20 Burst results for "Mary Catherine"

"mary catherine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:33 min | 8 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Your high candidate joined by Mary Katharine Ham of CNN fame. Good Morning, Mary Catherine, How are you? Good morning. I'm doing all right now. I have not talked to in the longest time on the air. Follow Mary Catherine on Twitter and Kate Hammer. How goes the CNN gig? And what else were you doing with your time these days? Besides writing the funniest Instagram post ever? I am working on some writing projects freelance and possibly book related, Um and, uh and also many something Audio podcast in the works, so keep you posted very good Now, you and guy Benson wrote a few years ago. End of discussion. It was prophetic because canceled culture with just getting started. Do you think? What you predicted, then is even worse now or about what you saw coming. Yeah, We always joke that It's good for the book and bed for America. This is still relevant. Right on DIT does grow, I think The issues that we said at the time. Hey, cancel culture, arms race is not really want to go. Um, we don't want to spite the left in the way that it fights us, even though it can be In the short term, satisfying like I don't want to unilaterally disarm against the left on these fights, but escalating them in the exact same way and looking for our own takedowns and and pulling people out of employment. For thine tweets or something. Which is that that's my to me. That's one of the more agree just versions of this When you find someone old tweets from when they were Almost literally a minor sometimes to bring them down. That happened with husband quarterback at one point and I'm not sure that everyone sort of escalating At this point. We're in a we're in a An arms race of cancel culture. It's uncomfortable. It's not. It's not leading us anywhere. Good. Now I find some examples where it's okay to go back. For example, Marjorie Taylor Greene. Speculated that a plane had not hit the Pentagon two years ago. Is that relevant to discussions about her today? Yeah, that's that is relevant on bullets in there. One thing we argued in the book is that there should be a difference between how public figures air are treated versus just the private says private Citizen who is like you know, has a job at the Local gas station right now, he's the congresswoman. Some of that happened when she was a private citizen. But I do think this is worthy of discussion. These air her takes on pretty important Public issues and, uh and also, she was. She was no minor at that time. This is like I want people to be able to come back from mistakes. But this is a pattern of behavior that needs to be addressed and the way that The way that Congress deals with that there's several choices available to them, but I think absent a public Dealing with this on her behalf and apologies for some of these things and backing off of them pretty pretty vehemently. You have to Deal with her in some way. I agree. Yesterday she made a speech. The Republican conference apologizing for suggesting school shootings were false flag incident. I have not yet heard her repudiate. The idea that a plane did not hit the Pentagon. And to me, that is, I mean, publicly upfront. Yes, a plane hit the Pentagon. I'm sorry that I suggested otherwise. Because I had had the son of a Victim in the Pentagon call yesterday and that kind of stuff is not only crazy, it's hurtful. Yeah. So now I want to turn to politico and I don't want to put you on a hot spot. I only want to know what you've told people generally, what happened with politico? So which, like a guy Benson and I was supposed to write the playbook the same week that Ben Shapiro wrote the playbook. We had agreed to do it on had a tentative date. But it never panned out and s. So we wondered if the reason for that was that they got scared off by the controversy over bin Now, I do want to say that they stood behind Ben and did not sort of apologize and retract. That piece of writing, which was the right thing to do, But we felt that possibly we were the casualty in the wake of that Andre have spoken to them. About that, and we're trying to figure out exactly what happened. But I think the fact pattern looks up looks fairly clear. To us. The fact pattern was clear. Brad Dayspring, who is their cover conservative over there. Got into it with me on Twitter. So after I criticized the hiring of Sam Stein and their their first choice of one of your colleagues and calling her mind don lemon to be the play book editor They said how we're gonna have a bunch of conservatives just you watch and I said, I'll wait and see. It'll be very revealing. They put up Ben Shapiro that caused the nightmare. I got requests from inside politico as to who want to do this because I can't do it. I work for the post and I suggested while you don't got events, and Mary Katharine Ham pretty good team. And a couple other famine at any more conservative. They gave up. They named their new playbook team, so they never followed through. Mary Catherine and Brad has fallen silent. What do you think that signals Well, I mean, I think I think that the conclusion that you're drawing is not, uh, off based entirely and this Here's the thing is, I think it's important. Who tried to cross pollinate with mainstream organizations right because that's why it worked at CNN. I want to reach the people that CNN is talking to. I don't always want to preach to my to my choir until I think it's important to try to do those things and I look for ways to do this one of the ways one of the reasons, I said Let's let's do playbook because it's important for people apparently especially newsrooms to encounter people who think different things so I will continue to look for opportunities. You do that, And sometimes it is running your head up against a wall. But I hope in the future that there are other outlets that will countenance this one of the things that The guy and I are working on. It is something about the newsroom issue because this is this is these are internal revolts that it's happened all over the U. S. Where folks have gotten Ousted from years of careers for merely suggesting that the other side has a point or should have a place to write on..

Pentagon Ben Shapiro Mary Catherine CNN Mary Katharine Ham guy Benson Twitter Brad Dayspring politico Kate Hammer Marjorie Taylor Greene America Sam Stein Congress Andre editor
"mary catherine" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

04:18 min | 8 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"In a trauma situation abuse situation. Well so yes it now so the most dangerous time and in an abusive relationship is when you leave but we all know that you have to leave in order to survive. That is what the family places there for is to help our victims create this safety plan to Which is you know a personalized plan. That safety measures So you can maintain safety after that. Abusive relationship It includes physical safety. See if your kids. Pat and that established plan will help that mitigate that That that time yeah that risk And some of the warning signs. We're we're getting close on the clock. We've got about four minutes but What are some of the warning signs that a friend or a family member is being abused. Oh my gosh So there's lots two ways you can tell. Something's wrong unexplained injuries explanations. That don't quite make sense. Came plans at the last minute. Fear making their partner angry when they do something wrong. I mean some of the big line especially in dallas is wearing turtleneck in the middle of summer And you know trying to master. Those injuries always wearing sunglasses But it's important to always ask questions so many of our clients have they just wish someone had asked especially in the workplace and right now. Covid nineteen People still isolating it. It has been more difficult for people to reach out to their friends. And so we're leaning on each other to still keep up with each other. Keep up with your friends to make sure that they're safe and secure. Yeah well the work that you do is so amazing and We've got two minutes. So what is the safest way to help a friend who is being abused without causing them more abuse or harm But i know that you care asked direct questions at lea- give them time to talk. I in a few days later. Don't rush anything and don't blame them. It's not their fault. Within without judging your friend believe the abusers negative messaging. Yeah so they feel ashamed. Inadequate need to explain that. There's never an excuse for physical violence. You not alcohol. Not drugs not financial reasons. There's no excuse for it. Yeah and if your friend remains a woman leaving average of seven times before leaving for good Just continue to express your concern and tell them that help is available. Family places available are hotline two and four nine four one one nine nine one. Yeah well and it's also wanna add this because a lot of people think that socio economics plays a role in this. It does not their covers. It covers the gamut It doesn't matter what your income is. Abuse can happen. No matter how rich or poor you are. It's it's not a socioeconomic thing right. Mary no not not at all people of all backgrounds. All religions all ethnicities everyone experiences in texas. The one in three women will experience domestic violence in their lifetime. Yeah we'll thank you so much Everyone you've been listening to. Mary catherine ben evita's and thank you so much for the work that you do. I got your name right. I did you should hear how people are my name via shoddy i i made a name with sereni so it's just well it's you. It's been great having you on the show. We'll edit the tape. Thank you so much for jumping on the and all the work that you do in our community on all right everyone. I hope everybody has a fantastic weekend. Enjoy it. It's going to be beautiful. I think a little chilly but you know what. Let's all be thankful that we You know that we're all alive right all right Junior have a good weekend okay. He didn't get to hear your voice much during today's show but that you know we'll we'll tap into you next week. All right Have a great weekend. Everyone and remember you get one body. You'll get one mind and you get one life..

next week two minutes texas Mary nineteen People sereni today Mary catherine ben evita seven times two ways three women dallas Pat one life two one body one mind Junior few days later four nine four one one nine ni
"mary catherine" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

