soon as I heard both of those shows announced I was like, yeah. These are those are good names. And you were Rosie O'Donnell with our friend, Daniel Kelsen. Yes. Friend of ours who came who was a producer with Mary Letterman us. We don't think Kevin was born. College friends. I would watch Rosie we took the trip out to did you go with her when she was animal kingdom it doesn world. Yes. Oh, we went on. We all like you went. Yes. It was hilarious. That's crazy. You're probably in the same place at the same time. And who? These years later we'd be a team Eddie glavin use. I'd like to hear about what of your previous jobs made you most ready to do this job at Ellen. You know, I'm not sure, but I think the most foundational job in my career was the Phil Donahue show that was really really an amazing experience, and it was live. So it was live at four o'clock in the afternoon on NBC in New York City, and that was just the most visible job. I had before the Ellen show, and he was just such an amazing guy, and he like, Ellen was brilliant. And he was very quick like he his mind was just insanely fast. And you know, he would run from one side of the studio to the other to take audience questions, and it was a really cool gig. And I did that for a few years, but nothing I don't think anything could prepare me for Ellen but working at Ellen raciest all our careers have times for Jenny Jones. Alright careers have been talk shows. I mean, Mary had a little where she worked on whose line is it anyway, she used? She used to work on. Mad about you. Okay. So he's had a real. The rest of us have literally are living. Yeah, we'll tell you is a fun. Good living. You ready for this? Okay. And I were working in the same building in thirty rock at the same time. I was in NBC page and working at the Letterman show when he was on the Donahue show. That is true. Wow. Andy was working in thirty rock at the Rosie O'Donnell four that I was ED's internet the Morton. My first job. I'm talk. Okay. And it's really people really want to hear about me on this. What happens then thirty rock? You're thirty rock in the Rosie O'Donnell show in the same studio that the Phil Donahue show had been. That's right. That's right. We shot that in there. And then also we had a fire at thirty rock and David Letterman kindly offered his studio to us for a week. And we did shows on the David Letterman set. Right. Yeah. On the Letterman. Yeah. That was very cool. Right there. Yeah. I did. I did an internship in Philadelphia only because I didn't have enough credits to graduate and like three it was for pm magazine show like a sort of like extra in Philadelphia, locally produced and three days into that internship. I was like this is the most amazing thing I've ever been a part of an I only want to do this for the rest of Highland. Yeah. It was the first time I did not have to detail cars, and that's all I've done my entire career. This daily television is so cool. We were joking about the rhymes which Jones. So my wife, and I took over the Jenny Jones show in nineteen Ninety-two ran it for eight years, and we got into his own where I just wanted every every show had a title. So it was what you would call a one hour one topic show. So whatever the theme was like geek chic. What what was geek to chic Eddie? Well, one title would be. I mean, we did it many times. So what would it was who, you know, looked really nerdy had frizzy hair and braces might have been like heavier, and then blossomed into beautiful in some cases. And you didn't you didn't make them over. It was just they started out that way, and then they became chic or did you make them over from geek Tichy? I would say they started out really geeky. And then in mo-, you know, always thought they were chic I sometimes they actually were sometimes less so and we would have we would rhyme the titles and was maybe the most fun. I had three years was doing. No. So funny. I used to be fat. Now, I'm all that. Which is also sort of your which is actually your story. What are the most important things when it comes to socks for me? It's comfort quality and fit. Well, the geniuses at Bomba's put two years of research and development into their socks and came up with the most comfortable ones out there honeycomb arch support cushioned foot bed seamless toe. Super soft cotton, stay up technology. These are just some of them any features that make Bomba socks superior to all others. Did you know that SOX are the number one requested item in homeless shelters across the US? When the founders of Bomba saw the statistic, they decided to do something about it. That's why for every pair of socks they sell. They also donate one to someone in need at Bombay's. They believe in one hundred percent customer happiness, simply put if you don't love their socks as much as they think you will they'll refund you no questions asked bomb is offering twenty percent off your first purchase. You can save twenty percent by visiting Bombay dot com slash Ellen. And that's B O M B A S dot com slash Ellen and entering the offer. Ellen in the checkout code space. Here's why I know. Yeah. Okay. And obviously it's changed a lot because you've been successful here. But how has your life changed the most since we kicked off in two thousand three? That's a great question. Great question. I can say on my life has changed. I went from a father of one daughter to getting married again and having three kids, and yeah, Ellen was at my wedding, and Mary and ahead. Not hurt. Now has changed in so many ways it's sixteen years. Did you ever think you'd have kids again once Aaron well, I thought this is good done. The thing is when you get a second wife, they often want kids to my God cute, and he has the most durable family. Thank you. Thank you. We all you all have pretty good families. And yeah when you were on Rosie. Yeah. You weren't recognizing you're walking around. No, no. I've been out with Andy everyone recognizes. It's so weird. We started doing with him on the show. And here's one of the earliest ones, we used to descend called cold opens. We'd come up on Ellen before we even start the show, and we were doing a little joke about the holidays and all and had to say was it burned for eight days. Couldn't get through it without laughing, and I'm not going to describe it. But here you go. You know, we do these cold opens that before we start the show. Sometimes we're surprised someone for the audience, I'm in my dressing room. And I say you see that personnel there. So they're called cold opens. And we shoot 'em like right before the show starts and we're shooting hunting last week. And Andy, I'm sure you've seen Andy before because he's always on camera. He's taken gum out of his mouth right now. So Andy is is. Backstage with me, and we're about to shoot this thing. And he had one line and all he was supposed to say was it burned for eight days. And because we were supposedly talking about Hanukkah, but Andy, of course, took a different way in his head. So as he's trying to say it burned for eight days. He couldn't keep a straight face. And we're trying to start the show literally was supposed to be a quick thing. And then start the show. This is trying to do that one thing last week. Right. In the right place. Got it. Really? Right. Okay. Burn for. Burn for eight days. Eight days. Did you see a doctor? Any and I were just talking about the miracle Konica. Hannukah? There. I was laughing too which made it harder. So Andy, I wanna give you another chance to kill people. Come on over. Randy. No. Now, look at me. But that's not what I want. I want you to say I had some other things I want to say. You need that. All right. So start with is your you Bernie. Yulong? Is your you'll love burden? One should be good. My pain has not. My my cats. That was done. Say open my packet. Me. Back. Are they? Mary we one more. Which one of these you wanna say. Do you have balls your tree? Oh my God. Produce this whole. Little more buttoned up. Yes. I like the Kevin Leman on the go. So I know that one little bit launched something called can Ambi say that which the writers have a lot of fun with writing about balls, and whatever and here's a little bit of that. Can you? Can you crack nuts? Could you crack? Now, here's one is going to just wait for both of them. My wife wanted a big pack, but I have a small package. A small. Not confession time. I'm asking you to. Okay. My wife wanted a big package. My wife wanted a big package. Small. And now Andy's like on air all the time. In fact, we have another average Andy coming up. So you gotta check out the generous show to see that. Yeah. Right around the corner. Eddie glass. Your life changing play my. Begin is this show started to form you were guy living in New Jersey with your family. I feel like an entirely different human being. I was when the show started for real. I did not want to move to California. Like I worked for this company for fifteen years before maybe twelve or thirteen years before this show launched Edward for Tele pictures who are show and manage to not have to live in Los Angeles. And you my whole family's in Philadelphia or around Philadelphia, I really didn't wanna leave the east coast. But once I met Mary at a show, we were both consulting on I really one of the opportunity to work with her again. So I did move the whole family out here. My youngest Colin was just going into kindergarten. And now all they really know in remember is California. They're surfers Colin won't leave California. He wouldn't leave California to go to college. Like, he's just never gonna leave. They were so upset. Well, we told them that we bought a house in California, they were just little kids. And they thought we were just adding to our collection of houses, tell them. No. We're actually moving to this house in California. And that did not go over will. But I mean, my whole life changed, and I don't think I'll ever leave this area. It's just such a it's such a great place to live. Also, we're here sixteen years. Eleven years in I quit drinking. Ready? That was a big Vesa. I still sometimes don't believe that to be true. You weren't because you know, had a good thirty years of drinking. Sure the five where I didn't. You were a lot more fun. When you drank. Not true thought for the first couple of years. What people probably don't know about. That is like he is so determined like he can determinist after he does not take no finance. No doesn't also launch all of our social networks and everything we do here. He's been amazing that he also when he put his mind to it decided to run a marathon. Which is. Yeah. He sure did. And if you're listening to the podcast, and you haven't seen me, that's the thing. Demi won't stop. Four foot six to twenty. Twenty six miles. But after he ran the New York marathon sure Ellen gave him a kind shout. People. We go to break. There's one thing that I have to do my abuser. Ed, glavin ran the New York City marathon over the weekend. And I want to congratulate. Come out. I want an wanna talk you bring your medal bring your medal. Twenty six miles, right? Twenty six point two two. What was your time? I was five and a half hour hours of running. Morning. Home this morning this morning. A little I've seen you walking a little bit your little can you do squat right now. Like, sure. Yeah. How's that feel? What about a jumping Jack with that be good? All right. Thank you, should or something. But we're really proud of you that was amazing. All right. I wanna talk about the new sheets, I've discovered from Brooklyn in dot com. You know, that incredible feeling that fancy hotel sheets have we'll Brooklyn and was started by a husband and wife who didn't think it should be so difficult and expensive to get sheets. Like that at home Brooklyn is the fastest growing bedding brand in the world with over thirty thousand five star reviews, and they were just named the winner in the best of online betting category by good housekeeping, their mission to bring five star hotel quality luxury sheets to everyday life without the luxury markup, which could be as high as three hundred percent the sheets. Don't just feel great. But they look great to you can mix and match over twenty plus colors and patterns, my Brooklyn and sheets are the best most comfortable sheets I've ever slept on. Now. It's time for Europe grade Brooklyn in dot com is giving an exclusive offer just for our listeners. Get twenty percent off and free shipping when you use promo code Ellen at Brooklyn in dot com. Brooklyn is so confident in their product that all their sheets comforters towels come with a lifetime warranty. The only way to get twenty dollars off and free shipping is to use promo code L. At Brooklyn in dot com. That's our okay. L I N E N dot com. Promo code Ellen. Brooklyn. These really are the best sheets ever. All right. Life changed my life changed. My life is changed in many ways when I began the show Julian had been together for a couple of years. I got married during the course of this show. We have two beautiful girls. These years. So I have a heavily family. I've had pets dogs and things. I never thought I would ever have in my life. When you started. When you started the show, gay marriage was not legal. That's right. Did you always want to be a mom? Yes. I always I always wanted to be a mom. I couldn't always picture how that would happen. I didn't necessarily see myself married to a man, although I like that you dated mentor longtime I did date. I did. Really nice guy. But you know. Mary St Mary's problematic. Mary was used St. Mary drank Mary. Straight. Mary had a lot to figure out have not been in therapy. She didn't grow up in a culture where it was. Okay. To be out in gay crazy. How much even even just say that? So you heard the news, right? Did hear the news exciting? Our executive producer Mary calmly and her wife. Julie welcome to brand new baby. That is a very pretty baby in her name is Katherine Crawford silver. Conley. At our last name is. Long name seven pounds ten ounces and nineteen and three quarter inches long. For those of you keeping score at home, Catherine is one quarter inch longer than I writer gills, baby. I talked about yesterday. So. She wins. No, I know Kevin is running this yet. Kevin and co Kevin. Kevin. Running it something. Going. I'm almost I'm ready to get to Michelle, Obama speaking. I would like what I would like to say is we all got richer as much as it has been to be together for sixteen years. None of us would be able to do it. We do without our families at home without the people who are really the reason we get up in the morning, and and do what we do. And it's my wife, Julie. And my daughter Sara, and my daughter, Katie, we find a way to make it all work, but it's not always easy because we have to be here a lot. Yes, we do really long hours. I am very very grateful to my family at home. Drains. A lot of our time. I was gonna say an to Ellen. I mean. Our lives have changed because. Yes, we all have so much more as people, and I feel just more fulfilled in sixteen years than I did sixteen years ago, and and materially we obviously all have more. But I think we've all become more charitable because we're around. Well, I think that's right. I mean edged hordes little but speaking for me, become more charity. So I'm a giver. Oh, gosh. Well, thank you guys. Let's talk about Michelle Obama. I love God love Michelle Obama. Everyone in the office is happy better at the so much fun. Elena's happy she's Ellen starts bragging a week out that her and Michelle are texting each other. Yeah. She. I always feel guilty. But I just stay quiet because I don't want to brag that Michelle, and I are texting also very text to Michelle Obama aired last week. So hopefully, it's still on your DVR. We had it for the entire hour. You should watch it. It's really amazing. And if it's not on your DVR, we're going to repeat it sometime in the next month. So just keep watching and you'll see last time. She was here we took her to CVS shopping together. It was so fun. Really, really? You would think you couldn't top it. Nope. This time we took her to Costco, because Michelle has a new book out called becoming and Ellen decide to an impromptu book signing there, she thought that would be hilarious if a big pile of books, and they just crashed the Costco, and this is what happened. I've seen in a store you're gonna sign. Is your book you'll start reading it? When you get home. I book. Ellen signs Michelle Obama book or Michelle Obama sign. Why? Fine. First of all Michelle Obama tells an amazing story she does she'll she tells a great talk show story. And and she told these stories that were in her book, and she told one story about the day that marriage equality became the law of the land, and they lit up the outside of the White House in rainbow colors, and it was and it was really moving, and it was special and people came out people came out to really celebrate that in front of the White House and Michelle Obama was watching it on TV in the White House. And realized that if she just went outside her how she could actually also be there. So you talk about in the book also the night that gay marriage passed, and this is a great story. Yeah. One of the interesting things I bring it up to talk about just how badly different one could be. In the White House during art ministration and the day that Barack and I went to the funeral. Where he famously saying amazing grace we were at that funeral but we flew back in that same day. Marriage equality was passed and. And we're in the White House in when you're in the residents there's so much bulletproof glass. Sometimes you don't hear what's going on outside, and we were having dinner. And we were, you know, listen, we knew that there was celebration happening. But we didn't realize that people. Thousands of people were gathering in front of the White House at that time to celebrate. And my staff was calling me everybody was celebrating and people were crying. And I thought I want I want to be in that, you know, also we had. Worked to make sure that the White House was lit up in the LGBT colors. So the White House. It was beautiful beautiful. So we had made that plan. And I was sitting in watching it on TV and realizing I'm living this I said I have to break out of this. I want to go outside, and I wanna be a part of that celebration. So I had the bright idea I'm going outside. Okay. So I tried to find some partners. I went to Barack Sophist that I said, we should go outside. He was like got too much stuff to do. I can't go out. He's like, you know, I can't walk outside. Come on get out of my office. Yeah. I go to me. I said you go to Sasha. You wanna come outside with me and see the house, it's colors. Let's celebrate. And she's like, no, I'm wanting came. Molina's room. And I said come on go with me. And she says, okay, I'm down me and Malia, and we're trying to get out of the White House and realize that it's not that easy to get out of the White House when you're in it, but we were determined. And I said, we're not listening to anyone we're going to walk out that door you and me. So you come out of the residents and there's an elevator and there's usually an agent right there. And when you come out, they whisper our code-named, they're moving, and I'm like, they know we're moving let's not take the elevator. Come on you. Go down the stairs. We rushed down the stairs. And you can see the agent thinking. Why are they running? Doesn't quite know. What to do? He starts following us. And I'm going to turn faster one step, and we go to the front door the north portico door, which faces Pennsylvania Avenue, and I'm just thinking I'm gonna walk out. So we go to the door and the doors locked so now, they're many people behind us the uniform policemen. The usher who's in charge of the house, and they don't know what to do. Right. And they're like, ma'am, where are you going? I said I'm going out. I'm going I'm we're going out we're going outside and they're watching because they're calling in more people. She's trying to get out. She's trying to get out. Like she's pumped up. She's like do this mom. But the door's locked in. The says mayor. If you walk out there, you will be on camera in front of the nation Nyman ripped up shorts and a t shirt and no shoes on no makeup. And I thought you have a point. I don't wanna I don't wanna be on that clip looking like this. But eventually the happy news was that we got out we me and I walked outside. It took fifteen minutes to get outside, and we stood along with all the cheering crowd off to the side mind, you so no one would see us with security surrounding us. And we tried to have our Tinder mother daughter moment, but we just took it in. I held her tight. And my feeling was see where we are moving forward chain. If you're looking for beautiful well-crafted furniture with the Scandinavian simplicity. Look, no further article is an online only furniture company that eliminates the layers of fictional retail and keep their prices low quality, high let me guess no showroom social rooms, no sales, people people just savings article is serious about shipping to no matter. How many items every order shipped flat for forty nine bucks? That's so crazy and within two to three weeks. And if you need help getting set up, they have options for room delivery, and assembly assistance. They are all about the customer coming. I the thirty day return policy, and that's honestly, the best customer service in the business. Sure is article is offering our listeners fifty dollars off their first purchase of one hundred dollars or more visit article dot com slash L. And that's all it takes go to article dot com slash Ellen. And the discount will be automatically applied at checkout. That's all you have to do that's article dot com slash. Shell in to get fifty dollars off your first purchase of one hundred dollars and more and they have beautiful furniture. If you don't believe me, just go right now, click on their website, the stuff is so cool. It was so fun having here this time now that she's out of the White House. Yes, no guard anymore. She doesn't have. I always remember we were when she co hosted with Ellen when she was the first lady we had a game called remember Michelle Obama this or that maybe we gave her just two choices of rather. Mundane things pick what she liked and we were in rehearsal where we asked her twizzlers or red vines. She goes twizzlers, then there was a lot of whispering in the audience between her people talking talking and then hand goes up over not going to answer that question. I don't know. Kind of deal. They had with red vines to me. You know, we put her in the hut. See Ellen was loud. Ask her whatever she wants. And she just answers. Michelle Obama, and we have learned a lot about you in this book, but we have a few more questions as so we thought we would play a quick round burning questions. I Levy crush Jermaine Jackson of the Jackson five's. Let me explain most people work. They had a crush on Michael. That's right. I was young. I liked the older Jemaine. Yeah. I was in the older, man. I think I would seven. Tell us something you stole from the White House. We had to pay for everything that's in the book. I know you stole stuff. I did. I still well the napkins that that were in the bathroom you still have. No, what did you do? I don't know. Do your best Barack Obama impression. Well, let me tell you. I have three points one. Then there's two and finally. Three. You didn't do your best Barack Obama impression? Well, I don't know. I don't really do. Really bad impression. Do you have a nickname that you like to be called me? What is something that you love that? Everyone else doesn't kale. Are you better friends with me or Oprah? I know. No, my spouse gives the best. He's the best at everything. What about you? She's the best. When you're alone. What do you talk to your dogs about do you talk to your? Oh, gosh. Yes. How's your day? What are you doing? What do you have? Did you bring me a bone? What a dad do. Oh, we have long conversations. Yeah. Your dogs. It's usually what set on your. But let me. Let me get that. What do you do that makes your daughter's laugh, it would take their father decides your family who would you like to go on a road trip with? Yeah. Michelle. Where would we go? I don't know. Where would you wanna go? We should travel across America. We should. Yeah. Until you. She keeps me in this crazy world when I'm freaking out and stressed and going. What's happening? She texts me the most positive Optimus things and keeps me balanced because I could show you how much you don't have to worry. I know. Well, let's do it. All right. It is called becoming an it's available in bookstores and online it is a fantastic book. Obviously today, you're all going home with a copy. She's everyone feels. Nice to everyone on the Steph appreciative for everything we do. She's senses. That this is the part of their texting relationship that blew my mind. If she senses that Ellen is down or gets discouraged about the state of the state, right? She sends her positive stories to lift spirits. That's amazing. Michelle Obama sees the glass half full twenty four hours a day and Ellen make sure that during Ellen for an hour a day wants to raise everybody up. But that's what she wants to do with her with our a day on the air. And Michelle Obama does that for doing a buddy comedy without a doubt, the two of them at Costco is so funny win sisters separated at birth. Good. Kevin look who already has idea my pitch, I own it. Own it. And she's just smart. She's lady who just understands how it all works. Cool. Couple bet. She's an awesome. Oh, yeah. And the kids are cool from what you can just tell those kids are cool and talking about her daughter's date picking the daughter of story at the prom on the white at the White House. You got to listen to this. So in the book, you talk about malaria going to prom is. I just can't even imagine. Set the state. Yeah. Go ahead. You know, their whole lives were spent trying to have a normal life, go to soccer matches and birthday parties and sleepovers in have kids come over with a security detail. So then prom comes and me. We ask can I please ride with my date in his car. Because at that point they had never driven in another person's car for security reasons, they have two kids could ride in their car, but they couldn't accept a ride from someone else. So everything in their lives is now a discussion we have to pull insecurity, we have to talk the chief of staff talked to the communications director, and we decide my thing was to get a ride in the car with her prom date. You know, I mean, come on people. So she gets to ride. So he comes to pick her up. Poor kid. And. He's got to come through the official driveway that dignitaries. Come when we are. When state visits happen around the the south lawn that long driveway up to the front door of our home, which is like the Dipper room. We're coming down the elevator. Because we're in the elevator me and Baraki in me. And she's like just be cool. Please don't embarrass me. She looked beautiful. I mean, oh it. She just was vision is a vision Brock's. Try not to cry and he's trying to cool and we greet the young men in the nights tux. You know, God knows what happened to him getting in because I tried to make security note. He's coming don't hassle him. I don't believe make sure his car is clean. If you know what I mean because dog sniff the car said, I don't want him to be embarrassed. So I was I said, I don't know to kid, but you know, he'd beats picking up at a different house. I had met him. But I didn't know him. No. So he comes in, and you can tell these a little nervous, and we shake his hand take picture, and they get in the car, and they go off and then like three cars follow. Like them, and then three cars with men with guns and Barabbas like this makes running for a second term, all worthwhile. My daughter is being followed by men with guns. I'm good. There's also a segment on the Michelle Obama show where we put together a tape piece that showed the impact that Michelle Obama has head on this country. It was it was the one thing. We didn't tell Michelle that was happening in the show. So Ellen starts to intro it and Michelle goes, wait. What what's happening? I didn't know about this. And we roll the tape really fun. And it was a beautiful tape is really cool, and you can see that on our show. That's on your DVR. You can see it on Ellen tube. But check it out take take five minutes in check it out because it's really it's your time. Makes you feel good and your money your time. Kevin. You didn't tell your life has changed since the covenant co. Yes, that's right. Kevin. And I got Kevin how has your life changed? It's honestly that would be a couple of our special. We'd have to do. Oh, I was straight when I started here used to stay at work for as long as I could. So I wouldn't have to like social life. Yeah. Yeah. So I mean, just like the gift of like being who I am. Fame about who. I am dating a man that I love like, my every single thing has changed all of it was because you guys I just wanted to take this hour. I hope everyone listening all eight of you. Call five people you wouldn't normally tell your will for them today. And just let them know that you love them. That's it. I love you. Thanksgiving everyone happy thanksgiving and next week. Find out how you too can win twelve days all twelve days of giveaways, thousands and thousands of dollars. Just by listening to Andy and friends podcast company out today. It's Kevin today was I Kevin Koe was a one and done. I relinquished the reins for one episode. Subscribe today on apple podcasts or every listening to us right now. And don't forget to watch Ellen Jenner show weekdays for even more Ellen fund. Everybody. Drive safe. Could be real.

Ellen Michelle Obama Andy Kevin Michelle White House Mary David Letterman Ed glavin Ellen Degeneres Barack NBC Brooklyn producer Jenny Jones Rosie O'Donnell New York City Philadelphia
David Beckham, Justin Bieber, Justin Timberlake, Anderson. Paak, SZA

