19 Episode results for "Mary Barra"

Back to Biz with Katie and Boz: GM CEO Mary Barra

Katie Couric

33:53 min | 4 months ago

Back to Biz with Katie and Boz: GM CEO Mary Barra

"My name is Kimberly Jura if I've learned. Anything in my years of studying uplifting black artist. Is that we all have the power to create something beautiful. That's why I'm pleased. Introduce you to people who have broken down boundaries in fencing and helped to create the first ever smart store. They're a big deal and it's time we give them our attention. Listen to your attention. Please Hulu podcast with iheartradio. iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. It's inspired by your attention. Please now streaming on Hulu. Watch for a fresh view on black history. Everyone Katie couric and I'm Bozo Saint, John, and this is back to business with Katie and bows. This week. Those we have really exciting and very inspiring guests, she such a trailblazer, such an inspiration in the business world. I know you haven't met her, but you know all about her, so take it away both. Tell us about our guests Mary Barra. Katie I am excited about Mary Barra. She is all of my corporate goals. She is the CEO of General Motors. One of the Big Three. DETROIT AUTOMAKERS GM is one of the largest and historically important companies, so the American economy and I mean talk about male dominated. You can't get more of a swaggering boys club than the car industry that's for sure. And when Mary was appointed those in two thousand, fourteen, only twenty of the fortune, five hundred chief execs. execs were women, and now we're up to thirty seven, which we should note is still impossibly infuriatingly small, but is more women. Take over those executive positions. We really have to thank leaders like Mary Barra absolutely incredible, and it was such a pleasure to meet her resume, and have this meaty wonderful conversation you know. She shared her path to leadership, and how she was able to make such a massive company like GM. Gm Act nimbly in a time of crisis. But of course we had to start in the here and now we have to talk about this letter. She wrote toward nearly two hundred thousand employees in response to our current racial unrest. I've to tell you Katie I was I mean. I'm really really impressed. You know the company letter express some fiery sentiments that I really haven't heard seen presented by mini CEO's at all and. And a lot of people hopefully bose will follow suit and I've got a quote from that letter. She says she is impatient and disgusted. By the fact, that is a nation. We seem to be placated by the passive discussion of why we wanted to know where her head was that when she wrote that letter, and how she plans on turning those words into action, so we started there Yup. Let's get into it. Well I think. You know there was this sense of sadness and frustration that I had is I learned what was happening and processed it and at a human level. It was just unconscionable of what happened. And I'm an engineer. By degree and so I, I'm a problem solver. You know I think we just became very clear to me. There's been to many others that we can't just talk about why and then you know something else replaces the news cycle and nothing gets done became really important to me that we do something, and we find solutions, and we drive for lasting change and I'm really. Passionate about. Really making changes in stop talking, let's start doing. That is that's that's so true and refreshing to hear. I know that your letter also announced the formation of an advisory board. As you said which has the intention of making GM more inclusive company in the world What do you think that the company and perhaps like yourself and the others who are leading the company How do you actually get there? How do you make it a more inclusive company? Because that's really the operative word here? Diversity is one thing, certainly you know we can have people of all types of backgrounds and cultures, ethnicities, etc, but inclusion is what actually makes it. Workable it's what actually creates success. So what? What is it that you intend to do by creating this advisory? Board? Jim We've been talking about for a while now that we wanna have a culture in an environment where everybody can bring their true selves to work, because if you can be your true self, you can be at your best, and so that's been our goal. we recognize we have more work to do and so with the. Inclusion Advisory Board one of the very first things we know we need to do is listen. because we don't have all the answers and so actually I'm excited. Because this evening we have one of our first listening sessions with several members of the senior leader team and we need to listen. We need to talk. We need to learn together. you know as I said in in no You know listening and talking will lead to the dialog that will lead to change and so. That's one of the. We need to work on I'm also personally very pleased that I get to be a part of the Bart. Group that is going to work on four areas of the area of from a finance perspective, a healthcare perspective education workforce, which is the committee, I chair and Ben Criminal Justice because. We need stomach change, and when you a company like General Motors. We feel responsibility to drive change within our environment and what we can do. With our dealers and our suppliers, so we have a pretty wide footprint, but than in addition to working with the Business Roundtable and all of those companies I. Think together we can. Really, we can really start to dismantle. And Change Systems for the better. So again we have much work to do to build on things that we've already done, but we have much more work to do, and we're going to be working both as a company, and then as a collection of companies, it seems to me that we've reached this new era where it's not really okay to stay silent on some of these issues. We've seen people like you marry speaking out Jeff. bezos basically told customer from Amazon that if he didn't like it. It, you know he could lump it, and he didn't mind losing him as a customer, which is a real shift for Jeff Bezos, and we see you know people like Ken Frazier. The CEO of Merck saying George Floyd could have been him and you know I think that that we're hearing from the corporate leaders in a much more palpable way right now. Why is that so essential? And and what do you make of this real shift in in speaking out? Again when I when I look at General Motors, we've always said we want to be known as a values based company, and so as we have spoken out in the past. It's been to make sure our employees understood what we believe in what we stood for. As it relates to our values, I think it is to a tipping point now where it would be inconsistent with our values not. Not to speak out and not to work with others and challenge ourselves and challenge others when I, when I said in the note, we want to be the most inclusive company in the world I. Don't want to I. Mean I want every company to be the most inclusive in the world. Because it's not something we should on. It's something we all have to dedicate ourselves to do so. To me, it's values based, and you can't stay silent when something is just fundamentally happening, that is so inconsistent with your values you. You have a responsibility to act. That's. That is quite a radical. Statement it really is to say that it's not just about General Motors speaking the most inclusive company in the world that you want every company I like. I have to pause there because I don't know that I've ever heard that before. I'm curious, Bose. Do you think that's starting to happen? Obviously Mary as a real leader in this. Do you think that more and more people will follow Mary? Mary Boras Lead I. Hope that more people follow Mary's lead, but I do think that this is a change. I again I have never felt the kind of movement and the kind of personal responsibility that leaders are taking in this very moment, I've never seen this before. Yes, this type of thing has happened a lot. This is not the first video we've seen. It actually makes me quite enraged. When we think about. The countless people who don't have video, but I do believe that there are several things that are adding to this moment I mean obviously we cannot ignore Covid, nineteen right, and so when you see something like George Floyd's video of his murder. I think it is shocking. It is shocking and it makes us all. Wake up and so I i. do believe that this is a turning for all of us. and I've also said that I. I wish more companies would make more statements like Mary making. but I do wonder about the some of the mixed reactions. You know that the companies get in. Perhaps there are some fear. From. Business leaders to make the kind of bold statements that Mary and others were making You know because there's there's GonNa be mixed reaction sometimes. People won't believe you right right that they won't believe you I. Was GonNa ask you Mary. About sort of you know we live in such as Senecal Age and I'm wondering if if if you're worried on behalf of other leaders like yourself that that some will view this as sort of flagrant brand opportunism. You know that they are jumping on the bandwagon that they. That that they're not really that sincere in their commitment and I'm curious how you feel about that. I would say I've I've had the opportunity over the last couple of weeks to talk to a lot of CEO's and. It's real it there. I mean you know it's a it's a deep concern, and from that comes a strong commitment, and so I from every all the CEO's that I've talked to I believe it's it's real, and it's sincere, and they're being very authentic, and I would also say with the the response that I received from the letter we shared at General Motors not only did. We have hundreds? In one day we had almost six hundred responses from our employees on our internal site, but I've had dealers reach out to me. Suppliers reach out to me saying, thank you. We believe in this, too, and we WANNA work with you and so. We expected. There would be some pushback or some negativity and other than some skepticism. Which I think is fair. It is some of our employees, said. Hey, yeah, I hear you i. read what you said I wanna see what you're going to do. And I think that's a very fair response, and that's why we're taking steps with the fund set up the initial donation to the N. w. c. p. in the fact that we're already starting our listeners as it happens to be my first listening sessions there have been other leaders that have already been having. Discussions to to to learn and to also provide a a resource to to their employees, because this is such a difficult time To leaders today and she said you know people are exhausted on this issue so troubling and so so difficult. I'm wondering Mary how much you've learned about how to tackle this challenge through your work on gender equality, G., M. has been consistently recognized as one of the world's leading corporations and establishing gender equality. First of all. How do you get other people to follow suit? And what lessons have you learned from those efforts that could be applied to creating a more diverse and. Inclusive workplace and company. Well I would say one of the big lessons. I learned because as I mentioned. You know there was work going on over twenty years ago. That allowed me to have the chances in the opportunities that. Allowed to be ready in considered for the position. I'm in now. Is the company in the late Alito nine time from his. We went through the bankruptcy I realized as we survived. We had to start again so I think what minds that people have to have is this is never done. This is something of or I guess I look for the day when it doesn't need special focus, but I think we're a long way off. From having leaders very deliberate about creating a diverse groups, diverse opportunities and and you know it really gets to I, would say I'm an engineer and so what I've had to challenge myself to do is. I think I would sometimes pick people like me because I was like okay. Well I know I'll get it done so if I pick someone like me, they'll get it done. And recognizing you get a really narrow slice when you do that, and so we've worked really hard to have our leadership team. Not only have a say, gender race from a diversity perspective, but also experiences other companies and Ben Because that. You know very diverse. Thinking I think is allowed. Allowed us to make better decisions than challenge each other, and so I i. really think that we it's something you have to continually focus and and make sure again. It's a business imperative, just as much as you know wanting our next set of electric vehicles, and that's the mindset that we have to have a net one of the learnings. I had because I think at some point, people said okay well. We got that. We're doing well. It's it's a continual focus. You're listening to back to Biz with Katie and bows, and when we come back Mary Barra on GM's decision to stop making cars and start making ventilators. When Mary Barra became CEO OF GM in two thousand fourteen, she was not only the first female co in GM history. She was also the first woman to lead any of the big three Detroit. Automakers talk about a glass ceiling Mary credits. Her role models for helping her realize that it was hers to smash. I think for me. It starts phenomenal mother who made me. She just encouraged me from I. Think the day I was born that my brother, and I we could do anything we could be anything and if we worked hard, we could make it happen, and so she a. you know I. Think having that through my life. I I always had this belief in myself. And, so I think that carried me. Into many of the positions leading up to this, and and gave me confidence because one of the things. I was in this job. Ashley a daughter of one of our employees said, said to me because you're in this role i. now see that I can do this and I hadn't been again because of my mom. Just you know it was just such an encouraging person. I had I had a really step back and think about that, and that caused me to realize I had an extra role to play of Nadal of championing on young women. Because we've. We've done a lot of work as Katie, mentioned earlier from a gender perspective and helping women understand some of the situations they put themselves in of always use the example If there is a posting for a new job, a woman will look at it and say if there's ten requirements, and she only has nine of them. She'll be like a bummer where a man will look at fan got six of ten. I'M GONNA. Go for and what to. No don't don't be mad at them. You go for it because even if you don't get the position, you're going to learn and so I think. When I got to the roll, it was something I very quickly realized I could play an additional role of really encouraging. Girls and young women, and and being a champion, but also working within the company for that, and then to as we did more work from an for bias, you know everyone has so being able to start talking about that in sharing what we've learned, because I have found personally as I realize some of the ways. I was looking at things. We're just not right it really gave me the opportunity. We started having open dialogue and conversation about and so I think that's been one of the. Things that I think has been powerful within our group, but I. We also brought. We do a lot of high-performance teamwork. We worked with an outside coach to to really help us know ourselves understand our week weaknesses where we can be better. Where are blind spots and I think that work has been important for a now lays the foundation for a have a very important conversations and take the actions we. We need to take now end to hold ourselves accountable, so Mary Let's talk about business I. Though how the pandemic affected your business, because while all this is going on, it's against the backdrop of a pandemic. That has a laid bare, some serious social issues, but I'm just curious. Did you realize early on what a serious problem this was going to be because you have facilities all over the world including China. Yes well before we transition and. Be Happy to to talk about that I. I would say the issue. We've been discussing I. DO SEE as a huge business issue. For business to address and be part of of the systemic change that we need to make to uphold our responsibilities as citizens and as corporate leader so That's actually a very good point. This is business. It's not the bottom line it's it's workplace culture, so thank you dry wit, which drives the bottom line you don't you know people have choices, and if you don't have a culture of inclusion and you aren't valuing everyone over time, people people can can choose I just wanted to say that, but as it relates to Kovin, clearly as as we were in the early part of the year a late, January early February. We started to see the impact on China We had to shutter facilities there and a really work and make sure we were doing the right thing for our our people and you know reaching out working. Working with their suppliers dealers, etc, so a though it was still not clear. If it would you know, have the global reach that now clearly it has as as we did see that happening. We were able to take all of the learnings from China and Ben from Korea and other operations around the globe, and that very much informed. What we what we did in when North America was was impacted, and Brinkley than is China came back. Everyone was able to come back to work. All the lessons learned informed what we did. So one of the things that has been a silver lining from this tragic pandemic has been. I think in the past. Sometimes we'd have a mindset of well I'm different. Because I'm in this country. You're different. It's different here because. And this with this everybody realize what. They've there's people who have experienced with this pandemic how it impacts the workplace in and work in finances and every aspect of the business, and so the the desire to learn in the outreach across a just general motors I thought was very very powerful is has made us I think stronger. And so you know it was something very significant because when you're an automobile company and you stop making vehicles, it's pretty significant work, pretty capital, intensive business, and so we had to take dramatic action quickly of went through a zero based budgeting process to save money to make sure we were going to be secure with all the unknowns that you had in March and April, and so we focused. Focused on those steps the minute we had to shut her plants down though in the United States that there was a team already starting to work of what do we need to do to run and also because we didn't have some essential services, how do we make sure we provide a a safe environment so One of our leaders coined this phrase, but he said I. It's lives than its livelihood. And we're going to focus on lives and make sure we're creating a safe environment, and then will focus on livelihood than that of the corporation, and that's what guy has guided us through it. And continues to stay because I think we all sit. Not Knowing will be will be another spike. How will that be handled? How long will it be barriers of You know medical treatments or a vaccine, and so we're. We're doing a tremendous scenario planning of hoping for the best of being prepared for a less optimal outcome, and that's how we're facing from a business perspective. I do find it very impressive that Yes for a business like yours which requires manufacturing which requires. plants and All kinds of operations that must keep going to have to pit. is a really big decision every I think after right after you shut down the North American operations. The team began working with Fintech. Right to manufacture ventilators mean that is s a huge decision to make and to to put into action. How did that happen? And how did you facilitate this type of quick turnaround? Well I think it really speaks to the tremendous dedication of the General Motors team I mean I got a call from Ken Chenault the next day some of our leaders were talking to the leaders of Ventech than they were on a plane, and from that first meeting that we had with Ventech a month later, we were producing ventilators and to do that. We had to engage hundreds of our suppliers because we had to find suppliers who could start making the parts because Benthic at the time was making between two and three hundred ventilators Amman and we wanted to scale that up to ten thousand a month. And so you know with that challenge. You know everybody just came to the table. Because everybody realized in like I, said, it is just the dedication and the strength of the GM team. people work night and day because they knew they had an opportunity to save lives, and that's what motivated them. Our suppliers, many of our suppliers of worked around the clock as you know, went and spent time in Indiana at the factory in Kokomo Indiana. That was making an still. Today is making ventilators. Everybody just did what they needed to do and For them. It was incredibly empowering, but they they knew every ventilator menopause essential light states, and that was the mindset, and you know they just, did they. They did what it took. Our OUR head of manufacturing for North America. He said as they started the project on the plane. RIDE OUT TO SEATTLE. Said You know, let's let's just assume one of our family members is going to need a ventilator. What would we do? That was the mindset and I so I. I can take very little credit I can only be exceptionally proud. You're listening to back to Biz with Katie. And Bows, and when we come back, how pandemic altered the future of the GM car? I'm Katie couric. Saint John, I'm an award winning journalist and I'm a trail-blazing marketing executive, and we sound kind of full of ourselves, but together we're hosting a brand new podcast to help us look beyond our pandemic. It's called back to Biz with Katie and votes. Each week will interview the leaders and big thinkers in industries from Tech Education to fashion and pop culture to find out how they're adjusting to this new way of life. Listen to back to Biz with Katie and focus on the iheartradio, APP Apple, podcasts or wherever you get your favorite shows. After three months of closure to to cove nineteen jamboree opened its North American facilities on May, twenty twenty, and for businesses around the country, looking to do the same, the automaker may provide a peak at what's ahead our guest Mary. Barra tells us how that process has gone. And what business in this new normal looks like? So far. It has gone well. We have protocols in place, and we took the time to train our employees to answer. All those questions their questions, because recognizing everybody's coming from a different place as it relates to Kobe. Some people don't know a single person who's even had a disease and other people have lost, loved ones or have family members on the front line, and so the training in the end the the work we did in Emberley one of the things we shared with everybody is is we need to show empathy because everybody's living, this a little bit differently and so. So as we welcomed everyone back, we put them through the training. We also explain the why. Why do you need to wear a mask? Why are we sanitizing? Why are we screening? And all those processes are working for us right now and you know people as I visited our facilities. People tell me I feel safer at work that I do at the grocery store, and so and we keep involving everyone into. How can we make it even better and the ideas are great, and so we just once we have an idea coming from one facility. We spread it across the globe. So everyone can get better so so far so good. We're not declaring victory, but it is working, and we know when our people have confidence that they are working in a safe environment. I think the big unknown is. Will this crisis change? Consumer Habits will change the way people live. Will it change what they want? I'm just wondering if this pandemic has shifted how you're looking at the future, and how you're predicting what your consumers are going to actually want. We we've seen this as an hour trying to accelerate our move to electric vehicles, because we think that is the big part of the solution, even though it will happen over a period of time, the sooner we provide affordable desirable. Electric vehicles. We think we can start at transformation, so that's one of the things we've tried to accelerate as we go through this process There's also an interest with customers wanting to have their own vehicle, not being sure of public transportation, and then we've also been listening to customers and doing customer clinics has what has changed in what are they looking for in their vehicle? And it's early days in that I think it will drive some change. I think people will still WANNA have vehicles, I think Thomas offers solutions even in in ridesharing, it's one less dimension of another person being in the vehicle, so we see you know the transformation we see happening in mobility with special electrified vehicles at Thomas Vehicles. We see that it. We haven't. Changed our commitment and our intensity in moving in that direction, we think it's actually an opportunity to accelerate. Perhaps in closing our their thoughts that you have about the your hope for the future and for recovery at this time that we could take away even as we think about our own individual businesses or individuals jobs, and how we operate, and what that time line perhaps look like. Say I offer to Kinda different perspectives one within General Motors with how to do things with much less bureaucracy to do things faster to empower people and they're going to do great things and make great decisions. In the rare times, something doesn't work out is not a reason for when ninety eight percent of the time it's going to so i. think that's something I'm very. Very excited about you know. As I look to the country and be an Emmy Globe I hope as especially in the United States. As things are opening up I hope people stay with understanding. The virus is still with us in foul. The safety protocols wear masks and practice social distancing, because if we can come through this without another you know spike. Be So important for the economy and for everyone's life. From a livelihood perspective, so that's my hope that we all are responsible. As we go through these next several months to get to the other side, it must be hard to run a big company like GM with so many uncertainties looming in the future, so I don't envy you, but I do admire you marry. Team a great team. While you're always quick to give them credit. Which I think is part of the reason behind your success Mary Barra. Thank you so much for spending time with us today. Thank you for the opportunity. I have to say I've learned a lot and I've really enjoyed the conversation, so thank you both. Thank you HASHTAG goals. And that does it for this episode of back to Biz with Katie and bows. If you're not already, you can subscribe to the podcast on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows, and please do everyone and you can find more about all the cool people were talking to as well as our favorite moments from these episodes on our instagram feeds and stories. We're all about the Graham until next time. Everyone I'm Katie couric and I'm bows. Miss Saint John and this is back to Biz with Katie. Infos thank you. Everyone for listening and we'll talk to you next time. Back too busy with Katie and bows production of iheartradio and Katy Kirk media. The executive producers are Katie, couric Bozeman Saint, John, and Courtney let's the supervising producer is Lauren Hanson. The associate producers are Derek Clements Elisa hostess and Emily Pinto Editing by Derek. Clements and Lauren Hanson mixing by Derek Clements special thanks to Adriana Fawzia. For more information about today's episode. GO TO KATY KIRK DOT COM. You can also follow Katie. couric and both Saint John on twitter instagram. For more podcast or my heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. This is Dj Vlad I. Want you to check out the Vlad TV podcast launching on June seventeen since two thousand and eight. Latino has been the leader in a hard hitting no-holds-barred interviews with the world's biggest rappers singers Hollywood stars professional athletes and former big time criminals, and now you can catch all of our full link interviews available as audio podcasts, so listen to the Vlad TV podcast iheartradio APP apple podcasts, spotify or wherever you get your podcast. KC and sorry, but staying on top of the news every single day during these times has been really hard. I wish there was an easy way to get everything I need to know Hayes I. Think you're forgetting about news o'clock you know the daily podcast we host from buzzfeed and iheartradio oh bright. I'm his Brown and I've Casey Raca, and every day on news o'clock we help you catch up on all the stories you missed throughout the day from coronavirus updates, the latest and pop culture with a little help from special guests like Isa Ray. You know I definitely won't be able to do yeah party this year at all an ethic mount my only chance to be the life party. Is Your. It's your party. They will pay. My. Clock is the new podcast from buzzfeed and Iheartradio that you need to keep track of life outside of quarantine. Listen on iheartradio. APP Apple Podcasts, or you get your podcast.

GM Katie General Motors Mary Barra Mary CEO Saint John Katie I executive Katie. couric Apple Katie couric Mary Barra North America China George Floyd Detroit engineer Ben
GM CEO Mary Barra on why equity is the bottom line

Back to Biz with Katie and Boz

33:06 min | 4 months ago

GM CEO Mary Barra on why equity is the bottom line

"Hi I'm Michael. CASSON chairman and CEO immediately and host of the new podcast, good company where we'll talk to some of the smartest minds in media, marketing entertainment intact about how they built their companies from the ground up, or reinvented them from the inside out and how you can do the same. What's really important as we think about purpose, and we think about purpose different brands is you've got to go back to values as a brand listening, subscribe to good company with Michael Castle on the iheartradio APP. Apple podcasts were wherever you get your podcasts. I everyone I'm Katie, couric and I'm Bozeman Saint John and this is back to Biz with Kadian boast. This week, those we have been really exciting and very inspiring gas. She's such a trailblazer, such an inspiration in the business world I. Know You haven't met her, but you know all about her, so take it away. Those tell us about our guests Mary Barra. ooh, Katie. I am excited. Head about Mary, Barra? She is all of my corporate goals. She is the CEO of General Motors one of the Big Three Detroit automakers. Has One of the largest and historically important companies, so the American economy and I mean talk about male dominated. You can't get more of a swaggering boys club than the car industry that's for sure. And when Mary was appointed bows and two thousand fourteen, only twenty of the fortune, five hundred chief execs were women, and now we're up to thirty seven, which we should note is still impossibly infuriatingly small, but is more women. Take over those executive positions. We really have to thank leaders like Mary Barra. Barra absolutely, She's incredible, and it was such a pleasure to meet her over zoom and have this meaty wonderful conversation you know. She shared her path to leadership, and how she was able to make such a massive company like GM act nimbly in a time of crisis, but of course we had to start in the here and now we have to talk about this letter. She wrote toward nearly two hundred thousand employees in response to our current racial unrest. I've to tell you Katie. I was. Really impressed, you know the company let her express some fiery sentiments that I really haven't heard seen presented by mini. CEO's at all and a lot of people. Hopefully, bose will follow suit and I've got a quote from that letter. She says she is impatient and disgusted. By the fact, that is a nation. We seem to be placated by the passive discussion of why we wanted to know where her head was that when she wrote that letter, and how she plans on turning those words into action, so we started there. Yup let's get into it. I think. There was this sense of sadness and frustration that I had as I learned what was happening and processed it and a human level. It was just unconscionable of what happened. And I'm an engineer. By degree and so I, I'm a problem solver. You know I think we just became very clear to me. There's been to many others that we can't just know talk about why and then you know something else replaces the news cycle in nothing gets done became really important to me that we do something that we find solutions, and we drive for lasting change and I'm really A. Week I'm just passionate about. Really making changes in stop talking. Let's start doing. That is that's a that's so true and refreshing to hear I know that your letter also announced the formation of an advisory board. As you said which has the intention of making GM and more inclusive company in the world What do you think that the company and perhaps like? Yourself and the others who are leading the company How do you actually get their account? You make it a more inclusive company. Because that's really the operative word here you're diversity is one thing. Certainly you know, we can have people of all types of backgrounds and cultures MRIs etc.. but inclusion is what actually makes it. Workable. It's what creates the success. So what? What is it that you intend to do by creating this advisory board? Why can't we been talking about for a while? Now that we WANNA have a culture in an environment where everybody can bring their true selves to work, because if you can be your true south, you can be at your best, and so that's been our goal. We recognize. We have more work to do and so with the. Inclusion Advisory Board. One of the first things we know we need to do is listen. Because we don't have all the answers, and so actually I'm excited because this evening we have one of our first listening sessions with several members of the senior leader team, and we believe we need to listen. We need to talk. We need to learn together. you know as I said in in no? You know listening and talking will lead to the dialog that will lead to change and so. That's one of the areas we need to work on I'm also personally very pleased. That I get to be a part of the Bart a group that is going to work on four areas of the area of from a finance perspective, healthcare perspective, education workforce, which is the committee I chair and Ben Criminal Justice because I. do think we need systemic change, and when you a company like General Motors. We feel a responsibility to drive change within our environment and what we can do, with our dealers and our suppliers we, we have a pretty wide footprint, but then in addition to working with the Business Roundtable and all of those companies I think together we can. Really we can really start to dismantle and change. Systems for the better so again. We have much work to do to build on things that we've already done. We have much more work to do, and we're going to be working both as a company, and then as a collection of companies, it seems to me that we've reached this new era where it's not really. To stay silent on some of these issues. We've seen people like you. Mary, speaking out Jeff's. Basically, told the customer from Amazon that if he didn't like it, you know he could lump it and he didn't mind losing him as a customer, which is a real shift for Jeff Bezos and we see you know people like Ken Frazier the CEO of Merck saying George Floyd could have been him and. I think that that we're hearing from these corporate leaders in a much more palatable way right now. Why is that so essential? And and what do you make of this real shift in and speaking out? Again when I when I, look at General Motors, we've always said we want to be known as a values. Based Company and so as we have spoken out in the past is has been to make sure our employees understood what we believe in what we stood for. As it relates to our values, and I think it is to a tipping point now where it would be inconsistent with our values, not to speak out, and not to work with others and challenge ourselves and challenge others when I when I said in the note, we want to be the most inclusive company in the world I don't want to. I, mean I want every company to be the most inclusive in the world. Because it's not something we should compete on. It's something we have to dedicate ourselves to do so. To me, it's values based, and you can't stay silent when something is just fundamentally happening. That is so inconsistent with your values you. You have a responsibility to act. That's that is quite a radical. Statement? It really is to say that it's not just about general. Motors being the most inclusive company in the world that you want every company I have to pause there because I. Don't know that I've ever heard that before. I'm curious, Bose. Do you think that's starting to happen? Obviously Mary is a real leader in this. Do you think that more and more people will follow Mary Barra's? Barra's lead I hope that more people follow Mary's lead but I. do think that this is a change. I again I have never felt the kind of movement and the kind of personal responsibility that leaders are taking in this very moment I've never seen this before. Yes, this type of thing has happened a lot. This is not the first video we've seen. It actually makes me quite enraged. When we think about. The countless people who don't have video, but I do believe that there are several things that are adding to this moment, I mean obviously we cannot ignore covid nineteen right, and so when you see something like George Floyd's video of his murder. I think it is shocking. It is shocking and it makes us all. Wake up and so I i. do believe that this is a turning point for all of us. and I've also said that I wish more companies would make more statements like Mary as making. but I do wonder about the some of the mixed reactions. That the getting, perhaps, there are some fear. From. Business leaders to make the kind of bold statements that Mary and others were making You know because there's there's GonNa. Be Mixed reaction. Sometimes people won't believe you. Right right that. I was going to ask you. Mary, about sort of you know we live in such senecal age and I'm wondering if if if you're worried on behalf of other leaders like yourself that that some will view this as sort of flagrant brand opportunism. You know that they are jumping on the bandwagon that they. They're not really that sincere in their commitment and I'm curious how you feel about that. I would say I've had the opportunity over the last couple of weeks to talk to a lot of CEO's and. It's real it there I mean it's a it's a deep concern, and from that comes a strong commitment and so. From all the CEO's that I've talked to I, believe it's it's real, and it's sincere, and they're being very offensive, and I would also say with the the response that I received from the letter we shared at general. Motors not only did we have hundreds? In one day we had almost six hundred responses from our employees on our internal site, but I've had dealers reach out to me. Suppliers reach out to me saying thank you. We believe in this too, and we want to work with you and so. We expected there would be some pushback or some negativity and other than some skepticism, which I think is fair in some of our employees, said. Hey, yeah I, hear you i. read what you said. I WanNa see what you're going to do and I think that's a very fair response, and that's why we're taking steps with the the. Set up the initial donation made to the N. W. CPA in the fact that we're already starting lists as it happens to be my first listening session, there have been other leaders that have already been having. Discussions to to learn and to also provide a a resource to to their employees. Because this is such a difficult time, was talking to one of our leaders today and she said you know people are exhausted on. This issue has been so troubling and so so difficult. I'm wondering Mary how much you've learned. About, how to tackle this challenge through your work on gender equality, GM has been consistently recognized as one of the world's leading corporations in establishing gender equality. First of all. How do you get other people to follow suit? And what lessons have you learned from those efforts that could be applied to creating a more diverse and inclusive workplace and company. Well I would say one of the big lessons I learned. Because as I mentioned you know. There was work going on over twenty years ago. That allowed me to have the chances the opportunities that. Know allowed me to be ready in considered for the position I'm in now. You know as the company in the late Nine time from his went through the bankruptcy I realized as we survived. We had to start again so I think. What am I mindset people have to have is this has never done. This is something of or I guess I. Look for the day when it doesn't need special focus, but I think we're a long way off from having leaders very deliberate about creating a diverse groups diverse opportunities. And and you know it really gets to say I'm an engineer and so what I've had to challenge myself to do is. I think I would sometimes pick people like me because I was like okay well I know I'll get it done, so if I pick someone like me, they'll get it done. And recognizing you get a really narrow slice when you do that, and so we've worked really hard to have our leadership team. Not only have you know I'll say gender race from a diversity perspective, but also experiences other companies and Ben Because that you know very diverse thinking I think. Think is allowed us to make better decisions than challenge each other and so I I really think that we it's something you have to continually focus and and make sure again. It's a business imperative, just as much as you know wanting our next set of electric vehicles, and that's the mindset that we have to have, and that's one of the learnings. I had because I think at some point. People said okay well. We've got that doing well. It's it's a continual focus. Listening to back to visit with Katie and bows when we come back Mary Barra on GM's decision to stop making cars and start making ventilators. When Mary Barra became CEO of GM in twenty fourteen, she was not only the first female co GM's history. She was also the first woman to lead any of the big three. Detroit automakers talk about a glass ceiling. Mary credits. Her role models for helping her realize that it was hers to smash it. I think for me. It starts I had a phenomenal mother who made me. She just encouraged me from I. Think the day I was born that I my brother and I we could do anything we could be anything and if we worked hard, we could make it happen, and so she You know I think having that. You know through my life I I always had this belief in myself. And so I think that carried me. Into many of the positions leading up to this and Ev- gave me that confidence because one of the things when I I was in this job actually a daughter of one of our employees said to said to me because you're in this role I now see that I can do this. And I hadn't been because of my mom. Just you know it was just such an encouraging person. I had I had a really step back and think about that, and that caused me realize I had an extra role to play a national of of championing. Young women because we've we've done a lot of work. Katie mentioned earlier from gender. Perspective and helping women understand some of the situations. They put themselves in You know I always use the example If there is a posting for a new job, a woman will look at it and save. There's ten requirements and she only has nine of them. She'll be like a bummer where a man will look at. San Got six of ten. I'm going to go for and what to. Exactly. No. Don't don't be mad at them. You go for it because even if you don't get the position, you're going to learn and so I think when I got to the role, it was something I. Very quickly realized I could play an additional role of really encouraging. Girls and young women and being a champion, but also working within the company for that, and then as we did more work from from a bias. Everyone has so being able to start talking about that and sharing a learn because I have found personally as I realize some of the ways I was looking at things were just not right. It really gave me the opportunity. We started having dialogue and conversation about it, and so I think that's been one of the The things that I think has powerful within our group, but we also brought. We do a lot of high-performance teamwork. We work with an outside coach. Coach to to really help us know ourselves understand our weaknesses where we can be better. Where are blind spots and I think that work has been important for a now lays the foundation for us to have very important conversations and take the actions. We need to take now an and to hold ourself accountable so Mary Let's talk about business I so how the pandemic affected your business, because while all this is going on, it's against the backdrop of a pandemic that has. Laid bare some serious social issues, but I'm just curious. Did you realize early on what is serious problem? This was going to be because you have facilities all over the world including China. Yes, and well before we transition and be happy to to talk about that. I would say that the issue we've been discussing I do see as a huge business issue, for business to address and be part of the systemic change that we need to make to uphold our our responsibilities as citizens in as corporate leader so That's actually a very good point. This is business It's not the bottom line. It's workplace culture, so thank you which dry wit which drives the bottom line you down, you know people have choices, and if you don't have a a culture of inclusion and you aren't valuing everyone over time, people people can can so I just wanted to say that, but as it relates to Kobe clearly, as as we were in the early part of the year a late January early February. We started to see the impact on China you know we. We we had to shutter facilities there and a really work and make sure we were doing the right thing for our people, and you know reaching out work with our suppliers dealers, etc, so a at that point, though was still not clear, if it would have the global reach that now clearly it has as as we did see that happening. We were able to take all of the learnings from China and Ben from Korea and other operations around the globe, and that very much informed what we what we did in when North America. was was impacted, and frankly than this is China came back. everyone was able to come back to where all the lessons learned informed what we did. So one of the things that has been a silver lining from this tragic pandemic has been. I think in the past. Sometimes we have a mindset of well. I'm different because I'm in this country. You're on different. It's different here because. And this with this everybody realize you know what. There's people who have experienced with this pandemic, and how it impacts the workplace in and work in finances and every aspect of the business, so the the the desire to learn and the outreach across a just general motors I thought was very very powerful, as has made us a stronger and so you know it was something very significant, because when you're an automobile company and you stop making vehicles, it's pretty significant were pretty capital intensive business, and so we had to take dramatic action quickly. Quickly of went through a zero based budgeting process to save money to make sure we were going to be secure with all the unknowns that you had in in March and April and so we focused on those steps the minute we had to shut her plants down though in the United States that there was a team already starting to work of what do we need to do to run and also because we didn't have some essential services, how do we make sure we provide a? Safe Environment so One of our leaders kinda coined this phrase, but he said I. It's lives than its livelihood. And we're going to focus on lives and make sure we're creating a safe environment, and then we'll focus on livelihood than that of the corporation, and that's what guy has guided us through it. And continues to this day. Because I think we all sit, not knowing will be Will there be another spike. How will that be handled? How long will it be Tilberis of You know medical treatments or a vaccine, and so we're doing a tremendous scenario planning hoping for the best a being prepared for less optimal outcome, and that's how we're facing up from a business perspective. Do? Find it very impressive that Yes for a business like yours. which requires manufacturing which requires you know? Plants and All kinds of operations that must keep going to have to pivot is a really big decision. I think after right after you shut down the North American operations. The team began working with Fintech right to manufacture ventilators. That is s a huge decision to make and to to put into action. How did that happen? And how did you facilitate this type of quick turnaround? Think! It really speaks to the tremendous dedication of the General Motors team I mean I. got a call from Kennel. The next day on some of our leaders were talking to the leaders of Ben Tack Than They were on a plane, and from that I mean that we had with Zantac a month later, we were producing ventilators and to do that. We had doing gauge hundreds of our suppliers because we had to find suppliers who could start making the parts because at the time was making between two and three hundred ventilators Amman and we wanted to scale that up to ten thousand a month. And so with that challenge. You know everybody just came to the table. Because everybody realized in like it is just the dedication in the strength of the GM team, people work night and day because they knew they had an opportunity to save lives, and that's what motivated them. Our suppliers, many of our suppliers, a worked around the clock, as I went and spent time, and in Indiana at the factory. Kokomo Indiana that was making. Making, still today is making ventilators. Everybody just did what they needed to do. And you know for them. It was incredibly empowering, but they they knew every ventilator MENA potential state, and that was the mindset and you know they just did. They did what it took our our head of manufacturing for North America he he said as they started the project on the plane. RIDE OUT TO SEATTLE. said. You know let's let's just assume one of our family members is going to need a van later. What would we do? That was the mindset and I so I I can take very little credit. I can only be exceptionally proud. You're listening to back Biz with Katie and bows, and when we come back how the pandemic the future of the GM CAR I'm Michael Castle, Chairman and CEO immediately and host of the new podcast, good company where we'll talk to some of the smartest minds in media, marketing entertainment attack about how they built their companies from the ground up, or reinvented them from the inside out and how you can do the same. What's really important as we think about purpose, and we think about purpose different brands is you've got to go back to what are your values as a brand? Listening subscribe to good company with Michael Castle on the iheartradio APP. Apple podcasts were wherever you get your podcasts. After three months of closure to to Kobe, nineteen jamboree opened its north. American facilities on May, twenty twenty, and for businesses around the. Looking to do the same, the automaker may provide a peak at what's ahead. Our Guest Mary Barra tells us how that process has gone, and what business in this new normal looks like Ooh? So far it has gone well. We have protocols in place, and we took the time to train our employees to answer. All those questions their questions, because recognizing everybody's coming from different place as it relates to Kobe, some people don't know a single person who's even season. Other people have lost loved ones or have family members on the front line, and so the training and the end the the work we did in Emberley. One of the things we shared with everybody is, is we need to? Show empathy because everybody's living this a little bit differently, and so as we welcome everyone back. We put them through the training. We also explain the why. Why do you need to wear a mask? Why are we sanitizing? Why are we screening? And all those processes are working for us right now and you know people as I visited our facilities. People tell me I feel safer at work. That I do at the grocery store, and so we keep involving everyone into. How can we make it? Even better and the ideas are great, and so we just. Just end once we have an idea coming from one facility spreading across the globe so everyone can get better so far so good. We're not declaring victory, but it is working I, and we know when our people have confidence that they are working in a safe environment. I think the big unknown is will. This Crisis Changed Consumer Habits? Will it change the way people live? Will it change what they want? I'm just wondering if this pandemic has shifted how you're looking at the future and how you're predicting what your consumers are going to actually want. We we've seen this as an are trying to accelerate our move to electric vehicles, because we think that is the big part of the solution, even though it will happen over a period of time, the sooner we provide affordable desirable. Electric vehicles. We think we can start at transformation, so that's one of the things we've tried to accelerate. As we go through this process, I think there's also an interest with customers wanting to have their own vehicle, not being sure of public transportation, and then we've also been listening to customers and doing customer clinics to has what has changed. What are they looking for in their vehicle and it's early days in that I. Think it will drive some. I think people will still WanNa have vehicles I think a Thomas offers solutions even in in ridesharing, because it's one less dimension of another person being the vehicle, so we see the transformation that we see happening in mobility with special electrified vehicles at autonomous vehicles. We see that. Our we haven't. Changed our commitment and our intensity in moving in that direction. We think it's actually an opportunity to accelerate. Perhaps in closing our their thoughts that you have about the your hope for the future and for recovery at this time that we could take away even as we think about our own, individual businesses are individual jobs in how we operate, and what that time line perhaps looks like. Live say I'd offer to Canada different perspectives one within General Motors. We've learned how to do things with much less bureaucracy to do things faster to empower people and they're gonNA. Do great things and make great decisions. In the rare times. Something doesn't work out is not a reason for it. When Ninety eight percent of the time it's going to think that's something I'm very excited about. You know as I look to the country and be an globe. I hope as especially in the United States. Things are opening up. I hope people stay with understanding. The virus is still with us in follow the safety protocols in wear masks to practice social distancing, because if we can come through this without another Spike I think it's going to be so important for the economy, and for everyone's life from a livelihood perspective, so that's my hope that we all are responsible. As we go through these next several months to get to the other side, it must be hard to run a big company like GM with so many uncertainties looming in the future so i. don't m view, but I do admire you, Mary I have a green team a great team. while. You're always quick to give them credit. Which I think is part of the reason behind your success Mary Barra. Thank you so much for spending time with us today. Thank you for the opportunity. I have to say I've learned a lot and I've really enjoyed the conversation, so thank you both. HASHTAG goals. And that does it for this episode of Back to busy with Katie, and if you're not already, you can subscribe to the podcast on the iheartradio, APP apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows, and please do everyone and you can find more about all the cool people were talking to as well as our favorite moments from these episodes on our instagram feeds and stories. We're all about the Graham until next time. Everyone I'm Katie couric and I'm Bozeman Saint John and this is fact is with Katie. Infos thank you everyone for listening and we'll talk to you next time. Back too busy with Katie and bose is a production of iheartradio and Katie couric media. The executive producers are Katie couric Bozeman, Saint John and court inlets. The supervising producer is Lauren Hansen? The associate producers are Derek, clements, Elisa hostess and Emily Pinto Editing by Derek. Clements and Lauren Hanson mixing by Derek Clements special. Thanks to Adriana Fazio. For more information about today's episode. Go to Katie COURIC DOT COM. You can also follow Katie couric and Bozeman. Saint John on twitter and instagram. For more podcast iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP, apple, podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Are you a fan of professional wrestling. A My name is battle host, pro wrestling podcast battleground podcast, join me and my friends Eli the bells of the brawl. Lane and K B each week as we break down, what's going on in the world of professional wrestling from hot topics to interviews with some of the biggest names in professional wrestling? Roman reigns Charlotte flair. Cody Rhodes the young Bucks Billy Corgan smashing pumpkins and president of the. And, so many more listen to the battleground podcasts on the iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Dj Vlad and I want you to check out the Vlad TV podcast. Since two thousand eight Vlad TV has been the leader in hard getting no-holds-barred interviews with the world's biggest rappers singers, Hollywood stars professional athletes and former big time criminals, and now you can catch all of our full Leith interviews available audio podcasts, so listen to the Vlad. TV podcast on iheartradio. APP APPLE PODCASTS, spotify or wherever you get your podcast.

