17 Burst results for "Marty Ginsburg"

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

11:54 min | 7 months ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on Words Matter

"Douglas grew up 'em in a house where his father died when he was quite young and Kina siblings had to work help. The family rooks really. We saw his mother struggle. And so I think that's one of the reasons that he ended up going flipping in that case in saying that this property tax exemption was actually reconstitutional. Oh that's interesting. I didn't know that background on him. And I'm going to ask you about that case in a bit because I believe that was her loss right. That's yeah okay. We go through all of them. That would take a few more episodes but the last justice I really WanNa talk about. Is Harry Blackmun. Yeah now he was appointed by Richard Nixon in nineteen seventy windy and is a great example of how some presidents are disappointed court. Picks Justice Blackmun eventually became known as one of the most liberal justices on the court and was the author of the majority opinion. We know in Roe v Wade. But let's talk about Justice Blackman's notes. What did he write about? RPG after her oral argument in frontier. anti-roma Richardson Right. So these notes are available in the Library of Congress and so you can actually go take them out and hold them in your hands. Handwritten notes that he road which is a is a real pleasure and also can be surprising so after her first or argument he wrote that she gave her a C. Plus for her performance which she is a little harsher grade by he also wrote that. Aclu New York and then he had the letter. J which apparently is his notation for Jew. which which is really shocking? And I struggled to know how to even discuss on the podcast that he would find that relevant to write in his notes. But it's you know it's it's it's they're blocking. Yeah in your second episode the blind the lame and the widows which by the way I love all of your episode title at the Beer Middle Tier one is maybe my favorite but that that episode your Second Episode Examines. Connie shelvin which you already spoke about a little bit but it's the only in case that RPG lost after appearing before the court and you say the case is often glossed over an examination of RPG's career but explain a little about the case. And why you think it's just justice important to talk about her setbacks as her successes absolutely so. This case was about a Florida law as I mentioned earlier that gave a pro special property tax exemption to women who lost their husband and Ginsburg did not want this case to be her next up in the in the Supreme Court after Frontier Antero her first role argument. She was really hoping that my favorite case and her favourite case in just a wonderful fact case was going to be next now. A Stephen Weiss and belts but the Florida affiliate office at the Aclu actually didn't tell her that they were bringing this case and then end up getting granted which was not the overall strategy strategy and so she had to take take the case at that point when ashamed when that happens when a certain grant is not part of your overall strategy. Yes exactly and the reason why. It wasn't part of her overall strategies because she knew these were tough facts. These were going to be faxed at the justices. We're GONNA really struggle to see the underlying sexism issue. And so her. Her overall point was that by according women with special property tax exemption and special advantages. Perhaps you in the short term give women a short term benefit but in the long-term what these laws actually do is reflect societal values that women belong at home. Women are dependent pendant on men and then to codify those values in a system of American law but she knew that granting a property taxes jumps into the poor widows and Florida and justice assist Marshall even called out. He said the poor spinster in Tallahassee. We right was going to be just as effective as a very well off widow in palm beach so these were difficult facts but but she knew she had to take the case. And I think that this is important to look at not just when you think about the overall strategy of constitutional change but also in that no do one person's effort is going to be perfect and there is always going to be challenges right. You talked about that a little bit in the podcast. These laws that were helpful to do women at the time and in fact they argued as a part of or at least the ACL. You lawyer argued in the first case frontier. Oh that those laws was actually would be fine. And we don't need to apply scrutiny to those but we can look at the laws that may be created detrimental. Create a problem for women. Is that what he did. Yeah that's about right so one of the central missions of Aclu Women's rights project was to show that law said which on their face report to benefit. Women actually conserve to hold them back from full participation. In American Life Right the language you used was benevolent sexism and romantic paternalism. Exactly and unlike a lot of other forms of discrimination and invidious discrimination in American society. It's sometimes hard to see. If you're not digging deep how laws like this can operate to hold. Hold Women Back Because Hey oh you're getting property tax exemptions that really something that you don't want and so part of their overall strategy was to show the court into show this all all-male Bench of justices that these laws can really operate to hold back. Both sexes from full participation in American life by really encouraging men to be breadwinners and women to be homemakers without giving much choice so after immersing yourself in the Ginsburg tapes and all of her arguments events over the years in particular that decade. Do you have a favorite moment. You alluded to a favorite case. I have plenty of least favorite moments. I really sticks out to me in California which is going to be next full oral argument breakdown that the Solicitor General's office said that part of the reason for this case is that feminism is in fashion and feminists would just like to ride on its skirt tales swell and so that was a pretty while moment. Indeed and Shocking that is the first time I have heard the phrase skirt tale that I'm come up in two thousand sixteen. I mean actually. It's crazy I I also really enjoyed. Probably my my favorite case definitely was Stephen Weiss and felt case right but I just had so much fun with the near Beer in the Middle Tier and Ranger Fred who that it was only episode. I've done where it wasn't Ginsburg arguing the case we had someone else who was arguing and he was really fun for me to focus on so talk about your your favorite case. That Weysan fell case. So Stephen Weiss and Feld was a young man who had lost his wife she died in childbirth and he wrote a letter to his local newspaper describing how a social security benefit that would have been available. Had the gender roles been reversed to his wife wasn't available to him and said at the end of his letter. I I wonder if Gloria Steinem knows this about this and Gloria Steinem might not have known about it but that letter connected him with Ruth Bader Ginsburg and so she represented him in challenging the Social Security Law all that said that sole surviving mothers could be entitled to special benefits when they had a very low income. Something like fourteen thousand dollars a year in today's dollars but that that same benefit wasn't available to stay at home fathers who were sole surviving fathers and so Steven Weiss impelled was. Just this really wonderful plaintiff and I know that he and Ginsburg Burke stayed in touch throughout their lives and she even performed his marriage about forty years later at the Supreme Court. Oh Wow yeah. So Supreme Court oral arguments we know are not On video there is no camera in the courtroom. There's only audio recording available and we may be biased. Here do you think the podcast medium itself. The one you've chosen the one I've chosen is uniquely suited to be able to talk about and explain and breakdown Supreme Court arguments in their import. I definitely do and I think that with with podcasts. Something that's really amazing is that it's all about your ideas and your voice. We don't take into account visual judgments and it leaves a lot of of room for empathy and for trying to understand an idea for an idea steak. It's a very words matter concept. I think the same is true for oral arguments there such surely about the words. I'm surely about the ideas and those folks that is. Yeah that's something that's really very precious right. I was thinking about her and the concept up to having videos in the courtroom this week because as we know justice Stevens passed away and his very last day on the bench was a remarkable day eh for him but also for her and it was in two thousand and ten when her husband. Marty Ginsburg passed away the day before and she went on the bench to read opinions and was there that day. And the I believe the chief justice spoke fondly of Mardi and and Justice Stevens. You know gave his goodbyes. But she was there strong as ever the day after the love of her life who had been her career supporter and family supporter. Really her backbone. She was on the court. So Justice Stevens passing away made me think of her and wished that there have been a camera in in the courtroom that day because it would have been certainly a sight to see I think so in the modern world. There's a book there's a movie. There's a t shirt. There's so you know all bobblehead. There's all of this love and affection for her. But have you found through your work any criticisms or any room for improvement or Parts of her legacy that we don't put on the mantle yet I mean. Of course no one is perfect and no movement is perfect in history always allows you to learn lessons and I try not have my podcast hagiography but rather a place to really explore these ideas and I I think one critique of the overall movement I think was really a reflection of the laws as they existed at the time is that it wasn't entirely an inclusive set of arguments so okay. One of the central missions of the women's rights project was to show that so much of American law really codified and perpetuated. This notion that women belonged at home in men at work and I think that's obviously a very important in laudable objective but at the same time women of color have always worked in this country and so so it was almost coming from a position of privilege and also just reflection of the privilege that is part of American law. And I think Serena Mary who's a professor at U. Penn.. Dan has done a ton of important work. Talking about this connection between sex discrimination and race discrimination as a matter of legal doctrine and I really early like that sheeps pointed to some of the original statements of Eleanor. Holmes Norton Who's our representative as well as Pauli Murray who was a huge influence on Ginsberg's project and both of these. These women were speaking out at in this nineteen seventies contemporary with the GINSBERG's movement. Saying you know we should really look to communities of color as a source of strength and as an example Oh for how households can be more gala -Tarian Wall boost discussions. Were happening at the time. It's also important to recognize that not. Everyone was enjoying the fruits of this movement. Right same way right. It's still true today. Black and Brown women experience the world and even the feminist movement differently based based on the results and the fruits of her labor. But also it's setbacks as well so what's next for you you. Is there a Ginsburg tapes. Par To oh her on the bench or is there are going to look at another justice or is this just focusing on her six oil arguments and really spreading the Ginsburg Gospel now. But I'm definitely going to finish her to oral arguments that I haven't covered yet. I have so many other ideas of things that I want to do. I would love to do an upset on the year a doing episode on transgender issues. which you know all of these cases are so gender binary? I have a list of things I want to do..

