35 Burst results for "Martine"

Former Dodgers HOF manager Lasorda dies at 93

WBZ Afternoon News

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Former Dodgers HOF manager Lasorda dies at 93

"Of of its its Hall Hall of of Fame Fame managers managers and and a a legend legend in in the the game. game. Tommy Tommy Lasorda, Lasorda, the the former former Dodgers Dodgers manager, manager, guided guided the the team team toe toe to to World World Series Series titles titles more more from from CBS CBS is is Chris Chris Martine. Martine. After After suffering suffering a a heart heart attack attack in in 1996, 1996, Lasorda decided it was time to focus focus more more on on family family and and less less on on the the field. field. It's It's not not the the end end for for May. May. Ladies Ladies and and gentlemen, gentlemen, That's That's the the beginning. beginning. He He was was inducted inducted into into the the Baseball Baseball Hall Hall of of Fame Fame following following his his retirement, retirement, But But Lasorda Lasorda couldn't couldn't give give up up the the sport sport He He loved loved in in 2000. 2000. He He managed managed team team U. U. S. S. A A two two gold gold at at the the Sydney Sydney Olympics. Olympics. Lasorda once said that after his death, he wants a Dodger schedule taped to his tombstone. Every year. Chris Martinez.

Lasorda Hall Hall Of Of Fame Fame Tommy Tommy Lasorda Dodgers Chris Chris Martine Heart Heart Attack Attack CBS Martine Baseball Baseball Hall Hall Lasorda Lasorda U. U. S. S. Sydney Olympics Dodger Chris Martinez
Visual Illusions Deceiving Neural Networks

Data Skeptic

04:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Visual Illusions Deceiving Neural Networks

"I i'm. Martine was the researcher at the university in barcelona spain. Welcome this show. Tell us a little bit about what you studied there. As i say. I started some years ago so now undoing Study was mathematics and computer science with them led me to computer science. Masterson abused deal nimitz processing on. Now we were basically in image processing ongoing recent techniques with For models that comes round this study obesity in humans. Got just so. I know we always hear this analogy. That's deep neural. Networks are kinda like the layers of the brain and i think sometimes neurologist cringe a little bit when we make the comparison but i'm not sure how much they cringe. Maybe some of its fair. What's your perception there on. The comparison between a neural network and artificial neural network and a human neural network. I will definitely creamed celso like us. Now it's an of the networks of course inspired Network this we all know that this simplification and naturally i think more and more people are working on trying to go from that simplification. some Actually are margaret. And you'd mentioned part of your work includes looking at models that are used. The word inspired but something along those lines from the human visual system. What are some of the ways in which one might be inspired in that fashion will actually. It's it's interesting because the model of activism neural network is inspired beecham's so when people started to look at how actually sees you start to mobile A stack of layers where we have some with some filters When we envision us oriented field. There's that can see recent vertical different frequencies To obedience actually like a very simplified note. Landlord say i'm not really someone knows a lot about the brain but i'm vaguely aware that our eyes are somewhat imperfect in the brain does a lot of cleaning up yet. I don't know if that's true in the more computer vision. I think our cameras are maybe more accurate than the human eye in some cases. And there's not quite as much cleanup. Are these fundamentally different approaches. Or at the end of the day do both systems have basically the same day to set. Nah i think it's a analogy because there's a bar that is only the information that we receive from the exterior. Let's say the luminance of they're seeing on the This on bar. But of course we don just see that we processing formation on this is why we say that we actually we perceive information because there are some other things that are happening in our brain taking this information on combining with everything that we know from the beginning memories although stop so we actually is when we see at camera. recording is actually taking just some information soon so the analogy would be computer. Actually tried to do this analogy so when you put so not. What's behind those cameras. Tried to do something without information. Either retail They're like following someone. Then you're more or less doing this analogy how ac. Because when we see we are doing something with information is it not only just preceding the light which is the dot com era's i saw perceiving and processing. Then is that right. yes exactly. Yeah it makes sense. Well the main work. I invited you on to talk about with the paper titled convolution neural. Networks can be deceived by visual illusions. I thought maybe we should start with a definition of a visual illusion in my mind. I'm picturing like the image where it's either a candle or two faces or maybe some. Mc art is there a formal like mathematically satisfying definition of what a visual illusion is own. Think so. I think it's something that you see one but is not so easy to describe. I would say that the these right is something. By general it would be some images stimulus usually name it that actually cows illusion in your rain and illusion will women with any lewiston. Is that what you perceive is not consistent with reality. So we've got mr light actually with photo mentors for instance and we can measure a color. That is different from the one that we are proceeding. So that's obvious lucille. When actually the reality perception are not in the same face

Martine Masterson Celso Barcelona Beecham Obesity Spain Margaret Lewiston Lucille
Visual Illusions Deceiving Neural Networks