Mary Barra Katie General Motors Mary GM CEO Katie couric apple Ben Tack Mary Barra Michael Castle Bozeman chairman and CEO George Floyd China executive Kobe engineer Detroit bose
AP One Minute Headlines Mar 22 2019 11:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

02:00 min | 1 year ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 22 2019 11:00 (EDT)

"Sky diving. This is amazed. Yep. But you know, what else is amazing an iphone six s for just forty nine bucks at metro really imagine streaming all the way down with that amazing camera. I've switching that smart. You know, what else is smart parachutes? Switched to metro and get an amazing iphone six s for only forty nine bucks metro by T mobile. Phone requires porting of number not currently active on T mobile network are active on metro and past ninety days. See store for details and terms and conditions. Trump and Muller. I'm Ed Donahue with the AP news minute. President Trump is increasing the criticism of the Russia investigation as the day of its release draws near. He was asked about the new investigations by the democrat led house. It's just a continuation of the same which they know it n behind closed doors. They laugh at it. It's not clear when the report will be released GM's, Mary Barra announced plans today to add four hundred jobs and build a new electric vehicle plant at a factory north of Detroit. This new Chevrolet EV is part of a larger strategy to introduce several new battery electric vehicles during the next several years moves come after last weekend's string of tweets by President Trump condemning GM for shutting its small car factory and Lordstown Ohio east of Cleveland. The Missouri river flood waters searching onto an era base housing. The US military strategic command overwhelmed round. The clock sandbagging by airmen and others. They had to scramble to save sensitive equipment. I may Donahue. Hi fashion hotline high after this long winter my family needs to sail. Pick me up for spring gets old navy old navy. Yep springs. I big sale is on now. Pick a for styles for the family from just five ten and fifteen dollars petits and tanks revived bucks kids towards from ten bucks in jeans from fifteen bucks. Whoa styles from just five bucks. That's right. Plus get fifty percent off swimwear and bile nine and big up in store for free today. Now, that's a real pick me up gets old navy and old navy dot com. Now for spring styles from five ten and fifteen bucks three hundred three twenty six stores flex dollars. Only. Excludes licensed in instructions.

President Trump Ed Donahue US GM Missouri river Chevrolet EV Mary Barra Detroit Cleveland Russia Muller fifteen dollars fifty percent ninety days
AP One Minute Headlines Nov 26 2018 16:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

02:00 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Nov 26 2018 16:00 (EST)

"Holiday tips and wine stories from Kristen, and Paula total wine and more Chardonnay paired with lobster, mashed potatoes, simply delicious, how good am I with wines? Put it this way. My mother-in-law now loves me for introducing her to her favorite wine. Now, there's nothing I can't deal. Whether you're entertaining or just bringing the wine, we'd love to share are always low prices with you this holiday. Cheers. Come explored are twelve northern Virginia locations now open and rest in plaza, America's said der- across from wholefoods shop online, total wine dot com. GM restructuring. I'm Ed Donahue with the AP news minute. President Trump is not happy with the CEO General Motors, Mary Barra and GM is cutting up to fourteen thousand workers in North America and possibly closing by plant. Not good the plant in Lordstown, Ohio that makes the Chevrolet Cruze. Compact car is on the possible closure list say the Chevy Cruz is not selling. Well, I say, well, then get somebody get a car that is selling well and put it back in big size of relief today at NASA. A NASA spacecraft designed to borrow beneath the surface of Mars landed on the red planet after a six month three hundred million mile journey. President Trump says the US doesn't approve of escalating violence either way between Russia and Ukraine. He spoke for the first time after weekend. Naval confrontation off the disputed Crimean peninsula. The Dow finished up three hundred fifty four points. I'm Ed Donahue, holiday, tips and wine stories from Paul, Kristen and Dexter at total wine and more might top tip. Not all gifts have to be for others, treat yourself. Chris whites. Like, a floral Soviet-bloc pairs, perfectly, shrimp, cocktail and other light appetizers. Now. That's how you kick off a holiday meal, adult smile and average of twenty times a day make that twenty one for someone you love with the perfect bottle from total wine and more. Whether you're enter -taining or just bringing the wine, we'd love to share are always low prices and ridiculous election with you this holiday, total wine and more. Cheers.

President Trump Kristen Ed Donahue GM NASA Chevrolet Paula Dexter Lordstown Virginia North America CEO General Motors Mary Barra Chris whites America Ohio US Cruz Russia
Electric Vehicles center stage at L.A. International Car Show

Techstination

02:00 min | 11 months ago

Electric Vehicles center stage at L.A. International Car Show

"Your destination for gadgets ungeared. I'm Fred fishkill. Electric vehicles took center stage in and around the Los Angeles international auto show which wrapped up this month. The Ford Mustang Mucky an SUV with a battery range of up to three hundred miles. Drew Crowds Markov. Men Is Global Director of marketing. At Ford this is almost like route. Sixty six meet silicone valley. We put a lot of time getting this perfect blend of iconic Mustang with technology at GM Chevy Bolt is getting a boost for twenty twenty up to two hundred fifty nine miles on a full charge beyond that product. Specialist Chad says our CEO. Mary Barra she has said Ed very directly that we envision all of our products to eventually be electric and of course Elon. Musk drew crowds to the amount of Tesla's cyber truck while windows in the them over unexpectedly smashed. So we're preorder records in the following. Day You can find us at text. NATION DOT COM. I'm Fred Friskin cooking with the power of the song. Hi I'm Fred Friskin here to tell you about the latest innovation for my friend Patrick Sherwin and and his great team at goes on stove the goes on fusion has arrived using the companies tried and true reflectors and the solar vacuum tube could get cooking without the massive charcoal heavy propane tanks or smoke a really bright idea and with an optional solar panel and battery storage on the ability to plug again at home or on the road really can use the goes on fusion to cook anytime and anywhere day or night Reno. Shy I love what Patrick and and his team are doing and so will you want to learn more head to go some dot. Co Two check out all of the company's products and innovations and use the code textile nation to save ten percent that's goes on Dot C._O..

Fred Friskin Fred fishkill Patrick Sherwin Mary Barra Mustang Ford Los Angeles Global Director of marketing GM Musk Reno Tesla Chad CEO Ed ten percent
Evenings with Dr. Mary Barrett

The RIFT Radio Podcast Network

58:48 min | Last month

Evenings with Dr. Mary Barrett

"Locked Talk Radio. From everyone here at the rift radio network would like to welcome you to tonight's special broadcast. This work is protected by creative Commons license and now a word from our sponsors. Ladies. Do join us on. Sunday nights at eleven o'clock at. Facebook and on you to feel swear after you get all come out normal soup every Sunday night. Well Hi everybody my to work again tonight, but that's okay. Welcome to evening with Dr Mary Barra Tonight I decided I was going to do is show on. Addiction addiction is very. Prevalent, now in our society and you know it's always been there I. Remember when I was a teenager everybody was go out had good join you know down here and we'll have a keg beer whatnot. You know you don't think much when you are a teenager. I didn't fortunately bother with any of that stuff but and I still don't. But it's really good. Subject because there are so many people. That have been touched by addiction. and. Myself included. I cannot. Tell you how many people that I know That have had somebody passed. Due to addiction. I can't tell you how many. People have told me. Their son or their daughter or their father or their mother is an act. And it doesn't. Matter, what kind of an addict? Because alcohols and addiction. Drug Addiction. And when we put the two of them together. We have a CO occurrences, the disorder known as dual diagnosis. Now, I have been studying in school. Since nineteen, ninety seven. About. Dual diagnosis. And I'm still going at it. I'm in my second on Doctor Program Right now. And all my papers are on drug addiction. We ask why? Why somebody who never to drug? Still interested. In Addiction. When I was eighteen, I'm married my first husband. He was you know it? He was very mean alcohol. And very few so. and. I found out. It's hereditary. So. If I have a son out there. Who is a A high functioning. Alcoholic. And nothing I can say nothing you can say nothing anybody can say. Until that person is ready to admit and I mean really. Admit that they have a problem and want help. They can stay here all the time and say yeah I have a problem. Yeah I know I drink too much or I smoked too much pot or whatever. You know. This last weekend. I was contacted by a childhood friend of mine. Her daughter died of a heroin addiction. And I've heard so many other people tell me marrying I've just lost on. So Do Heroin Addiction. And I do vote this show I dedicate this show. To all the addicts out there. May they. Realize what they're doing to themselves, what they're doing to their family. I always wondered. What I should have done. To get my husband and I just. To get him to love name. And stay with me. Oh sure he loves me more than. He loves booze. Doesn't work that way. My He's dead. Now he died. Before her. and He was only fifty four when he died. But when he started drinking, he was seven years old. You. Heard me right seven. His uncle with me to him alcohol under the table. he'd be sitting there drinking. This is what happens with so many people. They start at an early age song people start later. And, I taught an addiction clouds at. Unity College where I'm at. and. It was funny. My students weren't so happy about this, but I made them do a week. What they couldn't go without. My daughter she was in the class and she was a texting fanatic. I phone offer and I said you cannot attacked as of right now. And she's like what? I could you cannot tax it all. This other girl told me she got. Yeah. I'm a junk food McDonald's, eater So we went ahead with the week with the things that were going on. So when we met again for the week, I should everybody do. My daughter said I didn't test anybody. I'm. Proud of myself. I said really, she said, yeah Ferrelli. So ask the girl about the junk food at McDonalds. She said I gotTa Tell You. She said I went into the McDonald parking lot and I kept looking around for all. To See who was going to see me. And I get high? Eating the McDonald's. Will now you know how it feels to be managed Because that's what does. The Go. To see WHO's watching. Or you know. Where can I go get my neck hit or nobody's GONNA. See me. You know we all think addiction is easy. You know you go. You get in your junk. You do. You're fine. No, that's not true. And a lot of people th-that can quit when they want to. Wow. There's a debate about that. Yes they can't quit. If they really really truly. Wanted to but. But. They usually have relaxes. And they have to work a program. And they have to get. A sponsor. And sometimes, that doesn't even work. Sometimes, they have just got so addicted to the drums. That that doesn't work. That doesn't bring them out of it. And now to shame that is what so many people. Cry About. Because they lose their precious child or husband or mother or father tune in diction and they still on love they feel like you're not cared about but they are. She'll be audit I knew this one addict that Who would be standing on a street corner? Drunk out of his mind. His mom would drive right past them. And she wouldn't stop. Because he would not stop his using. And she couldn't get back into him, stealing things and taking money from or and. Whatnot. I want you believe he's in this team. And he's still going through you know. Dealing and being in jail in prison. I don't think he's ever GonNa. Stop That's personally. My thoughts I know this person. And when he starts with, they called Jonesing he go. You don't care. They'll take whatever he can take. And just go. Because at that time, the addict is just thinking about where they're gonNA score their next hit. You could be right with minimum labour. They're not gonNA give to shut your labor. They're gonNA. Say I'll be right back. And then they never show back up again. Possibly for days. And addiction the. Warble. Terrible. Thing a person go through but do you know that they're most likely addict to? A lot of things. Yeah. Right drug and alcohol. Addiction well, how about a TV addiction? Hot Coffee and. I taught this class at my church and I that they had to go week without what they're. Not Wanting to give out and I had man tell me I'll tell you right now. Coffee is my addiction if I have to go week without coffee. Everybody screwed. He wouldn't do it. Because he knew he couldn't do without that coffee. How about you chocolate people out there. You go without chocolate. If you had to give that up for the rest of like. Could you go out? Could you go without travel? I will challenge anybody who is listening to me. To go one week. Without something that you know it would be hard to give up. And the come back and talk to me. You're going to have the withdrawals. You're GonNa have long then again to heck with it. and. You're GONNA see what why would inadequate goes through When they want that hit. And do you know before I forget that? There are so many overdoses as we all know, but there's something called nor can that you can go and get from a hospital police station whatever and you can. Get. It hold it. In case, somebody that you know od and you give it to them. That will save their why. So you have anybody in your family. Or your around that are using drugs or even you if you're using drugs. Cool gets an art can and hold. Keep it with you. Because you never know when you're going to need it. It's very, very important. People with addictions do not that. They don't think at all. They don't care. Well Wow, they are using. They don't care Sandra from prison. They don't care the end up in jail they don't even care ended up that. I hate to say that but that's how it is I how interviewed lot of addicts. A lot of recovering addicts. On into lottery ability center been to a lot of Narconon, A. R. eight meetings and I've experienced. My journey. Withdraws. Even though. I don't know how I have never been involved with it started when I was sixteen years old. How My. First Boyfriend, he wasn't an addict, but he was dealer. and has not naive is I was I didn't even know he was a dealer. But. there. Is something driving everybody. And as drives me. I've talked to the The head of my department because I'm getting ready to do what it's like a dissertation. But at the capstone, I'm doing it on addiction and I started talking more about those. I, notice and everything and I said sorry but I'm passionate about this she says I can tell. But even when all this is done and over with my school. I'm still gonNA wonder. Why they cannot give it up. People are so what? They think give it up with they want to. They don't they can't give it up. They're not even GONNA try to give it up. But. Again. One of my meetings I was at. This guy. Wasn't out and he went through five rehabilitation centers. Before demand, the heady Thomas. And now that's a really terrible thing. It's terrible for anybody to go. Wrong. But. You think about it. Do not being enabler. And then able or is where Like my first mother-in-law was unable or My husband would ask her like five bucks to go get a six pack of beer. And she would be behind his best throw me like five single stuff in there. You know he borrowed five bucks. You know she was his big enabler. And That wasn't going to help them get any better. I didn't notice when with awareness family. He didn't drink as much. But thing that. Soon as he could, he was right back in it again. And that's another thing I wanNA talk about to the people that are nasty ad but the addict. Girlfriend wife. Husband child mother father whatever with my experience. I was eighteen years old. He was twenty one who was really bad. Alcoholic which I didn't know he's very mean. And I did not know when I was getting into and I was an abused wife. Get Out of the situation as fast as you can. I don't care how old you are. Eighteen years old back in the seventies I. Thought Ahead I handle this I'm going to cure you know. Mo- gifts why. I didn't hear him. He almost killed me. I can't tell you how many times. I was put in the hospital from my own protection He would chase down the street and people would hear me screaming cops come running around the corner onto will. They couldn't arrest them. Because the peace bomb, which is now called her restraining order. The cops used to keep it they lost and they couldn't. Arrest Them. Gop Anybody's punching bag. Don't think that you're going to be able to. Cure Him. Don't think that he's GonNa give us the drugs off now my husband now was really funny. we met. And there was. Well. Let me back up. We knew each other in high school. And then we got. We met up again to some friends while. We were dating and it was near the holidays and drinking long. Island Nice teeth. And who come to my house and he's hassled on my couch. And I'm like I'm not going through this crap anymore no way. So I told him I said look I'm telling you right now. I'm done we're finished. He goes hundred five prove to that I'm not an alcoholic. I said all right. Go six months without answering. And I believe you're not an alcoholic. Well, after a couple of weeks I said, okay forget it. I know you're not in Oklahoma? you're during for the holidays which didn't help since senior that you know I've got a marriage that my you know was an abusive alcoholic. But No, he doesn't drink drink at all now. Well, not really but Yeah. This is something that you have to careful about because people and to go back into. The same type of relationship over and over and over and over again. I. Did. was they were friend? You know that had an addiction whatever. and. I don't know if it's my abilities and I just got done telling somebody that. My Bill. Anybody who has these types of bility's? They seem to always have to always getting dumped on. and. It's a because he ability because you know. We attract those people. I don't know. But. I know addiction is really really hard on everybody. Does not discriminate it does not discriminate. At all. You go in the house. A couple of. Drinks. That's fun or you can keep drinking. And then you know you have a problem. Just looks with crack cracked used to be the number one drug. Now heroin. If you take. Either one shot crap you're up. And heroin seems to be really killing. A lot of people lately. The last couple of years all I keep hearing. Is. Heroin Addiction. My nephew died drugs also. And it's It's unbelievable. I hear especially in the Pennsylvania area where I'm from. People, tell me. Oh. My God everybody on talking to is losing somebody over heroines. Thereof game. Are they putting something in that heroin. Or these people just taking too much heroin. And you know who I feel sorry for. I'm still really sorry for the people. that. Surround their loved one. That is the added. They don't know they should keep loving crime or if they should try tuft lot none of that's going to work. You could bag the Abbot wit. You can throw them out of your house. But that addicts it's not gonNA quit. Until something happens. To either they finally say, I'm going to beat us. And I know a lot of people's not going to agree with me because they're going to say she bull crap I can quit whenever I want my son told me that. And forty, some years old and he's still drinking. And I'm not just talking about the occasional aren't talking about. This of Jack Daniels, in the freezer fear in the refrigerator telling done. BOGUT DAHBI juice. Who Yeah? Addiction. Is Bad. Living With the addiction especially when you're not the addict. Is really really tough. Because that person changes from a nice person that you knew love. Into something that. You don't even recognize anymore. I believe me. Other than hard time person. and. Taking them out in the middle of the country and making them stay there for months we. It's one work. You know and these thirty day. Rehabilitation Center they make me. Laugh. Because you know what they say. When you go into the thirty day rehabilitation. You're meeting your next drug dealer. and. I've seen that happen in our per numerous drug addicts. Alcoholics. So anybody WHO's going to go into. A program. I would suggest that six months ago Brown the very least. or at least a month, I'm here. Teen. Challenge. Has. A. Year. Ovation. Army believe it or not they have a are. You know. Adult. Rehabilitation Center for men and women. You just have to look some have it ferments and have from women what They do how both And this guy on TV. Oh my God he gets me he's from I. Don't even know what were you have, but he turns around he goes. Oh I was an addict at one time, but I am no longer added you're always had padded. You cannot get rid of your diction. Once look up again. And you're using. The added Star. And? Relapse. or they're recovering addict. But. There is no such thing as I am non-annex knowing more. Because that person. If they go thirty years without a drinker drugs. They can still relax. I met a guy. At Hey. He was running the A. And says, Mary, I'll tell you. Hey because I have been playing for thirty. Five. Years. And I'm still afraid I'm gonNA realize. He says, I, see people coming in here. All, they can clean a day. They'RE GONNA say? Clean. They go in there to me women are men go are women going there to me? Man. You know NA meetings and AA meeting for recovery. Not For this. Not for meaning. The matter of fact when you get your first day. For years you're not even supposed to be in a relationship with anybody you're supposed to concentrate on yourself work the program gets the twelve steps were. Yes they do. If you work some, you stay away from the people that you've hung out with your friend you you know the area you can't. Sometimes, it's just an help though because I'm on people that move out of, say an ended up finding their drug dealer anyway. You know I mean. As long as you take the necessary steps and now they say you're damned and determine. Hopefully with the grace of God, you can do it. Some people cannot do it drinking. After, he found out, he has to Rosa's deliver. He refused another liver told him that he was going to continue to drink. I get a little bit mixed. From the family on this but apparently right before he died quit. I one thing he said to me is. The more you talk to somebody about their drinking. The more they're gonNA drink. That came from an addict. I'm never ever ever thought I, would ever hear those words from him. But I did. Little did I know he was on his done that though he didn't tell me he was dying. He asked me out to dinner when I came back up there again. But he never told me can't throw some little liver or he was dying. But please. If you're an addict. There's help out there. You can do it. You can get clean. brother-in-law he was my husband's brother. He was an alcoholic whole boy was him. You know hard I. Hit quit cold Turkey. And his enduring for thirty some years or more. I'm just quit cold Turkey. Didn't need a or didn't eat anything. Didn't you sponsor or I don't know how he did it and it's horrible. It really hard to believe. But he didn't. and that was really surprising. So. Do. Even if you're diverse smoker and you're addicted to cigarettes. You could do it. Do you know a lot of people and I tossed class in prison when I was a teacher their. Cigarette people turn around and I've done this myself. Oh, give me a cigarette coming diety. It'll come my nerve. Do you know actually make to be opposite. It makes you more nervous and more anxious. I'm surprised when I read that. And I told the in May so. You learn something new every day because I didn't know that. People. Are It to one thing or another? Be A addicted to? Candy Licorice. You could be. Addicted to Coca Cola or Pepsi or chocolate a lot of women you know, hey, give me the chocolate chocolate strawberry whatever. Everybody. Or pretty much everybody has some type of addiction. And they can argue with me. And that's fine. But I know for fat. That if you trying to stop something. And it's hard for you. Stop It. It's an addiction. I gave a Pepsi I stopped drinking for a while. I. Have Pepsi now and then or whatever. But I get stomach issues from too much soda and I'm also pre diabetic. So I'm not supposed to be drinking soda. Drink a little bit every once in awhile awhile overpriced like buying one and bring it home. For the most part I stay away from it. I don't have an addict personality. But there are some things that are harder for me to quit than others. So. Was I just cigarettes? Yeah. But I quit. And when I quit I have quit cold Turkey. Same thing with Pepsi you know. But. I was telling you I'm in I've been studying addiction long time. Anybody has any questions or anybody wants to talk to me about an addiction or somebody they love. It's an added. Let me know we'll. We'll talk. You know come to me and say, yeah, I, know I'm an addict I I know but I can't break it. So I'm just GONNA keep doing. That the The dust the car away out. If you know you have an addiction, you're going to do everything that you can. To overcome. And Yeah. You can ask people for help. There people that have died from the addiction and the families come to me I did everything that I could do to help him mom. And it didn't. What do I do? You know what did I do wrong There's nothing you get wrong. And if I would listen to my mother, she would always say, well, if that person time to go. Even though we hate to say that we hate you think. They were called back home, for reason. No. I had a besting in high school. You know. Crime that hung around with the girls I'm still friends with today. We never did drugs women even really dranked you know but. Hopefully. Years. Oh, man probably about ten years ago. I found out I had lost contact. With one of my best eat. And I noticed that her mother had A. Bit Wary. In the paper and I saw where my desk had died. And I was like what? So I gotTa hold a Holdover brother and she had died of a drug overdose. And we were. We were like half an hour from each other and I didn't even shoes there. I tried to find her but couldn't find her. And I found out that she got hooked on drugs and she was in and out of jail, and finally to walk, she didn't wake one morning. And? That's really it's really sad. When people do the? Yeah. No I. I. Wish there was A. A, Miracle Cure in wish there was a way. That I can just. Quitting my arms around all the people hurting and I. I know you're hurting. But what can you say to family? You know when they try to help that person and the first one. Just. So do anyway this blames themselves. And it's not the family. That's one thing that I've learned during all the. It's accountability. And the accountability and the responsibility is not the family. It is the accountability and the. The. Responsibility. Of? The addict. Did they choose that kind of life. where, they, trick. In. Trying drugs. Why did they suck drive? Why don't they start drinking. I believe my son started drinking just to show me he wouldn't make him an alcohol. Well, that's what. He's proved me right. He proved himself fall. And I don't know. I brought him up telling him his whole life. Not to get involved with alcohol. The because. There's the history family alcoholism I both sides actually. My grandfather returned rubbing alcohol just to get high. When he couldn't afford any beer. So. Yeah. And you know what they do in prison when? Believe this or not. Now we're number I work. Enterprise on and I work in the addiction part of the prison I was there she teacher but then when I started Going for my masters of going for counseling. So I was the counselor there. They will go to the nurse. They would get their daily medicine. If could be Ritalin, it could be a pain pill it could be anything. They would stick it under their tongue and hide it somehow. And they would leave they would spitting out in their hand. And they would give it to another inmate who wanted to get high. Or this town then when I was there and one of the Guy Oh did. But it was. Okay. He'll do, but he did not die from it. They're rushing to the hospital and next day he was back into the prison war. But you know what these ads do. In there besides the. If, they're taking stuff and they're getting high. There do per drug tests what do they do? They drink bleach. Don't do that. I'm just giving people this for knowledge do not do anything to drink weeks to try to get a clean drug tests do not. High pills and give them to other people. bevis this conversation is about this is a conversation about one length and addict will go to. To get their next tip to get their score. Do, they love you. These down. Yeah. They do. But when they're in the thrones of their addiction, the only thing they see. is their drug of choice. Bessie only thing they want. And They'll go get it. They'll be sorry later. But they all have their hit. And it's really sad. Addiction have ruined a lot of lives and it has taken this lady here. Many many many years. So trying to understand addiction. And you know what? By the time I'm done. I still don't think I'm GONNA understand it. My question would be. Why can't addict just stop? It because they don't want to or is it because they can't And even though studies show, there's a possibility is hereditary. My answer to that would be, yes I believe it's hereditary. From all the people spoke to him with the. To my own personal experiences. I think it's hereditary. Can you stop addiction no. You can't if you don't. Indulge. Cure for addiction. Even if you're clean. For thirty five years like guy. told me that the. And meaning. There's no care. FOR ADDICTS FOR LIFE We are just none out of we're in recovery. Do People Relapse, oh? Yeah. Yeah they do. They can be cleaned for forty years. And relapsed and their back right were before. and. That is really. Where we're at with. Addiction. You know if you go and you fall in love with somebody, you have a baby with that person. You have to check everything anymore. What's the family like? What's the father life what? What's he going to be like If he's not to rubber I mean there's so many people out there anymore having babies here and there and deserting them that you could be married to your own brother and not even know it. You know so you really have to invest getting yourself into. And your potential children. Be is there's also medical issues that go on that. You're not. You know you need to know about you need to know the medical history of the family so you know what you're facing or possibly facing. So all the people they're. Better, listening tonight or that we'll be listening to this show. If you yourself. Or someone else who is an addict do not do that. Remember it is not. Your. All. We had an accountability class and the person and this guy he'd been in prison for twenty years. Oh my gosh. WHO's an African Americans He's the nicest guy I mean. I have protectors in jail and he was one of them. He was built big was toll and he was the nicest guy. And he goes on going home my mom's GonNa. Make. Me Some Collard Greens and my favorite dinners Collard Greens that masks head or that, and he's listening all this school. And I'm sitting there thinking Oh that's really nice. You know. Within thirty days back in the system. He wasn't even on prison two weeks. And he was back in again. He wants back to his old neighborhood he got involved with his old friend. He was feeling. Back ears again. Prison it's like revolving door. and. This guy. was. Clean. For. Twenty. Years. All it took Kim was. I'll say probably, not even day. Out. And He was using in dealing. and. That is really that's the bad situation. But remember. Don't blame yourself I somebody else being an addict. The only way you can blame yourself as you washed it down them. Do I blame my husband. Sonko for that for my husband being an alcoholic if I do. Why because seven-year-old knows better When he got older, he could've quit. Yeah. But by then I think he was too far gone. because. That's all he knew. That's all he knew was. I shot a whiskey. And Beer. I saw him his uncle and his friend. There and drink I sixteen. Wow. A whiskey. With beer chaser. They could barely walk. I'm surprised sitting. Die. But again. I'm not responsible for my and I'm not responsible for my son. It's their choice as much as her. To know that my son is an alcoholic. There's not a Dang thing I. can you know? Seeing that I can do for anybody there's not anything new can do for anybody. If somebody comes up to you and says, Hey, honor. Hey, mom or dad. I believe I have a drug problem. Yes, you can take them. To a drug center. Rehabilitation Center. a mental health facility. They're gonNA. June. Intake on them. And they're going to decide the trial you were the person has an addiction or not. But by the time that person coming to you and telling you, I think I have an addiction. They haven't addiction. I'm for. In knowing. that. There could be alive at the end of the tunnel. You're addict. May. Get Clinton. And they clean. That is all that we can do is pray. And Hope to God. that. These addicts real-life was going on. And they get the help that they. I think. My own personal opinion. Is that they should legalize all drugs. and. You're saying what? What does she been? All wrong yeah I think they should legalize all drugs. And here's my philosophy for that. The reason I think they should because once is out there. No out there for a while, you're not gonNA want it anymore. Why because of legal? Do you remember when you were twenty one. Oh Man I can go buy liquor legally. You walk into the. We have called state stores, but liquor stores and. You're buying worker. How there's no fun enough. So. It's GONNA number one. Wear off. To. If the person's still gonNA. Be. Using they're going to be using anyway so it doesn't matter. But. We'll put the drug dealers out of business. And they're the ones that yeah, children. Involved there's one in Rehab saying, Hey, when we get out here I come fix you'll put some good stuff. The drug dealers. We'll be out of business so fast or heads on. They won't know what to do and you know why? A drug dealer. Of them will not become addicts. Because then they'll use their profit. There's a lot of money to be made in drugs. Oh, yeah. There is, and when they push push and push, they're gonNA. Keep you got one. And the money's GONNA keep coming in. And out of going give. A phone. To, drug dealer drug dealer taking give him a hit whatever they want. And they can use the phone until the person who owns it turns it off or runs out of money. So just think about it. Sit down. Get. It Pencil and paper. And just start writing. Because this is not your fault. This is not on your shoulders. This is not your burden to carry. I have learned. At least that much. I have learned that people have choices to make. And sometimes they the wrong choice. They WANNA. Go out partying with bodies or their knock something or they'll hey, only tried this one. Yeah, and they're hooked. But while they're going down, you do not need to go down with them addiction as hell. We, all have some type of addiction. But. Drug and Alcohol Addiction. Is, the worst kind of addiction that you can how? You can tolerate the burnt you've been telling right chocolate candy. I was only trying to make the point. On everybody having addiction. You can tolerate bad. But it drug. A drug addiction and alcohol addiction it makes people into somebody that they're not. And it makes the family it breaks up family. You. It's they say it's a disease. There's also people that base not into cities. There's so many people. So many. Studies out there. That they don't know. They don't know. Kim An addict stop if they want to. It's impossible for an addict to stop why should somatic DOPP and so matt can't. Why some people smoke pot and some people shooting heroin. Why some people do math. And some do Hash. There's no simple answer to any of these questions. One thing I can say is almost almost positive of. It is hereditary. I have studied and studied and is. Man I hab interviews, many many people. And yes, I do believe it is hereditary. And people out there that are not added but they love an avid there's healthier for few too. You can go to Alanon you can go to Nor nor. Nor not. And Talk to them. Just like Your. Average to go to a money. But you have to go to and you get to tell them what's going on and the best part of it. It's usually closed where nobody has to know. There's Silence with them. So. If you WANNA talk to you minister, you don't WanNa talk to account. So you don't WanNa talk to your best friend. Go to a meeting. And I'm, not talking, about online. Because I've check them out to and some of them are BS. Go Talk to somebody. Who talked to somebody who's been in your shoes? Don't take. Don't keep that Wayne walked in you. It was their choice and its builder choice. Until they. Decide to choose. To get the help nothing. But in the meanwhile, you carry yourself, get the help that you need. Because when you have an addict in the family. Unfortunately everybody suffers. And everybody. and. Enabling them one way or the other. So once you think about what I said going and I also challenge you. The one week though one thing. That you cannot go without whether it be coffee soda. Chips Cookies Candy whatever it is. You will see one added goes through with redraw with withdrawal. Is Not. Easy. Nobody said it was easy. Life is not easy. But. You know why? It's it in the end. If you just understand and you feel. How they are. How they're feeling. We don't sympathize now. He's you don't want to get back going again. You want to be healthy yourself. That person comes to you and says, I need help you can help that person. Take care of yourself. Get the meeting if you need it, do what you gotTa do for you. Work on yourself don't be drug down. You don't want to be dragged down into that. As. A bottomless pit, which is not going to help anybody. So if you have any questions. You can always get me on facebook. And answer what I can't answer for you. But you have babies the taste as well as your at. And if you're the addict. please. Think about getting yourself clean. Well. I hope I helped somebody out here tonight at least to I don't really just talking about addiction which I mean that's what I was going to do. I wanted to thank you for coming in having the evening with Dr Mary Barrett, which is me, and I hope to see you again next week. I'm not sure of the title of next week but you can't always well. You can always call in for reading. Okay. So just go ahead remember when I said. And Sleep on it. And please. Be Guilt free. Because this is not your choice. Just, the addicts choice. Again. Thank you so much for calling, coming in and listening and being in the chat room tonight. Evening with Dr Mary. Barrett loopy. Every Wednesday central. Eight Eastern. And I hope that you will call and talk to me. Or even asking. That were. Actually, in the chat room. Okay. Well, all I can say, good night. And God bless you and we. Think about everything that I said, tonight. Okay take care and we will see you again next week. Thank you all for being here.

heroin Facebook Dr Mary Cure Pepsi Unity College McDonald Kim Dr Mary Barra drug overdose Rehabilitation Center Dr Mary Barrett Oklahoma McDonalds Alanon Sandra
AP One Minute Headlines Nov 26 2018 19:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

02:00 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Nov 26 2018 19:00 (EST)

"The holiday tips and wine stories from Paul Kristen and Dexter at total wine and more my top tip. Not all gifts have to be for others, treat yourself. Chris whites. Like, a floral Soviet-bloc pairs, perfectly, shrimp, cocktail and other light appetizers. Now. That's how you kick off the holiday meal, most adults smile and average of twenty times a day. Make that Twenty-one for someone you love with the perfect bottle from total wine and more. Whether you're entertaining or just bringing the wine, we'd love to share are always low prices and ridiculous election with you this holiday, total wine and more. Cheers in Mississippi. I'm Tim Maguire. The news President Trump is campaigning in Mississippi for Republican Senate appointees, Cindy Hyde Smith during a rally in Tupelo Trump talked about getting congress to approve more money for his border wall. Actually started big sections of the wall. But we wanna finish the wall. We gotta get funding from congress and of this is in the right time to get funding. When you look at what's happening at the border. They'll never be a right time a runoff election between Hyde Smith and democrat, Mike Espy, a former congressman and Agra. Culture secretary is tomorrow before leaving the White House. Trump told reporters he's not happy with GM CEO, Mary Barra after the company decided to eliminate some fourteen thousand white collar jobs and issue plaza close five North American plants. They say the Chevy Cruz is not selling. Well, I say, well, then get somebody to get a car that is selling well and put it back in the plant in Lordstown, Ohio that makes a Chevy Cruze compact car is on the possible closure list. I'm Tim Maguire. Holiday tips and wine stories from Kristen, and Paula total wine and more a paired with lobster, mashed potatoes. Simply delicious how good with wines. Put it this way. My mother-in-law now loves me for introducing her favorite wine. Now, there's nothing I can't deal. Whether you're entertaining or just bringing the wine, we'd love to share are always low prices with you this holiday. Cheers, come explorer are twelve northern Virginia locations now open and rest in plaza, America's center across from wholefoods shop online at totalwine dot com.