06:00 min | 8 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"It's friday brought to you by castor in politics. One of our sponsors at one life radio and casteran. Pollock's is the only complete line of usda organically certified pet food setting the new standard in pet nutrition. We are back with mary. Catherine ben evita's and she is development manager of the family place so many things. I wanna ask you mary. Catherine you guys do such tremendous work. Let me ask you this. How many families a year do you work with. And so i we just looking at this actually so we really because we are the largest in the state and we serve We serve actually. We talked about eleven thousand nine hundred and thirty three clients last year with over sixty thousand days of emergency shelter thirty six thousand days of transitional housing over eighteen thousand hours of counseling for survivors and almost nine thousand hours of counseling for batters. So because we look at not just the mom but we service the children as well We have a youth. Violence prevention program called b project which is out in the area schools that teaches about dating violence so we service such a myriad of service that so it's not just one family service so many different types of family and the children too. I mean there's there's so many cost involved in this and so that's why you know. The work that you do is development manager at the family place. It is so critical. Because like i said with patti dawson with dallas dog. Refunding makes the rocket. go up right. You need to have funding in order to have changed. Yes and our community has been just so wonderful and we thinking deep this past year to help us stay open and provide all these amazing services for our clients and we have different events fundraising events throughout the year. Of course last year and this year they're looking a little differently. Usually we Last year in the past. We've had a thousand person luncheon and dinner A golf tournament Many of those things were cancelled posture. Just because of covid. Nineteen and Shelter at home orders and you know just for safety and security of everyone involved. fortunately Partners card did was able to occur. It is our largest fundraiser. its Seventy five dollars cards. You mentioned earlier that it's twenty percent off at over seven hundred stores retailers restaurants in the dallas fort worth area so that actually occurs this past year and was a huge success. They in no small part to all of our amazing retailers are shoppers. That were out and shopping online. Which you're able to do Doing contactless car pickup and just really supporting our retailers and our organization at the same time. Yeah the partners card is how i i learned about the about the family place and it is your biggest fundraiser. I knew that i was going to ask you that. And so yeah you were. You were affected by cove in nineteen people. Were not out shopping. So many people. But what are your plans for the future. In any great ideas out there to navigate through the covid nineteen That's continuing well. And that's part of our development strategy is to always think outside the box and whether it is sort of micro fundraisers partnering with local restaurants to give a percentage that a lot of Are a lot of companies are doing virtual drives to help us. Because as i said when our clients come to us with nothing but the clothes on their back they need additional clothing toiletries household items when they graduate from programs and go out and live in their own apartments. We set them up for success. Meaning that we have furniture. We have make sure and have a starter kit for them pots and pans and those things are provided by our volunteers by our community and so those virtual drives are wonderful thing to do We're also looking at different fundraisers this year so one of the ones that i'm organizing is in february. It's called love helps since we know most It people aren't going to be dining out as much for valentine's day. It's a little cold outside. I'm really are doing a dine in delivery event. And it's chaired by dr tiffany moon and her husband. Daniel moon and she is one of the newest cast members of real housewives the dallas and a are yeah and they're tearing awesome fundraiser events You can sign up online at family. Place dot org slash love help. It is Fundraiser first and foremost it is a seven hundred fifty. Four at dinner for two. It's a four course dinner from vessels catering with two bottles of wine beautiful flowers chocolate and fun goody box all the expertly delivered to your home on either february twelfth thirteenth. The donors choosing. So we're we're looking at you know innovative and ways of doing it. We are going to have our major donor dinner this spring. But it's going to be completely outside and small tables masks service you know You know trying to make sure that everyone is healthy and comfortable and safe. We're always looking for to partner with organizations to really spread awareness. Like like y'all partnering with people like y'all to spread awareness about organization and to You know provide are circuses Well the work that you do is so amazing and let me ask you this. Is it true that it can be more dangerous to leave than to stay in a.

Daniel moon Catherine twenty percent thirty six thousand days february Last year this year Catherine ben evita last year Four over sixty thousand days nineteen people patti dawson february twelfth thirteenth over eighteen thousand hours One Nineteen two dallas valentine's day
"mary catherine" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

07:28 min | 8 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Are you ready. It is friday. Tgi app welcome back. You're listening to one life. Radio this is bernadette with junior broadcasting live from dallas texas on iheartmedia as well as an et in california on abc news. Talk we have a very special guest with us today. It is mary catherine ben. Evita's a she is a development manager of the family place she has been with the organization for over seven years and leads. They're safe keepers annual giving society. There reunite major donor dinner. Fundraiser and mary catherine is also spearheading. Love helps their new valentine's dinner delivery fundraiser and organiz these seventeen million legacy campaign to build the and moody place. Mary catherine hails from a small town in tennessee graduated from vanderbilt university and previously worked in major gifts at duke university before relocating to dallas with her husband. She is an active member of the junior league. Here in dallas and the dallas alpha delta pi alumni association and. She also enjoys spending time with her family and friends including her toddler. Girl and menagerie of animals you can visit their website at family place dot org mary catherine welcome to one life radio. Such an honor to have you on the show. Thank you so much such a pleasure to be here today. And it's fun to be here on furry friday. I in my home office right now if my two dogs and two cats hopefully they don't make too much noise. I love it. I love it and you know the family place is something is a place that i have supported for many many years starting with the partners card that i participate in every year. You guys do such amazing work and today we're talking about the family place mission so let's tell our listeners. What the family place is. And what your mission is for those who don't know of course so. The family place is a local dallas organization and we are actually the largest domestic violence agency in the state of texas and one of the first ones we started in nineteen seventy eight and our mission is to empower victims of family. Violence like providing safe housing counseling and skills to create independence while building teeny engagement and advocating for social change to stop family violence. Do me i we really look. Our ultimate goal is to in family violence and we look at the entire circle of violence. Working not only with victims and survivors cut with youth and batters as well. Yeah it's such an amazing amazing plays the family place and all the women that work there you guys do incredible work and you know i I i i wanna say this for people that you know that are animal lovers to about the family place. You guys do a lot of work with animals because you are one of the few places in the whole country. If i'm not mistaken that actually have not only You know a place a safe place for families to go but also their pets guys have shelters for the for the pets in your facility. Am i right yes. You're you're totally correct at. This is a new initiative With most recent capital campaigns build and maybe place In the past win Victims would come to us and need shelter They would have to either leave their animals behind as a pet lover and Pet mom myself. I could never imagine. We're we would have to you know Smith a call to action usually on a friday night on facebook and say just any. Can anyone please help us. Shelter this animal while we shelter her mom and kids So we realized that there was such a need for this and we know that animals are part of the family and especially for women. That don't have children. They are their children absolutely. And then the children if you're dealing with family violence and you know this better than anybody when a family is in is basically running for their life. They want to take that animal with and that's part of their family. I can't even imagine the trauma that a child would have to endure to leave their beloved pet behind. It breaks my heart to even think about it. I know and so we at being the family place. We want to make sure that family together. So i m really place. We have a kennel for up to ten dollars and up to ten cats And so it's the victims state. Our shelter can also shelter their animals as well and it has been such an amazing program we partner with the spca and they provide usually animals these eight or neutered and and wellness exam and the uptodate vaccination and because we want to make sure that those animals also have the support their fading too because many of that have experienced trauma And i'm sure you're very familiar with more davies. She's been on the show since very beginning on for refried as a. She's a wonderful person. You know doing all kinds of work in the community like you and that's really what it takes mary. Catherine isn't it for all of us to come together and raise our awareness and work together as a community because we all have experienced trauma in our life and we have to be there for one another. And that's what the family place does yes. We are so fortunate to be able to be there for our community and we provide services for Victims of family violence. So if they the first way that people really get in touch with us through our hotline at Two one four nine four one one nine nine one and staff twenty four seven in spanish and in english and people call if they just need to know information about you know what family. Violence is island. Or if they're in a situation and they need help immediately and so and even when are victims called nine one one and the police come to them and it's a domestic violets Situation if The police will call our hotline. We have a partnership with a dallas least department. They will call our hotline and then put the victim out. They talked to the family place and we have made a partnership and a promise to them that we will shelter any of those victims that they call us about and so we yeah we shall them and we provide this emergency shelter for them their kids when they come to us with absolutely nothing so we depend on our community to help us provide clothing and toiletries and You know any basic necessities that they might even when they're in the shelter and we always have that we have a chef on or three meals to today at all of our shelters across dallas. I love that and people that have never experienced family violence. Don't know that you know when you have to leave. You don't get you don't have time to take anything with you. It's a very spontaneous last minute. You know you're your kids your dog your cat whatever you can and getting the heck out of there. It's so traumatic for the families that have to go to go through it. And i know you said you know that better than anyone else. I'm loving talking about this and bringing awareness. We're going to go for a quick break station. Identification more coming up with mary. Catherine the benefit is that right. Our ben evita's then lead us. Yeah bene- vitas there. You go.