Ellen on the Go

32:08 min | 1 year ago

David Beckham, Justin Bieber, Justin Timberlake, Anderson. Paak, SZA

"Hi IT'S ELLEN DEGENERES. Welcomed with my podcast. We're GONNA listen to some of the best moments from the show and it's going to be hosted by four executive producers that I love happy listening on Today's episode of Ellen on the go. Justin BIEBER SCARES DAYLIGHTS OUT OF DAVID. Beckham. Justin timberlake and the cast of trolls world tour including Anderson Pack and CIZA. Sarah here and Ellen's tips for how to be entertained during quarantine and lastly we try to answer the question. How do you do a comedy show without a studio audience? I'm Ed Glavin. I'm Andy Lansner. I'm Andy's friend. Mary Connell Inc really in the second. This we are coming to you from our quarantine area. We have quarantined ourselves together. Or Stance Office for two nights trying. We are broadcasting. Now Kevin Kevin try to of our seven listeners. Tweeted told me they hope I felt better. Thank you so much for the two of his Cabinet. Outpouring of love. We also we all my friends from three turnout. Well let's give it a little state of the state. Last podcast was just and Ian me was Andy and friend. Yeah sure in front Mary Marysville sickly. She gets sick right. Yeah yeah she was out I was out and then Kevin usually fairly durable often pickled he He hit the skids. Yeah Kevin I was you guys. I've never had a stomach before is what I've learned about myself. Wow intestinal cramps. You're in such pain. It was really it was like I swallowed a rock. It was not yeah it could be ongoing expected to come back to go get some gall bladder testing and I said the Kevin this morning. I don't think it has anything to do with six months of Diet. Pills and big. Okay mom with your. I'm sure we hired him. He was twenty five. He still acts like he's twenty five. He's forty two and Daniel leary. Who is often the producer of this Pasha? Not here not here all day. He went down. Yeah Jackie's filling in Johnny filling in Jackie. Dunbar has been here as a part of the team. She works on our on. Our digital team leads our digital team quite sherry for how Long Jackie. Six years six years. Wow that's insane child yeah. She's lovely talented smart and quirky. But let's start with Beckham Bieber thing sure so. We have David Beckham on the show for the first time in four years looking. Good Looking Guy yes he. He's here because he's a part owner of an MLS major league soccer franchise. He has a team in Miami. Yeah he is devilishly. Handsome Yari Hand Wife would leave me tomorrow. He He he's one of the owners of the Miami kickers you know I just want to. I wouldn't thing when he came. I knew nothing about soccer. And the whole reason he was coming to America was to make it more visible game for Americans. They gave him a lot of money to play. Well yes they gave him a lot but I do think it succeeded. Maybe not for la necessarily but it did make sock much more visible. It was a huge success for La. Oh it was oh. Thousands of people in my family included season tickets to the galaxy when David Bethel joined the team and then sold their season tickets when David Beckham Lafayette. Yeah so I am now. He's now he's with the kickers. I was going through some old photos on my phone. That are that are these are mainly photos taken by my wife and I was trying to find that picture of my son Colin for his birthday. And what I found. Were half a dozen shots of David. Beckham's asks while stretching. It really enjoyed him and she still enjoys them. Yeah and he's a good guest. Yep Talk Show. Guest is sweet guy is and enjoys Ellen and has a friendship with Justin Bieber and so we did the unlikely thing of putting Justin Bieber in the scare. Table shirt usually occupied by Corey. Palette and then Justin Bieber tried to scare David Beckham and I would say that went about as we all expected it to go. Yeah Yeah So. We're going to play that clip and then I recommend that you go to your Dvr and you watch that because it looks as weird as it. Sounds playing a clip of scare an audio clip of Virginia? Mary's a pocket people have thirty seconds at a time so they can skip the clip to get back to me talking to you guys all right. Well I look forward to that well. Here's the clip. So Halloween you went to Justin Bieber's house to trick or treat with your kids. How does that happen did you? I mean we'll follow me on instagram force and fans and we love him and we were it was coming towards the end of our nitric. Treating kids have had far too much candy and enjoyed this over lots on the way back. Romeo turned around me he said Justin's celine snow cones. And I was like really. How do we know given snow? Kyle sorry keep giving the boy. I gotta do that. Protect your freedom to sell candy. So He's giving you know snow cones away. Sars okay they said Dad. Can you just contact? Come on your who you are. I'm sure he'll show hill replied to you deemed him and he got back within like seconds and he said yet. We're doing it now. So we were literally two minutes from the House so we went straight ground. There turned up and we got snow cones and trick or treated at Johnston's house the justice. They love Justin so much. I heard the boys when Harper was before she was born. They wanted to name her. Well Justin if it was a boy adjusting girl. Yeah did that not work out. Sorry really didn't know what I know. You'll love him. He's the most amazing human being really. Is You know for someone to achieve what is achieved and still being amazing person and to be doing what he's doing he's always been. I always gauging of how are people are two kids my kids and he has been so kind to my kids over the years. It's you know it's great to see him great to see him back. I know I know I missed him. He's he's a good guy and now you've probably just found fast. Didn't listen to that I'm back. It's Andy goode high bands to know that I love you and I want you to be safe during this corona virus scare and just remember I'm in your heart and your mind you know. That's a beautiful bar cringe. It's a beautiful sentiment and it brings up a really good point that there's there's a lot of information going out around the current a virus and also a lot of misinformation. There is leading to an incredible moment. This is the best that happened this morning with Andy last night. Who's going to tell us? Okay remember it I will never ever forget it. Oh so andy. And I are both native New Yorkers. We grew up on the island manhasset. I've never mentioned it. We've never met. Let me guess the street Park Avenue would be me but come on? You know the silver spoon but we get Andy's Andy's mother one is zero is still living in the apartment that Andy grew up in and my brother is all Jamie Jamie's just a couple of options with the corona virus. I'm worried right. And so our Allen so Alemanno Kaelin Kaelin who we love. Kaelin sent Andy. Text a text of a tweet announcing saying no not tweet. No it was just text. Yeah just at Ted Breaking New York City. Subways are all closed down but they will only close one at a time. Something Click on the attached Matt Map for the latest details right and then it said something. We need everyone to be careful and Please stay it look very official. So let's just unpack this for a second but right actually was okay. I saw the texts on these phone. Andy then forwarded the texts to us. It did not look at all official. Okay it's not a tweet. It's not it's just words with a link and then more words but that's the word sound like they're in for nine hundred and ninety nine people out of a thousand would do what I mary. Well the click on the link. Yet you WANNA know he wanted to you know. Let me explain thing Kaelin Allen. Who's been nothing but sweet nice to me. I'm thanking. He knows that my family is there. So I'm just GonNa cut and paste this whole thing explaining that you're not going to check it Kaelin's Nelson to my brother and my link here just going to send it to a minute of sending it to my brother and my mother my mother rights E E K and I go what. Subways grossed out by the subway. And then it's even on the TV. You can't take a joke in turn on me and then. Jamie my brother goes. Lol this is awesome and my mother then writes this is your distributing pornography. You're distributing pornography. What is she talking about? So then he finally after all that and he goes. Oh I better on what I just sent them and when you click on it. There is a man there naked with one of the largest dependable edge of bed. It's literally hanging over the edge of the. Oh my goodness I sent this to my eighty one year old mother out of concern and my brother that subways are closing in news. It was it. Would you say it was the largest appendage ever sent to your mother and and this all happened what I need to say here. Is this all happened with Mary? Ed and Kevin in the room so in real time it was so they're watching me freak. God losing my mind you know. There's not a lot of great news these days. There's a lot of like there's just. It's not a lot of great news. I'm telling you the laughter that happen your poor mother really. I was on my podcast to convey to listeners. The amount of activity that occurs on an hourly basis on Andy's phone the operation. That is good day long on. I don't know how he doesn't Freia has my whole life. It's here he has. It has nothing to do with you not having a computer. It is spectacularly about the number of people that you are interacting all day long and then no time to click links because you just like a forward this over here forward that over there. I gotTA start coming in here. I got over here to take everyone informed. I would doing it because I understand because I want to read this to my listeners listeners. Because here's the think Andy and everything that's going on is is genuinely well connected with real sources of news. People hailing people with real news information. Yes tell you think Kaylin Alan who who the last time. He texted me was because we were shooting something like He. We don't have this relationship where we joke around with each other and he knows might sound. You're not true. We joke around with each other on twitter. Okay but silly. Listen listen my listeners. I want you to listen. He won't you mayor and your behavior. Mayor Bill De Blasio. This is what I get mayor. Bill de Blasio officially closes New York City subway system beginning three eleven twenty twenty outage map lists closing by station legionary with southern through reading not news. It's truly truly truly not news from Kale and to Andy. New York City occasionally goes into lockdown as it tries to contain the virus. Please Tell Your New York New Jersey family to stay safe. Click the link for more INFO. Song sounds great. What do you think Kaylin thought you were GONNA do? He'd think Amy's going to send us through his eighty quick question. Then you're just subway. Please tell but Jamie and my mind. Crushing the link. Usa TODAY DOT COM is at the Washington Times the nearest and why do sent to everyone? Why Colin backslash or it will say like it might be New York one could be New York the link. I didn't read the whole thing. It's nothing it's just numbers but it does say it when I first looked at it said http dot slash slash PBS dot. So I'm like okay so public television is giving out this as another thousand. So what happened. I said my mother man with a penis so big he sitting on the edge of a bed that it hangs over this and halfway down to the ground I've never average in and I sent it to my mother that penises average. You guys I hate to tell it to you. I'm in big trouble. My Gosh. It was so funny every that I know it was fantastic fantastic. It's a good lesson. What's the lesson it's a good lesson for your crazy aunts uncles? Who are forty around facebook articles? Sometimes you need to read a little bit deeper. I didn't read full. Disclosure a full disclosure. My mother's in Orthodox. It's just so you know. I love jokes like that. Let's see eighty one year. Old Mother is also an Orthodox Jew known this woman on the planet. So that's what happened here. Sorry Danielle Oh gosh. Let's talk about something much more pleasant Ellen's friend. International Star Justin timberlake appeared on the show. This he hasn't done much lately no he's just always shows up just ready to go ready to have fun ready to love on. Ellen affection for each other when they sit down together believe he was on the second show. We ever did say that. I was Jennifer Aniston the second and then it was a slippery slope from there. Yeah but yeah that's right but he what I loved about. This appearance was that in his second act. He brought out his two of his Co stars from the trolls movie. I believe it's called trolls. World tour. Wait we've known Jennifer Aniston Justin Timberlake for seventy years. That is unbelievable. They've held up better than we have. They have yeah. They look exactly what they have a lot more money. That's your money makes good. You're GonNa Bang those feet the whole time now. I'm GonNa Stop Right now. And and he brought so two of his Co stars were Anderson Pack. Who's been on the show before the hotel in hip hop Barmby Star? He's just so talented. Anderson pack has a song called comedown which we play minimum once twice a week here and then the other voice in the movie was scissor and ride just have such a crush on. Says she is And I used to say his in his She has by the way has a song with Kendrick. Lamar might be called all the stars and she's on the cover of rolling stone right now with normany and Megan the stallion and she was on the show with them and they were both so fun and they were like dancing in the commercial breaks. It was super cool but will play a clip. Let's play clip of the three of them together on the show. So you are just on the here in soundtrack. You're not in the movie that is you are in the movie. Yes and on the Soundtrack Creek and do we want to tell everybody what this new movie is about? Even just clip and trolls. Yes trolls trolls. No so basically you know in our second movie and Kendricks character and my character We find out that. We're not the only type of trolls and that there's all these different sort of tribes of trolls in the represented by a different genre of music We find out where the pop trolls. And there's the funk trolls which you saw the techno trolls Classical country Western. So what happens is that's Kelly Clarkson's character. She crushes it in the movie too. And what happens? Is they basically go without sounding too much more? Like I'm intoxicated. They they they go on a on adventure To try to save music and it's hilarious. It's it's twice as funny as the as the first one and and sort of a movie about diversity and inclusion and and I I think that's a timely theme right now all yes you know how we should embrace how everybody's so different and that's a wonderful thing and So yeah and Anderson it. How did you get involved with Justin? Did y'all know each other before you must have. I think mayhem like most people like on instagram twitter and stuff right. We hadn't really met in rural just just like a huge fan you know since I was younger since high school just being out of high school parties dances Justin timberlake album classic. But yeah you get me up. He's like y'all put in a good. We're free the trolls thing. Don't blow it man they call you know what I'm saying. I was like well. You want me to music on Downey's like now you. Actually they want your voice they want you to be in like what okay and says. I saw because I texted. You said love the what you posted the video that. I saw all working together. Had You met Justin? I had an have no idea how we're GONNA do. You know I was just still don't know I'm grateful for the blessing WANNA know. How do I was like shut up? You're doing great. Everything is great for killing. Thank you missed one fund moment when you were gone on Friday. What's that Andy looked at the board and sauces name our listeners? Who Don't know it's spelled. S? And he goes okay so what is Who is a assault? GonNa Sing. Do they like WHO's and repair? And it's like a hundred I honestly. You're like trapped in the trap and can't get asked away and I became him immediately. You were kind of him before he passed away. Yeah no shit. I 'cause I was like shit like everybody's like those guys are doing a game of games episode that we just listen to. I don't know when I think I love that. We are they doing the dangerous doing another. It was like a whole trolls. Takeover release fantastic by the way we mentioned right. That are a little game. Show got renewed. I say ours is Really Kevin. Is Really. It's really Kevin and friends and renewed for season. Four we did and we still have eight now a couple of preempted this season for debates and Super Tuesday and stuff like that. It's back now. It's back for Multiple Tuesdays in a row gone and it's so good it's such a show and I promise you if you watch it like there's nothing on it that's GonNa bring you down. It's just happy that's all it is. You're just gonNA feel good. Yeah and if you don't WanNa feel good don't watch it good. Watch it if you WANNA feel bad. Don't don't discuss spoiler alert. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA talk now we're going to have. We have two more areas left to think any listeners left of this. Oh No with we promote that story about the link we're going to play and monologue that. Ellen did which was tips to stay entertained right. Yep Somehow to be entertained giving quarantine so we're gonNA play that And then after that. We're going to talk about the latest development of on how the corona virus which is now officially pandemic has affected our tapings. Here sure so. Let's play the monologue. I anything you want to say by way of introduction here it is thank you so much. I love each and every single one of you but if I so much here sniffle sneeze. You're Outta here. Obviously all anybody is talking about is a corona virus and as we know it. It's important to stay home if you're feeling sick. This is totally unrelated to anything but Mary. How are you feeling? Oh my God where is she? She's not here she's home. She's not feeling well she's I knew she wasn't the whole bit I was doing. I was pretending yes. She's she's feeling not well enough to be near me. So that's that's why she's home. Some people are home. Some people might even be quarantined. Been told that we are the number one TV show for people under quarantine so thank you everybody. Thank you if you're not familiar with quarantine it's fourteen days. You can't leave Your House. You have to blow into a tube every twelve hours and you have to wear a bracelet on your ankle. I'm thinking of my time house arrest. If you're stuck at home I thought I could offer some ways to pass the time. Of course. There's lots of good things to watch on television. Love is blind. It'd been watching. It's about dating through pods which is now looking better and better really if this virus keeps going. That's how we're dating from now on if you're into movies there's the fast and furious movie for everyday of your quarantine and when you make it to make it to. Hobson show your free so chance for people who have seen all the movies if you like. Games I've got a boatload I shouldn't say boatload I have. I have a lot of games. I have a heads up where you can safely play six feet apart from someone else. There's game of games you can watch. People play blindfolded musical chairs and taste buds. And you can see all the fun that we used to have when we can still touch each other all right. So here's where we are the week. This was a week this was this was. This was a big week. I mean look. We're we're we all still got to work for now for the most part. Were not working from home to do our show. Not Some of our guests have cancelled not a lot of them. For example we were supposed to have savannah. Guthrie was supposed to actually be airing today. Nbc is not allowing their talent to travel right now. Carrie Washington was supposed to be here earlier in the week it canceled. She was a story for months. And now it's a story that's hit us a little bit like someone on our staff. Is it known on? Our staff has interacted with anyone. Who has it so it's still? It's still a bit remote. But but because of the way the world is reacting to it things have started to happen here and the latest is that we have decided on the heels. Frankly we're not the first to make this decision on the heels of a lot of other shows who are who live studio. Audiences canceling their audiences and doing their shows without audiences mainly at first in New York in New York City. But now here in L. A. Maybe maybe we're one of the first comedy shows in La to do this but effective Monday so three days from now. We are doing shows at least for now without studio audiences. You you may see shows that air studio audiences because they were recorded before this policy took effect but just because we want if you have an increased risk of of exposure to this virus by being in a big group of people you know. Our audience holds anywhere from three hundred to four hundred people. On a given day. When you include riffraff and sky box and all that and we don't WanNa do anything to elevate the risk of our studio audience of our Audience Department who interacts with the studio audience of our guests of Twitch Ellen and so we're doing it without audiences which is not nearly as fun as doing it with audiences and just want to say one thing to all our listeners. However many are out there and I don't mean this in a political way I just mean this as an honest human being. Cdc Center for Disease Control. Who World Health Organization both have websites? I implore you to go to those two sources for your news and information on the coronas. Do not get fooled by me. Because as Mary started the program saying there is a lot of misinformation and sometimes an idiot like me will send that misinformation. Say that the wild large penis to his mother. The Washington Post has worked their. Their team has been working around the clock to assemble corona virus facts and information and they they are a very safe place to go to get accurate information about any like whatever your question is. Let's air question is about travel. Or how susceptible you are or which groups are most vulnerable or all the all those questions. I think have accurate answers to the best of their knowledge on The Washington Post Web site as well. I feel like the answer to this. But since Ed you and Mary these are your People Ireland canceling their Saint Patrick's Day. Well W W is gigantic right. That's a big thing and today. New York cancelled as for the first time in two hundred fifty eight years Boston. Boston cancelling it. Yeah that's a really big deal. I say we work really really hard to take care of her audiences. They are such a huge part of our show. The writers like to work on Games. They get to play with. We built a reference. They feel excluded is what kills us. These people have been looking forward to coming here. I Apologize How many people travel your presence will be missed here. Yes yes yes it's going to be. It's going to be an interesting time for all of us. Yes sort of see how. The show's look without a studio audience. And just know that we know the the shows are better if we have a studio and obviously on behalf on behalf of the show and on behalf of Ellen. We apologize to everybody that Kevin brought this virus into our country. The one bright spot. Yeah to not having a studio audience is that we often do audience giveaways and I happen to know that next week one day next week there was an audience giveaway plant where everyone in the audience. Yeah was going to get going to get a gift card now. Yeah we're going to give away all of those giveaways to viewers watching the show via our website. Ellen to kind of figure out how to how to try to win the giveaways that we give away to our audience. Our studio audience will not be here. So we're going to give them to our home audience. Nice yeah banker on your favorite. But let's ask this question. If we get quarantined we the podcast will continue. We will figure it out because I think a lot of listeners are worried what happens if Andy God forbid gets the virus and I'm here to say that I will be coming to you live broadcasting from well older the state of your fragile health. I'm not sure what are they saying? What is the line? Everyone is saying my kids school ever in wanted out of an abundance of caution. Okay got it by caution. Yeah I read. I think our school said out of an abundance of concern. Oh that's good I have A. I have a daughter who is a senior at Nyu and why you is now taken and in the law school included. I believe has taken all of their classes to online classes. Yeah and my daughter is absolutely crushed by this news now going to class. I don't go in class. I just know that she's really last year. Yes she's in her last year. Now I have a son who goes to. Usc also doing their classes online house. You four not happy. Happy my kids school as soon as this started becoming a thing. Set up the system to make sure it's ready to go in case so they know how to log on. Teachers are doing tele lessons or whatever and they're like it's school from home without our friends. There so bummed about it. Yeah yeah they'll babies. I think that's eight kids. All I can say now is keep. Keep watching the show. I hope you'll watch the show every day. They're going to be the show coming up for you going to be really interesting interesting. They're going to be interesting and we're going to see what it's all like and we're going to the fun thing is we're all. GonNa Learn together next week shows include Kerry Washington Dan Levy from Shits Creek. Heidi Klum we have some great with some cool bands. We have one Republican your tennis. If you know if j Galvin we're gonNA decorate stuff coming. We're going to have to hold Ellen's hand through this process because as you know despite the huge amount of requests we do this podcast without an audience so we know we know how it feels. We don't even doesn't even air to an audience. There's no audience present in the room. There's also no audience. What might still listen. How many episodes have we done of the podcast? Yeah I don't know hundreds right and we know sort of how it goes today. We have Jackie Dunbar filling in for Daniel leary right. And she's holding up a sign to make sure people subscribe as if Ed has done that one hundred fifty times. That's her big help you. Us does giant signed says. Tell people to subscribe in doing this for Jackie Dunbar. Here you go subscribe today on Apple podcasts on spotify or wherever. You're listening to this podcast right now. Jackie Dunbar and don't forget to watch Ellen Weekdays for even more Ellen Fund. Goodbye everything everybody Porsche. We would so love to know more about you here on the go please. Head over to wondering DOT COM slash survey. It's a really short survey. That will help. Make this show better. The wonder re DOT COM Slash Survey W. O. N. D. E. R. Y. dot com slash survey. We'd really appreciate hearing from you.

Twitch Ellen Andy Kevin Kevin Justin timberlake Justin Bieber Justin Mary New York City Ed Glavin Your House Jackie Dunbar Jamie Jamie ELLEN DEGENERES Anderson Pack Kaelin Allen La Kaylin Alan Jennifer Aniston Andy Lansner David Beckham
Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda, Allison Janney, Robin Roberts

Ellen on the Go

36:55 min | 2 years ago

Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda, Allison Janney, Robin Roberts

"Hi, it's Ellen Degeneres. Welcome to my podcast. We're gonna listen to some of the best moments from the show, and it's going to be hosted by four executive producers that I love happy listening on today's episode of Ellen on the go lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda, the iconic lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda, aka grace and Franky DIGI a f about anything Nate seltzer surprises fellow kid expert and fan. Landon. Gregory. I was fantastic. Allison Janney is looking for her new lover and his name is hot pants. True story, Robin Roberts plays around of blanking news and Ellen celebrates the most popular egg on instrument. Hello everyone. I'm Mary Connolly. Andy lasts ner, Kevin Lima's Edward Patrick Lavin. And welcome to another episode were happy to have you. And thank you for listening, and my son this morning, which said do you ever look at how many stars your podcast has? And I go no you have five stars and fourteen hundred reviews. You're kidding. Wow. Wow. I was blown away under and Ian, friends or. He never looking at Ellen on the go. And they they're like I mean stuff on yelp doesn't even get five stars. I don't know if perhaps Kevin paid people to send reviews, but do your boys listened to the podcast occasionally on the way to school. They say can we listen to that radio show? You do would you give them around? I will. Hi, ethan. And Ryan while that was really the best right? Hi. Hi, ryan. So glad you listened to the podcast. They don't like Kevin shout out to all the bought. So did those reviews? Thank you. Shoutout to do you think it's Russians? I think those are rushing. Yeah. Oh my God. There is worse for America than Trump than this podcast. They're trying to influence handy. They're trying to get you in there. So these aren't real my gosh, this is going to be fun to watch. Now. We'll see how Andy suddenly starts thinking the Russians. This is fascinating never thought of it until I never thought to look at our ratings talk about lily Tomlin, and Jane lily Tomlin, and Jane Fonda, I love them so much when I was in high school lily Tomlin was on Broadway in a show called appearing nightly, and she was had a one woman show on Broadway. And it was unbelievable. It was fantastic. And I knew her from Laffin, and I knew her from that. And she's she do Letterman wishy Letterman 'cause she used to do Letterman. Yeah. She used to do Letterman, and it's so much fun to see she and Jane Fonda on grace and Franky and on this was they have all these young viewers. I think I just saw your nephew on TB. Mary. Really? Yeah. May. But just so everyone knows Mary's nephew works with Nancy Pelosi. Yeah. And is pretty high up in that. Tell you a little time Mary's political bent. Yeah. So she every time you see Nancy Pelosi on the news like walking from one meeting to another. There's Mary's nephew, which I think is very cool. But that's not what we were saying. So anyway, young people love this Franken, grace grace, and Frankie grace and Franky everyone. I know who started watching it as like, Debbie, I have watched. So my daughter, Emily, who's twenty four fell in love with grace and Franky and kept telling me to watch it. And like I do with most of the people. I love the most. I did not listen. That's all ready for an extended period of time. And then I when I truly ran out of things to watch. I thought let me try this grace and Franky and two episodes in I began wondering why the hell I never listened to people when they recommend. I love it so much. We've seen every episode where I think the new one starts out will now came out last Friday dropped last Friday, and they're just amazing together on on grace and Franky for whatever reason I didn't have such huge expectations of them together on the Ellen show. I didn't think they were going to be grace and Franky either they're going to be lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda, which they were and their chemistry together. They're just like endurable. Larry's both names. Billy hasn't been here. Five times. She hasn't been here. Ten times she'd never been here before. Not one thing. I know lily Tomlin had never been here. See how give Ellen her Mark Twain prize rise. That's right. And it's just it was so fun to see how they are really sharp and funny. She is the timing that they have for the I just wanted to. I just want to go on a road trip with them. They just make me laugh lily, just I dunno lily, just just she is the perfect complement to. And Jane, just like has amazing comic timing has a little slow burn has a little look has a little thing. And then we did questions. Right. I don't think we call it. We didn't call it burning questions for them. But we we ask them questions. And the question we asked was describe each other in one word. Wow, I love and it was quite a moment. Take a listen. Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda, and we're gonna play a question game in honor of the seasons a grace and Franky it's called lily in. Jane, don't give I apologized for that. That's the name of the game. And I didn't I didn't write it. But that's the theme was the it's the theme. You know, you get old and then who gives them right? Right, right. The theme this season is I don't give them right? So I'm gonna hit a button and random questions where oh up on you have to both answer. Honestly with the first thing that comes to mind. All right. Your best some immersed celebrity crush. Oh, Tony Curtis. Okay. Dorothy malone. Yeah. Okay. Started early. Something everyone loves, but you hate mashed potatoes. I love him. I was wrong. I don't know. Why said that? Jane cooked, bananas of any kind. All right. Do you want to redo Rex yourself? Now, you've lost the Hispanic audience. I'm not running for office. It doesn't matter. Right. I'm going to say, I I hate cotton balls. I don't know who likes him. But I hate cotton button ball. I don't even want to say the word. Okay. Let's go. Your go-to excuse to get out of something. I'm old. Try again. This bribe each other in one word adroitness. Totally. You'd like to do a love scene with lamb Newson. Or Mike Shelton. Yellen shelton. Oh, Blake Shelton lily. Oh. Dorothy malone. Die. We. I'm not going to say, I know I know there's enough of that going around anyway. I have a hard time answering this. Okay. Because honestly, I I love Jane. I can't it's hard for me to think of say that's the right. I know that's the right answer. Because you're telling me, it's the right end. Ways. All right. The new season of grace and Franky is available on Netflix. This friday. We'll be right back. So the questions was called Jane lily, don't give a f. Which is the theme of their show this season. And and and there and true if they were to form they didn't give and they haven't for a long time. So that's really fun. And so I'm sure it's still on your DVR, so go, you should really watch the whole interview. It's it's they were they were two or three acts and they were fantastic. And lily eighty years old is in I think jeans and a Ruth Bader Ginsburg shirts shirt with a jacket over at an rose colored glasses looking just as cool as all get out. I mean, and Jane who had on just an insanely beautiful suit was regretting that she wasn't wearing a shirt as cool as lily's. We'd love them. We do. And you know, Mary when I'm when I made a you're gonna come put some flowers at my headstone. I'm gonna will you to wherever you want a guy. Let's talk about another pair that we had. We had we had high expectations for this pair. And this pair did not disappoint. So if you're if you're a regular fan of the show, you know, Nate seltzer is our young boy kid geography six year old geography. Right. Right. And so we have him on every couple of months, and we and we love this kid, and he's so sweet. And so funny, and so cute. He's awkward and brilliant. Yep. We learned about another six-year-old geography expert name landing Craig Orie who was a huge fan of Nate seltzer 's and wanted to meet Nate seltzer because he thought they would be friends because they have lots in common because they love the each love geography, so we head landing Gregory on. And then we surprised him the way that Ellen can just embrace the awkwardness of two six year old boys meeting each other for the first time on national. Television. It's just nobody else can do that. It's just so fun in amazing. And why would you be in a hurry to get any place other than moment? This e what they were like, and I think if you listen to it you'll also hear how adorable it is. Doc was six year old geography expert, Landon Gregory, I have a surprise for you because you wanted to meet Nate. And so I thought Nate should come here and meet you so Nate come on out Nate this land in land and this is Nate Highland. Hi. So he's also six years old, and he's been on the show so many times. So he's so comfortable on here. He's like a big star. You get recognized all the time now Nate. Yeah. Both of you. Okay. So you have a fan you have a fan in Landon. How's that feel to have a fan? Awesome. Yeah. Yeah. Have you had a fan before? Yeah. Yeah. You know, what a fan, you know, what that means to have a fan. Yeah. What does it mean? It means to someone in Meyer someone else. That's exactly right. And he admires you because you and how long have you been knowing about geography he it's been since mid-july for him. I known geography sent sells four four so like a year before. So but y'all it seems like he knows a lot. Did you watch him? And just you saw you do all those what's your favorite country. I think mine is probably going to be. See? If so many to choose. Yeah. There are. There are you could just make one up. What what what what the country like China China? Okay. Do you like China also? Yeah. It's great. Do you have any advice for land? And since you've been here before this is first time. Yeah. I have two roles. Oh, okay. We'll number one always have fun. We'll number two. What's into rule number one? What do you think those rules? Yeah. Yeah. Pretty good. All right. So you only going to be best friends. Right. Yes. So what's your favorite thing about Nate? Would you say what do you like about Nate so much? He's just like me. Yeah. Okay. What's your favorite thing about Landon that he's even smarter than me? On TV. I saw I heard things that I didn't know. Geography about what what didn't you know, the capital, Chad? How about that? You knew something they didn't know or the capital, Philippines, or the capital of Philippines. Can you believe that? Here's a guy that you wanted to me. And you you know, if you more things than he does. How? Sure, y'all should be best friends because you can teach each other different things, you can learn a lot from each other. All right. And you brought land gift, right? Okay. Tell me what this is landed Russia activity book. Because he knew that this was your favorite country. So what kind of activities are in here? A word set. Wait, okay. There's it. Okay. I read it. Okay. Bossy. I hope you have a great time on the Ellen show. I hope you enjoy the activity book love Nate. And there's he drew the two of you right there next to each other. Okay. Okay. So what is this? It's a word censorsh-. Okay. Then he's got to find the words. And then what else is in here. Washing phrases, rushing alo- get by and there's no collusion. Do you ever think about wanting to create a healthier routine? It's all I think about every day. I make deals with myself. I just wanna be healthier. And it's like, and I don't have the time at home to cook. And take care of things. All I did. With New Year's resolutions was set myself up yet to be disappointed myself. So I just don't do them. Well, mary. So here's the thing. Gobbles meal. Prep. Delivery service is an easy and delicious way to create a habit. Yes, they have a healthier routines gobbles, so good. Here's the thing. With gobble, no matter. How busy things get you. And your family can make healthy homemade dinner in fifteen minutes. You haven't seen any minutes that I can do gobble picks. They do they pick out the highest quality ingredients. They take care of all the time consuming work like peeling chopping thing. Creating the perfect south about them. Just pick up gobbles extensive menu each week, including low carb vegetarian gluten and dairy free options. I'm gonna say it again, low carb vegetarian. Gluten and dairy free option. This week is featuring bistro hamburgers. Yaman with Swiss cheese. Ball saw red onions salsa Verde spinach enchiladas with corn black bean rice chicken Marsala with broccoli and or Izzo pasta. I mean, come on start the new year off right by trying gobble. They're offering our listeners. This fantastic limited time deal. Fifty dollars off your first box of meals. That's insane. That's fifty dollars is a listen. It's only available. If you go to our special URL, go now to gobble dot com slash Ellen for fifty dollars off. That's gobble dot com. So I shall an Andrew what? Now you to talk at all. Pay. You wanna like maybe put you phone down during the cast. What are you talking about sorry Janney? Love Allison Janney happen to be a neighbor really don't wanna drop. But I have a lot of celebrities in my neighborhood how close because then it'll give it away and. Where you live very close to my how close twenty houses like have you ever seen her in the neighborhood? Yes. But I didn't bother but she's an exerciser. She's an avid exerciser. So you see her walk in this. Yes. So you see her? She does a lot of running and walking. And I've seen her. I mean, but she's just one of many Mary, really. Yeah. I'm very celebrity late in neighborhood. But let's not talk about that. Johny who won the Oscar last year, I tone. You Tanya, I Tanya, she was brilliant. It's a four year this week for mom and honestly for mom, honestly. I'm not kidding fifty appearances on our like, she has been a lot since the west wing, right? Yes. I feel like she has been on our show once a season at least many times more sixteen. We're in our sixteen season. She's been on like twenty seven times. Okay. Twenty seven I said fifty exaggerate in here is better at math than you're. Yes. That's true. But yes, she's always good. She has a great relationship with L. And she's always talking about her dating life. She's just very candidate. But she's an amazing actress like she was she was ridiculous in the movie that she got the Academy Award for. Yes. She's great on mom. She was amazing in the west wing. She she is an incredible. Actress Allison and Ellen. We're talking about their beliefs and psychic and who had a better psychic very hilarious. Yes. And Allison's psychic told her to the man was coming into her life and his name. Hot pants, right? He was going to be known as Mr. hot pants, and she has been living her life. She began working began working out and dressing better and going out it used to be a homebody. And now she's going out of meetings. She certain she's gonna be she's not sure where and thinking every time she gets an invite somewhere, she should go because this hot pants. So what if you're for I send something when I walked up to the stage. She sort of looked at me like are you? She's never seen someone so fat. I hate you. Uncalled for. This is all about me having a lot of celebrities in my neighborhood. Take a listen, I heard that you're single, but that that may change what's happening. Well, what does that mean in may change? I don't know about you. But I like to go see psychic Stu, I do like it. It's kind of interesting I went to the psychic. And she kept saying she kept seeing this this man that was gonna come into my life. And she said I want to. I mean, I'm seeing a lot of things I see in in the bedroom. And this man is going to be all my he's I'm seeing a lot of things he's doing too. Well, I'm just gonna call him. I'm gonna call them hot pants. So she's called him hot pants. And now this was a couple of months ago, and I still haven't found hot pants, but I keep looking for him keeps making me. Like, I go do things. I don't usually do just because I'm gonna go get the old change in my car because maybe hop pants will be there. It's getting me out of my house. I don't know if that's what she was really trying to do. But I keep I doing more things. I usually do because I think that had pants is going to hear that. That's so weird that she sees. What's your doing in the bedroom that she's she's visualizing you with someone else? That's kind of weird barris about what she was saying. It was weird. But she also said a lot of other things that have come true. So what we'll I can't. I'm. Scott. Alright those things. No, I do believe in them because I see I actually talked to someone on a regular basis. And she's yes, she's been right about like crazy. Anyway, there could be the same person as your name Gye. No. Then it's not. Mine is named Wendy. She's not good from what I've heard. Yeah. I asked my psycho better. And she said. I don't know Wendy. Can I give you an exclusive games clip for the podcast? I have one how about us getting renewed for season three days and grabbing Jila shame games. Congratulations. You so, you know, whenever we talk game of games, we always give extra. Congratulations to Kevin you do because the three Mary Ed and Andy are fortunate enough to be part of the executive producing team. But really the games and the mechanics of the games are all from the demented brain of Kevin Leman. So so the reason we give him a shout out is because we feel fortunate to be included. We do it all together, we do it together. And obviously, obviously, it's true. And and it wouldn't work without me involved. But I'd like to give Kevin do, but it is funny because on Twitter everyone's like who comes up with this. And I'm like, I wish you would meet Kevin Leman and understand how insane and heaven has. Here's here's three. Kevin has three or here's what the three of us deserve credit for. Yes. We knew early on that Kevin Leman had was going to know just has an imagination that is. You just don't see it every day. You just don't see it every day. And so when you do you you you time up for the rest of his life. And even when he thinks getting out you pull him back in. Well, we knew you know, we knew he had an imagination and we knew he needed friends. And we also knew that he'd be. But Kevin is a great example of that kid in school that, you know, you'll you'll make fun of and didn't fit in whatever. But we saw we saw something in him because nobody else wanted to hire him. No one wanted him. And we said, you know, what let's give this kid a chance we do need to dedicate a whole episode one day to Kevin lemans obsession. And when I say obsession, I'm actually under selling it with Disney and how he grew up obsessed with that because it's a whole. Here's the point the point is a brand new game games. Yes. That's what we were getting one of Ellen's favourite. Slowly, what else favorite contestants is on tonight? He is everything he says is laugh out. Loud hilarious. I'm excited for him. And one of our favorite games. Don't leave me hanging. Oh, yeah. Because they're under pressure. And they give insane answers because you have three contestants tethered to. They're all tied into ropes that will get yanked through the ceiling. If they give the wrong answers. There's a lot of pressure to answer fast and correct as such night. We just get some of the craziest answers, and here's the very first round of only hanging from chides episode and enjoy -joy Joey. Start with you celebrities whose name starts with a W. Wendy Williams, lending Williams. That is right. We'll farrell. Okay. My god. Oh my God. There's so many of them. Tennis player on. Sorry, you're gonna what was the tennis players. Name would good matter. Anyway. Yeah. To sites and what he Harrelson Whoopi Goldberg. Yeah. I love that show. Of that show. I love watching that show with my kids. It's it really is family entertained when you think of a game. Like don't leave me hanging. You've three people they're sitting there, and they're tethered to this thing that's going to pull them up into the air and on the third pull it literally Yanks them into the rafters is it based on anything in your head. You see something where you go. Oh, I have an I like how does it happen in your head that you come up with a game started with dirty title? It was originally called fire down below that. That's right. Very often. Kevin is told us this before, but very often the ideas start with the title, I could title, then I got very excited when we got the primetime show to rename it by Felicia, right? And we all love the title NBC, not so much. No. Nope. Then I think it went through three other talent changes before we settle Dali hanging. But we work primarily at NBC with three people game of games. We sure does Yanni groom. Yes. Sahara Bush shoe before do issue and Steve Ridgway. Yes. And we are very very long and Paul to lead. The of course, who run the whole thing though, ship for regionally the guy we originally pitched the concept too big for under told Brunen British year or stralia something with an accent. Meredith is joined the team. Oh. Oh, she's wonderful lovely. I love everyone at NBC. We're very team over there. And I'm sure our viewers really love this talk about executives from television. Keep. Get you want keep. On their right to Paul till? I love. Anything you have about NBC call. He loves taking calls. Speaking of games, Robin Roberts Ellen played a great game. They did play great bits called blanking. News summit usually Ellen into which play. But since we had Robin Roberts who's the Queen of the news here. We thought we'd try it. Bad news is she's cleaning the news. Yes. I love her love her. She loves you love when Robin has come anytime own struggles in life, and has always been joyful, and I just love her. She's a good human being she's been through some stuff, ma'am. She sure has here's how that went. So you're on a and I thought it'd be fun to play a game. We call blanking news. So I'm gonna read a news headline, and it's missing one or two words, and then twitch, and you and I which is really good. He always wins. Here's the first one. To blank are accused of stealing five hundred thousand dollars in spending it on gambling and vacations. Two nuns. That's good. Guess. I'm gonna say children. I'm gonna say to. To seniors to seniors. Okay. We've got arrange here. All right. Let's say two nuns accused of embezzling. Many gambling. That's not fair here. You do the news. Every you probably knew that. Twitch we're up against somebody. Who knows the news? All right. Here's a Necker island. Texas woman wakes up from surgery with thick. Last time we had a blank blank was grilled cheese. But that's not gonna work. This is going to be stupid, and it's not going to be right at all with thick. It's true. Testicular glands. Listen, it couldn't be more wrong than that. I know. But that that's what will make it. Crazy. Now would make the news. I'm gonna say Fiqh, arm hair. Arm here. I don't know. All that. I can think of with quitting awareness. All right. I'm not sure that the sentence. But. All right. Bizarre story Texas woman who woke up from surgery with thick British accent. That. Yes, you should know. Yes. We were wrong. All right, next one woman attack parents because they wouldn't take her to. Ten women Eric Paris because they wouldn't take her to her to. I did see this. I saw this in the news. So I have I withdraw myself recusing. Yes. Because yes, I know what this is woman attacked parents because they wouldn't take her to. Taco bell. People get cranky about food. See your Taco Bell and raise you Burger King. All right. All right. All right. What is the floor woman is accused of attacking her elderly parents because they wouldn't take her to outback steakhouse. Blooming onion. Good Morning, America airs, weekdays on ABC. We will be right back, Robin. Who here has liked the Instagram post of the egg? I have not I'm not on the ground. I have I don't think I did you didn't like it. I don't think I followed it followed the world you followed the egg. Do we have someone come forward saying they are the like was it a person? I don't think anybody cares. If anybody I think the original person came forward who said let's beat everything was he has an egg or last. I heard correct me if I'm wrong if you for update our team reached out to the egg, and they're keeping the identity secret and didn't want reveal who's behind the Kimmel listing. Probably I don't know if they were point during the UK, I believe, so if you're unfamiliar with the right? This is this is a human being who opened an Instagram account with an and posted one thing in the name of the Instagram account. I believe is world eg and said, let's get this to be the most liked Instagram pick ever. Yeah. And and it has and it quickly surpassed like nineteen. Views that it had led the record of of Kardashian barely Jenner. Jenner showing stormy store. I I just holding your finger. Yeah. There's been hand. Yeah. That had that had eighteen million. This thing has will. But does it have now? Can you check? Let's I'm gonna guess that. It has thoroughly music. I'm gonna guess into this thirty million likes. It's insane. Oh, no. It was it was it was more than that. Wasn't. Yeah. Are are wonderful Kevin Leman decides. That would if we if the Ellen show posts combination of Kylie Jenner and the. How could you not right? You would think that would be amazing that I was kind of correct? And that seven million seven reelect, real eggs. Ars four has gotten to four million. We started all this nonsense. I should give Ellen the credit. We started all this nonsense with nonsense with the Oscar selfie. We sure did we're responsible at the yourself was before. There was a thing called Instagram. Anything up at four point three point four anything on the internet and started with us. Just remember, what did you say? You said he was saying that it all started with ourself. And I just said we're kind of responsible for everything that's good in the world. And remember that time when Ellen was hosting the Oscars. Andy got into Twitter fight with Trump, and then he blocked them. That's right. My favorite thing about our poses. Lindsay Lohan posted crying, laughing emojis love right away. That's anyone watch your new show. No, I wanna watch it. I don't. So. So back to the one just one last time. I just love when Ellen in the writers taken event like that in pop culture and run at it like the second that it becomes the thing. And I just don't think anybody does that better. Yeah. We're just so good at what we do. God, I know a lot of you look at this show is an escape. And sometimes I have to talk about things that are going on in the world that that are serious. No matter how serious they are. So today, this is what I saw in the news Instagram most like post is now a photo of aid. Must be a sexy. Tell you that this is the most popular Instagram posts. I don't it doesn't do anything for me. But I don't judge. So here's what happened. Do you know about this anybody some people know, all right? Well, ten days ago, someone started Instagram account and posted this AIG and said, let's set a world record together and get the most like post on Instagram beating the current world record held by Kylie Jenner and says we got this. So kylie's photo that they're referring to is this one that she posted last year with her baby, which is a precious photo. And it has over eighteen million likes. And I understand that that's beautiful picture. So that was the record holder, but not anymore. Now that AIG has. Over forty one million likes. The eggs life has completely changed. I want that on the show egg. If you're listening. I want you on the show. So now that holds the record everyone's going to try to beat the egg. And you know, what happens when you beat today gets homeless? Thank you. I spend it up. So you weren't ahead of me. I. So anyway, I think I know how to break the record. I combine both posts I named it Edward shelling. Jenner the third. And it is working. This now has are most like photo, it has almost four million likes on it. So that's more likes than this photo of me in the rock. That's more than this photo of me. And Julia Roberts somehow it's more likes than this photo of Barack Obama giving me the presidential medal of freedom. Hashtag. But I think this is great because with all the divisiveness that we have going on in the world, we found something that we can all agree on. It's a damn eg. That's what we all agree on at least. It's something it's better than nothing. What you guys we've learned a lot about each other today. It was really good. Acted in India. You really let it like. Yes. Do watch the show. We're having great original shows right on a are. And as I look at our booking board, which you people can't see who are listening. But it's a board that shows all our three weeks of shows coming up with some great names. Coming example, cerebral Ramana was the banks Melissa McCarthy. Mariah Carey the entire cast of the big bang theory. Yeah. I mean, boom, it's it's literally almost my entire block of neighbors. Thing. Just just before we go. You know, we wanna learn more about you guys. And and so our listeners are tell us about yourself. How do we do them? And where where should they go? They can go to Ellen tubes dot com. Tell us about yourself because the folks at wondering wanna know, we wanna know, and we want to give you more of the great content that you want to that you wanna listen to because we really like doing this. And if you like listening to it, that's that's fantastic. And if you don't like it don't tell us that. No that would hurt our feelings, and we are far more sensitive than you would think I'm assuming most of our listeners fell asleep was the podcast before us. We can't next to the stream there just aren't through it. But we appreciate it. I hope you're not driving subscribed today on podcasts or wherever you're listening right now. And don't forget to watch Ellen weekdays for even more Ellen fund. What Mary thanks everybody. I go by. We would so love to know more about to here at Ellen on the go, please head over to wonder dot com slash survey. It's a really short survey that will help make this show better. The wondering dot com slash survey. W O N D E R Y dot com slash survey. We'd really appreciate hearing from you.