Tupelo Trump Tim Maguire Cindy Hyde Smith Paul Kristen Mississippi congress Chevy Dexter Chris whites secretary Virginia America Mike Espy White House Lordstown Mary Barra President congressman Agra Senate
Morning Brief for Friday, October 11th

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Morning Brief for Friday, October 11th

"Eh indeed dot com slash W. J. that's indeed dot com slash W. S. J. I'm Charlie Turner in New York for the Wall Street Journal we'll be monitoring the are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your short list of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today wsj.com or the WSJ APP indeed used by over three million businesses for hiring post a job today at indeed was vying for the Democratic nomination promised Ukraine one billion dollars to fire a prosecutor looking into a Ukraine gas company with ties to his son Hunter Biden the strike against General Motors into its twenty-six day Gamco Mary Barra met this week with the United Auto Workers President Gary Jones to jump educated claim about former vice president Joe Biden's role in the ouster of Ukrainian prosecutor the ad which CNN rejected last week alleges Mr Biden and Mr Jones since the strike began both sides are reportedly still working to resolve differences on several issues including wages and new higher pay for more headed stocks rose yesterday on hopes for an agreement Mr Trump said of Thursday's trade talks quote we had a very very good negotiation comcast's NBC starts stalled contract talks Ms Bar called the meeting with Mr Jones concerned. The union had yet to respond to the company's latest proposal this is the first meeting between Ms Barra see universal won't continue to air trump reelection campaign ad on any of its cable networks unless changes are made to the spot the thirty second commercial contains an unsubstantiated Congress of trade negotiations Friday between President Trump and Chinese vice premier lou the two will attempt to reach a deal in a bid to head off tariff scheduled to take effect next Tuesday.

Hunter Biden Gamco Mary Barra Gary Jones Mr Trump Ukraine Wall Street Journal vice president prosecutor President United Auto Workers New York comcast W. S. J. General Motors Ms Bar NBC wsj.com CNN Charlie Turner
The 5 Factors of a Booming Culture | Jason Forrest

The LEADx Show

29:11 min | 1 year ago

The 5 Factors of a Booming Culture | Jason Forrest

"Would you like to accelerate your career and reach your full potential in just minutes? A day. Welcome to the lead, ex yo with New York Times bestselling author and eat five hundred entrepreneur Kevin cruise. Hey guys, Kevin crews here. Welcome to the lead X leadership show, where we help you to stand out and to get ahead at work. Now, as you know, we like to switch things up here. Keep it interesting. And it continue that tradition today on the podcast, instead of me interviewing, an expert guest. We're going to have the guest deep dive into their topic. You see. You'll be hearing audio from a lead X webinar. Now, of course, there are dozens of great webinars on leadership management communication productivity, and more all archived in the lead X app, just visit lead x dot org. For more information about our webinar archive, so enough on the setup enough background information here is Vanya Mathis to introduce our guest and handed over to them. Enjoy the key to lasting leadership in profit is strong employee engagement, and the Keita strong employee engagement is a culture that continually. Generates leaders who are better than the generation before. That's why the five factors of a booming culture, will unleash you and your team are host today is the owner and CEO afforest performance group, the nation's fastest growing sales training company. He's a leading thority in culture change programs and an expert at creating high performance, high profit and best place to work cultures the winner of seven international Stevie awards for his training programs. He's also an award winning author of six books, including leadership sales coaching, which was rated as one of selling power magazine's top sales books in two thousand eighteen his company FPG was named to the Inc. Five thousand fastest growing private companies list for the third consecutive year, one of just twelve hundred companies nationwide to achieve that honour out of more than seven million, please, welcome Jason Forrest. This is Jason Forrest. I wanna talk about today, the five factors of a booming culture. Before we, we talk about. The five factors right now. We think about how would you define what a culture really is? You know, to me might finish culture, is what happens behind the bosses back. You know, right now, if you have the culture, you want that means that you've, you know with a hundred percent certainty that your employees your team are doing exactly what they need to be doing as if you were right there next next to them. If for some reason, you're unsure about that, of course, is the gap, that's the culture that you don't want. And so we've done is we've studied, the five factors that create the most profitable culture that's out there because if you think about it, the number-one profit leak, and your organization is not your marketing. It's not your innovation. It's not it's not your vendor cost that your number one prophet leak is your people's productivity, and we have proven through our research is that if you can create a culture that people want to work for, and you can actually increase your profitability through. Your people's productivity now. What's interesting about me is that for last ten years. I've created a company called f p gene FPG stands for force performance group in we're all about unleashing human performance. Not potential. You know, a lot of our competitors talk about, it's all about getting people to realize their full potential, while I think that's the beginning, not the end of actually great training. The, the great training is all about. How do we get people to perform at their very best, not just know that they can achieve more and culture has a lot to do with that? When I first started my company, it was all about sales training, and it was all about going in there and showing people how to sell which we still do that, where the fastest growing sales training company in North America by Inc magazine. But when I realized is that we would go in there and create these, these sales, interventions would go in there. And we would we would show an organization how to increase their their sales. We'd have a tremendous gain changing results. And of course, after a couple of years of being with them they decided to go on their own. And of course, all of the previous sales success, went back to before FPG's prevention. Is that woman? I realized that we needed to do something about the culture when you have to change the culture, so that the intervention actually a took. Hold on. Let me give you an example. You think of you think of the celebrities out there, like Demidov Atto or east liberty who's, who's maybe gone in and out of rehab programs. You know what happens is they go into rehab program and they be completely cleansed of the drugs that they're on. They get rehabbed. And then what happens they go back into the neighborhood hanging around the same people that they hate they hung around with before the rehab. And of course, they go back to pre rehab addictions. Well, same thing goes with culture. Is that in order to really create a changed initiative? You have to make sure that the culture is reinforcing. What you are wanting. Give me another, another example of why is it that it's one hundred percent illegal to drink and drive yet yet right now, if you go to any seven eleven any kind of gas station on a Friday? There's going to be single forty ounce beers that a person can purchase on the checkout. I mean, everyone knows that no one buys a single forty ounce beer to wait until they get home. If that's the case they're going to get a six pack right? So why is it that it's illegal to drink and drive, yet all these gas stations are still selling single forty ounce beers that everyone knows the people are going to drink that on the way home again because the culture is always in control? It has nothing to do with the rules in the regulation has everything to do with your culture. It's socially acceptable to do the things you would like your people to do. They're going to do it. If it's not socially acceptable, that, of course, they're not going to do it is, again, the culture's always in control. So I'm going to show you the five. Factors that we all need to adopt and really reinforce in order to create that culture. And then at the end talk about a game changing program that we actually just won a Stevie award for the best leadership development program in the world, just this, this past year on, how do you create leaders? They can impact this kind of culture because that's of course the that's, that's the that's the whole x factor. The five factors are efficacy goals approach relationships in altruism. Agai- poughkeepsie goals approach relationship altruism. Let's go through all five very quickly. So I was ethics let me give you an example been Zander is considered to be the, the most successful conductor of all times. He's the conductor of the Boston Philipon orchestra. And in even though he can't play every single instrument and he actually was his, his natural instrument is the is the cello. What he realizes that his job is to unleash. Ish and to bring out the best in each of his musicians if even known whatever here been Zander, play a single note. His job is to play through them is to show them, how their individual effort makes a difference to show them how they can be the best versions of themselves, which is really all about efficacy. The next one is goals. Now, this is Mary Barra now. Mary Barra is the CEO General Motors. And she is also considered to be one of the most powerful leaders in the world based on fortune. Here's a cool story about Mary Barra, which he first started her career at, at General Motors, she started as an intern. But when she starts an intern thirty something years ago she had this goal and this goal was someday. I wanna be a senior executive leader of General Motors. I wanna be that person she was very laser focused on what she was trying to accomplish how she was in the get there. And why was important her? Why does that matter because it's? Portent that we create more Mary Barra's out there. We've got to have an organization culture, where everyone is very laser focused on what they're supposed to be doing by when how they're going to get there in, of course. What, what help do they need, what obstacles from the way? And how can you help them, of course as a leader? The third is approach when it comes to the factor of approach when, when as relates to cultures think of think of a Formula, one racing team of most successful, teen of all times is Ferrari, and in what's crazy is, if you actually ask yourself, okay, what's the average time that it takes to pit a Ferrari? Right. So, so the cars flying in the pit crew has to change all four tires. We know that the, the average time the fastest times one point nine two seconds. I mean think about that. Can you imagine getting twenty people's all work together in one point nine two seconds to change all four tires? Well, it's all about approach approaches. The approach of how we execute business on a daily basis. How are we working together as a team to be more efficient and effective with what we do? So I wanna ask you the critical thinking on right now and that is how's your team working together? Convey accomplish your goals based upon the approach how they're running their business, how doing their day to day tasks as efficiently and effectively as for Ari. The next one is relationships. Now relationships are obviously key in, in business. But I was supposed to be talking about the relationship of mentor ship so Oprah, as we know Oprah's considered to be the most successful talk show, host of all times. But when she first started, she had a mentor, and that mentor was Phil Donahue, and what she did is she went to fill, and she said, hey, Phil, you're currently the best talk show host on the planet. And so, I surrendered to you, I need you to put me under your wing. I wanna I wanna learn how to be you in my own way. Of course. And so fill host her along the way, even to this day Oprah. Will say the reason why she's Oprah that we know today is because of Phil Donahue, so again, thinking about your own organization right now or Ukraine culture where people have mentor ship, where we're, you're aligning people to work together. And of course, you're giving them the right coaching the right skills on. How can they be mentor? It's not just telling them to be mentors. But it's actually teaching them how to be the right mentor. The next one is altruism, altruism is, is getting people to work for a higher purpose where it's more than just a paycheck. Now, this is huge because of our Baleno population. We have right now right now in twenty nineteen. The average company has more millennials working for them than any other generation now millennials on everyone to write this down Baleno will always choose purpose over profit. So right now, for example, if, if you've got eight if you can show your lineal, and really, it's any individual right? You can show your individual ploy. Louis how their effort makes a difference in how what they're specifically doing is contributing to something greater. And in in how your company is on a mission to accomplish something greater whatever that calling is, you can show them that, then they create this, this, this kind of extra energy, this extra motivation. We're gonna everyday they're called to work for you and serve what you're doing versus again. It's just a paycheck, the lowest level of loyalty and Lois level of productivity for any employee is the loyalty of, I'm loyal to the paycheck, if that's all I care about, then, of course you want to raise the loyalty to loyalty to your brand, and then loyalty to the cease, we'd the CEO and president in the new would be loyal. So the department had, which is their direct supervisor last, it's loyal to loyal to to their team. You know, a great organizations are loyal to each other. But again, it starts with the idea of, of altruism. Okay. So, again, those are the five those are the five factors. And so now. Do I want I want to show you how you can make a media changes starting today on impacting those five factors? Now in order to do that, you need to recognize that the single most important variable in creating a profitable culture, is your leader. Now a leader has a lot of impact, right? Because think about this. You know, we, we most of us, we became a leader because it was the next thing in our career path, not, because we had a calling, and the thing that I teach leaders, all the time is I wanna leader to recognize that a leader is all about. It's all about influencing. It's all about legacy. You know, if if a leader realizes their job is to, to create a legacy to impact people's belief systems, then then everything changes for them again, become more of a calling that it becomes a title. And that's what leadership is all about. And so, so right now you can see a graphic here. This is what we call our results matrix. And this is really how how the. Human behavior works. And so, if you ever wondering why one person outperforms other person or does things that person does doesn't do. Well, that's because of this results matrix. So the bottom level on the right hand side, you can see your team, and you can see that programming is what they've been told to be true, so programming, of course, comes from their culture, or comes from other parents comes from the books they've read the college, they attended their peers or family. Well, that drives their beliefs, do they believe there are enough. They believe they're not enough do that drives their emotions. They have emotions of confidence, and certainty and hope or do they have a motions of fear and worry and dread. That, of course, drives their motivation, do they have a want to motivation or have to motivation. So I want to do these things, or I have to do these things where I'm going to get fired. And then, of course, that drives behaviors are do they have productive in initiate type behaviors or do they have more of a weight type behavior. And of course. Drives your KPI's, which are your results. Now, the reason why I think is important is because the single most influential person on your employees programming is the leader. So it's what your leader does to them, and how they treat them and how they talk to them is actually creating programming. And so we want to teach your leaders, how to be better programmers. How to be better hackers? And the reason why use the word hacker is because think of computer what does a hacker? Do they go to computer system? They rewire it to, to do what it with the hacker wants to do now. Most people think of a hacker from a negative perspective, but I want you to think of a hacker from a positive perspective is the right now. Your leaders are hacking, your employees, regardless, if you like it or not, some of them are hacking them to do the right things. The things that are about the line that things that are profitable for you. And other leaders are hacking them to do things that are below the line. And of course, not profitable. A regardless your employees are being hacked by your leaders every single day. So it's important, of course, to teach leaders, how to, to do the right things. So let me give me let me give you another example of that. And I'm going to show you how to how to pull that off. So a traditional three sixty that most people have probably taken their career is the three sixteen it evaluates how the leader is performing from the employee perspective. So a normal three sixty will say, hey Paul. Paul, my boss is a very hard worker, or Paul is very, he's very focused or very goal oriented, well, the problem is it doesn't matter what people say about Paul, what matters is what Paul is causing his people to do. So what matters more is if Paul's a hard worker, can't he program. His employees to be a hard worker if Paul has high integrity, can he program, his employees. To have high integrity and so forth. So that's what we're really working on when it comes to this. And so let's talk about how to how to bring this to life, so many go back through the five factors. I'm gonna give you examples to the first one is efficacy. Remember, it's all about efficacy is does my effort make a difference. Do I understand the cause and effect relationship that when I do blank it causes blank, and the effect is blank research has said that if people understand the cause and effect of their behaviors then they're more likely to repeat the behaviors win the is not around? They don't understand how the connection works that, of course they're going to do it sometimes not at all. So something that we do at PG in our clients do is every Friday. We have a thing called. I'm freaking awesome, happy hour. Now, of course, did the word freaking. Awesome is not your culture. You can use something different. I'm awesome. Or however, you want to do it. But we haven't think I'm freaking awesome, happy hour in its where every person in the week on a Friday. It's it's required meeting the last of the day goes around, and they validate. One other employees across functional on something. They did. They saw them do that was great. They also affirm themselves using the statement. I'm freaking awesome. Because I did blank that caused blank and the effect is blank. I'm freaking awesome because I did blank that caused blank and the effect is blamed, so again, remember your brain is constantly being hacked. And so the most the person who has the most influence over an employee's belief system is, is their own self talk. And so if I can get their self talk to say why the freaking awesome in the causing effect. Again, it creates that hacking rewires the neural hard-drive. And then, of course if their manager their leader is validating, those things, or their peers are valid and those things, again, they're getting that social that social proof. Emmer earlier, I talked about one gets socially acceptable, do the right thing. Well, this is an example, of course how you can do that to change your culture, the next factor of. Goals in what we do and FPG. And what we teach is how to have it. What's called a daily huddle. And so there's forcible questions that we use in our daily huddle. It's a fifteen minute huddle every department does it on a daily basis? And they answer four questions. And that is today. I want to accomplish blank by win. So today, I'm gonna -ccomplish this what accomplish by win. Number two wise, unimportant, number three. How are you going to get there? And before who's help. Do you need like we're you stuck who's coaching? You need most of the time. People are stuck crossed partly so sales needs for marketing, or marketing needs something from research, application, development department or operations. And so that's the stuff that will come up. I will tell you one of the secrets of the most profitable organizations is how fast they can make decisions. And so we believe that the longest it takes for us to make a decision or to get get something unstuck is only twenty four hours, most organizations take weeks, of course, to get something unstuck. And so, again, goals are very focused keeps your your resume. Nation very focus just like that. Mary barra. The third one is approach approaches again, how we run our business. And so you can see this as an example of that daily huddle that I was talking about where everyone's standing up for fifteen minutes, and they're working through their strategies for the day, and they're getting coached the person's looking at the screen right now. That's Mary Marshall, she's the president of FPG. And so these these, she's running her huddle her huddle right now. And then those department heads will then go have huddles with their individual employees. And so we get worked very, very fast. Everyone's on the same page, and everyone is getting gained time coaching every single day. And you might be thinking, gosh, it seems like a lot of meetings will it's actually not because we're actually since we only need every day for fifteen minutes. We actually end up having less means than most people, but we're getting we're getting things done faster and more efficiently. The next one is relationships. The most important thing I think when it comes to having above the line impactful relationships is always ask yourself the question, what is the positive intention of? Of this person because behind every behavior is a positive attention. So, for example, let's say you've got an employee, who is you feel like doing something kind of below the line. So let's say me, you have a sales person who is not on board with your CRM system. That happens sometimes right? Your customer relationship management system, and they're not putting everything in when it comes to paperwork, what, what's their positive attention? Because then you go in it from a negative perspective and say, well, there's being defiant will, again, you can't change the behavior. But if you can go in San okay? What's a positive attention? You'll probably find out that, that they wanna make sales happen as fast as possible, which is a great positition because that's what their job is will, then you're able to coach them because you wanted to make sales as fast as possible to, and they probably don't see the benefit of your CRM. And so then it's, it's about showing them how your CRM can improve their efficiency, and actually help them achieve their positive attention, which is to sell to sell product and services faster. But again, always. Go in assuming the, the positive intention, don't ever go in sumit, someone's doing something intentionally negative. This is a much more effective approach, and the final one is L tras. And so we can altruism is all about creating a culture where people can live out their highest purpose. And this is more than just a job for them. We have interns, all the time, lineal interns, that work for us for free. And they will tell us that most organizations they go to work because they have not they want. They want to we have employees that say they like to escape life to come to work because FPG is their sanctuary. We've won the best place to work in Fort Worth now, three years, and one of the best places to work in Texas and by Inc magazine, as well as with the fast growing Companies inC, and so it is possible to create profitable organization, that's high growth and a best place to work along time ago. People thought they had to choose one of the three they got the best place to work, but people weren't very productive and didn't create a lot of revenue or. You could create a lot of revenue and have horrible place to work with turnover. And we've really proven that to be untrue. And I called the, the, the unicorn trifecta us the ultimate goal of every business leader success is to have those three things best buy so work fast of your growth and of course profitability. So the final one is L tras them. This is based on the six human needs psychology. This is like the maslow's hierarchy of needs of all version. So every human being wakes up every day and says, how do I accomplish my six human needs? Certain t-o-n full safe growth. I want to feel like I'm getting better contribution. I if like and making a difference variety, I wanna feel like there's change in my life things get too boring. I want some change connection. I want to feel like I'm connected to higher purpose or connected to my friends, and people that care about me insignificance, I wanna feel like I'm making a difference that I'm important. I matter so something we'd do it. FPG is we can give this to you. If you Email us, just emails at sales at FPG dot com. Sales at FPG dot com. An Email, if you would like. Can give you our culture survey where we evaluate every employee or every every employee evaluates us based on the six Uman need psychology. And then their leader wants a quarter meets with them to go over there. Six human means and FPG meeting meeting those needs. And if not what we do to improve. And so it works really well for us again, the goal is, how can you create employees that are very addicted to your brand into your organization? I heard a great align recently from a speaker. And she said, do you have a culture where where your employee's want to wear a t shirt with your logo on it? Those are really great question. Do you even a culture where your employees want to wear a t shirt with your logo? And if you create an ultra some culture and you critical these five factors, they're gonna wanna they're going to want to be a brand ambassador for you, which, of course, is huge. All right. Well. My last story in the novel. Have a couple of final thoughts, here is this. And that, that is these are my two kids, Mary, Jane Saunders in, I grew up in Texas and, and prescribing horses. And so I wanted to teach my two kids how to ride a horse. And so we go out there to a ranch and Jairo Wrangler. And he says he says let me ask you how, how comfortable are your kids riding horses? And he says, how about Saunders and I said, well, Senator ridden worse before, but he's definitely capable of, of. He's got courage, and he wants to learn how to do it. He says, no problem we're going to put put Saunders on a two thousand twelve model horse. So definitely not a younger model horse. What about Mary, Jane James Lamar skittish, but she definitely will try anything and all right. We're gonna put Mary Jane on the two thousand eight worse, a little bit older horse again, little more subdued. And of course I got the youngest the youngest worse. So it's about four o'clock in the afternoon. And we're writing and immediately the horses are getting restless because they win they get back and they wanted to eat. And so we kept telling the kids, you know, control your horse control your Boris because the horses kept wanting to turn and go will immediately saw. Force starts taking off and running towards the stable and the ringer says Mr. forest stay with your daughter. I've got your son will, of course, Mary Jane's horse starts taking off just the same and following Sandra source back to the food. And I think I've got to figure this out, so I immediately kicked, my voice grab the reins of Mary Jane's worse and put her back in submission and get trained back line. Well, so now we're all back on the trail. Again. Everything is fine. And Mary, Jane yells at me and says, dad, dad dad, you know, please just have your horse and I said, why your horses, so gentle and easy writing? And my worse is so unstable. And I said, Mary, Jane. You have a two thousand eight horse as I have a brand new horse, Mike worse, as lots of energy and is very young. It's very much. It's much harder to control, but as Mary Jane, I'm you to know something about horse riding, and that is that it's not about the horse. It's all about the writer. It's not about the horse about the writer. It's about now. Let's see, I think that's a great kind of leadership philosophy right? Because, you know, I think leaders it's all about the energy. Fourth it's all about taking control. It's all about our presence. And when our horses are employees, kinda get outta line or they get unstable, or they uncertain, it's leadership presence. It's all about giving them that certainty. That's all the horse needs not case. All employees needs all human beings. They need certainty. And when certainly has lost all is lost. And so if PG we've developed a program, again, that's one the, the best executive Elon program in the world. A forty countries just this past past month. And if you go to f p g executive playbook dot com. So again, f p g executive playbook dot com. You can course, get more information about what we do, but will it's a whole program where we take your leaders through a development process, showing them the impact they're making based upon the survey in the data, and then we have a program, which we coach them along the way through videos through follow up, and through coaching calls on how to become a leader that people wanna follow how to become a lead. Her that, of course, encompasses all of these five factors. So that's it. So again, right now, my parting words to each of you is that again, you might not have signed up to be this leader. I know when I was told to be leader. I took it for the wrong reasons I took it because I thought it was the next level of my career, it was until years later, that I realized I was making an impact in causing of my employees to believe a certain way, and it was only, then I decided to take control over my life and become the leader that I needed to become and so, so starting today be that leader be the leader of that people wanna follow the leader that hacks, your people to become above the line be profitable. And of course, love what they do on a daily basis. Thanks a lot. Friends if you'd like this episode of the lead X, leadership podcast, please take a minute. Leave a rating on itunes or Stitcher ratings are invaluable for attracting new listeners, and I like to convert those listeners into leaders because, you know, I'm on a mission to spark one hundred million leaders in the next ten years. And if you want to become the boss, everyone fights to work for, and nobody wants to leave checkout the lead x platform with coach. Amanda at lead dot org. And if you have ten or more managers who could use some binge worthy training. Send me an Email at info at lead. X dot org. Elliott x dot ORG, and we'll talk about getting you set up with a totally free pilot for those managers. See if they like it if they don't that's fine. We go away part as friends, but if they love it, you've just found yourself and new resource for them. Remember leadership is influence your. Always leading. Today.

FPG Paul Mary Jane Mary Barra FPG sales training Stevie intern Jason Forrest gene FPG Inc magazine General Motors Phil Donahue New York Times FPG dot CEO Mary Oprah executive CEO afforest performance group
Why 46,000 Auto Workers Are on Strike

The Journal.

20:17 min | 1 year ago

Why 46,000 Auto Workers Are on Strike

"After weeks of frustration in contract negotiations forty six thousand autoworkers walked out on General Motors on Monday. Guillaume hasn't seen strike like this in more than a decade union leaders are angry that their demands for a bigger share of GM's prophets better healthcare and a promise that factories won't close those aren't being met on the other side of the table. GM management which is living in the shadow of the company's two thousand nine bankruptcy in government bailout and GM led by CEO. Mary Barra is dedicated to making sure the company stays profitable strong. General General Motors is the best way for me to provide and maintain the ninety thousand plus jobs that we have across the United States today on the show a legacy labor union union and a legacy car manufacturer are at odds what both sides want and why they wanted welcome to the Journal our daily show about money business and power. I'm Kate Lime and I'm Ryan Knutson. It's Thursday used as September nineteenth. Christina Rogers is the Wall Street Journal's Detroit Bureau chief. I have covered. Gm Ford and Fiat Chrysler I've been an auto journalist for nearly a decade now and this is actually my third round of labor talks but your first strike yes. It's my first strike. What was your reaction to this. Were you surprised by the the decision to do it. No I wasn't wasn't surprised. There's been a lot building. I mean you have a confluence of events here you have these tech companies are trying to muscle into the car business and like you also have new technologies that are becoming required like electric cars because of emissions requirements and so it's trained to make sure it has the cash to invest in the future. The future is becoming expensive and the thing with GM the other other Detroit carmakers is there really vulnerable to the industry's boom bust cycle. I mean basically for decades that the companies you know they have at this period of extreme profitability when things are good when the economy's good and people are buying cars and then if the economy weekends all of a sudden the whole thing thing turns on its head and they can go from very profitable year is to losing money in a short period of time the current conflict between the UAW W. N. G. M. Actually has its roots in the economy's last August. The two thousand eight great recession and both sides are looking at what happened then as they think about the future. GM had been struggling even before the recession in two thousand seven the company posted a loss thirty nine billion dollars and by two thousand nine it sales fell by almost thirty percent such bad sales and such big losses brought the company company to its knees. Today is the day that capitalism capsized the symbol of American industry. General Motors is bankrupt once the world's largest corporation and now GM hopes to emerge from bankruptcy a smaller company that makes vehicles people want to buy the break it was the culmination of kind of this like long slide jam had for years had numerous challenges one of them being very high cost of labor they had too many factories they were stuck doc in the cycle overbuilding cars and then having to heavily discount them and that year GM turn to the government for help and filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy in the midst of a deep recession and financial crisis the collapse of these companies would have been devastating for countless Americans what's and done enormous damage to our economy beyond the auto industry is also because the auto industry is so crucial to American manufacturing factoring in the economy the government stepped in and invested fifty billion dollars in GM to help the company rebuild working with my auto task force. GM eminent stakeholders have produced a viable achievable plan the we'll give this iconic American company a chance to rise again and and after it was all over and GM was out of bankruptcy the company's leaders needed to figure out how to never let that happen again that bankruptcy was really traumatizing for leaders at GM. I mean the memories of that are still really fresh. GM's currency. Oh Mary Barra came in a few years after the crisis assist in two thousand fourteen to get the company into shape she was brought in to be a change agent to really change the culture and make it more proactive. You've really kind of make it more forward thinking so Mary Barra. She made major headlines because she's a first female executive to run a car. Our company and she's also electrical engineer. She's what we call in Detroit. GM lifer she's been at GM for most of her career and was did her dad adwork. GM to yes her father did work at GM so she's second generation jammer and she's from Michigan as well. Do you remember your first interview with her. The first time sat down with her like what is she like and what is it that she talks about when she talks about. Gm yes I do remember very vividly away when I first met her and at that time she was heading product development and I remember asking her what changes she was making and she she gave me this example of how you swipe your card in between to get into different departments and that she was going about removing those because it just seemed like a barrier that was not needed and that to me was symbolic of how she was trying to break down. GM Silo Culture. I think GM is really looking at like look. We cannot not just lean on our history. We have to make decisions that are looking foward and if that means kind of blowing up the way we did things in the past that's fine in the past two years under Baras leadership. The company has posted record profits. Wall Street investors have been thrilled with her performance and and one reason they like what she's doing. She has remained vigilant about preventing another financial meltdown at GM to do that. Bar has made major decisions decisions about the company's future so is really last year that GM decided that they were. GonNa execute on a big restructuring the really want to do some belt tightening and generates meaningful savings not only heading into the downturn but also to free up cash for some future technology bets such as self driving cars cars and electric cars so that set the stage set the stage for a big announcement from GM in two thousand eighteen. This was the weekend after Thanksgiving and news star to leak on that Sunday night. That was going to start closing plans the next day. Barra got on the phone with investors to explain the news and she stressed that you know this is going to improve their cash flow. It's going to really prepare them on to take the next steps and I mean her. Message acid was like this is really going to help us move through the next downturn and free up the cash to invest in some of these future technologies we taking these actions now while the company and the economy are strong stay in front of a fast-changing market and capitalize on growth opportunities as we push to achieve a vision of a world. Duro crashes Euro Missions Zero Congestion and did she discuss the impact on employees. No she did not on that call. ooh. The announcement hit the following morning. They announced that they were. GonNa close five plants in North America including including four in the US and two of those plants were major assembly plants one in Lordstown Ohio and the other one in Detroit because it leaks the night before many of the workers found out about the plant closures like some of them as they were getting ready for work from the the morning news so General Motors has announced its biggest restructuring efforts since it went bankrupt a decade ago. The Auto Company says that it may close five factories four the US and one in Canada and cut more than fourteen thousand salary jobs. GM certainly it landed with a third for many of these workers. It was a total bombshell. I think at some of the plants they had been taking off chefs but to close the plant. I think took a lot of workers by surprise surprise you know the scene in Lordstown as the result there is workers that were just kind of choked up and disappointed and felt betrayed. A lot of the workers felt like hey we really help. Gm you know survive through the bankruptcy and this is how we're being repaid one of the UAW's vice vice president the official who's in charge of bargaining with GM really came out swinging. He called callous. He said this is a real slap in the face to workers workers saw it as a particular insult because they believe the company was rebuilt after the bankruptcy on their backs even before the bankruptcy the the union agreed to lower wages for new employees it also took over the retiree health benefits for its members which GM had previously provided you know the UAW workers really remember that moment. I mean this also has colored. They're thinking going forward. The feeling we sacrificed a lot during the bankruptcy abrupty to help this company survive and so now when they see the company making big profits they feel like hey. We deserve to get more back because we did help up you in that moment of need. GM said they made this move because they really really need to prepare and it is true true like the big trend in the industry right now is that many consumers are moving away from cars and buying SUV's and trucks and the two plants that are targeted for closure build cars in so GM's argument was that we're not seeing demand for these vehicles for GM workers. The decision to close plants lance was hard to swallow but immediately after the announcement their frustration was being echoed at the highest levels of government ever since trump stepped into the office and even before I mean he's really taking the automakers to tass in particular GM and Ford for not building more cars in the US and when this landed I mean he immediately jumped an criticized. Mary directly both were there are closing and I said you know this country's in general motors you better get back there soon so hieaux that also criticised GM for building cars in China and building cars in Mexico. I don't one general motors to be building plants outside of this country as you know they built many plants in China and Mexico and I don't like that at all and you know the the UAW members they hear that a- and I think even just like members hearing it. I mean that kind of emboldens fam- to really take a stand. The workers also have leverage because unemployment employment is so low right now. GM just can't go out and hire new workers that easily they need to deal with the ones they have also. It is much easier here to negotiate a contract when sales are up prophets or up. Things seem to be going good. You know the company can give a little more one. It is financially very strong in some worried about the future and I think that's why you're seeing this friction now. The United added Auto Workers Union is ready to push back on GM's decision to close plants and cut shops and GM is ready to defend its choices and fightback after the break about a decade ago the US government decided to do something they'd never done before today more than sixty percent of all US tax payers will be able to for free free prepare and file their taxes online. They thought they were creating a free online. Tax Filing System instead what they'd made was trap attracted the huge companies take millions of dollars from low-income Americans here how that happened under polyps at one hundred forty four dark pattern listen wherever you get your podcasts welcome back every four years auto companies sit down with the United Auto Workers Union and negotiate new contracts the latest round of talks between GM and the UAW started in July what is at the top of the UAW's agenda going into these talks well. I mean keeping these plants. Open is certainly one of them. I mean they've they made that statement very early on heading in but there's a range of issues that they're discussing a big one for the union is the use of temporary workers workers. The companies WANNA use temps because you know they'll have periods where you know they need to quickly increase output but don't WanNa hire permanent workers to do that because they don't know how long those sales will sustain and so they bring in do that work the problem is is and this is what really has a w the wrong way as some of these temps are not so temporary that they've been working at the company for many years they feel it's really unfair to have temps working alongside fulltime employees but making much less money. That's a major issue on on the table. Healthcare is a major issue. I mean the companies want the union members to pay more of their healthcare cost. They pay about three percent and that's versus you know twenty thirty percent for most salaried workers okay so in these contract talks on the other side of the table is GM. What are they looking for the big thing that GM wants is to keep its labor costs check now one of the things that's happened. Ben Is as the market has rebounded as GM's profits have rebounded through the last two rounds of contract talks in two thousand eleven two thousand mm fifteen it did give a lot back to the workers you know in terms of pay raises and so as they've given more back to the union in their labor costs have crept back up and so the big goal for them is not only keeping labor costs from continuing to grow but also trying to bring him down and also the companies are facing a lot of uncertainty. There's trade uncertainty. There's uncertainty over fuel economy regulations and right now they could really use some flexibility so that's a big issue for them. At the bargaining table negotiations have gone basically nowhere aware since July and this weekend they hit a deadline. The current contract expired in other circumstances. The Union might have extended the contract attract a bit too. Give time to keep the talks going but this time it didn't so when they didn't extend those contracts we knew is is looking for confrontation. You know the Birkner on the Union side came in and said Hey we're just not getting anywhere you know we don't feel like GM as bargaining good faith and they basically said we are at a standstill and we were told that the vote was unanimous mask to strike shortly after the meeting. They held a press conference and they said we're GONNA strike at midnight restarted last night at twelve the first shift we're from twelve to six six citoyen six round the clock few years back. We gave up a lot to keep this house and now they're making more money than they ever had. We feel like we should get some of that stuff back we buy we gave concessions during the darkest hour. Keep this company running and now this company is making record profits off our labor in. They don't want to even give anything back but they want to continue the tate and that's not right. That's I feel betrayed trade the strike covers more than thirty plants in ten states and GM has essentially forty six thousand full-time factory workers represented represented by the UAW's this major major strike one. We haven't seen in more than a decade. Were several days into the strike right now. What are the workers giving up by striking well a lot of pay so the way it works is not paid while they're on the picket line by the company instead had what they receive is what they call strike pay this is paid by the Union and it has turned fifty dollars a week. That's a fraction of what they'd make at the plant. What is GM losing. This does take a financial toll so the way it works. Is that a car maker books revenue went vehicle rolls off off the line and sold to a dealership so if there's no vehicles rolling off the line and being sent to dealerships. I mean obviously they're not booking that revenue. Some analysts analysts have said that it can cost anywhere from fifty million to one hundred million dollars a day granted. GM does have a stockpile of cars but certainly it does cost the company and the longer it goes on the longer the financial head. Mary Barra seems to be trying to deliver what Wall Street wants and what she wants for the company right to be sustainable in the future to meet the changing aging technology. That's coming into the auto industry and to do that. She wants to kind of lean mean company but the workers you want a share of the prophets and to keep their jobs and to have better wages. How can she strike this balance. I mean it's a really tough one and I mean and there's a lot of dynamics that play into you know. We're essentially do they end up. I mean I I really do feel like that's the question that they are resolving right now. At the bargaining pardoning table the strike is now in its fourth day and the most recent developments. Don't look promising on Tuesday. GM stopped paying health care costs for the workers on strike in response the Union put out a statement about GM saying quote quote one minute. They say they care about their workers and next GM is cutting off people's lifeline that's offered today. Thursday September nineteenth nineteenth. The Journal is a CO production of Gimblett and the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening. We'll see you tomorrow.