Ginsburg Burke Supreme Court Justice Stevens Ruth Bader Ginsburg Harry Blackmun Stephen Weiss Florida Gloria Steinem Justice Blackman Richard Nixon Marty Ginsburg Library of Congress Douglas Aclu Kina Ginsberg Connie shelvin
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"The months before the Oscars are usually a time to be saturated with information about the biggest films and the most talked about categories. So today, we're not going to talk about those things at all today. We are diving into documentaries and foreign language films. We'll tell you which wants to watch and where to find them, which might just make you the star of your Oscar party. I'm Stephen Thompson. And I'm Linda Holmes, lots of good stuff. From around the world is coming to you on today's pop culture. Happy hour here with me. And Stephen in the studio is Glen Weldon NPR's. Art Ceska Glenn. It's just the three of us hanging out talking about a whole bunch of movies. We're going to start with the documentaries and between the three of us. We've seen all of them. We have some thoughts. Glenn? Why don't you start off by talking about what you thought of Rb g which is the film about Ruth Bader Ginsburg directed by Julie Coen, add Betsy west right, which you can see streaming on Hulu if. You're so inclined. I mean sure is the total some substance of my reaction to this. Look, she's got a great story. She's a hugely important figure, and it it made me appreciate her more not understand her anymore. And I think that was the goal, obviously. Because she is a participant in the in the documentary, and it just keeps glancing off anything that is chewy or dark and keeps hitting the same three points again. And again, she is very smart. She is introvert. She's had a great marriage, right? Boom. Boom. Boom, boom, boom. Again, it again, we get those same three points. And that's all we get. And so I mean, sure I had the the same initial reaction. I thought I don't know that I learned a lot that I didn't already know. But it did occur to me that as somebody who studied a lot of the cases that she brought to the supreme court as an attorney. I studied a lot of those cases when I was in law school, and I do think the film does a good job of giving context to the fact that this. Series of cases was a specific strategy largely put together by her and people she worked with to bring a series of cases about gender to the supreme court and some of the strategy around making at least some of them cases about men being entitled to benefits that were typically imagined as being for women for widows and dependents and things like that. And that's a clever piece of the strategy. I think it did give that context to that. As more of a linear effort that I do think has been missing a little bit. If you studied those cases specifically before she was on the supreme court and don't have that background. Yeah. I had a similar reaction. I was really interested. In those cases. I also I'm a softy? I was into the story into the love story. That's kind of at the center of this this movie her marriage to Marty Ginsburg who was much more gregarious guy. And I really this is kind of a slight movie. But I found it pleasurable. It is to me very sad that because won't you be? My neighbor wasn't. Nominated for documentary, which I think it should have been we miss out on the battle royale between Nina totenberg RPG and Susan Berg who is in who is in what you'd be my neighbor airplane. I enjoyed this movie. It's this to me is a perfect documentary to watch on streaming. Yeah. I agree. The next one we're going to talk about is called of fathers and sons, Steven tell us a little bit about this film. Yeah. There's a lot going on in fathers and sons to Lal Durkee is a filmmaker who is from Syria who basically went undercover kind of embedded with a group of radical Islamists in in Syria and kind of posed as a sympathizer and collected all this footage some of it in terms of the conflict in the area. But mostly in terms of like the title suggests the relationship between this one particular guy, Abu Osama and his sons, and you see these kind of young adolescent boys who are being race..

Ceska Glenn Stephen Thompson Julie Coen Ruth Bader Ginsburg Linda Holmes Glen Weldon NPR Marty Ginsburg Syria Susan Berg Oscar Lal Durkee Abu Osama Hulu attorney Steven Betsy west
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

11:13 min | 1 year ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Writing for defining ideas, Richard is reviewing the the career of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who is the subject of a very successful movie and on the basis of sex, Richard is taking me having never been to law school into the supreme court cases, where Ruth Ginsburg won her reputation as a pioneer Richard a very good evening to you divide. These supreme court cases in two parts, and I want to address the first part because it's a trip down memory lane. It's like a time machine. The first case that you look at very closely is Reid versus Reid which came down as animus nineteen. Seventy one supreme court decision by just written by Justice Berger. What were the terms of read versus re v? Read and added Ruth beta Ginsburg, respond to what I can only re- regard now as ignorant discrimination of the period. Well, I think you're a little bit hard on the period. So let's go back to the early. Seventies were a period of an immense change in American, legal and social culture. I started teaching in nineteen sixty eight which was probably the last year in which there was a strong sex divisions. One of the stories I like to tell about this is for the first two years. I was there. I was the having to all amateur auction here for an organization known as law wives, which ran in nineteen sixty nine in the spring and was finally less success in nineteen seventy nine thousand nine hundred seventy one it became law. Spouses, and in nineteen seventy two it disbanded, and why was that because it turned out particularly in the Vietnam war, the composition of law school classes changed and the expectations that women in Manhattan about each other for changed, and this was going on at the same time in the California state legislature all of the sex linked characteristics. To their community property statutes were removed and scrub by legislation. So the old rule had said that the husband had management to control the assets and owed a duty a fiduciary care to his wife, the new room made them equal partners in the way in which the thing was done. It should be understood about all of these kinds of political changes is there was no resistance to any of them. And I could still remember people in my generation being sort of puzzled about how powerful these distinctions seem to have been only a half generation or a generation ago. So what happens is read v? Read is not a case, which is designed to transform the way in which the world is thinking what it did is it editor judicial stimulus to what was already a very powerful, social political and legislative movement itself is a community property case. And what happens is you have this young man named read and it gets killed at age seventeen. He was an adopted child and his. Adopted mother and his father split they got divorced. And the question is who's going to handle the administration of his estate? The word administration requires some attention. It's only used in those cases where the deceit and does not have a will. And if you have a will the test data to name, whoever he or she sees fit. And if you prefer the wife to the husband, you can do so, and that was always the law long before this Idaho, did was had a preference system at the first level of the preferences, the near you are the stronger your claim. So if you're a parent, you will beat a sibling, you will be first cousin or something like that. But then you have two parents, and there's a draw and you could do one of two things you can have a hearing to figure out which is more qualified Strauss. You can draw straws of one kind or another from it. You can ask them to jointly administer the states. But in this case, the Idaho rule was look the father gets preference over the mother because. He's the father, and she's the mother, and you know, you look at this now, and it does seem as you say Quainton archaic that would want to do this. And the lower court said there is no way you could constitutionally challenge a state decision on how it is that they're going to run their system, I've been heritages. And when it comes to the supreme court the equal protection clause, governed states. It says no state Sheldon. I any person within his jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws, and the supreme court nine nothing thought that this was a perfect illustration of a kind of thing that should be targeted by it. No preference should be given. So it struck it down Ruth. Did not argue the case that is Ruth Ginsburg. Did not argue the case, but she was on the winning brief because she has always been part and parcel of the women's rights movement from the time that she I entered law school back in nineteen fifty six and she was supported in this by our husband, Marty Ginsburg who was an extra. Ordinarily able tax lawyer who died I think around two thousand tents. This was a carnation rather than a conflict the next case. So that's what Ruth did. Yes. And and I just want to mention the next case, Ruth Ginsburg, and Martin Ginsburg are mentioned in the opening lines as arguing the case. So here here Ruth gets into action on C. Yes, what happens is it turns out that this time the sex distinctions are pretty much built into virtually every fabric of the code. And indeed, the ACLU I think didn't an exhaustive study finding you know, a thousand sex bakes distinction since the constitution. Are you don't wanna take the conclusion at every one of them is unjustified? But given the changes in morals and given the comprehensive suite. There are lots of them would certainly look highly suspect, and this was a case in which you could not get a better set of facts, it turned out that there was a bachelor never married who was taking care of his sick mother. Nobody doubted whatsoever that he met all the conditions for getting some kind of tax relief except one bachelors were not covered you had to be married in order to get the protection. So it apply to women and Twitter was and things like that. And so he says I want a refund from the Internal Revenue Service. And they said look federal government gets the tournament. Whatever kind of tax provision at want. Somebody said is there any reason for this distinction? The answer came back not that there's a reason the answer came back. Instead, we don't have to give reason because we're the United States Congress. Well, by the time this case got to the tenth circuit that's out in Colorado. Read be read was already on the books, and then source essentially with three judges who understand that they take their marching orders from unanimous supreme court decision written by extensively conservative Justice. Warren burger in a period, I might add after the death of Rwandan the next three years until Rehnquist comes on the court on the most liberal years in the history of the United States Supreme court. It's the period of Roe v. Wade and things like that written by his buddy, Harry Blackmun. And so the case is relatively tranquil when they strike this thing down. And then you ask yourself is this the kind of thing that's going to create a massive social disruption is this the sort of thing that's going to override market mechanisms, but there's no market mechanism. Involved in this case, it's just a tax benefit going to one kind of person, but not to another. And you can't see any reason why it is that you'd want to differentiate between them. So again, the decision passed without note because it was sound. It was correct. And it was sensible, and at this particular point, what happens is you're going after low hanging fruit when you get to other cases, it turns out that you can start. I just I agree with you about low hanging fruit. I just want to concentrate on these two pieces. This is about the time. I got out of college and everything was under transformation at this point. Ms magazine, saw was on the magazine racks every month. And everybody was recognizing the inequality of language language that we were speaking. And so there was much attention to detail. In fact, at some point we we speculated that absolutely everything was gonna come down to gender, including where you put your four can where you put your spoon. I mean, we were exaggerating, but the language transformation was sweeping the country. So this is the time of equal rights amendment, right, which essentially would have gone a great deal further than any of the cases eventually went. And there's a lot of other stuff going on. It was only when people started to say, well, we know what the easy cases. Look like, what are the hard? Well, let's turn to frontier. Oh, because that's another case, it seems that the language itself has changed everything the word dependent Zimbabwean in frontier. What's the case, which well from terrorism case in which it turns out that if you were in the military, you may have people who depend upon you. And there's certain circumstances in which say if you're injured or ill, the dependence are entitled to receive a certain kind of money and the rule that they follow. Then was that if you were the wife of the service, man, you got you a dependency salary, no questions asked if you were a woman. However, you had to prove that you met the one half payments or support requirements for the husband the rationale for the statute was utilitarian one at the time. Not today at the time. There was a very high percentage of women who did not. Not work outside the home. For whom the dependency thing was essentially there if you're trying to figure out which women don't meet that standard. It's going to be very costly. You gonna introduce an average. So you take what we call a very simple per se rule, if you then do it the other way there were many fewer women in the services at the time. And they add Hon husbands, most of whom probably had an independent job. And would not qualify as dependence. If you just simply didn't automatic rule, you probably cut them all out. So they'd required you to pull this up case by case. So there's a fundamental asymmetry in the rule and the position that was taken by the Civil Liberties Union, and so forth was that the sex discrimination discriminated against men. I either men recipients it could have been discriminated against women. I the woman servicewoman, but whatever they want wanna perfect parody. And the question is do you give it and the supreme court said emir, quote, unquote, administrative costs really should not matter in these cases. A we are going to strike. Like this thing down, but then with two disagreements about this one is just how far you're willing to go Justice Brennan was willing to say, I think sex discrimination is a serious race discrimination. And I think that probably not the case in terms of the level of abuse. I think segregation is a hell of a lot more serious problem than you have were they symmetrical benefits coming out of military services. And there were still cases in which everybody insists that we distinguish on grounds of sex. We do not have coed teams in basketball because we know wind up being all male. So I mean, it's a different case they had the lowest standard and Justice Rehnquist at the time actually descended..