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UNDER THE COVER OF DARKNESS

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

2:47:57 hr | 2 years ago

UNDER THE COVER OF DARKNESS

"Never in a million years. Did I imagine when I accepted a job in two thousand seven to work for Donald Trump? That he would one day run for the presidency. To launch a campaign on a platform of hate and intolerance and actively win. The last time I appeared before congress I came to protect Mr. Trump today. I am here to tell the truth about Mr. Trump. I am ashamed of my weakness and my misplaced loyalty of the things. I did for Mr. Trump in an effort to protect and promote him. I am shamed. That I chose to take part in concealing, Mr. Trump's illicit axe rather than listening to my own conscience. I am shamed. Because I know what. Mr. Trump is. He is a racist. He is a con, man. And he is a cheat. Last fall, I plead guilty in federal court to felonies for the benefit of at the direction of an in coordination with individual number one. And for the record individual number one is president Donald J Trump. Over time. I saw his true character revealed. Mr. Trump is a racist. The country has seen Mr. Trump court white supremacists and bigots you have heard him call poorer countries Schiphol's his private in private. He is even worse. He once asked me if I can name a country run by a black person that wasn't a shithole. This was when Barack Obama was president of the United States. And while we were once driving through struggling neighborhood in Chicago, he commented that only black people could live that way. And he told me that black people would never vote for him because they were too stupid. And yet I continue to work for him. The news. Maybe tightening stock about it. Riki soup of money. You've reached native opinion. We are an indigenous information and education radio show and podcast every single week or just about every single week. We talk about current affairs related to and from our own native American perspectives. My name is Michael kicking bear. And with me as always my good friend down there in Florida. What's much warmer than it is here? David gray. All how are you, sir? C O's pointing how's everyone? Oh, all right now, it's snowing here. Man, Robin should make their appearance soon soon. Yeah. Yet when we see the Robbins, we know for fact that much better yardstick that is coming than say a groundhog. I think I think so so yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Wanna say, hey, Karen and chat. Shatt room is open. So if you guys are listening, you want to chime in go to our website at native opinion dot com, there should be audio player at on the home page, click that little chat public's inside that player in you can join Karen others as they step in here. And yeah and Karen says it's knowing there in New Jersey. So see I wasn't lying. We don't lie here on this show. Do we? Not intentionally, but you know, who does lie sometimes. Michael Cohen, Donald Trump. Republican party. Oh, yeah. I think I think Colin is trying to well, obviously, he's trying to lessen his his sentence a little bit and get some leniency. But I think he's still in the truth. This time. I I ten share that as well. And we will definitely get into that a little bit later. So yeah. Yeah. But man, it's been interesting week following that in the. The Throwdown as we say as a result of that. But but anyway, it's all good. It's all good. Let's see we got a pretty full show this this week. We'll do the house cleaning as we always like to say you can reach us here at the show either. While we do it live. It's every Saturday morning now nine AM or as Lisa's the breakfast show. Breakfast show native opinion, ninety m Saturday mornings now, and you can also Email us hosts with an S hosts that native opinion dot com. We're out there on Twitter the Twitter year, as they say, it's at native opinion over there are Facebook page. It's Facebook dot com forward slash native opinion, podcast or website, as we said, aforementioned native, opinion dot com, all of our episodes also post out to YouTube, and we're also podcast so about twenty four to forty eight hours after this live broadcast. We put our show out through our podcast feed, and you can pick that up through apple podcast. Google pike casts radio Republik, Stitcher iheartradio Spotify or again, wherever you download your favorite podcast from you most inevitably find us there. And so by all means, please do so last, but not least I tested it because we haven't gotten voicemail in while. But you can also leave as voice it's eight six zero eight hundred five nine five I tested that yesterday. Still working. So that's all good. So you guys can utilize any of those to reach us here on this show. So. I hit them. Sometimes when I get nervous if you guys ever near like like that. I don't know why it's the weirdest damn thing. I get nervous, and I bang things. This making you nervous. I don't know. There's nothing to be nervous about I guess, but I haven't slept well in like the last four days and just something. It's one of those things man think it's indigenous thing when I feel like something's coming. I get I get edgy. And there's no reason for it. I can't blame it on coffee. Barely had any today. I have I have my big Boba. My big Cup. All right. You're right. You're ready to go go with the hazelnut this morning this morning as on that by stop and shop when you need. When you need to get me to go. Get your big Bubba in Cup of spreads. Oh, no. All right. Yeah. Go ahead. Oh, I'm sorry. Didn't mean to cut you out. You know, we're in episode one sixty three I'm just the numbers just keep climbing. And I'm just I'm always looking like, wow. They are we need. We really do need to do something special for show two hundred alab -solutely. We didn't we did kind of something for show one hundred. But we didn't really I think punch it up. I think we need a bunch of over two hundred. Yeah, we're getting close. In the title of this episode. It's under the cover of darkness. They strike. Thought of when I I read that it was. And did you the the inevitable evil laugh? You know affect. Effect. We will. We'll have to do something for the two double zero. That'll that'll be nice to put on our thinking caps and see what we can come up with. Absolutely, absolutely. But all right. What's watching to listener feedback? Yeah. Let's do that. I'm up. I and this comes to us from listener, Carol, and she says appreciation for truth. And she goes on to say, I can't tell you just how much I appreciate your truthful and solid podcast. Thank you. Thank you. I can't tell you. How much we appreciate you being listener. Absolutely. You literally have saved by sanity in an insane time. Well, I never thought we become therapy. But I'm glad. I wake every morning in disbelief that a creature is that person she mentioned of our country another creature day, medical you. Carol goes on to say. Oh, I love all living things again love. Yeah. Carol goes on to say, I am young seventy year old white lower middle class woman. I'd been an activist for a long time. And I thank you for that. Chicago nineteen sixty eight s NCC push other little stuff. I read the Browns. Bury my heart wounded knee. When it first came out, and my husband found me crying at six AM as I'd finished. Native literature and culture, dear to my heart. I am so grateful. I can listen to some sanity laughter an awakening. Opinions. Wakened opinions. Excuse me. Thank you for in the face of everything that has happened your grace and generosity to deliver. Share this truthful podcast, my many blessing forever, Carol, Carol. Thank you very much for that that vote of confidence. It's much appreciated is deeply deeply appreciate them. Thank you for the activism for sure. Oh. The fight is never seems to end. Unfortunately. Well, glad there are people out there. Like Karen that will continue the fight. Absolutely need care. All rather. We need it. We need it. Definitely do. All right in next Email is Karen in chat. Thank you. Karen for this. We create. Subject reads, a couple of things are learned this week. She says. She goes what's going kinfolk praying that your week is upward and productive sending good vibes. Your way now for the crazy stuff bear with me. I live in north Plainfield New Jersey about four point five miles away from an historic trail called what Chung reservation in quote, I figured I'd check it out. I'd say I'd say I was disappointed, but that would be a gross miss understatement. There is no reservation. They're the owns dead. Brothers created it they designed New York City central park. There are horses or horse stables, excuse me, picnic tables, and other associated associated park and nature trail features in short, it sucks, and I'll be sending a request for a name change. That's just number one though. He goes on say. I was looking through the course catalog from my Ulta martyr. Raritan valley community college. I found one native studies course, and no native American professor to teach it the freaking courses listed as an intro to an anthropology elective. Please. Don't get me started on the wack ask professor. He's one of those quote, I've lived among you while he studied. So I'm an expert on you, and quote, oh, please in front of me fleeing front of me. Anyway, she's one of those types. Karen says had her for another anthropology class, and I'm thoroughly disappointed in my school. So I'm arranging a sit down with the chair of the department with the intention of challenging their non diverse core, selection and lack of native oysters to give perspective good. We can't keep telling the colonizers version of our story. So true. And ask your collective advice on how I should proceed. I'm not native American yet. I feel as though I should say something as an ally. I only wish to amplify your histories, not presume to speak for native America. Yes, they do have. Yes. They do the obligatory native American cultural month, but just like black history month. Neither of our cultures can be relegated to thirty or twenty eight days. True, any advice, you can offer would be most appreciated. Thank you for this platform, and all your hard work, your friend. Karen, aka a love this. Militant mocha, mama. Absolutely. Love it. Limit limit. Limit. Well. What do you think brother? Karen? I thank you for that feedback. And I thank you for wanting to shake up the tree somewhat because it needs to be shaken. And yes, I fully support your efforts to have sit down with the powers that be and demand a class on a native American history taught by someone that is native American now having said that whomever that person a or whatever tried that person may belong to is. Actually, the only history they can correctly teach. But it's better than nothing. So, you know, if you have someone that's Mashantucket or Mohegan or Cherokee, or you know, that's the culture that they can effectively teach. Unless they have multi. Lineage and other tribes, and they know about those other jobs, but but again, it's better than nothing. So yes, I fully support your your desire to further our histories, and I wish you success. And if they need a little wakeup call have them listen to our show. Selfless plug. Yeah. I would also suggest. Dipping into our native American universities out there. They tend to be on the west coast. Sadly, everybody goes, oh, well, I send him to garden. Dartmouth. No, I don't recommend arth math whatsoever. At this point, maybe many years ago, I might have. But but any native colleges could probably offer up suggestions, everything they've said is absolutely correct. If. If it's a New Jersey to reaching out to travel nations within the state is also a good bet. And honestly that should be the responsibility of the university. Now what they'll probably tell you is. Well, we don't know who to contact. And you know, so basically what they're saying. We're too damn lazy? And we don't, you know, we, you know, it's too uncomfortable for us to to do any of the reach outs when it's just a simple, Google search and getting all the Email addresses and starting there. It really really is go head. Basically what you're saying is correct. It is that simple. Okay. I'm sorry. I was just going to say not not very difficult. If there's a true desire, right? Exactly. And. Maybe you know. In my heart. I completely agree with Dave. When when we say, you know, demand a change, but obviously going into at least an initial meeting. You know, we have we have to real it initially until you know, they start using those those sad tired excuses than than than we ratcheted up. But I would ask them, you know, whatever's have they made us for and just see what they tell you in there. And then slowly maybe maybe help them a little bit much. I hate to say this. But, you know, give them names the places, you know, maybe they reach out to Guten college. For example, is a host of others. What we'll do is. We have we'll Email you back with maybe some of the digital resources that you can check into as well. And go from there. We'd be interested. Also to hear what the responses once you do me with them. So. Because we try to we try to stay on top of that. And by all means, you can also reach out to other resources that we have on our website through media resources page. There's there's tons of. I'm sorry. Pressed people there as well. As other shows in reaching out to those shows in those hosts, you know, we all have resources, you know, and we we certainly don't know everything here. So other people can make suggestions to you. So by all means, please use that as well. And at one point somebody can reach out to them. So. That hopes. Thank you. Karen that that I always love hearing from all of our listeners. Think I'm up. You are brother. Thank you so much in Kern. Yes, thinking this comes to us from listener feedback. Snow comes to us from listener Glenn. Excuse me. And he says salutations Michael David bake you again for thank you again. Excuse me very much for your podcast. And thank you for being a listener. I agree completely about the lack of history education. It is significant problem in the US. A and it doesn't just impact the indigenous people of North America. It puts everyone in the USA at a relative disadvantage. Yes. It does. Let me give you a simple example, the typical history of humanity's given in the USA traces history from Babylonia and Egypt to Greece the Roman empire. And then it's successive empires that are basically successor embarrass. We might get a bit of Spain mentioned France a touch of British empire and a mention of North American nations before going into the information of what we call the U S A. So let's take for example, orange one sitting down at the table with the leader of North Korea this past week. Most people in the USA will never will have never been given excuse me any sort of introduction to eastern European history. Which is not very influenced by the Roman Catholic church. But it's heavily influenced by orthodox Christianity. And thus has quite a different outlook on life than western European culture or pressure or India or China or in a the other cultures that are ignored in our classrooms. Any says, gee, to- goes into meetings with leaders from countries where entire empire our empires. Excuse me Rosenfeld before Rome had a single stone. And due to the way history is presented and our classrooms. Our side of the bargaining table has been giving the impression over years of education that somehow our our culture excuse me as the most important because their culture was never mentioned in our history class. That's true. It's called brainwashing. The fact that some native American tribes participate participate practice agriculture before a Europe seems to have done. So. Should give people pause when they think of the linear time line from Babylon through Rome to America that is typically presented to us in our classrooms. Someone like the Cheeto, but not necessarily it could be any of a dozen of self centered. Individuals who doesn't think about these things as a huge disadvantage in making any sort of trade deal because in his mind, the sun moon and stars revolving around American culture is defined by few wealthy quite European descendants. The people across the table who have eight thousand years of history. Two white America's two hundred fifty or so years, the recognize us basically as being a tiny blip of a media right rather than being the center much of anything around which much of anything else orbits. And you want to add anything brother, Yali know? You know, that I totally get his point about, you know, white western terms in when thinking about the context of, you know, a a civilization that predates the United States, and that's on practically every every single nation on the planet. Right. But, but I also I don't want to discount are are native cultures over, you know, in the same context sitting across from enormous knowledge. And and you know, and so in terms of our civilizations be in the past or or even you know, some of our people that are around today. So yeah. So that that that's that's what I would add their Inc. You. You a bit simultaneous. Time-line presentation in our history and humanities class would do a great deal in bringing us up to par. With the rest of the world. I can't possibly imagine that British history leaves out say what is known about Neolithic or Celtic peoples that inhabited the islands before Rome. Much more could be done and needs to be done to bring native American history into art history as well as current events classes. Well, I couldn't agree more. The native American history is far more important to current American history and current events than say stories about which Greek gods were screwing around with whichever other Greek gods. Well, that's very true. Yeah. Added that. Yeah, I think. No, I think earlier. Cairns Email, you you made a good point too. I think about having starting points. Right. And so, you know, just having that in our in our public school systems, but make you know, a lot of sense. But I think it's it's actually more basic than out. I think that our history clearly precedes American history. Oh, sure inning negative history. So I'd settle for nyc. Number one, a formal apology from the federal government and apologies from each of the states within the union for crimes against North American indigenous people, it'd be good. Let's start there. Another might be a nationwide adoption of an education curriculum that gets accepted regionally in all public schools across this country, which could include a formal acknowledgement of our existence. It could include content authored improved by tribes from the four regions of the country. So north south east and west the creation of an annual native lead education conference as another that's open to all educators across the country. You know, so doesn't seem too much to ask. But we can't seem to get. I like the first step. I simply. No. Because they still think that we are antiquities. Yeah. Like what the hell? Exactly. So you know that that's the approach. I would take. Yeah. It's good approach. It always takes me back to when I used to teach at mystic. And. Mystic aquarium in every frigging class. I would have some some child say to me their parents, say Indians don't exist anymore. Medicine in a class. Your native you're sitting in a class. And okay, let's let's put it in perspective. So Dave sitting in a class. The teacher looks at Dave assumes, there's a black person. And goes there's no more Indians. Just let that sink in for moment. Right. Picture of actually picturing full grown person sitting ADL tiny desks like elementary looking around. I've had for that sake. You talked. Talking about exactly. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Number one would be an excellent start acknowledge. They were still here. Well on the Glenn Glenn continues to say it any event on with the actual news articles. And he says have you been following at all the ungoing situation with the coal fired buyer, excuse me power plants in the four corners area of New Mexico in Arizona. Someone one of the power plants has been purchased by the city of Farmington in order to keep it operating as an employment center for several more decades. While the Navajos drive is being urged by different coal plant operator to purchase the Navajos generating station myself to use their name and then want to try to sell them the same same station for which they had no permission to use the name. For example, this article in a list link it's about the mom Aho generating station. And we'll have that in the show notes. And he goes on to say, I've been to the Farmington New Mexico area as part of a ball on tier project and solely thick black smoke rising from what I think. Ser probably four corners generating station. It may have been the San Juan generating station or one or two others in the area. There were days that the sky to the west of Farmington was completely black. I remember those days as a kid. I'm glad that the Navajo nation was fought has fought back excuse me against the outright purchase of the Navajo generating station because there is no question in my mind that there is a lot of contamination in the ground. From decades of relatively untreated, coal smoke, dropping poisonous suet over the landscape. I really hope that the owners of these facilities are quite are required to clean up the mess that they have made of the Navajo land before they pack up and leave. Well, their aim is to. You know, selling and run and absolve themselves of any any environmental impact. That's what their aim is. I had to think about this. I'm going back number of years. I was dating someone from that area. She's not ho, and I seem to recall this plant plead or not I didn't I didn't spend a lot of time there. But but Ben in the Farmington area number of times as well as to city and. And yeah, I do I do remember the smoke to some degree of a little surprised by that. But but go head brother. Years ago. The ASA our CEO smelter into coma. Washington at five hundred seventy one foot tall smokestack in order to spread the top smelling smoke from their plant over a wider area. So residents wouldn't complain as much yet this worked well for them. Anyway. Excuse me. And now a vast area of southern Pete. The Puget Sound has tops in soil and people living in a pretty large area or advise not to even have vegetable gardens unless they build a raised bed and bring soil in from another location due to the contamination in the ground that would get into the food say, that's that's one of the things that I remember most vividly was the talk city in the soil, the grass had a hard time growing. Haven't seen what? SAARC? Oh did to Tacoma makes me very concerned about what has happened over the years with those big coal fired plants in the four corners area, and the mess. The Navajo will be stuck with dealing. With what's the those plants leave? Yeah. That's what I was saying. I've gone. We'll sell it run in forget it. Thank you very much for your program. And I'm very glad to founded Glenn gland. Thank you. We're glad you found it to thank you for being a listener. And we appreciate it. What a lot of people don't realize that you know, the most poisonous things are what are used to actually generate. The the bulk of the power that feeds the grid. And you know, it's it's it's unfortunate as we try to transition away from that kind of stuff and stuff that hopefully a little bit safer fuel cell technologies. Actually, very interesting as well. Doing more research on that as speak. Yes. But I'm not prepared to speak on it just yet. But very well. If they can they can make hydrogen even safer that would be fantastic. Exactly. Yep. Definitely definitely. Almost an endless resource one quickly. Welcome Karen in everybody in chat here. Karen, David Livy. Welcome. You guys all you guys jumping in here. Absolutely. And thank you again Glen for your Email. We appreciate that very little. Well, it is time for our native new Seguin. Yes, it is. And I'd say what mid week Dave threw me a text message. He's like, oh my God. But in my head, it's sound like, oh, my God, rather, you wouldn't believe what's happening do know how they're gonna pay for this wall. And I go why no. Would you share? He goes, no not to the show. Secretive about it. I was like, okay. You and me. So would that brother? I am in waiting and waiting and Brit with beta breath Europe. Hold on your butts, folks. The title of this show came before I uncovered this bit of information. So it it fits like a glove. In this first article is the full in the White House. My words administration is waving twenty five loss to build a new bit of wall. And before I go on what the rabid. Right. Doesn't understand is? He's only building a small section of wall. Which is only an addition to the wall and other barriers that have been under construction since. You know, the two thousands. So people are under the impression hits followers under the impression that he's building. This whole big two thousand mile long wall. And they have no clue as to what the jogger fy down. There is like that's absolutely true. I think I think a lot of people, you know, listen this early been studying the situation and. In the news media has been reporting from the border pretty incessantly in the, you know, the past six to eight months mostly mostly having to do, you know, the the quote migrant camps, the another somewhat invention of Trump in terms of a national emergency. But once in a while the stray away from that Nashi talk about okay? Well, we're saying building a wall. What are we actually talking about? How long is this? And it is turns out his Davis said it's pretty short. So. Right anyway. Go ahead pro. Okay to it some fencing in New Mexico. The government will need to brush aside, a bunch of environmental and yet land use regulations. I that byline is in itself troubling. But I'll tell you why in a moment, and what caught my attention was the story came from vice dot com and the author is married with Hoffman. And the story is from last year. This is a story from January the twenty fifth twenty eighteen so keep that date in mind. And the art of goals onto read the fate of the fool in the white. House's my words great great wall on our southern border in that was a quote, which he vowed will stem the flow of all undocumented immigrants drugs, currently hangs in limbo as congress battles over whether to fund the multi billion dollar project, but quietly part of the wall, it's already being built after fashion. Anyway. An expansion of the eighteen foot Bush era fencing is slated for construction next month. The department of homeland security has waived twenty five loss to jump start. Construction projects in eastern New Mexico. The agency announced Tuesday, the laws mainly environmental regulations that need to be brushed aside in order to begin building. The. To Joel I'm gonna call hearth bits, probably not the name desert one of the most biologically diverse desert's in the world. Thanks. Thanks. Border patrol must have a more effective means of deterring and preventing illegal crossings. And that was a quote from the H S secretary Kirsten Nielsen in her Monday notice about the waiver, which will cover a twenty miles stretch running east from Santa Teresa. And this area part of the border patrols, El Paso sector. And again, a quote an area of high legal entry in quote where twenty five thousand border crossers, six sixty seven thousand pounds of marijuana and fifty one hundred fifty seven pounds of cocaine or apprehended in the fiscal year twenty sixteen Nielsen said in her announcement now that in itself is laughable because a majority thousands of pounds of those those products come in through our ports of entry thousands of pounds. So this is nothing more than a ruse to get people looking over here while they're doing a majority of the there's the traveled over there. More than on a border. And a quote, there is presently need to construct physical barriers and roads in the vicinity of the border of the United States to deter illegal crossings in quote. Nielsen continued. They waved laws include the National Environmental Protection act, which required agencies to assess the environmental impact of all major projects the clean air water act, which prevents discharging pollutants into net. Nabal waters the Clean Air Act which regulates emissions of hazardous pollutants into the air, the Endangered Species Act, which protects imperilled Spacey's species excuse me on their habits. Habitats. Gives me Nielsen has also waived regulations, hold on your butts. Here comes preserving the cultural heritage of native Americans, including the native American grave, protection and repatriation act. I. Hazard. I ivory they American Indian religious freedom act and the national historic preservation act. Go ahead. They can try. I'll leave it at that. What the laws are ready to be away. I'm just you know. Where there were there any court proceedings that followed at the follow up on that. But that way last looked into this, and I have not seen a waiver. The Labor's the waivers, they I'll get to that in a minute. Okay. Ignoring these laws helps ensure expeditious construction of more still Mollard structure to bent border crossings customs and border protection. Spokesman Carlos the ass told me. This barrier. This barrier. Expanding roughly seven hundred miles of fence or wall, depending on what you choose to call it begun by the Bush administration already received funding for congress since fiscal years twenty seventeen budget a house appropriations committees confirmed. The congress doesn't reach an agreement to fund the fools wall slated to be thirty instead of eighteen feet tall. It is unclear whether CP SE BP could use this waiver to apply to its construction. BSN one of the wall. Prototypes day Justice, considering it's also made a Bollard steel. Bollard steel. There's a little bit more to this. Article. But I'm going to get down to some of the meat of the matter. Waiver issue issues waiver to expedite border construction project in dog, okay county, Texas now the release date this waiver was or this report was eleven October twenty eighteen. After the January report from article from vice and this comes directly from the department of homeland security dot gov. Washington. The department of homeland security has issued a waiver to waive certain laws to ensure the expeditious construction barriers and roads near the international border in the state of Texas in the county of panel. Okay. So it's confined there. I'm sorry. So seems to be confined there. That's where they're applying it to okay. The waiver was published at the fact that it was a waiver. They can apply anywhere they want. But this is where they're working on. I guess it presently. The way was published in the Federal Register on October eleven twenty eighteen this waivers pursuant to author to thority granted to the security board this waivers pursuant to authority granted to the secretary of homeland security by congress and covers a variety of environmental natural resource and land management laws. Congress provided the secretary of homeland security what the number of thority is necessary to carry out the ages is bordered security mission. One of these authorities found at section one or two of the illegal illegal, pardon me, emmigration reform and immigration responsibility. Active. Nineteen ninety six as amended. I R I R A. Section one or two a of the. Lots of ice and ours provides that the secretary of homeland security, she'll take such actions as may be necessary to install additional physical barriers and roads in the senity of the United States border to deter illegal crossings in areas of high illegal entry in the United States. Okay. So once again, and I'm sorry for interrupting. But once again, you guys can see. If all is is still true. Because again, Dave mentioned the dates are a little older. But the reason to believe that they're not true, but you can see the damage caused by Ryan Zinke, straight up eleven excuse me, thirteen individual counts of legal action still pending as result of that yet. And one of the reasons he ran as quickly as he could pack out of office. Oh, sure. So now now remember October wasn't that long ago? I hear that. Yeah. So what five months ago? Yeah. I'm in front of the federal destroy right now. So find something eventually why only and section went to see of. A lot of is ours. Congress granted to the secretary of homeland security the off the the thirty to waive all legal requirements that the secretary in secretary sole discretion determines necessary to ensure the expeditious construction of the barriers at rose authorized by section one or two of a lot of is ours period. The department exercise the waiver thority section two one oh to see of that act on five occasions in two thousand five two thousand eight and on two occasions and twenty seventeen. So these these. In my opinion violations. Have happened on Republican watches. What we always have to look for is they they still had to vote on that somebody had to vote on that. So so we we have to look at who else supported this. Yeah. We can clearly say it's Republicans, but Democrats in there too. Oh, I'm sure there are and there's a little article coming up down the down the road here that will kind of speak to that. The rest of this is fluff for you know, their support. But there's more. There's been a push to try to resent the DHS waiver authority for the border wall act, and it was introduced by Representative Catling rights, it didn't it didn't game in a ground. But the article comes from home homeland that house that gove. The Democrats for homeland security house dot gov. They were sending the waiver thirty for border wall act would strike twenty two five law that granted the secretary of homeland security unilateral authority to waive all local state federal laws as such as important environmental laws such as the endangered species. Act the Clean Air Act. The native American graves protection repatriation act in safe drinking water to expedite the construction. Offenses concrete slabs or other infrastructure at the border. The thirty has been used. A number of times and on January twenty second twenty eighteenth. Nielsen waved approximately twenty laws including the Endangered Species Act. Which I have read are ready the American religious freedom act. And these things are, you know, really crucial to, you know, native cultures and what we've been fighting for for all this this time in what the stroke of a pen. They say we don't have to buy those. Okay. So. The rest of this will be on the show. My comments, very simple. On the show repeatedly. We talk about the hypocrisy of immigration, and you're gonna go how does that relate to this while we're talking about border wall? But I'll say it again like a broken record. I find it very very hilarious. And I say that are cast, of course, that descendants of European invaders, quite frankly who. Came here by force are now writing the rules as far who's who else can come here. And now as you can see and there's other point after point after bullet point here in in this in this article regarding department of homeland security. Giving the power giving them the power to say where reinforcing. Ourselves. On or at the expense of in one particular case, the buried dead of our people. Because as as many of you may or may not know, we don't Mark our graves. Necessarily. We do. It's only by the way, we know how to identify them. And so if something is quote amusing air quotes discovered as a result of construction, the navy American graves repatriation act in this particular case, it's very specific when we're talking about federal actions. So when nag prize is acronym is what native American graves protection repatriation act stands for Nagpur is triggered when there is a federal action on the project that has federal funds involved. Okay. Where gravesites our accidents hit as a result of construction all workers opposed to stop. Affected. Tribes are them contacted. For claiming ownership once a determination is made that they are. In fact, indigenous people. So that we can rebury our debt. But in this particular case, we're not even giving that option saying we don't care about clean water. We don't care about clean air. We don't care about native people that might be buried in the area. We want a wall. Think about that. That's basically what they're saying. So that's basically what they're saying at this was all done on the cover of darkness. Yes. And so. When you hear? I'll say straight up, and I know I'm why policies ahead of time. When you hear the Cheeto asshole say in, you know, we're gonna get Jones court, and then it's gonna go to district court. And then it's going to go to the supreme court. We're will win we hope. Guys, remember him saying that that's because he already knew that this had happened. So FM. F- anybody that's signed that in homeland security. And I know the real story. Right on through all the way back to the formation of. Immigration act. Ill understand where I'm coming from. Before I get upset because I have. Lead big book of be your friend. Yeah. I will. I will leave it there. I made my point. Oh, I did. Anyway. But. Coming from the emotional part. Of course, and. Another example of why many of these people need to go away. And I don't mean to be replaced by some other schmuck asshole. Yeah. Like, the coal guy that just replays. Zinke. Amazing. Mazing? Win the full say, the only highs very best people say he only highs the very best crooks. Yes. Exactly. All right. You're up next circle. Look it gets much better. Title. Article reads Representative Tom Cole whose native complained about a one page Bill and a and native Twitter. Rosie them for it. Is back on February twenty six this year. Representative Tom Cole Republican of Oklahoma. A citizen of the Chickasaw nation. Is one of the most experienced legislators and politicians but his complaints about a one page. Bill aren't earning him, very