Catherine two dogs two cats mary catherine tennessee Mary catherine friday today vanderbilt university Evita one Smith friday night california over seven years iheartmedia duke university facebook mary catherine ben. one life radio
"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:09 min | 9 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"We have to mind the insights of the past and we have to one way of saying it is. We have to learn to use the word we to include all of life on earth that we have to get beyond the huge emphasis on individualism and competition and to learn that we are part of each other and we are. We are part of the life of the planet. And and we have to find. We have to learn to experience that as a terrible and tender beauty and shape everything we do to protect it. You know These said a of your parents said they were artists. As much as scientists said their knowledge was in carrying their books even their scientific books in different ways full of poetry. And i ex also experienced that. In in your writing and also in this conversation with you So i wanna thank you so much for just being in the world and charing as you do well. Thank you for giving me an opportunity to share with my new hampshire neighbors and beyond. Yeah we love new hampshire public radio. Is that where you are you we will let you know what's happening with this I think you've been in touch with lily and She'll continue to be in touch and we may have some other questions but Very grateful that you make time for this today. Thank you thank you grateful to good good meet you bye bye bye bye..

new hampshire
"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

13:40 min | 9 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Well. You know one one way of looking at christianity is to say that we should always be finding christ in each other and you know. That's not always obvious. I mean here all these people and scratching and tries to get their children not to throw spitballs. I don't know what But they the community comes together and here are these words that have been read and reread and reread and reinterpreted for two thousand years. When you think about how many people are given sunday are trying to find something to say about something. That's been read and preached on in hundreds of churches for for thousands of years thousands of year. Yeah i mean it boggles the mind. But they do because you are always different. You are always meeting the ritual different from the way you were last week or yesterday or whenever confronting different things in your life and it it it. There's a resonance between the tradition and the president. That makes it fresh. I don't know how better to put it. It has that it's like it becomes part of the improvisation right. Because you're improvising. You're composing your life than it has a different place at different stages in that. So i mean we. We were running out of time. This is so wonderful. But i do want to. We touched a little bit on the thinking. You've been doing more recently on composing a further life and and this almost this new evolutionary stage developmental stage of active wisdom active adulthood beyond what we had considered the adulthood where you retire at sixty or sixty five and then fade off into the sunset. I wonder you know. Are there things you've learned things you're thinking now As a person as a wife and mother and as an anthropologist and as margaret mead's daughter you know that that that surprise you that two thoughts that you don't think you would have been able to have Oh yes quite often right. Often i mean. Of course i'm cheating a little bit. I mean when. I wrote composing a life. I was writing about young women early in their careers families which was where i was. Yeah and now. I'm writing about people in old age. Should i'm seventy five. Yeah that's very interesting. yeah. I mean it's if you are and actually that book was meant to to continue through to death and i found myself with this new life. Stage that nobody seemed to know about And so that's what i concentrated on. Because and i also found myself in the course of writing that book. Adopting adopting a a new definition of spirituality Because i watch people thinking about issues that had not been important to them before in terms of their relationships with other people or with society or taking the time to reflect on their lives. And i don't think there's any single recipe but i have to say people go on growing. They become deeper. You you said an said in another interview. We'd talk a lot. These days about gap years for people graduating from high school. And you said there's that elders should think about taking gap years too. Well see i think a lot of what the society wants to push on older people is. You're supposed to have fun now I was. I was on a on a panel at the national press club Several years ago. And i was pointing out that the at that point the group of the age cohort that was coming into using computers and the largest numbers where people over sixty and very often they were being taught how to use the computer by their grandchildren to eight and newt gingrich was on the panel and he said He said dr basis absolutely right. It's very important for old people to learn to use computers. Why i know a couple that because they could use the computer to search they were able to go on three cruises a year instead of just two well. That is the message. A lot of people are getting You worked hard all your life now. You should play and spend money obviously market. Yeah obviously we're talking about a certain certain segment of the population. Also that can afford that. Right i mean. I just heard today that the largest growing segment of the american population is poor elderly women so i mean that's the other that's the other side of that illusion. I'm sure But and and look we. We have a lot of ageism in our society And the message. I feel passionately about spreading the message. That older adults no a lot. And if they continue to learn and share that and engage in society. You know that may be may be our salvation because everybody else's so busy you and it is. It is absolutely critical as a society. We do have social security because if in many cultures and times in human history. When when you couldn't work you were. You were just sort of allowed to starve you. You've also talked. You've talked specifically about thinking about the future of the planet ecology something like climate change And that this might be a place where grandparents and grandchildren elders and the young might be. Come a force. I i i love that and i sent in my own conversations. Both among young people a sense of knowing their need for elders and among elders a sense of wanting to have a role. But not knowing how to find that or cert- it and i wonder and and we're very by age in this culture as much as any of our other segregation and i wonder how you think. About how those kinds of twos that language of your mother out these clusters or or this new kind of collective homemaking How do you see that that might happen. How would you propose. I was for a while. And i'm not an organizer. I was for a while trying to Organize a movement that i called granny voter Because i felt that one of the ways that people think about the future is by looking at the their own specific children and grandchildren going into that future. You know and we'll we'll there'd be out in the lake for my grandson to catch when he's at teenage. Yeah that kind of question And i do think that's part of it. It's very rarely pointed out. That never has never before that i know of has a fundamental ethical. Change worked his way into the population from the children. You know they get told a little bit about ecology at school and they come home and teach their parents so the intergenerational dialog is is very central you mean apart it's the children have always been part of it that the these it hasn't happened without apart from the children or no i mean vast numbers of people wouldn't know their vices right. If the children hadn't gotten cited about wales yeah And you know people kids are. They tend to look at particular species. Yeah you know. They care about polar bears or fails or what's been called a charismatic mega fauna right but the animals that the children are interested in our part of the living organism. That is that is the ecosystem that from you know. Microscopic members to elephants but see glimpses. Start saying you know mom. Don't leave the light on all night. Yeah dad you know. Don't leave the water running while you're shaving institute The let me ask you this This this large question. What does it mean to be human which is philosophical question. It's a theological question. And it's an anthropological question. It's a question. Your mother margaret mead and your father gregory bateson. We're asking how was your i. I know it's a huge question How would you start to talk about how your sense of that has evolved. In the course of this life you've lived perhaps in ways that have taken by surprise or not.

margaret mead national press club newt gingrich wales gregory bateson
"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:05 min | 9 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"How beautiful it is how complicated it is What what the wonder of creation he wakes up as frivolous pop. When i started thinking about this i i actually got interested in this sense of wonder because for a series of historical reasons. I know a lot about judaism. My lip live my last two year. Last year of high school in israel right right and graduated from an israeli school and had to be know a lot about the hebrew scriptures. Okay And then i came back and decided. I wanted to learn about islam and the study arabic and then you spent a good amount of time in iran before the revolution seven years. Yeah well six years. And i have great respect for these other traditions and i and a lot of knowledge I mean it's. I'm i'm a member of a catholic church and i know more about the old testament most So i thought. I should be doing something to address the islamaphobia the hostility the prejudice that has grown up in this country after nine eleven and there were there have been a lot of projects people trying to do exactly that Educate the public more about islam. Bake them familiar with the magnificent artwork associated with the islamic tradition. Yeah the achievements in science and etcetera etcetera. The way i went about it was to say what is it that makes me as a christian amplifies with muslim. Where at what point are we together. And what struck me is that what actually all three of the religions that come from abraham judaism christianity and islam. There what we all have in common is the sense of wonder that leads to praise that is to say when you when you go from wonder to a religious context shared worship something like that. It takes the form of praise and in spite of the huge differences in other aspects of the traditions. Different set of rules expectations behaviors today. I'm tom toronto. Trump praises central in all of whom. So do you feel like Even as an anthropologist that that that that sense of wonder is is much what religion keeps alive for human beings as as ritual. Yes i think. Ritual is an important part of it because ritual is constantly building. You repeat the same thing at different stages of your life you know and and you're putting new layers of of meaning you're re recognizing the familiar There's a it's wonderful phrase in a familiar. Christmas carol it's in a little town of bethlehem And i think it's in the second verse that the angels are above the stable and and while mortals sleep the angels keep their watch of wondering love that juxtaposition of wonder and love and it is what we feel with a new baby. You know You and it's what we we can. We need to learn to feel about the forests and the lakes and the all the life around us and to see them all as a live. You.

tom toronto iran israel abraham Trump bethlehem carol angels
"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:06 min | 9 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"The past. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I guess <Speech_Female> one way of saying <Speech_Female> it is <Silence> <Speech_Female> we have <Speech_Female> to learn to <Silence> use <SpeakerChange> the word <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> we <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> To include <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> all of life on <Silence> earth <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> we have to learn <Speech_Female> to experience <Silence> that <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> as <Speech_Female> a terrible <Speech_Female> and tender <Silence> beauty <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> shape <Silence> everything we do <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> to protect <Speech_Female> it. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You know <Speech_Female> you've said a <Speech_Female> of your parents said <Speech_Female> they were artists. <Speech_Female> As much as scientists <Speech_Female> said. Their knowledge <Speech_Female> was based in carrying <Speech_Female> their <Speech_Female> books. Even <Speech_Female> their scientific books <Speech_Female> in different ways full <Speech_Female> of poetry. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> i ex also <Speech_Female> experienced that <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> in your writing and <Speech_Female> also in this conversation <Speech_Female> with you. <Speech_Female> So i wanna thank <Speech_Female> you so much just <Speech_Music_Female> being in the <Speech_Music_Female> world and <Music> <Music> charing <SpeakerChange> as <Speech_Music_Female> you do <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> well. Thank <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Female> for giving me an <Speech_Female> opportunity to <Speech_Female> share with my new hampshire <Speech_Music_Female> neighbors <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> and beyond <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> mary. Catherine bateson <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is professor <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> emeritus at george <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> mason university. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Her books <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> include a memoir <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of life with her parents. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Margaret <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and gregory <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> bateson called <Speech_Music_Female> with daughters. <Speech_Female> I as <Speech_Female> well as her bestselling <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> book composing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a life <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> most <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> recently. She's co <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> authored thinking <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> race. Social <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> myths and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> biological realities <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> published <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> nearly fifty <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> years after her mother's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> rap on <Speech_Music_Female> race with james <Speech_Music_Female> baldwin. <Speech_Music_Female> The ongoing <Speech_Female> project is <Speech_Music_Female> chris. Cagle <Speech_Music_Female> lily percy <Speech_Music_Female> laurindo. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Aaron <SpeakerChange> soko <Speech_Music_Male> eddie. Gonzalez <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> lucas <Speech_Music_Female> johnson. Suzanne <Speech_Music_Female> burly zack. <Speech_Music_Female> rose