Ruth Bader Ginsburg supreme court Justice Rehnquist Idaho Justice Berger Richard Marty Ginsburg Martin Ginsburg Reid Twitter basketball United States Congress Ms magazine Internal Revenue Service Justice Brennan fiduciary Colorado Warren burger
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:11 min | 1 year ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on KGO 810

"The university of Chicago, and at NYU writing for defining ideas, Richard is reviewing the the career of roof baiter Ginsburg, who's the subject of a very successful movie and Donald on the basis of sex, Richard is taking me having never been to law school into the supreme court cases, where Ruth Bader Ginsburg won her reputation as a pioneer Richard a very good evening to you divide. These supreme court cases in two parts. And I want to address the first part because it's like a trip down memory lane. It's like a time machine. The first case that you look at very closely is Reid versus Reid which came down as animus nineteen. Seventy one supreme court decision by just. Written by Justice Berger. What were the terms of read versus re v? Read and added Ruth beta Ginsburg, respond to what I can only re- regard now as ignorant discrimination period. Well, I think you're a little bit hard on the period. So let's go back to the early. Seventies were a period of an immense change in American, legal and social culture. I started teaching in nineteen sixty which was probably the last year in which there was a strong sex divisions. One of the stories I liked to tell about this is for the first two years. I was there. I was the Hammond to all amateur walks in the air for an organization known as law wives, which ran in nineteen sixty nine in the spring and with less success in nineteen seventy nine thousand nine hundred seventy one it became law. Spouses, and in nineteen seventy-two it disbanded, and why was that because it turned out particularly in the Vietnam war, the composition of law school classes to change and the expectations that women in Manhattan about each other for change. And this was going on at the same time in the California state legislature all of the sex linked characteristics. To their community property statute will removed and scrub by legislation. So the old rule had said that the husband had management to control the assets and owed a duty fiduciary care to his wife. The new rule made them equal partners in the way in which the thing was done. It should be understood about all of these kinds of political changes is there was no resistance to any of them. And I could still remember people in my generation being sort of puzzled about how powerful these distinctions seem to have been only a half generation or a generation ago. So what happens is read v? Read is not a case, which is designed to transform the way in which the world is thinking what it did is it editor judicial stimulus to what was already a very powerful, social political and legislative movement itself is a community property case. And what happens is you have this young man named read and it gets killed at age seventeen. He was an adopted child and his. Adopted mother and his doctor saw the split they got divorced. And the question is who's going to handle the administration of his estate? The word administration. Requires some attention is only used in those cases where the deceit and does not have a will. And if you have a will the test data to name, whoever he or she sees Spitz and have you prefer wife to the husband all you can do. So and that was always the law long before this Idaho, did was had a preference system at the first level of the preferences, the near you are the stronger your claim. So if you're a parent, you will beat a sibling, you will be first cousin or something like that. But then you have two parents and there's a drought, and you could do one of two things you can have a hearing to figure out which is more qualified Strauss. You can draw scores of one kind or another from it. You can ask them to jointly administer the states. But in this case, the Idaho rule was look the father gets preference over the mother. Because he's the father, and she's the mother, and you know, you look at this now, and it does seem as you say Quainton archaic that you would want to do this. And the lower court said there is no way you could constitutionally challenge a state decision on how it is that they're going to run their system I've been heritage. And when it comes to the supreme court, the equal protection clause govern states. It says no state shall denied any person within his jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws, and the supreme court nine nothing thought that this was a perfect illustration of a kind of thing that should be targeted by no preference should be given. So it struck it down a Ruth did not argue the case that is from Ginsburg do not argue the case, but she was on the winning brief because she has always been part and parcel of the women's rights movement from the time that she I entered law school back in nineteen fifty six and she was supported in this by our husband, Marty Ginsburg who was. Extraordinarily able tax lawyer who died I think around two thousand and tents. This was a carnation rather than a conflict the next case. So that's what Ruth did in that. Yes. And I just want to mention the next case Ruth Ginsburg, and Martin Ginsburg are mentioned in the opening lines as arguing the case. So here here Ruth gets into action on C. What happens is it turns out that this time sex distinctions are pretty much built into virtually every fabric of the code. And indeed, the ACLU I think didn't an exhaustive study finding you know, a thousand sex Bates distinction since of the constitution. Are you don't wanna take the conclusion that every one of them is unjustified? But given the changes in morals and giving the comprehensive suite. There are lots of them would certainly look highly suspect, and this was a case in which you could not get a better set of facts, it turned out that there was a bachelor never married who is taking care of his sick mother. Nobody doubted whatsoever that he met all the conditions are getting some kind of tax relief except one bachelors were not covered you had to be married in order to get the protection. So it apply to women and to Witter was and things like that. And so he says I want a refund from the Internal Revenue Service. And they said look federal government gets determine whatever kind of tax provision that want. Is there any reason for this distinction? The answer came back not that there's a reason the answer came back. Instead, we don't have to give reasons because we're the United States Congress. Well, by the time this case got to the tenth circuit that's out in Colorado. Read be read was already on the books, and then source essentially worth three judges who understand that they take their marching orders from unanimous supreme court decision written by extensively conservative Justice. Warren burger in a period, I might add after the death of Rwandan the next three years until Rehnquist comes on the court or the most liberal years in the history of the United States Supreme court. It's the period of Roe v. Wade and things like that written by his buddy, Harry Blackmun. And so the case is relatively tranquil, and they strike this thing down. And then you ask yourself is this the kind of thing that's going to create a massive social disruption is this the sort of thing that's going to override market mechanisms, but there's no market mechanism. Involved in this case, it's just a tax benefit going to one kind of person, but not to another. And you can't see any reason why it is that you'd want to differentiate between them. So again, the decision passed without note because it was sound. It was correct. And it was sensible, and at this particular point, what happens is you're going after the low hanging fruit when you get to other cases, it turns out that you can start. I I agree with you about low hanging fruit. I just want to concentrate on these two pieces. This is about the time. I got out of college and everything was under transformation at this point, MS magazine on the was on the magazine racks every month. And everybody was recognizing the inequality of language language that we were speaking. And so there was much attention to detail. In fact, at some point we we speculated that absolutely everything was gonna come down to gender, including where you put four can where you put your spoon. I mean, we were exaggerating, but the language transformation was sweeping the country. So this is the time of equal rights amendment, right, which essentially would have gone a great deal further than any of the cases eventually went. And there's a lot of other stuff going on. It was only when people started to say, well, we know what the easy cases. Look like, what are the hard? Well, let's turn to frontier because that's another case, it seems that the language itself has changed everything. The word dependent is important in frontier. What's the case which? Well, Frontera was a case in which it turns out that if you're in the military, you may have people who depend upon you. And there's certain circumstances in which say if you're injured or ill, the dependence are entitled to receive a certain kind of money and the rule that they follow. Then was that if you were the wife of a serviceman, you got you a dependency salary, no questions asked if you were a woman. However, you had to prove that you met the one half payments was support requirements for the husband the rationale for the statute was a utilitarian one. At the time knocked today at the time. There was a very high percentage of women who did not work outside the home. For whom the dependency thing was essentially, they're trying to figure out which women don't meet that standard is going to be very costly you gonna introduce them efforts. So you take what we call a very simple per se rule. It'd be then do it. The other way. There were many fewer women in the services at the time. And they add on husbands, most of whom probably had an independent job. And would not qualify as dependence. If you just simply did an automatic rule, you've probably cut them all out. So they'd required you to pull this up case by case. So there's a fundamental asymmetry in the rule and the position that was taken by the Civil Liberties Union, and so forth was that the sex discrimination discriminated against men. I either men recipients it could have been discriminated against women. I either women servicewomen, but whatever they want wanna perfect parody. And the question is do you give it and the supreme court said emir, quote, unquote, administrative costs, really? Should not matter in these cases, a we are going to strike this thing down, but then with two disagreements about this one is just how far you're willing to go Justice Brennan was willing to say, I think sex discrimination is a serious race discrimination. And I think they're probably not the case in terms of the level of abuse. I think segregation is a hell of a lot more serious problem than you have were they symmetrical benefits coming out of military services. And there are still cases in which everybody insists that we distinguish on grounds of sex. We do not have coed teams in basketball because we know end up being all male..