GM United Auto Workers Union Mary Barra Union General Motors Detroit United States Wall Street Journal labor union union Auto Workers Union Ford General General Motors Auto Company Guillaume Christina Rogers Kate Lime Lordstown
When to Resist and When to Welcome [SSL130]

Spark My Muse

21:57 min | 1 year ago

When to Resist and When to Welcome [SSL130]

"Welcome listeners. You're listening to ABC News. I'm your host Lisa. Delay today is so school lesson one thirty what to resist and what to welcome there are many things that we should resist and take a moral stance against. I want you to be encouraged to resist those things. Even though sometimes it's counter cultural it's not popular or it costs us a lot. We can refuse to to be moved from choosing the wrong thing we can resist the powerful inside with the powerless for the sake of justice and putting things to rights and we can take a posture of resistance we can do this without violence and we want to do this without violence because violence always eventually hurts us personally and the people we love it. It always bounces back and inflicts more violence. I'm going to be speaking a little bit about how to do this how to resist without inflicting violence apart ourselves. I think think there might just be one way to continue to resist stand up for what needs to be stood up for and also welcome. A nun is with a disposition and a posture that welcomes oh comes the types of feelings were feeling the time without holding them at day oftentimes we take an entire posture of resistance which includes our feelings and desires that are negative and we pushed them down with the press them or repressed them. Circumstances can be very entire very despairing and we can also wind up resisting them and the feelings that go along with it this will not sustain S. for the long journey ahead for standing up for the powerless or for justice or for what needs to be stood up for in our own lives if we suppress are natural feelings that occur whatever they may be joyful excited and despairing fearful angry those efforts will grind us to a point of despair or anguish or cynicism or apathy and that will not sustain us or the people around us for the marathon that is our lives so while I encourage resistance towards evil towards wrongdoers towards injustice <hes> I also want to encourage welcome and so what do I mean by welcome in Cynthia Borjas book centering prayer and Inner Awakening which I highly recommend she talks about welcoming prayer and this this is quite a challenge for any of us who enjoy the feeling of control or wanting to have control in our lives and over our feelings but I'm gonna read it because it is very very powerful and and if practiced in our lives can be completely transformative there will be links to this book as well as Cynthia's work at the website sparked by means dot Com for Seoul school lesson one one thirty and at the support page patriotic dot com forward slash sparked my means for soil school lesson one thirty. I really hope that you will help me support this work not just by listening in sharing the podcast with other people on the programs with other people but also by contributing dollar more because you get something out of one. I'm sharing with you. It really goes a long way to defray the costs of producing this show. It's a lot more than you think so. It really encourages me to see the people don't even just a dollar. Thank you so much for doing that. Cynthia rights our page one forty one the founding genius behind the welcoming prayer was a woman named Mary Barra Zaleski who from nineteen nineteen eighty-three when she showed up at the fateful I Lama Foundation retreat until her death in Nineteen ninety-three was one of Thomas Keating's closest associates and a prime mover in the development and popularization of his teachings for those privilege to know Mary. The practice is immediately recognizable and is a direct reflection of her vibrant salty approach to spirituality it combines deep surrender with a Gutsy Z. unflappable presence. Mary was a New Yorker through and through for her Brooklyn accent to her in your feats kind of possess a divorce Catholic back in an era when such things were virtually nearly unheard of she supported her family through her job as an administrator in a psychiatric hospital later offering her spare time as a literacy volunteer in the prisons through her work in therapy she was familiar with the biofeedback. Techniques then sprouting on her own she had already begun to develop a personal life practice combining these techniques with an underlying attitude of surrender that had been deeply imprinted on her through reading abandonment to the divine in providence a seventeenth century spiritual classic by Pierre Day ca said when she encountered centering prayer and Thomas Keating's owning teachings on the full self system the pieces began to come together for her in a single single integrated method the welcoming prayer was I taught at the Christmas House in Warwick New York contemporary of outreaches first experiment in contemporary of living which she helped found several of the community members particularly David Freenet and Kathy McCarthy contributed to the fine tuning the practice proved so successful in bringing out real inner change that it was soon being offered far more widely throughout the network. No welcoming prayer involves three main ideas three step process. If you will number one is that you focus and sink in towards happening you welcome that thing and then you let it go might sound easy but this is done the throes of something that is difficult to endure or maybe is overwhelming in some way maybe for good or bad but involves a kind of litany that will get into soon. Cynthia also reminds insists that there are these things called peacock feathers where we get self-congratulatory over something good we might have mastered <hes> for the moment anyway and we self congratulate and we get a little impressed with ourselves we take joy in some accomplishment that we might have done well and this actually is counterproductive to spiritual growth majority and in those moments to we can focus and sink in welcome those feelings even of pride and then let them go and don't let them harbor investor so they deteriorate us in some way that hinders inhibits our growth in faith so during a time of fighter flight forever able all to get a hold of ourselves during that moment an interrupt that stage somehow. We don't try to change anything. We just try to stay present with it. We don't try to analyze what we're thinking or wondering why we're thinking it instead we are just observing. She says on page one forty four spiritual practice in which separation is to mental I E in which the inner observer is used primarily to dissociate from the unpleasant feelings rather than than to experience an integrate great them will require some difficult on learning somewhere along the line before inter integration is finally achieved by keeping a firm grounding in physical sensation. The welcoming prayer ensures that this mistake does not made a lot of spiritual practices involve something mental but they don't necessarily sink deep into the felt feelings that are happening within us and that way they create a disassociation or even repression instead of spiritual growth we just play the good girl the good boy and shovel way the bad feelings and try to stay good based on what we think is appropriate for the time and we wind up having a religion of proper actions that isn't actually changing us from the inside out so in the case of Mary she actually had an experience where she was hit by a car when she was in Italy at the time she was able to use the welcoming prayer in really in a really horrible circumstance where she was able when she felt extreme pain to say welcome pain or campaign and not be fearful of it not hold it at bay not run away. Hey from it not this associated with it but acknowledged it. Pause with it. Stay with it folks with it. Welcome it and then let it go instead of resisting resisting resisting which is typically normally what we do and we you so much energy doing that we wear ourselves out when we welcome something we relent to the circumstance that is happening as it really is and as we really are on page forty six Cynthia rights there is a crucial distinction between surrender as an inner attitude and as an outer practice and we are concerned only with the former here the inner attitude. We're not saying we have to surrender to all the circumstances outside us and just be a doormat for anyone or anything that's happening. What we're talking about is an inner surrender to the feelings that were actually having instead of saying? They're not happening to us. I'm going to resist them. I'm not gonNA feel them or I'm gonNA show shoved down. Were saying no. These feelings are actually happening to me. I'm going to welcome these feelings and I'm not gonNA say they don't exist that way. We're experiencing them painful as they might be but by allowing them to exist and welcoming them and experiencing them were very fearful of doing that. We can not go into kind of repression of these things where they will pop up later as anger rage or cynicism now once you are rightly aligned then. You can decide what you're going to do in the outer world being able to stop yourself focus on what is bothering you stay with that feeling and then welcome it gives you back your freedom of choice then you can decide what you want to do in your actions in the exterior world without being able to stop pause focus on what's happening and your feelings that are happening to you you lose your free will a new become sort of mechanized and in the fighter fighter flight stage in a reaction reactive stage <hes> just kind of a slave to your own expressions and reflexes so that you will just respond in maybe an angry outbursts or maybe in shutting down. Maybe a running away fleeing the scene or shoving that feeling and burying it far far beneath the surface where you can't notice it anymore and no one else will be the wiser people think you just got over it but there'll there are still be now. The letting go is the part of the real work. It's actually accomplished in the first two steps you stay with them rather like needing a Charlie horse. Cynthia says on page one forty seven needing a Charlie horse in your leg going back and forth between focusing and welcoming until the not begins to dissolve of its own accord and yes letting go is also just for now. It's not a final forever renunciation of your anger or your fear. It is simply a way of gently waving farewell as the emotion starts to recede if you simply can't in good conscience move to the next step. Don't fake it. The bulk of the work has already been accomplished in the short way of doing this welcoming prayer. You simply say something like I let go of my anger or if you prefer I give my anger to God or I enjoy doing a little of both I let go of my anger and I give an odd now Mary Mar Zaleski however preferred more complex and in variable litany when it became time to proceed to this third step after the welcoming she would I use the following formula to help her. She would say and this can be very hard to do if you're clutching on to your desires and I realized for myself this sexually exceptionally hard for me to do. I was convicted of this us and I realized I had my efforts and really relinquish. Mary would say I let go of my desire for security and survival. I let go of my desire for a steam steam and affection. I let go of my desire for power in control. I let go of my desire to change the situation now. At first blush of you are thinking and I can't say any of those things I do have a desire for security and survival and esteem and affection power control and I do WanNa change my situation. I do have those desires. You're letting go of your desire to control things and you relinquish the energy. It takes to keep all those balls in the air. You give that over to God and you exhale and you breathe. The weight has been lifted off your shoulders this welcoming prayer for you. Welcome the hard thing. Perhaps it's fear say if you have cancer and you're afraid to die. You are accepting that you're afraid which is very normal so you might just say I welcome the fear you wouldn't be welcoming the cancer of course but you would be welcoming the fear of it or the fear of death and you could welcome that because God will help you through it you welcome it. You're not resisting it and using your energy to resistant repressive shovel way or Beriot. You're not gonNA use your energy for that anymore. You're just going to welcome what you already fear. You're going to welcome what you already feel will be honest and acknowledge it and not pretend anymore than it's not their allow to just be what it is and be what you are and then you're going to let it go by letting it go. You're going to be saying I let go of my desire for security in survival. I let go of my desire for a steam affection. I let go of my desire for power and control. I let go of my desire to change the situation. Am I sing. Those things you get your power back because you are not going to be a victim of your desires. You're going to be empowered by getting your free choice back on page one forty eight Cynthia rights what is most fascinating to me about this practices. How powerfully frees up energy we usually don't realize just how much of our vital life energy is bound up and unconsciously leached away in those energy? He centers one thing you may notice there's a kind of feedback loop. Energy generated in useless identified emotion simply gets reabsorbed into those unconscious false self programs the keep us working hard toward wanting to feel in power and control secure enabled to survive an esteemed given affection and thinking that we can affect our situations more than we really can. We use a lot of energy in those programs of fulfillment and happiness but when we give up those desires to continue in those ways we free up all this energy that we've been using in resistance with that the energy of your being remains bound at a frequency to slow and to self-preoccupied to sustain real inner awakening the classic saying inner work is as you're being increases your receptivity to hire meaning increases as you're being decreases old meanings return a false self system is a system working at a low level of being which is why it remains so mechanical ambitiously self reinforcing with it's vital energy largely locked up in its defenses there is little leftover to reach escape velocity into real awakened consciousness which both requires and produces a higher level of spiritual vibrancy then we're used to in the welcoming prayer the energy normally bound up in identification is suddenly vitally freed. Sometimes show dramatically you can almost here wife and the influx of this new energy is immediately experienced as a deepening and vital ization of your innermost being. I hope that some of this made some sense to you may need to read listen to this program over again and I hope also purchase Cynthia or does work centering prayer and inner awakening to get a fuller fuller idea of what she means by surrendering welcoming prayer and inner awakening one is so interesting to me about resistance and welcoming prayer is that we can have more energy freed up to standard standard ground when our consciences pricked and yet be aware of all the negative feelings that might come up when our sense of unjust nece has been aroused. Our sense of unrighteousness has been aroused say someone has been mistreated and you feel anger and you feel resentment. You don't have to push that away or push it down. You can say I welcome the anger I welcome the resentment and stay with it and then say I let my desire go. I let my desire go to be angry. I let my desire go to be resentful. I lead my desire go to be in control of any situation and that is the most realistic kind of prayer we can pray that we become ourselves and the we let God he handle it. We join in God's work in whatever way we can but we don't think that we have omnipotence and the ability to change all the outcomes but we can join in with God is already doing and we don't have the ability to be a savior like God as a savior but we do have the ability to stand firm. We do have the believed to stop and recognize what we're feeling. Feel it let it go. We do have the ability to control ourselves. Pay Attention listen be aware and be like water which moves around its environment and yet affects its environment. It doesn't work like a bulldozer but it will follow the natural terrain that it's in and yet change it smooth out all the rough edges to and like water we can adjust and yet be the one who adjusts and that way the can sustain for the long term what it takes to be change agents in the world without compromising our soul without compromising our health and our wellbeing and relationships around us. If you have any questions for me about this or any other programs I welcome your comments in your suggestions and your correspondence you can contact me at contact. That's Berkman News Dot Com. We're going to the website sparked by Muniz DOT com and use the contact page. Thank you so much for listening. I'll be here next week with a new episode for you to listen to God bless.

Cynthia Borjas Mary Barra Zaleski Thomas Keating ABC News Lisa Muniz DOT com cancer Seoul Berkman Italy administrator Pierre Day Beriot I Lama Foundation retreat Brooklyn Warwick New York Christmas House David Freenet
Special: GM's Mary Barra: "Deep, profound sadness" and "going ventilator fast"

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

35:26 min | 4 months ago

Special: GM's Mary Barra: "Deep, profound sadness" and "going ventilator fast"

"Hi listeners it's read by now. You probably know who I am, but awkwardly. I know a lot less about you, so many of you tell me you're listening to the show and I want to know more. Who Are you? Why do you tune in? What do you want most from the show? Let us know by going to massive scale dot com slash survey. It takes just five minutes and will read every answer. That's Mastro scale dot com slash survey and now onto the show. When people ask me that question. What keeps you up at night? I always say speed. The world is moving quickly. Our industry is transforming quickly and I feel very confident a strategy we have, but no one's GonNa. Wait for us. I don't WanNa go back to the way it was before because I have just seen so many things be done so quickly without bureaucracy. The ventilator project literally from when the first contact was made to. When there was a ventilator rolling off the line, it was a month. I've already heard people in companies say we WANNA go ventilator fast and I love that. I've gone through a whole range of emotions. We've got to move from asking ourselves why this is happening and move to what can we do about it? Our diversity, our culture, our inclusion. Do we have work to do absolutely, and we're going to approach that with a much more heightened sense of urgency, but we also have a lot of opportunities. That's Mary Barra. Chairman and CEO of General Motors after shutting US auto plant in March when the corona virus hit bar temporarily reduced pay for sixty nine thousand employees at the same time. She fast track production of masks in ventilators, one of the largest organizations to pivot to meet new needs and now GM is reopening plants seemingly coming full circle. But after the killing of George Floyd things are hardly back to normal. Mary talks about what she calls her profound feeling of sadness at this time. But she's also optimistic that the country and her company will bounce back. I'm Bob Sathian former editor of fast company founder of the Flux Group and host of massive scale, rapid response I wanted to talk with Mary. Because so many social and economic issues come together with GM from worker safety to business adaptation corporate responsibility for addressing inequality. Mary stresses that there's a lot more work to do. Including heightened urgency around inclusion. But her glass she says is three quarters full. We'll be back in a moment after word from our sponsor refinish. the school that went to was out in the forest. People would generally find it by saying you go post to other schools. The feds school is our school. That's nausea. Reflective global data company that provides human insights to enable financial markets. She grew up in rural. Kenya with around roundabout as a local landmark like rural towns all over. They didn't have street addresses. Here's how she'd guide you to her house. We used to have a massive roundabout. It's one of the largest roundabouts in Africa. You can actually see it from satellite, and so that was a good navigation point. The Hill where I lived. There was a really weird dip, so people would just know that hill that you're going to fall down. That would be another landmark. Navigation by landmark, common in emerging markets, and it works, but in an emergency you need to move fast, and that need can lead to innovation Snell will tell us how later in the show in the meantime learn how definitive connects thriving global financial markets community visit, representative dot com slash emerging. That's reflective with no he at the end R. E. F. I N. I t. i. Dot Com slash emerging. I'm Bob Sathian and I'm here with Mary Barra CEO of General. Motors like many industries. The auto business has been stalled by the pandemic for GM sales have been impacted manufacturing supply chain in the US and around the world, and since George Floyd's death, another layer of challenge has risen. It's season of high uncertainty with leadership decisions. All around Mary is coming to us today from her home in Detroit, Metro area. As I asked my questions from my home in Brooklyn. Mary. Thanks for joining us how it's great to be here. Thanks so much for having me. So far in twenty twenty. We've experienced unprecedented health crisis, an economic crisis and most recently a social crisis the past few weeks of putting into relief that even when you try to be prepared. There are these unexpected twists that come. How have the days since George? Floyd's death impacted you. And how have they impacted GM? I think they've impacted me. I've gone through a whole range of emotions. It was such a difficult thing to see and then to step back and realize that we're still at this place, and so I've spent a lot of time talking to different people on the GM team. We actually put a letter out to the employees. Saying we've got to move from asking ourselves why this is happening and move to what can we do about it? I'm an action oriented person, and so I think frustration, and my deep profound feeling of sadness was coming because I didn't know what to do to start to make change and then I. I realized as I shared the how I felt, and on behalf of the company with our employees was an outpouring of response over hundreds and hundreds employees responded some with support that we need to take action, but many were telling their stories, and through their stories I started to learn, and that's why one of the first things were doing. As we form our inclusion advisory board is. We're going to listen. In fact, we have listening sessions set up with members of the GM team this week and through the month, so we can learn and make sure that we're taking steps and actions that are going to drive real change. So. You created this advisory board I know you committed ten million dollars to promote racial justice. Do you think why didn't we do this before? Or why did we need a crisis to get to the next level? You know that's a question. I keep asking myself. I think what has crystallized for so many now is this is about respecting everybody in truly creating a country, a world where everyone is valued, everyone can be their true self, and that's what we want to have. Happen at General Motors. That's the environment we want to create. We feel everyone can do their best when they can be themselves and I think it was just a a complete realization that that does not exist right now and therefore we have to take immediate action to fix it. It's such an interesting transition that business leaders have gone through in recent times, but your responsibility to your employees to your investors to your community and larger society. How do you weigh what your responsibility is as a leader in a time like this? When we face different issues and questions like this, we always go back to our values, and we've asked every single employee and those who do business with us Oliver stakeholders to understand GM is to understand that we're a values based company, and if you're going to live your values, there are certain topics. This is one of them that you have to take action you to your employees. You owe it to all the stakeholders, but frankly as a corporation that can influence you have that responsibility as well. And all this of course comes in the context of this pandemic, which we've been struggling with for many months, which has had its own waves of disruption, right I the focus on health and safety issues, pivoting production, two PP, making masks, ventilators, and then the return to work protocols and reopening in all of this. What's been the most difficult decision for you or is? There have been difficulties that are different at each stage of this. I think that one of the biggest difficulties as the virus really came into the United States were so many unknowns. How long was it going to last? How deep was going to be? How long are we going to be unable to make vehicles? When we were able to make vehicles, what would demand look like how much of a hit have impacted the economy that would there be demand and so. So with that with all that uncertainty we had US take steps to make sure we were securing the company for the long term for all of our stakeholders, and so that was one of the first challenges closely followed with making sure we knew how to have people come back to work safely. One of my coworkers, a member of our leadership team. He always talks about the fact that I it's. It's lives than its livelihood and both are important are medical director used to work at the CDC, so we immediately started working on? What are the protocols? What are the learnings from other parts of the world of how we can create an environment where people have confidence that they're safe and they can come back to work, and we needed that pretty quickly, because as we were making masks and ventilators. Ventilators. We needed to provide that environment to those volunteers who came back to do that, so that was the second phase, and I would still say we're planning for a wide range of potential outcomes were hoping for the best. We're hoping that there isn't a more severe outbreak. Another outbreak and we're also hoping that the economy recovers, but we're also making plans for a much more conservative outcome just. Just to make sure we're being responsible from a company perspective, and so those early protocols that you put in place for folks who are making masks and ventilators. They're the same protocols that you're now putting in place for the larger operation, or did those evolve over time as you learn new things because we had the learnings from, China, we had the fundamentals, and so we were able to start at. At both the mass plant and the ventilator plant, using those with social distancing, but what I would say is also our employees have come back and they've found ways to make it even better. A suggestions as simple as instead of everybody touching a human machine interface keypad. Use a pencil eraser, so everybody has their own pencil. It's clever. Things like that that our employees have come up with to. To make it safer and make it better, and so they're not necessarily complicated. They just have to be applied consistently exactly and the number. One thing we have learned is appropriately wearing the mask and I've been seven of our facilities. Since we'd restarted in mid-may, we took the time to train. Everybody have them understand. Ask questions. Give them answers so as I visit our facilities. People are wearing the masks. Masks in. They're wearing it appropriately. We all have experienced mass now, and it's not the most comfortable, but when you understand you're doing it for your fellow employees, and those you're surrounded as one of our team. Members just said to me last week I don't WanNa be the guy that gets sick, so everybody is adhering to it. They understand it and again. They're finding ways to make it work. In these visits to the plants are are particularly memorable moments has the environment in the plant change from the first visit you made to the one that's most recent. How is the mood evolving and all of that? I number of people have told me they are so glad to get back to work. They understand that it's important. They love their job. They want to be there. There were people who shared with me stories that you know as they were thinking about coming back either they were worried about it or their spouse or their family was worried about it, but as they went through the training, they were able to take the material home. Share it I haven't been in a facility at where someone hasn't told me feel safer at work than they do going to the grocery store. At some organizations, there's sort of this battle underway between folks pushing for kind of a return to normal and others who are looking at the speed of change that was allowed during this crisis time and saying Oh, we don't WanNa lose that with your ventilator production Ano-. You partner with a firm in Seattle you set up a facility in Indiana you hired it thousand people. You instituted new protocols. How do you keep that spirit? When maybe the crisis isn't quite as acute. Well I've thought a lot about that because to your point, I don't want to go back to the way it was before because I have just seen so many things be done so quickly without bureaucracy so to me the number one thing I think we need to do to be able to move at that speed is to empower people. We had teams that they didn't go through a couple levels of review, they just said. Said I know I've got to get this done. I know it's the right thing to do. I'm going to do it. We saw that in the ventilator production. We saw it as they did. Mass production and I've seen it in other areas. Somebody was telling me a story of something usually would take two weeks to get all the buy in and all the approvals and they got it done in twenty four hours and vets. Lives Better, so we've been talking about that as a company because it's better for everyone, it's better for the company. It's better for everybody doing the work. So, if you're going to move beyond this bureaucracy, how much of that is dismantling rules versus culturally getting people to say we don't need everyone's approval? How do you make that transition? It's a bit of both for the ventilator project. As an example, we have to empower them, so we have to let them know. It's okay and occasionally is. They're going to be a mistake or. Or a problem, yes, but the odds are. It's GonNa happen very infrequently, and when it does, we'll fix it. We know how to do that, so I think it's making sure people understand that we want to move fast, but we want to move smart, and there's a difference so I think we're going to have to continue to empower people. They know how to do the. The job the right way for the few times where it won't work out perfectly, we'll just move on. I think that's going to be number one. There's a whole bunch of people around who can say yes, or no. Do we really need all those buying ends, or is there a couple key? And then everybody else just needs to be aware so I think that's going to. To be a change that will take some work, because I think as people go back, their mindset will be. We'll wait a minute. I used to have a say in that will the question we have have everyone asks themselves as really need to say you're you just need to know so? We'll have work to do for sure and as you're saying a certain tolerance for. Experimentation, that may not work out ideally, but as you say, you can fix it. Yes, because we have such talented people ninety eight ninety nine percent of the time it's GonNa work out just fine. Do you really want to slow everything down for that? One to two percent, or do you want to use the team? That has the speed capability now to just fixed those issues where you're going to have to tweak something. Did you realize before that? You were moving slower than you could have been moving. I think when people ask me that question. What keeps you up at night? I always say speed because we're a large corporation. The world is moving quickly. Our industry is transforming quickly, and I feel very confident strategy. We have, but no one's going to wait for us, so we have to execute with a sense of urgency spent something that's been on my mind for a while so now to see the company really embraced in move forward because of this tragic situation that is one of the silver linings I'm also confident, though the people aren't GonNa want to go back. They know what they can do. They know what they can accomplish, so I think there'll be enough will to make it permanent. Come back to that idea in a moment after word from our sponsor refinish. She go to Kigali Kigali is beautiful. By the way it looks very modern, and all the roads are absolutely sunny. We're back with now. Shaw of representative. She's describing the gleaming modern capital of Rwanda and the contrast drive from the city to the countryside. When you go into some of these more rural areas that aren't reservist very often, you can just imagine an old pickup truck in a dusty road. On a normal day, this contrast is interesting in an emergency. It can be life threatening. If. You needed to get blood from Kigali from the main hospital to a rural area. It would often take you hours in really rural parts of Nigeria and Kenya Ethiopia has not even good refrigeration systems. Even if you delivered it for a week, they can't store it for a week. Right, so you need to have it when you need it. Those are the real situations that people face every day in these emerging markets then not in places where people can get to them enough. These conditions in Rwanda we're a modern city has a rural neighbor that's left behind. That creates room for a high. Tech Solution. There's a company called line that started using drones to deliver blood. They pick up the blood from the hospital. Take it by drone and use a parachute system to deliver it within sixteen feet of the hospital. They've cut down the livery time to less than an hour. zip-line found creative collaborators in Rwanda and sixty five percent of Rwanda's blood supply is now delivered via drum, but that only solves part of the problem. How can a drone know where to go without street addresses enter another surprising innovation. There's a company called what three words they've mocked. Every three meters squared cephas of earth with three random words, and they're now using that technology to deliver packages. You can basically look up any address, and so you're able to get to the place where you will go into even if it's not on any grid or any map. What three words was born in London, but it's really taken off in Africa. Thanks to local startups in South Africa. There's a really cool company called Lula that there's like an uber, but it uses public transport vehicles for addressing. They use what three words. Lula plus what three words is across continental collaboration conwright and later in the show we'll hear how reflective is fueling this kind of innovation. Their headquarters are located at thing, zealous gossip, or check them out the old fashioned way reflective dot com slash emerging. That's the preventative with no. He at the end are af I and I ivy dot com slash emerging. You saw the pandemic enfold in China and Asia I. You have global business. Obviously, there's some things that you learned from that that you apply to the US like. Where's the learning curve going about the things you're applying? I think because the China team and the create team were so successful. I think it really was like. Let's learn what they did and just copy it in. Take it, and then Brazil followed suit and Mexico across the globe. So what I think is really happened is there's been an increase value of learning from each other instead of looking back and saying yes, I know that work there, but we're different, so we have to recreate. People say if it worked there. It should work here so I'm just GonNa do it. As. You mentioned these protocols. You mentioned sort of asking people, questions and getting information. There are a lot of new technologies that different folks are rolling out. Infrared temperature trackers are all of those technologies things that you think are having lots of impact or is the most important thing. Serve gathering the information and being clear about the communication between the different people on the team. It's a combination. One of the stories I learned is in our battery assembly plant. We had some infrared scanners that were for a different purpose, and again is we got into this and not knowing if we would have enough of everything we needed. They reprogrammed and repurpose them, so we're using technology and we're piloting many of the different contact tracing tools to look at what's going to be. Be Best for us in our facilities. We do have a lot of people that work just as a regular basis closer than six feet, and that's why the masks and the regular cleaning are so important, so I think it's really a combination, but the number one thing is, there's always ways we can make it better. Use Technology, but the core of what we need to do doesn't change. The issue of contract tracing that you mentioned now. It's become a criteria for health. How do you balance those the privacy and the health needs for safety needs. Well I think many of them. In as we piloted them, they'll be opt in and so people will have a choice if they want to opt in. We're doing manual contact tracing right now. Virtually everyone doesn't want to be responsible for getting someone sick, or if they are, they want to get it. Be Understood as quick as possible so anybody they may have been exposed to can solve isolate so i. think it's just the human good and wanting to respect your fellow team members is what's causing people to be okay with the questions, and and again we're just in the early phases of piloting some of the the APPS. In the midst of all this managing the health managing the social, there's financial pressure sales dropped showrooms closed. There were cost that you had to cut back on. People delayed getting some of their payments right. Some of you took pay cuts took a pay cut. As part of this are there plans for the future that you felt like you had to cut back on also to give you the financial flexibility to move through this period. But one of the things that we quickly did is we did what we call zero based budgeting approach so almost every expense header earn its way back in no matter how small, and that really caused everything to get scrutinized with a pretty tough I, and so I think there are things that will say you know what we were able to cut that pretty easily. We really haven't missed it, so we're not going to keep doing that whatever that was. was I would also say again. Another silver lining is through this period where a lot of the dealerships closed. The service side in many cases was open because it was considered an essential service in many showrooms were impacted, our dealers again pivoted quickly and showed the agility to move to a mostly online sales process. We have a tool called chocolate drive, and we actually are rolling out even more enhancements to it right now, so just as the company. Company pivoted soda at our dealers. They also work to develop contact lists or clean delivery processes, and I think that helped us across the country. That's something we can do I think more of because we've seen how consumers across the globe across the country they are used to buying things online, and that was something that you couldn't train was harder to transact a whole vehicle. Online will be to the point very quickly working with the dealers to make that. That happen and so that's a positive thing that will come from this so again. It's a question of what do we no longer need to do? Because it really wasn't adding as much value and finally got the scrutiny at needed. And then what are the things we did to adapt to the new situation that customers are going to appreciate, or that's GonNa make our business more efficient. Get rid of bureaucracy. It's a combination and frankly it's pretty exciting. I mean there was a an assumption in other periods that people would not by a vehicle or not, many would buy a vehicle like a car or a truck online that it's something you had to go to a showroom. You needed to drive into experience and it sounds like you're saying that. Maybe we've crossed a threshold. Where maybe that's shifting and the larger portion of business in the future we'll be transacted that way the way it is for other goods. I think we're GONNA. See more of a chef. I don't think it will be one hundred percent I think there's still some people who literally WANNA go kick the tires, but I think the more that we can make the process easy, and we can allow a consumer to do it the way they want to do business whether it's fully online and delivered to their home, or it's portions of it. I think meeting the customer where they want to be is what we're going to strive to do. And Shop Click drive was in place before the pandemic came right. This is a tool that you could lean into. Your dealers could lean into in this time. Exactly right and they leaned in pretty quick, and the usage rate went up dramatically, but then we also, we leaned in very quickly realized there were some other features that we needed to add and did that very quickly as well so it was both. When you were doing this zero based budgeting and you're looking to the future and a lot of money that you've invested in autonomous vehicles electric vehicles. Did those things take a back seat? Well, we see electric vehicles and a Thomas Vehicles as the future, and so those were areas where we didn't cut it all. In fact, in some cases we said, can we go faster? Can we leverage this situation to transform even more quickly, and so those programs are on track, maybe even a little ahead, and that's the focus that we kept on them funding and resources. How does this period allow them to get ahead? Say for instance we were doing a minor model enhancement, saying hey, that's not as important and we were able to transfer resources over to work on that, so we actually supplemented resources on the key programs we wanted to make sure stayed on. Tracker could even move ahead of it. I guess there's a greater emphasis on the models that are in more demand as your ramping up production as opposed to the models with lesser demand. We are just in the final phases of launching our all new full sized trucks and SUV's. We did light duty and heavy duty trucks over the last eighteen months. Those vehicles are very much in demand, so as we return to work were very focused, and if there has to be decisions from supply base or a resource base. They were getting the attention because they have such high demand. Are there things that we haven't mentioned that you look back and you say we've learned from this situation. That will better prepare us for the future or things. We should be doing to prepare for the future differently. You know I think one of the learnings did come from the ventilator project because it was literally from when the first contact was made to. When there was a ventilator rolling off the line, it was a month and engaging our supply base, and having them work with us. Our supply base was just outstanding in that here's automotive suppliers, and we literally had been parts, and we started releasing prince, and saying who can make these new. We needed to get new sources to be able to build the. The number of ventilators we wanted to build, and our supplier stepped up and so I think there's an opportunity in situations like that to move more quickly. Still Quality and safety will be our overriding priorities, but to partner and work that way I think it showed everybody when there's a will, there's a way as my mom used to say. And they demonstrated it, and so I think that can do attitude. I've already heard people in the company say we WANNA go ventilator fast and I love that. How do you think about what's at stake? Well I think we're an industry and transformation. There's very capable I'll say traditional competitors, and then there's new competitors, and so leading from an innovation and technology perspective is how we win, and how we provide the most value to our customers and ultimately society, when you look at our vision of creating a world with zero crashes, zero missions and zero congestion, and so making sure we've got the right talent, and we're deploying the right resources to accomplish that I think has a huge impact on our success in the future. I was talking to Danny Meyer in the restaurant business, and he sort of see some of his role now is not just helping his own business, but helping the whole industry. That's not necessarily the priority. Well I would say depends on what we're talking about. One of the things that the industry did is we work together on the safety protocols, so we shared ideas. Lessons learned I. could tell you from us-based automotive manufacturer. We may not be doing it exactly the same, but we're following all the same principles and protocols, so those are areas. We don't want to compete I've also had conversations. Conversations with some of the other OEM's and we're talking about the fact that with what we were able to do. With mass production and ventilator production there seems to be a new appreciation for manufacturing, and we think that's very important as well so I think it depends on the dimension. We do want to distinguish ourselves. We've been working hard for many years to make some of the tough decisions to strengthen the company investing in technologies that we think will transform the way people move, but there are some things that are good for the industry. Good for everyone and safety was one of them. You very calm as you talk about all this I know it's been a tumultuous time. You're working from your home or all working in different ways. Are you stressed? I'm sure there were many moments over the last several weeks and months that I've been stressed, but I have a great team, not a time of the day that I can't pick up the phone and get the whole team or several members of the team on the phone, and we just talked through the problems I'm an engineer so I believe there's always a solution. We just have to find it. You know when they say your glass half full or half empty our minds, three quarters full so I believe we'll find a way, but yes, there's times where it's a bit stressful. It's why I have such a great team that I can rely on. I know a lot of folks feel like just when things were getting. Easier or we were getting more comfortable with them. Social changes happen. GM is better position than most companies on Gender Inclusion Your Board for example half women. The leadership isn't necessarily racially diverse Alexis Oh Hainian recently resigned from red. It's board to up a place for more diversity on the board. Have you guys have any board discussions about things like that? Well I am really proud of our board that is diverse from gender perspective, and from a race, perspective and Rodley. Every time we ask somebody to the board, we look at the ultimate, which is diversity of thought, and we work hard one of the things the board oversees for the company is our diversity, our culture, our inclusion, and so do we have work to do absolutely, and we're going to approach that with a much more heightened sense of urgency, but we also have a lot of opportunities I know again after we listen as we look at what are the most important things there's things that are going to take some time, but there's some things that we can do immediately and will do. Do, you feel like. There are specific things that you already hope the inclusion board. Leads to, or is it just wide open? I think it's wide open. We WanNa look at short term and long term, and we WANNA. Look at what's really going to drive lasting change within the company, and that is our rule outside the company with our corporate, giving with what we do from a lobbying from legislation what we support and so I think it's multi-tiered, but I'm also working on the Business Roundtable, a lead, the Education and workforce, but there's also a focus on healthcare, criminal justice and Finance and I think those are four fairly big areas that if there can be real change, I think we'll have an impact and. Is My passion. My brother and I are both first generation college students, and my mother believed that education was the pathway to living the American dream. Both my parents grew up. We're born and raised during the depression, and so education is one of my passions, and so I know that will be a big piece of it, but I think there's much more. Thank you for sharing your time and your perspective and your insight with us I. Really appreciate it. Thank you. It's been a pleasure. And now a final word from our sponsor reflective. Africa is really a hotbed of innovation right. We're back one more time with snow. Hush of definitive. She's been telling us. How High Tech Solutions are flourishing on the ground Africa Ba-? Legacy systems often stand in innovations way. For example, a banking system stuck in the nineteenth century. Central banks would sort of run these foreign exchange or fixed income options, and they'd be running them in a very manual way. They would literally have a career and they'd ask everyone to sellout spreadsheets print out what their bids were, and then put them in an envelope and send them back to the central bank. The solution, an auction platform built by repetitive that helps central banks, especially in emerging and frontier markets manage their domestic currencies and their economy. We said well. Why don't we automate that? Because not only is your system going to be more efficient and you're going to be able to see on a more real time basis. What's going on, but we can then feed the exhaust of that information to global investors who want to know what's going on in this market and we can make this market more transparent to global investors. Refunded of auctions worked so well in Africa that they're being used in other emerging markets around the world, it's unlocking global capital markets which helps connect global capital with local opportunity. We used to do a lot of our innovation in the financial centers. Because the idea was, you should do it with your customers are, but actually we've now started doing a lot more innovation where the need is. Where's their big problem that needs solving. And then how do we apply our global assets to solving that problem? There auctions platform is just one way that representatives global data infrastructure brings investment and innovation to emerging economies to learn more about profanities, auction, platform, and other financial solutions visit refit of dot com slash emerging. That's reflective with no way at the end our F. I n I. T I v Dot Com slash emerging? Masters scale rapid response can away what? The show is recorded remotely using sanitized audio gear. It's hosted by me Bob Sathian masters of Scales editor-at-large and masters of scale host Reid Hoffman. Are Executive Producers Are June Cohen and Darin trip. Our supervising producer is J., Punjab. Producer. Is George mccloud scripts by Cristina Gonzales. Original Music and sound design by Ryan Holiday and Daniel Nissenbaum. Audio editing by Keith j Nelson and Lena Cillizza. Mixing and mastering by Brian Pugh. Special thanks to Emily McManus Sarah Sandman Adam Heiner Kelsey copy. Tano Tim Cronin Charlie Manassas and Seda sappy ever. Visit Masters who scaled dot com slash rapid response to find the transcript for this episode and be sure to subscribe to our email newsletter.