"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

08:10 min | 9 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Is on being today with the linguist anthropologist and wise woman. Mary catherine bateson. She explores the matter of composing our lives of life as an improvisational art at every age since her childhood is the daughter of the towering anthropologist margaret mead and gregory bateson. She's had an ability to experience life. Both as an original observer and as joyful participant i do find echoes. But also i find that you are. Improvising are working with some of the same convictions but bringing them into a different world. I mean here's something you wrote about your belief that multiple small spheres of personal experience both and enable events shared more widely expressions of moment in a world in which we now recognize that no microcosm is completely separate. No tide pool no forest no family no nation indeed. The knowledge drawn from the life of some single organism or community or from the intimate experience of an individual may prove to be relevant to decisions that affect the health of a city or the peace of the world. Not sultan of very central quotation. Now i'm working on a book the title of which is love across different And central to the thinking in that book is that love depends on a recognition of something in common and the valuing of a different right. You don't want someone just like yourself. You want someone enough like yourself so that you can learn new things from them right right. I'd like to talk to you about religion. I i mean it's it's very interesting. Your your parents. Had you know as we've discussed complicated lives and philosophies and and complicated relationships with religion i mean you describe. Your father's studied english atheism but across his life span. He was investigating conscious purpose and the san francisco. Zen center was an important place for him in eastland institute and you read him passages that he loved from the book of job while he was dying and your mother you know you you quote this There's this these lines of kipling though just so taken with kipling's description of heaven which your mother loved heaven as a place of tireless creativity but each for the joy of working and each in his son versus are yeah. Paint the thing as she sees it for the god of things as they are. Isn't that a wonderful line. God is wonderful. I love it and it seems to me that across your life you you were more overtly curious and kind of moving towards religion and wanting to understand it and what its place in your life might be. I mean. I'm curious about both as a human being as an as an anthropologist. You know how you've come to think of the presence of these traditions among us you know what they mean for human beings and end their integrity in this moment change because that way your father was is the way. Many many people are growing up to be now. i mean he was quite unique Well you know his his father who was a distinguished file adjust insisted they read the bible to each other on a fairly regular basis the parents and the three sons because his father said he didn't want them to be empty minded atheists. Your mother said this you. Uc site your mother saying this very insightful. The wonderful thing that too many people when they reject god go on believing in the devil that many intellectuals have sense of evil without a confidence in good she did indeed say that and she said it about some specific people Now i think i think what shall i say. I think i'm not happy with the division of between people who say i'm spiritual but not religious to me. The starting place is the sense of wonder and that can take you into science. It can take you into other. Human beings are amazing and beautiful. The natural world around us the more we study it the more fascinating and intricate and elegant. It turns out to be. That's my interpretation of the book of job incidentally My father used to say that joe gets over his distress by learning some natural history. But i don't think it's it's it is a matter of i mean god you remember in the book of job god says. Do you know why the rains fall here. And not there. When the deer bring before they're young et cetera et cetera. All that that. It sounds like a quiz on nature studies. Yes but that's not really what it is. I think the point about the book of job is that job is virtuous member of an institution. He's respectable he obeys all the rules. He's complacent he goes through the appropriate rituals that were required and is community at that time but he's lost his sense of wonder and thank god says look just look realize how beautiful it is. How complicated it is The wonder of and he wakes up. I actually got interested in this sense of wonder because for a series of historical reasons. I know a lot about judaism. I live my last year of high school in israel right and then i came back and decided i wanted to learn about islam and studied arabic. And then you spent a good amount of time in iran before the revolution seven years. Yeah well six years. So i thought i should be doing something to address the islamaphobia the hostility the prejudice that has grown up in this country after nine eleven..

Mary catherine bateson eastland institute gregory bateson margaret mead Zen center kipling san francisco Uc joe israel iran
"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

10:20 min | 9 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I think round nineteen composing. A life brought some dates with me. Hang on this is a. This is a pause. We can get upstairs in my office. I got them in person brinton. I well don't worry about it. Nine thousand nine hundred ninety one. We have our crack researchers behind the glass. So nineteen ninety-one okay. I think that is a phrase that you brought into the world that's Very evocative and rich and And i think it actually follows on what we've just been talking about numb this discipline way of being that you invite going up of living and reflecting and so just start to talk a little bit about that notion of composing a life how that came to you and what you what you mean by that. Well at that point. I had been dean of faculty at amherst college for several years with the faculty that hadn't gotten used to the idea of co education yet Which was perennially and was habich really antagonist to the administration which is not uncommon And i was very aware at that point in history that women were going back to school back into the workplace Trying for the first time to combine family life with an active career and finding it very difficult Talking about juggling. Yeah which to me is a is a terribly anxiety producing metaphor right. It's very. I mean you you say that in your writing and i i i wrote that down because it does throw into sharp relief what it would a different way of approaching. Composing life is than rather than jug. I wouldn't wouldn't it be a nice thing if we didn't use quite so many Military metaphors i think. Ninety one is a little late. I think the book was down earlier. That oh look it up look it up but people would say to me you know. I can't get my life together. I try different things. My husband says. I'm not a serious person because i don't have a consistent career line i feel like such a failure and what i saw was that they were working harder than their husbands and doing a pretty good job and i was looking for a metaphor that would allow them to realize that the effort they were making to work out. A new kind of women's role was creative that it was an art form. An improv is a tory. Impr- improvisation as an improv. Dettori art exactly. Well you know people think. Improvisation means you don't practice but i have a cousin who is a jazz flutist and i know that jazz musicians practice. Improvisation by the hour and improvisation is a is a high order of skill. Yeah you know you you you meant you say in composing alive so again. This was some decades ago. This was as the this is in the latter part of the twentieth century and now in the early decades of the twenty first you said in a stable society composing a life is somewhat like throwing pot or building a house in a traditional form. The materials are known the hands move along familiar tasks. The fit of the completed hole in common life is understood. But you know what you just said about. The the situation of women In those latter decades of the twentieth century is true of everybody just about everybody graduated from college. Now that as you said. The consistent career paths Aren't there for anyone in think. That's the case. I mean i think we now live with constant change and whereas there was a certain predictability in women's roles Up to the end of the nineteenth century That predictability is lost and so they're on stage without a script right and so our kids graduating from college on stage without a script. Yeah yes and which. So which again. I think the just playing with this language and kind of delving into this language of composing. And you know. Here's another piece of your writing. I like to think of men and women as artists of their own lives working with what comes to hand through accident or talent to compose and recompose pattern in time that expresses who they are what they believe in making meaning even as they are studying and working and raising children creating and recreating themselves. You know that metaphor was simply a gift A bad metaphor can create chaos literally. I was at a conference. Oh sorry. I'm about to tell you about my more recent metaphor composing a further life. They the well mp in composing a further life about later adulthood. yeah i talk about what i call active wisdom. Yes and that too. you know. it's it's it's very hard to find things to say about. Aj that don't make people uncomfortable. Yeah I mean if you advertised talk on the subject of let's say productive aging or positive aging or something like that people wanna come Whereas the concept of active wisdom. Yeah of of having a period before Becoming frail and multiple medical problems zone so forth When you have a harvest of a life of learning and thinking and observing and at the same time you're still active. Yeah you talk you talk about tell you. It's wisdom on the hoof where you say there's you talk about adulthood one The first phase of adulthood. Which is what we traditionally have thought of as adulthood but then with these suddenly ever longer productive lives. he's talk about adulthood to as a new developmental state. Which i like wisdom on the hoop. I think it is. I think it's it's it is so profound a change. It really affects our status as a species. It's something that gives me hope that we will deal with climate change. We will learn to be more careful with the ways. We use the planet Because what's been happening is we've been thinking Living longer and thinking shorter we've been accelerating our activities. And gosh if we have more people that have lived into a certain degree of wisdom. Maybe we'll think twice. I wanna i wanna come back to that. That's so important I mean you also as you as you yourself have composed your life. I mean you composed your life. You did become a linguist and a an anthropologist Which i mean the field which your your mother. In fact both of your parents really helped create has radically evolved. But you are part of that field. But i mean it's so interesting as you're you know one thing you said about your mother as your mother composed her life. She had her marriage and her family fit into that. Then you've done it very differently You i mean you. Can i just ask you this. There's this quote of your mother margaret. Mead that i've discussed with other people and i don't know if it's true so i can ask you now. That did she say so. Both of your parents your what did you say your mother your father. Your both of your parents had three marriages right. Each of them was married. Three was married three times. And i've heard that your mother said that everyone has three marriages..