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Idaho baiter Ginsburg United States Supreme court Justice Berger Richard Martin Ginsburg Reid Marty Ginsburg university of Chicago California basketball United States Congress MS magazine Internal Revenue Service NYU Hammond Donald
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

11:13 min | 1 year ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Writing for defining ideas, Richard is reviewing the the career of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who the subject of a very successful movie and on the basis of sex, Richard is taking me having never been to law school into the supreme court cases, where Ruth Bader Ginsburg won her reputation as a pioneer Richard a very good evening to you divide. These supreme court cases in two parts. And I want to address the first part because it's like a trip down memory lane. It's like a time machine. The first case that you look at very closely is Reid versus Reid which came down in nineteen seventy one supreme court decision by just written by Justice Berger. What were the terms of read versus re v? Read and added Ruth beta Ginsburg, respond to what I can only re- regarded now as ignorant discrimination of the period. Well, I figured out a little bit hard on the period. So let's go back to the early. Seventies were a period of an immense change in American, legal and social culture. I started teaching in nineteen sixty eight which was probably the last year in which there was a strong sex divisions. One of the stories I like to tell about this is for the first two years. I was there. I was the avenue all amateur orchestra near for an organization known as law wise, which ran in nineteen sixty nine in the spring and was slightly less success in nineteen seventy nineteen seventy one it became law. Spouses, and in one thousand nine hundred seventy two it disbanded, and why was that because it turned out particularly in the Vietnam war, the composition of law school, classes, it changed and the expectations that women and men had about each other who changed and this was going on at the same time in the California state legislature all of the sex linked characteristics. To their community property statute were removed and scrub by legislation. So the old rule had said that the husband had management all of the assets and owed a duty fiduciary care to his wife. The new rule made them equal partners in the way in which the thing was done. It should be understood about all of these kinds of political changes is there was no resistance to any of them. And I could still remember people in my generation being sort of puzzled about how powerful these distinctions seem to have been only a half generation or a generation ago. So what happens is read v? Read is not a case, which is designed to transform the way in which the world is thinking what it did is it editor judicial stimulus to what was already a very powerful, social political and legislative, right? Itself is a community property case. And what happens is you have this young man named read. It gets killed at age seventeen. He was an adopted child and his adopted mother and his doctor saw the split they got divorced. And the question is who's going to handle the administration of his estate the word administration requires some attention? It's only used in those cases where the deceit and does not have a will. And if you have a will the test data could name, whoever he or she sees fit. And have you prefer the wife to the husband are you can do. So and that was always the law long before this. But I'd Aho did was had a preference system at the first level. The preferences, the near you on the stronger your claim, so if you're a parent, you will be a sibling, you will be a first cousin or something like that. But then you have two parents, and there's a draw and you could do one of two things you can have a hearing to figure out which is the more qualified Strauss. You can draw straws of one kind. Kind or another from it. You can ask them to jointly administer the state. But in this case, the Idaho rule was look the father gets preference over the mother because he's the father, and she's the mother. And you know, you look at this now, and it does seem as you say Quainton archaic that you would want to do this. And the lower court said there is no way you could constitutionally challenge a state decision on how it is that they're going to run their system of inheritance. And when it comes to the supreme court, equal protection clause govern states. It says no state shall than any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws, and the supreme court nine nothing thought that this was a perfect illustration of a kind thing that should be targeted by no preference should be given. So it struck it down a ruse did not argue the case that this was Ginsburg did not argue the case, but she was on the winning brief because she has always been part and parcel of the women's rights movement from the time that she I entered law school back in nineteen fifty six and she was supported in the spiral husband, Marty Ginsburg who was an extraordinarily able. Tax lawyer who died I think around two thousand and pets are this was a carnation rather than a conflict the next case. So that's what Ruth did that. I just want to mention the next case Ruth Ginsburg, and Martin Ginsburg are mentioned in the opening lines as arguing the case. So here here Ruth gets into action on C. What happens is it turns out that this time the sex distinctions are pretty much built into virtually every fabric of the code. And indeed, the ACLU I think didn't an exhaustive study finding you know, a thousand sex bakes distinction since the constitution. I don't wanna take the conclusion that every one of them is unjustified. But given the changes when morals and given the comprehensive suite there are lots of them. But certainly look highly suspect, and this was a case in which you could not get a better set of facts, it turned out that there was a bachelor never married who is taking care of his sick mother. Nobody doubted whatsoever that he met all the conditions are getting some kind of tax relief except one bachelors were not covered you had to be married in order to get the protection sort apply to women and to Witter was and things like that. And so he says I want a refund from the Internal Revenue Service. And they said look federal government gets the tournament. Whatever kind of tax provision at want. Somebody is there any reason to this distinction. The answer came back not that there's a reason the answer came back. Instead, we don't have to give reason because we're the United States Congress. Well, by the time this case got to the ten circuit bats out in Colorado. Read the read was already on the books, and then source essentially with three judges who understand that they take their marching orders from unanimous supreme court decision rig buying extensively conservative Justice. Warren burger in a period, I might add after the death of Rwandan the next three years until Rehnquist comes on the court on the most liberal years in the history of the United States Supreme court. It's the period of Roe v. Wade and things like that written by his buddy, Harry Blackmun. And so the case is relatively tranquil when they strike this thing down. And then you ask yourself is this the kind of thing that's going to create some massive social disruption is this the sort of thing that's going to override market mechanisms, but there's no market mechanism involved. In this case, it's just a tax benefit going to one kind of person, but not to another. And you can't see any reason why does it you'd want to differentiate between them. So again, the decision passed without note because it was sound. It was correct. And it was sensible, and at this particular point, what happens is you're going after the low hanging fruit when you get to other cases, it turns out that you can start. I agree with you about low hanging fruit. I just want to concentrate on these two pieces. This is about the time. I got out of college and everything was under transformation at this point. Ms magazine, saw was on the magazine racks every month. And everybody was recognizing the inequality of language language that we were speaking. And so there was much attention to detail. In fact, at some point we we speculated that absolutely everything was gonna come down to gender, including where you put your fork. And where you put your spoon. I mean, we were exaggerating, but the language transformation was sweeping the country. So this is the time of equal rights amendment, right, which essentially would've gone a great deal further than any of the cases eventually went. And there's a lot of other stuff going on. It was only when people started to say, well, we know what the easy cases. Look like, what are the hard? Well, let's turn to frontier because that's another case, it seems that the language itself has changed everything the word dependent Zimbabwean in frontier. What's the case, which well Frontera was a case in which it turns out that if you're in the military, you may have people who depend upon you. And there's certain circumstances in which say if you're injured or ill, the dependence are entitled to receive a certain kind of money and the rule that they follow. Then was that if you were the wife of a serviceman, you got you a dependency salary, no questions asked if you were a woman. However, you had to prove that you met the one half payment was support requirements for the husband the rationale for the statute was a utilitarian one at the time. Not today at the time. There was a very high percentage of women. Who did not work outside the home, whom the dependency thing was essentially there if you're trying to figure out which women don't meet that standard. It's going to be very costly. You gonna introduce them. So you take what we call a very simple per se rule, if you then do it the other way there were many fewer women in the services at the time, and they add on husbands, most of whom probably had an independent job. And would not qualify as dependent. If you just simply did an automatic rule, you've probably cut them all out. So they'd required. You to prove this case by case. So there's a fundamental asymmetry in the rule and the position that was taken by the Civil Liberties Union, and so forth was that the sex discrimination discriminated against men. I either men recipients it could have discriminated against women. I the women's servicewomen, but whatever they wanna perfect parody. And the question is do you give it and supreme court said emir, quote, unquote, administrative costs really should not matter in these cases. A we are. Going to strike this thing down. But then we're two disagreements about this one is just how far you're willing to go Justice. Brennan was willing to say, I think sex discrimination is a serious race discrimination. And I think probably not the case in terms of the level of abuse. I think segregation is a hell of a lot more serious problem. Then you were they symmetrical benefits coming out of military services. And there are still cases in which everybody insists that we distinguish on grounds the sex. We do not have coed teams in basketball because we know what the wind up being all male. So I mean, it's a different case they had the lowest standard and Justice Rehnquist at the time actually descended..