GM US Bob Sathian Mary representative George Floyd General Motors Africa Rwanda China advisory board Kenya Mary Barra partner nausea Chairman and CEO feds school Kigali
General Motors CEO Mary Barra; Mavericks Owner Mark Cuban

Squawk Pod

34:21 min | 4 months ago

General Motors CEO Mary Barra; Mavericks Owner Mark Cuban

"This CNBC podcast is sponsored by capital group home of American funds. Nearly Ninety years of experience helps you say I can partner with this firm to navigate times visit capital group DOT com slash market volatility American, Funds Distributors Inc... This squawk pod I'm CNBC. Producer Katie Kramer Today on our podcast General Motors CEO Mary Barra has seen her company through more than one crisis. How she's leading GM through this cova recovery. We believe on tram for virtually every one of our facilities to be back the levels they were producing prior to the impact of covert in this country and making work, safer and more equitable for her one, hundred and sixty thousand employees. How to we advance much more quickly to? To creating a truly inclusive environment, where everybody can bring their true self, and be themselves at at work plus Dallas Mavericks owner. Entrepreneur and investor Mark Cuban on Sports Post pandemic and tackling white privilege in America. People have got to have difficult conversations right now. We as white people all know people who are raised this, maybe not overtly racist, but you know subtly racist, and when we think people act that way, we have to step in and say something. Those stories plus delivery for president, Putin. It's a four year. It's a chamber. It's a disinfection tunnel. It's Wednesday June seventeenth twenty twenty squad. Right Days after accepting the job as motors CEO in January twenty fourteen Mary, Barra had to confront a crisis that threatens the entire company's future and ignition switch malfunctioned from a decade, prior had resulted in one hundred twenty four deaths and two hundred seventy five injuries bars started a string of recalls. That would ultimately involve more than thirty million vehicles that year she also revamped the company's culture and management process focusing on keyword safety, the first woman to run an American car maker said the experience taught her to be impatient about solving problems and encouraged employees and managers to be transparent. Fast forward to twenty twenty. Mary Barra. Is the word impatient again. General Motors has had a rough spring like most companies forced to close plans for two months to develop safety protocols to deal with the threat of coronavirus. And when the crisis of racial inequality in our cities and our workplaces spilled over into the biggest public demonstrations in decades, Mary Barra wrote to GM, employees, suppliers and dealers, saying that she was impatient and disgusted, with Americans, passive discussions about inequality, the chairman and CEO of General Motors Mary Barra spoke to Joe Kernan Becky Quick Andrew Ross sorkin today on squawk box about all of this as well as about the automakers virtual shareholders meeting yesterday consumers after Corona virus, and how you build an inclusive workplace. Here's Mary. Really going to see you. Thank you for being here. Let's get. Get to be with you today to Becky, thank you. Let's talk a little bit about the year. You have seen so far leading up to the shareholder meeting. You said that this was a tragic year. Can you kind of walk through what you've learned what you've seen? What would? GM has experienced this year? Well? When you think about first pandemic, it started with our operations in China and has moved through the entire world, so we've been experience in that and trying to make sure that we do everything we can to keep our people safe are. As we look at this, we want to make sure we protect lives then livelihoods, and so we've been applying learnings from across the globe to make sure that we can do just that, and so as you look at that, which has had a tremendous impact on our business, as it has many businesses across the globe. And then with the incident dealing with social inequity and racial equity. Clearly. That has been. Hanging and very heavy on all of our hearts, so those are serious issues that we need to look at to from a business perspective, but also doing what's right and making sure that we create an environment for include to be inclusive for everyone, so we have a lot of work that we've outlined, and we're very committed to taking action, not just talking about why things are happening, but what? What are we going to do to be part of the change? Definitely want to talk more about the Justice and equality measures in just a moment, but before we get to that, let's let's talk about some of the things that you mentioned yesterday at the shareholders meeting and leading up to that you had said that by the end of this month. You're really hoping to get GM production levels. Levels back to the pre cova levels That's a tall order considering what you all have been doing in terms of having handle the shutdowns, and then shift to making some of the personal protective equipment that th that people have been using for the cove response to where where are you on that track? Anything that that is is a goal that you're likely to have. Yes, WE I. I have been in eight of our plan. Cy in the United States over the last few weeks. Plan to visit moral being another one of our facilities tomorrow, so the return to work has been going pretty well. We took the time to really train. Everybody on what our safety protocols are, and why they're so important, but then very importantly listened to everybody's concerns in questions and I think. That has allowed us to. Make sure people return with the protocols that with all the work we've done. We believe are safe, but also to give them confidence in the safety, so that has been very very important. We have well over ninety percent of our team. In the United States back and most of North America and so we believe we're on trend for virtually every one of our facilities to be back to the levels. They were producing prior to the impact of covert in this country we. We are also back. as it relates to China cree and other locations around the world. South America is coming back up. It's a little slower because they're at a different point. in the curve as it relates to the coronavirus that create any problems just in terms of your supply chain, the particularly looking at some of the situations in Mexico that we had seen earlier to have. Have you had issues trying to make sure you get everything? You need these cars? We're working through them A. we have a complex global supply chain, so there's always challenges working very closely with local and federal governments in many countries as well as our suppliers, and you know we're on a good path will continue to work through any challenges that we have I think that we can successfully work through those as we progress through the end of the month, and then continue on into third quarter. There've been a lot of questions about consumer demand and I know there are issues. Issues that people worry about their jobs. Worry about what's going to happen next, but then there are probably potentially other buyers who had been out of the market, or maybe never bought a car before who think, wait a second I need a car. I need my own transportation now because I trust public transportation less. What are you starting to see? Some of the car? Dealers actually reopen around the country well we been pleasantly surprised that how how demand has come back and even stage. It didn't drop as low as it had. In other countries in the United States, even during the height of the peak from from an impact perspective, so we're cautiously optimistic. We do see people very interested. In completing much of the transaction online using our shop clicked Dr Tool. We also have many of our dealers. Virtually all of them that have signed up for kind of a clean certification context list delivery, and I think that is giving consumers confidence as well so I think it's too soon to tell but a work cautiously optimistic as we see demand resuming. Where where is demand? Coming up is their pent up demand. People looking to buy trucks. Are they looking to buy cars? What what what have you seen from the consumer? We've seen strength in trucks, and because of the strength of our truck franchise effect that we just have been over the last year and a half wanting all new full size trucks both light duty and heavy duty were right now also launching our full size suv, the the Chevrolet suburban and Tahoe the GMC Yukon and then the Cadillac. Escalade we're very. Encouraged by the fact that demand for full size trucks SUV's has been very strong, and now we're starting to see on. Mid crossovers SUV demand also increase. Just in terms of trying to restart financially, you obviously took some some measures to try and battle the shutdown that you were dealing with during the second quarter. Do you think you've gotten through the worst of the coronavirus? Issues and shut down at this point, or do you worry that there? There are more repercussions to come down the road well I think it's A. It's a very uncertain time. I think when you look back the steps that we've taken over the last five six years to strengthen the company making some the tough decisions and transforming our industry that put us in a much better. Better position as we face this pandemic and right now we're hopeful that will have a a strong recovery, but we're planning multiple scenarios to make sure that the the company were that we're strong from a business perspective, and can whether whatever outcome, but right now we're cautiously optimistic and Mary one thing I want to ask you from a CNBC poll. That's out this morning. Morning. We've been testing people to kind of ask them how they feel about things coming back. Fifty percent of people said that they would feel comfortable going back to work. Only twenty eight percent said they would feel comfortable getting on flight at this point in the number of people who said they'd feel comfortable. Taking either an uber lift was thirty four percent as somebody who owns. owns a stake in lift. What what do you think about the ride? Sharing of of the future and how much that might potentially be impacted by this pandemic? Why I think right now you're seeing people for the most part be very cautious in shared environments across many levels, but I think the as we look and we move forward. We still believe in share ridesharing. Relates to autonomous vehicles, and if you think about an autonomous vehicle, takes out one more variable from a potential exposure perspective so I think as we move forward ridesharing will be important and a Thomas I think we'll. We'll be even stronger again especially if you look at how we designed the cruise origin as well from a separation and from cleanliness perspective. Mary. I just wanted to ask about the autonomous vehicle business, and specifically there are some reports that Amazon is in talks to buy Zouk which is one of the autonomous vehicle companies still out there. Would you support that acquisition there? There's been some questions about whether an Amazon is you know given big Tex role in society should be allowed to buy other companies like that into get into spaces like this well android. It's really not my decision of Amazon does and what happens to souks, You know what I know is the way. Way were approaching autonomous with cruise. Having the integration of the way we do the development with the vehicle team working hand in hand with the team. That's actually doing the autonomous I think that puts us in a very strong position and I'm very pleased with how the cruise team continues to hit milestones, even with some of the challenges of the pandemic, so I'm very optimistic and very pleased with how cruises progressing and developing the technology, because the key is having the technology where you can demonstrate that you're safer than a human driver. Mary the the the travails of hurts are pretty well documented, and we've talked about it a lot. Because of crazy trading we see in in the stock of you know. The bankrupt company made even issuing stock. What does the state of the rental car industry mean to the big three, the or just the automakers in general, in terms of maybe not being able to count on on fleet sales, etc, it's going to be different world when this is all said and done. We have seen the retail customer come back into the marketplace much more than the fleet customer over the last several years, General Motors has been decreasing the amount of vehicles that we sell specifically in Toronto, so it's had much less of an impact on General Motors, and we think when you look at some of the commercial fleets that business will regain. Rule, have stronger demand as we move forward. It's low right now, but there will be time where commercial fleets need to a grade. They're the their vehicles in their fleets so I think over time you know that will come back as well and again rental has less of an impact on General Motors because of our position has the the movement and oil prices. Lessen the the mandate to move towards hybrids and electric vehicles. Do you think in smaller more gas efficient vehicles at this point I know how profitable trucks and SUV's are. Are we back to thinking that that's what Americans want. Do you have to consider things like that? Well I think overall people look at their their total cost of ownership, but if you think about the improvements that have been made in from general, motors perspective in the fuel, economy and emissions improvement in our our full sized trucks and SUV's and our mid crossovers. Giving people more choice. We still do believe in an all electric future, and we're using this time to accelerate our work and we believe let's get to all electric vehicles as quickly as possible and do it in a way where we're creating value for the customer that they have the vehicle in the segment they want. It's affordable. It has the right range, and then we're also working on making sure working with energy companies as well as startup companies in a in a kind of a collection of companies that there's a robust charging infrastructure, and when you have all those questions answered we're seeing a willingness and stronger interest from the consumer in electric vehicles. Mary, let's talk about a letter that you wrote to your employees and your suppliers. I think it was on June first after that that we were, we hadn't seen so many protests around the country you wrote some pretty moving and powerful words said that I'm both inpatient and disgusted. By the fact that as a nation we seem to be placated by the passive. Discussion of why why does this happen? Why can't we get to a different place wires the response so visceral. Let's stop asking why and start asking. What so I wonder I? What is the response that you receive back from your employees and your suppliers after that? We shared it with employees on Saturday. And then we shared it with our dealers, and our suppliers on Monday and response has been overwhelmingly positive hundreds of people responded on our internal site for communications, and then I've had dozens and dozens probably. Over one hundred individual emails from our employees and suppliers and dealers all around the world with support and sharing that same of frustration at that. We can't let this keep happening. We need to drive real and lasting change. Recognize the. Stem issues that need to be addressed. How do you address those issues? I know that you are one of the CEOS on the Business Roundtable responsible for heading up some of the Business Roundtable's response to this. What do you do as a Business Roundtable member? What do you do at GM specifically? G. Specifically. We have announced that we're forming an inclusion advisory board and I'm really excited in the next. Week if not sooner, we'll be sharing the membership of that and we are also starting off by listening. I've been in two listening sessions of just really understanding. How are African American? Employees feel what they're facing some of the challenges and that's going to inform how we move forward, but there's things that we can do across the board. As it relates to our corporate, giving our marketing communications, our talent development are hiring, so we're looking very holistically inside General Motors of how do we advance much more quickly to creating a truly inclusive environment where everybody can? Can bring their true self and be themselves at work, because if you can be yourself, you're going to be happy you're you're you're going to be at your best, so it's the the response has been very positive. We know we have a lot of work to do. This isn't going to be an overnight, but were looking to make measurable progress in. You know we can look back in one year two year three year. and we want to hold yourself accountable. That will see real progress as it relates to be our T. I'm very. Encouraged by the fact that against so many Bart. Companies are very supportive and I. Think when you take the strength of the Bart working together to look at some of the fundamental issues, whether it's from a legislative front whether it's from sharing, best practices and drive change I think that's going to help. Move The nation forward as well. Mary, are there specific goals that that you think you might hold yourself and GM accountable to? And I asked that only because we heard from the tech companies several years ago about how they were going to start telling us the numbers of diversity in their staffs and it didn't seem to make much difference. It can be difficult to find qualified employees to go into some of these positions, but it just without saying okay here. Here are the levels that we want to reach the levels we will reach. You wonder if change will be different this time if progress will happen well, I think representation and opportunity is one aspect, but I think it really gets at. How do you? How do you really? Really create the right culture and one of the things at General Motors, we've made incredible progress on his is creating a true safety culture, and we started in earnest in sixteen timeframe, and I can look now, and our numbers reflect fewer incidents across the board and I think, but it wasn't. It was a lot of things that we needed to do, but one of the most important thing. Thing was was changing the culture where people knew We wanted people to behave safely I. Think when you look at inclusion creating having the dialogue, having people understand each other value each other, listen to each other and put themselves in someone else's shoes I think we've got to create that type of change from a cultural perspective along with representation, hiring development, and programs across the board, but But when I think we'll be more successful is when we've really changed the way people feel day to day. As the they go about their work this something you're focusing on more at headquarters more at the plants, I know what you know as I visited the a conversation, we have with every single plant with their joint leadership team, and with employee's across all aspects. So this is something. You know for the company because it's about our culture, it's about it's it's about how we treat each other. How we each other and how we interact, so it's it's something everywhere, and it's global marijuana switch gears again and talk a little bit about Lordstown Ohio with the closure of the plant, there Ohio officials have suggested that they may try and claw back. Sixty billion dollars sixty million dollars I should say in tax incentives that they provided to g Do you have any idea how this might work out? Well, when we look at the difficult decision that we had made when we saw that small cars. We're not selling that. was that was something that decision we didn't like making, but it was important because customers were not interested in those vehicles any longer, but we're very proud of the fact that we have invested in going not only investing in our locations in. In Ohio across the board, but specifically in Lordstown is where we're putting our battery cell manufacturing plant with our our joint venture with G., and so I think that type of investment in the future of where we see the auto auto industry going I. Think is going to be very important for that community so many times you have to make these types of transformations. But very proud of the investment, we've made to support the Lordstown community. Let's talk a little bit about. Environmental Social and government governance transparency. Yesterday Jim was ranked number eight on a list that came out from the hundred best corporate citizens that's up from number twenty four last. What kind of changes have you made a GM? What made you get to that point and and moved up the list? If this is something that we have been working on for years now just last year, we did a name. A chief Sustainability Officer in create a sustainability office. We moved up our targets in the past. We'd said we'd be running on all renewable energy by by twenty fifty. We were able to put plans in place to pull that back. To twenty forty and for the US by twenty thirty, we've also made a very strong commitment to electric vehicles in early March right before. The covid nineteen strongly impacted the United States. We had an day where we shared our altium battery. Platform ourselves. Our our platform strategy and the number of vehicles we plan to launch in the not too distant future from an it perspective, and also then the work that we're doing from A. From an infrastructure perspective so I think from an environmental perspective. There's a lot of effort. And, also, we've continually been working on our culture. I mentioned safety and there's a lot of research to indicate that when you have a true safety culture, it leads to more inclusion, happier empowered employees, and also better business results that we've been working on. Our culture from a perspective of safety from inclusion, we're really building, accelerating the work that we have been doing and then governance and of the company. We've already had a lot of recognition of the work that we've done to have very strong governance principles, and how we operate so I think it's the continued progress. We're making and all aspects of ES G. G that afforded us this recognition and we have more work to do, and we're going to stay on that path marijuana. Thank you for being with us today. We really appreciate your time and we wish good luck as those plants get back up and running to full capacity. We do appreciate your time today. We'll take so much and I hope everyone stays well. Next on pod, the return of sports finally Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban on what's needed to keep athletes and fans safe. Obviously, safety is the first and most important. Picked the hotel. California approach once you enter you don't leave until you are eliminated from the regular season or playoffs really right back. This CNBC podcast is sponsored by capital group home of American funds. Nearly Ninety years of experience helps. You say I can partner with this firm to navigate tough times visit capital group DOT com slash market volatility American. Funds Distributors Inc... SQUAWK pod here's Joe Kernan. The, country's reopening processes going forward even as corona viruses. The cases spike in states scattered around the country. The latest CBC Change Research States of play survey measures attitudes among likely voters in returning to some normal activities, a for instance, for instance, fifty percent of respondents said they feel it is now safe to go into their office. Forty percent feel comfortable dining in at a restaurant, but only twenty eight percent said they are comfortable taking a flight. Grilling down to the state level Texas seeing a continued increase in Covid, nineteen cases with hospitalization, sitting new high of sixty six percent. Since Memorial, day join us now to talk about the reopening process in Texas and nationwide, a pro sports inequality in America, is Mark Cuban entrepreneur philanthropist, an owner of the NBA's Dallas Mavericks. Mark, we want to talk about all the different sports openings, but let's start within. Be I don't know what we're. GonNa do with. With mlb either we did see a golf a match and we got another one finally. We got another one starting. Tomorrow got to tell you I, got just. Justin rose this time. And for every stroke under par. I get two dollars so I might make up to twenty five dollars. Anyway he he played well last week, but what about? What do we need to do for NBA? Make the make coaches. Players and fans and everybody else comfortable and. We're going to be able to pull this off mark. I think we're going to be able to pull it off. Obviously, safety is the first most important thing and I think we've got a good program in place. I mean we're going to be working very closely with Disney. And the facilities and Disney. World are going to be optimized to keep you. SAFE! We're GONNA. Take the Hotel California approach. Once you or you don't leave until you are eliminated from the regular season or playoffs. We're going. Keep you know. We have very distinct programs for testing I think we're doing everything possible to keep everybody as safe as possible and I think it will work after watching everything that's happened in the different states mark and You Know Texas pretty well I would imagine. Where you stand on the way Texas is handled this versus the way I. State, it has not reopened at all. It's handling it or Georgia versus some of these other states. What's it's a great question Joe? It's very difficult situation. We had a scare here in our household. A bunch of graduation parties sixteen year old daughter attended a bunch of kids ended up getting sick and tested positive, so everybody had to go get tested. We've seen eight deaths last night. Just Dallas alone. So the number of hospitalizations are increasing so to answer your question. I wasn't opposed to opening up, but I was kind of I wasn't happy with the fact that there wasn't a lot of management of people's. People's expectations in other words people. When we went out and we drove around, there are people without mass as nothing had ever happened, and there was nobody there say no, what this could lead to problems, and so I think if we're going to stay open. We're really going to have to take some steps to make sure that businesses enforced the requirements for mask excetera. So you've got that personal experience down in Texas, but you're also trying to figure out. What do with the mavs, but then also have shark tank, and and all the businesses that you've invested in. You more than anyone else knows. You know these are great people that that have the nerve to start a business in enthusiasm and it just. You know to to run into this buzzsaw when they're trump's to get. We want to trust we want to try, and if we could open safely, that's an important part of the whole calculus on. You know it's not as important. Nothing's more important than health, but it's hard to to stay healthy if you can't pay. The rent can't put food on, but you know what the deal with those small businesses shark tank businesses. What I've told them all is you have to innovate, right? We've seen a transition to online buying and selling, and that's exactly what the. The Best of my shark tank companies have done you know when you look at the retail sales being up seventeen point seven percent you see that online sales were up thirty one percent, and so you know that people are making those purchases there and so you really have to be adaptive. The challenge has been for retail right because you want those stores to get open, but you want them to get open safely and the same with restaurants, and so we're kind of and kind of. A weird environment right now because there's so much stimulus, and so we don't know what the organic demand is right now so trying to find that balance between staying open, you know keeping people healthy and making money. Doing that is going to be difficult right now until we get past July thirty first when the. Enhanced unemployment benefits run out you. Know you've you've been on other a media outlets and other place, and you must have responded to this many many times, but in looking for ways to to change what needs to be changed in this country in of the way that the. Static racism we see with maybe with police forces for. We have no idea about I think. And, just the the inequality issue in many neighborhoods in the hopelessness in many urban areas. What do you think? Where does the answer lie after thinking about it like all of us have for so I. Don't know if I had the answer, but just to be brutally honest. White people have got to have difficult conversations right now. When we hear the term white privilege, we all react negatively. We're not used to talking about race, but you know we don't really understand. We very defensive when people use the term white privilege, but we have to start to recognize that racism. Comes from US and you know dealing with it means that you and I and anybody who looks like us as we see racism when we see people acting inappropriately when we see businesses, doing things the wrong way and not treating. Minorities as they should be treated then we need to say something. We need to speak up. You know as an entrepreneur as a business guy, what I see this as a generational opportunity opportunity for this country to move forward, and so now is the time to do it. Is it hard? Yes, painful? Yes, but you know we are the ones. White people don't like to talk about race. It makes me uncomfortable. Just saying the white people. Because, we associated with so many negative things, but that's what we have to do, and again we can't. We hear the term white privilege. Maybe it's not the best term, but maybe it makes us uncomfortable, but the fact that makes us uncomfortable gives us reason to really WANNA. Start taking steps forward. So going into some of the areas where this is the separate issue, but but where we know it's just so seemed so hopeless for for the kids that are growing up there. In terms of education in terms of the surroundings we do have something in as a model in Harlem very expensive, and it takes a lot of of. They start with kids when they're born and it goes all the way to win. The kid gets a job and they watch what they do after school and they watch. You know what they're involved with. The cleanup programs are great. But we need. How do we? How do we go? It's not just education because they get out of school. The kids do and they go to the. Place that might not be. Greater me and not have none of these things. None of these things are mutually exclusive. We need to have programs that help people anybody who's just banish. We need to have people we've been doing, but we need to step it up or or do it differently or something with the schools or do something with the home life, or it's something. Yes, but at the same time I'll go back to what I was saying earlier. We is white. People Who are racist, maybe not overtly racist, but you know suddenly subtly. And when we see people act that way, we have to step in and say something that's when things start to change. When we see all these numbers. Come Out, we see the impact of the police departments on the African. American community. We hear the prevalence stories about African American men and their interactions with the police. Those are systemic issues. Those don't just you know. People always talk about race is not. You're not born with hatred. Hatred towards other races, your audit and the people that we know that are teaching those things. Those are the people we need to talk to. That's what's going to lead to systemic change. It may just be one little baby step at a time that each one of us can take, but in aggregate. That's where Real Change Occurs K. marked, or we're going to continue to to have the have these. Thanks rescue the question Chelsea. Tough question, tough, tough answers, but We'll, we'll keep plugging away hopefully will. We'll be right back. You're listening to Squawk pod from CNBC. Here's Joe Kernan. In read about this. I like it Russian president. Vladimir Putin has a disinfection tunnel installed of this country residence that sounds like kind of like a car wash almost to protect them from the coronavirus video. was released by a Russian news agency yesterday. Anyone entering Putin's residents has to pass through the chamber that uses a fine mist of disinfectant solution that is sprayed all over the exposed areas of the body to kill anything that. Might be on you. I guess as you're going in. I thought it was bigger than I. Read about it. That's not exactly a tunnel I. Don't think I wonder if we're ever going to see those around here though. The airport. Why don't they put those in? There were very fine mist, isn't it? It's kind of can't even can't even convince people to wear masks here. Good luck. What right in once you go through there? I mean it's in your. ORIFICES. Nose and your lungs and I. It's not just sitting on your skin. It's. I mean if you cough or sneeze? You're back to score. If you call for sneeze, though, are you? Wearing a mask. And Ninety five mask after you do that. Ask You get straight okay? And that's the podcast for today on our rundown tomorrow met EEO and Co. founder Reed Hastings making a personal donation to historically black colleges and universities, and speaking with leaders, Spelman morehouse and the UNC. This moment is not the first time that raises them regard. It's terribly ugly. And many of us have been working on these issues for a long time. Again mostly through education and. Visits said my understanding. My relationships with all my colleagues here was all pre crisis. squawk box is hosted by Joe, Kernan Becky, quick and Andrew Ross Sorkin, tune weekday mornings on CNBC at six am. Eastern subscribe to Squawk pod wherever you listen, share our podcast with a friend and tweet US anytime at Squawk CNBC will meet EVAC here tomorrow. This CNBC podcast is sponsored by capital group home of American funds. Nearly Ninety years of experience helps. You say I can partner with this firm to navigate tough times visit capital group DOT. com slash market volatility American funds, Distributors Inc...

Mary Barra GM General Motors CNBC Texas Dallas Mavericks United States partner Mark Cuban Vladimir Putin China SUV CNBC president Funds Distributors Inc Joe Kernan Kernan Becky marijuana Andrew Ross sorkin
Walmart gets into health care

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

06:54 min | 8 months ago

Walmart gets into health care

"A store where you can get an xbox and x rays while mark gets into healthcare in New York. I'm Sabrina Short. In for David Brancaccio Walmart which reports earnings on Tuesday is expanding. Its move into. Healthcare recently opened a second free standing health clinic in. Georgia next to one of its supercenters so I can see a doctor. There for routine visits. Urgent Care xrays. Labs counseling dental and exams. That is a lot of healthcare marketplaces. Mary Barra has more. Here's the problem that Walmart and other retailers like CVs and walgreens see as an opportunity so curious expensive. It's difficult to access and that doesn't seem to be getting solved very rapidly. Within the Healthcare Industry Jill ran pulled is a managing director at Alex. Partner's swimming a lot of folks in retailer saying Hey. We have stores close to where people are. We have a proven ability to deliver goods and services in a highly efficient better. And this sounds like something that we'd be good at Walmart is promising transparent and low pricing at these new clinics. Whether or not customers have insurance there is a challenge. Here for any retailer. Timothy Campbell is director of retail insights at Kantar. Really WanNa go to a retail store to do you know your care which you you know. You're not necessarily looking for bargain by you. Want your quality in in your life is your most important thing but he says it seems like Walmart design the new clinics with that in mind. They have separate entrances and they look like doctors offices. Not Walmart supercenters. I'm Mary Barra for marketplace. The consumer products company Reynolds went public late last month. Reynolds as in Aluminum. Foil and plastic wrap disposable plates so far investors have liked what they've seen. Reynolds stock is up almost nine percent since its debut but as the one hundred year old company emerges as a modern public company. It's also dealing with the fact that many of its products are not exactly sustainable. Marketplace's Justin Ho has more in its IPO Prospectus Reynolds said concerns about the environment and single use plastics could impact the man for several of its products like the hefty tableware line. I think increasingly. We're seeing companies begin to disclose what we call stain. Ability Risks Tunsi wheel on this director of nyu's Center for sustainable business over the last few years she says. Half of the growth in the consumer goods market has come from products with sustainable marketing. It's really important for both business and investors to understand that this consumer shift is happening and Reynolds has adapted to consumer tastes. It says foil and plastic bags made from recycled material and compostable parchment paper but warden marketing Professor Barbara. Kahn says the company also knows that. Many customers still value convenience over sustainability and. I don't think they're gonNA want to disappoint those consumers. Reynolds says surveys of its customers. Show consumers value their ability ease of use in price as their top concerns. I'm Justin Ho for marketplace. Let's do the numbers. Us markets are closed for the president's Day holiday but the footsie in London is up three tenths percent. German DAX up two tenths percent. Japan's Nikkei is down seven tenths percent. The Shanghai composite closed up two point three percent. Today it's recovered about half of its losses. Since the Rohnert virus outbreak the Chinese government announced today an additional strategy for trying to control the spread of the virus China's central bank announced. It would start actually cleaning. Its currency in handing out brand new banknotes whenever it pop possible some bacteria and some viruses can stick to money and stay viable for days. It's not known how long corona virus can stay viable on the surface or whether it could be spread through money money can be cleaned by exposure to UV. Light or high temperatures. Remember the three RS reduce reuse recycle. Well we haven't been doing so great at one of those ours recycling when it comes to plastics the Environmental Protection Agency says just eight point. Four percent of plastics were recycled in two thousand seventeen and that was before China stopped taking. Us Plastic waste so some stores are leaning on one of the other ours. The Forgotten Reuse. They are focusing on refillable products in reusable containers sue carpenter reports. Nellie del Rosario has seen the video that show animal stomachs full of plastic. We humans have thrown away. That motivated me so much so I was like okay. I'm doing less and zero waste. That's like my pursuit right now. These days del. Rosario does is much shopping as possible. At refill stations shops like no talks life in Los Angeles it sells beauty products and home cleaning supplies and little or no packaging. Instead of buying items in plastic throwaways customers bring their own containers. Pay By the ounce. Kelly Milford is co owner of no talks life noticing that a lot of people were coming in and looking at our products and saying this is great. This is natural Do have it without plastic so now customers can bring their own reusable containers. I they weigh those containers. Then they fill them with product out of the stores. Large glass jugs filled with everything from body. Lotion dishwasher detergent then. Customers way the containers again and pay often items. Sold at retail shops can cost more than mainstream brands sold in conventional stores. That's because many stores with refill stations are small independent businesses. Some sell products made from more expensive ingredients. Marshall Cohen is a senior retail analyst with NPD. Group that conducts annual surveys on consumer trends. He says shoppers are willing to spend about ten percent. More ON ECO. Friendly Products millennials. He says are willing to pay even more. You have a generation that's causing brands to be much more effective much. More sustainable focus only a small percentage of stores participate in refill programs at the Moment Cohen. Says but the retail model may offer an early glimpse at a new phase in retail when that's more environmentally conscious and practical but challenge at this business model has to overcome is convenience more often. He says retailers are focused on recyclable and reusable packaging because that business model is less cumbersome in Los Angeles. I'm sue carpenter marketplace and in New York I'm rebound ashore with the marketplace morning report from APM American public media.

Walmart Reynolds managing director David Brancaccio Walmart Mary Barra Nellie del Rosario New York Justin Ho Los Angeles China Sabrina Short Georgia Reynolds mark Shanghai Kantar
Neurocentricity & Empathetic Recruitment: Aligning the Corporate Mission to Meaningful Work

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

36:22 min | 2 years ago

Neurocentricity & Empathetic Recruitment: Aligning the Corporate Mission to Meaningful Work

"What is their purpose? What lights them up? What do they want their contribution to the universe to be? And how does that align to what we're trying to do? What how does that align to our mission to our vision? What's their mission statement for themselves with their vision for themselves would their personal values? Let's talk about that. Then we'll be able to figure things out. From Washington DC. This is the tight rope. I'm your host, Dan Smolen. An unusual alignment of forces is taking hold in today's workplace one that merges the needs of hiring managers and the express wants and desires of professionals the alignment is aided by what our guest performance expert. Adrian shock calls neuro centrist city, the dynamics that encapsulate. How we relate to the world. And what allows us to thrive the merger has ushered in a new era of empathetic recruitment. In this episode. We flush out the forces that are coalescing to make work more efficient and profitable for hiring managers. But also more meaningful for the millions of Americans who seek purpose profound meaning and experience and enjoyment on the job. We spoke with Adrian shock in July twenty eighteen so you've established. Considerable subject matter expertise in an area that you call neuro centrist city, and I was wondering if you could share with our listeners what that is about. Sure, so narrow centrisly comes from nurse Centric. And my former company was called neuro Centric leadership consulting nurse. And trysofi is basically how I define the nervous system. The nervous system is what gets activated when we feel good when we feel badly. It is our Brahma tour in terms of how we experience and few the world it's designed to keep us alive. It's designed to keep us safe. And it's designed to lift us to our highest heights. That's what nerves interested is. It's a focus of the nervous system and the contribution. It makes to our being and our -bility to connect in our village to influence or be influenced. It's all about the nervous system. The nervous system generates language when I'm feeling upset when I'm feeling disrespected unsafe. What comes out of my mouth is very different than when I feel at ease. Happy and understood I'm not making those decisions consciously. But I am emoting. My nervous system is emoting language. It's the nervous system that that's the origin. This is my belief. This is this is how I see the world. So may agree. Some may not, but my experiences our nervous system is what emotes it creates emotion and the emotion that creates language now, how does neuro century city play out in a work environment. Especially when people are applying for a job in an organization or are hiring people in an organization, how does neuro centrisly play out in those kinds of dynamics if we look at this in the. Context of hiring. So if we there are many different context from which we can take a look at this. We can look at hiring. You can look at performance evaluation. We can look succession planning in order to really see what someone is capable of. We need to make sure that they are at ease and sharing their story with us. If I have somebody who stressed or if I have somebody who is way to relax. I'm going to get a version of that person that may or may not be aligned to what I actually get. If I hire this person. So understanding the nurse and trinity is about understanding how to keep this person. They're nervous system at ease. And how to keep minority system at ease. Because when we're both at ease. We see the world much more accurately. Much more realistically, we don't have these filters. That are keeping us from hearing. What's coming out of somebody else's mouth? Like, oh my God. You know? I hate that tire. Oh my gosh. I can't believe the person were this to an interview. So there's all of this narrative that's happening in the mind of the interviewer and in the minds of the interviewee. So how can I keep this person at their absolute most comfortable level of east? See what they're really about. But not holds true for performance evaluation. I mean, I've worked with people in many scenarios. I mean, I've seen a lot. I've been around for a long time. And I remember having conversations with HR to say, we don't even know what this guy's made of he's so stressed out. There's this was there's a specific specific example between, you know, disguise, boss and performance. And I said, we don't even know what he's capable of his boss is making them crazy. So let's figure out if I mean, it's so expensive to let people go it's so expensive to to weed them out. I mean, if they're not a good fit get them out as soon as possible. But if if you don't even know gotta figure. It out. So what you're describing here is optimal. It's the conditions. That would optimize the relationship between in this particular case, the higher talent and the hiring manager. So it's cohesive. It's open it can withstand constructive criticism. But more importantly, it can grow boat for both parties has to happen in a state of balance. One of the things that I cook my clients, the time is there's an you'd align. It is a term that stemmed from the army. It's orient observe the an act. I love military acronyms. I have to get back to escapes me. But basically just draw a line where am I on this line? Am I end up in the line itself? Sit down before any conversation just draw that line out and my Bubba line. So the line is baseline balance. Am I hyped up excited or am I below the line in my feeling insecure? My feeling angry feeling stressed and the bottom that the game is get yourself to that baseline of balance. So that you can show up listening. Well, communicating well and seeing what's actually going on. And I don't go into a conversation knowing my state of bean, it's going to be very difficult for me to influence you and get you to to hear what I'm saying show. Let's play out the different ways that somebody could interact with a hiring manager the old way. I'll call transactional is a recruiter. Would come up with a list of candidates who check off all the boxes experience education training. And maybe some other things maybe where they went to grad school. I'm not sure so the person shows up, and if I do my job, well, and I peer into the person's soul, and I can kind of get a sense of who they are. And they're really good people. We get them through the interview process, and then we hope that the fit check works, and so ninety days into the job it either works or a dozen, and maybe maybe it doesn't work after two years. That's sometimes happens. The old transactional model goes against the grain of neuro centrist. Because it's like how how is the hiring manager? See the world see this opportunity and the talent that I'm bringing in is just an instrument of that. I'm not thinking about what they need from the experience. So I wanna fast forward to a new trend that I think is happening, and I see it here in in Washington DC. So the old model is put out a job spec. And then call central casting and show me somebody who went to Warton school, and you know, is a digital marketing professional and has worked in these kinds of companies. And you know, that's what recruiters do they find those people, and they send them off to interviews. And if we're lucky as often as the case, we hire somebody. But here's the new approach, which is not transactional. I'll call it relational. So I saw this. I about six or seven years ago with an. NGO a non-governmental organization here in DC and what they do is. They say to the universe. Send us interesting people. We don't care what they do. We don't care where they went to school. Send me people that have a sense of purpose and a sense as what because we wanna grow an ecosystem when within the organization that creates more of that that becomes a big family, and we and we're supportive cried idea. How do you do it? Well, we don't post jobs we bring people in for coffee, and we interview them, and we see if we like them. But more importantly, we see if they like us. I said so how's that working out? She goes the retention rate. Is unbelievable. You're working out. All the all the courtship. I in your finding out if it's not just can you work with me. Can I work with you? It's can we create something new together. So I want to ask you how you feel about that progression. I think it's amazing. I just listening to you describe that what what comes up for me is what we're talking about is empathetic recruitment. It is recruiting from the space from which someone is looking for a job. You're looking at your your route create your recruiting them from their lens. And that's that's what this is all about. It's it's when we look at how do we know quite frankly now that I'm reflecting on this for a second. When I think back at my early days in the Netherlands when I was an ex Pat with AMS. We I mean, we we were extreme in that. We were so desperate for resources that we would joke that we didn't really mean it. But it's like if you could follow mirror, we take you on. But really if you were smart if you were flexible positive nice, we will figure it out. And that's how we grew from seven people to seven hundred fifty people in two years, and we delivered on time a highly complex project in four years. No one thought we could do it. No one, and we had history majors and music majors and some engineers and political. It's it's the gamut of this diversity that created this this ability to to collectively innovate and saw problems together. And I think that that's what that's what you're describing. When when you're talking about equality conversation. I am imagining a coffee maybe standing up nothing between two people. And you know, what is their purpose? What lights them up? What's their? What's their what do they want their contribute contribution to the universe to be? And how does that align to what we're trying to do what how does that align to our mission to our vision? What's their mission statement for themselves? What's their vision for themselves would've their personal values? Let's talk about that. Then we'll be able to figure some things out when we went through the great recession of two thousand eight something seismic happened in our relationship to work in the days prior to that in the years in the eons prior to that it was definitely transactional. And if you asked a person at least as I would recruit what gets you up out of bed in the morning. What's your motivation? Oftentimes, it would be in terms of monetary gain or recognition which often go hand in hand. You certainly hear that all the time with really good sales people. It's not about money than it's about. Recognition, but with sales people often about money when we went through the great recession something happened and part of it was we started to deceive ourselves things were getting better. And then we learn that a lot of people just sort of fell through the cracks and never got re energized or reengaged into the workforce. And why was that partly because the money was getting harder to come by the reach for that upward mobility was not attainable. And that got proved out in some research that came out last year where the American dreams basically been rebooted to one of economic stability. I'm happy, and I am content. If I'm covering my monthly expenses and a medical expense. You know, my daughter breaks her arm and have to pay out of pocket for something or have a a water leak in the basement, and I have to spend money that I don't have to fix it that I can somehow withstand that, and I think a lot of people have been jogged by that. But it's. Liberated us to really think about what motivates us, and this is the important point here. More of us are getting back to meaning what I do. I want to know makes a difference that it's positive that is profound that I'm having fun doing it perhaps. And I think this is getting played at how we relate to work and how we get hired for opportunities. Millennials are very much like this as a cohort more of them are like meaning driven people than money driven people part of that comes out of the fact that money is alluded them. So they had to find meaning positive and profound meeting in other ways. But as a result of that millennials only want to go to work for companies that reflect their values. So now the market is driving. This kind of organizational changes relates to bringing people on board. And what's the result cohesion thought process improvement breakthroughs reinvention? When companies are redefining what they do. Because of the people they're bringing in. How do you get more companies to do that is the question you have any thoughts? Well, I think that there's much more to it than just millennials. And I think that we've got more baby boomers in the workforce than anything by a long shot. And a lot of these baby boomers have a lot in common with these millennials really taking a look at what is my purpose in what is my contribution going to be. That's why I'm here. So I think that it's not just millennials that are addressing this. I think that there's more to it as there should be as human beings. We are intrinsically designed to continually develop we're on this planet. We are in this period of time to become more resilient. That are happier. That's I mean, that's why we're here. We're here to continually develop, and I think that that is more meaningful. Two people at different stages in their lives. If you're looking at aligning values, organizational values new purpose or to contribution in meaningful ways. That speaks to how an organization is going to define it. So not only for their staff, but for their clients, there's an incredible trend. I think it's spot on. I think it's more than just millennials. And I think at the end of the day all of these organizations need to do what is best for them. And so for some organizations, it doesn't make sense to think of themselves with these values that they truly don't hold, and they are transactional, and they are bottom line focused, and it is. Okay. It is. Okay. But when we're looking at engagement when we're looking at validation, you know, you talk about, you know, validating people Oprah Winfrey. Said, you know, recently at the end of the day in all of her conversations with really difficult. People had people good people the one common thread. That everyone needs in order to go. There is that they need to be validated. As a human being I would agree with them on. So so long as we understand the importance of validation of respect of being heard, you can be bottom line focused. You can be transactional. You can. But it's this way of how are we interconnecting with each other in a more meaningful way? How am I going to ensure that even though I only care if you show up eight hours a day, and you create x number of widgets, or whatever the case may be. Yeah, that's fine. And I'm Wayne to validate you as a contributing member of this team, and as a human being on this planet, and that's that's I think what we're saying. Is you don't have to be the model doesn't have to be black and white. But I think what we're looking at is the root. What what creates this energy of performance of being a part of and. Connection. And I think that's what we're really talking about. Here. What keeps managers up at night in relation to creating that kind of an an ecosystem in their companies being punished for doing something different. Oh going against the status quo. When the stakes are down, and you have an organization that I find organizations are very interesting. I find that when people use the word accountable, y'all we hold we believe in accountability, we will people accountable, and that's great. But sometimes what they really are doing. This is a cultural blame and the word blame and accountability are used synonymous -ly. They don't use the word blame. But that's what shows up in the behavior. So so when we're really looking at what kind of an organization is open to new ways of inspiring and motivating it may look different than what their boss has ever seen. Before. And if that boss isn't comfortable and feels like there's a risk associated with doing that. I mean, there are very important compiled compliance regulations at HR needs to abide by their things. I get it movies things that we need to be very careful of and it's risk aversion. You know, they're afraid of being sued, and I get it. But there's fear of doing things differently that some organizations can't they can't do it. They can't do it to peer into the soul of the senior manager who's pushing back on the economy class to shine to create the change has to be interesting. I would think I l let the alignment, but I think, but I think is probably the person is worried about their legacy their relevance. Of course, it's an ego driver. Well, it's fear. It's fear. They wanna be relevant. They wanna be validated. I mean, if you really think about it that person's manager if they really. That manager was really thinking about it in an open positive way. They would know that man that guy who does that for his team comes from his manager his managers view of the world of inspiring performance as opposed to. We don't do it that way. You can't do it. Simple of this that I felt with as a recruiter was new hire. Who said, hey, I live forty five miles from the office. I like having the remote officing because it's less, wear and tear on me and on the car. It gets spent more time with my family. But then the hiring manager is saying I need to see you. I can't look at you on a screen. I need to feel you in the room. You know, maybe there's some bring a truth to that. But it does talk about the resistance that change agents face on a daily basis in my higher new soldier through for a while until he had to go get something else. Because at the end of the day it had to be right for him. That's an excellent point that. Organizations and individuals are trying to grapple with every single day. And everybody's right. I mean when you bring people together, and they are physically together in the presence of each other. And it's a positive experience you have access to a very different field of energy of very different field of creating something new then when you are virtual and at the same time when we're working virtual what we haven't thought about is. And I work with teams on this allot, the virtual experience, the virtual demo for selling something, and we need to do a demo the skills and behaviors and competencies that you need to do that are not the same as skills and competencies and behaviors of when you're dealing face to face but nobody's talking about. Okay. How are we going to train these folks to do this differently? The same thing holds true for managers. Okay. I don't know anybody who's talking about. All right. Look if we're going. To do a virtual team. And I've worked with teams that are all over the world. All right. I've managed people all over the world. It requires very different skills on doing that and behaviors. But nobody taught me how to do that. Nobody trained me. Nobody said this is what you were doing the skills. And behaviors that got you to where you are today are not going to be the skills and behaviors that get you there for Charlie. They don't exist. So you need to look at things differently by doing x y and z and they need to be trained people. Don't know this intuitively because we've never had to experience it before. So I think the virtual experience makes a lot of sense because people are not driving two hours a day. And believe me, you've got kids you've got parents. Who are it's a crazy space right now. So how can we make it easier for people we can do that? But we need to teach people how to manage and we need people teach people how. To contribute in those different spaces. I think one area that we may see some positive movement in is in the area workplace flexibility and work experience flexibility. What do I mean by that it used to be you had to be in the office boss out of see you part of that was cynical? I don't see you. I don't see you doing the work, and therefore you're not doing the work. Right. But what's happened is that more of us, and especially women who need the flexibility get pushed back because their lives. Don't allow them. The ability to be in an office nine to five five days a week, or whatever I'm tapping in now to the work of on our back started a company called work, spill W E R K and on us focus has to do with flexibility. And why we need flexible work, she identified three years. The first is that we might have to take care of somebody on a long-term a mom or dad or another family member who needs are. Attention, obviously as our population gets older where more and more of us are dealing with parents who need long term care and it's expensive. And it may be best that I have a role in that which part of the day the second is working style. You know, not everybody is wired to work the typical allotted eight hour slot. Plus overtime. Some of us are night. Owls ideal sometimes with graphic designers. They do their best work at two in the morning, traditional work environment doesn't really allow for that. And the other despite be I don't do well in a traditional office setup. I get up. I walk around. I'm on my headset going to the kitchen, I'm making myself launch. But I'm still doing work, and I'm engaging in a conference call do you see more hiring managers softening up to the realities of the best talent needing flexibility? And if they are what's it gonna take to get them? They're such an interesting conversation point because it's very complex, and it's. Not easy, and it's not black and white and I've seen as much push against it as I've seen pushed for it lucre. I think if you were to look at this idea of just looking at the medical field, you video patient visits. Do I need to really go to a doctor? There's a big push for you know, you have to go to the doctors they need to see you and at the same time. No, you don't you don't need to you can see me and Skype. You can see me zoom. You can see me in a FaceTime, whatever there are ways to work in a service industry with clients that is virtual and highly effective and keeping waiting rooms from being filled pissing off your patients because you're waiting in a room for an hour wire doing this in the same way. There's that pushback as your as the move for flexible work hours. I think that you're absolutely right. Everybody is different. You have people who are in their groove two o'clock in the morning. And you have people who are now if you're managing a team of people and your project team there enough project managers in the world who are managing people all over the world in different time zones that we know it can be done and effectively s- long as everybody's very clear on what it is that they're supposed to be delivering. And by when so I think that what it speaks to is a lack of confidence in the capacity to manage those different work environments. Well, because again, we need to learn new skills and behaviors to stay on top of it. If people aren't working I guarantee that they could be sitting in front of you doing Facebook half the day, then whether they're down the hall or in the comfort of their own own home. I also I also wanna speak to this idea that we are not resources ourselves in a way that can help us access high performance in ways that we need to right now sitting down all day driving in a car city. Being showing up at work at sitting for eight hours driving in a car home sitting. There is no way you have access to performance. It's it's just not your body has as much to do with that as your brain. So again, looking at what is it that we need if looking at this holistically when you look at how is your body being resource when you're at your home, or whether you're at work, if you don't have access to movement, if you don't have access to nourishment, it's going to affect your performance, it's tough because people don't know how to do it because they haven't had to do it. This is all about north plus the city, they need to see it work. Well, so that they can trust it. With think that you would want to do this. Because if you like the people you work with you want them to stay with you. Yes. But at the same time, they have response managers and leadership have responsibilities that they need to deliver on and they're going to do it the way they know how to do it. So there's a tension between pay what is in the best interest of the wellbeing of my staff, and what is in the best interest of me keeping my job. And if the leadership in the organization is adverse to this kind of way of working that boss has that's that's a tough place to be at a tough place to be that at the end of the day that boss is going to do what's best for him or her and their job and just to point out the tensions that people are are working with it's more than just women men have as much at stake of flexible work hours in the needs of flexible, work hours as women, I always think about the European. And South American tradition of siesta taking a couple hours out in the middle of the day to resource, whether it's sleep or shop, or do whatever it is having this extended break in the middle of your day helps you show up differently more powerfully more thoughtfully. And that's something that we don't do. I think that there's something to that as well. Well, we're very identified with what we do for work in this country. You go to Europe. You do not dare us somebody what they do for a living. You can ask about their children, and what's life like in the little town that they live in. But you can't venture into what you do for living. It's considered rude. And I think they have a good point work is part of life. It's not life. And we I think we're trending to a better place in that respect. We're seeing people get sick. We're seeing Scott's levels at an all time high and that's bottom line issue. That's an engagement issue. We are not resourcing. Ourselves. Well, and we are becoming less healthy period. If you really want the best from your employees there needs to be different conversations. But you know, I I'm very fine. Very interesting. This big break in the middle of the day for a good two hours to and what happens if you take that to take care of your yourself and your family in a different way on. The body the brain needs that reset. Well. Yeah, listen when I first started working out. It was started working in the work world oftentimes the executives that I work with went out for a two hour lunch which included martinis, and they would come back and be completely incapacitated for the rest of the afternoon. We're well beyond that point. Now, thankfully, but we don't take care of ourselves at the workplace. But I think we're going to have to get there. Otherwise, we're gonna fall behind. It's not the way we're working in many aspects of organizations today, it's it is not conducive to health and wellbeing. Just the way we're physically holding ourselves when we're working know, we talked about earlier with the way, we're using our phones the way we're using our, laptops, the physical posture that we're taking on for hours and hours each day is producing more cortisol more of the stress hormones that. I mean that that creates more stress. I mean, we we've got a look at man, what is it that we need to do differently? So that we can breathe. I mean, the the lack of breathing. I'm a certified yoga teacher, and the one thing that I pay attention to and and see in myself as man people are not breathing these when we're stressed. We're not breathing. We're not breathing when we're working on computers and phones, we are the our lungs our hearts it is contracting. We don't have access to quality breath. I mean, just if you were to do one thing and just say, okay, let's teach us organization how to breathe well that in itself would be extraordinary. I know you say that men are affected by this too. But I actually think women are the change agent. I think that with more women getting into the to sweep of big companies best example, I can think of as Mary Barra who runs GM she took over a company that was an old boys club. And it was like a paramilitary organization you produce. Cars, and this is what they look like. No, did she's change that culture. And as a result, it's becoming a great place to work. She's very smart. And I think more I'd like to see more women in roles like that. Because I think was a word out. So well when the meta run the show, I think that I think that there is something to be said for diversity. And I think that it's measured. It's proven. There's absolutely no doubt whatsoever. That when you have a diverse leadership team into verse workforce, it always always outperforms non diverse organizations, leadership teams, etc. Always the way that women experienced the world. I mean, we all experience the world based on our experiences. The experience of a woman the experience of children the experience of of of being women are different and based on our experiences. We see the world different the metoo movement. You know, my understand why men. I don't get it because they haven't experienced it. And until you experience it, it's hard to conceptualize. So I think that. Yeah. There absolutely is a problem with diversity as it relates to gender as it relates to race as it relates to religion. And I think that in twenty years there's going to be more minorities or going to be more women by default. And I think it's going to it's going to happen. It's going to happen organically regardless, but I think that there's a real role for women and minorities to step it up. And I think we're seeing that I think we're seeing that now to your point I'm positive about a too. I'm actually thinking about thirty years ahead. And that gets me to my final question for you dream, which is to help us look into the futures twenty forty eight and we'll let's pure to a workplace of a successful and fry than company what's the experience of work like what's typical day like, and is there such thing as a typical day. That's a really tough question to get my arms around. I can say that what would be ideal for me whether or not that is actually going to happen. I think that we're looking at a world of more empathetic buying empathetic recruitment empathetic leading empathetic leadership is absolutely the way of the future. It is allowing everybody that's connected to a common cause to work together to be respected feel connected and safe in a way that will change the world. So I believe that technology is going to be so down that there won't be a need for us to need to be in physical space with one another. I believe that through the next thirty years, we're going to learn some really tough lessons. I think in the next five years and ten years, we're going to learn some really really tough lessons that are going to inform the way we include everyone. So I think that. They'll be more diversity there'll be more innovation. And I think that the the diversity is going to drive that I think that the world will be leadership. I think organizations will look at their role as being as much a contributor to the greater good of each individual who are showing up to work for that organization as it is for the organization itself. So the the deliverable is going to be as much about the bottom line as it is about the health and wellbeing and ongoing development of everybody who's contributing to that organization, so hopeful future. Why not we can do it? We can do it. Adrian shock. Thank you so much for being on the tight rope. And my pleasure. Thank you for having me. I really enjoyed it. I hope we can get your back soon. My pleasure. I hope so thanks our sincere. Thanks, go out to Adrian shock for walking the tightrope with us links to her website are available on our website at Dan, Smolen dot com. Check out our past. Episodes on apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts by keyword ING. The tight rope with Dan Smolen. And if you like what you hear police give us a five star rating and post your comments like listener. Denise who writes that the episode? She listened to resonated with me on many levels, keep up the good work. Well, thank you. Denise don't forget to subscribe to our mailing lists by visiting Dan Smolen dot com, and please suggest topics that you believe we should tackle in future. Episodes by writing us at info at Dan, Smolen dot com from Washington DC. This is the tight rope. I'm Dan Smolen and to remember this our best days. Lie ahead have a great and successful week. Everyone.