many fans on social media, call serves as ranking member of the house committee on rules. And as the senior Republican on that panel. He's probably not going to go along with every democratic initiative. That's clearly case with h j res- forty six a resolution that rebukes president. The Cheeto for declaring a national emergency along the US border with Mexico. Quote. I do not understand see I I do these voices because they all on the same to me. All right quote. I do not understand the haste with which the majority is pushing this disapproval resolution through in quote Cole said as the committee took up the measure on Monday on Monday evening, excusing, quote, again, we've had no time to review the Bill and no committee has held a hearing or Mark it up and quote, Democrats who took control the house of representatives after winning a majority of the seats in the last election are indeed moving quickly on on day. Res- forty six. The measure was introduced on Friday, and is due to clear the chamber later, Tuesday, according to the majority leader's calendar, but native Twitter wasn't happy with Kohl's comments, quote, pathetic and quotas. What one user wrote after the remarks were made the rounds on Monday evening quote. It's seventy words and quote at an another referring to the length of the Bill, quote is getting paid to read it, and it's not that long. He needs to do is job or resign and quote. H day. Res- forty six is indeed about seventy words give or take. But the most important part is only two words the measure declares that Trump's emergency declaration of February. Fifteenth of twenty nineteen is quote hereby terminated end quote. Quote, again, if congress let's Trump's emergency declaration stand. This president and future presidents will come back for more. And quote, Representative Representative. Joke win because Castro democrat walking out. So sorry, Joaquin Castro. Democrat of Texas the sponsor of the Bill wrote in a post on Twitter on Monday quoting her again. And if the border wall is a national emergency under this law. How am I supposed to tell a future president that opioid in gun deaths are not in quote said Castro was among a crowded field. The Democrats seeking his party's nomination for president in twenty twenty quote again or climate change. If the president's emergency declaration sands, it will forever change, the constitutional balance of power between the president in congress. Thanks to Senator Collins and Senator Thom Tillis who have been indicated support for my resolution to terminate the president's declaration. And if congress, let's Trump's emergency declaration stand the president and future presidents will come back for more. And if the border wall is a national emergency under this law. How am I supposed to tell feature presidents again, the article repeated itself in sure why Cole a former share the Republican National Committee and former Oklahoma state lawmaker himself has expressed similar concerns about? Presidential power in a number of interviews with the media. But if he is concerned about native, Twitter's reaction, it's not showing. Gordon, call again, he said, I think it's an act will worth his authority and quote. As he said on NPR's morning edition on Tuesday as he was defending Trump's declaration, coal isn't alone in that view. Another name. We talk about on the show often Representative Mark Wayne Mullen are Republican of Oklahoma a citizen of the Cherokee nation supports Trump's border policies and had refused to shave his beard until congress votes to fund the the disputed wall. They'll be calling the. Van winkle? And he said President Trump did what he needed to be done in decorating and emergency at our border. And quote Mullen said after two. Molin said after the February fifteenth declaration quitting him again is my complete. He has my complete and total support and quote. The other to travel citizens to serve on congress. Both of whom are Democrats, disagree presentative. Deb Haaland democrat of New Mexico and Representative cherise Davis democratic Kansas. Who are the first native women elected to the house of representatives oppose Trump's wall and his emergency declaration. Quote during my trip to the border. I saw children separated from their parents whose lives will be forever changed by this. Trauma said Holland was a citizen of the Pueblo of Laguna citizen there and is also cosponsor of h j res- forty six never did the border feel unsafe. And it is by no means a national emergency. David's who was a citizen of the honk nation is not signed onto the disapproval approval resolution, but in discussing Trump's willingness to quote circumvent and quote, the US constitution with his emergency declaration. She said, quote, it is dangerous to national security, and it's dangerous to our democracy in quote. The house that the review Trump's attention to turning to the United States Senate, which remains in Republican hands all Democrats, and at least Republicans, including Senator Lisa Murkowski, Republican of Alaska, a long serving member of the Senate committee on Indian affairs has indicated that they will support the disapprove disapproval resolution if it comes up for a vote in their chamber. So again. You can see. Where two Republican? Native comrades. You can see whether loyalties lie. Not good gentlemen. Nope. They listen to the show. Yeah. I tell you. Well, now, this this next story that is about to read. Is interesting. Also, we had a listener send us the same article. I do believe which was Joel. So thank you for that. Often on this show. I'm just going to do a quick set brother often show. We've we've talked about this weird obsession by some archaeologists and people that are into that world and also anthropology have with the bones of our people. I will throw it over to you, brother. I don't know. That's. Yeah. We'll be some kid what the booger collection with people. Greener than that one. Man, I tell you. Some people native American remains among. Two thousand bones found at Indiana home containing forty two thousand artifacts. This comes out of new York Daily, News dot com, and Theresa brain is the author. Unbelie archive photo of the. I retired tribe of North Dakota. Erica a record. Thank you. FBI agents belief many of the two thousand bonds found in collector, Don Miller's Indiana, home where Ricca. Right ancestors. The FBI is working with the tribe to return. The remains the FBI has for the first time publicly released photos of more than forty two thousand artifacts collected the decades by now deceased, Indiana, man, I think we should go find these bombs. Put them somewhere. Yeah. Among them two thousand bounds representing five hundred people. Most of them native American. Pause right there who the hell. Think about a guy who the hell puts bones in a box stores in the basement of their home two thousand of them. I know an organization that puts them in a box stores. Baseball sorta y but I mean, this is an individual vote. I know. Anyway, go ahead. The FBI's 2014 search of the collection of World War Two vet and world traveler, Don Millar who died in twenty fifteen at age ninety one yielded pre Columbian pottery and talion mosaic an ancient items from China among other items. Much of it was obtained illegally. CBS news reporting. Mike, quote, roughly half of the collection was native American and the other half of the collection was from every other corner of the globe in quote, FBI art crime unit and Tim carpenter toll CBS news, the FBI descended on Miller's rural Indiana, home and began cataloging artifacts. Twenty four t according to the Indianapolis star other items found in his possession, included, a seemingly dented it. It can't make stuff up seemingly authentic Egyptian sarcophagus in the basement in quote, the Indianapolis star reported, but in addition to pottery figurines, a perfectly working pipe organ. There was something more Macab at this point. We pause with the sound effect. All righty. Collection included. I know included about two thousand human bones carpenter said, and that was a quote, and I quote again to the best of our knowledge right now, those two thousand bones represent about five hundred human beings, I'm quote, but that wasn't even the worst of it five hundred human beings. Okay. That's roughly most of the tribes of federally recognized tribes in the country. Almost that number federally work nights drives. Right. But that wasn't even the worst of it. Most of them had been looted from native American graves. He told the network Addy. It's very staggering in. That was a quote Miller is not the only collector to treat digital cultures in history. What such a lack of reverence and twenty fifteen a California and NS theologist was charged with twenty one fell any counts of looting native artifacts from private lands and national parks. He had amassed thirty thousand items though, no remains were found. My quote, that's like a way of life around here there there probably isn't a person in this valley that doesn't have artifacts in their house in quote, Kathy Jebsen Bancroft tribal stork preservation officer on the lone pine pie to show any reservation told Indian country media network at the time, and I quote, again, go to church on Sunday and the whole family would go out and collect artifacts. In quote. Some of the remains found in Indiana are from the Ricca tribe and officials there are working with the FBI to bring their ancestors home. And I quote, again, all too often here we have been treated as curiosities rather than a people tribal official Pete coffee toll CBS news. And I quote, again, they could be from my own great. Great. Great. Great, great grandfather grandmother, you know, that had been I care. Characterized it as being ripped out there at the now Amquip. Lord are mercy. I mean what like I've been saying let let that settle infra second. If any one of us listening right now, what grab a pick axe and shovel. And start digging into someone's backyard. How long do you think you'd be able to do that before the authorities are called or if you took a pick axe shovel, and you started going into a Jewish cemetery. Started digging up graves when they show up and ask you what you doing going? Well, I collect these I'm looking for. I'm looking for artifacts. Exactly. Of the Jewish persuasion or just any any member of cemeteries around the US just. Any number of told the story. But again, the Reader's Digest condensed version when I was because we do have to be trained in around the act that we mentioned earlier the Nagpur act. Our instructor told us a story of a. Of a university. Professor name redacted. Who was presented again. Let me let me back up part of the Nagpur act requires that if a tribe wishes to ask a university more a museum for an inventory of bones that they might have because they might wanna lay claim to them to repatriate. We mean by that is to rebury are dead. Some tribes do some tribes don't k-, but having that option available to us is very important. And so this university professor with resented inefficiential request by tribe. For bones. They knew that they had. And this guy scoop them up in boxes through them in his car and took off. To his home. Oh, man to prevent them from being returned to the nation of which they came from that sad. These people are in disgusting. Think about that. But you want your relatives dug up don't care. I don't care if you're native or not you wouldn't want that would you? It's common sense. Oil. Just Lance to the the story of you know, we we're looked at it integrity. We're not looked at. It's people that are still living. Doesn't make it. Right. Doesn't make it less. Sick. That's just. It's it's it's an idiot practice. It just is got nothing. I don't know. I got nothing. You're up. All right. Let's next title. Reads native American women are disappearing. Why is nothing being done produced out of matter of fact, and hosted by solid Ed O'Brien. Article goes on to say here native, American women and girls are vanishing across the country. Just last year. The FBI report is six hundred thirty three open missing persons cases for native American women. According to statistics, they are also ten times more likely to be murdered the non native Americans the families of victims say their communities are outraged. But law enforcement isn't taking action matter of fact, correspondent Leone Connie tells some of their stories we have some audio here for you guys. Whoops, sorry as I hold up the whole show. Here we go. Take a listen, I'm Soledad O'Brien. Welcome. To matter of fact, there is an epidemic happening right now in America that no one's talking about native American, women and girls are vanishing. According to the FBI last year, there were six hundred and thirty three open missing persons cases. For native women and native women are ten times more likely be murdered than non native Americans four times more likely to be rate. Those statistics have sparked community outrage, but very little law enforcement action, at least that's what the families of victims tell us. Here's matter of fact, Leoni Leconte with some of their stories. The black hills Powell rapid city, South Dakota. A time to celebrate the culture and tradition of the Lakota people. Also a time to bring awareness to a silent but deadly epidemic. I've been having a lot of friends that have been gone missing and never found. For decades. Indigenous women and girls have been disappearing including Louis alone hill that was one of the recent ones before she went missing more than two years of poss- since Lisa lone hill last saw her daughter. Was not threatened on filling. Can you? Imagine your own daughter being missing try to magin how painful that is. I prefer straight to. Go on. But it's so hard. Girl. It's impossible to know. How many native women are missing or murdered because some cases go on reported others aren't properly documented, and there isn't a specific government database tracking the cases. Komo. Always be equal two hours away on the Rosebud reservation. Elizabeth Rubio's daughter rescinded went missing twenty years ago. If you want to be in the army and fly the eleven year olds body was found in the trees what I was told shoe. Underwear? I don't know how long, but we do says law enforcement didn't help perserve for her daughter. I think. Wooded areas. Would there of me Holden her once again? Resendiz murder remains unsolved. Dr thing we really want is Justice. You guys know of any guys rat today that my Nina Joan I met Matthew loan, Barron. January twenty teen he was orchestrating a search for his sister Olivia. She'd been missing since October twenty seventeen the thirty two year old mother of five vanished from the fort birth. Hold Indian reservation in Utah, North Dakota. She was lost seen driving. A pickup truck loan Barra. Says thority was slow and launching their search looked at all these people that want to step in with their boats that got sonar on them and didn't allow them to despite his pleas loan says it took months to have a boat. Search a nearby lake by that time the seasons changed if they would have said yes to every agency that want to search water in the worked with the family. We could've got that water search six times, but they don't want to for some reason. And now we're sitting with a frozen lake and wondering look at all this effort with throwing try to find this trip would have. A lot of the whole time tribal PD will have to answer that. Nine months after she disappeared volunteers using sonar searched the same lake law enforcement searched they found a truck with Libya's body inside. We wanna make a protocol that oh help other families. And so we don't gotta jump through. All the hoops that we had to get rid of some of these excuses that law enforcement, agencies and other agencies. Will you know, have we're trying to eliminate those that way if someone goes missing on a reservation that you know, it happens, anyway, you know, law enforcement, all cohesive, working together state resources are available to come and reservations right away. Not months down not nine months down the road right away. Pine ridge Indian reservation in South Dakota. Lisa lone hill is still waiting for her daughter Larisa to come home. And so is Laura says three year old daughter. She's her mom's picture. She says. Oh, mommy. I miss you too much. She couldn't be gone forever to detective stay. She's not with us. No more. Maybe they gave up on her. But I didn't and I refuse to believe that she's dead. She'll never forgotten. And I won't give hope for matter of fact, this is the only look Hani. All right. Prayers always to these families just. Blink. We have another story on his new murder digits Miller later in the show. Don't do. I believe there might have any do cement as act. Yeah. So we will we'll get into that a little bit later appropriate. Now, I didn't have in the show notes brother, but you know, the rundown rather take a music break right now. So because of my mood. Pulled up some black fire. So here's some should be some good hard rock and roll to get it out. And then we'll move on. We'll back with you guys in about five and a half minutes. It we go black fire. Hey. Travel. Year eight even given Sharma d and your dude is sovereign entity. And therefore the relationship between the federal government and drive is one between sovereign entities. A new stranger. The white. On. Shadows. Of gods? Knows. Gods? On the dog. Chris. Non. Two thousand. Freedom bounds. Stranger? Slow. But fire. Black lab black fire. And yet sorta whip though that out I shouldn't said that. Realized. He's got a music is the medicine sometimes the help you get it out which play so. All right. Deconstruction seeing to do do. So this past week. Of course, mainstream news media was all focused on the Michael Cohen testimony. The house intelligence committee. And. And I watched most of it. I was working away. My office not watched so much as listened. Quite a bit of it. I think you know, because it's apparently mainstream new news media's role to tell you everything that's going to be said in a particular testimony before the person, even testifies because of leaks and everything else. So a number of things were already pre or deigned to be known. But there was a few. Gotcha. The difference with this particular around of testimonies by would be. Former Trump associates. Is that he came with receipts. That's the terming out. There proof of what he's saying. It was pretty much Republican shit show at the beginning by those guys trying to immediately discredit him. It's kind of hard to discredit when you have proof with you. However, you might. What here's what's really really telling. And nobody's picking up on this. I've seen hints of it here and there, but not one person not one Republican on that committee defended the fool in the White House. Not one. That sense. I got watching and listening. I I didn't really think that they were defending him. They were they were they were spinning the wheels. More to try to discredit Cohen when it's already a proven fact that you know, he's he's committed himself to perjury in the last hearing. Now, I understand that. And I've heard of the people make the same assertion. I guess the way I look at it is by discrediting this gentleman. They are trying to protect Trump. That's how I that's that's how I saw it up say that so see near her. But I wanted to go into a few very briefly actually only really one area that I thought was fairly substantial maybe to here. So I'll try to go through this fairly fairly quickly. But it is a bit involved. So hopefully, everybody can kind of understand. What what's going on here? So if you'll bear with me, and of course, I'm going to back this up with with audio. That is really the best way to do it. I think so again, this was Coen's testimony on February twenty seventh recently this year through in front of the house of representatives intelligence committee. So it was Democrats and Republicans in the room. And. So for talking about Trump and having potential crimes while. Occupying the White House. Let's talk about hush money payments. That was a big big factor. So the two main points to this one would be this one of the most damning things that came out during the Coen testimony was the evidence that he presented, by example of checks signed by Trump. And under his direction to Cohen. To pay the Trump campaign. An in-kind. And that's literally how it was phrased in kind contribution of one hundred thirty thousand dollars, which is way above the allotted contribution level allowed to a campaign. And you'll remember that Trump was asked about a payment to stormy Daniels. Pose to him on Air Force One which was about a year ago. So I wanna play that for you again. This is what he said. Video President Trump speaking to reporters aboard Air Force One today. Let's listen. So I don't know. I don't know you have to ask Michael Cohen. He's my attorney. So Michael Cohen. Was the personnel. So appears that there was a clear campaign violation not to mention numerous numerous ethic problems, which will get into also moment. So the second part of this is that Michael Cohen, then took a mortgage out on his home to pay off. Stormy Daniels in the amount of ready hundred and thirty thousand dollars to keep her silent before the presidential election. Trump then pays Cohen back in installments over the course of twelve months during twenty seventeen while he is president. The first installment, however came from the Trump organization with a check signed by Donald Trump junior and Alan waste Berg. That's the way Cohen pronounces it, by the way. Wanna say weasel bird? But I don't I don't know. Why? In this next clip. You're going to hear chairman Elias Cummings in chairman of the house intelligence committee ask for clarification of the situation. Referred stormy Daniels as quote, miss Clifford. Stormy Daniels in quotes, of course, is her adult film star stage name. So here's how that went down on hush payments. See my video Bank. The president also made numerous statements that turned out to be accurate, for example. He said he knew nothing about the hush money payments to miss Clifford and his twenty seventeen financial disclosure form said he'd never owed money to reimburse you for those payments. Yet in your testimony going. You said that you met with the president in the Oval Office in February twenty seventeen and discuss his plans to reimburse you for money, you pay you say he told you and I quote, don't worry. Michael your January and February reimbursement checks are coming. Is that accurate and that an Oval Office? The statement is accurate, but the discussions regarding the reimbursement occurred long before he became president. Would you explain that? Back in twenty seventeen when actually apologizing twenty sixteen prior to the election. I was. Contacted by Keith Davidson, who is the attorney a was the attorney from Clifford for stormy Daniels and after several rounds of conversations with him about purchasing her life rights for one hundred thirty thousand dollars each and every time is go straight into Mr. Trump's office and discussed the issue with him when it was ultimately determined and this was days before the election that Mr. Trump was going to pay the one hundred thirty thousand dollars. In the office with me was Alan Weisselberg. The chief financial officer of the Trump organization. He knowledge to Allen that he was going to pay the hundred and thirty thousand and that Allen nice should go back to his office and figure out how to do it. So yes, sir. I stand by the statement that I gave. But there was a history to it. In your testimony. You have you said what's some sex is that right? You said you checks. Yes, sir. Let me ask you about one of these. This. From the Trump trusts that holds the president businesses. Can you tell me who signed this? I believe that the top signature is Donald Trump junior. The bottom signature. I believe is Alan Weisselberg 's and can you tell me that data that check? March seventeenth of twenty seventeen now. The date on a check is after President Trump held his big press conference claiming that he gave up control of his businesses. How could be president ever rained for you to yet? This check if he was supposedly playing no role in business. Because the payments were designed to be paid over the course of twelve months, and it was. Declared to be a retainer for services that would be provided for the year. Of twenty seventeen was ever Tena agreement. There is no retainer agreement would Don jR, Mr. Weisselberg have more information about that. Mr. Weisselberg for sure about the entire discussions and negotiations prior to the election and Don, jR, would have. Cursory information. Now, here's another one this one appears to be signed by Donald Trump himself is that. Donald Trump signature. So let me make sure I understand Donald Trump wrote you a check out of his personal account while he was serving Frederick of the United States of America to reimburse you for hush money payments. Simmons Clifford is that what you are telling the American people today. Yes. Mr Chairman one final question. The president claimed he knew nothing about these payments ethics filing said he owed nothing to you based on your conversations with him. Is there any doubt in your mind? The President Trump knew exactly what he was paying for. There is no doubt in my mind. And I truly believe there's no doubt in the mind of the people of the United States of America. Yeah. So there you go. Were also hush hush payments made to a Karen McDougal Littell woman, Trump has had sexual relationships with apparently also that relationship was unknown by Malania Trump, which is why she was so pissed off last year. When that story broke. So we also have Alan Weisselberg. Great finance guy for Trump. This guy is also cooperating with prosecutors run ongoing investigation case in southern district of New York, and they have granted Weisselberg immunity in exchange for information that he has on Trump is finances and also the Trump organization, so that should be very very interesting. And also now looks like Weisselberg has been called testified before this same intelligence committee as well as as a result, of course, of Cohen's testimony. So it yet to be seen. How loyal this guy actually will be to Trump? Will they dangled the carrot just out of his reach? So they gave him eliminated immunity, which main. Okay, you give us something. We gave you something. I mean, this whole thing reads like a good fellows like the goodfellas movie. Mr trump. It's like crazy. All right. Everybody with me so far because we're not done yet. Unfortunately. So Don, jR. The son of. His hands are not cleaning any of this. All right. He apparently had full knowledge of his father's house payments. But also has denied knowledge of it that should put him in hot water as well clearly Trump seeking his offspring to lie. A lot another important thing that you might remember was the so-called Trump organization divestiture that dog and pony show. That was conducted by the then president elect that took place on January eleventh of twenty seventeen and play a little bit of that for you. Now. I have no dealings with Russian. I have. I have no deals that could have Russia because we've stayed away. And I have no loans with Russia as a real estate developer. It was very very little debt have assets that are and now. Company ever that ever lived? I've known loans with Russia. That was so I have no I have no. So I have. And no current headache you, but. I haven't no conflict of interest provision as president. It was many presents. Because they don't want presidents. I they don't what residents getting. Wanna president? So I actually run my business. Could actually Emmerick government at the same time. I don't like the way that loops able to do that. If I want to be the only do you can't do that in any best as I can run the Trump. The. I am actually people have learned a lot about my company. And now they realize companies much bigger much more powerful than they ever thought. We're many many countries, and I'm very proud of. And what I'm going to be doing is my two sons who are right here. Don. And. Are going to be running the company they are going to be running it in a very professional manner. They're not going to discuss it with me again. I don't have to do this. The not going to discuss it with me. And I went to ring up Sherri Dylan, and she's going to these neighbors are just some of the many documents that I've signed turning over complete and total control. Certain. We ask you one question on Russia, though, sir. And you walk away. It's my honor and privilege to be here today at President-Elect Trump's request. He's asked me as you just heard speak about the conflicts of interest and the steps he's taking as you know, the business empire. Phil Fudd President-elect Trump over the years is massive not dissimilar to the fortunes of Nelson Rockefeller when he became vice president. But at that time, no one was so concerned President-elect Trump wants the American public to rest assured that all of his efforts are directed pursuing the people's business and not his own to that end see explained a few moments ago, he directed me. And my colleagues at the law firm Lewis to sign a structure business empire that will completely isolate him from the management of the company he further instructed that we build in protections. That will sure the American people the decis. Teammates and the actions that he takes us president are for their benefit and not to support his financial interest as he said, he's terribly taking this the conflicts of interest laws simply do not apply to the president or the vice president, and they are not required to separate themselves from their financial assets, the primary conflicts of interest statute since someone questions this section eighteen USC to eight and it's simply inapplicable five. Trump's and this is not just our interpretation. It's congress it self made this clear nineteen eighty nine when it amended section eighteen USC to to to stay except as otherwise provided the terms office in employees in section two eight shell pollute the president, even so president-elect. Trump wants there to be no doubt in the minds of the American public is completely isolating himself. This business interests instructed us to take all steps realistically possible to make it clear that he is not exploiting the office of the presidency for his personal bet. He also saw of individuals were familiar with and extensively in the fields of government ethics and constitutional law critical. Morgan Lewis team is Fred fielding standing here to our side with us today. In many of you have known is serve several precedence over the years, including serving as counsel to president Ronald Reagan, and George W Bush as well as serving on president, George H W Bush is commission on federal ethics law reform Republicans held the physician vice chair of the ethics resource center. Mr. fielding has been extensively involved with an approved. This plan is here today to support the plan and he will continue to provide items at the plans implemented and as Eric done along with others takeover. Management of the Trump organization. Detail some of the store nearest ups. Now, the president-elect is taking I president from investments and business commonly known as the Trump organization comprising hundreds of entities, which again, although take a look financial disclosure statement, the pages and pages and pages of entities have all been or will be conveyed to trust prior to January twentieth. Here's just some of the paperwork taking care of those actions. Second through the trust agreement. He has relinquished leadership and management of the Trump organization to his son, Don, and Eric and a longtime Trump executive Alan Wieser together done Eric Ellen the authority to manage the Trump organization and we'll make decisions for the duration of the presidency without any involvement whatsoever by President-elect Trump. Okay. Let's take the most recent. She just mentioned in work backwards. So trust was was created. For that. Removed Trump from his company it turn it over to Weisselberg and the sun. And then it's worth noting that most of the we'll call it out of Washington meetings happened at Trump Trump organizations right may the resorts more Lago as one okay? So there is always instill will be a connection as long as this idiots in Washington. So he's benefiting no matter what okay. This trust that she was speaking to is also why he paid Cohen primarily with personal checks in paying off the hundred thirty thousand dollars with exception of that one. I check and who signatures were on that check Don jR in Weisselberg. So he knew going into that dog and pony show that he had covers ass. And set things up this way to do. So you also heard the attorney Sherry Dillon with the law firm Morgan Lewis in Baca mentioned United States co title code eighteen statute to await, and she stated that it wasn't applicable, and that seems to me to be a bit misleading because the statute that she's really referring to is actually statue to two and it's subsection c which states specifically quote except as otherwise provided in such sections. The terms quote officer end quote, and quote employees and quote in sections to three to five to seven through two nine and that of two eighteen of this title being titled eighteen shall not include the president the vice president a member of congress or a federal judge and quote. What you actually have to do is review specifically sections to three to five and two seven through two nine as well as statute to eighteen and apply that language to any specific ethics situation. But regardless of the sections mentioned in the press conference Trump and Dylan bowl stated that he Trump was voluntarily isolating himself and quote through an ethic structure that the law firm put in place at that time. So this lice elation that the referring to his not been tested yet. And this is something that the intelligence committees also need to take a look at again, that's my personal opinion. But, but I think it's kind of speaks for itself because there are really really deep lip relations within the ethics code that may still apply to quote, the president, and quote, as well as the vice president also on this show, we've mentioned or at least I have I know from time to time that I keep asking the question. You know, we talk we hear about loopholes, and how could it get away with this? And this that and the other. Thing. But you don't see in the action of people putting forth new legislation to quote close. These loopholes. This is an example of that. Right. So really, that's that's really all. I wanted to say about the Coen testimony. Again, that was probably the biggest reveal the day because he had evidence to back it up that Trump is made payments while in office. That I really think are actionable. And and as I said simultaneously going going to this. And this is just my own personal theory, regardless of what happens whether he's isolated as president or not we've got some folks waiting for his ass in New York through the the actions that are taking place there in the investigations going on. So he can't run very far. Nope. From what from from our point of view earliest mine. So there you go. Thank you for bearing with me. But I felt it was worth going going through. Thank you for sharing that. Yeah. No problem. It's time for our main content unless you had something else you wanted to tear commandeer all done. It was enough. Like, you know, turning that screwed through more fewer. Caper main content segment. This next article is native son news today yet yacht. Tell today television show reaches a broader audience and this comes to us, by way of native son news, and Richie Richards is the correspondent. After a year and a half of airing on a local TV station in rapid city. They oh, yeah. Today show has made its debut on South Dakota public broadcasting or PBS. Oh, yeah. Today made it d- debut on Kate e v n black hills FOX and twenty seventeen the idea of the show came from Tim. The Otto who used to weekly show on KABC in in the nineteen seventies called the first Americans, Tim and Jackie Iago approached Chris gross, excuse me, the station manager and told him the idea of doing the show with the caveat that they had to raise money in order for the show to air Jackie set out to find sponsors. And although it will say tough, go and rapid city. She did find enough sponsors to get the show on air originally filmed in the doll fine arts building near downtown rapid city the show soon moved its production to prairie edge with host Richie rich Richards in the fall of twenty seventeen. Oh, yeah. Today has been a local hit show in rapid city. And it's been featured on KABC in black hills. Fox for the last year and a half over the weekend. The program premiered on South Dakota public broadcasting. The producers of the show are Tim Jackie jago. Prairie age owner Ray Hillenbrand and general manager, Dan trippy have been very supportive of today. The historic building provides perfect backdrop or show, featuring the traditional storytelling up contemporary leaders. In business, literature, and art and culture. They show continues to be filmed at prairie edge and the staff appreciate the filming which takes place every other Thursday. Nice. The overall mission of yet today as bent to tell the positive stories of local leaders oftentimes these leaders work behind the scenes on projects of community interest in which to remain anonymous in the impact they have on the community producers in host have worked closely with guests to get them to open up and let down their humble guard that is done. So others can be inspired by the work and can show appreciation for local leadership. I good example of those working quietly to change the lives of others where the special guest featured on the premiere of a yacht today. The South Dakota PBS on Sunday February seventeenth at eleven AM. Roxanne? Anna Quinn, Roxanne is a