3 Burst results for "Marvin Susman"

"marvin susman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:07 min | 3 years ago

"marvin susman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Stories about this, and I've gone on you to, and you can find me on YouTube telling these stories on the way to the other side of the peninsula. Yeah. Marvin Sussman is here. He's Coggan who's ninety six years old, right today, age, almost almost ninety six he was almost twenty one on d day he was there two hours before everybody else landed to secure an island, just off the beaches, and he tells the story on YouTube, and as d day is approaching the seventy fifth anniversary a friend or mutual acquaintance told me a little bit about you, and we asked you to come in you're actually going back over to France in the near future. By John D day we this year, we should be on the beach. How many I wonder if it was a reunion of those of you that were there that first day and first week, I wonder how many there would be, well, it's interesting, the fiftieth anniversary. Serie nine hundred ninety four there were forty thousand d day veterans showed up and, and the beach and five years later. The fifty fifth anniversary nineteen ninety nine there were of four thousand four zero and five years later, there was four hundred. So this time maybe forty. You really are one of the, the great stories and storytellers of, of World War Two, then, aren't you? Yeah. Well, this story I tell us about a couple of them are in Normandy. And one of them. The other the other battlefields. But we, we were given infantry assignments dismounted cleaning up the peninsula working toward the Atlantic coast toward fair board. And we captured a lot of Germans, I, I had going up in a Jewish home. I learned Yiddish, which is dialect German. So I was the German interpreter and having studied, French in England by phonograph record for about six months before the invasion. I was also the French interpreter and so handled prisoners, I dealt with civilians was if I may was the. Was your job? They're more personal because you are Jewish. No. I wouldn't say that it was just an accident that I knew German 'cause I had two years of German high school, plus background right? As so. And I had two years of Latin and is school and lived in talian neighborhood. So French was easy for me. Yeah, yeah. And so it, it came in handy, and it's interesting that I was one of the few guys one hundred and forty men internet cavalry troop, and maybe five of us are half dozen came from cities. The others were rural kids going up on farms, small towns, and they knew they knew everything kid kickball, born on a farm. Convict's anything knows how to survive in the woods and he's to get through. Yeah, I end may I was useless as nipples on a bull. My, my sergeant said. But, but, but when they found out, I knew French, and German well by time I became useful. So when you tell stories what's the story you like to tell or what's, what's one of your tales that you tell well tell a story about the time, we got we Bush, they a German company remains a German company and killed their leader. And that's one story and other stories on how they tried to send me to West Point. But it didn't work out and you weren't officer material. Well, I turned out that I had a very high score in an aptitude test that everybody gets and with thirty days of combat experience and that score, I was the only man in the squadron who qualified but, but I work glass. Asses, so they ruled me out as so otherwise, Marvin Susman's here, Mark would you're dead tells these stories, I guess did you grow up hearing them as well? Well, no, actually my father didn't say much about this. I have to tell you until nineteen ninety four when he went to that reunion. And we found out that he went to it. I really had.

Marvin Sussman YouTube German high school Marvin Susman Normandy John D talian Atlantic France England officer Bush West Point Mark five years two years ninety six years seventy fifth fifty fifth
"marvin susman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