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Justice Rehnquist United States Supreme court Richard Justice Berger Martin Ginsburg Marty Ginsburg Reid basketball Idaho Ms magazine Internal Revenue Service United States Congress Colorado fiduciary Warren burger California Aho
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

"And you provide me with the soundtrack to my Saturday morning bike rides along the Pacific Ocean here in Los Angeles. So keep up the great work. I love being a part of the Sinophile family. Shouts risk Passmore for making the trip to Tribeca came down. Supported our film, the American Meam, which he watched now, a Netflix. But yeah, that's my twenty eighteen top ten in the lines. Then Ben Lyons porzingas forever piece, Adnan. Pleasure. Bring in guest reviewer who's now become a staple of Sinophile Claire Atkins. Unfortunately, not in studio. She's been on the road working hard. But she's here. Joining us to talk about a film starring Felicity Jones. It's not RV G. But fictionalized version Arba g Claire tells all about. Thank you for having me review this movie, I feel that twenty eighteen with certainly the year of RV g my book club read the book or g and of course, I watched the documentary which got a lot of press. So it does still little bit that Rb G is kind of over saturated. So I think some people are going to be tired when they see there's another piece of medium out about her called on basis of sex and like ad and said it stars Felicity Jones, you probably know her from Star Wars, you probably know from Syria everything, and she's she's good in the role. The movie is about her time at Harvard Law School through her first sex discrimination case, she argued in front of the supreme court in the early nineteen seventies. She is good role. Like, I said it was originally intended for Natalie Portman who probably didn't wanna bore audiences anymore after Jackie. It Rachel Windsor her and her husband is played by Armie hammer who is incredibly good looking and for him to play Marty Ginsburg was a little bit of a reach for me. But it's a beautiful love story. And if you don't know the story, I it's really remarkable how he stood by her through the trials and tribulations of being a lung young lawyer, and he really treats her as equal, and so it's perfect for Hollywood. But I think this movie falls back on a lot of bio pic cliches. So if you're fan of Hidden Figures or Mona Lisa smile, I think this is the movie for you. And it doesn't ice job of showcasing wife or early years were so important to the history of US gender law, and it's feel-good movie for sure I recommend all mothers and daughters. Go the ad, but it's not gonna stick out to me, you know through this award season. I you know, I. It's just going to it's going to be a nice January film. And you know, we'll move on from there. So you're both free police. I give it to and a half. I think it's really cliche. And you know, it doesn't surprise at anytime. I it it's a story worth telling. And I'm glad it's being told. But you know, I mean, just throw makes a nice appearance, and so that will surprise audiences but other than that, it's it's not very memorable or to notice. We took the duck venture Jean stead early top two of the deposits. Not verse you on this one. But if you wanna give us a handful of your favorite movies of the year. What would they be of twenty teen? I would definitely go with the favorite as mentioned on previous podcast. It was it was clearly going to be written and made for me. I can't get over. I still think about it today. Please go see it it. I think it's just going to surprise and shock you. And I think it should I'm with I'm with this in a file podcast with. I reforms. I still can't stop thinking about it. I think even hawk is incredible. I often recommend you you go out. Instead or rented, however form you can I'm with fantasy that eighth grade. Really stuck for me? I think if something different I've never seen it before. I think really resonated as a young woman. So I would say those three were really the ones that that. I will remember from twenty eight teen. I was huge fan of star born I'm totally with Adnan. It's very melodramatic. But I mean, it was really great as big music fan. I think Bradley Cooper really really hit the nail on the head. And a lot of music is done by Lucas Nelson's Willie Nelson son Jason bell and being from Nashville. Those are two huge acts that I'm so happy are getting kind of a main stay in the media..

Claire Atkins Felicity Jones Netflix Adnan Pacific Ocean g Claire Ben Lyons Sinophile family Los Angeles Passmore Harvard Law School Natalie Portman Rachel Windsor Mona Lisa Marty Ginsburg Tribeca Jean stead US Armie hammer Bradley Cooper
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Medved Show. There are two big new movies that are opening up all across the country today and both of them are considered solid chances for awards consideration fanfare from Hollywood. Please. And the two movies. We're talking about are involved, the very famous public figure who is much in the news these days, and and then the other one very important, civil rights, novelist. Who's worked from nineteen seventy has just been adapted for screen first time, we'll get to that first up the movie is called on the basis of sex. Now, you might think that this is some kind of steamy NC seventeen sex romp. It's not it's about Ruth, Bader Ginsburg, and they're talking about laws that were formed and drafted and accepted where they treated people differently on the basis of sex and Ruth, Bader Ginsburg in real life made a point of combating that her entire life. This film was actually written by her nephew with her cooperation, and it's very closely based on her historical record begins with her at Harvard Law School and. Then she's unable to get a job because she's a woman, and because she's a mother and because she's Jewish and she ends up taking a professor's job. But she longs to be involved in civil rights law, particularly when she hears about a case where a single man is denied a tax deduction for being a caretaker for his invalid mother why because he's a single man and a woman could have gone that tax deduction and talking to her husband, who's our filler fellow Harvard trained lawyer his name was Marty Ginsburg, he's played here by Armie hammer. Felicity Jones, who plays Ruth Bader Ginsburg sees the significance of this case..

Bader Ginsburg Ruth Bader Ginsburg Harvard Law School Medved Hollywood Felicity Jones Harvard Armie hammer professor
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