Data Skeptic

03:21 min | 3 weeks ago

Visual Illusions Deceiving Neural Networks

"I i'm. Martine was the researcher at the university in barcelona spain. Welcome this show. Tell us a little bit about what you studied there. As i say. I started some years ago so now undoing Study was mathematics and computer science with them led me to computer science. Masterson abused deal nimitz processing on. Now we were basically in image processing ongoing recent techniques with For models that comes round this study obesity in humans. Got just so. I know we always hear this analogy. That's deep neural. Networks are kinda like the layers of the brain and i think sometimes neurologist cringe a little bit when we make the comparison but i'm not sure how much they cringe. Maybe some of its fair. What's your perception there on. The comparison between a neural network and artificial neural network and a human neural network. I will definitely creamed celso like us. Now it's an of the networks of course inspired Network this we all know that this simplification and naturally i think more and more people are working on trying to go from that simplification. some Actually are margaret. And you'd mentioned part of your work includes looking at models that are used. The word inspired but something along those lines from the human visual system. What are some of the ways in which one might be inspired in that fashion will actually. It's it's interesting because the model of activism neural network is inspired beecham's so when people started to look at how actually sees you start to mobile A stack of layers where we have some with some filters When we envision us oriented field. There's that can see recent vertical different frequencies To obedience actually like a very simplified note. Landlord say i'm not really someone knows a lot about the brain but i'm vaguely aware that our eyes are somewhat imperfect in the brain does a lot of cleaning up yet. I don't know if that's true in the more computer vision. I think our cameras are maybe more accurate than the human eye in some cases. And there's not quite as much cleanup. Are these fundamentally different approaches. Or at the end of the day do both systems have basically the same day to set. Nah i think it's a analogy because there's a bar that is only the information that we receive from the exterior. Let's say the luminance of they're seeing on the This on bar. But of course we don just see that we processing formation on this is why we say that we actually we perceive information because there are some other things that are happening in our brain taking this information on combining with everything that we know from the beginning memories although stop so we actually is when we see at camera. recording is actually taking just some information soon so the analogy would be computer. Actually tried to do this analogy so when you put so not. What's behind those cameras. Tried to do something without information. Either retail They're like following someone. Then you're more or less doing this analogy how ac. Because when we see we are doing something with information is it not only just preceding the light which is the dot com era's

Martine Masterson Celso Barcelona Spain Obesity Beecham Margaret
Peru’s interim president resigns after massive protests, chaos embroil nation

BBC Newshour

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Peru’s interim president resigns after massive protests, chaos embroil nation

"Interim president, Manuel Marino has resigned days after taking office. He lost the support of Congress following the deaths of two anti government protesters in the capital, Lima. Widespread demonstrations were triggered by the impeachment on Monday off Mr Marino's predecessor, Martine Vizcarra on corruption allegations. Mr Marino denied that he done stood president this Kara and said the violence that led to the demonstrators deaths was unacceptable. Killer preserve me sentir condolences. I want to express my sincere condolences to the families of the victims who died during the protests where citizens practice their right to liberty. All of Peru's in mourning. Nothing can justify a legitimate protest, which ends with the deaths of Peruvians. We live in a democracy. Peru is our homeland, and just like everyone else I want the best for our country.

Mr Marino Manuel Marino Martine Vizcarra Lima Congress Kara Peru
Peru President Ousted in Surprise Impeachment Vote

Democracy Now! Audio

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Peru President Ousted in Surprise Impeachment Vote

"Peru has been thrown into political uncertainty after lawmakers ousted president martine scotto on monday and his impeachment. Trial the vote to remove him on. Charges of corruption came two months after failed impeachment in september on an unrelated accusation of obstruction of justice some lawmakers and protesters to cry vote is a political ploy ahead of elections in twenty twenty one and said the political chaos could further hamper the response to the coronavirus pandemic which has devastated peru

Martine Scotto Peru
"martine" Discussed on Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