11:43 min | 3 years ago

"marvin susman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Ed, no horses, but the German army. A lot of horse because other than their motorized divisions of wish they ended dozen or so all the other divisions were were horse-pulled. Did they tell you all what to expect when the d day landing forces? We're going to arrive in Normandy. Well, we knew our sinement. Maybe a day before until then we knew nothing, really. So we were told me mystified about what we were going to do. Well, I'm wondering if you had a sense of what the resistance would be not on your island per se, but on the beaches. Well, they tried to tell us about the kind of fortifications we were going to find. But. Nobody could give us detailed information. I guess it wouldn't have been all that helpful. Anyway, if you knew that there were these embankments, and you're going to have to overtake them you have to storm the being sometimes climb. You do that telling you the volume of lead coming back might not have been all that helpful. On day. Nobody had enough information now. And of course, they were wrong about where to land the paratroopers and the day. Everybody wars one big mistake. What? Looking at your son now, and you know, some of his stories better than I do so feel free to chime in with additional information or questions here. But then when it was determined that that I learned was not by the Germans. So that gun isn't initial and there's a few hundred of you on that island landing craft eventually came back and got you. All right, all we they took us to Utah beach, which was then a safe place, and since we had no none of our vehicles or heavy armament because are all art of guns were mounted on. Our Jason armored cars over all mobile entirely mobile. We had to wait for validity of our our automotive. So for about week, our sinement was to guard headquarters, the the army corps headquarters were general Collins was installed established that on the beach or nearby pretty close next day or two, and and we're so we had a lot of KP duty and messenger duty and guard duty and until our weapons came and then we were off running. I guess you'd see plenty of action. Eventually. Oh, yes. Yes. Before I get to that though say in those first hours this first few days than where you weren't so intimately involved in the shooting where you anxious to get involved or each day that you weren't where you happy not to be. Well, that's both. Yeah. Perfect answer, I suppose. Yeah. Both because it was just a matter of time before we got involved and by time, I mean, days not months or weeks. When you did get to what beach eventually beef. What did you see when you came upon that scene? Well, Utah beat force not as difficult as Omaha beach. There was some debris, and I guess they had been cleaned up. By the time. We got there. It was very safe. So we didn't get involved in the war until about a week later. And then what happens to what our job then was to of what we call screen the flank of the fourth infantry division. We would follow them and stay under flanks too. Prevent the surprise warranted warned them and pick up stragglers and do a do whatever necessary. And we did this a lot of that dismounted would rifles rather than running around with japes and foot patrols just poking around finding out what's going on. And we did that across the peninsula to the other side, which took almost a month. What was that? Like well. Interesting did you. So I mean in some ways you'd say maybe better, you could tell him in survival mode right here. And maybe that's not appropriate to what you were asked to do. But I wonder if on the printer then you felt like that was an advantageous position for yourself. Or did you feel really vulnerable because you're stuck out there on the wing? Well, we sure vulnerable, and we did run into Germans. But we we never had a fixed battle patrols meeting patrols firing at them and bathe fired at them. But. And there were incidents now, I've I've written several stories about this. And I've gone on you to and you can find me on YouTube telling these stories on the way to the other side of the fitness flip. Yeah. Marvin Sussman here. He's chicago. Who's ninety six years old? Right. Right. You most almost ninety six he was almost twenty one on d day. He was there. Two hours before everybody else landed to secure an island just off the beaches, and he tells the story on YouTube and as d day is approaching seventy fifth anniversary, a friend or mutual Quainton told me a little bit about you. And we asked you to come in. You're actually going back over to France in the near future by John D day. We are this year. We should be at the beach. How many I wonder if it was a reunion of those of you that were there that first day and first week. I wonder how many there would be. Well, it's interesting of. The fiftieth anniversary hundred ninety four there were forty thousand d day veterans showed up and and beach and five years later the fifty fifth anniversary nineteen ninety nine. There were of four thousand four zero and five years later the four hundred so this time, maybe forty. You really are one of the the great stories and storytellers of of World War Two, then aren't you? Yeah. Well. This story. I tell us about a couple of them are in Normandy and one of them the other the other battlefields. But we we were giving infantry assignments dismounted cleaning up the peninsula. Good working toward the Atlantic coast toward fair board. And we catch a lot of Germans, I I had growing up in a Jewish home. I learned issue, which is the dialect German. So I was the German interpreter. And having studied French in England by phonograph record for about six months before the invasion. I was also the French interpreter and so handled prisoners I dealt with civilians. Was variance. If I may was the. Was your job. They're more personal because you are Jewish. No, I wouldn't say that. It was just an accident that I knew German 'cause I had two years of German high school, plus a Yiddish background right as so. And I had two years of Latin and is school and lived in talian neighborhood. So French was easy for me. Yeah. And so it it came in handy. Interesting that I was one of the few guys one hundred and forty men in a cavalry troop, and maybe five of us are half dozen came from cities, the others were rural kids going up on farms small towns, and they knew they knew everything kickball born on a farm. Convict's anything knows how to survive in the woods to get through. Yeah. I and may I was useless as nipples on a bull. My my sergeant said, but but but when they found out I knew French and German well time, I became useful. So when you tell stories what's the story, you liked to tell what's what's one of your tales that you tell well tell story about the time we got we ambushed a a German company remains a German company and killed their leader. That's one story. And other story is how they tried to send me to West Point. But it didn't work out and you want to officer material. Well, I turned out that I had a very high score in after two tests that everybody gets and. And thirty days of combat experience. And that score. I was the only man into sward who qualified, but but I work glasses. So they ruled me out as so. Otherwise, Marvin Susman's here. Mark would you're dead tells these stories, I guess did you grow up hearing them as well. Well, no, actually, my father didn't say much about this. I have to tell you until nineteen ninety four when he went to that reunion. And we found out that he went to it. I really had little understanding of my father's works. Parents. We found out that he went to. He didn't tell you is going to my mom and dad were spending summers and France at that point. My mother was born and raised there, and they moved to her child at home summers. And so what they did on their summer vacation. We didn't really know. So this second chapter of your dad's life is the bit of a revelation you then to all of us. It was what surprised you about his story in World War Two. Well, I think that every child doesn't know that their parents had a real life before them and as time has gone. On by. And we gained a we my brothers. And I and our family have gained a better understanding of. You know, how pivotal and ex stench of a threat was in World War Two. And you know, what this group of people did sixteen million men in the armed forces during World War Two. It's staggering fighting with what a rifle what kind of.