amherst college for several ye habich Dettori brinton Aj Mead margaret
"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

08:38 min | 9 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm krista tippett and this is on being today with the wise writer. Mary catherine bateson. She's an anthropologist and linguist and the daughter of the iconic twentieth century anthropologist margaret mead and gregory bateson as you yourself have composed your life. I mean you composed your life. You did become a linguist and a and an anthropologist Which i mean the field which your your mother in fact both of your parents really helped create has radically evolved but you are part of that field but you know one thing you said about your mother as your mother composed her life. She made her marriage and her family fit into that. Then you've done it very differently. I mean you. Can i just ask you this. There's this quote of your mother of market me that i've discussed with other people. I don't know if it's true. So i can ask you now. Did she say so. Both your parents had three marriages. Is that right. Each of them was married three times. And i've heard that your mother said that everyone has three marriages even if it's to the same person is that true I haven't ever heard it quotas exactly that way I think that's that's adding even if it's to the same person does make sense I mean you know marriage. I don't know if you've heard this statistic that the average duration of a marriage in the united states today is longer than it was in colonial times because people didn't live as long right in women died in childbirth. Exactly yeah divorce could be called a replacement for death. Yeah that's a cynical way of putting it but the point is we think of marriage as as a relationship between to ensure people hopefully who love each other and settle in to constancy and continuity and in fact those two people are growing and changing all the time. I mean just as you have to keep learning your infant. You know from week to week because the infant is growing and discovering things a marriage requires a constant rhythm of adaptation between two people who are changing and much as we would like the constancy. It's actually quite a challenge. But i think. I mean it's funny one of the things that i tend to talk about. A great deal is the amount of learning that takes place throughout adulthood. You don't graduate from college and the president of your college says stand up you are now. The president of harvard. Used to say you. Now join the company of educated men right well for as i can see. They're out of kindergarten. They've got a huge amount to learn. There's such a contrast between this truth. You're telling because it is true. It's really common sense. I mean you're just you're talking about the reality we all know and yet it stands in such contrast to the focus the ambition and focus that we press on ourselves and on our children and children. It seems younger and younger ages. Alas one of the things we press on them is competition. You know because we have so much bought into the idea. That competition is a law of nature and the only source of creativity. And incidentally that is not a true biological fact. there is competition in in as part of viva lucia process. But there's a tremendous amount of of of cooperation also involved even at the cellular level But even evolutionary biology's these days is paying so much attention to cooperation and and there's this much broader palette of science that describes us in so many other ways that you're part of toey volition ando symbiosis. What's that well when you were in high school. You look through a microscope. It sell i. One of the things she learned to recognize was the nucleus of the cell right Made pictures of it. Well the earliest lifeforms had no nucleus and on the whole bacteria don't have that kind of nucleus and a a biologist named lynn margolis. Who was a microbiologist. Studying single celled creatures and their janitors came up with the theory that the sal with a nucleus actually came about by one single cell organism taking up residence inside the other. In a way that was mutually beneficial. The cells in the green plants have little islands of chlorophyll in order to do photosynthesis that is the base of our entire food. Chain right. yeah and it is now understood that they were originally like algae the up aside these cells because they needed to a they needed a home they didn't have and so for millions of years. Every cell in every leaf is actually a cooperative vendor prize. And one thing that's so interesting in division of life that you've been developing is in precisely that view also of how how we compose our lives right as as the building blocks of that interdependence i mean you know you use the word home cemented go talking about the natural world and in homemaking is something you've been talking about you. You tell this story and a few places that when you first met your future husband that you were telling him about your life and your parents failed marriages and your sense that with these role models you could never sustain a commitment in that somehow that very evening it ended with the two of you talking about when you get married. That's right did we did talk to me about what the word homemaking Holds for you. Well creating an environment in which learning as possible and that is what a home is Mean that is what we want the homes that we give to our children to be places where they grow in many many different ways they learn how to connect with other people they.

krista tippett Mary catherine bateson gregory bateson margaret mead lynn margolis harvard united states
"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

12:16 min | 9 months ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"There i am. Can you hear me. And i can hear you now. Well hello. I was adjusting. The wrong volume. You can be forgiven for that. Thank you so much for doing this. It's a pleasure chris. I have a little. There's some weird sound in my. Oh okay that's it. Yeah okay so do you need us to do okay so now tell me that you you do at this point in your life like to be called. Mary catherine is that correct. Yes okay so can you. Let's talk about something banal for couple minutes while we get our our our volumes right. I don't want to start talking about anything significant Unless we know it will work so something like Let's see what did you have for breakfast. Oh dear that's a long time ago I have adopted a lazy person. Breakfast of one You know protein bar and a hunk of cheese and a cup of coffee sounds good. How are we do chris. Is that good. You need more of us okay. I think we're fine Then we can get going You know i d. I have a cough button. Okay well you know and don't worry about that because we can This technology is magical and we can correct and improve on things like coughs. So just don't even worry about that man and the the great thing about this is we get to have a real meandering conversation and we'll You know it's like you talk about. Composing alive will compose a radio show afterwards and let me make one small request. Okay my last book when it was recorded for people who wanna listen in the car. Yeah was put through a program that took all the pauses out And it makes it almost unintelligible when the pauses and you can't tell where paragraph ends. You know we won't do that. I know there's a yeah there's a fear in the audio world of silence but silence is a part of a conversation too. I think so. Yeah i mean. I've felt for a long time. That one should not be embarrassed to think in public. Yeah no that's right and so it allows other people to think. Yeah yeah okay now. Don't worry don't you don't need to worry about that Also let let's Let's plunge right and let me just say first of all. I you know i've read you across the years I read composing life. And i i read With daughters i years and years ago and then Have been really intrigued by what you've been writing more recently so just disbelief saying i'm really Delighted to be speaking with you. And then i've had a chance to really steep in your work these last few days again. Getting ready for this So so i do wanna talk about you and your wisdom In a in as Vivid away as anyone. I know You also always. We've that together with your your parents who were such amazing characters and thinkers And it's so interesting just to look at the beginnings of your life. I mean it seems like in some ways. Your childhood was this vast anthropological experiment beginning breastfeeding which most people just can't say about their their infancy. Well it was a great advantage. I mean after all. I had the benefit of ideas that are now regarded as as the better. The better form of of child raising. Yeah when i was born you know middle class. Women didn't nurse babies. That would have been an animal like thing to do I only the very poor actually breastfed So i was very lucky that my mother having been in bali in new guinea Believed that breastfeeding was good for babies and from others. Yeah and unisem sometimes your call. dr sparks. First baby seems to me in reading about that. Your mother was educating doctor. Spock as much as he was advising her absolutely. He was young fashionable and Being psycho analysed. And she figured we're talking one thousand nine thirty nine that if he was being psycho analysed he must be pretty progressive so she would just so. So larry i. i'm If i ask you to describe the spiritual background of your childhood what whatever connotations you bring to that language of spirituality. How would you start to talk about that. Well i would start with the fact that The day i was bored by mother received a telegram from her husband who had sailed to the uk to enlist the war having begun in europe. And not yet. The united states wasn't yet involved and he sent her off or cable. Saying congratulations on baby katherine. Do not kristen right. And meanwhile she was so busy trying to you know persuading the she having seen babies in several different cultures She had very clear ideas of what she wanted to do. She wanted to have no anesthesia and she wanted rooming in and she wanted to breast feed and she wanted the pediatrician present at the delivery Oh and she made a movie. All of that was decades before any of this became something that would be a cultural norm in well exactly as you say in the middle class united states of america and she as she thought about all of this Decided that i should be born in what used to be called the french hospital in new york which was a catholic hospital because if she told the nuns does it was better for the baby if the didn't have anesthesia they would stick up for her and She was. I think fairly determined to get her way. So when i was born on december eight which is a catholic holy day. It's the of the immaculate conception She added the mary. I mean she and her husband had agreed. That i would be catherine area so she didn't kristin you but she called you mary. She never called me mary. It's part of my name. She waited she waited until gregory got back to find out how he wanted the the baby to be called. She called me sugar for the first year of my life You know it's very interesting. I mean it comes through and you're writing but even more in talking to you You're you have such an intimate identification with your parents. But also there's a there's a distance like you even talk about yourself in the third person sometimes as a baby which was something about how the life that you were born into is about living and reflecting all at the same time. I don't know yeah i. I've tried to track down My first lesson in participant observation written about that Because i mean that's what anthropologists to they live with the people of the culture. They're studying they eat with them. They hang out with them. Ask them questions. All of those things So they're participants but they're also observing and they're also self observing. Yeah and there was an app dewitt. Should i tell stories now. You know you're not recording yet. No we are go ahead. We're recording her. Yeah oklahoman okay. So one day. When i was probably oh about eight or nine She took me In a cab. She said we were going to visit a family. Who had a little boy named bobby and the parents were worried about him and he wasn't behaving well in school and she said I hope you can. You will enjoy playing with bobby and you can tell me howie seems to you right now. Bobby was awful pain in the neck. He hit me any pinched me and he ignored me and he wouldn't his toys There was definitely a problem there So after a couple of hours She fetched me from the playroom and we went out and got a cab to head for home and she said now. Tell me about bobby. And i said where i had learned this. I don't know. I said i'm going to wait till we get home and i will dictate to you. What i think about bobby. So that if another child ever has to play with a child like that they'll have a resource to have a way of knowing about it. So even your play dates were anthropological experiment with you. as politics. They often worked so. But actually i think there's a huge benefit and in being a participant observer. Are there are people who are just observers and don't engage with others there are people that just engaged in. Don't think about what's happening and to learn to to go back and forth between or simultaneously. Be learning observing But at the same time be fully present was a marvelous thing to learn. And it's it's it's a barbarous way to live actually. Well it's certainly it's certainly a it's certainly a ripe field for the work of becoming wise And your book. When did you write composing a life. When was that published. Oh.