12:49 min | 1 year ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Three or three someone three eight two five five. What are your are BG thoughts? You know, I think she's admirable. I mean, she said on the supreme court. It's no easy task to get there when she was in law school. I guess she was one of like nine, and in fact, ISIS is in the movie, I haven't seen the movie, but a a dean said you justify why you're here. And why your seat has not gone to a man she went into law school at a time. Limit didn't do that. I have no doubt that she helped break ground both legally and socially with her choices. I also liked the fact that her husband Marty Ginsburg stood by her and she stood by him. She went to classes for him while he had a cancer scare in college. She helped him get through. And then. He ended up standing by her through her career seriously. They have a beautiful partnership. I'm sure that's highlighted in the film that said, I probably won't see it. I like films with aliens in zombies in car crashes, and this is the kind of film that I'm not saying, I wouldn't see it. It's just that. They would be other films in front if there's list. Yeah. And I certainly appreciate folks who have what it takes to overcome different barriers as she certainly had to with gender. But I don't respect folks who then use it to do bad things which he has done over and over again. So to me, it should be very encouraging to to conservatives that the left has to try to make her out to be some kind of hero. I think it just shows how desperate the is for heroes. And when you stop and think about it, the reason you don't have heroes on the left is because the left side, ideas, don't work, and the left is is bound together by this this devotion to abortion on demand through labor and delivery. Who can really celebrate that? But you look at Ginsburg, and she's one of the absolute worse than that. So I've never understood how somebody could be held out to be a feminist hero who has devoted her life and her biggest claim to fame is is keeping it legal to kill seven hundred and fifty thousand. Thousand females a year in America. So how are you? Then some kind of feminist hero. And then she just flat out admits it in an interview with the New York Times, I can anybody really believe she said this. But she did she said frankly, referring to Roe v. Wade I thought at the time RoH was decided there was concern about population growth, and particularly says re Ruth Bader Ginsburg and particularly growth in populations that quote. We don't want to have too many of Ruth baiter Ginsburg, saying, hey, abortions meant to get rid of those populations, quote, we including her don't wanna have too many, can you imagine Christopher conservative has said that they would be literally run out of this nation. And then you get when when Donald Trump won that GOP nomination is, you know, she comes out and she breaks with respect for the supreme court respect for her robe and calls Trump publicly a faker says he. Should resign? The nomination what you know how she undermines confidence in the court. She pretends to care so much about by indulging herself that way to me. It just demonstrates very gaping flaws with her. And then I'm glad she did this. I think God she did this. But think about if she truly believes all this leftist stuff, she spouts how incredibly selfish she must be to not give up her seat during Obama's second term. I mean, she's eighty three and Obama could've appointed somebody and thank God. He didn't get the chance. He could have appointed somebody for forty or fifty years, but she's so selfish. She would not give that seat up for Obama to appoint somebody else so left you want to celebrate her knock yourselves out. I think it just shows that there aren't real heroes on the left. I can see why she's a hero to those on the left. She's a reliable vote for for liberal causes. She's somebody that they that. They like. The same way that I like Thomas Justice, Thomas and Justice Scalia and others on the right? I I wouldn't mind seeing a film made by Justice Thomas. I I know his wife a little bit Chinni. He's a good, man. I got to hang out with them at one point in at the supreme court and just to hear a little bit more about him personally, his his love of a man for all seasons. A movie from the sixties that's about cer- Thomas, more it. So I just as I would probably go to even though there would be no sambas in a film on Justice Thomas. I could see why people on the left would like to see a film about Ruth, Bader Ginsburg. I think she's wrong on the vast majority of topics. But I believe that she sincerely believes them. She loves the court. She loves her job. I love the fact that she stood up for Brad, Kavanagh and criticized his treatment on the left and the partisanship. I know that she was good friends with Justice Scalia. They both love to opera would see opera together. So she's not. So partisan as to not appreciate the humanity of a of a conservative Justice. If I were on the last and believed as the left dupe, I I would consider her a hero in a life worth. Did she stand up for Kevin on before he was confirmed? I'd have to look at the different press releases. But I appreciate that. She did stand up for him that the process was highly partisan, and she did not like the hearings and that was during the hearings. So yeah, I don't think she stood up from before confirmation. But I'll double check on that hate Jim capitalist. K for k how Jim great, thanks. That was interesting that you said sincerity with with the against, you know, the key to success is sincerity with these folks. And once they can take that they've got it made. Why would they sincerity? Why isn't she's left? She believes in lefty things and she sincere way. I sincerely on the right and libertarian, and I appreciate you quoting scripture earlier today. Good. And and because that is the true source of truth. The. Know, the compassion that may be the liberals feel for these people who want to cross our border. And I think you said that well, I know I know their heart pretty much where I know that this is what they feel. But let me let me just read something from Jeremiah in seventeen nine. It says the heart is deceitful above all things and desperately wicked who can know it. You don't know their heart. They don't know your heart. You don't know dance heart only Dan knows his heart and only God knows his heart which people based on their actions. Right. I know my friends on the left, I know their hearts it is the fruit of their doing. It's the fruit that you can judge where their heart is. I just I know a lot of people on the left, and I know they're they truly feel compassion. I think they have the wrong answers. And but I I am not going to criticize where their heart is. And they've talked to me about how they do care about people. I believe they do care about people. I just think they're solutions are incorrect. Hey, Jim appreciate the call. You know? I think most people probably go about it the smart way, which is you term determined people's intent by their actions. You know, I I mean, I I think I think part of that is not the only thing why wouldn't it be? Well, let's say that I. I'm sure with my. With a loved one on the phone because I'm in a bad boon. Maybe say something I don't mean, you guess if you were looking specifically at that one action. You would say Chris doesn't care respect her her friend look at what she said on the phone. You have no way of knowing that I deeply love, my friend. I was just having a bad day and said something short on the phone in the same way. I can look at the human. But. A flawed policy recommendations by folks on the left and realize that it can come out of a space of compassion and just be wrong. Well, that's what I said actions, plural. So yes, you want to judge somebody by the Rover all body of work. None of us want to be judged by our worst moment because we've all had them. I sure don't wanna be judged by my worst moment. But you look at somebody's overall body of work. I I think their intention becomes pretty clear but artists from Aurora here with capitalism Kafer on K artists. Hey ardis. Artists intends to talk here shortly. I can sense it. I want to know how she's a member of a church with a great choir wonder, how this Christmas. Wonderful love to hear about it. All righty. You know, this one text we didn't get to the texter wrote five seven seven three nine started T A N letting fence jumpers have legality is unfair to poor people across the oceans, I understand that concern in. It's perfectly logical concern my response to that would be because the day's gonna come when there's going to be true border security, and then there's gonna be some kind of deal to let the folks here illegally. You aren't committing other crimes have some kind of legal status. Right. We all know that tastes coming. Whether it's a year or fifty years it's coming, but, but even then they'll be that very legitimate concern about hey, what about the folks waiting in line? Absolutely legit. My response to that would be if you accept the premise, which I believe is true that both parties have essentially invited in and allowed in the vast majority of folks who are here illegally. Then I think it becomes then I think it becomes logically morally. Palatable to to then allow folks here illegally legal status because the truth is we invited most of men, right? Just by leaving that border open Republicans data for cheap labor. Democrats did it for votes, but we essentially invited him in. You know, I I understand the reason why some employers will hire illegal aliens, it is it's tough. If you've got a dairy or farm or a meat packing plant. It is hard to get new new folks in the door legally to work. It's tough. It's tough to get the visas. It's tough to get. There are a lot of Americans that don't wanna work that kind of hard labor. They just don't you can advertise all you want in the inner city to come out to you know, some part of eastern Colorado to work at a dairy. And you're not gonna get a ton of taker. So I get why they do it. I can't justify it because they're breaking the law, and I also can't justify the idea of open borders because if you just let everyone come in to work what happens is. Yeah. The dairy gets to fill some jobs, and that that's a good thing. But what if you have a say construction jobs where folks are getting I don't know twenty five dollars an hour, and you'll get an influx of people willing to do those jobs, then the employer says, well, I don't have to pay. Benefits and twenty five bucks an hour or thirty bucks an hour. I can pay minimum wage no benefits and higher. These these folks from from south of the border, so it it isn't fair to people who work in various professions. When you let a lot of folks in that are willing to work for less. And so that's why we have to regulate regulate these regulate immigration because we need to make sure that folks who are here who are working at various jobs are not going to be undercut by the presence of large numbers of people who will work for less forgot to tell you know, it's a little late in the show for my profound truth of the day. But this is it, and it's one of the reasons I am so optimistic about nineteen. I I've been very optimistic brought lots years I can't remember being more optimistic about a year than I am about nineteen. And I'm very optimistic that that there is going to be a deal soon that allows true border security, which is nation desperately needs. Which will then? Allow some kind of common sense legal status for folks here illegally, not committing other crimes and the reason sister, I am so confident of this is unfortunately because of this exploding scourge of drugs from south of the border, no reflection on the average person in Mexico. Just the reality that this nation as you well know has been ravaged by this opioid crisis. We all know that Mike my goodness. Life expectancy is down and the greatest nation in the history of the world, and so much of it can be traced to drugs coming up, whether it's it's math heroin..