Washington DC Dan Smolen Adrian shock NGO Oprah Winfrey the Netherlands Europe Denise Warton school Facebook senior manager apple cortisol Charlie Scott Mary Barra GM
General Motors CEO Mary Barra Bets on Nikola; Pharma CEOs Commit to Vaccine Safety

Squawk Pod

37:41 min | Last month

General Motors CEO Mary Barra Bets on Nikola; Pharma CEOs Commit to Vaccine Safety

"It takes conviction to see beyond the turmoil in today's markets. That's PG the investment management business of Prudential with a legacy of risk management discipline and investment experience through thirty market cycles PG is prepared for today's challenges. Pgn Brings long-term perspective and deep expertise across public and private markets globally outlast today's uncertainty with P. Ju- find out more at Pge dot. com. That's PG. I IM DOT com. This is Squawk pod today on our podcast safety and Cova Vaccine Development Nine pharmacy have issued an historic joint statement. CNBC's health report mentor out. They say quote we believe this pledge will help ensure public confidence in the rigorous scientific and regulatory process by which covid nineteen vaccines are evaluated and may ultimately be approved. Dr Tool Gone Day Sir did writer and Public Health expert on voiding cove resurgence this winter whether it's ventilators masks. Now it's test in the monks to come. That will be back seems we need that basic public health infrastructure that matches the capacity should the need and we can do it. And Big News and Autos General Motors betting on electric vehicle darling Nikola GM. Announcing an eleven percent stake in the startup and CEO Mary Barra says it couldn't be a better fit this a wonderful validation of our technology and then bringing our engineering and manufacturing expertise to the table. I'm CNBC producer Katie Kramer is. September eight, twenty, twenty we have delusions of grandeur squawk on begins right now. Good morning everybody. Welcome to Squawk box here on CNBC I'm becky quick with Joe Kernan and Andrew Ross Sorkin and gentlemen welcome back to both of you. You guys are back just in time for what we've been watching the markets. Watching it. ASYMPTOTICALLY head higher was. Watching it every day we're like this tech stuff is insane. It's benefiting unlike other companies benefiting from from what we're all. Sort of living with now but some of it didn't quite make sense as much as what what was it up to I mean the Nasdaq was way up even even for the year what do you think we're back Yonder Right what's better for America? I think US coming back. Maybe tied. What do you think Sorkin? You, know Congress back then it back Washington back or US back together SPA. Think there's a huge squawk. Yes. I'll take. That taught walk back. To we have delusions of grandeur maybe maybe just slightly but but I think it's No coincidence I don't think that the country's getting back to get. Back. To work Washington wise. If you called what they do work, what do we do though we're getting back to work to anyway but but scary week last week when it did have a lot to do and I think we should talk about it. This morning is the role of Softbank in artificially effectively. Does prices really over the past month through call options a lot more details about saw. Thanks big bet on tech, stocks The Wall Street Journal reporting, and also the T- There's lots of different reports. Now, the firm used stock options to ties much as fifty billion dollars in individual tech stocks similar reporting I've done the notion, the notional amount of that they that they might have put out there. If all the stocks ended up having to be bought could be close to half a trillion dollars. Southbank hasn't published any of the details of the trades just yet. But Softbank shares dropped yesterday today as investors got nervous about south. Thanks bet on tech stocks. Rising also should note when you really look at what was happening late last week as far as I can tell, they were not in the market and that I think has put a lot of pressure on what's happening. So you have the retail investors, the Robin investors, that's one element of it but softbank coming in behind buying a huge notional amount of stock pushing that stock up a lot of hedge funds and others on the other side of that trait having actually buy that stock to hedge themselves. There's something like four billion dollars an upside on that that they're they're up on the trade at this point by about four billion dollars, but it's still. Going to investors who thought they were investing in a in a vision fund you know looking for new start ups, new technology startups that we're. GonNa go. Well, it turns out it's just moss who's kind of playing the market on this plane, the US market big way others no question. You know if you go back and look in of the filings from southbank before they had. Bought into the things you could have actually seen some of the by earlier. The issue in this case is that they just bought so much more and they really bought so much more in the last three to four weeks, and because they did it with calls, and this is why is affecting the market and it's so interesting relatives even the issues that Softbank is having but. They're using calls the notional amount of stock that's getting bought and all the hedges that are getting put on and how much stock is therefore being bought in the market is what really did push up the market to some extent and then you had, of course, the Robin Hood, effect and everybody else seeing that those stocks were going up. The most interesting part is you don't see it in the volume which was so interesting that will come later because. So much of this was done quote unquote off the tape if you will. Let's get back to this sort of a heartwarming story I guess and that's a congress returning to Washington. But it's important. 'cause now on top of a stimulus package, you gotta worry about keeping government open, which seems to happen again and again and again. Deja Vu all over again, because government funding is going to expire. But this time it seems like there may not be an issue Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says that Democrats and Republicans haven't reached a final deal on spending legislation, but he predicts congress is going to be able to move forward. He had meetings with Pelosi. And maybe by the end of the week, that legislation is not expected though to contain any corona virus relief provision given that jobs report that we had. Even, though there's you know the the rate of change might be decelerating. Still a lot of jobs in the you know the market's. Down but not out. So you wonder. The point we've made again, and again, how much pressure is on lawmakers to do more based on some of them thinking that up has been done already and and we don't need to you know to write even bigger. Ticket for all of our children eventually pay so we'll see what? Friday, and then just that that was my read on a Friday. This makes it tougher. You continue to see the market at these levels at obviously the market, not the economy nobody's saying it is. But when you see the market at these levels that takes the pressure off on some aspects when you see better than anticipated jobs, numbers and other economic reports that have come along, you already had a lot of a lot of congressmen and senators who were not interested in coming back to the table and putting more on it, and this gives them more of a wait and see approach you hit that one day last week before the the the really. Moving the Nasdaq but. In the Dow just look like a blow off top five hundred points was already extended remember, which was last night. I'm watching it and it's like you're already way up here at almost thirty thousand, and now you've got up another five hundred on nothing really and just little did we know that that that that may have been sort of a a climax in terms of buying at that point we'll see we'll see the sharp corrections typically are part of a continuing move higher but with the election coming I think all bets are off. The FAA says that it is investigating manufacturing flaws affecting certain Boeing seven seven jets. The regulator isn't giving more details, but the Wall Street Journal reports that production issues may stretch back nearly a decade. So yeah, you're talking about a lot of places that would have to be checked serious when you start hearing the word fuselage and again just to add. This to the pile guys the many issues that Boeing's dealing with it had all the issues going into this with its own planes, and then to see shutdown that we've seen in terms of flights and airlines under pressure and not having money to to buy new airlines or air airplane. So this is just added to the pile of many dealing with. Is will all flag and by the way? Maybe yes, and of course, you're talking about Washington world waiting to find out whether the airlines will get a bailout a second bailout as well, which is what Boeing is waiting on. And that's been one of the overhangs there for them. So we'll see what happens nobody's flowing. Story. Of the three Amigos here. No I don't think we've been flying just yet. Others I know some other people be fine. But we haven't done it yet. You'd be driving a little I drove so much at my right leg, because the cruise control I drove up to my right leg was wouldn't work for like twenty four hours I was like moving around and trying to move it over here from from the accelerate I'm not kidding from. For like a long enough period, it stops working I don't know if going to. Get Your Tesla. We're GONNA, get you a Tesla Joe's you don't even have to touch the accelerate. Read a book. That's a good idea. But the Book Stop Waffle House every three hours. That's the only problem which is fine with me. Excellent. Anyway. Next. On squawk pod Dr a tool guerande surgeon and staff writer at the New Yorker on what the US should be doing to avoid a corona virus resurgence in the fall and winter months. This basic public health work and infrastructure we should be building now but we aren't the race for vaccine and for an infrastructure to match right after this. It takes conviction to see beyond the turmoil in today's markets. That's PGN. The investment management business of Prudential with a legacy of risk management discipline and investment experience through thirty market cycles PG is prepared for today's challenges p Jim Brings long-term perspective and deep expertise across public and private markets globally outlast today's uncertainty with pgn find out more at PG DOT com. That's PG. I M DOT com. You're. Listening to Scott. Good morning spot box right here on CNBC Andrew Ross Sorkin along with becky quick and Joe Kernan all three of us together at. Once again as the summer comes to an end and well, this is always when we started sprinting the marathon from natural Christmas. We'll see whether we really are this year because what an unusual year it's been breaking news out of the former suitable sector. Let's get to make. Good Morning. Good Morning Joe Nine. CEO's of some of the largest drug companies in the world announcing they've signed onto what they're calling a historic pledge to uphold the scientific integrity and put safety first as they are developing covid nineteen vaccines. These are basically the front runners in the vaccine race for covid nineteen, all of the companies involved in operation warp speed in addition to Merck Pfizer and its partner biotech Astra Zeneca Madonna GlaxoSmithKline Sanofi Johnson and Johnson and Nova VACs all signing onto this pledge to do essentially four things. They say always make safety and wellbeing of vaccinated people a top priority continue to adhere to high scientific and Ethical Standards Regarding. The conduct of clinical trials and the rigor of their manufacturing process they pledged to submit for approval or emergency use authorization after demonstrating safety and efficacy through phase three clinical studies designed to design and conducted to meet regulatory guidelines through a regulatory authorities like the FDA, and they say to work to ensure sufficient supply and range of vaccine options including those suitable for global access. They say quote we believe this pledge will help ensure public confidence in the rigorous scientific and regulatory process by which covid nineteen vaccines are evaluated and may ultimately approved and guys. This comes as vaccine development is moving at unprecedented speeds and we are hearing about some hesitancy. From folks to believe in the process and to be comfortable taking these vaccines especially as the FDA's leadership has come under question about political influence regarding convalescent plasma and hydroxy chloroquine in a recent change research and CB poll about thirty percent of people said that they either definitely not or probably not take covid nineteen vaccine, and so guys the company is trying to step in here to tell the public, they will keep safety I. Yeah. It's in response to rumors that we'd get an emergency youth authorization for for one of these vaccines before completing. The process there's always pressure on the FDA. obviously in especially with you know we're talking about life and death situations with with some of these drugs to to cut corners and I think they're just you know they're just putting it out there that especially with so many people when. Vaccines are such A. Controversial even before this people, you know what? The Anti Vaccine and everything else and we do remember back with with polio before we knew everything luckily nothing happened but you need to be sure. His longtime ago we know so much more and we know what's in vaccines. We know the scientific basis for how they worked meg. So I, I would be comfortable with. with one of these, the ad no mediated. Vaccine or you know if there's a small stretch of Messenger Aurigny I'll give it a shot I. I'm not overly concerned with with like contamination by some horrific virus that we don't see or something like that. You know make so. A wary public needs to be. Absolutely certain that that. We've. Crossed all the cross the is and cross. The is in dotted the teeth I just wanted to know we are coming up on that and that final stretch and the vaccine development process sort of inconceivably because this only begin in January really. But when we get to the end of October that's when Pfizer is indicating that they may see results about whether they're vaccine works and the FDA has scheduled advisory committee meeting of outside advisers, October twenty second, and so a lot of people are gonNA be looking at that date and saying, are we going to see data and how transparent will this process be So these are nine major drugmakers saying that their first priority is safety and I think this is hugely important not only for building public confidence in. A covert vaccine, but for protecting the sanctity of vaccines in general broader, we've had discussions with Scott gottlieb about this. The reason you don't want to rush through and push something out there that hasn't been thoroughly vetted with a phase three trial is that if there were problems with it, not only would it convince people not to take a Kovin vaccine, but it could undo a lot of the work that's been done with other vaccination programs around the globe I mean Joe. Brought up polio. Well, Jonas salk actually. Vaccinated his children. As some of the very first people testing this out so you know that was something he felt one hundred percent confident with we don't do things that way anymore. But there has been so much that that we have done with vaccinations diseases that we don't even think about anymore because over the last fifty years or so you know they've they've they've kind of gone away up very common This is just important not only for covert vaccination, but for faith in the vaccination system at large. Yeah it's so fragile. Public Health experts are incredibly concerned that a misstep here when vaccines are so important could shake the the fragile confidence in the vaccine system in general, and as you pointed out, it's this terrible irony of vaccines that they have rendered all these terrible diseases sort of non existent, and so we don't appreciate that vaccines did that for us. So there's a lot on the line here. Thank you and a new article in the New Yorker Dr Toga Juande highlights why the United States is lagging behind intesting testing and how he thinks we can solve that problem ahead of the upcoming flu season joining us right now is Dr Tool. Gandhi, he is staff writer for the New Yorker. He's also chairman of haven and a surgeon at Brigham and women's Hospital and Dr One day. It's good to see. It's been a while it's good. See you before we jump into the testing issues that we're facing in this country. Let's talk a little bit about this news these. Nine companies these nine companies that are working on a back seen that have said they are going to make sure that they don't go ahead and file for FDA approval until they have seen results in a phase three study that's a big move and there've been a lot of questions that have been raised recently about the safety and efficacy of these vaccines. If there was some rush some push by the FDA, bring them out earlier than than had been anticipated the the seems like a strong move. What do you think of it I? Think this is a very big deal. I'd like to see the other vaccine manufacturer sign onto the compact. But what we've seen again and again is that business has been willing to step out and follow the science much more consistently. Asking, for example, that people put on their masks when you go into retail establishments and I think this is just another example of being out out in front and following the science I. Think it's Important Meg. Terrell. At pointed out earlier that in in recent polls as many as thirty percent of people said, they either would not take a corona virus vaccine or they probably would not and I think that steps like this are probably very important to to beef up public confidence. It comes to the idea of what would happen if there was a vaccine available. Yes I don't blame thirty percent of people saying they want to wait and see the evidence before they say they are gonNA. Take, vaccine I. Think This is very important and we want to see that we have solid clinical trials showing that that these vaccines that are being considered are safe and that they are affected detector Gwanda your article in The New Yorker is is eye opening just from the perspective of the testing problems that we have the testing not being able to get done quickly and readily available. You think this is a problem that could be fixed very quickly in a matter of weeks. First of all described the problem and second of all television you fix it. Yeah I think the thing to understand is that the problem we have in testing his change from what it was in the winter. In the first few months the problem was we didn't have the technology we didn't have the tests approved and we didn't have labs capable of deploying them. Then we where we are now eight months into the pandemic in the United States is we now have hundreds of labs that are that that have ability to do these tests, and yet we're dependent on just three or four for the majority of US testing. What we have is an inability to connect the untapped large amount of capacity that's out there I name companies that would double that have capacity that would double the volume of a test capacity that. We are currently have currently available and are already delivering next day turnaround time, but we don't have you know I, compare it to the electric grid. We don't have a system that matches capacity in the regions and cities where there's lots of it to the regions and cities where there is need and that's what we have deployed. It's sort of fundamental aspect of the public health infrastructure that we lack in the country whether it's was ventilators masks. Now it's tests in the months to come it will be vaccines we need that basic public health infrastructure that matches the capacity to the need, and we can do it. I. Was a little surprised and shocked even at at how much excess capacity there is in some of the labs that you've visited and seen talk about how many tests do you think could be done just in the the labs that you've already kind of checked out and Give an example here in Boston. There's a nonprofit lab, the broad institute it's affiliated with Harvard and Mit they have they. You know when I visited them in the middle of of the summer they had they were doing a few thousand tests a day in a state of ten thousand people that was. Already. You know one of our largest sources of capacity we've had good turnaround time, but they had on hand in the middle of July. Thirty five thousand tests today capacity in the country doing six, hundred, fifty, thousand tests a day and given the signal they could. They could expand to one hundred thousand tests a day. Then another company here, Gingko Bio works is building capacity to do a north of two hundred thousand tests today. But again, the question is, can they bring that capacity on to more than just this regional community and tap it and bring elsewhere I point? To companies also like Helix and gardened in California we have University of Minnesota Genomic Center has tens of thousands of tests capacity ready to come online. So you know this is this is the situation we have where you do have big parts of the country where they're still difficult to a turnaround time. The big companies quest lab core bio reference told us. They alone can't carry the load when the surge comes in the fall and we're already not able to meet the needs of making sure everybody who is sick has appropriate testing. So this is This is basic public health work and and IT infrastructure. We should be building now but but we aren't. Doctor. A question for you and this is something we've talked a lot with Dr Scott Gottlieb over the past several months about are you of the view long-term irrespective of whether we get a vaccine for this year and whether we're going to need different vaccines every year whether we're going to need massive surveillance testing programs across this country meaning that you're going to be testing one, hundred, two, hundred, million people weekly, and you'd end up having to do that through schools through workplaces and do that not just for the next several months, but do that for for an extended period of time. Well. I think if the fire continues to be spreading the way it is we will have little choice but to but to do that, but but it really breaks down to some very simple things The the cases are spreading in places where people are having large crowds who aren't wearing masks and are packing together whether it's right now the campus parties that are fueling spread and multiple cities now. Where where we were, we had an under control or a few weeks ago like the sturgis motorcycle rally that has driven. The DAKOTAS TO BE tabby highest rates of infection. Now, in the country, that's step one is we have to just get those basics, wear a mask, and let's avoid large gatherings where people disdain wearing masks and maintaining. So distant second, we need to make sure that sick people anybody with symptoms can get test, but there are big parts of resuming normal human interaction that are going to require. You know what what, I've called assurance testing meaning that some screening ability to make sure you're you don't have an infection and those can be as simple as wanting to having travelers return into a state or getting film filming going again or lots of essential work nursing homes are. We currently expect weekly testing but aren't delivering duct WanNa just understand. Though do you see a day where for example, I know the airlines have looked into this. I don't know where where they've landed on this. Do you see a day where you show up in an airport irrespective of whether there's a vaccine available or not, and to get on the plane they test you with with the equivalent of one of these quick tests that would change everything positive in terms of. Confidence in the economy and the People's ability travel. Yes I agree that that that when it comes to, that's an example of you. WanNa get on a plane with two hundred people at the current rates you can expect there'd be a case on the plane and unless we have testing that will you will not feel you're able to do those things with the same level of freedom that we that we used to have and testing would make that possible quick rapid testing and we have growing capacity that the critical thing is deploying that kind of capability and then knowing how to deal with the INS and outs. There are false negatives and false positives and we have to be smart about how we deal with them. Dr Gwanda I to thank you for your time today. It's good seeing you and we'll have you back again. Here. Next on Swath pod it's electric a new dream for general. Motors that is the car manufacturing giant has teamed up with Unicorn Turn Electric, vehicle, hot stock. Nikola and the to CEO's share big electric vision for the future. The whole world is waiting process on who you're working with this most amazing electric pickup truck and hydrogen pickup truck. In the World Nicholas Trevor Milton and GM's Mary Barra after this. This pipe from CNBC. Nikola Motor Company has come surging onto the electric vehicle seam. It's a competitor to Tesla paying homage to the same nineteen, th and twenty, th century inventor. Nikola Tesla. Who Fun fact I share birthday with the company announced today it is teaming up with General Motors to us. It's widely acclaimed altium battery technology Nikola will hand over two billion dollars in stock to GM giving them an eleven percent stake in the company the transaction is set to closed before the end of the month and Nikola. expects. There Badger truck to enter production by the year twenty, twenty, two, the electric startup is valued at about. Fifteen billion dollars, which is sizable considering that to this point, the company has yet to begin commercial production on a single vehicle but Nicholas business isn't entirely about traditional ev batteries. The company is also pioneering hydrogen fuel cell technology. Here's Andrew Ross Sorkin with the rest of forming a strategic partnership with General Motors this morning Nikola Badger will be engineered and manufactured by GM Jim Getting, an eleven percent ownership stake in Nikolas result in the right to nominate one director to the board joining us right now to talk all about it just Milton. Founder and Executive Chairman of Nikola and Mary Barra CEO of GM. To both of you, I'm going to start on the GM side of I could marry and try to try to get a sense of how you were thinking about this partnership and why you ended up deciding to do this, and then I wanna get to trevor on what it really means. Thanks drew and we're very excited to be partnering with Nikola when we look at the opportunity to continue to leverage our technology, the opium battery platform system, as well as the hydrogen fuel cell technology. This is a wonderful validation of our technology and bringing our engineering and manufacturing expertise to the table. So Trevor I know you were looking for a manufacturing partner for quite some time. In terms of this transaction, just just break it down for us. Our understanding is that the GM's going to receive two billion dollar a two, billion dollar equity stake in the company I assume that's that the valuation prior to the move this morning and we're looking at your stock by the way moving forty five percent right now on this news GM is. Up Eight percent is that right? Yeah. I mean look we had we had. Four or five different Williams. We analyze who'd be the best point for for Nicklaus to build the Badger and Jim was very unique to us because they brought a lot more than just building the Badger. The whole world is waiting for us to tone who you're working with bill. Most amazing electric pickup truck hydrogel pickup truck in the world in Jim was definitely the top of our list and after I got to know Mary more and their whole entire team do is absolutely the right decision for the. For the company to do. I mean it's just it's it's a perfect relationship there. One of the best purchasers manufacturers enduring houses in the entire planet. and. They're working with Nikola with all of our our intellectual property, combining it with what they're doing badgers truly going to be one of the most amazing. Amazing vehicles ever built in A. Their existing power trait. So they do get big in the Levin's Levin percent stake in the company and throughout our like drawer agreement with a GM, we're GONNA see somewhere between four and five billion dollar savings just in battery costs alone. So for us, it was a no brainer and for GM it's it's it's a great way to help cross utilize all the. Everything, we're doing everything they're doing is just really a perfect relationship without hurt each other. A trouble real quick. Are you anticipating the GM will always be your manufactured you ever instant manufacturing vehicles on your own? No do not WanNa make our own like our own truck lines I mean, this is what GM so good news billions and billions of dollars is going to be built air plant engineered validated untested with their team as well. So we get access to their entire supply chain. The team has built some of the best programs in the world. The SILVERADO is the Hummers I mean everything they've got the best of the best in and aren't going to be building our trucks out of their plant, and that was the idea to save Meka billions of dollars while still being able to. Grow someone that doesn't that doesn't conflict with our DNA. Mary as part of this deal GM says, it expects you receive in excess of four billion dollars of benefits what you're calling benefits between the equity value. So we'll call that the two billion dollar value along with can't contract manufacturing of the badgers so I'm assuming those are going to be contracts. That that that Nikolas going to be paying you. Is that right sure. You know in addition to all the technology that we're bringing in the value from both altium and a high tech technology perspective they're also then is We'll be doing the manufacturing and validation engineering. So all of that comes together and again it's for the Badger but it's also for the. Fuel. Cell. Technology for the Nikolai products in the class seven and eight truck business. So this is a huge growth opportunity for us and it's Trevor said as we started to talk, we realize we shared a common vision of the world of creating an all electric feature. The teams have already begun discussions and I. There's there's really good chemistry between the technical team. So we couldn't be more excited about working with law. And marriages so I understand while while Nicholas going to be using some of your technology are you going to be allowed to use some of their technology in your trucks? I think you know the truck, that Badger truck, and then the the class seven eight trucks are going to be leveraging our propulsion technology both altium and hydrogen tax. So that's really going to be the foundation. As we go forward, we may find other areas that we can collaborate and share, but that's the foundation that we're building off right now. One. Related Question I see you're going to get a board seat on this company. The General Motors will, is there any opportunity for GM like a? I. Look Opportunity To ultimately by out this company and take it inside of General Motors I. Think we're very focused right now on working in partnership with Trevor His team they've got they've got A. Strong team and a great vision, and that's what our focus is working together and and seeing both companies grow and related to that married because we're looking at the stocks moving I, mean it's an unbelievable thing Nikola now up forty, two percent this morning just on this news your stock also up Mary up over seven percent you look valuation Nikola and it is. About twenty, five percent of or maybe it's maybe closing higher. This morning of your own valuation does that make sense to you as someone who's been in this business? Very Long Time I think we're leveraging all of the skills and capabilities that we have a rich and very engineering design engineering team, manufacturing team leveraging our global sell with purchasing. So we're just GONNA continue to advance our goal to create an all electric future with partners like Nikola as well as what we announced last week with continuing our partnership with hottest. So we think that's the way to really unlock value General Motors, and we're GONNA continue to stay focused a driver. Can I ask you the valuation question because we are looking at the stock up I said forty five percent, which is a huge move and and yet as I said this represents a big chunk of what even GM is worth today and Of course, there's no car that's been sold yet. Yeah. I mean look I think the world is rewarding those that are changing the world for the better. They're kind of tired of the some of the old legacy philosophy where it's like, okay that's all we do is we build cars in the more bill the more we nineteen by GM. They've taken a stance look. We know zero emissions is a huge part of the future of the world and the investors out there the ESPN funds and the other investment groups they're sitting back saying you know what? We're GONNA INVEST A we're to invest in those. And reward those that are willing to completely disrupt supply chain and goes your emission. And that's why Nicholas such an incredible story I mean look the whole world is waiting for us to announce this. It's finally out today, which is a huge relief for us because we can. We can start talking about the full production where where we're going now win unions are going to be delivered. The world knows it is trucks. You know it's it's awesome I I handle the truck just in a couple of months from now so. You know it's not about the next two months art generations all about you entertain me for the next two months but it's not about that. It's about the neck this about the long-term and GM is a perfect partner to be able to build a badger, the trucks coming out, Nicholas building out hydrogen networks I mean we just couldn't be more happy with partnership. It's despite people are rewarded us. It's it's a long term play. It's the. Ability to get in early, and that's what Nicholas is a great relationship one question and kick it over to Becky, which is on the margins for vs this remarried you expect them to grow over time and how profitable could they become given? How how low margins have been thus far? Well, when you look at the margins on electric vehicles, it's all about the battery and that's why the work that we've been doing to create a platform with. The LTM on battery system and we have a whole technology road bat broke map of taking cost out of the battery while increasing the the power. So we're very excited about that roadmap and a partnering like we're doing with Nikola gives us the opportunity to build scale even faster and get those costs down gain the efficiencies. So we definitely envision a world where we're going to have strong merges and our products across the board. Goes just to add a little context of this, this news caught all of us by surprise here Philibeaux rights, and he says that this is a win win for both sides. He says, the GM gets a steak and Nikola and has a customer to use some of its capacity at that Detroit Hamtramck plant the ultimate ultimate ultimate battery system it's developing Nikola doesn't have to pay to set up manufacturing can tap GM's expertise on this, and obviously that's the reaction your seeing in the stock market right now American. You just a little bit of a update about what? You do have going on the Detroit Hamtramck plant, how many customers you have their what sort of capacity you have with the EV right now, we'll right now we're in the process of getting ready to set up the Detroit Hamtramck plant to build the GMC Hummer Ev, and so that's what the focus is. Right now we have announced I haven't announced the total capacity there yet, but it is something that is going to be foundational to our strategy and the team. There is doing great work every day to get ready to be able to launch our first. E R. Beverly Electric Truck. Program on next year Okay Mary and Trevor WanNa. Thank you WANNA. Thank you for joining us on this big end. What may turn out to be quite historic day in the future, both of GM and of nickel, and we appreciate you joining us this morning. Thanks to both of you. And that squad pond for today. Thanks for listening. squawk box is hosted by Joe Kernan Becky quick and Andrew Ross Sorkin together in the spirit of central distance. So beca we keep saying we're all together. It doesn't feel like we're all together What are we? We're alone we're alone together is that it? For lonely together, we we miss each other together and spirit as you said. This whole thing together. Yeah that's still yeah. That's we're loan together. That's a famous alumax I believe it or not the Dave Mason. Album, from long ago but I digress to weekday mornings on CNBC at six am eastern anti get the smartest tapes and analysis from our TV show right into your ears subscribe to Squawk pod wherever you get your podcasts. We'll meet you back here tomorrow. Takes conviction to see beyond the turmoil in today's markets? That's PG. The investment management business of Prudential with the legacy of risk management discipline and investment experience through thirty market cycles. PJ is prepared for today's challenges p Jim. Brings. long-term perspective and deep expertise across public and private markets globally outlast today's uncertainty with PG find out more at PG DOT com. That's PG IM DOT COM.