Mary catherine chris unisem dr sparks anesthesia new guinea united states of america Spock psycho bali bobby kristen katherine larry kristin europe gregory uk new york howie
"mary catherine" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on WTOP

"Ways south of Mary Catherine Dr. Getting the first report of a crash there. I'm Rob Stole worth beauty Opie traffic. Not a star Team four meteorologist Lauren Rickets. Temperatures will continue to rise into the load of mid nineties. Today a mix of sun and clouds and boys it humid that's going to make it feel up in over 100 degrees at times today, isolated chance of showers and thunderstorms this afternoon again about a 20% chance and I'm going to keep that chance into the overnight by your Monday there could be a lingering shower for the morning commute, but otherwise increasing rain chances throughout the day. Temperatures are in the eighties rain through the day on Tuesday with ease. Yes, that will continue through Tuesday night. I'm starting for meteorologist Lauren Rickets right now Looking at the temperatures. It is 88 degrees in Fairfax, 87 degrees in Rockville, and we have 85 degrees along the southwest waterfront in D. C at 12 41. The Koven 19 stay at home orders in quarantine seem to be fueling a lot of activity in the realestate market. It has also given way to the new buying trends in the D. C region deeper on this with El Dad. Morar of Compass, Really? So you know what I'm seeing is a combination of things. One is people are being motivated by a desire to have their house match their new lifestyle. So people have been stuck at home in quarantine for a few months now and whatever was bothering them about their home. Has now really been exasperated. So for those who needed more space, it's just become so much more pronounced because they're spending so much time at home..

Lauren Rickets Rob Stole Mary Catherine Dr. El Dad Fairfax Rockville D. C
Oklahoma tribal jurisdiction problem

Native America Calling

09:30 min | 1 year ago

Oklahoma tribal jurisdiction problem

"And here with us at Ann Arbor Michigan. Today is Riyaz. Kenji partner with Kenji and Ketson he is currently representing the Muskogee Creek nation. In mcgirt case that we are talking about also here is a partner with pipes. Tin Law Mary Catherine Nagel and she's a citizen of the Cherokee nation. She joins US OUT OF DENVER. Colorado thank you both for being here and Riyaz before the break you were talking about The significance of the history. And just where we got to today and of course. There are more Things that you'd like to share just paint this picture fully. Please do and also open up. Why we're even talking about any of this about where land exists and it doesn't under tribal jurisdiction in how it applies to this case Go ahead continue your thank you You know where we got to where we are. Today is a really interesting question. So it Congress An axe the statutes and the in the very early part of the Twentieth Century Paving the way for Oklahoma statehood as I was saying before the break. None of those statutes Say Anything about just establishing the creek reservation but what happens is in nineteen o seven. Oklahoma becomes a state. That's right around the same time that oil is discovered in Oklahoma and you have this tremendous influx of settlers The Creek Allotment Act which was passed in nineteen. O One Took the what was communal. Ownership of the creek. Nation parceled out Lots to creek members almost exclusively to treat creek members. The land of the reservation was divided up with the idea being that Consistent with federal policy of the time. That the creeks were would own their land in individually they would learn to become farmers they would be acculturated but it would still be their land But we all know what happened What's been described as a orgy of plunder and exploitation with that land having all of a sudden become incredibly valuable because of the oil deposits. There was all manner of Fraud Cheating and worse. Outright murders To dispossess the creeks of their land so in a pretty short amount of time. A reservation that under federal statute entreaty was still meant to be controlled by the creek. People in terms of landownership Ended up having a very large proportion of non Indian ownership and because of that confluence of factors over time. Sort of the argument welled up while there's not even a creek reservation here anymore. Look at look at it demographically. It's largely Non-indian and what this litigation is really about is reaffirming the rule of law which says that even despite what happened in terms of this orgy of plunder and exploitation and the transfer of land title to a largely to non Indians Congress disestablished the reservation boundaries and those remain intact so that the creek nation while it might not own much of the land within the reservation just as true for my say my home state of Michigan which does not own most of the land within Michigan's borders that those borders still still exist in talk to me a little bit about the authority of the courts. Mary Catherine especially Intertribal nations when it comes to all of this and we think about where jurisdiction lays plenty of issues when it comes to policing as well as Crimes committed anything more. You want to share just to make things clear when we talk about Why murders even claiming this happened on indigenous land? Sure yes one thing. Very clear right Anyone who studied federal Indian Law Understand that it is. You know a giant complex network when A crime is committed within the borders of a reservation on tribal lands or against the native victim or by native perpetrator. There is a huge complex jurisdictional analysis that law enforcement that You know a potential prosecutor whether there'd be federal state or tribal. Everyone has to undergo an this crazy analysis right and at the end of the day And we can agree or disagree with this law but the law is that you know and again I can come up with some exceptions but by March if the victim is not native and the perpetrator is native. Even if it's on a reservation in most instances the state right is going to have jurisdiction and so at the end of the day you know we know right now. Creek. Nation has a reservation. That's never been disestablished. It exists let's say regardless of whether the status quo is maintained changed really not going to alter whether or not Oklahoma has criminal jurisdiction over over the majority of the crimes committed within the borders of what we understand the the creek nation reservation today. Why because federal law is crazy it that way and we can debate it but at the end of the day. Oklahoma is going to maintain its jurisdiction over. You know the majority of population is very point out is not Indian and they're going to maintain jurisdiction over the majority of those crimes however Tribes ever in nineteen seventy eight. The Supreme Court eliminated tribal criminal jurisdiction over non Indians who come under tribal lands and commit crimes. And that's been very unfortunate and Indian country and a lot of our are made of women understand that this is contributing to wide native women suffer the highest rate of domestic violence sexual assault and murder in the United States. Today it's the Department of Justice is noted majority of violent crimes committed against native victims are committed by Non Indians. Congress has taken action to address this vision all from nineteen seventy eight and twenty thirteen restored tribal criminal jurisdiction acts criminal acts of domestic violence dating violence in violation of protection whereas committed by Non Indians so our lives today can protect their citizens living on travel and some those crimes but if you look at volatility thirteen statute very clear that those categories of non-indian crimes the try to prosecute them if the crime is committed on quote Indian country and that is a very a term defined by Congress to include a treasure ovation. So if you have a reservation today which not just create nation. That has this issue right. You've got tried to sue or standing rock or you know Fort Birth hold or Tulalip. Who have reservations that have survived statehood and have survived allotment right but if Oklahoma wins and Oklahoma gets to say no no no if your reservation was created before the state came into existence. You can no longer have a reservation today regardless of whether Congress ever just established you then all of a sudden those types who may have already or may seek to implement Vala twenty thirteen's restore criminal jurisdiction will now be put a law where they cannot protect their own tribal citizens against these three categories of non Indian perpetrated crimes anywhere within their borders. And instead they'll have to go under undergo and even more complicated analysis About the individual status at that parcel of land is that individual personal of land and restrict status. Is it in trust status. Is it non Indian fee lands In which case it would not be Indian country under the statute and so it. Actually the court's decision this case could have far reaching implications for the ability of tribal nations to implement vase restored criminal jurisdiction. And that's something. Oklahoma doesn't want to talk about right because really what's at stake here is not Oklahoma sovereignty but the sovereignty of our tribal nations. And that's really I think important to keep in mind and something that you know. Certainly Oklahoma won't be spreading in their conversations about this case. And so I WANNA get your your take to just thinking of the justices who are GonNa be hearing this and what you just explained. How deep is their knowledge on on? How tangled all of this is especially when we come to Violence in our nation's in I do want to let folks know that we did reach out to the state of Oklahoma In and invited them to be on the program. Today we did not hear back from them In America for Neagle tell me about The analysis of you know the knowledge of the point. You just brought up in how verse justices are in all of that. Well you know and I will defer to answer this question too because certainly the supreme court is his area of expertise but justice course such as a as an intellectual heavyweight when it comes to federal Indian Law You know historically a lot of the justices on this court did not study Indian law in law school. It's an area. They're very unfamiliar with. We're very fortunate that just gorsuch will be hearing this case. And if you've looked at the precedents. He has written his the decisions he wrote in the Tenth Circuit and since he's gotten to the Supreme Court it is clear that he in a very intellectual way under stands federal Indian law the complex framework of Criminal Law on tribal lands Dealing with tribal citizens. Both you know in reservations offers divisions rush. You know he understands all of this in a way that I think few other justices can parallel I think there are few other justices on the Supreme Court that have done a lot to educate themselves on these issues. Like justice. Sort of your