02:53 min | 3 months ago

"martine" Discussed on Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

"So most people they just go through their lives and they repressed this as much as possible because they are afraid they will lose their job that they'll lose their family or that leave lose their lives if they come out openly as a transgendered person, and in fact, steve unfortunately, the vast majority of transgender people I believe have who have come out have lost their family lost even their lives from coming out like them. I was extremely fortunate that I was able to keep this bottled up. Until I was in my late thirties and at that time I was very happily married for about ten years and I have four children who were wonderful ahead to great parents and it was by a the only way I would express. This would be to dress in the opposite genders close. And so when I I came out about this to my wife Beena, she was one hundred percent accepting she said I'd Never Kurt of something like this. It's very unusual but Martine I, Mary you for your soul, not for your gender, and this is what you have to do to be happy with yourself. All I want is for you to be happy with yourself. So she accepted me by our kids accepted me my parents accepted me my wife's parents accept me the big majority of my coworkers accepted me. So I have a very easy passage steve for transitioning from Male Martin, which was the name I was assigned at birth to female Martine. Added though one little either. And Since that time I do feel an obligation to help other people and the LGBT community has much as I can consistent with all my other responsibilities. I have had close friends who I know, lose their lives as a result of transgender discrimination and hatred, and I hope very much that my life can be an example for other transgender people and for other straight people to accept transgendered nece. It's just part of the beautiful multicolored nature of humanity. We are all God's gift to the world and we should love each other Martine. Thank you very very much. You're an inspiration in so many ways and We can only cheer you want in the fantastic work. Thank you for being with US my pleasure great to be with you. Thanks for listening to what's ahead I'm Steve. Forbes looking forward to next week. and. If you could rate review subscribe to this show we had forbes sure would appreciate it..

Martine I steve Mary Forbes Beena Martin
California theme parks could seek legal action to speed up reopening

All Things Considered

01:05 min | 3 months ago

California theme parks could seek legal action to speed up reopening

"Sell Its assets. Theme parks like Disneyland, A universal studios are not happy with the state's new guidance for reopening both L A and orange counties are nowhere near the yellow or minimal risk tear. The state says they have to be in for a large theme park to reopen Park say they've been able to safely reopen in other states like Florida By following their own protocols. Hugo Martine covers the travel industry for the Times. He says that while the state sent representatives to Florida to check out reopening protocols, it didn't lead to any changes. Apparently, that didn't really sway the state much because they came back. Pretty much with the same protocols that they were considering about two weeks ago. The theme parks say they aren't ruling out legal action. Erin Guerrero is the executive director of Kappa. The California Attractions and Parks Association is our number one goal is to be allowed to reopen responsibly. Obviously, we love to keep that conversation going and come up with a reasonable timeline for re openings. But at this point Any options There are viable industry associations say that the shuttering of US theme parks has led to

Parks Association Hugo Martine Florida A Universal Studios Erin Guerrero United States Executive Director California The Times
Bob Rosenberg & the Lessons Learned From Running Dunkin Donuts