Justice Thomas Marty Ginsburg Ruth Bader Ginsburg supreme court Jim great Justice Scalia Obama Ruth baiter Ginsburg Donald Trump cancer New York Times America Jeremiah Thomas Justice GOP Roe heroin Mexico
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on X96

X96

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on X96

"Action figure news specialist Kerry Jackson. Well, we're excited to talk about this. Because who doesn't love the really big giant. No, no, not to be your thing. The BF g. Oh, yeah. The big. No, not that either. No friendly friendly. That's right. This isn't any of those things this is Ruth, Bader Ginsburg. A different kind. He is a she is a supreme court Justice. If you do not know that and we have with us here a Betsy west and Julie Cohen, the co directors and producers of a documentary about Ruth, Bader Ginsburg, called RV G, and it's I would be fascinated to see this. And I'm reading a little bit about it. Because who knows what most people don't know much about her other than her recent career on the supreme court, right? Yeah. I mean, this is Betsy talking and high Bill so happy to be here. Have you a lot of people know about the notorious our BG who gained a lot of notoriety for some blistering dissents that she made in the past few years, and she's become a kind of internet rockstar people. Dress up like her on Halloween amazing, and the, you know, the Saturday Night Live parody but three years ago. Julie ann. I who had both interviewed her before looked at each other and said a lot of people don't know, the real story of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, this should be a documentary, and we should do it. Now, let's Betsy west is a we've interviewed her before Betsy is a twenty one time EMMY winner for her work at ABC is a news producer executive producer of documentary turning point which people I think might remember the story Bill films and Julie has a great credentials as well directed eight documentaries on various topics, including African opera singers. She also did she's New York. Emmy winner, legendary legendary fish store, the sturgeon queens. I'd like to see that. Know who's in? It are really really why is she in that? She is in that film. And that's how I first met her because she happens to be a devante of this particular smoked fish store owned by a family of immigrants. So there you go. Dan RPG, and I actually think really big giant is really not a bad subtitled for our film. Now that you're saying that. RPG a has has when she has a passion for something. She really has a passion for it. She loves smoked fish. She loves opera. Yes. We know that because he would go to the opera with Scalia is that really true. And that is really true. I it seems like an odd pairing as everybody pointed out, but did they really like each other? You know, that's a great western because people. People ask that a lot. And we ask it to. I it's it's one of the things about the legend of our BG that you think like is that really true were they really friends. But now having having spent time talking to her about it, we interviewed Justice Scalia son, Eugene Scalia hearing about their friendship, and seeing you know, some of the photos of them together they actually performed in an opera together once as extra at the Washington National opera, they look adorable. You'll see it in the movie, they were genuine, deep friends Justice Ginsburg, you know, when she likes someone from her friends to her late husband who she loved so much Marty Ginsburg when she talks about someone. She cares about there's like a twinkle in her eyes. And and she has a twinkle in her eye. They were intellectual adversaries, but they were close close friends. She loves I'll tell you one thing Justice Ginsburg, who's a kind of quiet and reserved person loves to laugh and just Scalia was a very. Funny, fellow as she says, he was funny even in his awful decisions.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Betsy west Eugene Scalia Marty Ginsburg Justice Scalia Kerry Jackson Dan RPG Julie ann Emmy Washington National opera Saturday Night Live Julie sturgeon queens Julie Cohen RV G New York ABC Bill producer
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on Overdue

"But then I obviously, I was like, okay, this, like he so specific about this person who is number two in class ahead of him, you know, were there like Jewish students from Bryn Mawr who were at Harvard law in that time period. So obviously I have filed a request with the archives at Harvard University find to find out this information. I have not yet had a response had a very nice automated response that they received my query. And when I get that information, I will share it with the listeners of overdue podcast. And it's not just because I am. A Jewish graduate of Bryn Mawr college, but it's not not because I'm Jewish cudgel at college. That like that. Like if you want the real love story folks that our BG one thousand percents documentary 'cause it takes place like the same time. Yup. Only recognizes that like the interesting character is like the young woman from like tough circumstances who wrestles into institution of enormous privilege on scholarship mic something incredibly impressive herself and the man who like, you know, you read this book and you think yourself a boil men in this time period, what a bunch of garbage heaps and then you re remember, wait. But Marty Ginsburg was a man in this time period, and he's pretty much the opposite, and he was sincerely seems like pretty delighted to play second fiddle. He's beautiful, genius, wife, and was himself a successful tax lawyer like they pursued these career. Ears together, but became clear to him immediately that she was going to outshine him professionally, and he decided that he was gonna make like his main life's work, making sure that she could do that to the very best of her ability. Yes. So like I just I, it makes me reject the idea like is, is Oliver bear at the fourth even broadly Representative of men in that time period. I don't know. Like it just seems that a world in which mardi Ginsburg can grow up and be himself and be the husband of. Eighth, like Oliver Barrett, the fourth romantic hero? Yeah, that's what I would say. Yeah. So anyhow, he doesn't put his wife. I know his life comes second. They moved to New York and decide they wanna make a baby. They try and it's not going anywhere in. He's like real preoccupied over whether he's in fertile or she's in fertile. They go to a doctor and the doctor calls them back in each separately and he's like, it's Jenny's fault, isn't it? The doctors will. It's nobody's fault these. Like which one of us malfunctioning the dodgers like Jenny grease, what can we do? There were all these treatments on these like, nah, bro. Jenny can't have babies, Jenny has Kimia. She is dying. It'll be weeks or a month. There's nothing we can do about it. PS lied to her earlier and told her you're both still fine and fertile and can have babies, and you're the only one who. Knows she's dying of cancer, so you should probably clear in sooner rather than later at which point I threw the book across the room. Yep. It made me until to the same of researched. Yes, I did. So yeah. So here's what I found this..

Marty Ginsburg Jenny grease Bryn Mawr Bryn Mawr college Oliver Barrett Oliver bear Harvard University mardi Ginsburg dodgers New York Representative
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on KGO 810

"Don't know i remember doing my show daughter of a garbage man that was interesting because i humbly say that the reviews were very very nice and then this is a cash she brings up the kardashians and it's wearisome why is she bringing them up and i'm like because it's the juxtaposition of our reality show world versus the values with which i was raised with my mother and garbage ma'am father so i said there's so many people i'm gonna use them to encapsulate all those getting so disproportionately rewarded again they are representation it isn't about them it's about what they represent teaching kindergarten you really don't get it dude you really don't get it it's a story about my parents and it goes into hulan rip open your heart and that's what you took away from it i hate you you cannot help everybody do the best i can but also to the critique that they didn't go into the federal court years i'm thinking they went into her love relationship with this man marty ginsburg who i just you just could feel the love he had for her and the and the respect they had for each other oh yeah you know and the way they would rib each other and i want to tell that part of the story because he is in his own way so remarkable and it would be wrong to leave that part of the story out so before we move on from this again i know we spent a long time we weren't talking about yes we were talking about the movie are the g ruth baiter ginsburg but more so than that we're talking about the importance of this film right now and this woman right now and as our supreme court the face if it is changing it is regressing we are not progressing and that's very frightening and to understand the work of this woman and i pray to god the work she's done has set a precedent that cannot be overturned and to your point andrea chase a killer movie reviews dot com marine lang enough.

kardashians marty ginsburg ruth baiter ginsburg andrea chase
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on KGO 810

"A partner truly extraordinary for his generation i play i ever knew that i had a brain he is a center of power on and off the court every time justice ginsburg wrote a dissent with the internet would explode came up with a couple of slogans you can't spell would not be in this room today without the determined efforts men and women who kept dreams alive i could cry i'm maureen lying and you're hanging langen k g o on this sunday night that's a clip from the film ruth bader ginsburg r b g rpg i rarely want to see movies twice a mccurry there's eight million to see who wants to spend time seeing another i can't wait to see this again it is riveting is emotional it's inspiring it is important it is absolutely necessary now more so than ever when ruth baiter ginsburg was appointed to the supreme court by bill clinton which by the way if her husband marty ginsburg the most supportive wonderfully humored man did not support her in the way he did he lobbied for her because she was not that type she's much more serious though not umer lewis just a serious person having her there so when she got on the supreme court she was considered a moderate moderate now when they over the years they would show you where the judges stood on the spectrum now it looks like she's far left but only because so many conservatives on the far right have been appointed anyway my guess andrea chase killer movie reviews dot com we are honoring this wonderful woman tonight aren't you and her and you and you know i go ahead sorry i wanted to set this up she was one of the founders of the women's rights project and she participated in over three hundred gender discrimination cases by nineteen seventyfour argued six gender discrimination cases before the supreme court winning five but one of those was a for agenda right for a man isn't that and she was so smart in the cases she chose to move forward with if you'll forgive me ending a sentence with the we're being colloquial but this is but it's a way of getting through to those nine men sitting on the court that this isn't just about women this affect everybody and putting it in a way that they could understand like like she says the film she felt like she was teaching kindergarten which is basically what she was doing in the case of wine versus weisenthal she represented a widower a man who has denied survivor benefits under social security they were given see his wife died i don't know if it was during childbirth or right yeah it was during childbirth the very shortly after so here he is a widower and he can't get the benefits that women would have been able to get to care for minor children and she because she had been working and she was paying into social security he was someone listening titled to it so ginsburg argued that the statute discriminated against male survivors of workers by denying them the same protection as their female counterparts so i love that she did that for men if you see when there is discrimination it hurts everybody and i you know i love we see him back when the case was being argued we see pictures up in but they also interviewing today and i love that smile he gets on his face when he remembers that moment in the courtroom and i do have to correct myself i did say the jury case where she fought for women that they must equally serve on juries as men that they must be called to jury duty because it was not mandated that they had to that was not in missouri what was in missouri is different drinking ages from henan women drinking ages in that crazy it's ridiculous you think about what was legal in those times like you know we all hear about the one where you know legally a man couldn't rape his wife because she was still buta some property but you couldn't take out a credit card your husband had to cosign for that it was just nuts and she's very quick i mean there were a lot of women storming the ramparts god love them it was the right thing to do bella apps for dan and you're very good frank lauria steinem who appears in this film but there was first baiter ginsburg very quietly working choosing her cases bringing it towards supreme court setting that precedent and making the law so.