Oklahoma Congress Indian Law Supreme Court Muskogee Creek Nation Murder Mary Catherine Nagel Denver Ann Arbor Michigan Colorado Riyaz Partner Kenji Indians Congress Department Of Justice Michigan
Oklahoma tribal jurisdiction problem

Native America Calling

07:17 min | 1 year ago

Oklahoma tribal jurisdiction problem

"This is native America calling. I'm Taraji would the. Us Supreme Court is again looking at a case that involves a crime a citizen of the Muskogee Creek nation and whether or not someone should have been tried in federal court. Jim C mcgirt was convicted of raping a child in Oklahoma State Court. He received a life sentence plus five hundred years. He maintains a conviction is invalid because he should have been tried in federal. Not State Court. Mcgirt is citizen. A federally recognized tribe the cases similar to a claim made by Patrick Murphy. A citizen of the Muskogee Creek Nation. He admits he murdered a man in nineteen ninety nine but he maintains he should have been tried in federal court. A ruling in his favor could up in his death sentence. The question on both of these cases is over land and Oklahoma's unique status with tribes and whether Congress properly disestablish reservation boundaries more than a century ago. We are inviting you into this conversation. Did you learn more about it? Maybe you've been following the long and have some thoughts on this. What a decision that would go either way would mean for tribal nation's sovereignty land status go hidden. Dial in our phone lines are open. You can join us today at one. Eight hundred nine six tweet four. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and with us today at a Denver Colorado is Mary Kathleen Nagel A. She is a partner at pipe stem law in a citizen of the Cherokee nation. My pleasure to have her here Mary Kim Mayor Catherine Welcome. Thank you so much. It's an honor to be here. Great to have year Also join us to Ann Arbor Michigan. Today is Riyaz. Kenji in he is a partner at Kenji and Katzen and he represents the Muskogee Creek nation in the mcgirt case. My pleasure to welcome here Riyaz. Welcome thank you for having me. Tara and thank you for being here with us today in Merry Catherine Let's start with more details on this case and just essential things you think. People need to understand When we talk about what this really could mean why headline say Oklahoma Could turn into chaos go ahead and establish a little bit more so I I do have to say as someone who was born in Oklahoma and as a citizen of a tribe in Oklahoma I I find a lot of headlines that Oklahoma has been promoting the incredibly disappointing. And I think Truth Bending is very kind way to describe them and I of course defer to Muskogee Crete nations attorney Who was also listening here in this interview because this is their reservation at stake but the tenth circuit was very clear a couple years ago and it's decision. Congress has never disestablished the creek nations reservation. That means it's still in existence and that's the you know plain simple truth and of course the brief that My Law Firm submitted was on behalf of the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center as well as tribes that have implemented the restored tribal criminal jurisdiction in the Violence Against Women. Act from twenty thirteen and so the points we were making simply Just how chaotic it will be and how troubling it will be for the tribes to have women involved is all of a sudden. A new precedent is established which no federal quarter Supreme Court has really held this. Before that. In instances where. Congress has not just established a reservation. Court should feel free to do so. That would actually create chaos. But I know Oklahoma certainly want folks to think that the sky is going to fall. It is not The reality today is that Christians evasion has never been established by Congress. It would actually be more destabilizing for the Supreme Court to do that. In this instance Then to uphold the tenth circuit decision and say. Actually the reservation has not been disestablished. Congress which is in fact the case and I think Oklahoma sort of grasping at straws here in terms of the different arguments. They're coming up with but the fact that a reservation still exists does not alter the individual ownership of the land within the reservation so non Indian landowners business owners that doesn't change doesn't affect their ownership of their homes or their land or the vast majority of the crimes perpetrated within the borders of the reservation. The state will still maintain criminal jurisdiction over many crimes. It's not It's not as easy stabilizing this. Oklahoma would have you believe in. I do need to make a correction. I was given wrong information In the INTRO Talking about his ruling could up in his death sentence. It's not Fact and we'll get closer into the Patrick Murphy case coming up but Mary Catherine when we think of all of this and Really what a decision in the supreme court could mean Either way let's talk a little bit about them. Yeah it's it's actually if the Supreme Court in this instance and Riyaz can explain this to what we're dealing with now is a bit of a procedurally positioned different case than Murphy Murphy was The state of Oklahoma seeking cert seeking the Supreme Court's Review. After the tenth circuit upheld the continued existence of the reservation since that decision has not been fully Adjudicated on the merits from court has not issued a written decision. This last time they did grant cert on The current case mcgirt. And so you know in that case You know this is coming out of the Oklahoma Supreme Court's decision to hear the The appeal that McGrath had filed the Oklahoma Supreme Court. And you know again. It's the same question of okay the Tenth Circuit has said. The reservation still exists Oklahoma still wants to assert criminal jurisdiction over an air. You know a few flip crimes that are actually clearly left to the federal government into to the tribal government. And that's that's really what's at stake here. It's a small number of crimes and And at the end of the day this is really what sovereignty is about. And there's no other sovereign that has more interested steak right then a tribal nation when it comes to protecting children and its citizens on its own land and at the end of the day You Know Oklahoma has made a lot of arguments. They've tried to make it sound. Like you know half of the state will go back to quote unquote tribal ownership which is not at all the case. the fact that a reservation exists does not alter the ownership of who owns the land inside the borders of the reservation. And that's the case in South Dakota. That's the case in the state of Washington. That's the case with every reservation in the United States right. Now there's a lot of non Indian ownership of reservation land especially the simple fact because of the dog acts and various other federal laws over time so at the end of the day What you know create nation and all of the folks who filed briefs in support of creation like my client the national indigenous women's Resource Center. It's really asking for a maintenance of the status quo. Don't change anything. Oklahoma is actually asking for something that would upend a hundred years of Supreme Court precedent and when completely alter the law around winner Reservation Candy disestablished? And how

Oklahoma Supreme Court Oklahoma Supreme Court Muskogee Creek Nation Oklahoma State Court Congress State Court Jim C Mcgirt United States Patrick Murphy Mary Kim Mayor Catherine Welco America Partner Muskogee Crete My Law Firm Riyaz South Dakota Denver Ann Arbor Michigan
"mary catherine" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

Ellen on the Go

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

"But you've done so many other things this is Mary Catherine is she helped a waitress get her car fixed she paid the bills of her friends on social media. You donate your kidney to your uncle when he needed a transplant. Even though you don't have a lot of money whenever you have any extra money you find a way to pay it forward. That's amazing it's really in so you're you're laughing at yourself because you so that's why you decided to just film yourself okay. I was just really feeling the holiday spirit filled with the spirit man. I shouldn't because that seemed like a good place to go and I was filled with this went and got my Goeke and I bought that lady. You got a coq the with nuggets ice. Oh good I was like well. I'm going to tell the whole world about this idea right right. Well you didn't know the whole world was gonNA enjoy it so much I. I don't know who you thought you were telling it. Spread on my mom and I did not anticipate. Yeah I love that first of all he sees you hug him getting get in your car and pull over to spaces to film yourself that she has she took what could just be like. It's such an embarrassing situation. And she laughed she so hard at herself about it that the audience and eighty eighty million viewers online made it much just so enjoyed. It couldn't agree more all right. Kevin Love Perks talk show host. Oh Gosh I love this monologue so much ellen. Had the idea that she just WanNa like after Eggnog. I think she was reminded like like how lucky she is to get to do. Not only Eggnog giveaways game of games and then the show so she came in and wanted to a monologue about. Oh Oh.