Dose of Leadership

07:44 min | 3 months ago

Bob Rosenberg & the Lessons Learned From Running Dunkin Donuts

"Bob Rosenberg on dose of leadership, former CEO of Dunkin donuts. I am so excited to have you on the show. Welcome pleasure. Well, you got this new book coming out in October, round the corner to round the world, your lessons of that you learn running Dunkin donuts I love Dunkin donuts by the way I think copies outstanding pilot. Now, go through the airport I always bypass starbuck's sorry starbucks and I always go straight to Dunkin donuts that coffees just so good to music to my ears. You know I was reading your bio and it said you graduated from Harvard Business School. Told me this right and your twenty five and you became the CEO when you're twenty five is that right? That's correct within weeks of my graduation I had in my early career I basically virtually grew up. Over the store I worked in lots of different jobs within my family business, which is not call Dunkin donuts gone universal food systems and a variety of different jobs I went to hotel school and went into the army, and then went on to graduate school in. Expected to join the family business but Lord knows I had no expectation that it's twenty five I dad who is only forty seven at the time eighth grade educated Guy Returns to me. And asked me if I wouldn't take over the responsibility of CEO. At his business said the REF aching request and that one third few weeks to decide upon. But ultimately best decision I ever made man the yeah. Obviously a life altering one of those decisions in life that that. was definitely a y intersection the road, and you had to make a choice. You went down that path and there was no looking back. Once you did. But Man Twenty, five, I can't imagine you know that was almost twenty seven years ago for me just the the leadership lessons I've learned from twenty five to fifty, two AB. been. I can only imagine you with your experience it had to be a minimum exponential. So the type of leader you were at twenty five to when you stopped in one, thousand, nine hundred and what do you think the big differences were one of the things that was an advantage early on in the first soda, era I break the book down into the six areas that I that I see as the company history from nineteen, sixty, three to. Nineteen Ninety Eight. But in the first era, the big help was business school and it was there that I learned the language to strategy. I would love to say that I came to the job as a copy twenty, five year old into it. All right I think I matured and and made my mistakes and boy did I make a lot of mistakes over those thirty five years if that the thing that I think the grew was my emotional intelligence. To better understand myself an-and away to. Hopefully understand my teammates around me franchise on his and the people that I came in contact with end consumers. and. It was a journey I. Mean I would absolutely say that It's an old saying, but it's true in my case no, you can't put an old hat on a young body. You do have the Soda Lauren through trial and error and I think truthfully, in my case, the setbacks experience were more informative and more useful. than the successes in fact, a big mistake the after the five I five is of tremendous success, the second five years or really difficult, and it really came as a result of the success of the first five years. It became an impediment to future success in it wasn't until. Unfortunately almost led the team off a cliff in the second five-year era that I really began to start to learn the more effective lessons about who I was what my responsibilities were. As a leader. and. It came from a book of all places. Really my my soda moment transformational moment for me. He uses a book that you read was kind of a transformation moment, moment or. Second Year of a second era of Maya my stint as CEO, and after the first five years basically was under pressure to go publican. And when I came out of Business School Isaiah inheritance universal systems where eight little businesses it was it was excused chaos and fundamentally what the team did is we basically narrowed that down a one we had really been experimenting with far too many businesses and we say basically decided to exploit the the sort of the diamond in the rough that we. Had which was a bunch of stores in many cases, soul breakfast lunch called Dunkin donuts and made donuts and coffee, and we decided to focus on our core business and quiz extraordinarily successful and we went from one hundred thousand dollars in pretax profit within five to seven, hundred, fifty thousand and we went public because my dad I've been trying to sell the business. While I was in business school was unable to sell from billion dollars. It'd become the billionaire always wanted to be after taxes and that was the reason he turned to me I. Think at that Young Age is he wasn't quite sure what to do and. Put me in charge. Then I changed the vision, change the dried to keep up unreasonable injectors and. Drove the business off a cliff I was sitting there amidst. Stockholder suits, franchisee lawsuits reading a book called the best and the brightest by David Halberstam. And it was a book about the Johnson and Kennedy Administration of the Vietnamese War, and what he maintained was even though the administration are governmental Mister show run by these Ivy Leaguers the best the brightest our country at the offer they never really went into the hamlets and into the front lines where the war was being waged the final what the true story was while the con-, winning the hearts and minds of the townspeople in the leadership in the towns. And Halbe Sam said the great fault lie in the fact that our leadership. Suffered from what he called Hubris the Greek word for arrogance in sitting in that chair and I remember like it was yesterday I said Oh my God Halberstam could be talking about me. Yeah it was in that and I decided I. You know I was blaming Franchisees for suing us and. Problems that we're having in terms of Mike. One of my key executives left the company because he had lost faith leadership fellow had gone out of business school with. An and basically we convened our management team. We decided that as leadership we'd never blamed. Martine. Mates are followership take a hundred percent of the responsibility hundred other responsibility. And that we that invite, we apologize for the Arab always we invited franchise on his end to noodle out with us what we did on how we can improve it. We decided we're GONNA go each of us to visit a hundred stores a year each in order to touch the front is travel with the district manages visit the store talk to the owners. Get very important in we created an advisory council. So fundamentally, we did a one eighty in terms of our attitude about how were leaders particularly need what my responsibility was in it all came from that that insight that momentary it's insight from that one book that was transformation I love that story the book was called the best and brightest what what was the full in the brightest by David Halberstam? Think Nineteen, seventy-three, it's it's it's bestseller it was. An important book at the time. In my view, it's still a great management.

Dunkin Donuts CEO Harvard Business School David Halberstam Starbucks Bob Rosenberg Lord Advisory Council Halbe Sam Martine Mike Kennedy Administration Johnson
Substance abuse linked to COVID-19 susceptibility: Study

News, Traffic and Weather

04:08 min | 4 months ago

Substance abuse linked to COVID-19 susceptibility: Study

"The pandemic, There's been been an an increase increase in in substance substance abuse. abuse. It's It's also also had had significant significant impact impact on on mental mental health health and and is is impacting impacting communities communities across across America. America. ABC ABC News News producer producer Jenny Jenny Goldstein Goldstein has has more more on on some some of the steps being taken and is part of the ABC News turning point. Siri's were focusing on how addiction affects communities of color. He was Jenny. September is National Recovery Month an entire month dedicated to educating Americans about substance use disorders, mental health treatment and services. I am a woman in long term recovery from alcoholic drug addiction. Paddy McCarthy is the CEO of the organization faces and voices of recovery. I have overcome challenges with my own alcohol and turkeys and now then in recovery for over 30 years this year marks the 31st anniversary of National recovery Month. This year's theme joined the voices for recovery celebrating connections. Recovery is a journey. We want a path to a better future. Martine Hackett is an associate professor in the master of public Health and community health programs at Hofstra University. She says, the first step to recovery is acknowledgements. You really cannot attempt to solve that problem or to even begin your recovery until you acknowledge that jacket says racial disparities exist in the process of recovery. This is in part due to the barriers that hinder minorities in particular from getting the help. They need some of these barriers that minorities face when it comes to identifying help. Have to do with the even their perceived need for treatment, Recognising that they might not want to have help from official means and might be more comfortable seeking help from family or from religious institutions. Another obstacle, health insurance coverage or access to behavioral health services. Trauma and racial stress can make minorities more susceptible to miss using drugs or alcohol as a coping mechanism. Some of this has to do with concepts around trauma. And the the experiences of trauma clearly in an early age people who are exposed to stressors there's research that talks about the stressors of racism. And how those stressors can cause behaviors that you know people reach to to be able to deal with those stressors. Hackett says. Native Americans are the most affected by these disparities. They have a higher rate of addiction, but they also have a lower rate of recovery and being able to seek recovery. As for national recovery month McCarthy says Connecting in 2020 will be a little different than previous years. You know that we can't do it alone. So that's why the theme of celebrating connections is so important, especially right now. During Koven 19 when connecting with people has become a whole new challenge when we're not able to visit people in person or tender, usual gatherings to support recovery. McCarthy also says the language and terminology we used when referring to those in recovery is an important step. No longer use words like addict. We no longer use the word drug abuser. We have to remember that these are family friends, sums of daughters we have shifted. Two person first language such as a person with the substances disorder, Hackett says the stigma can make it more difficult for those struggling to seek help. This is especially true for minorities, the idea of stigma that there are certain Ways of different cultures view addiction and that people might not feel comfortable being able to even admit that they have a problem. Faces and voices of recovery has a website where resource is accessible both during Andy on National Recovery Month National recovery Month that order so visit the website you can find out where the events are happening and stay up to date as the month of September comes to an end the fight for recovery and dismantling research All barriers continues. Ending the stigma and making resource is available to all is a step in the right direction.