volunteer at the hope center in rapid city. In Quinn is the founder executive director. Excuse me. They still have been working with the homeless population in rapid city. And have been providing a certain material relationship too, many who had been utilizing the services of this highly needed to Siliguri in rapid city. Featured on the show was Francis. Contrary a homeless man who survived many years on the streets and finally found a permanent home in twenty eighteen good frame. He was grateful for the support of Andre in Quin for their support. Today will continue to be featured on KVM black hills FOX on Saturday nights at ten pm mountain time in rapid city and will begin to build a state white audience on South Dakota public broadcasting on Sunday mornings at eleven AM mounted time. Congratulations to them. That's very cool. That's where my son lives, and I'll have to. Hopefully going to get out there this summer to see him. So I made by check it out. Oh. So he moved from Texas. Yes. Yes. I've said that on the show. Not that. I remember. But for Caterpillar out there and don't nights any designs virtual reality training. Yep. Training stuff. Very proud of him. Yes. He lives in the rapid city area. Yes. Yes. Just just so nice. Okay. So this article this is. What I was referring to earlier, brother. So from native son news today campaign focuses on missing and murdered sisters and. I'm going to play a clip I hear from Representative Torres on Savannah's ACTA annoyed. Actually sent you a question in chat. Yesterday, brother. I don't know if you saw that regarding this clip that about the play level confused by it. So if you could look for that oh up lay this right now. So here's what she had to say. The Senate is leading town and has left us just a few items that we can accomplish. And this isn't one of them, however, one item that is ready for passage is savannah 's at native American women face a murder rate ten times higher than the national average with eighty four percent experiencing some form of violence in their lifetime violence against. Women reauthorization act of twenty thirteen and the tribal law and order act have helped bring attention to the high rates of violence against native women. However, there is still no reliable way of knowing how many native women go missing each year because the database is that whole statistics statistics of these cases are extremely outdated and in need of reform. Congress hasn't paid attention to the lives of native American women that is why I joined Senator Heitkamp in introducing Savannah's act earlier this year name after savannah gray wind a pregnant twenty two year old North Dakota woman and member of the spirit lake nation who was murdered in twenty seventeen. Savannah's would. Acquire the department of Justice to finally keep a nationwide database of missing and murder. Native women this common sense. This is a common sense it passed the Senate unanimously last month, but one member one member of this body has decided to prevent us from passing Savannah's at and the rest has capitulated. One member standing in a way of finally doing the right thing for native women. American women women who are victims of crime shameful and shame on this body for allowing this and not taking this last week of the hundred and fifteenth congress to finally bring about some Justice to these cases. Now one thing that this body the hundred and fifteenth congress has been really good for in the face of tragedy. Has been moments of silence. And that is why today I want to take some time that we have left to have a moment of silence, Mr Speaker. I would like my colleagues to join me in a moment of silence for savannah. Thank you, Mr Speaker. Instead of taking action on Savannah's at we are asked to vote on this real to pass a tax Bill, which has been crafted in secret in has no chance of becoming law. We could be doing something for Justice for truth for victims of crime. This is one hundred fifteenth congress good riddance with that I served the balance of my time. So let me explain my understanding. The bill. A Bill was introduced in the Senate Heidi Heitkamp called Savannah's act was passed in the Senate. The Senate controlled by Republicans. Then I assume brothers where need help it was moved to the house and at that time also under Republican control and one person. One person failed to vote for it. My question to you was you know, who that was no I replied to your your your question. Okay. You may not have seen it. Guess what? I'd said I would look into it and say who it was and I haven't found out with that was yet. Okay. The speaker at the time, of course, was that Eddie Munster look and mug Paul Ryan. Well, if it came down to one vote it was fifty fifty tie and it came down to one boat. It's it's the yeah. It's the speaker that. So they're they're they're there you have once again, you know, what I mean? I get so upset. But let me let me read this article speak or the or the vice president whoever was charged of that particular the body. One of the two of them would have done it. But. Here's what here's how the article where we let off with that to let people know that Savannah's act was defeated in the house. And so again, this story also comes out a rapid city. South Dakota says goes on here to say. When sandy swallow presented a carefully folded readdress to marry black bonnet one cold day. This winter. Friends with them learned that the dress would be one of seventy at an exhibit culminating in February twenty four th multimedia performance here at the journey museum to honor missing and murdered indigenous women. The installation of red dresses each with a alleged South Dakota crime victims name tag was mounted in the cottonwoods at the museum February tenth in the two week kick off of the quote, why campaign in quote aimed at comforting survivors of violence raising awareness of injustice and achieving equitable public safety enforcement. Swallow, black bonnet and other members of the red ribbon skirt society of the black hills who conceived the commemoration labeled and draped the dresses from the tree. So people could see them from Omaha St.. They plan to move the installation inside February twenty four th to be part of their finale presentation consisting of poetry, reading talks, photographic documentation, music treats and unveiling of the original work, quote why and quote by Jim yellow hawk. Swallows dress symbolizes, the nineteen sixty eight murder of her sister who she said, she also will represent within original verse at the event an excerpt, quote, Donald swallow, may you name never be forgotten strong Lakota woman. Big sister guiding and protecting me advising me on life. Donald swallow. Your life was not easy. You didn't complain or show your bruises and your pain in quote. Black bonnet author of the poetry book of poetry book here to here to be dragons said she will read some of the work she wrote, especially for the upcoming occasion. Which includes a found word introduction to an art book for guest sign quote. It is dedicated that those still trapped and those who've passed and quote, she says quoting her again, you are always in our hearts in quote. Black bonnet is particularly sensitized to the campaign issues after surviving her own rape. And battery a part of her went missing in the incident unresolved by law enforcement, she acknowledges quote doing this project has been very triggering for me, and quote, she told him say native son news today. Quote, I feel so grateful in many ways that I'm still here. And that I didn't disappear the whole situation could have been so different in quote. Yet. Addressing the issues was not new to black bonnet. Kid. Also since been alarmed by the losses of family members on her Rosebud Sioux Indian reservation Hugh recalls. The unresolved case of eleven year old Retana robot who went missing from a Rosebud family home twenty two years ago. It was never and was found murdered quote. It was horrific to me. I learned about the power of silence. I felt like someone had the answers, but they weren't giving them and quote. She urges family. Members of every age to be aware of their surroundings to take responsibility for their own safety, any others. But without becoming paranoid quote. We have to work out a balance between fear and a healthy environment in quote, she said quoting again, but I want people to think about when they see it is just a woman a woman or an Indian issue. It's that everyone is related to a woman somehow in some way in their lives, and quote, she added. Crime victims of unpunished violence are all too often children and teens. She noted many of the dresses in the installation are for them, including at least one of age three. Another part of the spec of the spectrum are the women who are quote, strong spirited and don't keep their mouth shut and quote, they are victimized. Quote, again, because some of the people don't like it when you point out the truth or discrepancies or things that are wrong, and quote, she said. She cites enemy o'clock a mic MAC, read power activists and thirty year old mother of two who spoke truth to power and was disappeared in nineteen seventy five. Her body with a bullet hole in the back of her head was found on the frozen ground of the Prien ridge Indian reservation, not until three decades later were suspects trials concluded. It was the disappearance of savannah, gray wind that spurred nationwide advocacy and media coverage for such victims after her Fargo, North Dakota. Neighbor pleaded guilty to killing her in a fetal objection two years ago. Black bonnet cries when she talks about it gray wind whose body was found in a river, quote was loved by many people and she had a husband who loved and supported her. And was there for her baby. And quote. The baby was reunited to be raised by the father. But will not know her mother. The tragedy is also, quote, a success story unquote in that it caused change to happen. Black bonnet comments quote. It was probably the first funeral that went down the streets of North Dakota that honored Indian woman end, quote, she said. Will be in the show notes for that. You guys. You know, what what's appalling to me even to this day? Is the fact that. You know, the lawmakers worry about how that pay for this. Well, the payment comes in the form of education teaching people what they shouldn't be doing. And it's a shame. But I've even got. And then teaching people that they're stiff penalties that will be imposed. If you do this. It's just that simple. You know, the the Justice system has become so convoluted that somebody can't commit a crime. And there's no accountability for thirty years down the road is evidenced by you know, the trials that just concluded after thirty years, absolutely. You know, I understand. Yes, mistakes can be made in the system and wrong. People can you know, such as, you know, been evidenced by, you know, the DNA projects that have gone on where people are incarcerated falsely for X number of years. But you know, that's that's why the education is so important. You gotta start somewhere in the that start holding people accountable. You know, there shouldn't have to be an argument, y'all. How are we gonna pay for it? You know, everybody. I'm sorry. No, nothing nothing. I'm listening. Everybody's safety should be a concern that shouldn't be there shouldn't be a price tag affixed to it shouldn't be a worry about. Well. How are we gonna pay for this? How is a paper that that the payout comes from doing the right thing? That's where the payout comes from. Well, you know, it's funny. It's funny. They bring up cost. You know, something important to us. Again, the positioning is where a blight on them. You know, what I mean when in fact, this is all part of what they should have been doing to begin with. Sure. But yet as you said, you know, suddenly, the, you know, a budget becomes an issue as I said that's where the payout comes in doing doing the right thing from the beginning. Then you won't have to worry about where where our we gotta pay for this. My grandmother was always famous for saying this. It's better to stay out of something than it is to try to get out of something. Yeah. Very true. So, and I've always I've always lived by that it's easier to stay out of trouble than it is to try to get out of trouble. It's always easier to do the right thing instead of trying to figure out ways to make it right? A mentioned the amount of energy your have to expend to get away with something that you know is wrong. Exactly. You know, it it's just straight of logic in again, if you apply that to all these losers in government. That tend to be more of the Republican today. Okay. But magin the amount of energy hide stuff in how absolutely pointless. It is to doesn't help anybody that need help. A Justice department that won't engage on this issue. No, I know. So that's that's sad thing. You know? Instead of, you know, not instead of looking at us as an antique witty or a groups of people that that don't deserve recognition of any sort do the right fricken thing, we are people. Exactly. You know, when you when when these non natives commit crimes against tribal people. Hold them accountable. Go back to the cliff we played the onset of this particular story. She said do the right thing for Indian women. Who are American women? Absolutely is what she said. But just these people don't care. About that. Those American women it's evidence in the vote. Oh, sure. So. All right to move on. And with that. Would like to introduce to you. What's all those beeps? The clean version, brother. Oh, I know. I lever. We would like to introduce to you our new mostly weekly segment America, examples of racism. This feature will focus on high profile examples of racism across the United States because we feel. It's needed. It's needed us needed. So would that I'm going to hand this off for first example to my brother, David grail? Who went away? Like. Hell of a lot of questions from people about why do you talk about racism? Well, I talk about it. Because. Not talking about it doesn't make it. Go away. You have to discuss something to be able to find out. What the solution is going to be if you say nothing than it just continues in a status quo says status and nothing gets done. Nothing gets done. There was something. We briefly talked about on chat the other day. And I I felt that it should be mentioned that I'm going to. Then I'll get into this next part and one of the problems with racism is the people responsible can't see it as racism because it's part of their everyday existence. Them racism is natural saying good morning. Unbelievable. That is sad. Definitely. Sad. And you know, when when racism becomes that, commonplace and people become that comfortable with it. You have to talk about it. But by the way, I mean, I mean. Most of them when people hear racism talking about. Oh, you know, blacks versus whites. Right. Exactly. Okay. There's racism within our own communities their own tribal communities. Oh, absolutely. Okay. You know in in. Right now, I won't call it out. But, but but we will get into it in a future episodes. But believe me when I tell you it happens within our own tribal communities as well. We we are not immune to this. But the education comes from recognizing it when you see it besides the very basic stuff like black people. In call them, you know, names that they shouldn't be calling them. But but didn't right. I'll put it back to you, brother. Thank you. All right in our first example. We will use something called tokenism. And this example, we go back to the part of the dog and pony show. And the Michael Cohen testimony and present an exchange between the putts, Mark. Mark meadows, a Republican from North Carolina and rush she'd tally by a democrat from Michigan's thirteenth district and one of two I ever newly elected Muslim people in congress newly elected that distinction is necessary because there are Muslims than congress already. You'll also hear chairman Elijah Cummings attempts fields the situation, and it's classic. Go about. Mexico, and do, you know land patent? I'm right here, you know, land patent. Just I do I I asked land to come today in her personal capacity to actually shed some light. How long have you known this, Pat, I'm responsible for Lind, Pat and joining the Trump organization and the job that she currently holds. Well, that's I'm glad you acknowledge that because you made some very demeaning comments about the the president that MS Patton doesn't agree with. In fact, it has to do with your claim of racism. She says that as a daughter of a man born in Birmingham, Alabama that there is no way that she would work for for an individual. Who was racist? How do you reconcile the two of those? Neither should I as the son of a holocaust survivor. But Mr. Cohen, I guess what I'm saying is I've talked to to the president over three hundred times. I've not heard one time a racist comment out of out of his mouth in private. So how do you reconcile it? Do you have proof of those conversations? Those conversations. No, sir. Well, you've taped everybody else. Wouldn't you not true, sir? That's not true. You have a taped anybody. I have taped in many times taped individuals maybe one hundred times over ten years is that a low estimate because I've heard over two hundred times now, I don't think I think it's a proxy one hundred from what I recall, but I would ask why ask me. Yes, or no. I do where's the proof Asmus Patten? How many people were black? Our executives at the Trump organization is we can go through this. I would I would ask you an annus set that her entire statement put in the record. Just to make a note. Mr Chairman, just because someone has a person of color, a black person working for them does not mean, they aren't racist. And it is insensitive that somewhat even say, it's the fact that someone would actually use a prop a black woman in this chamber in this committee. Is alone racist and itself. Donald Trump is setting. President. I reclaim my time. The president. Office can be Istra. Chairman the rules are clear cover up and hold onto business assets to break campaign finance laws house to shnell causes. Mr Chairman, I asked that her words when she's referring to an individual member of this body be taken down stricken from the record. I'm sure she didn't intend to do this. But if anyone knows my record as it relates. It should be you. Mr Chairman, would you like to rephrase that statement? Thank you. Mr chairman. I can actually read it from here. And I consider it this for the record. If a colleague is thinking that that's what I'm saying. I'm just saying that's what I believed to have happened if as a person of color in this committee. That's how I felt at that moment. And I wanted to express that. But I am not calling the gentleman Mr. models racist for doing. So I'm saying that in itself it is a racist act. I hope. Because I need to be clear on this. Mr Chairman, Mr. Mr. meadows, wait a minute. I defended you. False those. I'm gonna tear. Yes. Are you like you? I will clear this up. Now missile Leib. I wanna make sure I understand. You did not you're not intending to call Mr. meadows races. Is that right? No, MR chairman, I do not call Mr. medals racist. I am trying a person of color, Mr Chairman, just to express myself and how I felt at that moment. And so just for the record. That's what was my intention. There's nothing more personal to me than my relationship. My nieces and nephews are people of color. Many people know that you know, that Mr Chairman and to indicate that I asked someone who is a personal friend of the the Trump family who is worked for him who knows this particular individual that she's coming in to be a prop. It's racist to suggest that I asked her to come in here for that reason. And Mr Chairman, you are you, and I have a personal relationship is not based on color, and and to even go down this direction is wrong. Mr Chairman, first of all I wanna thank them. For what you have said. If there's anyone who is sensitive regard to race. It's me. Her brother. Well, you know, unpack this. Yeah. Let's let's pack. It goes there is a lot of dirty laundry. Yeah. Mark meadows is a racist. He as a racist. And he's he's he's whining because he's Bank called out in front of a committee on national TV Ford. He started Suri started. So let's let's be clear. He started in emails. He started by parading that lady in front of in front of the committee that way as a token to say, oh, see he's got a black girl working for me can't be racist books. And that's not to say that that that. I'm sorry. Her name is escaping me Linh when Patton can't speak for herself. But the thing is did he offer her to speak. No. He did not. No, no. He did not basically told her stand there and shut up all handle this, right? Pretty much. So so it's not a matter of lady can't speak for herself. It's not gonna matter whether or not the lady likes Donald Trump or not might be loyal to him because he's her employer. But this is about the representation of. You know, I just. You know, this goes back to the what I said about, you know. This. This country is going to be a terrible terrible way before things start to start to ride themselves. And when you have putz is like that Mark metals. That's why inning because he got called out for his his racist prop. You know, like I said, he probably doesn't consider anything Donald Donald Trump says racist because like I said before it's it's natural saying good morning to them. So I would have asked. I would've asked him. Nobody is doing this. Tell me Mr. medals twenty you consider racist. Nobody's holding any feet to the fire asked them point blank. What do you consider racist? And then see what they say. Uh-huh. But I digress. We have another clip of Mr. Mr. meadows. And some of his comments twenty twelve. That's correct. I think the audience if you're calling Marissa's middle prove it. Okay. You go the Morley find out the more. We realized how wrong direction we're going. So what we're gonna do is take back. Our ten thousand twelve is time that we're going to send Mr Obama home. Kenya? Where ever it is? There you go. Leading that was when he was running for. Election. Apparently, he won no surprise there. For district eleven North Carolina. So, you know, it's it's crap. Like that that keeps this country going, you know, people try to use the term, reverse racism. There's no such thing. There's no such thing. The freeloaders that came over here on boats. Excuse me and dragged of the people from other countries over here to work for nothing under threat of death and other things and the people who died on the shores in this land. That were original inhabitants. Didn't invent racism not. We did not create racism did not. It was created by those that came to the shorts uninvited. Who did not understand our way of life? But instantly said we were wrong. Said we didn't pray like them instantly. We were wrong. And there's plenty of examples in English Tex the backup, but we're saying again, oh, sure Google yell Indian papers project drop in any tribal name that you can think of us use my own tribe peak. Why drop it in their start reading the text? You'll see words like overseers. It's it's amazing to me that. People get offended. Over. I'm just going to say a word like call white person's call the cracker. How the hell can somebody get offended over being compared to a food? I'm a salty. What I I'm not understanding you nobody winds when when they say, you're the apple of my eye or yours. You know, you're you're cracked is not. Nobody gets offended over those things. Well, the term point trash the term white trash was created by Caucasian. Yes, it was. Yes. It was wasn't created button pool of call. And I'll be more specific it was created by Caucasians of of statute, meaning business white businessmen. That are making top dollar will look down on exactly lower white class. That's exactly where it came from. You're absolutely right. So, you know, people of color didn't invent the concept of racism. Sure is hell understand it. Trust me when I tell you I understand it. I been a victim of it most of my life. So I understand it. Well. So we have another example we do hearing. What? So this example, we've entitled I'm an Indian too Twitter. Recently was a flutter when two clips were circulated which involve our good, buddy. Alex Jones, the host and founder of the largely now discredited propaganda. News organization known as info wars who appeared on the Joe Rogan podcast were Jones proclaimed that he was six percent Comanche job is totally spoil my gut servers people need to know about all this. And this is what's going on? And this is what's happening and show. So they want the cement of blood is they get people on a group, and they get them to horrible evil things during per pressure, and they create the census, you have to know the darker elements of the criminal networks that are inside. Our government are actually running Mexico as a laboratory test because they know Americans are telling. Tae ho, and they're tough. And they're ready to fight know, I'm part native American six percent Comanche, and you know, a, Texas and just that little bit makes me wild. So they can get them 'cause they're powerful. They're smart. They're neat. They're cool. But. Genetically they go into group think really really fast, so native Americans you can mind control, really fast. You know, what I say that suck it? Well, it didn't stop there. Then. Then the duo transition into jenex with the Jones going on to say that people of Asian heritage. When fighting all quote, Cinco are robots and have no fear, and then goes into discuss the I q differences between races. Here's what the said. Like, nobody in fights in Korea Chinese that's really narrow Vietnam. They're like they're conscious real people. But when they get into a fight they all sync up a robots have no fear about psychotic killers. You're hiding and so- Asians are about the most fareless killers are like the Mongols. Agents go to war. It's like they do now there. It's don't even craze going wild on a battle. They're like robots coming to kill you. And so you think that's from do you think that's from their heritage of war that they're along? Like, if you think about Japan Japan is a long history of being a noble warrior culture with the samurais and all the Marshall. The nobility. It's the genetics crates that y'all it's like five hundred of you load and plans saying mean. Saying I mean, what I'm saying is think about a place like Japan where so much martial arts came from kendo sword fighting karate above a bunch of different branches across judo, Jiu, jitsu, Japan, all that stuff came from Japan. I mean that that that is a group of people that were obsessed with combat. I mean, they figured out class was well, not just that the soldiers and even the civilian. No, I agree, but the ruling class samurai shoguns the ruling class was the shogun's right end. When you think about what a small place Japan is stunning. It is that so much innovation especially in terms of like. Bell curve. You've got black people that are Sparta's any white person. And then you've got black people that are way better at sports, whatever their arginine differences. We're not then you've got the head of a former skull springs harbor. Watson comes out says blacks aren't him and all that Bs. That's just the racist crap the government, but it's true that northern some groups northern Europeans and the Japanese on average per capita q. Q. All right for for for implode. I. Eating. You'll get stuff all over the office. Worth noting again, info wars was banned from most social media platforms over Jones comments to incite his audience into taking up arms of the government tries to take away their guns because you you have a right to own your own, right? And he and his program also continued to say that the sandy hook school shootings that took place here in my home. State of Connecticut was a hoax. So this is the mentality that we're dealing with here. Okay. I kind of wish Dave from live in Tokyo was still in chat because I'm sure he could weigh in on this all the stuff that they were talking about Japan. Joe Rogan who apparently is a martial artist. The host the other voice that you heard. But also he doesn't have his martial arts facts because anybody that has studied the martial arts understands that the core root of the martial arts actually came from China. So he doesn't get a pass on that either. But the other point I wanted to know it is why do these people have such a fascination with violence. Because it gives them the upper hand where they wouldn't have it any other way. Thank we can. We can win with violence. If we can't win with anything else. That's the mentality. We have. People in archea archaeology and anthropological circles fascinated with studying. Combat. In the sense of past battles that occurred in the United States. In fact, even grants out there to support the study of. So an inexplicably when they start talking about battle and wars and taking up arms. It always an eventually leads back to indigenous people. Well, we only went to the Indians. Right. Yeah. As if you know talk about warrior, clans, I guess we had more. No question. Tough people. Okay. But they always they always pencil it into you know, what I mean. They can be supposedly. Acknowledging and respecting our strength. If you will. And then that gets as we've talked endlessly on the show about transitions into of course, you know, stereotyping us in mascots and things like that warriors. I wanna be a chief, right? Sorry. I can't stop doing the Jones. Void. Visit big Bubba. You don't forget six percent. Of course. Catchy. I know. That's where I get my craziness from. That's basically what he said, basically. I absolutely. That's exactly what he said. So any crazy you're warrior like clan people, right? Just can't make it up. You know, you can't you can't make it. And now top of that Jones used to show more hypocrisy. Okay. All right. You know? So having. The racist. You know? Things that he said, and then turns around said all point one hundred point the finger record, the US government, one of the reasons they're separate himself. Right. Makes no sense. Not. So anyway, there you go. There's there's there's a couple of quick apples for you. But just maybe you. But the that's all I got for the show this week. Well, I've got something else. You don't twenty one minutes left in the library. Guess that's all I need. Okay. No problem, something that. My ex studio partner my ex studio art partner posted on Facebook. The other day. And it's the unlikely success at Manja Lewis black sculptor in nineteenth century, America. Samuel C. Well, Boston-based abolution abolitionist excuse me. Lawyer was not expecting a delivery from Rome. So he was understandably shop to find three foot tall marble sculpture waiting for him at the city's port one day. Eighteen sixty eight the accompanying eight hundred dollar Bill for the artwork came as a second less. Welcome surprise. The artwork was title forever free. Eighteen sixty seven the work had been sent by sculptor Monia Lewis and depicted, I newly freed African American couple it celebrated the recent emancipation proclamation, and that had declared on January one eighteen sixty three that all persons held slaves within any state shall be then henceforth and forever free. Lewis who had begun her career in Boston years earlier by selling sculptured. Poetry. It's of abolitionist was hoping seawall. What helper find a buyer for forever free? He did the following year. The work was depicted to respect it pastor at underground railroad conductor wherever Leonard Grimes during a festive ceremony at Boston's Tremont temple. Like her uncommissioned sculpture Louis was used to being a surprise arrival on the art scene as a woman of mixed African and native American descent who came obeyed during the civil war her odds of making it were slim best yet, she managed to become the world's first professional African American sculpture sculptor, excuse me, celebrated internationally for our Neo classic style. And I quote the obstacles at Monte Lewis overcame was unparalleled in America are in quote wrote Henry hinders Harry Henderson, excuse me and the nineteen ninety three ball. My history of African American artists from seventeen ninety two to the present. Orphan data young age. Lewis was raised by her mother's Chippewa sisters and upstate New York in eighteen fifty nine supported by her brother. She traveled to a high to attend Oberlin college there. She received drawing instruction from experience artists. Georgina Anna why that's our first plaster casts of classical sculpture overland, which admitted both female and African American students was a major abolition the center at the time yet Lewis still face discrimination falsely accused of poisoning her roommates, stealing art supplies. She was denied the right to enroll for her final semester. Was there for able to graduate to continue her studies Lewis moved to Boston with a letter of introduction that secured her training under self taught sculptor Edward bracket. Although he was hopeful Lewis eventually decided it would be best to leave the United States and the summer of eighteen sixty five young sculptor boarded the ship to join the growing number of American artists working in Italy. The path to Rome was already well trodden by group of American women sculptors depreciating dubbed by author Henry James as a white Marian flock, great that included Harriet good Hume Haas Mer, Emma, stabbings and Margaret Foley Hossam was the first to recommend that Louis studied sculpture in Italy and arranged for her to rent a studio that once belonged to prominent Venetian sculptor Antonio Canova and that daunting workspace Lewis chisel away, I'm sorry. Lewis chisel newly freed African Americans with the timeless marble gravitas of the nail classical style. She also sculpted native Americans a subject many attributed to our personal heritage. But which may have signalled a desire to join the American art mainstream stayed representation of native Americans were very prevalent at the time both for artist working at home and artists work abroad in Florence and Rome because they had announced themselves as specifically American themes. Excuse me explains they are tallest curator of American paintings sculpture at the Metropolitan Museum of art. Louis spent her life traveling across the Atlantic emphasizing certain aspects of her Dimity based on her audience at the time during abolitionist, she found reciprocal interest and common ground with anti-slavery advocates. Said Patrick said Christian pie Buick to the professor of history at the university of New Mexico and author of child on fire. Mary Ed Mani Lewis and the problem of arts history. Black Etienne subject twenty ten after slavery was abolished Lewis sculpted religious subjects that appeal to Catholic patrons in Italy at England. And the popularity of Henry Wadsworth long fellows nineteen. I mean, I'm sorry. Eighteen fifty-five epic poem the song of hiawatha which tells the story of two star crossed lovers. From different native American tribes set the stage for Lewis to share answer antidotes for her. I'm sorry, answering of her nomadic Jeb watch would. Louis sculpted a version of the fictitional couple eighteen sixty eight a pair of marble figures that are today on display at the met. Nice. There was a typical practice at the time. According to pick Lewis did nothing beyond what other items. Did she says she found patronage where there was interest one hundred years later? Louis sent forever free to see while it caught the eye of James porter. The father of African American ideas three artist himself Puerto ended up ended up acquiring the sculpture for Howard University where he was both a professor and director of the gallery, and I quote, he really tried to get the university underspent understand the importance of negro art in quotes, Scott Baker who was the assistant director of the Howard University gallery of art. And I quote again, you have to remember this was back in nineteen sixty seven. So they didn't think much of it. So he purchased it with his own money in quote forever. Free has prominently display. It has been prominently displayed at the university ever since as it turns out both school in sculptor sculpture were created that same year and they celebrated their shared hundred fiftieth anniversary twenty Anna. Virtually Antoni seventeen the artwork currently serves as the centerpiece of an ongoing exhibition marking the sets Quin tent tannehill a far cry from its unheralded rival and Boston a century and a half before. And I think Karen chair Nick for that article, very cool. And I think my ex studio partner for posting its why could share it with everyone. Excellent. Absolutely. Absence of people. Read it again, if they want our research more. I will include it in the show notes. So. So would that you guys we appreciate you coming and hanging out with us for this nearly now three hours and prohibit it would like to thank everybody who's in chat right now. And who earlier thank you, very very, much and. Coming hanging with us here as I play out as we like to say, you cannot reach us here at the show by emailing us hosts with an S hosts that native opinion dot com or available out on the major social media networks. So that's Twitter and Facebook Twitter. It's at native opinion our Facebook page, it's Facebook dot com. Forward slash native opinion podcast. Our website is native opinion dot com, and we're also podcast. So you can subscribe, which is free and get this show delivered to you every single week when we do it. You can go to any of the major podcast directories, apple podcast, Google podcasts. Spotify our heart radio and many many others. My name is Michael kicking bear from the Mashantucket Pequot travel nation. He is David Gray album, the children Cherokee tribe, Alabama dot Gauley. I think you guys ever so much once again, I stay put up a language be. Well, everybody have great week see next week. Bye.