partner
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"Three won't you be my neighbor oh won't you be able i haven't seen that yet so if i know i haven't seen that scene rby yeah yeah good and you nailed it it's his ministry his calling in life it spoke to me as a man who made that you're calling is not always to the ministry you're calling can be your ministry well said sir and and the lessons and civility which is so disgust now this that the uncivil nature of our world and that there is this beautiful film about fred rogers that wonderful email from the reverend mark schaefer last week i've heard nothing but when i'm sure i would adore this movie and you'll catch up with it and it's doing wonderfully well which is very heartening people are connecting with it and taking it to heart i hope and close to that our bg yes i have them see i had the end won't you be my neighbor is my number tens okay tied together okay do you have them three and four i put won't you be my neighbor up high in my list rb g as well and our be g now now is something to discuss because you get a sense of how she makes her decisions and and and get a sense of her of her basis of equality and now we're in the midst of supreme court reshuffling yeah yeah big time and to get insight into somebody who sits on this court and there's so many important issues that have passed before her in her time and it will in the in the coming years plus she had a corky unusual life well and it's also a wonderful love story between her and her husband who is such a hero in this i mean marty ginsburg is such a parent on and such a great example of feminist man who just had zero insecurity about her career cer maybe surpassing his or him sacrificing for her career is just a great i think that's what a lot of people are responding to as much as the politics of it isn't it show a great friendship between a warmth between her and skelly apps necessarily see from four and that goes back to the fred rogers of like look we might be opposite sides of the political fence but doesn't mean we can't get along they're showing us how to do it and that's the most of all of us to watch a recent decision though i read her what's the word when you're not on the descent and i understood it better because i had seen this yeah it's fascinating well where are we are we worth three number three number three is death of stalin saw just the other week on and gosh is this just great i mean it's just ridiculous it's i mean it's everything you wanted to be i mean i i was going with high hopes in a hit every single one of those grow and i think what it does while i'll talk about it it's on my list too so i'll say that was no choice my number three is totally surprised not higher on your list your shoes right here right there the next one and criminal under seen movie another one yeah i really hope i don't know what they can do if they could re release it awards time because personally i think charlie's there on deserves she deserves consideration for her performance script was fabulously cody who sometimes i haven't thought was you know sometimes i wasn't such a fan but this one it's such an inventive idea it's about a woman who seemingly is suffering from postpartum depression but it really isn't about that at all it's more like like life is just what a life she's like this is not who i thought i it's about identity about who you think you are who you wants were and how that all kind of comes together and i just love where it ended up and i love how it got there and i thought it was really original and inventive and beautifully acted that's too i was people are responding oddly to it they didn't get a response kinda just didn't ever really didn't didn't really grab hold with folks and i don't know it's just what everybody who i talked to and again i didn't see it but everybody i spoke with seem to love it it is.

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Yeah there these moments you have in the film julia betsy where you're playing this archive tape of rebate against bergen her husband marty in ruth now is watching it and you see such a beautiful overwhelming smile on her face and you see the love that she still has for this man and it is hard to not be moved to tears by it what made you both want to spend such a good amount of time in the film focusing not just on her legal career but on this the true romance well we knew that she'd had a long and happy marriage but it wasn't until we began working on the film that we realized how important this marriage was to her both personally and professionally i mean it's an incredible model of a feminist marriage marty ginsburg was was an extremely talented successful tax lawyer who happened to be married to a brilliant legal strategist ruth bader ginsburg and when her career began to take off in the nineteen seventies when she was arguing cases before the supreme court that change the world for american women he began to take over more of the responsibilities in the house and eventually when she became a federal judge he moved to washington for her and then you know when there was an opening on the supreme court mardi ginsburg who was very affable wellconnected guy campaign for her to be considered to go on the supreme court i mean what more could you.

julia betsy bergen marty ginsburg ruth bader ginsburg mardi ginsburg washington
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Shows and i learned a lot more about her husband water remarkable person yes ruth and marty ginsburg had what we think of as like the greatest feminist love story of the twentieth century they met as undergraduates at cornell university ruth bader as you'll see from the home movies that we have in our film is was an astoundingly beautiful young woman she had her pick really of guys at cornell where the male female ratio was four to one but she says that marty was the first guy that seemed to really care that she had a brain yeah you know when they got to harvard law school where they went i marty was bragging about her was my wife is going to be on the law review so and that his kind of support continued throughout their their careers were set up on a blind date but was it really blind not on his end while ruth bader had never seen mardi ginsburg before apparently he cheated by his own admission he made sure that someone pointed her out to him and said like whoa she's she's really beautiful he he acknowledges that was his initial reaction then he spent a few evenings with our whoa but she's really smart and that was one of the things he treasured most about her too i was struck by the fact that people forget that he was also very accomplished man brilliant in his own right but he leaves his professional life in order to support his wife marty ginsburg was one of the most successful tax attorneys in new york which is saying something and yet when ruth bader ginsburg was appointed to the second circuit court in washington he the dc circuit court he left his job he went down to washington people used to say us to assume that she was commuting to new york but no mardi moved down there to support her he was a character before as straight laced and to.

ruth bader cornell mardi ginsburg marty ginsburg new york washington harvard law school
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was not the top pick when they were looking at supreme court justice that's true bill clinton it was his first opportunity to put someone on the supreme court that's a big deal he told us that he really wanted new york governor mario cuomo that governor cuomo didn't wanna do it so then he started looking and just then judge ruth bader ginsburg she was a federal court judge was not at the top of the list she's very as we said kind of shy person who doesn't tutor own horn and so it was her husband who wound up going on a lobbying campaign to bring her to bill clinton's attention she was already sixty at the time she was sixty years old then yes when we talk about her we often just see this powerhouse this incredible legal mind but we often don't see the softer sides that your film showers and i learned a lot more about her husband water remarkable person yes ruth and marty ginsburg had what we think of as the greatest feminist love story of the twentieth century they met as undergraduates at cornell university ruth baiter as you'll see from the home movies that we have in our film is was an astoundingly beautiful young woman she had her pick really of guys at cornell where the male female ratio was four to one but she says that marty was the first guy that seemed to really care that she had a brain yeah you know when they got to harvard law school where they went i marty was bragging about her was my wife is going to be on the law review so and that his kind of support continued throughout their their careers were set up on a blind date but was it really blind not on his end while ruth bader had never seen marty ginsburg before apparently he cheated by his own admission he made sure that someone pointed her out to him and said like whoa she's she's really beautiful he he acknowledges that was his initial reaction then he spent a few evenings with our whoa but she's really smart and that was one of the things he treasured most about her i was struck by the fact that people forget that he was also very accomplished man brilliant in his own right but he leaves his professional life in order to support his wife marty ginsburg was one.

governor cuomo ruth bader ginsburg ruth baiter cornell marty ginsburg bill clinton new york ruth harvard law school sixty years
"marty ginsburg" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"marty ginsburg" Discussed on KPCC

"And and sometimes didn't share of responsibilities and put one person's career ahead of the others her husband was very accomplish lawyer he was a partner in a law firm in new york city and she says that when he was trying to make partner his career kind of came first but as the women's movement ramped up and as she began this initiative to bring cases to challenge discriminatory laws marty ginsburg understood do the importance of her work and he stepped back a little bit and basically her career then came first and he also did all the cooking cartilage yeah i mean really who could what a great husband he was a fantastic cook a very funny guy she loved his sense of humor and um he helped her become a supreme court justice she says you know there's no question that without marty i probably wouldn't have been considered a couple of years ago i was fortunate enough to go to the supreme court in your oral arguments and brooke better johnnesberg is a tiny woman she doesn't have a booming voice but her questions were remarkably astute she knew this case backward and forward she's now eighty four i believe what do you think keeps her go wayne i hope i'm well retired by the age of eighty four it doesn't sound like she's going anywhere anytime soon she loves the law she absolutely loves it that's been the case ever since she was a student at harvard law school she's obviously feels the cheese at the top of her game and she's gonna keep going it is kind of a contrast that i think that's part of the fun of notorious rbg because she is a diminutive woman and yet you underestimate her at your peril she's very sharpen buried with it what will if you're what to take her to park city and show the movie with her i assume an attendance at sundance it's going to be very exciting and a little nerve wracking i think um the thing about justice ginsburg is that she has a tremendous sense of humor when we showed her some of the clips of the parody on saturday night live she laughed and laugh i hope that she likes the film i think everyone expected to retire soon them in your eighthranked espn d'ambra with little retire look under nazi west along with julie cohen is.

partner law firm harvard law school sundance julie cohen new york marty ginsburg brooke espn