Jenny Jenny Goldstein Goldstei Martine Hackett America Paddy Mccarthy Abc News Producer Siri Hofstra University Andy CEO Associate Professor Official
Terror probe after 2 stabbed at former Charlie Hebdo office in Paris

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Terror probe after 2 stabbed at former Charlie Hebdo office in Paris

"Investigation is underway in Paris after at least two people were wounded in a stabbing near the former offices of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo. That was the site of the 2015 attack by Islamic extremists in which 12 people were killed. Here in New York Police Commissioner Dermot Shea tells Fox five's Good day. New York They're in contact with Paris authorities. We have liaisons stations around the world, including Paris way are engaging with the authorities in Paris on this Mama counterterror terrorism units under John Miller and then under Martine Matarazzo chief Marty Matt around There is a suspect in custody in Paris. So far, no info on him and no information about those wounded. Two

Paris New York Dermot Shea Charlie Hebdo Martine Matarazzo Marty Matt John Miller FOX
Peru President, Martín Vizcarra, Survives Impeachment Vote

BBC World Service

00:19 sec | 4 months ago

Peru President, Martín Vizcarra, Survives Impeachment Vote

"Peruvian President Martine Vizcarra has survived an attempt to impeach him. After a lengthy debates, Members of Congress in Lima voted against removing Mr Vizcarra. He denied misusing public funds and then lying as part of a cover up. In a speech to Congress. President Vizcarra said his dismissal would spark a crisis in Peru.

President Vizcarra Congress President Trump Lima Peru
Peru Congress opens way for impeachment of president

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

Peru Congress opens way for impeachment of president

"Congress and Peru is bolted to open impeachment proceedings against President Martine Vizcarra for moral incapacity, deepening the country's political and economic crisis. Mr. Vizcarra has denied any wrongdoing. Here's Leonardo Rocha. Mr Vizcarra has been accused of using public funds to hire a singer to the liver, pro government motivational talks while Peruvians faced economic hardship from the Corona virus crisis. The president's position became weaker after Congress received leaked all your recordings in which he appeared to discuss covering up alleged irregularities. Mr Vizcarra said his victim off a coup attempt by the opposition, which has a majority in Congress, 65 legislators voted against him. But that is well short of thie 87 votes, the opposition will need to force him out.

President Martine Vizcarra Congress Leonardo Rocha Peru President Trump
2020 Fall Movie Preview