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#29: Chris Capell - Coffee Savant and Entrepreneur

The SpiritBros Podcast

2:24:26 hr | 2 years ago

#29: Chris Capell - Coffee Savant and Entrepreneur

"This is Peter love wa this is Scott Simon's, and this is the spirit broS podcast, a podcast about entrepreneurship, health and spirituality today is the day, one of my personal most anticipated episodes, ever, the big one, the one I love it's the coffee episode. Yes, you heard correctly. I said the coffee episode who better to guide us through the coffee episode. Then Coffey savant, Chris Capelle now before I get to Chris, and who he is. And what he does I want to say that today's episode Mr. Scott Mike co-hosts my spirit, bro, could not make it. So we had to find someone to take his place, the first person who came to mind, was Matt's Yar Dumont. You may remember Matt from all the way back episode. Three on the spirit rose podcast where Matt came on and told us about his crew. Ross fit Jim cross fit cap up. He's also a huge health nerd loves learning about health loves learning about how to optimize physical health. And also a huge pootie matinee go way back. We definitely connect over food. We've even taught food workshops together workshops on nutrition. But one thing we definitely connect on is our shared love for coffee. Yes, we are both huge coffee fans. So Matt was the obvious choice and very happy that he could come on the show and co host it with me, as we had Chris, Chris Capelle with us in the studio. So Chris is the former founder and owner of liquid to the knife now known as myriad cafe. Myriad onsite Denise street in Montreal. He is the current owner and founder of Montreal coffee academy. The Montreal coffee academy offers classes of all types all the way from professional trainings for baristas who wanna take it to the next. Level two classes for casual coffee enthusiasts such as myself. I took one of the classes at the academy, and even based, my home setup on that class that I took with Chris, we definitely spend a big chunk of time in this show, just talking coffee, I asked him all the questions I could think of I even thought of questions after the show, then like, oh my gosh. How did I not ask him that have haven't back at some point? But I think I got to a lot of really interesting topics on coffee, both on how to make delicious coffees to the whole culture, the whole theory of coffee. And what does it mean to be a progressive coffeemaker third wave coffee maker? So Chris helps us define some of these terms and understand them better. He also walks us through the whole process from grain and ground to coffee Cup in hand. So we talk about how the plant the coffee plant and the bean itself, how. It can impact flavor how the processing of the coffee bean impacts lever in how the extraction process all of these different steps. How the impact flavor and how you can optimize these steps Chris gives us some tips on what we can do when we're making our own coffee at home, and how we can make it so bad. The best flavor comes out. The also walks us through some of the entrepreneurial experience, he's had both with liquid toll running a coffee business. Some of the challenges, he met as an entrepreneur, and some of the things he learned and whether or not he'd do things the same way he had to go back and start from scratch again. I know this episode is not the subset but the show is a show about spirituality, if you're like me, and you love coffee, I guarantee you will have a spiritual. Experience listening to Chris speak about coffee. This guy is the real deal. This is an amazing episode. This is Chris Capelle on the spear Bros podcast. The spirit grows podcasts. Christabel. Welcome to the spirit, rose podcast. Thanks very much. And before we dive into all things, Chris, I want to say hi to Metra's multi. Yes. Yeah. Co host of the day impressive welcome back to the podcast about to be here. Yes. So, so Matt, you may remember him from our episode on, on cross fit and Crawford, cap up where you talk to us about training and business and running across business, and lots of amazing official life of the business owner in bucks. So it's great to have you here because I know you're a fellow coffee lover enthusiasts, and we have, like, the, the coffee captain slash professor slash grew slash maestro. I don't know what title you may be a humble humble title. Maybe it's like we're just having casual living back with God tests, even before had, like we were like making coffee before the podcast started, and we were like you're giving us like a home class. And man, I think we're just to be there soaking up the wiz. Adam is the beginning of the Wayne's world. We're not worthy. Stuffed tends to spill out of me somewhat naturally. I think my bio on the, the coffee kademi website, says, like Chris can talk about coffee for a long time. So yeah, so take advantage guys. For real because if you love coffee like hearing you speak about it. It's like it's poetry cool. So before we jump into the coffee aspect, I, I heard you, streaming, you we talked about ukulele before we start recording. So I learnt that you're also ukulele player. What's your favorite ukulele song? What's one song that really got you sort of an amored with the instrument? I mean, I, I are playing ukulele when I was like seven or eight or nine or something like that. So that was a nineteen twenty two. And so I was just playing folk stuff and things like that. But as an adult, I got back into it, you know, when with the hipsters where doing covers of, like, you know, really serious songs, but on like this fun punky little things. So I still like that kind of stuff, I think I was playing Radiohead earlier. So when I hear those kind of fun covers on ukulele and stuff that, that tends to be the thing. There's something I talked to my brother about it because he also plays guitar and ukulele and stuff. And there's something non serious about the ukulele that makes you feel like a little freer to. Sit down and just plink away, kind of thing where it's like you can go around on guitar too. But there's something when you pick up a guitar you're like, okay I should play now. But usually it's like we. Yeah. It's so true. When even when you get into those kind of more melancholy songs on the U Cooley, there's like a cheer that's added to it. And so it's really fun to, to cover a song. That's got a bit more darker. Undertones good on the UK just one of my favorite bands that I used to play cafe all the time is the Smiths and one of the things said about him is that like their music? Sounds really, really happy and their lyrics are really dark so fund makes right? All men. All right. So one thing I guess where I want to start posting daily talk is. You, you have a past life, as, you know, working in production and film, and video games. What was that Jeff like an early moment where you felt either drawn to, to the creative aspect of that, that jaw are to the, the group, the teamwork, the, you know, like that, that special magical mirror miraculous thing that comes together when, when there's a much more shallow story. Yeah. Which I, I was finished university. And I was back working at the same restaurant that I've been working at summers while I was in university just trying to pay off my hydro-quebec Bill that I had accrued during my last year students because we had an apartment that had really crappy installation and the Bill was sky high by the end of the year. So I was back just working at that restaurant. And I was going to the gym and a guy in the gym was wearing a t shirt for the Panasonic. Three DO. I believe is the name of the, the platform. It was the one of the first CD base CD ROM based video game systems. And this was in Victoria, Victoria BC. Ninety three okay? Ninety three ninety four. And he was wearing this t shirt. And I'd read about it in wired magazine though, system wasn't even out yet. And, but it was coming and I was playing Seca Genesis or whatever at the time it was kind of like CD based game. Awesome. And so I asked him, you know, like where where where. Where'd you get that teacher whether and he's like, oh, I work for a company that that is making a game for it. You know, you should come by and check it out. And I was like, okay, and so I came by and gave me a tour and, you know, people were walking around in shorts eating slices of pizza, which in nineteen Ninety-three was like no way. I was just like I would have. And that's literally how I got into video kids. That's really cool. I, I have no training. I just I have an English degree, but I'd love to do anything and he looked at me and he went video game. Tester get me your resume tomorrow. We're looking for somebody, and I was like, okay. Wow. Back into days. Because Sega Genesis like you said it was like the big platform at that time. Now, three D, O, CD-rom remember, having that kind of parameters that you put under your Genesis with CD-ROM right after all them after. That was we're looking back into the next level. But that is back in the days because like video game, the video game industry at that point. I don't think it had nearly the same amount of polish are renown today today you walk in the mile end. And you've got like every, you know, those Ubisoft there's these other like gaming companies set up and it's like it's huge in the and I went to work for electric arts after that small company in Victoria, got headhunted over to the Vancouver was. A big company at that point. But it was pretty much the only one like it was the only really big established company. Everything else at the time was, was more small sort of independent stuff. So because it was the A I think, when I mentioned it to my parents, they were kind of pretty happy. But if I if I said, I'm just going to work for, you know, some other little small thing or something that they would have been, like, rarely video games. I don't know. But now, of course. Yeah, it's like people you video games. Awesome excited. To this day. One of my favorite all time video games. NHL ninety four oh, you're your initial NHL guy. I just played the NHL ninety four that's for me. That was it. I didn't get into the fence you like current and it shall ones. But ninety four I mean, I've, I've spent countless hours, including buying a super Nintendo, like in two thousand and seven with my raincoat time. And then it was he and I and we got like it was crazy. Amount of hours was such mind games at the end. You know the other guy, so. Well, it's a coup who blinks first. Not. You're playing the team you're playing him at that point. Yes. Now at. In vancouver. That's why they did most of the sports games. So they did hockey. They did a feta. They did baseball and basketball which is what I ended up working on. Yeah. Right on up, but you also dabbled in films. So I when I left video games, I took a year off and I did just some freelance writing and stuff like that for magazines and stuff like that. And then I got into it was motion capture actually for computer animated cartoons at mainframe entertainment head of the curve. You're jumping this thing. Well, it's not that different an environment. It was a bunch of, you know, like techie people in, in cubicles, some creative, some more technical programming side. Yeah. And then, you know, trying to make an entertainment product. And then I went from that into visual effects basically. So. So what, what now like looking back? What do you, what's you take from that time spent in visual effects in video gaming, and film? I, I can still I think some people when they get working in a specific area. They get too close inserts the pug them or they get tired of it or something that, but I still really love how I can watch films now and I can see the craftsmanship. I can see the choices that were made, I can still see even visual effects, I've been out for ten years now. And a lot of stuff has changed. But I can still see some of the technical stuff that's done, and I can go whoa. That's a really complicated shot. Even though it doesn't just passes you by and it smooth it pops out to me. So I like the insight that, that gives me into, you know what it takes to make something from from having been there on the inside for a while. Yeah. Are you a gamer I actually stopped video gaming when I got into film because I realized that, like, okay I've got a free evening or a weekend or something that I can either spend five six hours and get an eighth of a w-. Away into a video game or I can watch citizen Kane, and like some other classic though, is like there was so many movies that I wanted to educate myself with that. I just switched over and I kind of lost the taste for gaming. I I'll my girlfriend's a big gamer and I'll still do casual gaming with her, like Mariel Bharti and stuff like that. But the minimum party in. Yeah, I got her the switch for Christmas last, not this year. But the year before that, so is that good. Yeah. It's fun. It's a good system. What about you matter, your gamer, I used to? Yeah. Probably the same thing after a while. I used to be a big gamer for specific starcraft back into days on. Oh, but after a while when you start to do something else who that I'll do I use my time game. I really wanna spend it like four or five our computer used to play word of aircraft, like crazy back in the days. Really? Grossly. There's three categories. There's people that don't wanna game at all. There's people like you and I can really get into gaming for a while. But then if it comes down to time we're going to pick something else. And then there's other people who are like, no matter what's going on their life. They're going to make time for it. So that's fell by the wayside, but somebody Sylvia. That's still got like some, some games on my computer and I'm like, yeah, she'll be fun to play. But I'm like, do I really want to spend an hour that and not get at the end of the level of something like that? Yeah. That now there's something else. That's the level of questioning I haven't. Now I can say it's it is like when I, I love gaming still to this day. But I try to choose games that have like a firm finish. Right. Because now with a free to pay models. And a lot of the games they want recurrent current interaction with the game. And then the game set up so that you spend money. Yeah. And like if I like like the last game that I got into that doesn't have a clear finish was counter strike global offensive, and that's a first person shooter, that strategic, and like in the group, competitive sports, you know, when I love the competitive aspect and kind of scratch that each with their game. And I felt peop- in a rabbit hole. And like you said it's like so many hours spent on this game, and I'm like, okay, I got to, like, move myself away from this, because I'll just keep playing forever. Trevor that I used to work with Electronic Arts. He sees the term krono fish each time. You seem like as a person of very sort of whatever you get into whether it's a hobby, or profession, that be passionate to be really thorough and dive into it if if it's the right thing. Yeah. I mean I think I'd like to say it's about passion. I think it might have been something that my dad inculcated into my brain a little bit about, like if you're going to do something do it. Well and. You know, and that applies to, like, like how I do dishes and everything like that. But it has a dark side, which is that if I feel like I can't do something. Well, then I just don't want to do it. I would run into that at work if I get an assignment from a boss that I was like this is not going to work out. I would be really resistant to it. I'd be like, and I'd try and like fight and resist taking the thing. And it would frustrate my boss bosses. That's interesting because that's not all. How I the impression I got out of you making one of your coffee workshops, but we can get to that later. I mean, let's let's, let's use that let's transition from, maybe that mindset in the gaming production side to Admiral if this the right date, but around two thousand five you start getting into coffee so, yeah, why why that time? What's the draw coffee? What's the? It's an it's another great little shallow story. Is that I was dating a girl who I didn't actually drink much coffee at the time, I used to drink coffee when I was in university, the way that you take aspirin when I would take it when I needed it to stay awake for a class or something like that. And I was drinking bad coffee and diet coke. And some of that and my stomach started to hurt, and so I kinda just laid off it, and so I was dating a girl, she was my first francophone Quebecois girlfriend, and she really liked her bowl of cafe ole so on the weekend, we get up and make a bit of a fancy breakfast. And I had because I had a condo. And you had to have one of these things I had a little plastic two hundred dollars special machine on the counter, and it made terrible coffee and the coffee got worse over time. Now looking back. It was probably, I don't know. Maybe the water chemistry was getting worse or machines. Just getting dirtier. I don't know what because I didn't know anything about any of that stuff, but it was just getting worse and worse than I you know, I said, I'm going to go on the internet, and I'm gonna figure out the best. Espresso machine. I can I'm going to pay like five hundred dollars and I'm going to have top machine gun at the time I was working in film, and there was no contracts were between contracts that the production house. I was at. And so I had a lotta time I literally could just sit there for like I think I spent a week straight eight hours a day, just reading coffee forums. If my former bosses listening, sorry. I rapidly realized that five hundred dollars was barely going to get me a grinder, and that you needed a grinder. You couldn't use progress offi, but I also learned about this new movement in coffee, that was happening. I in my classes, I always try and use the term progressive coffee because I think it's a better term. But of course, most people still use the term third wave. You elaborate on that. We'll maybe. To that after. Yeah. Exactly. But so I saw that there was this new thing going on. And it was kind of interesting to me, it was geeky. The forms in particular that I was reading where a little more focused on the equipment side, and modification and brewing parameters and things like that. And so, I was like okay that kind of rings, a bell for me. And also I could see it. You could just keep going. You know, you could learn, you know, and learning is for most people even whether they realize it or not, you know, your brain goes to a fun place when you're learning new stuff at this point, were their third wave or progressive coffee, scenes anywhere, like yeah. There were some of the most more west coast at that point in North America anyway. But there was one in Montreal at the time we ask cafe or javelin mount Royal and. Taking you back. But anyway, so I after a week I pushed the button on a seven hundred fifty dollars Espresso machine, and like three hundred and fifty dollar grinder and I pressed the button and like how to five second panic attack 'cause I was like, how much did I spend on that coffee and? It became my hobby at home. And as we were talking about in the kitchen just beforehand when people come to me, and they say, I want to get into doing coffee at home. So you know what Espresso machine should I buy say, okay? Hold on. Let's step back a second here. Why do you want an Espresso machine at home? Is it just because you want to have a nice latte in the morning. And if the answer is, yes, then I tell them just find the cafe that's on the way to your work, and just stop by and get one on the way because buying an Espresso machine to just have a coffee in the morning is like buying a vintage Vespa scooter in order to go from home to work. You're you're going to get from home to work, but you're also gonna spend a lot of your time in the garage on the weekend tinkering with it, and trying to order parts that don't aren't made anymore, online, and informs with fest Boehner's, and stuff like that. And that's exactly what Espresso is at home. So I if people say, oh, no, I don't really want to be spending an hour and a half every week, every Saturday, dialing in playing with different. Recipes and cleaning my machine and reading forums, and things like that. And, you know, never mind just the weekend but like joining the week and stuff as well. Then I tell them, you know, what filter is is a great option for you. So, so many things. Thanks, a camp, sir. I'm sure some coffee fans like the way you're speaking. That's exactly me. When I took your workshop the first time I'm hearing the questions that I was asking you. I was curious about getting answered, and I'm sure a lot of people who love coffee are passionate about coffee. Think that Espresso are just because that's what's used in all coffeeshops is the height is some of coffee concoction in quality, and taste and everything else. And what you're saying is that, that's not necessarily the case. So I, I do this little spiel in my class and I'll try and condense it down because I'm on your time. Not my time here. Take as much time to talk about this golden, the lake Sarah, God's that his coffee there is this belief now that Espresso is, is in the minds of I think, the general coffee market, that Espresso is this better fancier thing Espresso was invented to be faster. It it was the added pressure. And they realized that they could make coffee in thirty seconds as opposed to three four five minutes. Which normally it takes without pressure. And that was it. I like to show this. A poster from the from the time when Espresso machines were invented from a company that still exists called Victoria. Or do we know it's a classic poster? You can see it in, like poster shops on mount Royal and stuff like that still. It's this guy leaning. It's like sort of an art, deco art, nouveau, sorta to design this guy in a long, trench coat leaning out of a train to receive a Cup of Espresso. This just come off this one of those beautiful tall. Espresso machine. Yeah, you go on the top. And it's like that's what they were at the time. That's what they were proud of his look, how fast we can make coffee. We can make it so fast that you don't even have to get off the train, you could just shout out the order, and we'll pass it to you. You know, that's all that's all they wanted to do. And in one hundred years since for many, many reasons it's become conflicted with something, that's better quality. There is a route to that, which is that, you know, Espresso is always served freshly brewed. Right. Whereas filter can be served freshly brewed and increasingly it is now with the progressive coffee, scenes and stuff. But for most of the hundred years that Espresso as existed filter has been served. It's been Bruton big pots and then left to sit on oil or for thirty minutes. Whereas America where, you know, our filter is like folders. We also wasn't the best quality ingredients and all that kind of stuff with the intelligence didn't have great colleague ingredients either for most of that time it was really just that most filter was prepared in advance and then held for long periods of time in order. So that when you walked in, you could still get your Cup pretty quick. Yeah. That's not a fault of the method that's a fault of the way it served. If you if you brew coffee in smaller batches, and you serve it more fresh filter coffee. The other thing that I talk about is the big advantage of the filter format for when you're trying to taste, subtlety and coffee, the concentration of Espresso is so high that it's just a big punch flavor in your mouth, all at once guys who are paid to taste coffee for living guys who by green coffee for roasters or roasters having received the green coffee from their buyer, and they're trying to figure out exactly how to roast coffee. They're tasting it in style. We call it cupping and a coming is the exact same concentration is filter. So we're trying to find the tiny little, like defects, and stuff in flavor to decide whether they spent one hundred thousand dollars on this lot of coffee or not there tasting it at the concentration of filter. It's clear to me that filter is the superior tasting format. Can we can we go through that? And that seems like a really interesting notion. So cupping when you Cup Espresso you're going to you're going to use this. Okay. Can you just kept coffee? You just you just cut coffee. But you want it to be the same ratio as a filter. Her cough. Yeah. But that's not normally the case Espresso uses less water, norm. Exactly. So Espresso is for each gram of dry coffee. You're using your passing way less water. And so it makes a Cup that is far more concentrated, which is why we serve it in smaller little portions cat, if you served in eight ounce Cup of Espresso. You'd kill somebody. I saw. Actual technical lethal dose for caffeine is really, really high. But it is just not the way we drumming forest Bresso in a Cup. Yeah. Starting their Schiff. I've seen that too, in my years, I once or twice a week, you get somebody that would come in and order, the quad the four double shots or something like that. And you just be like, okay, buddy, serving beckon Afghanistan, serving the mother of all coffee. The Milwaukee was four shots of Espresso and filter. That thing was insane by up that I'm that kind of guy to that level of caffeine consumption, and I can I can verify that it's near hallucinatory. Yeah. All at that point. Start seeing and hearing are not their God. Okay. The four guy within for their startup. Everybody was out outgained now. We're just dying nothing. Good is been from finishing that Cup. Yeah. The concentration that filter is that which is the same concentration and cupping just over over time with experience has been proven that the human tongue tastes best around that human can distinguish different things and subtleties a little more if it's a weaker than that it starts falling off, again, your perception because it's too weak for you to pick it out. But, you know, if you go stronger than filter coffee significantly towards Espresso, you, you get a big punch of flavor. It's more concentrated, but your ability to, like separate the different notes and to taste the but, like I say potential defects, or things like that are actually reduced. I love hearing you talk about coffee, so fun. Okay. Like again, there's so many things done packing that so, so you're talking about the, the ratio of filter coffee is the ideal amount, of, I guess, flavor compounds per water yet quantity for to be able to pick things apart. I'd mentioned this as well in my class that if you've ever done a whiz. Ski tasting when I asked this blessing less people say, yes, I don't know what happened on whiskey tasting isn't a thing anymore. But if you go the essay Q, and you do like a tasting or something like that, they'll often offer you flat water to dilute, the whisky down a little bit. They won't give you ice because if you call it down, you actually reduce flavor, perception room, temperature is actually better for human tasting. That's also evolutionary for most of human evolution. We didn't have fire so people could taste better at room temperature were more likely to avoid rotten meets void plants that were poisonous, and they would pass their genes on. So we taste better around room, temperature. So which is why you should also let your coffee cool a little bit, you'll taste it better. But. So you won't they won't recommend ice for whiskey tasting they won't recommend carbonated water because that's got you get you shift, the flavor. There's carbonic acid and stuff. But they will say if you want a little flat water, it'll open up the flavors. It doesn't open up anything it, it just dilutes the whiskey down closer to a concentration that the human tongue can work more with, because like Espresso straight whiskey. There's a lot of flavor there. And I mean, if you taste to Espresso side, by side from different coffees or two different whiskies, you will taste the difference between them, but you won't be able to taste the subtleties in each one as much as if you had it in a more dilute form yet. So I love this, because this reminds me of the class, I took a filter coffee class with you at the Montreal coffee, academy and hearing you speak about coffee in this way. Like for me was the realize ation that third wave isn't just a fancy name of describing these, these new coffee spots are opening up and seemed to have. This vintage. Look, it's it's there's a there's a lot of research and science and passion going into understanding. How do you how do you develop, how do you deliver the best flavor of coffee there? So there's one I have a quote from you. I to read the quote, and you maybe elaborate on that. And the code is if my Espresso runs five seconds, too fast and is sour. The customer is tasting my brewing. They're not tasting the bean, right? The machine right? If my Espresso runs a five seconds, too fast and is sour. The customers tasting my brewing. They're not teaching the bean or the machine. So that, that seems like a, you know, a simple concept maybe for someone who's in in the progressive field. But for someone like maybe me and mad. I don't know about you met. I'm like, wow. Okay. Why what's the difference between? Let's five seconds in Espresso. So this is. I mean, it was one of the reasons why we opened the academy actually, is that having had the cafe for many years, I would hear comments like people would come in, and they would go, you're using I used to use forty ninth parallel coffee, and their Epoca's Presa was my special Goto, and they say, oh, you use epic, Espresso I had that somewhere else. It was it was sour. I didn't like it. I don't want one of your coffee's and I'd be like, well wait a minute. You know, because it's the same thing I would also get the opposite. I would get people coming in saying, oh, you're using forty nine. That's why your coffee, so good or. Oh look at your beautiful machine. This is why your coffee so good. And I you know, one of the things I start the classes with his saying, I can take the best being in the world, the best roast in the world, the best machine in the world. And I can still make something that is utterly non drinkable. It's a real surprise for people when they take the classes, and we, we go through all the theory at the beginning. But then when we go over to the machine, and we start tasting we'd just start tweaking Pramod or slightly, how massively different you can make a coffee taste. I don't want to save it, most of the. Waiver and a coffee comes from the brewing. It has it, it does come from the origin and from the bean flavors, there are in the bean and they are then transformed as well in the roaster. So I guess the farmer in the roaster really create the flavors that are there, but which flavors are coming out into your Cup can massively shifted by the barista. And like I say, it's a real revelatory moment for a lot of people, they didn't realize that like that. It had that much effect on it. So what for me what I'm trying to do is decouple that idea. P in people's mind that what they're tasting is just the being or is the machine or anything like that, to realize that, like if they get a bad coffee, it might not be the machines fault with the coffees fault. And if they get a good coffee. It's not just because of the being and the machine it's also because of the person who pulled the shot the Cup. Yeah. Can you walk us through then let's say hypothetical from the seed in the ground for the coffee in a Cup? Like, what are the, let's say the main factors that will influence a taste from. So one of the major hallmarks of the progressive coffee movement, is that we're trying to preserve as much of the terroir flavors of the bean as possible, and we use the exact same word terroir that they use them wine because they've already established everyone accepts very much that wind from one vineyard is going to taste different than one from another vineyard, and they didn't believe that in coffee. And that's our mission is to try and convince people of that. So just by borrowing the exact same language we immediately get some legitimacy, but. It's also true in the same way that grapes, are affected by the soil that they're grown in the variety of grape that they're grown in the weather and also the techniques that the farmer uses to grow it and to process, it is the same stuff happens in coffee. So, like I say the soil in Kenya is particularly acidic, and it produces a coffee that has a little more vibrant acidity different varieties. We'll have more emphasis on certain flavors and versus others. And then the altitude is also important that sort of falls into the terroir the, you know, the, the geographic location, a little bit as well. Yeah. Coffee that's grown at higher altitudes is usually a bit more complex. So there's all that kind of stuff the next major step that affects flavor is after the coffee. Well is the care put into not just the growing, but also the harvesting of coffee coffee actually ripens at different speeds, you walk by a coffee tree, and you look at a branch and you'll see. There's a bunch of cherries that are really nice and ripe and some that are a little less than some that are still green. And so when it's picked you have to actually just hand pick the ones that are already ripe. There is a way to get around that you can mechanically stripped, pick all the cherries, and then just separate them later, you can float coffee in water, and on, ripe ones will sink to the bottom. But then obviously you lose those. Yeah, you have to sell them to a lower grade market. So the best coffee, the kind of coffee that you guys are drinking right now is handpicked. So the picker has to go back over several weeks during harvest to get the ones that are a few weeks later, now, those ones are ripe, so there's the pick and the sort, you know, if there's any kind of sort that stunned to get any unwraps that happened to fall in, then there's the processing and there's generally two types of processing, but there's some hybrids and things that are going really classically, most coffee, that served nowadays is what we call a wash coffee. And so the flavors are the sort of flavors that us. Associate with coffee. But more and more people now have had the opportunity to try what's called a natural process or a dry processed coffee. And that coffee is actually left to dry in the fruit of the coffee cherry until the fruits, sort of starts to crack off, and dry off, and then the beans pulled out that way. And because it's left in the versus I should I should clarify the wash. Coffees are actually soaked in water in order to soften the fruit. And then they're moved that way. So, because the dry process it's left in the fruit, there's this crazy, I like to say, like fruity pebbles cereal kind of flavor gets added to the copy. And so if you if you if you've ever just happened to have or smell the bag of coffee or Cup of coffee or whatever, and you get this crazy weird fruit smell. That's from the processing, actually. It's not necessarily the, the tear war, one of the knocks in, in the industry from, for example, ScotRail my former coffee. He's still my current mentor, my former boss. My current mentor. Is he doesn't like natural processes much because they actually homogenize is the flavor a little bit. Up naturally processed coffee from Africa and South America, actually tastes, much more similar to each other than a washed one would because you had this crazy big strong fruit flavor over top, and you start losing maybe a little of the other subtleties. But there are some people that really love it as well, then after the processing, it's I'd say the next step for something not necessarily good. But more bad to happen would be in shipping. Coffee used to be shipped in jute bags. And unfortunately, those are poorest to air and water and animals. Crawling around in the hall of the ship that it's being shipped or something like that. Mice and rats. The better better coffee is now shipped in with a grain bags, which is sort of hermetically sealed, very thick plastic, the punctured and stuff. So you can preserve flavor a little bit better. And then it's how long it takes to get from origin to the roaster the shorter. You can get that the less loss of flavor and stuff like that. There is then is the roasting and again, this is something that I go on at length about in the classes, they'll do a little condensed version in progressive coffee, as I mentioned. We're really trying to preserve as much as possible the origin flavors of the coffee. So we tend to go for much lighter roast than maybe the majority of the industry, still does for us. There's this kind of magical point in our heads, where the grain, I quit, I do it in French and English light switch back and forth. But see that there's the, the coffee seed, which becomes our coffee bean is has to be kind of cooked all the way through. You gotta, you know, you've got to transform the bean. Yeah. For two reasons one because coffee before it's roasted if it's not fully transformed has very different flavors. It's very sour and green and grassy and not very good tasting and then also green coffee is not very soluble in water, right? So your roasting in order to increase the solubility can I ask you something? That's just what is roasting is like a baking oven. Is it a broil? Is it, what's the process of, it's literally just the application of heat? The simplest roasting technique is still done to this day and ET Opio when you make coffee in Ethiopia you start with green beans, and you literally just cooked him in a pan and you until they're roasted and then you grind it up using a mortar and pestle and you brew it. So that process is they, they never get start with roasted coffee and yeah. Yoga every time you make a Cup of coffee, you roast on the. Well, traditionally, I'm sure there are cafes now that have roasted coffee, but the traditional coffee ceremony that's done in every household couple times a day, and interestingly popcorn with their, their coffee, which I think, is awesome. I wanna try that definitely. But it's literally application of heat. So obviously, it gets more and more complicated. But most commercial roasters nowadays are done in one of two styles. Is either a giant drum roaster? So it's kind of a horizontal drum that spins and kind of, like if you're drier, basically, and the beans are just in there, and they apply heat, and it's much more complicated. There's airflow and rate of rise of temperature and all kinds of stuff that I'm happy. I don't have to have anything to do with 'cause I stick to the side, but the other style is more of an air roaster, it's more sort of a vertical container and the coffee beans are in their heat is applied and also airs shot through it. So the beans kind of bounce constantly so that, you know, the, the main reason why you want the movement is just so that like one side doesn't stick to something hot and. Get burned on one side and Ron the other or something like that. He said something to the greener like the progressive coffee movement. You want to have on the greener side. Why would anybody want the, the opposite, not the green or side, just the same was is that you have to cook it all the way through all so that you transform it, the, the flavors away from that sort of sour green into the kind of flavors, we actually one copy. And so that it's really soluble in water, but we want to stop. Exactly at that point. We don't want any further and for us the analogy uses always when you're cooking steak. If you go pass medium, you're starting to taste, the cooking more than the steak. So an I have no problem with people that, like their steak well done, and I have no problem with people that, like dark coffee. But if you're trying to taste the origin flavors of being the further you go pass that sort of magic, optimal point, the more, you're actually starting to either burn off some of the delicate origin flavors. They are delicate flavor compounds and enough heat will like literally pull them out and destroy them and, and, or you're going to actually start adding roast flavors on top. There are flavors that when you start roasting enough. It's the same as when. It's a steak starts going beyond medium. There are flavors of roast like the flavor notes on dark roasted coffee are often tobacco smoke leather, you know, things like that. And again, no problem if somebody likes those kind of flavors, but the thing is that when you do that, if you have a coffee from Indonesia and Kenya two very different origins. The darker you go. The more they're just going to taste the same. They're just gonna taste like dark roasted coffee, so your question why would someone do that? It's either a because they like those dark roasted flavors which, again, I have no problem with or be because the roaster believes, and I would still have to say that most restaurants were right. That there is a good chunk of consumers that want this that the, the consumer wants the coffee to taste the same every day, you know, every morning, the coffee in most roasters, even big commercial blends. The origins are changing throughout the whole year because the harvest season is different for each country through the year. So the roasters are even if they have a blend of, like ten different coffees, there's still. Wapping occasionally. So in order to keep the flavor from changing they just go really dark the cafe olympico effect. Oh. But, you know, so, like I say to this point, I would say that most consumers do still want more either the dark roasted flavors or they want it to be the same. But I can say from personal experience, when you give people a chance to taste later, roasted coffee, and they give them a chance to taste like a couple of different ones next to each other. It's a real revelation. So we're we're slowly gaining. We will never one hundred percent eliminate the dark roasted side of the industry because there are people that are going to like that. But we are winning slowly. We're winning more and more people to our side, but I'm a little bit because I. Where where we're going with progressive coffee in third wave. But where does it come from where that term is coming from where not talking about? I we've right. Yeah. So I think you wanted to ask me earlier on the progressive versus third way. Thanks. So I like progressive coffee because as soon as you say progressive coffee, there's already a meaning in their people can already kind of guess. Okay. You're trying to do something a little different than before. You're trying to change your trying to get better, you know, which is very much true. The third wave term was invented by a coffee roaster named Trish Roth gab, who is currently part owner and roaster for wrecking ball coffee in the states, and it the reason I don't like the term is that first of all, you have to explain it, if you say third wave coffee to someone means nothing right away. Unless they've heard the term like third way feminism or something before, so they realize, okay, this means that this is a new way of doing something different than before. But that's all they know the waves really briefly our first wave in North America was just that we had coffee at all. Starting four or five hundred years ago, whenever coffee I got imported into North America and you know. Actually people used to roast at home, a lot more originally and most people would grind their own coffee on mills and stuff like that. We a luxury item back, I think so. I don't think that it was very commonly had but. I think it became democratized probably sooner than a lot of other things because it helps people work. Brought copy. And the first wave probably culminates in folger's, and Maxwell house, instant coffee, stuff like that, basically, then, the second wave was the introduction of Espresso. Just that we had Espresso. We had sort of what, what some people call specialty beverages and stuff, you Kappa, Chino's and fancy drinks and stuff like that. And you know that started out, you know, in the twenties, and thirties in tiny little cafes in Italian neighborhoods in cities and stuff like that, and eventually culminated in big chains and stuff like that. Yeah. So the third wave. And again, like I much prefer progressive coffee. It's a lot of stuff. I don't like to try and pretend that I speak for the entire industry. But it's it's one of the things is that interest in preserving more terroirs so you can taste the difference from one coffee origin to another coffee. Another side of it is about ethics and sustainability and fair trade and better life for all the people in the chain. Better lives for the farmers and more fair wages and eliminating child labor and all that kind of side of it. Yeah. And also, the ecological side of that, you know, like a growing coffee in a way, that is not going to deplete soils and destroy environments, and things like that. And then another side of it is the sort of more technical side of preparation and equipment and things like that. And, you know, trying to push equipment to be more precise, and more repeatable and give us better results in experiment with whole new things that have never been tried before. And again, especially on the Espresso side, it's really easy to make the difference between progressive versus classical Espresso because classical Espresso is Italian. And there even there's a government department in Italy that has set the laws for what Espresso is. I'm not sure how many people in Italy actually follow those laws Eddy. Izard. The British comedian likes to talk about how fascism technically started in Italy. But he's like Italians are fascist there too casual there, too. So I can't really following these precise laws specifically, but it does exist. That's fascinating where law, there's all kinds of ruled the amount of grams you use. And how much like would you pull, and it has to be in this many seconds? And it has to you know they've just like that's it. And don't change it. Whereas progressive coffee like people have been like what happens if I pull in a special shot for a minute and a half or what happens if I try and put in six seconds. What if I change the ratio massively, like we've been just doing a lot more sort of like, well, let's take the limits off and experiment, and then let's share the results, and let's move forward that way. And I think it's not coincidental that it came along after the internet was relatively well established there. A pioneer progressive com icon before everyone else. A very beginnings of of progressive coffee. I think it was seventy-five as George Howell who still roasts and has cafes in Boston. I met him. We brought them up co-organiser for these coast coffee madness event. And we brought Georgia and he invented he actually sold a small chain of cafes to Starbucks the Frappuccino, which he likes to talk about these progressive coffee Friday near invented the petite. He sold his small chain of cafes to Starbucks and then took the money and started this series of competitions in origin company origin countries called Cup of excellence and in a Cup of excellence competition farmers from all across the country invited to submit samples of their coffee. There's a local set of judges that do a big triage and sort. And then there's maybe one hundred coffees or something like that, that are left the top one hundred and then international coffee. Judges are brought in and they do a cupping and then the top fifteen or twenty or something like that coffees ranked and then they're offered off. And so if you're a roaster somewhere, and you're trying to get your hands on a really good coffee in your this is a fabulous way to get stuff. All the works already been done for you. And you can. Just before the auction. What happens is they send out samples to anyone who requests them you cop, and then you bid on line. So, like you're like, we got number six from Honduras, or something like that. And you can put that on your bag and your customers are super excited and stuff like that. That's so cool. Yeah. The tuna fish markets in Japan for sushi. Nowhere to get the tuna catches of the day. And then it's like actually all and yeah, exactly. It's tough for roasters to find these really good things. And so if you've got someone's done all the work of certifying and tasting these things, and telling you that this stuff is really, really good. And then because it's auctioned that means the farmers literally getting the best price he possibly could if there's a better price someone would pay it at the auction. So, and so that, that competition is spread to many, many countries now. But that was sort of the origin of that, like trying to push for quality and push for the connection to origin and the transparency again to make the connection a little bit with wine. You know, the way that coffee outside of the progressive industry. The way the coffee is sold is sort of the way wine was sold, like forty or fifty years ago. You. It was like red or white. That was that was your choice. And if you were really lucky there might be three bottles, and one would say, France and the other ones, say, Italy, and the other one's Germany or something like that. And that was it. That was your choice. Whereas now it's very accepted that you want to know. Okay. But what region of Francis it from what far what's the name of the farm? And what's the name of the farmer? What variety of grape is it? That's all we're looking for in coffee. We're just trying to make that same thing. And that transparency that connection through to the origin has lots of beneficial. Sides to it. For example, the fact that if you know who the farmer is it can be independently verified that you can, you know that farmer can be contacted by journalist or anyone who's interested and say, how much did you get paid, like feel fairly treated