GM US Nikola CNBC Mary Barra Andrew Ross Sorkin PG Jim Getting Dr Scott Gottlieb altium CEO FDA Nikola GM Washington polio General Motors Tesla Cova Vaccine Development Nine
61: Something About Mary

Latter-Day Lesbian

55:27 min | 8 months ago

61: Something About Mary

"So this episode. Shelly is Kinda all about me that I think it's weird. Do you usually all about me. Give you an episode. Oh thank you own this so giving I'm GonNa give her. Yeah I definitely think I can. I can see that Okay well show we get to do it all right be right back? Hey everybody welcome to latter day lesbian podcast about a next event jellicoe girl trying to figure shit out. And she's also gay marriages took over our the way. I'm showing I'm Mary. We said X. Evangelical last week to it must be evangelical because we read a letter. Someone wrote in who is raised Evangelical So we must be going through. A few Evangelical Evangelical Wisdom is also no joke. Oh Yeah you WANNA avoid that shift So partly why. We decided to do this. Episode DEDICATED TO MORE. Wa is Because I was interviewed by Heather. Victory on her podcast called the brave files. You haven't checked it out. I invite you to do so We've had heather as a guest before will probably have Iran again not to talk about me but I was also interviewed the break up. She interviewed you first before me. Yep So here and there you may episode has just come out episode one. A one one. Oh one yeah. We're GONNA do a good job. I like write that down before we get into all that though. I would like to give a special shout out to our Singapore listeners. How POOR WE HAVE BEEN NUMBER ONE ON? Singapore's sexuality chart from Apple for a while now we're crushing for Singapore pipes. Maybe wonder how many people are actually listening? I might need like two or three but still we're number one. Yeah and you know I was just kind of looking up some images of Singapore And they're tapers there. Which is a very ex Mormon Mormon norse so we might need to go to Singapore. Some time this tapers go right to taper is a big no People Ride Day. Not only in book a Mormon Land. Okay that is hilarious. Only when you make it all up and lie about there being horses in them you know a hundred years later. They realized that there were horses so they have to say oh they were probably tapers. Yeah for sure dumb ass so if you are in Singapore and given us a listen thank you. We appreciate you. We do okay also before we get into the main meat as you like to say of the episode. We have a foam pod. We have he said what these are both dedicated to evangelical nonsense. Yeah Do you WanNa tell the short story about our crews. Oh maybe we should do that. I i. Yeah so we just went on a cruise and it was a Royal Caribbean cruise. But the crowd that we were with was an ex Mormon group. Forty people are so they do this. Annual INGS is the fifth year are going in. It was phenomenal. That way. If you get to your five and We might need to work toward this goal. You get a special row five years on so anyone interested in joining all of us on future cruises should as an email. What's our email Mary? That is contact at latter day. Lesbian Dot Org In the subject just say I wanna go on the cruise and we'll send you some information Asano much time. Shall we got to be a Carioca Judge? I did so. There was a karaoke competition. I was totally dis. Oh God you should make it through seriously. They were just looking for more. The Wayne Tights. I sang careless. Whisper yes you did. Thank you brilliant was not my voice. It was my work in the crowd. Did you wear the Crown You told everybody were lesbian. Asserted were not wearing a Bra America. That I was a lesbian. They loved it apparently because then they invited me to be a guest judge in Menaul yet. There's a lot of people there that would have been fun to perform in because it was live band Karaoke That is fun if you've never been backed by a live band. It's really fun. Yeah Good Times yes. I didn't sing. I was just judging One thing I made sure to do though is I did not critique any contestants on their singing abilities I was more smart. Yeah I was more about like what they were wearing or how they were or were not dancing or you know. I love seeing old. White guys seeing Reggae song which is what. I told one guy singing a reggae song. It was a lot of fun though. you could have been like Simon Cowl. It was utter sheet. Did tell one woman to warn her husband that I was going to steal his wife. Be careful husbands shelley. As on the MU yeah one of our stops on the cruise was in cozumel beyond fungal Mexican town Mexico right. Yeah so I thought anyway. We were trying to get back to the cruise ship and as we're walking. We somehow got suckered into a Tequila store. We were planning on bringing like a bottle of day. Labatt one win Mexico get a Mexican exactly exactly so the sales person there is probably like this. You know twenty five year old guy. Maybe thirty I don't know anyway. He invites us as good what he does as he was already drunk. Here's to you. Pod comes to you Paul Kane Pucker with civic. I was so pokka with a K. Poulsen willingly because you know we didn't say no. I guess. Show US some Tequila. Yes wanted to taste some. We said sure then. We spent the next hour just tasting all taking Tequila shots every flavor imaginable and we kept looking at each other like is this real and every time without pot was done giving us tasters she would go in the back and pull out more kinds and then he will start mixing favors and then been lining up and doing shots but he was doing shots with us too. I don't know how who was standing By the end of the hour hour and a half we had somehow managed to purchase five hundred dollars to didn't realize it till act. They act like six bottles or something probably more more than that. Well there are some smaller bottles to they. Were all like regular you want to know the flavors that we got. I took a picture. How did we end up with these ivers? Had No idea. I think he's not a couple in sure. He did all right. We have coconut Tequila. Peanut Butter Tequila Right Chocolate Tequila Hellfire which I don't remember when we wanted what is fireball. But only O- cinnamon adamant fireball but Tequila. I don't remember seeing isn't even throwing up yet because this is starting to gross me out. Here's more mango Tequila. Is that Gut spicing it as well? Ninna Know Oklahoma has the spice is the spicy. Tamarind and then coffee flavor. I forgot that one. Then Ron Pope pay which took us about thirty minutes of translation to finally realized that it was Eggnog. That's the eggnog. That Saddam rose. Hey this is disgusting. Why would anyone want to see? Oh and so we were getting all those not really understanding what we were doing and then Mary's like oh I also want just a plain flavor so I make mistake of asking Pucca with a K. What's your favorite Plane Tequila? And he probably brought the two hundred dollar agree. We'll get yes right. Yeah one born every minute. Never Money So Palko crushed it. Good Job Hakko. You got this and now. We have more Tequila that will ever ever need and we are now. Five hundred dollars in debt This would be a good time to announce patriotic. It'd be paying that often slow chunks in drinking and we need to have it Tequila Party for our patrons in the area and if you are a listener patron in the DC area. You let us know if you want to get in on a disgusting Tequila tasting discussing the yummy peanut butter. Where'd the Eggnog is the one? That's really kind of making me. Throw up a little in my mouth out where we did a little bit that night. We had way way too. It was rough night. It was a rough night rough night on the seas bad. Yeah but we did a fun Snorkeling excursion with the entire expo grew fun. I really enjoyed those people. Oh we did a sacrament. Meeting with with Tequila shot in Sacrament Cup a Hong religious. I love it I love. That was hilarious. Yeah it was a great great trip and we're GonNa do it again in two thousand twenty one. Yeah by the way you do not necessarily have to be ex Mormon. I'm not that's a couple that were not so. If you enjoy ex Mormons as much as we do and bruises ends of the best mets right being irreverent and just having a good time making new friends shoot US email and we will get the information to you. Sounds Good Okay? Oh also before we get into the rest of the episode we last week. We're struggling with the name of a crutch wig. Remember this remember. What is that a cod piece? Now that's not right and Now with the help of fanny fact check. We're going to clear all that up. Fannie she just comes through really really does thank you. So let's turn the time over brother Ben Who will then turn the time? Over to fanny sister fanny fact check youthful here. We go And now we turn the time over to sister fanny in fact. Thank you brother Ban for all you do with your priesthood over there because we couldn't possibly do it over here without priesthood. As we're women this week you sweet sisters asked me talk about body hair wigs particularly for the crop chill region. These are called Muffins not as in American like a citizen of the United States. But as in working out with humor in out or forgotten around with you must get around or don't be sure about your Merkin or don't go jerk off with your mercan off. The mark can has a long built. The history goes back to fifteenth or sixteenth century when prostitutes didn't WANNA get crabs. I'm not talking about getting crabs. Like if you go to Maryland in your tourist and you want to go to the restaurant and no I mean body Lice. So these ladies would shave the Short. Curly's off barely bits and then make selves little wigs out of animal here for God knows what reason and they would wear them and they would get crabs in their merkin. 's IS MY GUESS. You also asked about the little silver triangles that some pressman in the West clip onto the tips of their shirt collars look fancy. Those are called colour tips. They're not very interesting at all unless you consider that they were warned by my bishop crazy. Ed who was sealed to four sisters via serial monogamy and once bore his testimony that he had personally saved the USA from Ebola virus by raising his arm to the square and casting. It out. But I don't think his color tips helped and that's probably as meaningful as anything else about this and I leave this with you in the name of all of them are comes back none of this Summer Games. Wow once again I'm enlightened by the facts that Fannie keeps checking. She can check the batch. She sure can Some fanny yeah and Merkin is just a fun word to say. I want to say that sentence at least twice a day from now on okay. So doesn't leave my vocabulary You could say I can see your Merkin hanging out from your bikini bottom. No Merkin America. Great again It was fucking. I want that sure mark in America. Great again like a love that good his M. E. R. K. I. N. believe Murdering Merkin Agree. You and it could be a little twig in the shape of trump hair. Yes no one is going to be done all right now. No we are about to look the sentence. That was fucking hilarious. Okay Nice show we jump into. Do you want to do a phone pot or a? He said what you picked. Maybe all right. Let's do a Faux Pas. Wait so this is a reversal. I'm putting you yet. Yeah although it's not a foam pot it's a Foodie pod. What is what would a free pod. Its Effect Evangelical Phrase Cue Music bombed. Okay today's fucked up. Evangelical phrase of the day is put to death. Put to death put to death Okay I'm trying to put this into like a church way put to death. Is it when you get rid of your natural self and become god-like you put to death your natural self that it. That's shelly someone tried you get. The we named Brice Blanc. Get You my members. The thing evangelical terms or Christian terms me. You could probably pretty much the form one it's The natural man is an enemy to God. The natural man. I mean let's face it. Mormonism is an offshoot of mainstream Christianity. Grew so nothing original there. But yeah you're right. It is to overcome the temptations to sin that arise when our lusts and desires. Draw us to react. In ways we know to be evil. For instance pride hatred envy gossip et CETERA. It is the act of denying those thoughts and refusing to agree with them The lust to sin is not only suppressed but it actually dies according to versus in Romans and Colossians about that. I always thought was Colossians Did you really think so? I don't have actually said it out loud. Okay well there you go. That's the phone pod. Good job thank you. And he was so fucked up rated treat yourself. I was looking up expressions and really. They're they're easy to figure out for the most part especially if you have any sort of Christian upbringing. Here's the problem is the evangelical didn't make up a whole new book of scripture like Mormons. Did so there's a lot to pull from there like you know. The LEONA will for instance. There's a lot of made up bull chauffeur chef y foam pot is so fantastic because he almost never run out of weird women ever absence. Never ever we tried but we couldn't stumper Nice time. Anybody can think of a goofy Christian expression that shelly might not know you. Let me know and I'll try to stumper again right okay. Let's keep going we're going to do. He said what we're like that you WANNA do it on three or one. I don't know I lived on one three one and then we'll do it three to one. I mean I like that because we might be hearing some music cold from you little later on in the show that is a definite possibility But right now we are going to give Pat Robertson. Dear the credit for this. He said what this is from nineteen ninety-two but I feel like it's still relevant today with all the stuff. That's topical pack. Give it to us so in Nineteen ninety-two pat. Robertson described the feminist agenda in quotes as a Socialist. Anti family political movement that encouraged women to leave their husbands. Kill their children. God practice witchcraft. I mean who needs practice now? I'm gonNA destroy capitalism and my favorite part become lesbian off through very similar thing going on the Mormon Church. Were them saying that we were out to destroy the family yeah? This statement was included in a fundraising letter sent out under Robertson's name to supporters of the Christian coalition in Nineteen ninety-two seeking to rally opposition to a proposed Iowa state equal rights amendment But Mr Robertson's letter distributed to supporters of the Evangelical Organization Christian Coalition described the proposal as part of a feminist agenda that has not about equal rights for women. They're saying it's not about that instead. The letter said it is about socialist anti-family political movement that encourages women to leave their husbands. Blahdy blahdy Blah witchcraft body blahdy Blah and my favorite lesbians. So there you go. I mean I'm GONNA go ahead and agree with lesbian thing. No I'm kidding. Killed Her children kill our children. Yeah no that's And to me this is a scarcity mindset acts like all the great things we have all the benefits all the rights are a big Pie And then when you dedicated slice of the pipe obese people over here this means these people over here get less look world way. I don't think if you give some people rights than other rights. Get taken away now. I just look at it that way but that is definitely what is talked by the particularly Uber. Right wing Christian. Middle American self-assured late Middle Merck INS Middle Merck. Ns nine call back to that. So in nineteen eighty eight. Did you know that Pat Robertson ran for president? Jesus well Jesus supposedly told him to run into lose Didn't tell them to win. Got Your however. That's my favorite thing to say. Because his love to set people up for failure. Hey Pat I want you to run for president. I want you to get a bunch of people to send you money to run for president and then I want you to not be president. Yeah I want you to lose. There's a lesson here sure okay. Shall we take a little break and then come back and talk about my Weird Chela? Yes I want to hear all about you. Miss Mary Barra. Let's do it right back. We are supported by new dating APP. Hey listeners raise your hand if you think dating after mormonism is difficult. Probably Ninety five percent of our listeners are raising their hands right now. You know it's hard meeting someone and having to explain your whole Wacky Mormon upbringing. We went through this. And since your faith transition you've probably been kicked out of the singles ward so now what? Ooh That is challenging. Check out new. It's an ex mormon dating APP available for download on both android and iphone. Are you ready to Find Post Mormon love with someone who understands your story? I know I am too late. Visit new dating dot APP and learn more. That's new dating dot A. P. P. We are back so. I thought this was sort of topical to talk about me every topical. I think of like cortisone cream. Oh should we play some later? Jimmy Chafing. I have Asylum Ewing Sunburn. You do. I don't know cortisone detail. Yeah we're not smart. During our snorkeling excursion we missed our backs. Rubbed it off. Or we didn't reapply in time. Anyway back to you back to me. So brave files with Heather victory so I was interviewed. Hombre files and my episode is one. Oh one it just came out Mary one. Oh one yeah. I don't know actually the name of the episode but look up one. Oh One and you will find my episode. So she wanted to point out that I was brave and I don't know I never felt brave. I guess a lot of people who are being brave. Don't feel brave in this segment of course but you know. I've always thought of bravery as a choice so for instance if you're an EMT worker first responder type. You don't have to go into a burning building. I guess it's your job so you're supposed to write but that's an act of bravery if you choose to take that on and go into that burning building that you are acting bravely. No one would argue that but if some horrible situation is thrust upon you and you have no choice but to make a decision is that bravery. I think it is. I guess I didn't think about it that way at the top. No me neither. But I think a lot of us as ex Mormon X. Evangelical something. We didn't choose that life That's true But we chose to survive that life. Yeah and we did the things. It helped us to get out of that life and I think that's brave. You don't think about it at the time you think of it as survival. Yeah but it's brave to survive something like that. I agree with you and I think that all the decisions we make after crisis situations are acts of bravery potentially sure. And that's an interesting thing about heather's podcast is. Sometimes she has guests on that. Maybe don't fit the mold of. I'm doing a brave act on purpose and you look back on your life. And he was like well. Maybe I was more courageous than I thought about. And I guess that applies to me because there was a big incident in my childhood. That forever changed my life and influence who? I became as an adult Heather'S EPISODE UMBRELLA GOES INTO. A lot of detail. She asked me a lot of questions about it but basically when I was twelve years old I was coming home from school. It was October Fourth of nine hundred. Seventy eight and I came home alone. No one was in the house except my father had retired so he was there but he had died that day and I discovered his dead body by myself. I was alone. You were how old twelve row. So that happened I don't talk about it a lot. It's not that I have any trouble sharing it or talking about it I don't know maybe I just feel like it was so long ago. And it's such a Downer It's such a Downer sure. Yeah you know. It's it's real tragic. I look back and I think about my twelve year. Old Self And it's like I I grieve for her. Still who would want their twelve year old little boy or girl go through that? Who would want that for their kit. Yeah I had to decide what to do. I saw him lying on the floor. If anyone has seen a dead body hours old it's not like it is in TV and films Doesn't look like that. It's a horse. Seen is what it looks like the body. A stiff in the extremities. The blood pools like in clots or something and in the skin looks purple. And blotchy. What did you do I Had to figure out what to do I felt like my heart was pounding in my chest. That's all I could hear with my heart beating and my mother wasn't home from work yet so After what seemed like hours standing there in shock and probably was not even a minute. Maybe it was over a minute. I don't know I called the school where my mother worked. They couldn't get a hold of her I was in a panic and crying on the phone and they were trying to come from me on the phone but I was so distraught. I mean as you can imagine. And then I went across the street to the neighbor's house and they went over and I guess they called the police. I guess what you do right even when one. Yeah I mean you call emergency services and they probably sent an ambulance. We're so long ago. Yeah but I think the police generally come anytime you find a body? Yeah they have. Yeah so by. Then my mother and my sister had gotten home from school and Iran and told them and it was like we were all in a day's after that we were just it just changed all of our lives you know and my mother. This is one thing for all the crazy crap. She's told me over the years. She has a lot of guilt over not. She didn't feel like she was there for the kids because she was dealing with her own grief. I mean we all were just trying to figure out how to deal with grief in our own way. I didn't necessarily expect her to comfort me when she was distraught. Yes she lost her husband. She lost her partner. She lost yeah and to try to look outside of that and be there for other people hard. Yeah I mean I'm sure she was. She was there for me and in small ways. We were there for each other we. We supported each other. We're all going through it But you know I'd never seen her fall. Apart to this degree. Our world ended that now you know he was basically my best friend. He was retired. We played cards and he taught me how to play chess all the door. He thinks all the he taught me how to play. This really interesting card game called Russian bank if anyone's ever played it's very old fashioned litter planet and seventy. It's gs a long time ago. But it's very complicated game and I rocked that game. Yes really good at it and we have smart Susan Engineer. He was super smart super creative. Charming interesting guy. I miss him every day. My but yeah so that happened and I don't talk about it a lot but I am certainly willing to talk about it. It's not that I'm trying to hide anything about my past or anything but heather asked me some questions about that. So I recommend the interview if you're if you're interested in learning more about it what's crazy about that is I kind of have some guilt over some stuff with my father so he never went to church with us And he was basically either atheist or agnostic. I don't really know which one if he just didn't believe any of it. I thought it was crap we just didn't know I I don't know my guess is. He was just a really logical engineering type. That didn't put any stock in spirituality. yet here the rest of us were all born again and speaking in tongues and all that stuff. I don't think he knew to the extent that we were all in In the church. I don't think he wanted to know. But here's what I feel guilty about. We would pray my mother and I would pray for him to be saved as part of like nightly prayer thing every single night she would talk me in and we would pray for him. I mean starting at like probably like six years old or something graying for my father's soul with my mother every evening with the bedroom door open. I'm sure he walked by on his way to bed. I'm sure he knew it. We were up to and I feel terrible about now. Did you as a child did that. Make you afraid for your dad. Of course it did and it made me look down on him He was refusing the good news of Jesus You know I judged him for not being a Christian for not accepting Jesus into his heart right. Yeah why would you pray for someone to be saved if you thought they were perfectly fine the way they are right right? You want them to change. I wanted him to be a different person to be accepted into this bullshit that I had accepted so he probably felt like an outsider. We'll have yes. Of course he did. Of course he did. He told my mother one time he was jealous of. Jesus blame him. But Yeah I always felt a little guilt over Wanting my father to be a different person basically disapproving of him. Yeah Yeah when he died you were still in this evangelical movement. Were you worried for his soul after he died like. Oh my gosh been praying. He accepted now. He's dead Shit The brain is a funny thing and it can convince you of a lot of stuff so I'm glad that you brought that up for some reason. My mother felt like she had three signs. Not just one not two but three different signs that he went to heaven. He was saved supposedly the day he died. He was doing a crossword puzzle in the newspaper. She said on the opposite side of that page. He used to fold it over to the crossword puzzle and on the opposite side was some sort of article about Jesus or Christianity in the paper That seems a little strange But she says he clearly read it. He clearly last minute. Decision decided to accept Jesus as his Lord and Savior That was signed number one K. One down the second sign was a few days later. We were at my grandmother's house and my mother was going through some papers. Or maybe I was. I was like looking through this drawer and I came across some menu from years and years ago. My mother was preparing a Thanksgiving dinner. Or something And she was sharing the menu with my father was earning Jello. Probably NOT OKAY. It would have been called aspect in this was probably in the six pass. A what the fuck is that. Fanny bag check list. What has anyway he had written on the bottom of this menu. Richard Rut approved like he approved it. right so my mother took that as the second sign that he was approved into heaven. I mean if that's not a stretch. That's a stretch. Here's only about traffic. And he's in heaven. Okay Gotcha yeah number. Three number three was some friend of my mother's was trying to call another friend to let her know that my father had died and she kept dialing the number wrong but it was making a tune on her push-button phone is like in tune because remember. It was like back. Then the Anna here tones. I guess maybe you still can. I don't know but she said the tone. It was making was amazing. Grace Honor push-button phone. Now I WANNA see if we can greg. Yeah what number. Do you have to dial to hear amazing grace on your phone? Do the numbers have different tones? Now I have gone on. I got my phone. Let me see if they make different. Don't think they'd do. You eat any see sort of a five eight number. And then zone. Like amazing grace is yeah. I don't know how you make that happen. You know whatever your brain needs to tell himself to stop the grief mom but I hate that for her and for your family in general that you all all thought that he was like fucked like he's going to hell. What a horrible thing to think and then have to do these gymnastics. Maybe not because this thing happened happened I it takes the place of your actual grieving and appreciation for him. And you know when you're just so word that he's going to hell fucking religions on religion. I know exactly I don't know how he put up with all of it. I think I've mentioned that on another episode. When he suspected my mother having the affair with a pastor yeah and the other thing we did is my sisters and I can saying so. We grew up singing three part harmony. Jesus Songs Church Hell. Yeah born probably once a month in church singing meaning. You have some samples for an expert. My sister's singing harmony. I did this as early as I don't know six seven years old. Jesus learning to sing harmony. But I can't fucking win Karaoke on a on a you're singing. That night was better than all other singing except for. Maybe I should have Sung fucked up Mormon phrase day should have that would have a shoe Three should add hair Wayne Newton. Because that's what was required. Yeah And a single from Ebony em. I'm pretty sure. Oh God let's Throw that excerpt of my sisters and I want to Yeah Oh also before. We do My mother made us matching outfits And I will look in some old photos and see if I can put something on patriotic of my sisters in matching now. This is phenomenal picture. You With pictures that I've seen of you and your super super skinny and you haven't knobby knees and your hair is kind of like they're my hair's bear insist kind of doing little kid hair short little kid hair. Guinea anyway. And so. That's what I picture when I want. Hero young yeah. So will we be able to hear what choice is yours because there's three be singing right? I think I'm the middle part in this one. And this exa okay. Here we go all right. He takes me more pretty sure. Jesus touched me Jesus so that's Kinda my did you see sisters or you just. Did you know so many things were thrust on me as the last born three? I just accepted Jesus because everybody else was doing it. Yeah Lana becomes saved if Jesus in your heart say the centers prayer. Whatever the Hell I don't know I just did it I didn't think anything of it right and I wanted to do stuff. My sister's doing because they were older than me and I admire them so I guess at the time I wanted to sing these songs and my eldest sister play guitar and arranged the songs and harmony and she was very talented. Was I duNno cool? That part was interesting. I don't care about the songs at all any more. Geez to touch you make you all depends on where on the Internet I will slap Jesus and Jesus. He loves that. Yeah it was kind of a fun experience guests sing in three part harmony but my father had a rule no singing at the dinner table. That's what happens when you grow up with singing sisters. God Yeah that makes me Crazy. Shot up and pass the peas well. Everything became like. Oh you're starting the song here I'm GonNa jump up a third and join you and so on and so everything became those like harmony challenge. I love harmony Clearly clearly you're making me crazy. We were all in theater to three of us. Yeah okay that's my trip down memory in good time. Yeah the good thing about my childhood is before twelve it was sort of idyllic in a way because we had a lot of freedom as kids. We watch stranger things. One of the things I love about that show is those kids can be gone from breakfast dinner. And they're just riding their bikes. All over the neighborhood. Yeah it was for me. Yeah and I had that childhood too. I loved that part of it I grew up right on Lake Ontario. So the lake was literally in the backyard And there was a woods nearby. There was a harbor where I could ice skate. In the winter and boats would come in the summer and it was just. It was beautiful. It was a western New York near Niagara Falls right on Lake Ontario and it was a lovely lovely place unless it's the middle of winter. It's real cold. Yeah Yeah we've actually I've been to your place. We went on a Vaca- together and now an like an airbnb type of thing. You can just stay there. Yes we got to sleep game bedroom that you grew up. We slept in my childhood better. We Not Bang. Don't worry we did not desecrate the childhood bedroom. That'd been weird. Well we were also there with my cousins so that would also small house within wall. Knotty Pine paneling uh-huh Yup. You can rent that place. It's kind of trippy. Yeah Beautiful Town though. Really beautiful right down this hill. There's entertainment there at this restaurant. Yeah we could hear the band's playing on Fridays tonight. Might be distracting now living there if you could just hear bands. Friday and Saturday night. 'til like one or two. A and I enjoyed it. Yeah we're on vacation. We had no place to be. So that was fun anyhow That's about it. That's all you got me about you. You know it's interesting about that whole experience. My father died my sister. My older sister said that I started sleeping towards the wall. Like a closed down for a little bit. I think that's true Like I learned sarcasm as currency after that and I was picked on a lot. Oddly for being skinny kids bullied for every rea- any kind of reason you don't fit in. You're going to be bullied. Yeah so mine was that I was too skinny and probably that as a little too nerdy. I was like the smart kid that had talent I could sing and draw and stuff good at art and theatre later in high school. I really got into the music and theatre crowd and that was Kinda my people so that was all fine. I was teased a lot at that time so I learned to be really sarcastic. That was my form of humor. And that was my form of Guess Armor in a way And I could really jab somebody with sarcasm. I had to unlearn. That took a long time. Yeah because it's sort of mean-spirited in it how you can take it too far you know for sure can take it too far You just have to look back at the intentions. And if you're just teasing somebody that's a little bit different. You can tell the difference but yeah I had to learn to not be an asshole still working on Galera not an asset. You're wondering on it but I think from that experience I did learn how to make decisions like a almost. Never hesitate even though my astrological sign would tell me that. I'm indecisive. You're very dismayed. Gemini. they're supposed to be indecisive. Did you know that about Geminis? Did I do And it was designed again here we go just by way of Trivia. Shelley's in my birthdays are one day apart. Yeah today's June fourteenth year June sixteenth. Yup Someday will get married on June fifteenth. Why not why not just celebrate for three days? We'll just a drunk three days did last weekend. Yeah EVERY YEAR. We have three day celebration. Kinda fun good times BSO. Now I'M A. I'm an excellent decision maker. Maybe because I was faced with you had to grow up like at Age Twelve. You were no longer the baby Your whole world changed and really my heart breaks for your twelve year old self. Am I guess too? Yeah I know it's rough. I wish I could undo it because I still can picture that entire scene as if it happened yesterday I know every single detail. I'm sure and in my brain and that is unfortunate. Oddly that is one of two dead bodies I have discovered. Jesus Mary Yell Tell This other story. I was in was right after college. I went to a college in Virginia. J. Amu go dukes go to but ended up following a woman to where she was going to college right after that. I didn't have anywhere to go yet. I wasn't into my career yet. I didn't know what I was doing so I moved to Greenville North Carolina Where my girlfriend at the time was attending East Carolina University? And that's where she was going so I moved there and I managed to finagle a spot in campus housing okay. There was a woman's house and a men's house right next door to one another and they had an ra so I was a DJ at a local radio stations. You were and I had a six. Am shift. I did the news news voice. Yeah at the end of every newscast I'd say Greenville in Washington have only one community information. Fm and you've got US W classy ninety eight point three. You're well KLAFF's is still have that memory God so good. Yeah that was like from eighty nine or something but anyway so I was living in this house with some other ladies. I worked the morning shifts so I went to bed early. They had had a party so they drank some kamikazes and ate some pasta. I don't really know the details there but my roommate they didn't know very well had a gastro intestinal bypass one of I once. Well yes. She was very very large in fact when she was sleeping in her bed. I guess her mattress was so conformed to the shape of her body was a big dent in the middle of like a big ditch and she would sleep in their. Wow and you couldn't even see her. She was so like sunken in this mattress. That yes she almost disappeared in plus she had all these covers pillows and clothes all over the bed. She didn't really put her clothes away and they were just all over the bed. You could not tell that she was in the business like a big pile while it was impossible to tell plus we have this weird system. That one of us was still in the room. Then we wouldn't lock it when we left. We would lock the house but we wouldn't necessarily lock the room. I don't know why we did it that way. I went to work. She was still in bed. I assumed I close. The door did not lock. It went to work a lock my keys in the car that day. Whoops Yeah Lock My keys and I did this before this was before. The digging reminds you know car. Ford FIESTA WANNA say Shitty Car. I usually could just Jimmy. The lock with a coat hanger But this one day I couldn't. I tried and tried and tried couldn't do it. I call the R. A. And arrange to get an extra key. I had an extra key in my room. So when she went into the bedroom she got the key came out locked the door. Okay remember when one of us was in the room. We never locked the door right so when I came home from work the door was locked so you assume she was not there. I assumed my roommate Angie was not there. I was going to go away for the weekend. my girlfriend arrogant. I go. I Dunno camping weekend or something. I was packing getting ready. I'll never forget it. I sat down to clip my fingernails pulled a trash can instead of between my knees and was clipping my fingernails and it happened to face her bed when haunt her arm flopped out of her blotchy arm? That same look of the blood pooling to the surface garm hopped out of the bed. I Shit you not. I knew she was dead. Didn't even have to go over to the body. I knew Jesus what did you do? I put down the trash can stop. Stop the nail for Iran to the RA. And I said KNOCK KNOCK. Knock opens the door. It's Angie I think she's dead cheese The police came questioned us all. Needless to say I did not go away for the weekend. Yes thank God. Can you imagine if I had gone away for the weekend? Come back on Monday or Sunday afternoon or something. What is with you and people dying? Should I be a little nervous? Yeah I've discovered to so far how Say So far God Mary. Why is this falling upon me to do? It was easier the second time sure. What wasn't your dad was. My Dad and I was a lot older. I was probably twenty two twenty three at this point I didn't know her even that? Well yeah it was weird though because her parents called me. I had never talked to. These people are parents. Called me to ask me about Is there anything Angie could have done or eaten? That might have been harmful for her and they'd had that party. I don't know I'm sure there was a toxicology. Report would have said that there was alcohol owners assured but I just didn't feel comfortable. I Dunno making assumptions about what she Alec Not GonNa Tell. Her parents our why just because I don't know anyway yeah yeah. It was campus housing there. Underage people drinking So I did not want to be the one to read anybody out or especially when I really didn't know what she'd been doing because I wasn't there awkward. Alright so yeah. Wow Yeah Mary if you need someone to discover your dead body here for Ya. That's evidently one of my callings in life is to do that. Glad I've avoided that one. It's no fun no And I believe it is true what they say that the body is just a vessel. Yeah I mean there is no life in a dead body once you know your personality is GonNa let your spirit or soul or whatever you WANNA call. It is not there. It's just a bag of flesh and bones. So does that make you believe there is a god or there isn't a guy well? I don't know whether that makes me believe there isn't a God but I do believe that there's somewhere that our souls go afterward. It seems like I don't know where I don't know what we do. I don't know who knows but I don't think that our consciousness ends. Yeah by the way you and I were watching this thing. I want to say it was on a cruise ship. They're like crews TV. Or whatever it was that we watched chromatic. They showed this interesting graveyard off the coast of Miami. Remember this yeah. You can be cremated and then a diver will take Your remains in some sort of stone vessel it could be like shaped like a starfish and whatever And add it to this underwater graveyard. What happens is it becomes. Sort of a reef coral grows on it and fish lived there. I've actually thought that was pretty cool. Want me to make sure that's what happens with you. Sure once arranged on it. Wow mixing phone calls this afternoon. do that Then I suppose just as a side note to sort of wrap this up I mean. Gosh my life isn't all about finding dead bodies and feeling depressed for letting ones yeah career. Wise just real quick. I went to college for music. I was a vocal major. Didn't know what to do after that. 'cause I didn't WANNA teach And I wasn't good enough to be a performer so I didn't know what to do as a career. After that ended up getting into radio I was a DJ. And then I sold radio for a while. It was terrible at that but then I learned to write radio commercials. is actually good at it and and parlayed that into a career in television production. There you go there. It is there you have it. I've been in television production star. Not exactly behind the scenes Goshen. I'm definitely a behind the camera kind of person until we do after show videos and then uniform and I guess So that's me. I'm sure there's more to come. I'm not dead yet. Not Dead. Discover my own body. You could and you would know that you had done what would tell did I guess so. Well is that more mid. Yeah that's what more Sorry everybody off sometimes staying all that stuff probably because it's just not lighthearted. Yeah there's nothing great about the neck something about Mary. We can find some fun stuff. Oh I could tell you my first real job in high school. What was your first job in high school? What was only during the Christmas season? I was in drama. And they wanted someone who is a member of the drama club Thespian You know you start out as a gateway to lesbian so as a fest Byan can. My job was working at the mall during the Christmas season to try to get kids to go visit. Santa Claus sit on his lap. Pay For a picture So that was my job. I was a reindeer. Yes I was jingles. The talking reindeer. My God in Pembroke Mall in Virginia Beach Virginia. I sat in a Tree. Yup and worked this. Sort of voice activated. Talking head is the word I'm looking for. I was thinking more along the lines of creepy as fuck talking head you know. And so his voice activated so I would speak into a microphone and then the the mouth would move is definitely the correct term. I would talk to kids about like. Did you visit Santa Claus yet and the kids would come up to an intercom and talk to jingles. And then one time this group of dudes walk by their leg just jingles of a phone number hit on the reindeer. That's Dan. I began a career in voice porn. Just kidding but no but you know I could. Maybe a sex color no. Let's just stick with a podcast. Okay Okay are you gonNA use my talents for good and not? I mean nothing against no porn. Want Sir whatever you to you do you kids okay. Shall we take one final break and get to some patrons say let's do some Patriots you've got Magically five five. Oh Yeah I never happens. We'll be right back arend. We are supported by apostate. Coffee a damn good cup of Joe I would like to bear my testimony. But you will love this blend with every fiber of your being You Mean Bean. Yes absolutely the less being medium. Dark variety roasted in small batches to ensure freshness zero bitterness and balanced acidity with a sacred. Not Secret Combo of Caramel and cocoa very fancy. This coffee will nourish and strengthen your body so stop drinking subpar. Coffee gave the lesbian blend. Try today at apostate coffee DOT com. That's apostate coffee DOT COM. We are back with five. Exactly COUNT THEM PATRONS. Two three four five five year. Check it out and All right patron number one is Trey Trey Trey and I would also like to announce the TRAE has joined us on lottery lesbian channel. All yes she's having a good time. I actually woke up morning. Saw that she had joined clicked on some of the videos and then all of a sudden icy Kimberly Anderson responded to her videos and they're both speaking in Korean. Yup that happened. That is true. I love our channel yet nuts. Superfund yeah it's super super awesome by the way it's not yet open to android users. It's SORTA working around the corner patient. Be Patient Robin on there. So Trey thank you for joining and thank you even more for being a patron. We appreciate it so much. Next his Jordan eight Jordan age on each needs last name hogwarts. Nope nope because we're anti-drugs right rhyme Hula hoops okay. I like it Jordan. Hula hoops Thank you for US appreciate you so much next? Is Molly g the original G jokes? I've done it too many times Molly G Chinese last name. Good googling Mugabe molly good googly. Mugabe's thank you next one is a Mara and then a hyphenated last name. Oh and the initials for the hyphenation G. S. So try to make up for that Amara or Amirah G. Hyphen S. Good Shit. That's okay good Chamara Good Shit thank you. And lastly and this one's hard to pronounce amy no last initial initials into social needs. Oh no she does it. Who else didn't get a last name on your list. Somebody else didn't get Larry Trade and get a last name. Trey got a shadow on channels. Okay Amy we love you so much. Thank you so much for your patronage is enough. No Amy's last name Amy. We're so glad to join no amy's last night. What's the famous? Amy Amy Schumer. Is that a real comedian. We need another Amy Schumer in this world. I don't think the world can handle through Shimmer. Actually well amy no last name. Thank you so much for your patron and we really appreciate it. That's all five that's five. Ira everybody did also just film an after show today. So Gosh we have your way after shows and they have fallen by the wayside. We're trying read are putting in our best effort. We did just release our rainbow build a couple of weeks ago the worst slide show ever. That is so stupid. Why did Mormons waste their time on such dumb movies? That's what Mormons do basically and they're they're more my God. There's so many movies so bad. I'm GonNa make you watch. Some chuck talks bring it. Okay bring into patrons thank you all so much. We appreciate it. If you meaning the rest of you would like to join us on Patria. N- please visit Patriots Dot Com latter day lesbian to sign up Whereas Shelly likes to say Letter Day Tur- Lesbian Lesbian Latter Day last. Also if you want to join our channel which you should because we're having a lot of fun Where do they find that the easiest thing to do is to go to latter day lesbian dot org slash Polo Polo and sign up? Yes okay I think that does it. Hulu we cover it all. I think we did a good job. Maybe I'd like to thank Dan from extension audio. Thank you Dan for leaving. An An and for the recipe remembers steer clear of cults. Because they are known. Joe Know a joke at all. Talk to you later bye-bye.