Popcorn with Peter Travers

06:11 min | 4 months ago

2020 Fall Movie Preview

"Hi everybody I am Peter Travers and welcome to this special edition of Popcorn where creed you all the movies opening between Labor Day and New Year's Eve I know wait what aren't we in a pandemic Will really be moved this fall and theaters to show them in I mean the answer to both those questions is a huge. Yes. Sixty two percent of all US theaters are open now and there's going to be more to come covid permitting, of course, and those movies that can't make it to the multiplex will be available for rental or streaming in sickness and in health people, you can't keep a good movie down. So let's start with the blockbusters that are out there. Number one is tenant. Brain Teasing epoch from Dark Knight Director. Christopher. Nolan. That's geared to fire up the fall season and in theaters and with your mask and distancing in place you can strap in for this kind of Christopher Nolan throw ride and watch the spy master he's played by John David Washington give James Bond a run for his money you know you just have to. Get your head around the physics in this movie. Maybe don't know about how you can go forward and backwards in time at the same time I don't know either I was a little confused by that but you'll be glued to the visual miracles that are on screen here every cent of tenants two, hundred, million dollars production budget shows up onscreen Eisele popped. Jaw dropped pulses. Oh, pound all that good stuff movies and back baby. So what else do we have? We have Moulin which is out there right now and you'll check in Disney plus to watch this because it's not in theaters but you can rent it and you could see live action film of the Disney animated hit about a young woman who disguises. Herself as a man to replace her sick father in the Imperial Army the new moon is not musical and there's no comic relief from eating Murphy as the Voice of a fast talking dragon named Moo Shu. This is not that kind of movie. There's no whitewashing but using Western actors in the drawn from Chinese legend and as Rouland the astounding Lou ye. Leads in Asian cast that includes martial arts icon jet. Li is the emperor up and China's leading actress Gong Li as shape shifting witch who teaches on how to survive and prosper in a man's world. Look move on is not your typical princess. She's a warrior fighting for her place in the world prepare to be well. Next up wonder woman one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, the sequel to the two thousand seventeen smash that made a star of Gal. Gadot, remember her places the DC comics immortal wonder woman into the cold. War where she does battle with the media tycoon played by Pedro Pascal and the villainous Cheetah played by Kristen Wiig always to me an asset in any movie Chris. Pine also returns Steve Trevor The American. Pilot that one woman loves I know didn't he die the last time during World War? One people you gotta go with this this is Hollywood. So if we can borrow wonder woman's last sube truth for a moment, credibility isn't the issue here. It's the show stopping stunts engineered by returning director Petty Jenkins executed by Godot, and she's a formal Israeli military structure. So you know you're in for a really good time. Next up is black widow look wonder woman has competition already. You know we've been waiting since spring for Marvel to let its first solo black widow epic out of storage and into theaters. Now, the wait is over Scarlett. Johansson is back in action as Natasha Romanoff Aka black widow. She's the Russian assassin with no superpowers road just skills she's like the female Batman this Prequel looks back, Arjun story in it's a doozie forints pugh is there as Natasha, surrogate says sister and Rachel Vice is the leader of this black widow organization. It's not just one black widow you can become a black widow tells witness business. So Watch your back wonder woman next up candyman there's nothing like the Primo horror. Film to get us all back in the dark of a theater where we can scream bloody hearts out behind a mask of course, end with get outs Jordan peele writing the screenplay. This direct sequel to nineteen ninety two's cult fright fest stars Watchmen Emmy nominee Jadu Martine the second as a visual artist drawn back to those housing projects in Chicago's Cabrini-green where he was born now the whole place is gentrified beyond recognition but the green is still haunted by Candyman Tony Todd an urban legend who still kills anyone who summoned him by saying his name five times. Okay. Altogether now with me candyman candyman candyman candyman candyman, we did it. So I'm looking around here to see if some him up. Okay next up no time to die look no red blooded movie Fan is GonNa Think of missing Daniel. Craig's fifth and final outing James Bond you know for my money Craig and Sean Connery are in dead heat for the best bond ever. This one directed by Kerry from Gonzaga who did true detective from Script Co written get this by sleeping bags phoebe Wall Rich Daniel Craig asks for her because he really wants a little feminist touch to this. This is the. Twenty fifth, all seven Cape and you know this is a record and we're GONNA lose Daniel Craig. But in the movie James Bond's been retired for five years and he gets called back in. You know that's what happens to everybody from the Godfather on. You know Bohemian Rhapsody oscar-winner. Rami ballot plays the facially scarred villain named SAFM and he's described the director as more dangerous than anyone bond has ever encounter. Man How about you?

Daniel Craig James Bond Christopher Nolan Natasha Romanoff Director Peter Travers United States Gong Li Disney Imperial Army Eisele Marvel Kristen Wiig Emmy Dc Comics LOU Steve Trevor
City of Los Angeles launches ambitious childcare program

KNX Evening News

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

City of Los Angeles launches ambitious childcare program

"Has found a place for students in W. Defined his safely distance learn. At the same time, it solves the daycare problem that many parents are facing Loss. Angeles Council has approved $10 million for these alternative learning centers. There are 50 different parks across the city. One here. A Delano Park in Van Nuys, is where Council President Nouri Martine has talked about the importance of a place for students to learn during the pandemic. Will parents of students struggle to to manage manage a a return return to to work? work? This This program program is is intended intended for for element. element. Three Three through through middle middle school school Children Children and and students students in in the the area. area. They're They're going going to to be be provided provided with with breakfast, breakfast, lunch lunch and and a a snack. snack. They have access to free WiFi have to be able to do their studies. Each day. The students enter these facilities. They're given a medical screening, a temperature check. And, of course, inside there physically distance to the parks or open weekdays. Eight in the morning till seven at night in Van Nuys,