Mary Catherine Kevin Love nuggets
Trump on the trade war with China: 'I am the chosen one' since 'somebody had to do it'

The Lead with Jake Tapper

04:32 min | 2 years ago

Trump on the trade war with China: 'I am the chosen one' since 'somebody had to do it'

"As we look at old this the the president today saying the economy is doing his phenomenally well and also tried to distance himself from his own trade war listen. This is in my i trade war. This is a trade war. That should have taken place a long time ago by a lot of other president. Somebody had to do it. I am m._d. Chosen one somebody had to do it so i'm taking on china so as though that one because he really heat himself up for you so so he's joking right like it's meant to be a joke i get that he kind of looks up to the heavens but also like most things down from jokes but that totally totally joking. He does believe himself to be sort of big great man of history. He believes that he was elected in this unbelievable believable upset which by the way a hundred percent right about no-one said he could do it now he's here. He's always believe he is special and unique in the world. The election validated that so he is joking. I don't think he meant that seriously like the brake beam shines down on them at the same time. There's an element in how he refers to himself almost exaggerations. It's rations. All of his lies that are all aimed at that kind of idea can go ahead. I was going to raise definitely special and unique but not in the way he thinks i mean he spent the last twenty four hours saying chosen one king of israel etc century in this kind of stuff the last twenty four hours particularly mad and i think part of that is to do with the fact that he's seeing this stuff that he knows matter. Come november twenty twenty years. No chance of being reelected if the economy goes but that's one of the few good things you can point to which people in polls said he's good without even his opponents and yet he sees it going sideways. He says the meteors creating recession journalists are trying to crush economy. I did economics at college. I'm no expert but maybe i was away the clock today. They taught the class that journalists have the power to bring down an economy. People must pass alone the power the conspiracy theorist although although listen here's what's interesting right so if the economy is is still doing great all bets are off one house adviser telling politico and i think this is fast people don't vote on numbers they vote on whether they feel good and the president understands stands that and he's selling the feeling and they're right mary catherine i mean we look at this all the time in elections not only your politics local meaning that it matters how you're feeling in that moment and what your personal situation nation is but there is also feeling that's connected with it. He's stilling the feeling he's not wrong. The economy is good and it matters and for as long as it stay goes stays good that super super matters to his reluctance selling feelings one is don't you feel great about this economy. In two is wow there's a lot going on here right now and the new cycle insane and it makes people feel unsettled so like i was talking about earlier the people who are skeptics of him but feel good about the economy he's making them feel less secure and i would also say this is trade war stuff. I've always been of the mind that like if it ain't broke don't don't fix it you'd and he those chickens may come home to roost at some point and he has much less cushion with the economy falling off been and obama would <hes> just because of the very thin margins in the way he won and because he has much less goodwill and other ways than other presidents have so if it slips off a bit i think it hurts him more than what other people right and here's the problem here i it's. It's one thing to sell feeling <hes> and he can do that on some policy issues. She's a lot of what he does on immigration a lot of what he does on foreign policy all has to do with selling this construct and people do he's he's actually quite good at that and his you know his he's very good at sort of marketing marketing and the showmanship and telling people that things are going away when in fact they're not going that way at all but on the economy about the one place where that is not going to be enough because if come you know twenty twenty people are not the economy's actually not good if things if people are not actually feeling like they are financially secure if they're not feeling like they have the money to pay for the things that they need to pay for <hes> if costs continue to rise and if these trade wars do continue to affect people in the way that they have not just instill but an agricultural is well <hes> selling the feeling is not going to be enough and i think he does not. He's not really reckoning with that meets. Oh many giant promises on the economy which by the way is he will get rid of the budget deficit in the years which ain't happening. It's going to be a trillion dollars but but the point being growth at some point those things will matter because people will look at the economy is something that people do vote on if they feel as though he's maybe promises they have not been delivered on it. Any way shape or form now is in trouble because he was elected to change age. You have bring change. We will be

President Trump China Israel Barack Obama Politico Twenty Four Hours Twenty Twenty Years Trillion Dollars Hundred Percent
"mary catherine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Townhall dot com. I'm Ron garage both sides and the government shutdown air their differences before national audience in his Oval Office address to the nation. President Trump claimed there's a national security and humanitarian crisis on the border that could be solved by building a wall. This barrier is absolutely critical to border security. But in a rebuttal house speaker Nancy Pelosi called the wall expensive and ineffective. He always promised. Mexico would pay for and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer said a border wall sends the wrong message symbol of America should be the statue of liberty. Not a thirty foot wall. Each side blamed the other for causing the government shutdown. Greg Clugston, Washington. Mr. Trump follows up Tuesday's address with a trip on Thursday to the southern border, the House Democrats House Democratic majority that is has chosen an emotional anniversary two intrigue. Use new gun control legislation speaker Pelosi joined the announcement of an expansive background checks Bill for the sale and transfer of firearms Bill that will expand background checks to all firearm. Sales congressman Mike Thompson of California making the announcement. He's a co-sponsor announced on the eighth anniversary of the day. Former congresswoman Gabby giffords was seriously wounded in the head during a shooting at a constituent meeting in Arizona. She was present for the announcement. Now is the time to come together be responsible and NRA spokeswoman points out that a federal background. Check did not prevent the Gifford shooting. George funds on reporting a new court filing says former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort shared polling data with an associate accused of having ties to Russian intelligence during the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign and lied to federal investigators about it and a day after announcing fort police chief, Joel FitzGerald withdrew his name from consideration Baltimore's next the Mary Catherine Pugh mayor a now. Ounce..

Nancy Pelosi President Trump Gabby giffords House Democrats House Bill Mike Thompson Chuck Schumer Greg Clugston Mary Catherine Pugh NRA Gifford congressman Paul Manafort Joel FitzGerald Baltimore
"mary catherine" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Both sides and the government shutdown air their differences before national audience in his Oval Office address to the nation. President Trump claimed there's a national security and humanitarian crisis on the border that could be solved by building a wall. This barrier is absolutely critical to border security. But in a rebuttal house speaker Nancy Pelosi called the wall expensive and ineffective along. He always promised. Mexico would pay for and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer said a border wall sends the wrong message symbol of America should be the statue of liberty. Not a thirty foot wall. Each side blamed the other for causing the government shutdown. Greg Clugston, Washington. Mr. Trump follows up Tuesday's address with a trip on Thursday to the southern border, the House Democrats House Democratic majority that is has chosen an emotional anniversary to introduce new gun control. Legislation speaker Pelosi joined the announcement of an. Expansive background checks Bill for the sale and transfer of firearms. It's a Bill that will expand background checks to all firearm. Sales congressman Mike Thompson of California making the announcement. He's a co-sponsor announced on the eighth anniversary of the day. Former congresswoman Gabby giffords was seriously wounded in the head during a shooting at a constituent meeting in Arizona. She was present for the announcement. Now is the time to come together. Fevers fungible an NRA spokeswoman points out that a federal background. Check did not prevent the Gifford shooting George funds. Johnny reporting a new court filing says former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort shared polling data with an associate accused of having ties to Russian intelligence during the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign and lied to federal investigators about and a day after announcing fourth police chief, Joel FitzGerald withdrew his name from consideration Baltimore's next to Mary, Catherine Pugh mayor announced a new police Commissioner imagine doing one.

President Trump Gabby giffords Nancy Pelosi Mike Thompson House Democrats House Fevers Chuck Schumer Greg Clugston Bill NRA congressman Paul Manafort Baltimore Joel FitzGerald
"mary catherine" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

The Lead with Jake Tapper

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"mary catherine" Discussed on The Lead with Jake Tapper

"The border so many more though are waiting and some families don't even know where to begin wanna bring back my panel and mary catherine when you see these images and you hear these sounds it's hard to imagine being part of the people who are trying to implement this policy which is herkyjerky a best right in their stipulated that there are many good people at work trying to implement this but it's very unclear what they should do the government federal government is not great at doing things and not great at doing things quickly efficiently and this was a mistake that was made that overwhelmed and already overwhelmed system immigration judges couldn't process people fast enough on the border as it was and there was no plan for how to deal with that capacity take all the moral concerns off the table there was no plan for how to deal with the new capacity in the new flood of people and so trying to wreck that it's going to take some time and now hearing from from nick valencia at the border that the people inside who have been separated from their the parents have been separated from their kids don't even know that the policy is changed i've been we're talking to at the break about why this is very cathro was making a good point i mean one of the issues is what is the a government gonna tell them happens next i'm sitting there with my old government hat on saying okay if you go in there and say we're going to change the policy if i'm sitting there in that facility i'm to say okay well where do we go now and i'm guessing the person who's talking to them doesn't have a clue in the next problem is what if the president says something different tomorrow and your whiplash saying sorry we decided to move to a new facility and we're not going to do that i think when the president moves this quickly the ability of a slow moving bureaucracy and i was one of them that horrible word bureaucrat to keep up with the president when he moves quickly they just can't do it you're not a bureaucrat he's not simply moving quickly he's moving stupidly and cruelly he's following his whims and his impulses and his impetus which is invariably cruel except in divisively right well to be fair this this lice of a of a whim yesterday morning when he signed the executive order certainly through even more chaos into a chaotic process because executive order wasn't clear and all of these agencies are trying to figure out what it means so and so forth but that was a slice from my reporting and others of him looking at the images and saying okay we didn't go the way we thought we gotta figure out a way to stop it for now at least it's the coverage didn't go it's just went exactly the way they wanted i believe they are trying kids pain in these parents pain to send a message of central eric's deterrence this is what are turning journal said when he first rolled out this policy now we could put landmines in the border area and that would be a deterrent but there's things americans don't do because we have values in this president betray those values and i like the government is slow and bureaucratic supposed congressman broken for many years executive action been working pretty well until now this president yeah that's what protects from executive wim and sometimes cruelty and bad decisions is legislative solution durable and what's the word democrat set of the thing that we were supposed to be able to do and obama ramped up a lot using executive action it left this precedent where trump can do it for his whims which people suddenly realize oh i like that and i'm old enough to remember when obama with an imperial president agency process that ran these things through a imperial no he used the powers that are located him by the founders by the people this guy is using those powers capricious crew away but they're both and.

mary catherine