by this roaster? Whereas if the roasters buying and you have no idea where it comes from. You don't know what happened. So it's fun to know the source and where everything is coming from. I remember one fact I don't remember the exact number, but during the, the workshop, you said that there's there are more compounds in coffee than there are in wine yet. I hesitate to give the exact numbers. I throw some out in the class, but then I say, like I'm not. I gotta be honest. I'm not sure on the source of that, but there's more and more research that's been done. Actually the last few years. It's massively increased the threat of climate change has meant that even really big companies like Nestle and stuff like that are starting to funnel huge amounts of money in to research centers for coffee. UC Davis has one. That's very well known. There's one in Texas. Okay. And so they're, you know, they're doing more and more research, and the last number that I heard was, they've found their up to one thousand five hundred different compounds that they found in coffee not in one Cup. But in all the cups that they've analyzed every time they find a new compound. They added to the list. They're up to one thousand five hundred. Compound. For an average Cup. It's hard to save. I think seventy eight hundred or something like that is probably something reasonable. But again, I'm not even sure where I remember I got that number so with massive grains, assault, but I am told as well also a bit of grain of salt, but I'm told wine is sort of three to four, something like that essential thing to know because it shows that, you know, there there's a lot of complexity are essential complexity in a Cup of coffee. That's like if we direct the amount of love and attention to coffee that we do to one, because one tasting is common knowledge and we know there are some of us experts at pairing wine with food that are, you know, like recognizing wine. It's very cool to hear that there's that range. There's that spectrum of tastes of flavors available. Absolutely there. And like I say, for the reaction from the general public is either surprise and also cool that they're happy occasionally you get a little bit of pushback. You get people that are like, I think it comes from there. I think the fear is that they. Feel like something that is just been a basic easy daily choice for them. They just go to the grocery store, and they just buy this brand, and they just make the coffee that we're trying to make it like too complicated, or we're fancied upper that we're going to start charging them more money for it, and that's not true. You know, like the wine has gotten much more expensive and complex over the last forty fifty years. But you can still buy a doll bottle of like what do they call it to buck? Check in the states. And you know, you can get bottles of wine of the Denner for six seven bucks. You'll there will always be inexpensive. Just basic coffee for those people that don't wanna get into that side of it. But it just gives the option for those of us who do you know who are like, wow, that's intriguing you know? And I like the fact that I taste, you know what I'm tasting comes from the work done by these people in this other country and the attention that was made to it. It's like that's a cool thing. So Super Bowl. And if I just do like quick math. Let's say you know, the equipment I purchase to level at my coffee Android. Took your workshop probably like a year and a half ago. Maybe like six hundred bucks total, including the workshop grace, and that's just because you have that super fancy scale. But honestly, like a forty dollar scale and a two hundred dollar grinder and a brewer nail that ranges anywhere from ten to thirty bucks or something like that, a timer that we all have on our phones, a spoon, a kettle and then, like you mean if you buy your, your grains afterwards like a bag of coffee last, like a month instead of going to buy your coffee at Starbucks or your local coffee place. You earn that money back like, really quick. And it becomes kind of this really fun almost meditative process where you enjoy making it. It's not complicated. There's, there's a lot of talk in the inside the industry in that events and things like that to the general public about how coffee I think I remember Stephen Morris. He was a former UK barista champ, saying at first that coffee is still the foodie bargain. Yeah. You know, like the if you talk about what's the lowest price bottle of wine. It's probably that to buck check, what's that most expensive bottle of wine in the world who incident twenty thousand one hundred thousand dollars whatever. But even like even if you go to a restaurant here in Montreal, you know, you can spend five hundred dollars on a bottle of wine at a restaurant if you want, whereas the cheapest coffee is probably, I don't know, maybe five dollars a pound for a bag or something like that. And the most expensive bag of coffee on sale in Montreal right now, I'm going to guess is maybe thirty five dollars for a pound or something. So you're, you're from your lowest to your absolute highest is only a factor of like what seven or something, you know, whereas in wine, it's like. Five thousand or something. So it you can you can really easily treat yourself to a just a daily bag coffee. That's a little bit better. You know every once in a while. So I. Those special cups of filter there, you know, maybe seven dollars because it's a special variety that they bought it auction, maybe from Cup of excellence or something that your local cafes serving, you know, this month only we have exclusive coffee from Honduras, and it's seven dollars. And it's like who I paid twice or three times, what I would normally pay for a filter and I got this super special treat. If you go into spend two or three times more than your normal bottle of wine, it's, it's better, but it's not in the top by far. That's fascinating. We got to the process of roasting, and then we're talking about at what the fix tastes. So, so after roasting, then, again, there's, there's an opportunity for loss, which is how long time passes between when it's roasted and when it's brewed. So there's no way to change flavor in any way, other than just slow loss, which is why we really recommend try and use a coffee. That's been roasted in the last sort of three to four weeks, some coffees last a little longer, some a little less, and you can actually freeze coffee. It's a bit controversial on the industry. But if you I Scott who's again, my mentor. Is very big advocate for you can put roasted coffee and even ground coffee. If unfortunately you're in a situation where you have to have your coffee, pre ground because you're traveling or something like that, in a sealed container in the freezer, and it will massively prolong the freshness of that coffee. So. We'll put that aside. Because like I say somebody's going to take, you know, right in or something you can't do that precious precious fascist. And I'm really big on freshness but it's just that you can increase coffee. So after those three to four weeks like I say can vary a little bit from one coffee to another. There's just a slow loss coffee. Just tends to get a little less interesting, though. Some of those delicate flavor compounds are actually just passing out of the being into the air. So they're not in your company more. And then it's what we spent some time talking about before. It's the brewing yet, you know, I can take a coffee everywhere, from sour and bitter through the balanced, and delicious and through into a stringent. And with this, nasty bitter, aftertaste just based on how I handle, the parameters, and I can actually can have under an over at the same time. Unevenly extraction talked to us about that because that was one of my favorite parts of the of the workshop where you walked us through what an under extracted coffee tastes. Like then you know that sweet spot. Of extraction and over extracted. So when we do the class, I've recently started rejigging how I think about it in my head and how express a little bit. We talk about a bunch of stuff at the beginning. And then we get into the list of the bring parameters yet you can work with, and there's two lists and the second list is I say factors that affect quality, basically, those are the factors that you can screw up, and you can just ruin the coffee like if you use too hot or too, cold water. Or if you have the wrong water chemistry or if you extract the coffee, unevenly you don't pass the water evenly through all the coffee. Some coffee gets way more water than it was supposed to in some gets less. You do any of those things, and you just screw it up. But if you don't if you do those things right. So you don't screw it up, then the other list, which is the factors that affect the rate of extraction kick in, because, like I said the progression of flavors that come out of coffee, the first ones that come out are sort of sour and bitter, then later, there's these sugars that will balance out, though, sour and bitter flavors until. It starts to taste sort of balanced and, and delicious to us. And then if you keep going later on, there's these competence, tannin's actually, it's the same thing in red wines, that give you that astringent pasty, your mouth, kind of thing and in coffee. It also comes along with this nasty sort of metallic bitter aftertaste on the back of your tongue. And I remember you laid out the percentages when the workshop. Yeah. So I mean coffee workshop. Workshop now man. Feeder keeps asking. So the max, you can extract coffee is about thirty or thirty five percent of its mass. The rest of it is unsolvable stuff. So what they started doing in the fifties was extracting coffee from zero to thirty five thirty thirty five as a slight variants depending on how dark the coffees roasted and what variety comes from, but between zero and the max and then asking people, which when they liked best, and they found it sort of eighteen to twenty two is sort of the classic amount of extraction where you're in that middle zone. You've gotten past the sour and bitter to enough of the sugars to balance them out, but you haven't started touching that third group, and we've been able to push twenty two a little bit further now in recent years, better equipment, better grinders, things like that we can go higher and extraction without starting to hit that third group, but classically eighteen to twenty two but yeah, so then, like, I say that other list of parameters affects how fast things extract. And so you're just playing with those in your digging them until you get into that middle. Sweet spot where it tastes, good to you. And there's still a personal. Preference there. You know, like some people like nineteen percent because that's still tastes, a little more sort of fruity, and Tangy and also a little bit more bitterness. They like like the bitterness in dark chocolate, other people want more like twenty two twenty three even now like I say where there's even more sugar, and it's just kind of around sort of chocolate flavor or something like that in India city, and bitterness are reduced a little bit. But do you have a do you love swearing and have a propensity towards anger? Why? Thank you. All right. Hey folks, we had a little audio issue, so we cut off at some point Burgess going to restart. So I was saying that, that why I was asking that question about the anger and, and the swearing is that I feel like you could have the potential to be like the coffees Gordon Ramsay or something. And I, I, I like swearing for comedic affect. I certainly am not the kind of person who likes to. Especially when I walk into cafes. Critique right off the bat. I actually usually wait for people. To ask me. If they if they want some feedback or something like that. But. I generally like with my staff and things like that. I'm the guy who's trying to like do the feedback sandwich. Where say the nice thing, then say the little improvement that could be done, and then, say the nice thing I want everyone to walk out at the end of the day, few, and you're really good and happy and stuff like that. I don't think the yelling at people model early works long-term to the, you may, you may get someone to change something. But long-term the motivation is lost when you do that. But yeah. For sure today before we started making coffee, you saw like you. You notice some things about my grind right off the bat, and it was fun to witness that, that coffee expertise, like what you picked up versus what I was doing. Yeah. Yeah. And I, I notice that you were using a bit, of course or grind, what you should because you were brewing your pour over style coffee in the sixty which is. Thank you. Called the sixty because it's V-shaped and it's a sixty degree angle in the cone, and it's a very common Bruce for poor over coffee. And it's often used to make one Cup at a time. But you can brew as you did multiple cups. You just Portia water more slowly, so it doesn't overflow over the top, or you do multiple pours or some of that. But when you do brew bigger batches, the bed of coffee is going to resist the water a little bit more. There's more material for the water to pass through. So you have to shift your grind a little bit coarser. Otherwise, you'll end up with far too long contact time or something like that. So I immediately saw the grind and then I also saw okay, how much you'd put in there, and I was like, oh, you're making multiple cups thing, and you're like. No. That's that's why I love I love talking to you and I love that opportunity to have you come in and check out the, the way was doing the coffee because it's fun to revisit what we had seen during the coffee workshop at led us to this random question. But it's coming to mind now, the V six Japanese immigration into the Japanese have a specific approach to coffee or they're also kind of on that progressive side of things. The Japanese have a Japanese approach to coffee. There, you know that's the culture that's known for really revering attention to detail in things and taking maybe way longer way more effort than we traditionally, do I watch stuff about like. What was the last one that I saw I wanna say it was. It's a show on Netflix as like Japanese style originators that this one show, like like, oh, this week, we're showing how people make there's a thing. It looks like a little pig, and you burn like charcoal or something in it to, to take yet mosquitoes to go show like this. Most of them are now made by in factories, but there's this one guy who still hand making him in like all the attention. He does to make this little ceramic pig. Stylists. Retainer yesica. It's it's kind of talk show with celebrities. They're, they're, they're asking question. And now we have a wooden stick we have, like a flower, and we've got a fire, so, but what did he use the use it for everybody's like, guessing? And stuff like that is fun to watch every episode. They have they show some ancient technique still in use to do make some product or something like that. You'll enough thought about the originals Javanese stuff, like they've got a water result about tofu yet to oak that, that much trouble for. Yeah. Like, okay, this is not the same thing we're eating here. And so the same thing goes for coffee. You know, you'll see the attention to detail. That's putting any other thing that's really different is that they really don't do a special that much. There are places, and there and there are obsessive Espresso guys, I've seen documentaries about, I think there's a cafe called bear mountain or something like that, where the guy like he won't open if he doesn't like the way the espressos tasting that day or something like that. So. Japanese, but in general, they do much more filter and a lot of the equipment that we now the progressive industry has sort of started adopting to brew filter in tends to come from Japanese companies because they kept going after North America kind of went filter. It's it's done now. And we're moving onto Espresso. They kept going and they kept pushing and so, you know, like at the cafe when you guys would come in. You remember that siphon brewer that I had with allergen beam heater and stuff. All that stuff comes from Japan because that's where people still feel it's worth it. You know, felt it was worth it through the I guess, we call it the dark years of coffee to keep pushing quality and now the qualities new focus, we're starting to pull that stuff time curious like that, where, where should I go in Japan to get the best coffee? Oh, I don't know. I don't know. Unfortunately, I haven't been, I'm I would love to go. My girlfriend is a huge Japan file. She's been once and she's desperate to get. It back. But so I don't have any real research on, on where the best places b but it wouldn't be hard to find. You know, do some Google on. Unfortunately, third wave coffee. Not progressive coffee not using the term yet, but you'd find some good places. But, but yeah, so I'm sorry. I'm not sure where it was. There's a spot that, that opened up recently and much y'all called the Japanese cafe or something, it's like it's there during the Kickstarter phase. They're trying to get the funds so they did like a pop up for a few weeks. And they're really like emphasizing the pour over style. And that's what I was going to say actually was is that if you want your little hit of that style of coffee in Montreal at the moment. I didn't know about this one because it's new and it doesn't surprise me every time I turn my head around. There's a new quality cafe opening, which is awesome. Is focal on the Gaspe. It's French man and his Japanese wife, and they do so that you Japanese food. They do like on Geary and stuff like that. And then they do all siphoned brewed coffees there. So if you want to go check that out, then it's also one of those beautiful classic industrial style cafe, which that's we're maybe moving a little path that. But they're like they hit that note perfectly able to go to a coffee and get Abreu. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean you know. There's a saying that. They say Espresso, but it applies to all coffee is give him an Espresso. He'll drink for a day teach man to make Espresso who'd be free frustrated forever. Especially as more frustrating than filter filters. A little more easy. It's another reason why I like to recommend it when you when you try and do something in thirty seconds. You make everything at tiny bit harder tiny little variations, and things like that have larger effects, but even coffee, you know, like, once you the more you drink better coffee. The joke is the more. The more I get to know coffee, the more I disliked coffee and it's not true. Is that you just like it, but it's just the more coffee, you have that you're like you hiring this, this, this one's not quite as good as that other one that I had become snobbish a little bit. But then I think it's up to you, where you take that side to get like, really cranky about the fact that, you know, like Elvis coffee is not that good. Or there's a problem with this or something. Or do you just start going, this just makes me appreciate those good cups, even more? You don't want to be the person's always complaining about coffee. Okay. Is not good compared to this one, but it's still a decent, what would it take to make this better? And that's the other thing is if worst case I go out and I have a bad Cup or something I can go home, and I can make one myself and I can, you know, correct that errors, something like that. So you rebound ends the cosmic energy with coffee. That is what coffee does cosmic God like substance of things. I fully agree. I will actually say that in addition to the stimulant effects of coffee, it's purely anecdotal. But I've talked to other people about it, and they've sort of said, the same when I have a really well made Cup of coffee. I think there are some compounds in there that have a euphoric effect interesting. I really good Cup of coffee. I'll notice my worldview will literally shift and you could say it's because well, yeah, because you're got better because you had a really do is just a Cup of coffee. But I think chemically that there is stuff when you get that proper balance of extraction that I was talking about in addition to tasting, good, and the caffeine, stimulating you, I think there's a tiny little, there's something in there that just makes you feel like the world's a better place things are going to work out a little bit better. You know so, yeah, so it's a great way to start. Like everybody, I know who loves coffeen is had like a practice of drinking coffee over a long period of time. Even when they do like, okay, I'm, I'm taking a break for X reason, they always come back. It's not like an addict like it's not an addictive substance. I mean like I did a seven day water fast and the beginning of the month. So I cut coffee for that weaking. And I didn't feel any, you know, really any withdrawal effects, you're lucky most people, do I do I can go at day coffee. But if I have to go to I start getting a headache, technically you'd build a tolerance and you need, but it's just not one that's hard to break. Right. You know, you didn't even notice probably were just drinking a lot of extra waters. I love, you know, that your four thing you're describing I missed it for that. But, but maybe it's also because my body was like, okay I need to survive mode. Maybe it covered that. That. Prioritized survival. I give you the coffee headache. I think one of the things is nice about it is, is that it's, it's, you know, the downsides are relatively minimal, you know, it's not too expensive drinking a too much coffee is it would seem hard to me. I, I should roll that back. Like my dad. I remember telling me at one point, he was gonna cut down his coffee, this be in like the late eighties early nineties because I was like how many cups today you have in the office and he's about fourteen. I'm like fourteen. How would you can I think now because of the way we brew coffee now. Like you take the time you do like I'm not gonna do that fourteen times a day. I'm sorry. But that's not gonna happen. So but it's because they were, you know, you're in an office environment. You know, somebody's is making pots constantly, and you're just wandering around grabbing and just you never quite empty your Cup. You just keep topping it up. You could do that. But that's you know less and less places is coffee consumed that way, it's it would be difficult for me. To drink more. And I work in coffee to find the time to make and consume more than I don't know three or four a day. Now, I don't I normally stick to one or two, but, like even three or four there's no real downside to that healthwise. So the only negative thing is, is that yeah you can't really just stop for a few days. You know, you kind of have to keep going a little bit or or ramp down, or pay the price for stopping suddenly it doesn't have. It's not too expensive. It's not only not bad for your health at reasonable dosages. But most research shows, it's there's anti-oxidants. There's other things that can be helpful for you. It can get you if you're a single mom, and you're tired, and can be the thing that gets you up and gets you out to get your kid to school. You know, it's a way for friends to sit together and talk. It's a thing that gets guys to record podcasts. I don't know. I like it. I would say that right now we have more and more social aspects associated to coffee compare them. Then before before it was something to boost your day or just something to drink at the office. But the right now, it's like, oh, instead of going for drinks. Let's get a coffee and with all those progressive coffee popping up everywhere you can really find a nice base that fits removed that's fits, your, your taste, buds, and everything. But I think for that, that I find it brain dressing, that was one of the reasons that I did, eventually, when I got tired of the film industry, I got tired of the work life balance issues. I got tired of. Some of the people that I was working for to be perfectly honest. And decided, you know what I'm going to try and go out on my own. Coffee. One of the reasons I picked, it was because it's a social thing, and I'm an extrovert I get energy from talking to people. So the idea that I was going to be enough, and I was going to be talking with my workers and also with my customers, and they know that coffee is a very social lubricant that way, sort of in the same way as alcohol, but obviously, in a different way, just the stimulation of caffeine will make people chat and talk more in the history of coffee. That was actually disruptive was that there was a time in history in, let's say western Europe, where most people drank alcohol, most working people drank alcohol, there was no water sanitation and so water wasn't safe to drink. But when you brewed you made that water safe and so people would literally drink beer all day long and stuff. So the working classes were kind of drunk, most of the time, and then Coffey came along. And because you boil the water that sanitized the water, and these little coffee shops would open. And then, so suddenly people were sitting there and instead of just being drunk. They were sitting, and they were awake and they were talking. And then they started saying things like I don't know if we're getting a fair deal from their local feudal lords. Maybe it'd be an also different classes, and different groups of people were meeting in, in the same place. And so there was cross pollination of ideas. And so there was a pushback from the powers that be at the time they actually tried to get coffee outlawed by the pope at one point. At his. So 'cause all Wickham pedia but yeah, it's, it's fun. But because of that because it's. It was the first time that people could sit together and in not a diminished mental state from alcohol, but an actual elevated mental state from the caffeine start talking and thinking and share ideas and stuff. So, yeah. Just hopping on that in referring also to something you said earlier where, you know, coffee isn't isn't a luxury item in terms of a purchase but it offers you kind of a luxury experience of being around people. This thing you can go out of the house, and sit and do really I mean when you're where you're going to be guaranteed to be surrounded by people go to a park, you can go for a walk. But like go sit in a cafe and have a Cup of coffee. And look at people talk to people meet friends. Yeah, that's amazing stuff. So let's say coming back to your story, the progression from two thousand five. Going down the rabbit hole of making an amazing coffee at home to two thousand eight starting to work at, at cafe Maria under the tutelage of Scott wral. What, what was that? Like, does that a huge career move. Is that like committing to coffee now find the best place? I wanna make the best Cup of coffee and I have a plan. Yeah. Well, like I said, I you know, I was I was really kind of burned out on what I was doing at the time, you know, video games, computer animated cartoons, which is basically TV production and then film production, our jobs where, you know, work life balance is an issue. I think one of the reasons why the video game industry is getting better now is they're starting to address that kind of thing a little bit more finally. But back when I was doing it, it was no holds barred. I did a forty eight hour shift wants electric arts awhile. And so, you know, I was burned out on that. And like I said, I was burned out a expand a little bit. I was Vernet on some of the people I was working for in film. I would often find myself in situations where the person was reporting to had never done, what I did never done my job. And didn't really understand the processes, Sara Lee particularly here in Montreal. For example, a lot of the visual effects houses were founded in based around advertising, and I was working on the film side. And the, you know, the people management above me, did not get you couldn't treat film people the way you treated advertising people really basic, for example, advertising is booked by the hour. So whatever work you're doing if they make a million changes. It's fine because they pay for it. Yeah. Film, you make a bid, they say, okay, we want this as a shot, you say, okay. That'll be this much dollars, and they say okay, and you sign a contract, and then you keep you start working on it. And if they're not happy, you, keep going, and obviously, for management at a certain point, they start feeling like they're being abused or whatever you know, but the other side of that is. Me and between looking at the shot and listening to what the customers saying in going. Yeah. You know what? It's not very good, yet it does need more work. And that's our bad today. So I got tired of that fight a little bit as well. And so, I was I was about two years into coffee as a hobby at the time, and I was like. Okay, if, if I'm going to have to live with bad decisions, they might as well be my bad decision. I you know, the term that popped into my head several points through my career is that I'm kind of a reluctant entrepreneur. I would very happily. Have if I had found a boss and a job that that was a good fit for me. I would have kept doing that forever. I really decided to go on my own just because I was like, yeah. Healy said that in love the way you're phrasing it because for me that's the essence of entrepreneurship is having a dream or vision. And then if someone is out there already doing that. It's celebrating that dream and the vision. But then if it's not existing then it's kind of year responsibility to make it happen for me. That's like kind of the essence of entrepreneurship. And the thing is I don't know if that really applies the reluctant part of the reluctant entrepreneur, for me was is that I was really just looking for a situation that I wasn't miserable going into work. Yeah. I was just trying to create a better place for me and the coffee was secondary. So it seems because of the fact that I can talk at length of a coffee like I'm really hugely passionate about coffee, and I would say, probably in a certain way I am. But I actually I just shows coffee because it was like, Well, I, I know there's this movement is happening at the time, there was just a cafe or Java. And then the second one by the way, I had opened. In the meantime, in those two years, which was. Engand caffeine gamma that still exists over on park. And I was like located there's clearly a room in the market. You know, if I open I'm not going to be the two hundred one in style. I'm going to be like if I can or something by the time I got open. I wasn't even in the first ten but still I knew that this was something that was growing. So I just kind of went people always say, take your what your hobby the thing you're doing in your own time for free anyway. And then just do that for money. So it was kind of a perfect storm, but it really wasn't I, I worked with people all the time in the industry. I have people that work for me. And I'm really happy that are like so passionate about coffee that, like they would they would do it for nothing. You know. You know, I don't let them do it for nothing. But, but they would yeah I'm not that person. I really I picked coffee and I picked entrepreneurship because I was trying to solve that particular problem that I wanted something that I could do that. I felt good about that. I liked. And it was a situation that I liked. And like I say, I decided if sure I make mistakes is not released, they'll be my mistakes, then the frustration that I felt that having to deal with what I felt I could clearly see were mistakes or bad decisions, or not seeing the situation, correctly and that I then had to bear the responsibility for that. I was like, at least if I'm going to deal with I'm going to bear that responsibility. They might as well be my calls that was that cleared to you from the get-go started working at Mary at you knew exactly where you're headed for. That's the thing. I quit the film industry and I and then I spent about a month, sorta thinking about it and went, you know what I'm gonna do coffee. And I saw out the job at myriad. I knew that Anthony, who was one of the first owners was was looking to open. I didn't know that Scott was involved at the time. I remember the first time that another coffee person that I met at a competition around that time said, wow, you get to work for Scott. You know, that's, that's a great first job. And I was like, really? But as it turns out, I could not have fallen in, in a better situation, but I approached Anthony because I was like this is probably going to be the best cafe in the city at the time that it opens, and I just want to learn, and I was the first person hired we I met him at his job at the time, which was in the old port on at cafe Sante Veritas, and we started crossing the street. And I told him that I wanted to come and work for him. And he hired me before we got to the side. And the I just went and I worked for a year. And I was very open that I was there to learn because they eventually wanted to open my own place, and they were totally supportive of that stuff. So I just did that intensive training, totally with the idea that I was going to have my own place in mind. What did you take home from that year at Marietta that you could have never learned on your own taken, like ten times longer all of the technical brewing stuff from Scott? And then in addition, a bunch of the sort of cafe logistical stuff I didn't get all of it, some of it. I still had to figure out on my own. But like by the time I finished that year there, I mean, I'm still learning with every weekly goes by, but I learned more than enough to open a place where I could be very confident in the quality of the period that I was producing. And so I do a lot of consulting now for people that want to open cafes. And the piece of advice. I most commonly say that nobody wants to hear is quit your job and go work as a barista for a year or two. Because most people they're like, oh, I couldn't really afford to do that. I'm like, you know, you can do it without that I there are ample, that I've found where people start a cafe and they just they get as much training as they can. And, or they more often they hire someone who already really knows coffee, and if they do it, right. They get that person to teach them while they're working to a point where when that person is ready to move on there and a good position. So it can be done that way too. But the, the two-time Irish two or three time Irish barista champ, Colin Harmon talks all the time about, you know, people say to them, you know, like I want open a cafe. What should I do? And he's like go work in a cafe. You know, like if you're an architect and. And I say to you, hey. Yeah. You know, I want to I want to have an architecture studio of my own in two years. What should I do like, well start working as an architect, you know, like that really? It's the very best way to do it. And so, so that, you know, all of the like I say, all the technical brewing, and coffee, knowledge and a fair amount of the how to organize and logistically run a cafe came out of that time for sure. And obviously I just keep adding to it. So, so then when did the when did the move start to be made to open the knife, so I left myriad after about a year and I started looking for spaces on my own, and I started doing just some training contracts for forty ninth parallel some of their clients in town. I would go around and do some training. I did consulting contracts for some people that wanted I went and worked at other used to be a restaurant called Monty lay in town that had a small little cafe, which is now. Larry's. Oh, fairmont. But we were in there. It was a small bar called the bag tavern or something. And they were like, well, we want to turn it into a small cafe during the day at six months helping them get equipment and set it up and train people and get it open and stuff like that. So little contracts like that, while I was looking for my space, and it took way longer than I'd hoped to find the space. I was looking maybe three days a week. And it took two years finally. Got into that. Like did you have very specific idea of what you want to? And, and, you know, a specific neighborhood that I wanted to be in, I wanted to be roughly in the plateau, and I wanted to really particular type place and stuff and I ended up getting exactly what I wanted. I got my little romantic neighborhood coffee shop, and I'd worked at Mary, Ed. And in the beginning, it was very small and size wise. It's still small, but it was a little small cafe where we knew the names of the people and some of that, but over that year by the end of that year, you know, we were cranking and they've doubled business since then. So that's a I got less and less interested when it became more and more of a just put your head down and just crank drinks for eight hours. Don't talk to anybody kind of job. However myriad makes a ton of money. So I got exactly what I wanted. I got my little perfect neighborhood romantic place with my regular customers I could chat with and stuff. But money was always an issue and. You know, I signed that lease on Saint Dini. And I think part of the reason why I signed it was because the two years was long. You know like. One of the ways what feels like when you're doing that it's kind of the same as what it feels like when you're job, hunting, you go out every day and fail. And it's not true. You know as long as you look you succeed, basically. Yeah, that's all you have to do is look every day. But every day, you don't find something you're just like you know, so it got me down. And I think that eventually I found a place that fit all the criteria in my head. But my problem unbeknownst to me, was that at the time I signed was kind of the, the peak the end of the peak of Saint, Denise as a commercial street, and it's really been dropping down down, when, Peter, I met you and you were working at Lululemon, which doesn't exist there anymore. Either most of those the block that I was in just north of mount Royal, I walked the other day and the other side of the street is still empty almost all along so Saint Anita slowly died and it's a vicious circle. The more places close than the less people come to the area. And then the less people come to the area, the more places close and in a way. Now, it's not the knife anymore note that, that spot is kind of a lifetime. Line for that area. Go there. There's the, the attrac- which I highly recommend as a taco joint just half a block, south. Yeah. Amazing food, but yeah, there's there's just a couple of places kind of holding on, and it's going to renovate like the big empty space across when there was the gain which was the like the bookstore for educational books and stuff. And it was the notices it was going to be a grocery stores may as they're turning it into condos now. So it's fine. I'm I'm not I'm not anti. And honestly, like that's more people than living in that neighborhood. And then that will support. Businesses. But that's what Saint Denise is in the process of shifting to is instead of being a destination where they need businesses like big clothing stores, that need a lot of people to come every week in order to make it profitable. They're going to shift more towards small businesses that just serve the people that live there. Billy couldn't the bar is also an anchor in that area. The cafe is managing to do it. The little restaurant, you know, they don't need people to come from all over the city because those people don't go there anymore, they go Griffin town now are sent Henry or wherever, so that was the thing is, is that over the time that I had it, it, you know, as we would normally expect business to be going up as we get more and more people in the neighborhood to know where there, instead we kind of plateaued out, because we were dealing with the fact that there were less and less people coming. So we sort of went flat after about year one or two and then just sort of stayed there, and the last straw was the construction that started a little further south in front of Lululemon there. Yeah. Even though it wasn't in our block. There was a thirty percent drop in business. The day they started. And I was just like I'm out also had the academy already starting. So it was really easy for me to just go. Okay. I'll just make that switch because 'cause I imagine also that the margins aren't that great in a coffee. Shop, you have the hustle a crazy to make it profitable. Yeah. And people don't realize it and part of it is our stigma about talking about money. You know, nobody wants to say how much they make and things like that. So there's a there's a belief that coffeeshops make a ton of money. And I made this mistake I didn't go, and if I, maybe I could if I if I asked really politely asked to see some actual numbers for people even from Scott. Anthony, I never really asked them, what the financial side was like I just did the same thing. And I think most people do, which is well, a bag of coffee costs this much and a Cup cost that much. So you must be making a killing and it's just not true. The Collin Harmon that I mentioned earlier has a book that I haven't actually read yet, I've read excerpts. And I recommend it toll. My consulting customers it's called what I know about running coffee shops, and he has a lot of breakdown and information in there that actually shows like for the price of a Cup of coffee how much you're likely to really make. But even if we expand to restaurants instead of just coffeeshops because restaurants, obviously have higher costs, but they also have way more volume in money coming through they can sell alcohol. Who's a good restaurant are really good restaurant makes eight percent profit margin in imagine that eight percent eight percent margin and at the same time, yeah. You, it's not that much, and you're worrying about just keeping the clients coming in, like, what you just express with the with the nice home and he things can go wrong. So many things that must be that must be a stress free environment for the, you know, the person owning this is the section of entrepreneurship that I know. But I'm sure it's not significantly different in, in many ways. There's other different challenges and stuff. But you're, you're always, it's always the same thing. It's, you know. Bills coming in money coming in bills, you know, making money go out and, you know, having a man, all of that around it surprised in regulation has just up from the where somebody's going to you say, oh, by the way didn't filled out that form and you're done at that permits. What? I remember the first year that I had the cafe that when the letter arrived from so can which guys it's not much. But I mean it's just another in the long list of things that you weren't expecting. So can is. As music rights, just the fact that you are playing music publicly. They take your floor space or something like that. And they charge you a certain amount per year for the fact that you're playing music, how much I think, I think it was like or. Dependent or three hundred year for my cafe. Oh, yes. The same thing for the gym at the house. House, and it's, it's not a ton, but it's, it's the death by Southland cats. Then the person that comes in refills your fire extinguishers, every year, does the service that so that you don't get a ticket from the fire inspector. It's all these little things that you're like, oh, I didn't put that in my budget. And that's where the, the profit that you, you know, you look at that you do the math for the cop, and you're like, oh, you know profit must be seventy five percent. That's what eats it away. Everyone knows about the rent and the employee salaries and, you know, your utilities, but there's all the other stuff. All those bills defensive life with the poor like yet make sense. I'm gonna make tons of profit, but Indian death by small cuts out like that. Was it bittersweet to, to leave the night? And how did you find a buyer? It's Marietta's yes secret that that's mirrored. So that's kind of the continuation of your relationship with Mary, I just put out the word and you know, one of the people who was good at spreading. The word was Spiro, who is the local distributor and Montreal for forty ninth parallel coffee, and so- Spiro just because it's the kind of thing where you don't wanna you wanna get the word out to people who potentially by, but you don't wanna make it a general thing because you don't want your customers to suddenly be like, I mean, I don't I'm not sure the customers would necessarily abandon you. But, you know, you don't want that lame duck feeling of like oh, they're going, you don't wanna put like a first sale sign in the window. If you can avoid it. Yeah. So he discreetly put out the word and I had discussions with a bunch of people, but Yeltsin was not Anthony Scott's no longer with Marianne, but it wasn't Anthony. It was the other guy that had body in after Scott left that ended up buying the cafe from me and. I don't know if I even had time for it to be a bitter. Sweet thing I was like I've got us Elvis. It's literally a financial requirement. And I've got this other thing starting up, and I've really got to start focusing more on that. Yeah. So it was it was very difficult. It was a logistical headache. And it wasn't made easier by a bunch of other stuff that happened. But it you know, I actually just yesterday I think finished the very last piece of lucrative business that I had to do, which is that I last summer I am Malcolm aided the company still exists it. I didn't sell the company. Okay. I transferred the lease and I sold the assets. But the company still existed on paper and I was actually able to use some of the loss and stuff that was in the cafe. I can now amalgamating it with the academy. I'll pay less taxes for a little while. So at least there's that, but I just finally got the final notice of assessment firm revenue Quebec for the last tax emission. We. For the cafe, and it is a facially done. Congrats. So thank you. But yeah, you know. I mean I'm really hoping that in several years, the arc of this story is that was the first business that didn't really work out. But that I learned a bunch of stuff from, like, I would not have the academy, if I didn't hadn't had the cafe, I learned a bunch of my bring stuff while I was at Marietta, but I continued to learn more, and then I also got experience running a place which allows me to now consult to do consulting for people and it gave me a bunch more street cred. Like nobody really knew who I was why would someone pay to come and have a coffee lesson from this guy who had worked for a year at one place. But now I'm for four years, I had a cafe that ranked well in reviews, and it was considered fairly well, and I got a bit of a reputation and was able to leverage that, and it was the most one, it's still is because it's the same style into the most beautiful cafes on shelf like you had a sense. I think you're the first cafe that I went to the head like you up the game in terms of the. Get your water you had that, like little specialized area where it was like pitchers, and ice, actually, I did steal that. It wasn't the first I sold out from caffeine game. I mean obviously, there's places all around the world will have that, but it locally, I stole that from caffeine Gamba, that was at least the two years that was one of the things that I did with those two years was I over thunk everything, and I'm an over thinker nobody's ever accused him undertaking, except signing that lease on Saint Sania. But otherwise I spent that, that two years thinking about, you know, like I want the thing for the water over there, separates and so customers can serve themselves because I hated when I would go into cafes restaurants, and I would say, I'd make my order, and whether you're sitting down at the table or whether you're ordering Kennedy's, and then can I get a glass of water and they go? Yeah. No problem. And I mean, I've been in service, you know, in my twenties, and some of that, and I remember doing that. You're like yeah water, that's easy. No problem. So you immediately forget it. You work on the other thing, and it sucks because it's ex for the barista like, I would or the service person, like I say when I was a waiter, I would literally in the middle of the night, wake up and go, oh my God. I never bought that guys. The sex for the customer, because they're like, well, I really want the water. But if I ask, again, then I'm embarrassing the server for forgetting. So I was like, I'm just going to put that over there. And I thought through almost everything, you know, like where it was going to put the printers so that we would have the chits and for the orders and you know how this was gonna flow, and what size cups and how much space I wanted between the person at the cash and the person ordering I did a little cut in, in that bar design, so that when you handed the money to someone you didn't have to reach just to make it that, you know, like reduce the friction of that experience a little bit like all of that kind of stuff at least I got to do that. And I'm I definitely still feel good when I look back on that place aesthetically. Functionally how it worked and things like that. I, I did exactly what I wanted to do was very little that once we got open that I went with it on that a little different other than the location. I feel like you really instilled something in those two years, because first of all, what I liked when I was going there as a client was that you were there, a lot of the time, and you could see that the focus that you brought to the game. And I know it must have had an impact on the employees or with you like if your bosses there and he's like giving it like one hundred and ten percent and can't you can't not bring that level of focus and attention to things. That's