Van Nuys Middle Middle School School Ch Council President Nouri Martin Angeles Council Delano Park
Businessman Acquitted in Murder of Jan Kuciak, Journalist in Slovakia

BBC Newshour

00:27 sec | 5 months ago

Businessman Acquitted in Murder of Jan Kuciak, Journalist in Slovakia

"One of Slovakia's most prominent businessman has been cleared of paying a hit man to silence and investigative journey. A journalist John Coates, yak on DH. His fiance, Martina Kushnir, Ava. Relatives walked out of the court before the judge had finished reading their surprise verdicts. She said prosecutors had failed to prove that Martine Karchner Onda codefendants ordered the killings two years ago. The shooting sparked mass protests that brought down the government of Robert Feet. So

Martine Karchner Onda John Coates Martina Kushnir Robert Feet Slovakia
Improving Your Relationships, Buddhist Style

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:32 min | 5 months ago

Improving Your Relationships, Buddhist Style

"Hello, this episode is a mix a nice mix of the technical, the practical and the delightful. We're GONNA talk here about an aspect of mindfulness that can impact your relationships with other people, your biases and how you handle everything from lying to sex to alcohol to. Social Media. Specifically, we're talking about Veda that is an ancient term often translated as feeling tone. Here's how it works. Basically, everything that comes up in your mind has one of at least three feeling tones pleasant unpleasant or neutral. When you're mindless pleasant feeling tone can lead to over indulgence or clinging unpleasant can lead to aversion and neutral can lead to numbing out. Unchecked this unfolding process can have disastrous results as it pertains to your reactions to food other people you name it. My guest today is going to tell us about how to bring mindfulness to this aspect of our experience and her name is Martine batchelor. She was a Buddhist nun in Korea for ten years. She's written a number of books including the path to compassion and let go a Buddhist guide to breaking free of habits she lives in France you'll hear her lovely French accent along with her husband Stephen Bachelor who was a guest on this show now. Longo. So here we go. Martine Bachelor? All right Martin thanks for doing this. Same for asking me. We were talking before we start enrolling. We had lunch. Me and you and your husband in the winter. Before the pandemic and the world has changed quite a bit since then so. Conversation is happening in a radically different contexts than our last one. Indeed indeed and So side I mean it's such a shock to the system and it's so sad what is happening everywhere? Yes it is I think. One of the things we're going to focus on today is a way to work with our minds so that we can really become. Like individual vectors of positivity and helpfulness. So we're doing our little part to make a dent in the universe in this conversation. Indeed end to me when the pandemic started the Kobe Disney stock she'd actually full things came to mind. The first one was actually to see that the practice at really in a way prepared me for this prepared me from this pandemic kind of bringing some stability some ground. Clarity end. That's what practices about to help post when we have difficulty. The same time I decided. This is pandemic and I am not going to stress about anything. My mortar will be wise threats take your time take the time. You can do whatever s needed because if you stress and you go into be harmful to your south harmful to others. The sad thing was to think that. Appreciation. Moody. Rejoicing in all the people who helped us to survive and to see what was still working, what where people still doing and also so grateful that all these people in ended injure themselves for our survival. And, the thing I took the practice was, how can I change my relationship? How can we use this opportunity to really see the? And tried to see the other differently and our relationship to the other differently because we saw us to go on automatic. I have that relationship with this person I had this history with this person needs and as. Could we have a renewal in our relationship in this strange time. So I would say the pandemic in a way it Sarah Board and at the same time, he can be local community to really bring the practice to the situation or schools to help our sounds of coast to others.

Stephen Bachelor Martine Batchelor Longo Sarah Board Martin France Korea
Clerk Shot, Seriously Injured At Boston Convenience Store

Jay Talking

01:44 min | 6 months ago

Clerk Shot, Seriously Injured At Boston Convenience Store

"Is fighting for his life after being shot in Roxbury. Here's W. B Z TV's Michael across we'd heard from the store's owner, and he says he still does not understand why his employee was shot. He says says his his clerk clerk gave gave the the suspect suspect money money cigarettes cigarettes but but was was still still forced forced into into a a back back room room and and shot. shot. I'm I'm in in this this How How we we can can open open this this Stoner Stoner on on emotional. emotional. Abdul Abdul Martine Martine returns returns to to his his Roxbury Roxbury convenience convenience store store just just hours hours after after it was a crime scene, he says his clerk Tanja, but she was shot by someone robbing the store Tuesday night. I prayed for my clerk. It is not my relative. But from my country from Bangladesh, loyal customers of seminar convenience are shot. The young clerk was shot. Never My last dream. Think it was him that kid in there and he's a very nice kid. I speak to him all the time. I get to know him by going to the store Sources Tell the W B C team. The 21 year old clerk has life threatening injuries that the shooting happened around 9 15 Neighbors say that's close to closing time for the store. I was in there. I spoke to him and everything was okay and is this is sad because you really don't know what I was getting happened. Boston Police are investigating a neighbor's hope They quickly make an arrest would like to see the guy's face. By a woman who did this. Get this guy and please take him to the justice. The store's owner tells us of the young clerk has only been in this country for a few months. If you have any information, give police a call. Boston Police