Normandy YouTube France German army Utah beach Ed Omaha beach German high school Marvin Sussman Utah army corps talian Atlantic Marvin Susman chicago Collins officer England West Point
"marvin susman" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

11:53 min | 3 years ago

"marvin susman" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The others were rural kids growing up on farms small towns, and they knew they knew everything kid brought born on a farm. Convict's anything knows how to survive in the woods, and he's how to get through. Yeah. I and me I was useless as nipples on a boom. My my sergeant said, but but but when they found out I knew French and German well test right time, I became useful. So when you tell stories what's the story, you liked to tell or what's what's one of your tales that you tell. Well, I tell the story about the time we got we ambushed a a German company remains a German company and killed her leader. And that's one story and other story is how they tried to send me to West Point. But it didn't work out and you officer material. Well, I had turned out that I had a very high score in an aptitude tests that everybody gets and. And with thirty days of combat experience. And that score. I was the only man in the squadron who qualified, but but I wore glasses. So they ruled me out as so that otherwise Marvin Susman's here. Mark would your debt tells these stories, I guess did you grow up hearing them as well? Well, no, actually, my father didn't say much about this. I have to tell you until nineteen ninety four when he went to that reunion. And we found out that he went to it. I really had little understanding of my father's works. Parents. We found out that he went to it. He didn't tell you is going to the reunion. My mom and dad were spending summers in France at that point. My mother was born and raised there, and they moved to her child at home summers. And so what they did on their summer vacation. We didn't really know. So this second chapter of your dad's life is a bit of a revelation to you then to all of us. It was. What surprised you about his story in World War Two? Well, I think that every child doesn't know that their parents had a real life before them and as time has gone by. And we've gained a we my brothers. And I and our family have gained a better understanding of. You know, how pivotal and existential threat was in World War Two. And you know, what this group of people did, you know, sixteen million men in the armed forces during World War Two. It's staggering fighting with what a a rifle what kind of gun did you regrowed around in jeeps when when once we broke out of Normandy? The cavalry went out in front leading the way and opened roads and the the point cheap the first Jeep going down an empty road. We well, it was generally would be to GPS in an armored car and a squad and we had six we had three fifty caliber machine guns one on each vehicle three thirty caliber machine guns in each vehicle. Wendy, armored car two jeeps and armored car the armored car had it thirty seven MO meter cannon that could shoot. White phosphorus. So we had we could dispatch one hundred bullets in three seconds. If we all shot at the same time. So we were armed would be better than the Germans were was there. A point maybe early on in your tour in Europe, where it was shoot or be shot where this was absolutely. But my point is was that. That must have been a new feeling right there, you were trained as an engineer going to be in Chicago some day. And now you're this kid thrown into France in you haven't shot or killed anybody who four and now you're about to do it. I I wonder what that moment is like for a young, man. It's it would be. Entirely new for me because of one hundred and forty men in the troop, I was probably maybe half a dozen of from the city had had never done hunting for major ten like the other guys and the idea of just shooting a rightful at something was new entirely new. So it was it was just unexpected. But we were trained to do it to me. We had good training. I just finished the book, I told your son spearhead, which is about a World War Two a US World War Two actually, the Germans as well. But it was about what the the tank battles were like with the HOGAN tanks tankers, they call them demand and attacks with the with the life of those tankers was like, and what you know, just how difficult for us to imagine that experience be and afterwards. Words when when they were in their seventies or eighties. Some of those men were still dealing with the trauma of having to do that. And going back to the scene of the battles in Germany, and France was very therapeutic for them a long way of asking the question was it difficult for you? When you came back stateside to get over. What all you went through and Europe. I probably retrospect. Yes. As it may be at the time. I was simply lost and didn't understand why. But it took me until one thousand nine hundred forty nine letters of four years after I came home before I resolved to become an engineer and entered Illinois