Mary Barra Heather Shelly Pat Robertson Amy Amy Schumer Iran Jesus US Singapore Merkin America Fannie Angie Trey Trey Trey Singapore president Jimmy Chafing Mexico DJ
General Motors, Retail Records, and Cannabis Conventions

MarketFoolery

20:50 min | 2 years ago

General Motors, Retail Records, and Cannabis Conventions

"Thanks to Harry's for supporting this episode of market fully guys can be hard to shop for. But Harry's Harry's is the perfect gift. Trust me. He doesn't need another wallet. He doesn't need more socks this year. Okay. Get your holiday shopping done early free shipping ends on December twelfth so act now. Go to harrys dot com slash fool to get five dollars off a shave set while supplies last. That's harrys dot com slash fool. It's Monday, November twenty six on the market flurry. I'm Chris sale. Joining means studio back he's been away. It's David craftsman. Thanks for being here. Great CO Gan. Chris good to see you. We're going to get to your travels in a moment because it wasn't just holiday travels. You were you were working a little bit of work though shorts. Based on your Twitter feed. It seems like there was more than a little bit of work going on. And we're going to get to the retail. But we have to start with the news story of the day. And that is General Motors jam announced it is laying off fifteen percent of its employees and cutting production at five plants in the US and Canada and just to be more specific on that two of the plants are in Michigan one in Ohio one in Maryland and one in Ontario, that's close to fifteen thousand jobs, and as we've come to expect at least from the stock market perspective. We shouldn't be surprised that shares of GM up on this news. Yeah. And of course, we always sympathize with people who are losing their jobs, obviously, it's a big blow to those in a rough time of year. Yeah. It's unfortunate on a lot of levels for the individuals families those communities that probably rely good amount on the factory jobs there. So that's always a painful process, but looking at GM from a business perspective. This is a company that needs to cut costs. They need to find ways to cut expenses and basically rays free cash flow and improve profitability. This is a company with an operating margin of five percent a net profit margin of less than one percent. So so there right now really cutting a lot of corners. They're pinching pennies at this point. So I think that this makes sense from a strategic perspective, I one I heard this news. I thought okay, maybe they're shifting some of those production jobs to another market maybe overseas, where you're able to to hire labor for a cheaper rate, or whatever it might be. But it looks like they're essentially just taking that capacity off line and then just trying to ramp up capacity or utilized their existing facilities even more than they already are. So from an efficiency perspective that makes a lot of sense if you have enough capacity with other factories with other production facilities than you should just focus on those existing production facilities rather than having. Several other facilities that you don't really actually need to supply to produce the vehicles that that you need to supply. Yeah. It was interesting to see that. This wasn't simply a, you know, as you said, let's just cut these jobs. Let's move them. Elsewhere about twenty five percent of these jobs are white collar jobs. So yes, there are a lot of factory jobs. But there are also some front office jobs as well. And as you said scaling back to production in a pretty dramatic way. And it's it's interesting in this was this was hinted at a week or two ago by I think his name is Jim lots one of the former vice chairs at General Motors talking about Mary Barra the CEO at General Motors and her message to her executive team, which was essentially like let's start to look at ways that we can tighten the belt, and it's clear from and I don't know if Jim let's thought he was. Gonna be on this level. But it's clear from this move, the Mary Barra and her team essentially are saying not only are we tightening the belt for our own business. We're doing this. Now, we're we would rather be early in cutting costs in the wake of the economy and the run that it has had we'd rather be early on this than be late. We don't want to be the last ones to do this. Yeah. And GM isn't in position where they have a whole lot of flexibility says company with a lot of debt they are burning cash, and as I mentioned their profit margins are about as narrow as you can get and still be profitable. So it's not like they have a lot of time to tinker with things around the edges. They really have to address those core issues now. So I think in this case, they're ripping off the band aid. They're saying, yes, we can simplify our product portfolio. One thing I noticed in their press releases seventy five percent of their global sales volume is expected to just come from five vehicle architectures by the early part of the twenty twenty. So essentially, folks. On select vehicles architectures and building production facilities around those architectures rather than having a ton of different types of vehicle architectures out there, which is just harder to have an efficient operation when you have when you're trying to produce every vehicle under the sun. So really trying to simplify the product portfolio simplify production and in doing so reduce expenses increase efficiency, and the should end up saving them a lot of cash. They're expecting cash savings of about six billion dollars by twenty twenty or so so part of that is lower capital expenditure costs some of his just cost reductions, so lower labor expenses things like that so ripping off the band aid, as we mentioned, it's a painful time for for those individuals who are affected and losing their jobs, but for GM, it's a company that really needs to do something drastic like this. If they want to raise their chances of surviving over the long term, and I think if you're looking at automakers. Two things to watch for over the next two months. Our one Ford Motor and others. Are they coming out with similar tightening of the belt so to speak and to we are less than two months away from the North American International auto show, which is held every January in Detroit. And I have to believe that this is going to be a topic of conversation for the media at that event. Whether anyone follow suit or not I mean, it's almost like if you're a reporter covering this industry. If Ford has an announced job cuts Dutch, probably one of the first questions, you're asking their executives at the event, next January. Absolutely. I think this move from GM undoubtedly impacts the competitive landscape for North American automakers and potentially international automakers as well building cars is really challenging and capital intensive business. So the these are companies with narrow profit, Mark. Gines? And you gotta do what you gotta do. If you want to raise the odds that you will be around over the long run. Let's move onto retail. Which was obviously the the big headline over the last few days certainly post thanksgiving black Friday today being cyber Monday. I don't even know if I feel like cyber Monday is less of a big. I know everyone's talking about black Friday is not as big a deal. It still seems like it's a pretty big deal in cyber Monday. Just seems like it's been extended of black Friday online sales were record around six point two billion. That's up more than twenty percent from last year and total sales on black Friday somewhere in the neighborhood of twenty three billion dollars. So black Friday still seems like it's kind of a big deal still relevant. Although I saw clip I think it's from a black Friday a year or two ago, but kind of a news blooper type of thing where you were there. There's a new station you have all the cameras and reporters who are in the entrance of some retail store on. On the cusp of black Friday and the doors opened up and only one guy and for me personally. I've never been like a big black Friday shopper. So personally. I just feel disconnected from the whole thing didn't even buy anything online this year. Although I probably shouldn't Christmas is coming up right around the corner. You know, for me what really stuck out is the ecommerce strength as you mentioned. We saw e commerce sales up over twenty three percent. And I think what was it total black Friday sales. I think I saw up something like nine percent or a healthy amount. So that bodes well for for for retailers. And I think that shift to ecommerce were still in the relatively early innings because ecommerce says it percentage of overall retail in the US is still less than you know, depending on the category can still be less than ten twelve fifteen percent. So I gotta think that this is just another step along the way toward ecommerce taking a bigger piece of that retail pie. And we talk all the time about how important the hall. Today quarter is for retailers, but I came across some stats about how it's even more. So for some retailers in terms of the percent of annual earnings per share that comes from the holiday quarter here few names for Oetzi. It's forty two percent comes from the holiday quarter. Lululemon Forty-five percent. Best by fifty percent and bed bath and beyond. Fifty four percent. So yes, target and WalMart, and obviously, Amazon and others. They want to do. Well, but for those names among others. They got a nail it. Yeah. Absolutely. It's a challenging competitive space. And I think the companies that have that online presence. They probably have a better shot of reaching existing companies. Existing customers are reengaging customers who have been on those platforms before I know with that. That's a company that's constantly trying to find ways to be more than just the place to go to buy gifts and make it more of like, a regular ecommerce destination. But a company like the sort of being the craft fair online. Really, I think serves the holiday market, really. Well, so so they're a company that I think they continue to do really, well, but companies that are only focused on the brick and mortar aspect or don't have as strong of a ecommerce angle. I think now as we're seeing ecommerce is growing faster than overall retail. So if you don't have the e commerce presence, you're probably going to risk falling behind who's what you can buy for some guy out there. This holiday. Season. And it's harrys love Harry's bene- customer for years long before they started sponsoring this podcast. And let's face it most guys and by most guys I mean, most guys certainly I'm in that category. It must geyser terrible to shop for we don't make it easy. I always feel bad for my family this time of year. I don't know what I want. And you can get the guy in your life something that he's actually going to use. You can get them. Harry's gift sets come in a great looking holiday box, which I brought in here to show off to. And of course, it's not podcast. You can't see it bright radio trust young. But trust me. This thing is gorgeous gift set start at just ten dollars. And there's a special offer for dozens of listeners we're working with Harry's to give you five dollars off any shave set, including the limited edition holiday set, which come to gorgeous box. I maybe I shouldn't say this. But last year, the holiday gift sets were nice, but the box wasn't this next this gorgeous box. You get all of that. When you go to harrys dot com slash will. Plus, you get the free shipping. This offer is for new and returning customers. And it's only available during the holidays in each Harry, shaving set comes with an ergonomic waited handle, and you get the option to engrave it. German engineered five blade cartridges that provide a close, comfortable shave. Foaming shave gel for a rich leather travel cover to protect your blades. And did I mention the handsome holiday gift box. Yeah. It's handsome, and hey, if you just want something for yourself. You can redeem a Harry's trial offer to experience the quality of shave before committing get your holiday shopping done early. Don't wait don't be like me. Don't wait to the last minute. Get it done early because free shipping ends on December twelfth so act now go to harrys dot com slash fool to get five dollars off shave set while supplies last. That's harrys dot com slash fool because let's face. It. Guys are never going to buy new razors. It's not something. We're very good. Yeah. And you just get the razor that you started shaving within you use that for the rest of your life until someone actually buys you something like this. I'm guilty of that you as I mentioned you were travelling recently not just from the holidays, you were out in Las Vegas because as hopefully as longtime listeners know you have become over the past. I would say. Eighteen months the go-to cannabis industry expert, not just your at the motley fool. I saw that you were you did an interview with control amac for her show yet for wealth track. And I I guess that's a shot at that time. I mean, hey, I I was flattered that they ask. But. Yeah. Conceal a MAC, and I had had a conversation at turned out to be about fifty minutes, and it's up on YouTube. If you search Kretzman candidates, or maybe we can tweet it out or something semi the Lincoln will tweet that up. Yeah. Yeah. But it was a great conversation about fifty minute conversation just diving deep into the history of cannabis how we got to where we are today. And then just talking about how we're approaching this from an investing perspective at the motley fool recognizing that it is still a risky volatile and emerging space, but undoubtedly has captured a lot of attention lately. So it's an exciting space to follow. But then trying to keep expectations realistic level recognizing that this is still very risky, very volatile space. So by the way over thanksgiving one of my cousin. Lives up in Toronto. He's an attorney and he was and he listened to the podcast from time to time. And he said, you know, I always smile whenever I hear you talking about cannabis because our firm has been doing so much business with these because there are so many companies that are suddenly in need of legal help on this front. You're out in Las Vegas for what is the name of the conference. I know it's a huge conference. I just the name is escaping me. MJ biz Khan and minder standing is that this they host regional events over the course of the year. So they they've had vents in Toronto. I think they have one coming up in New Orleans Miami. But this one in Las Vegas, it's been going on for at least five or six years. Now, this is kind of like the flagship cannabis event in my understanding is that's the largest cannabis conference and expo worldwide this year. I heard estimates range from thirty to forty thousand attendees over the course of the week. So you really go in. It's not quite as big as C, which is also Las Vegas, but it takes up the entire convention center over in Las Vegas. So you just have hundreds if not thousands of vendors, and then thousands of people just going around networking trying to capture their little piece of the cannabis opportunity. Couple of questions in terms of the. Events that you went to the breakout sessions. And certainly the interviews. You did I was there anything that surprised you either on the good side or the bad side? I didn't know if there is anything real surprising. I'd say one thing that stuck out is just the the number of US companies that are going public in Canada now, and that sort of a trend that we've been seeing ramp up the past month, or so you, and you just have this murky legal framework in the US, which we've talked about where you have now over thirty states that have legalized medical cannabis in some shape or form, but it still remains an illicit substance on a federal level and from a financial or investing perspective. What's interesting there is that the major exchanges stock exchanges both in the US. And Canada won't let you be a public publicly traded candidates company on their exchange if you're operating in a territory where it still federally illegal. So you can't list on the NASDAQ and new York Stock Exchange the Toronto stock exchange or the venture exchange. Up in Canada. If you essentially if you have any involvement in the US, but you have this smaller and relatively obscure exchange in Canada called the Canadian securities exchange sometimes referred to as the cannabis securities exchange where they say, we'll let you lis- on our exchange as long as you're operating in a state where it's legal so over the past month you've had a number of US operators cannabis operators go public on the Canadian securities exchange, and that's their way of tapping the capital markets kind of riding this wave of cannabis hype that we've seen throughout the year. So so companies like cure leaf which has a market cap of well over three billion dollars. Now, probably one of the biggest if not the biggest US operators by market cap now. It's public up in Canada on that relatively small exchange than some other companies like harvests cannabis Dixie brands is another one going public. So. Over the course of the conference. I was able to have conversations with a variety of execs and insiders and a lot of these companies are the US operators who are looking at take advantage of kind of that that back door way to go public and access the public markets through the Canadian securities exchange so that was just a ongoing theme that that I recognize. And I think it's interesting because I think for a lot of reasons the US market is more appealing than Canada or the other international markets out there. So you mentioned the consumer electronic show, huge consumer tech show in Las Vegas every January. You've been to that. And I recall from a conversation you, and I had one time you went to see, and I asked you what was the most absurd thing you saw I think if memory serves me correctly, it was a smart rubber duck and win the smart duck, Edwin the smart duck. What was something that you saw at this cannabis conference that you maybe a vendor head or some- someone. Setting up a booth where you just sort of looked at it and shook your head and said, yeah, I don't I don't know that that's going to work out one technology aspect that. I saw walking the floor. It was imagined like a big machine that pumps out what's essentially synthetic DNA. So that is not at all. When I didn't even know this was a thing and the company they said, no, we haven't actually sold anything because they're walking me through this technology. And I I'll say what the technology is. So the idea is when you're drying, your cannabis you would be able to pump this synthetic DNA kinda through the air, it would touch the plants, and that synthetic DNA would essentially be almost like a DNA barcode that would be tied to your cannabis. So it'd be a unique form of DNA that's tidier cannabis. So if the government comes knocking and saying, hey, we think, you know, someone might be knocking off your product, or there might be some legal issue. Whatever reason you'd actually be able to test that product that might be in question and see okay that cannabis did come from our production facility in California. So that's the selling point. But then I asked has has anyone actually bought this because it seems like a bit of a stretch and a lot of different ways. And it's like, no, we know we've talked with a lot of people, but we haven't actually sold it for one thing. I didn't even know synthetic DNA was really a thing like that. And the idea of just having this chamber of dried cannabis where you have this machine pumping tons of synthetic DNA into it didn't sound all that appealing is that really like healthy, you know, if you're consuming that do I want something that has that the being pumped onto it? So a lot of questions there. But it was an interesting technology to learn about. So I was just going to say the the idea that you could you could bum barred cannabis with synthetic anything, and that it would have no effect other than to essentially just market for government inspection that seems like a stretch. Also, a I'm glad you provided that x. Oakland h in because if you just left it at synthetic DNA. I thought that sounded like a really a recipe for like Spiderman type situation where you know, instead of being bitten by a radioactive spider. Someone smokes a synthetic joint. And then all of a sudden they have some sort of power. So I'm not sure what powers, but they've got something. Yeah. I think synthetic DNA it raises the chances that you you really go places Tippett Christmas. Thanks for being here. Thanks, chris. As always people on the program have interest in the stocks. They talk about on the motley fool may have formal recommendations for against so by herself stocks based solely on what you're here. That's going to do it for this market. Fully the show was mixed by Dan Boyd. I'm Chris hill. Thanks for listening. We'll see you tomorrow.

cannabis GM US Harry Las Vegas Canada General Motors Chris Chris sale Toronto Twitter Ford Motor David craftsman Mary Barra Chris hill
TBS 190 - 4 Questions To Help You ReOpen Successfully with Dr. Tarun Agarwal

T-Bone Speaks Dentistry

34:12 min | 5 months ago

TBS 190 - 4 Questions To Help You ReOpen Successfully with Dr. Tarun Agarwal

"Welcome to t bone space with Dr Turunen Agarwal where our goal is to change the way you practiced industry by helping you achieve clinical financial and personal balance. Now here's your host t-bone welcome back. It's another week mayor. How you doing? Are they going to call you? Mary Barra now. Yeah calling you mayor. Five years years row. I don't know why but they do. How's everything going good tired? Yeah we're back to work in full speed. I don't know if it's I'm not. I mean last week like three days back to back long days and then we record after that so then we have a court. We had our lives. Hsun course yeah. I'm not saying we're not busy. I'm just saying I'm deaf. Now was a quick turn. The it was like nothing to everything. No naps in between no lunch. Breaks no naps. I mean bad news news I gotTA GIVE. My wife a lot of credit so I was like. Why can't I work nine to four all this? And then she's like no you're gonNA work. Tend to three with a lunch. Tend to fort with a lot before with the lunch and I'm complaining about it right. Yeah but the truth is I think she's looking out for me. It's really nice. Yeah especially once the gym's open back up you'll be energized and ready for your day. Fanny female will be. Take Him to the gym. He doesn't use the treadmill or the bike or way to quit me. Well we can do it here that's JP said you know that would just be too smart to use the gym at Your House. You saying I wish the I don't know what it is. I just I like going like going to the gym. I like the atmosphere a group of people. I can't say no to them. Yeah no and everybody's doing it together. It's motivating this twenty different things for me to use. I don't get bored right. I think really what it is. I'm just bored. I'm so good at things. I just get bored easily. Yeah whatever that's well let's get into what we're going to talk about today. This is really important as offices. Start to open back up so we have four questions. You should be asking yourself around reopening your practice. I was texting with a local dentist here in Raleigh and and we were talking and this is about a week ago and he was all freaked out about as I little bit. Honest with you about just didn't know what to expect what to expect and how things were going that first week and how patients weren't responding and know we were just talking about all these things and then I just start thinking to myself man these what can I do. What's going on. How how do we answer this and These four questions are these four things popped into my head so today we're going to talk about these four specific things that you can and should be doing in thinking about to help get your practice open faster better and in the way that you want and it has nothing to do with all of that nonsense. Just doesn't so let's get started. What are we doing to let people know that we are open well before that? Let's do a podcast review okay. Let's do that all right so I have a review from one of your lovely listeners. And this was over the Corentin time so great podcast straightforward insight on building implant production. The testimonials do work. I gotta say something. Thank you to that person. Time Jew money. They think they're DJ to Tom Excellent. I'm a little disappointed. We didn't get more reviews during quarantine time couple but because people have nothing better to do. I mean. They shouldn't so as you go back now that you're busier and you have a lunch break. Maybe a one hour lunch break during the leave us a review because our podcast only get terrain tire and grows. If you leave reviews for us on itunes spotify and Google podcasts. So please take an opportunity to do that. I would also like to tell you that we have a facebook group that is called dental business in clinical excellence. And what we're doing. There is an environment where serious people and fun people but not la people can come and have good conversation and get great information. That's practical pointed in relevant to your practice. Think of it like t-bone speaks community and what it is. It's I'm there are some of our other people there All of our three D. Instructors of there and we will talk about dental business and clinical excellence. Because you can't run a great business without being clinically excellent. You can't be clinical excellence if you're not running a good business so it's kind of all of those things and it's it's I'm trying to remove the pettiness. I'm trying to remove all the requirements. If you've got a post picture China trying to get all of that and I'm trying to also not make it a place where it's all Lallera Blah Blah. I want play. Yeah I want it to be realistic about everything. So that's super important and of course. How are we doing with three dentists? Though so we are moving to some online courses we did some live streaming so it's really exciting to be moving in this direction. People are liking to train from home. And you know it's super important To pivot your practice to pivot and I have a whole e book about the practice pitch you know and and so it's important to do that and we're doing that three dentists. We're going to be committed. We are committed and super excited to get back to having live classes but until that our education and our growth cannot stop. And I would argue that. It's the best time to be focused on some of these things because two things happened one. You take advantage of the slower and slow times and to keep your mind off all the nonsense. That's out there so now. Let's go ahead and get to this week's actual content all right so for the four questions you should be asking yourself around reopening your practice. We'll start with. What are you doing to let people know we are open? Yeah so you know if everything started around how busy we're going to be busy. We'RE NOT GOING TO BE. Our patients can come back. Or they're not gonNA come back you know. How many team members should I have? The first thing you gotta do. Is You got to let people your patients existing patients and prospective patients but focusing on your existing patients. You GotTa let them know you're open and I keep hearing over and over again from dentists who have stayed open helping with emergency even by the way. Some people have built a good business during this time. Just doing emergency. And they've had their patient people call patients call them and say my dentist and they don't return calls even during this clause not about whether they're not open right now some state talking letting them but even if you're like look I've got some conditions that may say. I have not ready to open. Maybe my team members ready to open but you can answer phones. You can return all messages your business. Your Business is all about availability right so you got to let people know how what are some ways. You Think Meredith. We can let people know that we are open. Well I think the easiest way is to use the base you already have out revenue while blast email reminder revenue demand force whatever obviously US revenue in practice. But you gotta do some kind of blasts and I would argue that you need to be a little bit more than you normally do. Not every day but you know every few days so like so. Here's what I'm thinking in our practice. Maybe it's a blast to our patient base around who's back right now because didn't come back all at one time. We came back four or five people at first then. We had two people start yesterday so last week would have been a good blast about saying. Hey you know we're back and the four or five people that are back and then this week we could have done a blast about. Hey we've added these two people back and you know we can have some quotes from them about how they're excited to be back specifically what they do in the practice what it's going to what the patients can benefit from that so and then next week as we have another person come back in the week after that has finally get into full steam four good email blasts right that with relevant information not sales information but relevant information where we're telling people hey we're back open so those things are super important. You know another thing that I was thinking that we should do. A we are doing is we should be doing social media posts around being back you know. Things are showing people working again to kind. Let your patients know that you're available that you're doing certain dentistry showing some of the things that you're you know that that you've done and changes you made in the office or maybe you haven't made any changes? But whatever it is a consistent social media focus around Opri opening your practice about. What's that you're open maybe? It's just a simple you know like we've done these scientists that we're back we're open. You know here here. You know or or just some stuff like that. Maybe we should get out and hold signs out on this being funny though. Pull toyland stuff. You know. I'll maybe we should do some of those things just fun and engaging things not overly complicated. There's a website called canvas. Nba Dot Com. If you're not good at photoshop graphic skills they have lots of pre made templates type in type it in and I don't think any of those things you never hold you back from. Lack of skills should hold you back and quite frankly we all have teenagers or we have team members. That can do some of that stuff for us. The thing I think that is important that we are not doing right now that I want to do so remind me tomorrow. Is I want to Ask PATIENTS TO LEAVE. Google reviews highlighting how they felt about coming back about the safety about you know the protocols. It's a good way to ask for it even a lot of times. We're afraid to ask our same patients again right like. Oh they've already done a review voice but if I said to you hey meredith. We're really trying to focus on getting reopen. And letting people know that it's safe to come back and that we're here. Do you mind leaving a google. You talking about that share. I have plenty of g mail accounts. I use multi view singular talent. So that's one of those things and then of course calling patients that were canceled and touch you got to and hopefully we've done that during this process that we called and personally canceled patients Hopefully we tried to reschedule them. Some didn't reschedule And so you got to let people know that you're open by just being open and I think the easiest ones are the two months that we've been closed off focus on trying to make a phone call to each and every one of those patients because they were scheduled to come in and they missed their appointment so we want to try to get them back. There are main focus. Okay well I think that was good for. What are we doing to let people know we are open? So what are we letting? What are we doing to let these people know that we are safe? John they know that we're open. I would say that that's probably one of the most important things that keep people from coming back fishing or hesitation. App May have although. Here's what I do WanNa make this common. I have not and again. Maybe it's because I'm the last one they talked to now. I have not had any patient asked me if we're using what of we have. I think this whole thing not that important. It's important but I think this whole thing about the craziness is all in our own minds right. I really do. I believe because we're watching it and we're so in tune to it. I think people are just looking for reassurance. Yeah nobody's haven't had one person in one not members come to me and said I had a patient. Ask exactly what we're doing you know. Like step-by-step they'd they just want to know all everything they say is it safe is okay to come in and I say yeah you know you know Meredith. We're always we're always you come here. Because you know we're a great blaze we take care of you and we cleanliness and safety is important to us so we we've Gone. We've gone above and beyond. Okay I call that. Don't answer questions they don't ask. They didn't ask what of TV listening to say. Oh but we don't have to have everything but disposable gallons in five minutes in facials but you know that's there so it's there but the thing. I think that you need first and foremost you need to be confident that you're doing everything possible. Not Confident that you're keeping up with the dentist across the street from you down the street from you because that's their practice and their way of doing things you need to be confident in what you are doing. I'm very confident what we've done. Yeah and make sure. The team members come across confidence and consistent a consistent message and I think one of the most important things we did was we got on the White Board as a team we sat down and I said these are the four categories of where safety is what we're doing as a practice what we're doing individually what we're doing for patients and what we're doing from procedures. Yeah you know. How are we addressing those four areas to maximize safety and you know? Initially I said. Oh we're not doing much different but when you write it down it's amazing how much it works and nothing made me happier than when patients had. God. That's a lot I feel. We're feeling this by SAFE PLACE TO BE. Yeah exactly and So so walking them through what you doing a group being confident that you're doing the best. Don't let all this social media nonsense. Get in the way. Be Confident if you WANNA go above board So I should overboard and Saran wrap your whole opera. Tori like Dexter the killer. You can do that. I'm cool with that. But be confident. In what you do and be consistent and what you do in what you say. Yeah so I think one of the main things about showing everybody. How safe you are is getting it out there you know. They're going to see when they get there that there is a sneeze guard that were coming out to get our patients but the whole thing that we need is need to get the patients there and I don't think they're willing to come until they see what we're doing. When people have seen on facebook videos we put out of the of how clean every opportunity is of the different things. We're doing like coming out to the car to get the patients that gives them the confidence that once they get to the office they have no questions already know everything. I think that the coronavirus doesn't go under armour to the side and they didn't take hours but And I'm glad Jesse little stick. Nobody runs into it. I think maybe even about the sneeze guards even making pictures fun of them like social media posts of somebody walking around the Sneeze. Guard saying we have here so you could but I wanted to put a little circle hole in it like a bank tellers. Little metal thing talk but that'd be pretty good. I I think I think I think the most important thing we've done is ask patients to wait in the car and go get them from there and do the questionnaire and the temperature check there because I think it sets the stage that obviously doing this and I think at that point leave it makes them at ease and I think a along with that is the messaging to the patients before they make their appointment so they can expect this like we're using revenue well which I'm not trying to make this commercial reverence just what we use in the practice. But they text us on a number revenue well and it POPs up on the computer saying I'm here and then we text him back. Say we'll be out. We went patients. Say I'd rather hang out my car. They're like no it's fine. I think we had Google Review actually left that we didn't ask and he said I was just having a party in my car. A lot of people would prefer preferred Bruce. They can talk on the phone. I don't have headphones. Some of that stuff you know so all I think I might have. We might just get. My wife may take are waiting waiting another office. I think. Also certainly the PGA. You gotTa have lunch know that you have the making them. Reassure you know. I think I wanna make a comment here and I don't know if some people are doing this out of fun or if the being series I think these pictures and posts about how much doing only hurts our profession these posts where people look like. They're NASA suits. Yeah that was my response. One of them they said what about this? It was like a whole helmet face. Shield thing like are you going into space? I think what it does is. It sends a message to patients that this is really bad. Yeah like maybe I shouldn't come right. I think if you have to do all that if you have to do all that maybe I shouldn't come right. And I think this level of one upsmanship with on social media like Oh. We're doing this. I think it's not good. You know because now it's one thing we do in groups that's just us but when we start proposing it our practice pages. I saw post the other day. That made me a little upset. In if you're if you're if you're if you're dentist office doesn't look like this. Then maybe you should come see. Yeah trying to steal their people. I didn't get these. We have all this shit that needs to be backed up. Yeah we're have a very clean minimalistic opportunity there and we don't need the back sitting out. Everything can be wiped down or spray. Yeah we have the air filters it's enough it's enough it's it's it's and you know what even if it isn't enough is enough me and if you don't believe it's enough that's okay but you don't need to go out there on creating more of this fear that's out there anyway And certainly you gotta be cleaning taking videos of you cleaning And then certainly videos and photos all social media about you specifically about the new protocol you know I would look at it. That most of us are doing at least five six seven things differently. And that's a video a day and put those out on your on your practice page and then boost him you know or doing ad around and whatever. The current trend is but boost domes. So people know that you're doing these things at other people know that you're doing these things and then you know and then I think again is the best way for people to know it's safe is we're biased if we're telling people that save but if you can ask you patients to make post about how safely felt or as patients to take pictures with you and then give them permission to post that. I think that speaks significant wonders to the safety to everybody else. Leverage your patients don't should ever be using for the mountain top about how great you are. It should be trying to make your patients from the mountaintops about how great you are. That's always better well. That sounds good. So for the third question of what you should be asking yourself around reopening your practice. What are we doing to reconnect with the two months patients that we have rescheduled I was? I'm worried about this because you know what coming back and we have a full schedule hygiene. We don't have a full schedule on my side because I wasn't booked out two months out pretty close but not quite two months out Which is a bad thing anyway So what is our plan to reconnect with those patients specifically know? Are we saving time for them? Are we giving them priority? You know what are we doing there? So the first thing is we when we cancel everybody. We created a covert code fake code and the system and we walk that out so that way we can quickly pull up who is a covert canceled patient on hygiene and on the doctor schedule. So that way we're running that mining that on a regular basis and we're trying to you know because look at day it's GonNa take time for a scheduled to fill back up from the existing hygiene patients. So we're trying to mind that on a daily basis. Because I think it's GonNa take a solid two to three weeks before our current hygiene patients. Start filling our schedule in terms of restorative work. So we got a couple of weeks to try to catch up and get people from the past and get them scheduled and give them priority because we do need to give them priority treatment for treatment absolutely insane for cleanings we hygiene has been the issue because we do book six months out so we're usually pretty full anyways and then we're trying to put eight weeks of patients into a schedule. That's already full that we only have half hygiene running for this week so once. That goes back up to full speed. Then we're trying to reschedule eight weeks worth of double hygiene into it. I think at the end of the day I think it comes back to that messaging. Yeah let people know when you send that messaging that. Listen we apologize. No one expected this. We're doing our best to figure out what solutions are. And then another thing is not. Everyone is ready to come back. They WANNA wait until August September. So the best thing you could do would be go ahead and push them to that six month mark of these eight weeks because that's what's going to be empty so for the people who aren't quite ready just act like you're not pushing them to come in any sooner. October going to be empty because we didn't do any recalls orch. That's what I mean so six months from when we were closed so that would be a good way to start to fill those you know calling and texting followups we've gone. We've started doing a lot of texting. With patients and your. You don't answer the phone if you don't know the number would like to think everybody's I think they're more so than you think maybe auto emails. Yeah you know so you know again with revenue well with all softwares like that you can take a quick fill list from Eagle Soft Rock and report and just send it to those people in revenue will you can take that fake covert code that we created and put them into a separate list and send them an email consistently So you know. We got to reconnect with them. And the other thing that I think is important on the reconnection is I want whoever schedule they were on for that person to call them? So if they're on the hygiene schedule I want. I want a personal touch their hygienist calling them. If they're on my schedule I won't win to call them. If they're undocked visas schedule. I Want Whitney to to call them so that way because they already know those patients and quite frankly it'd be better if the doctor called but I just remember when somebody asks if he called every new patient even give them to call me back good idea idea but the personal touch in calling people back to reconnect with them is super important. Because I don't want those patients to feel that we forgot about them or that. We didn't prioritize and the more proactive. You can be the less we can have them getting angry. And I don't want those patients get angry. We had one today And we'll talk about that in the next the next segment but You GotTa get in touch with them. So reports quick fields called text. Follow up do emails and have a personal touch of calling these patients right. So for our fourth question of things you should be asking yourself around your reopening we have. What can we do to fill any last minute? Cancellations with the two-month backlog so it's super important right we want to avoid having cancellations and we WANNA have a full schedule okay So the first step is minimized. No-shows okay so what we're doing. Is You know in the past. We used to send automated emails texts to people. We'd call a two days in advance to them now. We're calling every single hygiene patient in advance and saying do you plan to come. Yeah well we did turn off our audio because we are still moving patients and gene and it sends a two week prior and at one point you know a few weeks ago. We didn't know what point we would be bringing on more hygienists and when things would get back to a full schedule so with so much change. We didn't want patients to get confirmations. And then UH A call to change. It looks so we just turned off all auto reminders. So that kind of put us at a point where we have to call which I think is nice because then we can go people. So we're minimizing no-shows by proactively in advance not the day before even two days before multiple days before meredith. You know we got scheduled Marissa. I'm not quite ready. No Problem Meredith. Let's go ahead and move to September October right. Oh No I don't want to wait that long. Maybe you'll make it next right but nonetheless right July fourth week and then what that does is that clean to spot up rate and then the other thing that we're doing when we're not able to connect with the patient and we learned this last week. Maybe we should have been sputtering. Knew in advance is. We're have we. We're letting patients know that if we don't hear back from them by X. Date at X. Time we're going to take them off the schedule not just like mainly meredith. If we don't hear back from you on Tuesday at five o'clock we're going to go ahead and assume that you're not making we'll open that spot up for someone else in K. Because we do have. We do have two months with patience and that way. We're not reactive and we had our first patient today. Who came in and said always unscheduled. But we had left voicemail and email and text message saying that. If we don't hear back from you we're going to have to take your appointment off the schedule. And he you know he was okay with that. His wife was not so okay with it but But you know then the day we do have to take ownership of our business. And I think it's a great opportunity to really retrain retrain some patients and I'm the worst. We've been super super great accommodating patients and I wanna be that because that's my personality but at the same time we're one of three hygienics right now and we got a two month backlog. We can't we can't we. CaN'T HAPPEN EVERY MISSED APPOINTMENT. It sucks. You know. It really won't we know there's other people that people are wanting to come in. They're wanting to get out of the house they feel like it's a safe place. It's honestly I feel safer at our office than I do. At the grocery store you way saying for the Walmart yeah sure so they WANNA get out. A lot of them are already off work or working from home. So they're not gonNA flexible right so they're not having to take time off where in the past. They would have to leave the office early to get an appointment so they're wanting to come in so I hate to see someone not show up knowing that we could put some money. You know another thing that we implemented it combination of revenue. Well local met. Yeah so what we're doing is with this short list. And then once we clean the schedule off and we get We have openings. We send a daily email out to patients saying well just the past. Just the two-month patients not overly passed through just the people that we missed him but that Covet Code that covert code and what we've done. Is We call them and say hey? Click this link and if you WANNA come in go ahead and schedule an appointment. Just fried gene. Right not for restorative work but just for hygiene so that way we've given them without them having to call us asking multiple questions they can look right there and say these are the Times that are open. And so that way when the when the schedules open and then we've been able to put patients in last minute like that. You know we may have somebody that something came up or whatever they gotta cancel for two hours later. You know you can put that out there. They don't have anything else to do right now. Well people some people are suddenly getting called or different. Things are going on at work just like before and so so to me. That's that's the important part. How how do we fill these last minute cancellations and get these people in number one? Avoid these cancellations by being firm Raptor being firm with patients and just tell patients. Listen we unfortunately right now. We got to be a little bit more firm about these things because we've got two months with the patients that we've got to find a way to fit back into our off feels like the end of the year and it's not the end of the no so so maybe for the first time in our lives will be busy in the summertime. Yeah or maybe. We won't have sucked timber. Or maybe be really sucked timber. Who knows right but so the four things are? What are we doing to let people know where open? What are we doing to let people know we're safe and we're welcome back. What are we doing to reconnect with the two months of patients that we had to reschedule? And what are we doing to filling in? Fill any last minute cancellations and getting these two months of people back so hopefully we kind of gave some ideas some things you know. I hope not everybody's saying Oh. We're already doing that. You'll make me feel stupid but nonetheless. That's super important. You know and I want to say this. Making patients feel safe enough for them. To show up is ultimately what dictates whether our businesses open closed. And how busy we're going to be so you be pro. Active be confident inconsistent. Spend the time going over the systems. I made everybody do the thermometer. Everybody do I pay check in questions outside because I didn't want to take somebody to say. Oh yeah I know how to do it? And then they bumble and fumbling. I want to look for literally sat in the car and they came out and checked my temperature. Five times and ask the question. Five Times made sure that WIFI worked in the parking lot. It's important because I know many of us already open. Yeah maybe we're not as busy as we'd like to be and here's what I'll say on that. We Open last Monday Monday. Tuesday were team members only Wednesday. We started seeing patients. I was a little bit worried about what business was going to look like by the end of the week but then today's Today's Tuesday now a week and a half in and it's hygienes full restoratives. Full granted would not at full full capacity yet a lot. We do have available as and we're seeing the need to bring a hygienist back next week in a hygienist back week after that and we could bring them back earlier. I think but someone some people had to take time with getting the kids situated so all these things so look. We're all in this team members at their involve all your team members you know. Don't leave it up to the front to take care of everyone and get temperatures. I mean honestly. It's it's funny to me. I saw where somebody was taking temperatures in the back on their social media. Like it's too late and we had a patient to the called. I read your email. Is that if you have temperature or if you're coughing maybe not come in and she says you running a little bit of even I'm coughing. I'm saying yeah we don't want you to him. Yeah we would've caught you but we would have caught you in the parking lot with masks and gloves on before we took you back because once we bring you in the office. It's too late it's too late. Yeah so it's Super Awesome and look we've never been through this and now we can say we have and we will be prepared for if this happens again and I hope everybody has a great week. Enjoy work I think. It's going to be Memorial Day when this thing up. You Enjoy Memorial Day. Do me a favor. It's super important. I only got a few things. Ask You First and foremost join our facebook group. We WanNA grow. We're at about nine hundred members. Now I'd like to see us. Get up to fifteen hundred by midsummer. Gay and We're you know we're not blasting this everybody trying to get in. I'd love our listeners. To be their first to leave us a review and three support us at three dentists. Doing some phenomenal things to help you. Practice grow and we'll go from there so meredith. Anything else from you. I don't think Happy Memorial Day and have a great week after Memorial Day. Everybody thanks so much for listening to t-bone speaks with Doctor Tyrone Agarwal remember to keep striving for excellence. And we'll catch you on the next episode.

Google Meredith t-bone facebook Dr Turunen Agarwal Your House Mary Barra Fanny China US Nba spotify NASA Corentin Tom Excellent Raleigh Five Times Walmart