the lesson that I took from like being in those film, industry jobs and stuff where the boss who didn't know how to do what I do I. I mean you can't do this in every industry, but coffee is a simple enough. You know, cafes is simple enough industry that I can say like I've done everything I'm asking you to do. And I would also try, I would make sure that I still clean toilets periodically and stuff. It would be doing the clothes. I wouldn't always just do the machine in the cash. I'd be like I'll do the bathrooms you do that. You know, things like that. But I made sure that I wasn't asking anyone to do anything that I wasn't ready and capable to do myself. Yeah. And yeah, you're right. I mean as a way that's a, that's a way of leading without having to Gordon Ramsay people all the time. I'd still watch that show. You're like I say, I love the comedy of, of really a few swearing in the British do it better than anybody. Like one thing that I didn't know is that you start him on shell coffee, academy wall, the knife is open. So that's like, that's borderline masochistic starting a second while you're in, like full wealth running the first one of the things that because of that, that eight percent margin at best that you're getting, I think, like that's restaurants in general, on assuming it's roughly the same for coffee for just like a pure cafe pure cafe that doesn't exist. But what I mean is a cafe that just does like coffee and page or something doesn't do like meals that. One of the ways that people deal with the fact that there's just that eight percent is they often end up opening a second or third location. And they ended up having to stop working so much at one and pay someone to do that. So then suddenly, they make a little less out of that one, but then eventually, they make it more in volume over over time. So opening a second place was not an illogical thing to do it was until the construction started we were eking out a survival. I was making some money was maybe slowly leaching a little so having another one to balance. It wasn't a bad idea. But yeah, I, I, I wasn't really attracted to the idea that I might open a second one, and it might still do the same. So I was looking for a model that, that was a little easier to get profit out of that, you know, the, the way that it works out with the academy is, I'm basically selling my knowledge. So my costs are significantly lower. My space is smaller. I don't. Need as many employees are bunch of our equipment is actually on loan. That didn't cost me that much to get it up and going, okay. And, you know, I it doesn't cost that much to buy a few bags of beans and a few things every week to to give classes on basically selling what's in my head. And so as a result, quite prophet is already higher, but the I had been sort of mowing over the fact that I kept getting approached at the show. By a restaurant and cafe owners and stuff saying, you know, can you train us can you do a class or something? And I was like, man, I don't have time. I'm like, I'm working on this thing you know, seven days a week, almost not quite, but even the seventh days is my brain is working on it. And at the same time, I had an employee, David LaLonde, who had worked at Saint Henri where they were doing some basic classes on home brewing and things like that, and some comings and stuff like that. And so he approached me with the idea of sort of putting those two ideas together is a place where we can do classes for the public, but then also do some training and consulting for businesses. So the idea, originally actually was that he was going to mostly be the man on the ground. And I was going to be sort of behind the scenes, I was going to help design curriculums. And then I would handle the things like accounting and stuff like that, that I already knew how to do from the cafe, but then when the construction started and suddenly it wasn't financially. Tenable. Anymore. I just switched and became more of a, you know, on the ground, kind of guy. So it could have worked the other way. But David would be much more involved in stuff. And as a result, he, and I were able to sort of split it a little bit, and then eventually lasts. Gosh was summer twenty sixteen. I think no twenty seven is summer twenty six teams when we opened the gate kademi summer 2017 David decided, he wanted to move on and go work for roaster. So because I was there and I was on the ground, I was able to take that role and just keep going. Yeah. So that's that's interesting. Just this random question when you when you start a company like that, do you have to, like, biotech, your partner in that situation? Or are you just leaves and it really depends? But I did buy you would buy the personnel there. If the company was doing well, and there was any kind of value or something, usually, you have a partnership agreement, in place, beforehand, that you should lays out, all make sure to have a very. Good one. Yeah. I have a great lawyer name is Neil stoop, ller. I highly recommend who will work you through all the situations like what happens if one of you is incapacitated, and is in the hospital and can't make decisions anymore. At what point you know, like all of the stuff that could happen. Lays out those sort of, like, what happens if one of you just get pissed off at the other stops coming into work? So there's ways that are pre built into handle all of that stuff. So David Nyathi really, we didn't do that before we started. We knew we wanted to get to it. But we were actually just trying to save on lawyer's fees. But happily we started working on the partnership agreement where we decided that we actually wanted to go our separate ways, so happily we were able to work something out. But I gave him a chunk of cash and I'm paying him a little every month until September. Okay. And then it's all mine. I mean it's all my now in terms of chairs and stuff, but good deal. Yeah. Yeah. And has the vision for the academy changed over the course of three years, we did start off thinking that we would actually maybe do some catering and stuff like that, as well, like do some small events and stuff. And then we just rapidly realized that, like, that's a separate business. It's like people that have my cafe, and they would be like, you know, so you want to roast coffee, and I'm like, that's a whole different deal. There are cafes do. Both. But it's basically two businesses living in the same space in that case. And we rapidly realised like for our friend Maxime at cafe pizza. He his inter entrepreneurship story is Grady started with a little bike. Maksim ruling. Still got the bike. They roll it out occasionally for events for catering and things like that. And they also have a regular machine that they can take for catering and stuff, but he started doing that doing, like mobile little pop up things and bootstrapped himself up to an actual brick and mortar location. Then he's he just has the experience and he has the equipment so really early on I just started going, you know what? Go ahead. You know, just send send that to max, he can deal with it. We'll focus on the classes, and the consulting and training for for cafes and restaurants. Yes. And let's say you could look back and give some pointers to Chris circa, two thousand nine thousand twelve on starting a business. What would you tell your before I opened the toe in the starting sort of throws of it? I don't know if I could I could go back in time, and tell him like I wouldn't believe it. We talked when I came on that I was a little hesitant to come on entrepeneurship podcast because I feel like you know, my experience has not been particularly good. I mean from certain point of view, and the point of view. I try and take most of the time I still feel like I'm successful but I mean I lost a ton of money. I lost a ton of money I had to sell my condo, the relationship I was in, when I started the cafe was a woman that was in coffee, and thought she was ready and was not ready to deal with what it meant to me in my life. And that ended like the stress the mental effects, I've used to my family has some depression, and stuff. And so I knew that I through my life, I fought against oppression a little bit by then I got to meet anxiety, depressions, annoying bigger. And I've fought a lot of that even things like my like my lifespan is I know that the toll on my organs that I paid through that time. And that, I'm, you know, maybe still paying a little bit because I'm working my way back to healthier lifestyle and stuff now as things are starting to come around. It's a huge cost. And so, like I say, I could go back in time, and I can try and tell that person that, you know, all of these things are going to happen. Are you sure you want to do this? But I'm sure that guy would go knock come on. But it's fun when you do open up about this kind of stuff to other people that have done it. You realize really soon. You're not alone. It's really Enzi to, to lionize, and celebrate the stories of people that have where it's gone really great. And it's mostly been sunny days or they'll say, you know, like there was a tough stretch. But you know look at us now. You don't hear so much about the people that, like just crashed. Right out. And you know, they're in the majority. Absolutely. I most of what I read is that most people who are successful in business. Have I failed multiple times that business and I'd love to hear? What kept you afloat, when you're facing these, these challenges of depression, and anxiety and natural view. Matt, you want to jump in to if you had like these, these moments of doubt that you like what did you do to serve stay resilient in the face of that, and keep going because a wireless thing, your story, I'm like, oh, you stop by not to do you, sell you sell like two years. So that's, that's still in the trench in the first two year. So you're just trying to get a flow. So there's a lot of society that you're saying, a lot of stressors will of pressure to any couple anything, so it's kind of I can I can relate how you feel about it. When people say, oh, you, you had a coffee shop, you run at your. Yes, but not really because there's still this. Fitting of being an impostor get. Yeah. You had a business. Yeah. This this, but I'm not successful like those guys, when I opened a lot of my family and friends where like, congrats, you did it. Because they knew how many years, it took me to get to that point. And I'm like, no, no, no. I haven't done it. Not at all. Like they're like, yeah, but it look at it, it's beautiful and the coffee's good. And I'm like, we have lit. Let's take an extreme example. Anyone could open a wildly popular restaurant if they sold lobster for two dollars a plate. It's just that, that restaurants not going to succeed as a business. Exactly. It's like opening the doors now. We get to see this is the beginning of the long thing, where we see whether I so there is that people are telling you like your great your places open your success. Oh, no, no, no. I know because like me and five or six years and thought, and we'll open my Bank statement. And then we can see whether I'm quote unquote, a success six year later in ten years later this till the same stress, that's coming on. I would say you got you better equipped to deal with it. But the same stress than at the beginning than that I'm leaving entrepreneur right now. It's still close to the same thing. Yeah. You can meet me. It's gotten better for sure, you know, the fact that it was it was actually about four and a half years. I had the cafe and then moved on. And now I've had the academy from two and a half and the last year or so on my own. Net the advantage to the fact that this model of businesses more profitable, is that the day to day worrying about bills and stuff has started to back off, now it's just the stress of the debt that I'm still dragging behind me a little bit and stuff. So it's shifted a bit for me. But yeah. Some of it will always still be there. Just just being the person who's the last line of resort for something if something goes terribly wrong, or whatever it's like, well, that's his problem that guy, you know, be there. Would you say that, if you didn't open up the first you'd be dealing the same the same way as you you're doing right now with academy? Maybe because the learning curve, the learning curve happened, then already so I already had done that sort of bit of side of it. And so I would have to be doing that now but it would be less because. Assuming that this business was as profitable. Now, as I said earlier, I think that I needed the credit from just opened the academy without the credit probably wouldn't have done. But if we can make a magical, simulation where this business starts, and makes the same money doing. I think it would be a bit easier. It definitely. You know, having money to pay the bills makes a difference. But, but yeah, it wouldn't it wouldn't you know, we're not talking like ten times easier or even a fifty percent easier or something like that. It's just it's a bit easier because that side of it, I don't have to worry about so much. So. I think that's those are really important points that you guys are bringing up too, because I think we often see the, the more glorious sides of entrepreneurship, especially for our resources are like Instagram pages and Facebook pages. That's easy to sensationalize but it's it's a grind. I haven't started a business like both of you. But the parallel that alpha here is that it's a bit like parenting since that, you know, it's like, what you were saying, when you, you have the Sunday off, but your brain still in the business, again, you don't really have a day off. You're always kind of like thinking and that's kind of the nature of the game. And I guess it must be that period of adoption to that twenty four seven, you know, reality of being an entrepreneur that. Yeah, because the the way you manage your time become very flexible, I would say, because when the stress from the day to day start to drop you open up a will world of creativity for your brain because now you're not paying the Bill. You're not managing employees making sure that everything is clean and sparkle, and now you're. Try to relax in that moment. You're like, oh, I could do that, and work on that, and you're like, oh, let's start working for the laptop, and you just start to write down what you have as an idea. That's the best case scenario worst-case scenario is, is that when you're, there's just a certain break in time, where you, there's no crisis, you have to immediately deal with that your brain just goes like off. It just goes and you can't do anything. I feel we were talking earlier that when we talking about ukulele and stuff, I'm starting to pick up musical instruments, again, after sorta like six or seven years, because I just I didn't have it in me. I didn't have that energy required to like, just pick up and do something when I when I wasn't working, I would be just kind of frozen. The first. Would be pro probably that. Yeah. Yeah. Well, you get you get to all your bills on whistle in line. You're like, yeah. Okay. My first and second years, we're, we're kind of the toughest and then, like, I say, even though money got hardest towards the end. I think mentally I was more prepared to, like okay dig myself out and you know, it was it was a very difficult process as I mentioned. But I was there ready to, to do that it cost me. But I, I the first year when I got sort of seventy eight months in and I started doing the math and realizing where this was kind of maybe heading, I couldn't say, for sure, I was at that point, I was like, maybe second still going to be significantly better. But as I said earlier, ultimately, it turned out that sort of from second year on it was just kind of flat until close to the end. I was just not prepared for that. I was really thinking it was going to just go pretty good. And pretty soon I was going to have the money and it was going to be there at the beginning. It's normal that it's not when I started realizing, wait a minute. Let's do the projection that was. Yeah. Because there's kind of an aspect of an entrepreneur would say, you're, you're kind of always positive or up his stick with for what the future is, is going to bring you. And you're like oh, yeah. Okay. But I just need to work a little bit more of a marketing all just need to work on optimize that and other it'd be better. I mean you're moving the margin. But as soon as you looking at the cold ARD number, you're right. Oh, yeah. That's under the ball game. And so your question of the very beginning of this little section was, what did what did I do to keep going through that one answer would be the love of my family and friends. And then, you know, the people that were close to me that I could turn to you and talk about also people in the community, you know, that when I could talk to other owners and things like that, and we, we commiserate, and you get at least feel like I'm not the only one and maybe get a few suggestions. But also, there was a certain it was like try to like I just got to keep the head above water. If I just stop then what happens? So there's a certain amount of kill keeping going because you just think you have to keep going, which is I mean, in my case it kinda worked out in other situations. It might not be the right choice. And I want to throw this in there, too. You know, an entrepreneur podcast is, like, don't negate the possibility of just packing it in, when I follow a lot of people on the internet in restaurants and stuff like that. And like one of the sort of archetypal. Comments, and stuff is is like open your place and get it up and going, try and get a good review in the first week if after the first month, you're not in black. Slow close it like you are not it's not going to get very. Cafe restaurant harassed full on restaurant month. That like they're like, if you're not making money after a month statistically, the chances that you're eventually going to are very, very slim while and you're actually better off just closing it. I think that's a bit extreme. I don't know. And I'm happily that I decided consciously not to trying to get into full restaurant hood. I just tried to stick with a smaller subset of that. But I would say that, you know, it's a valid choice and people in the same way that as we talk about, you know, like people that end up being very successful. They often have a couple of failed businesses in their past. If you're gonna fail fail sooner. You know, I it's tough to make that call after all the stuff you've invested and things like that. But sometimes that is the smarter choice. I'm not sure for me again because I what I ended up building. I leveraged into this business. So I wouldn't say that for me maybe I should've shut it down sooner. But I think there are certainly situations where that's not a bad choice, even if it means bankruptcy, you know, I've been talking to a lot of friends and stuff like that, about the fact that, like, especially if you're on the younger side, which is also the better. Entrepreneurship, it's not that big a deal. And sometimes it can get you out of five six seven years of pain. Like when when I did this fast. So the beginning of the month, I was just like I'm going to do seven days. It's happening, and the first five days, we're fairly smooth sailing in the six day. My body started rejecting water. Oh, fun. Yeah. So like threw up water once and then I was like I thought it was because I drank too much, and then lie down and then came. And then on Sunday, it continued that was like this is seventh day. I'm not going to stop. But I could I was like in really bad shape on some, and if you could have gone back in time and stopped on four or five. And that's what I realize I hadn't defined clearly. What we're what we're stoppage signs. Right. And so when I got to the point where the I should've stopped probably day six that was like one more day my my stubbornness game in and also I made it public and like I'm thinking about when you your family's saying congrats. There's also this feeling of shame that comes into play. Like, okay, I'm going to have to explain to people it's like when you break up from a relationship, and then you have to relive that break-up every time you see like mutual acquaintance and kind of like. Yeah. You don't then you have your spiel or stuff or whatever it's like you have this emotional work beyond the actual closing of the thing that has more to do with, like your expectation, and the communities expectation around a lot of entrepreneur, most entrepreneurs would have a certain degree of that. But like a small startup or something like that is different than a cafe that's visible on the corner. And everyone knows your face. And you live in that neighborhood. For sure there's, there's a little bit of that around it and stuff as well. But honestly. You know, when you're when it got bad enough, and I was really having a tough time I would have happily taken the quote unquote. Shame of publicly failing it was just that I was like I wasn't sure that, that was an option for me at that point. But I think people should keep that option on the table and having as you say, if you can try and set for yourself, certain points, where you're like if it's not this by this, like that story about the restaurant if you're not in the black by a month or whatever, but something like that. That would be great. It's tough in the moment to make those calls. I remember when I started really struggling calling and talking to Vincent. Oh, who's the owner of Ford ninth parallel Vancouver, and his advice was he was actually willing to send a barista out from Vancouver to work my shifts? He was like, get time off, like just stop sleep. He's like you can't when you're that tired and you're that burns, you can't think and I did do I pulled back for two weeks. We actually had to produce the hours at the cafe in order because I didn't have enough people to cover shifts and things like that. But I took the two weeks, I rested a little bit. And then I found some ways to make it a bit better. But ultimately than the foot traffic thing, kind of advice Doda, take that time off, if you, it's not always an option. But sometimes, like I was thinking it wasn't. And then I realized there's a way there's a way to do this. And, and you know what happened during those two weeks was at that point. We were still only open six days a week because I was like I definitely need at least one full day myself to, to rest, and I could train people up and stuff to do a bit more. But I couldn't quite see, for some reason, I don't even remember now what the block was, but I just couldn't quite see how we could schedule seven and just getting a bit of a rest. I suddenly went, no, wait a minute. If we put this year and that there and this guy I definitely trust to be there for me when I'm not here. And, and, and I just I made that happen. But I couldn't have if, if I hadn't sort of had that break. And maybe, you know, like I say, that's the break where somebody else is going to make the call of, you know what, like it's not worth it any more so with that. But it's difficult when you're right in the being in the Oakland ocean and the waves are coming in. You're not like you're not strategizing at that point, you know what I mean. For sure. All right. Let's do this danger. I would say it's just always trying to survive. Yeah. Because after a while you just like you said, like yeah. Took a stab step back and everything started to get clearer. Okay. Now. I guess Lucien. Yeah. And it's easy to say that to me. Right. To say, like yeah. If all you're trying to do is just keep going then you're, you're not seeing the forest for the trees kind of thing, but. You. It's still true. It's easy to say and it doesn't mean that it's easy to do, but it's still true. You know, and you gotta if you can you got to find your way to force yourself to sort of get a little bit back and get a bitter space and get a bit of perspective to make better decisions. And you mentioned family and you mentioned the coffee community. Are there any other communities or tribes that help sustain you and inspire you and give you resilience? That was pretty much it for me. You know, if I was more if I was had a practice like yoga or something like that. I, which I should've I should've had something like. You know that I'm sure I could turn to that sort of group or something like that as well. I think that there for the average entrepreneur, there's many choices of different communities that could serve. But for me it was mostly. It was family and friends, and then other coffee people. So. And what about mentors? I mean you mentioned Scott. Scott row. Are there any other mentors that you knew either personally or not sometimes Skibo? We don't know that was a big one because he'd had cafes before he'd opened some he'd sold. Some heat had myriad. So, and he knew the coffee side really well and some of that as well. I remember talking a lot to the guys that community census because we use their TS at myriad. And they are the TV station of progressive coffee, they go and buy directly from the farmers and, you know, the, you can taste all the different origins, and the terroirs and their teas and stuff, and I remember Kevin who's the British co owner at camelia I went to him one day, I think, near the end of the two years and going, like I think I'm gonna pack it in two years of looking for the space and going, I think I'm gonna pack it in is not meant to be. I just can't find. I can't keep going out every day and looking and he was like, I really think you should keep going like you really have everything that an entrepreneur needs to have which I don't know if he was right about that. But he was encouraging as important part. So he was a great guys while, even though he wasn't technically coffee community. But other people that had done similar things or things like that, we're, we're good people to approach. And that's if there's a. A bit cautionary tale in any of this stuff. I mean there's a bunch of them, but it's you need more information than you think you do talk to more people like I wish I had seen financials for successful cafe, and no more realistic idea. I wish I had done had step back and looked at, you know, where is Saint Anne going like there's a there's a business persons association. There's there's the ticks, I could have seen that sales were already starting to, to drop on that street. And then maybe picked a location where instead they were starting to come up like Saint Henri or something like that. You need more info, ask more talk to people more, you know, as great enslave. So that's a beautiful too much. Yeah. Yeah. Right on. So let's say looking back. Do you have like a moment that feels like the greatest failure where it was, like, really end of days? But now you're kind of happy that it happened because it was very formative. There were crisis moments. You know, there were crisis moments in legacy say the one where about sort of eight nine months in where I suddenly saw a worthy money was going, and I had to take two weeks as I was, and I just had to step back and stuff. And that's when I started actually having a bunch of anxiety problems and stuff that one was was quite tough. My girlfriend breaking up with me. Having to sell my condo, while I was still working in keeping the cafe going, and then move and go through all that process all my own and then having to sell cafe, and even to a lesser extent. Having to by David when we realized that our goals weren't compatible anymore. Those are big tough stressful time periods and definitely, you know, I feel like I'm coming back. It's been a slow process but I feel like I'm coming back from all of that kind of stuff. And so I definitely can look back now and be like, oh, yeah. Glad I don't feel like that anymore. You know there's definitely progress has been made. And if you look ahead, let's say ten years from now anything is possible. What's the dream? What's the vision you have? I honestly don't know. And it may be again, become be because I didn't come into this as like a visionary. Like I really super into this, and I want to do this particular thing, I was really just kind of like I wanna find a way to make a living that I kind of like with something that I feel is interesting keeps my interest in that I feel good about. I'm not working the oil industry, or selling guns, or anything like that with coffee. If so as a result, you know, I'm, I'm just hoping to keep moving forward getting my debt paid off, if possible, grow the business, but I could one of the ways I could pay the debt off is I now have a profitable business. I could literally sell it and then I could go do something else. Go work for a big coffee company or a smaller local company, but a little bigger than big enough to be able to afford me. Let's say or I could go work in film. I don't think I would but you know there are all of those kind of possibilities. Really, my goals are much more sort of on a personal side. I wanna get back to doing exercise and healthy stuff. I wanna play mortgage. Tar yes. See more friends. I wanna stop worrying about money like that. And I just want to start making my life, a little bit more. What I wanted it to be because that was the whole point in the first place. And you know, it may pan out eventually and I feel good about it. I feel hopeful today, but it certainly. It, it was it didn't get me there in the last few years. So I just gotta keep going for that. That's wonderful insight, and I feel like you know, personal health is at least that's one of the reasons why we start this podcast. It's underrated. In terms of what it brings to life in general. I hope my hope for the future. My dream for the future is that it's something that's more and more regular to include in everyone's life. Whether you're an employee in a big company, or you're an entrepreneur like that you had that chance to be held because it can also help through those, it gives you a kind of resilience when you're meeting challenges, and I definitely think that I'm sure measure, you're, you're involved in fitness, as an entrepreneur. But so it makes sense. It's going to be important to you. But I think that out side of that sort of section of entrepreneurship, there's, there's a lot of these entrepreneurial myths and stories include things like oh, yeah. You just cut everything else out. And you just like, you know, burn it out. And, you know, you work twenty four hours a day, seventy a week and, and it's normal that you. You don't do health and exercise had it been really much more standard. Like they're almost been a tiny amount of shame around in not exercising. Then maybe I would have kept it going, I would have had more weight better healthier ways to deal with my stress and I probably would have done things better. But instead, I kind of did the whole like. Oh, yeah. Everything else goes to the side for the moment, kind of thing. So I'm with you. I think another piece of advice for anybody who's thinking about it is like try and build that stuff in and keep it going, no matter how it feels like. Oh, I don't have time today. No sometime. I'm really lucky healthwise. I feel in general nothing really bad has happened. But I also don't know what like I say what the internal cost. I don't know what's going on that side that might pop off later. So as soon as I can I started over Christmas doing a little more stretching. And starting to do some, like just push ups and stuff like that at home and try and write back in. So I'm just going to keep pushing for that. Matt the last question before we jump into the enlightening round bread right now. Yeah. Oh clear ready for some rapid fire Chechens go for it. So this is we asked this every lightning around him. What's your drink of choice when you have creative moment? Head of you. It's a good way. Probably mostly, obviously coffee. Then that's why you're laughing because that's kind of the obvious answer. But I I like drinking and tasting. So I also when I when coffee stopped being my home hobby, and it became my work, I started doing craft cocktails at home. So that kind of thing is kind of fun for me now that, that makes I get that same excitement that I used to get when I was my first year with my little Espresso machine at home. And it's like I wonder if this is going to be good. Well, so what's, what's something that few people know about you? After this podcast. Gosh, I don't know. That's a really good question. We come back to it. Well, I'll I won't say something that few people know about me, but I'll say something that I was kinda surprising for me through the coffee journey that I wasn't really expecting is. I got I got into Quebec L magazine. Okay. They wanted to do a little section on baristas. And so there's I was in Quebec version of L, there's a page photos of me that was like, was not really expecting my coffee career to get me into. Oh. And here's another one. I got interviewed by mid sue's sister, and she briefly, flirted with me at one point. All right. That's it guys open a cafe is that bay Beijing? I think yeah, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I remember her from music person. She was yeah. Okay. So I'm going to name a few categories or subjects. You can name either your all time favorite or your current Goto. Okay. I'm not really good with favorites because I like so much. So I'll just I'll just throw out instead of all time favorite. It'll be like one of the things I like in the last one that got you got you really excited book. I'm reading Neil gamons just finished American gods. And I'm reading the cycle and the Nancy. I'm a big Neil Gaiman fan series on on I haven't yet but I'm looking forward to it. Now I didn't want to until I read the book, and it was the one that was always out at the library and I couldn't get it. I've got all of his other stuff. I have all of his Sandman, comics in the original single issues, stuff like that. But yeah, so there's, there's a recent favorite. What about a movie? I'm classically known for flaking, several movies blade runner is one of them and the follow up, I thought was really good. The big lebowski. Hedwig in the angry inch like again too many dimension. But there's a bunch documentary. As a tougher one, because I because I worked in film, and stuff. I mostly worked in narrative, but I've definitely seen tons of documentaries that I really, really liked. Can't come up with one off the top ahead. It's all good series. Well, we were talking just before that instead of exercising, what I have done over the last few years is stream all kinds of stuff, and so just recently, what rewatching thirty rock with my girlfriend, because she's, she's in burlesque, and she's into comedy. Tina Fey as a woman head comedy writer playing a woman head comedy writer. Yeah, it's pretty epic. That casts the castle Nacho is. Yeah. I mean, we've watched her, and I have gone through tons of them, and it's I'm fifteen years older than her. So I get to do the fun thing where I get to be like, hey, watch this. You're gonna like it to rewatch it through her eyes. It's an ego trip, unfortunately, I try to push that side of it down a little bit. But we've watched a ton of stuff together like that music. I probably Radiohead as my top favorite band probably of all time, but lots of other stuff when I was a little bit younger. I was really into Billy Bragg is a British sort of folk punk singer, and I used to go and see him when he tour, I got to meet him backstage, once it was pretty epic. Lots of other stuff. I have a really wide taste in music. I was promised myself that when people asked me, what kind of music I was into every interviewed that I would say, early eighties Electronica? Okay. Just sounds like such such. True. I, I have this real soft spot for, like van jealous blade runner soundtrack. Awesome tangerine dream as Yami show know all of that. Like early like analog since sorta stuff. Yeah. Link really trippy just pick your head tears for fears quelled. No. 'cause their pop I'm talking more. Like there's not even any singing just like instruments. We check up these these groups again. That's why that's my hipster answer. It's not like actually every day, but I was like, I'm going to give that answer. That makes me sad. Really cool. Your factor. Food. Well, I now I wanna go to let me track for tacos. Earlier, but yeah, Japanese food, Thai food, Mexican food. I think those are my top three ethnic foods, although mostly what I end up eating is the talian because passed an pizzas available, and inexpensive. And also, my girlfriend's Italian so I like that, too. Generally just one of the happy things that I also again, wasn't expecting when I got into coffee was that I became a foodie I was not before. But when you know, when you're working with this kind of stuff, and you're working with taste like Scott would not, you know, he would seek out also the best food, and I really learned to, to separate the reputation of a restaurant from the actual quality of the restaurant, I will not give names, but there are places in town here where people line up all the time and it's just not worth it. And I walked by and shake my head, and I passed the place, two blocks further that I know is doing the much better job of that thing and getting the attention. But so yeah. Just in general, what people put in. Kind of care and energy that I'm putting into burn the coffee into the food. It's awesome. It's, it's so good to see. And it's still really rare. It's kind of one of the positive outcomes of dedicating a lot of time in passionate into subject is you start being able to recognize it in other people. Yeah. You see it. When you walk across the street you have that in nod it doesn't take me, you know, like when I got into cock, cocktails stuff a little bit of didn't take me long to figure out where the better places were. And if I walked into a place to go. Oh, wait a minute. I can see I can see what they're doing here, kind of thing. So, yeah, it's sort of spreads outward that way, which is great podcasts, you know? Huge Dan savage. Fan dances, savage. Love podcast relationship podcast and one that he the only other one that I listened to regularly. Now, it's relatively recent is when the he re tweeted about how much he loved. It's call the fall of civilization podcast. I think they're on, like episode four talks about all these different civilizations through time that have ended like the Mayans they stopped Roman Britain like they abandoned, Rome. At one point, they just gave Brandon Britain. They gave up at a certain point went. So and it's interesting because, of course, you know, one of the feelings that can you can easily have reading your morning news. These days is this isn't going, well, you know, so it's kind of fun to look back and see, like what were the warning signs and why did these things happen kind of things. So that's fascinating. It is fascinating. There's something really amazing endings learn about endings and endings on that scale yet. That's like that's world changing. I think the other thing is really interesting about. Another famous favorite author is Daniel Quinn, who wrote Ishmael is the most famous one but he's written a bunch of other stuff, and he talks about how I couldn't summarize really, but he's not a big fan of our current civilization than life structure, and he talks about how like there are examples the minds is one of them of Pete, where people walked away. People just went now. We'd rather go back to weigh, the we live in the forest, you know, like they hit, you can literally make a different choice because it seems impossible like how could we there are examples of that happening in the past? So we should have a special episode and just talk about all this stuff. Deepen it. Yes. Do you have a favorite social media polo someone out there doing it really well? So the only social media do is Twitter. And I know that I you know, Facebook, I'm very happy that I never was tempted. And I'm happier and happier every day that goes by. And instagram. I never really got into that. So I do Twitter. I hear all kinds of horrible things about Twitter but I use Twitter very differently. It's most I mostly just follow and read and every once in a while I sent a comment read on Twitter. So I read a bunch of coffee people. That's how I kind of with a lot of stuff is, is coffee Twitter. And then some of it are. It's people that I know locally a little local comedians, and friends and things like that. And then some of it is, is a little more political stuff and things like that. But again, I don't get into the interacting. I'm not posting my own stuff. And then getting at mentioned back and stuff like that. It's really I used to our RSS reader, just and I would just subscribe to things and Twitter's just that for me now. So I do follow Dan savage. I follow some people he recommended like Esther Parral, who's a relationship. Psychologist, counselor author. I follow that follow civilizations podcast coffee wise. I follow like James Hoffman from square mile in England Collin Harmon the Irish breeze to champ that I was talking about. And then some people that crossover there's a guy named Tony Kenichi. You as a coffee subscription service called, let, yes, please. And he used to have a coffee company called tonics and his stuff is park coffee, and then also part, social commentary and stuff's, cool guys like that. So and I had a few categories, just because it's you and I feel this is special super caffeinated, talk. Exactly. So just get name a different few different coffee ways of serving coffee in whichever spot in Montreal are wherever that you love to get that coffee from that place. Okay. I will caution this one by a pre worn for this. When I get asked this all the time. Now is this a question for, you know, it's a good question, because it allows me the chance to reframe the question I get asked all the time in classes like what is your top place or what your top three or something like that? And I was already thinking this, but I saw somebody else, replied to the same question in, I think, London, I think it might have been James Hoffman saying it's no longer. Question, happily of where's the best place? There's so many and the variation from one day to another and, you know, which is the right place for my mood, and did it, but it doesn't really matter because that's not really how you do coffee. I mean, it's very rare that you're like, okay, I'm gonna get up and I want to go to the best place in town. You're gonna go really far the question. You're asking yourself, mostly is what's the best place around here, like in five or ten minutes kind of thing. So, so that said go ahead and ask you what's the best place around here. Yes. So we're, I think I mentioned to you. Were sort of central plateau, and on the way over I walked by noble where Victor, who's one of the people that teaches classes with me at the academy works. So that's a really nice great option. You're also close to Larry's, which is sort of a small version of the Lawrence restaurant next door. But during the day they do coffee service, you can just walk in and get a coffee. Little further north. I really like on bogere. I really liked peace Di really like cafe Odessa. Yeah. Those would be sort of my options, real close. Oh, caffeine Gamba has well not too far. If you just go a little bit. That's on park park between I think Fairmount and Saint Vietor and it's, it's the granddaddy great now. It's the oldest currently existing progressive coffee cafe in the city. So, so maybe instead of focusing on, on the coffee what's cafe in Montreal or elsewhere that when you walk in always makes you smile almost feels like home. You're like that for me at the moment. It's the one that I go to most often his scheme, which is just half a block down from my kademi, and I don't tend to get coffee there because I'm I'm usually walking past it to go to my academy where I have all my time. I that's one of the things that I kind of almost oh, it to myself, most of the day to make the coffee myself and test my coffee. And so that, that is true that also in a larger sense, I owe it to myself to drink other people's coffee more. But the real answer to what makes thing feel like most home is not going to be the coffee. Even is not going to be the decor. It's going to be the people. And so I know the staff at a ski now and I walk in smiley face. And I'm I'm usually there because they receive deliveries for us when I'm not at the academy of paying up boxes of coffee or something like that. And it's just, you know, you say hi, and you do a quick catch up, and that, that may cut to the core of what really makes it good. Cafe is a place where you can walk in and say, hi, and it's a place where everybody knows your name for cheers. And last one. What's the best thing about being a Montreal or? Oh, I mean, I chose Montreal consciously. So I grew up mostly in Edmonton, and I came here for university, I between high school and university I was working in a clothing store, and I wanna sales competition for a four day weekend here, and it was actually I was going to say without revealing your address your onto Bouillon here. We're recording. And I was on the little apartment that they gave me the key to was two billion prince Arthur off spot. My. So I came here for four days and I went. Yup. Because I was from Edmonton. And there is an opposite. Montreal in Canada. It's pretty much advocate. So, you know, I came here. I was like, I'm determined. I'm gonna go to McGill and I did. And then when I graduated from Gil, I actually thought I had to leave because I thought I didn't speak French well enough to get a job here. This was nine hundred ninety two or three or whatever I could have definitely I mean you could still get a job of Westmount or something like that. The town where everyone should be bilingual, but whether they'll make exceptions I could've stayed, but I didn't know that. So I ended up going west but I spent ten years at west about once a month. I would have a dream that I was while walking through the collateral and looking at the buildings on a bike know what the trees and I would wake up and be like really sad that it was a dream. So I finally got back and I will say this to you asked me earlier about like what gets you through the dark times? I remember very consciously many, many times where I'd be biking to work along on a tree, Laden street going by these nice old hundred fifty year old buildings and going, you know what I did make it. You know I got here. It doesn't matter how much stress I have on the back of my mind. This is still a sunny day in the plateau, and it's the same with your Bank, balances ten thousand or minus ten thousand it's still a sunny day in the plateau. Amen, amen. And Chris, where can we? Learn more about you and the academy in the courses you offer there. Thank you for the opportunity to my website, which is Montreal coffee, academy dot com. And so he has a pretty file about me, there, you probably learned way more just listening to this podcast and you'd have learned from the site. But yeah, all of our classes are listed there and there's a contact form as well. So if there's any questions or anything else, we are like I say, in addition to the public classes, we offer a bunch of consulting services and other thing there's anything at all. You know, send us a male, and if we can help we will, and I'd like to emphasize that it's for absolutely anyone who loves coffee. You don't have to be a pro you have to be in the coffee business. You said to be curious. I'm pretty happy about that. We get a bunch of feedback from people, you know, we get a wide range of people come, and we get feedback from people that are full pros. They're like. Even though you started kind of zero I still learn so much in that class. And then from non professionals that have no nothing that are like you. You walked me through it. You got me there, we've managed to find create classes that really you can be sitting complete movie next to a total professional in both people seem to really get a lot out of it. Yeah. I'm happy about that. Thanks so much for coming on. Thank you guys. It was great to see both of you again, because I used to see both of you. It's a nice little reunion. Yeah. I really appreciate it. And thanks. Thanks for joining us on. Thanks. All right. Thanks, everyone. Cheers. Hey, hey, that was Chris Capelle on the spear broS podcast. Chris, thank you so much for coming on the show. I had such a blast. I'm sure that a lot of yo there is well, thoroughly enjoyed this special episode about coffee. I learned so much every time I'm next to Chris. I just start learning and absorbing coffee wisdom. I love coffee already. So anything more as bonus and it gets me so hyped moments like this gave me so hyped about making some delicious coffees. So thank you, Chris. Thank you, Mets yards and we'll pay for coming on and being such a RAD co host all be linking. His episode on the podcast in the blog posts and show notes case, you want to check out a bit more stuff with Matt. Thank you, everyone for tuning in, if you want more spirit, broS, material, check us out on WWW dot the spirit, rose dot com. We've got a special event coming up on June first called ceremony of yoga rise. It's going to be led by Kiko Fujimoto, and Elisa more organized by our very own Scott Simon's special event, Coon Delaney, yoga based, but really, it's for anybody who wants to have fun wants to experience an event based around health around getting to know yourself, better and so on. That's June first, you can check it out at ceremony of yoga dot com. If you are still listening, we love all of our audience, but we love you, especially because you listen to the very end. So thanks for tuning in to the spirit, rose podcast. This is Pete signing off for Scott for Matt for Chris, take it easy out there. Chow chow.

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