institute of technology. I was lost for four years. Of course, I had gone to Roosevelt university, and I had ate lunch with Harold Washington. Roosevelt collared. Yeah. Yeah. But I was lost. I was studying languages and Russian and tell us, okay. You are student till you were going to school you, but no no direction no direction. And maybe no even. To me that would be the least by concerns, I know kids going to school. Now, they don't know what the weather from down is what they should be doing with their lives. But you seem to be now. And maybe then you were emotionally mentally pretty stable after all of that. I don't think so looking back. No, yeah. No. Because I I if I had been rational, I would have done entirely different things, we're almost out of time. And I know you do YouTube videos, you talk to organizations and schools, which is just amazing any blast. Observations are words you have for our listeners right now. I am very much concerned about the way the world is going. I think I think America should have kept a draft. That was the greatest thing that 'cause I could've never met two guys that I met without to draft. And it's a serious loss to to not have your drive. We don't know we're separated, we're we're isolated will you? We don't know other Americans who we can't know them and the draft would've avoided that I'm I'm very sorry about that. And somebody ought to somebody ought to do something about that. I am going to year two isn't that much out of somebody's life? Is that it though, it's not just that you'd meet other Americans, but it would be service to your controversial relearning. What you learn the army. Plus you can do. All kinds of learning in the arm is there's all learn. So I wonder how your son feels about that were you in the military at any point. I wasn't I grew up in the gap between Vietnam and whatever came later. Yeah. See I I don't know if you and I probably older than you. But as a young boy Vietnam was being waged in there. I am eight nine ten eleven twelve years old, and I'm getting closer and closer to draftable age, and it terrified me. I mean as an adult today, I still think I knew kids whose brothers were going to get drafted or were in the army, and and I I just could not comprehend having to do with those men were doing or would you did, sir? And and even that left impression on me all these years later. Right. So so I think you know, what you did. And what you're asking people to consider today is is not only commendable, but is very challenging. That's not something. I expected you to say there's there's something wrong with this country. And that's why we've got the president. We've got and we don't have to go there. That's another show. Me back. You know what I will? And we won't even talk about that. But Marvin congratulations. Thank you for your service. Good Lord, and congratulations on on living such a a long healthy and evidently amiable life. I'm anxious for you to go back to France on the seventy fifth anniversary. I'm we're looking forward to Marvin. Thank you Sussman and Mark thank you both for coming in. Will you bring them back again sometime you call. We'll come how do people watch his videos, by the way? Been searched Marvin Sussman. I love this guy. I got a ninety five year old telling me how to do YouTube. This is instructive fellas. Thanks for coming by your wealth. All right into the WGN radio newsroom. That would be the northwestern medicine newsroom. Here's Steve Bertrand. Ryan burrow, taking over and Aurora man who said he would commit a mass shooting at a workplace has been given court supervision. Cook County prosecutors say a month ago fifty four year old Dwayne a mass told a co worker he would pull a Henry Pratt reference to the February mass shooting that left five dead and five police officers hurt. Coworker became alarmed contacted police moss pleaded guilty on Monday to misdemeanor disorderly conduct. You must pay a five hundred dollar fine and complete fifty hours of community service. Colorado's governor says that he and all of the states parents hugging their children a little tighter. After a young woman obsessed with the nineteen ninety nine Columbine attack was found dead. He says that the potential threat is over. After officials said Wednesday that the eighteen year old died of an apparent self inflicted, gunshot wound, and Wisconsin governor Tony eager says, it's unrealistic to think that Foxconn technology. Group will be able to employ thirteen thousand people in Wisconsin. Given the size of its plan manufacturing facility has been reduced Everts telling reporters today that the state was working with Foxconn to look at revising the original contract, given the changes to the project. He says the changes are being looked at because the current contract deals with the situation that no longer exists. This week FOX cons. 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France Europe YouTube engineer Vietnam Marvin Susman Mark West Point Foxconn Wisconsin WGN Marvin Sussman Marvin officer Normandy Roosevelt university Colorado FOX