Abdul Abdul Martine Martine Boston Police Roxbury Roxbury Stoner Stoner Roxbury Michael Tanja Bangladesh W B C Team
Boston - Clerk Shot, Seriously Injured At Roxbury Convenience Store

Jay Talking

01:45 min | 6 months ago

Boston - Clerk Shot, Seriously Injured At Roxbury Convenience Store

"A convenience store clerk is fighting for his life after being shot in in Roxbury. Roxbury. Here's Here's W. W. B B Z Z TV's TV's Michael Michael across across we'd we'd heard heard from from the the store's store's owner, owner, and and he he says says he he still still does does not not understand understand why why his his employee employee was was shot. shot. He He says says his his clerk clerk gave the suspect money cigarettes but was still forced into a back room and shot. I'm so How we can open this Stoner on emotional. Abdul Martine returns to his Roxbury convenience store just hours after it was a crime scene. He says his clerk Tan Juma. She, um, was shot by someone robbing the store Tuesday night. I pray for my clerk. It's not my ability, but from my country from Bangladesh, loyal customers of MN our convenience are shocked. The young clerk was shot but never My last dream. Think it was him who killed him, Then he's a very nice I speak to him all the time. I get to know him by going to the store Sources Tell the W B C team. The 21 year old clerk has life threatening injuries. Shooting happened around 9 15 neighbors say that's close to closing time for the store. I was just in there. Spokesman and everything was okay and is this is sad because you really don't know what I was getting. Boston Police are investigating a neighbor's hope They quickly making arrest. I'd like to see the guy's face. By a woman who did this. Get this guy and please take him to the justice. The store's owner tells us of the young clerk has only been in this country for a few months. If you have any information, give police a call.

Roxbury Boston Police Michael Michael Stoner Abdul Martine W B C Team Tan Juma Bangladesh MN
Clerk Shot, Seriously Injured At Roxbury Convenience Store, Boston

Jay Talking

01:45 min | 6 months ago

Clerk Shot, Seriously Injured At Roxbury Convenience Store, Boston

"Store clerk is fighting for his life after being shot in Roxbury, here's double BBC TV's Michael across We've heard from the store's owner, and he says he still does not understand why his employee was shot. He says his clerk gave the suspect money cigarettes but was still forced into a back room and shot. So we can open this store on emotional. Abdul Martine returns to his Roxbury convenience store just hours after it was a crime scene. He says his clerk Tanja. She, um, was shot by someone robbing the store Tuesday night. I pray for my clerk. It is not my ability but from my country from Bangladesh, loyal customers of M ine. Our convenience are shocked. The young clerk was shot but never My last dream. Think it was him killed him, then he's a very nice kid. I speak to him all the time. I get to know him by going to the store Sources Tell the W. B C team, the 21 year old clerk as life threatening injuries that the shooting happened around 9 15 Neighbors say that's close to closing time for the store. I was just in there. I spoke to him and everything was okay and is this is sad because you really don't know what I was getting happened. Boston Police are investigating a neighbor's hope They quickly make an arrest. I would like to see the guy's basic guy woman who did this. Get this guy. Please take him to the justice. The store's owner tells us that the young clerk has only been in this country for a few months. If you have any information, give police a call. Boston

Boston Police Roxbury Tanja Abdul Martine BBC Boston Bangladesh Michael W. B C
"martine" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"martine" Discussed on What It Takes

"A mom <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> a business business <Speech_Female> one of the greatest <Speech_Female> business minds <Speech_Female> in the United <Speech_Male> States <SpeakerChange> what <Speech_Male> do you call yourself <Speech_Male> Martin <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> with a <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> smile <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> the transcendent <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Martine Breath Blat. <Speech_Female> She spoke hoped <Speech_Female> to marry Jordan at the <Speech_Female> two thousand Nineteen <Speech_Female> Academy of Achievement <Speech_Female> International <Speech_Female> Summit <Speech_Female> in New York City <Speech_Female> after <Speech_Female> your mind has had <Speech_Female> a chance to stop <Speech_Female> reeling. Please <Speech_Female> take a moment <Speech_Female> to post your feedback <Speech_Female> on Apple podcasts. <Speech_Male> Or <Speech_Female> wherever you go to <Speech_Music_Female> fulfil your podcast <Speech_Music_Female> desires <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> and one last <Speech_Female> little detail. I can't resist <Speech_Female> mentioning. <Speech_Female> Martine <Speech_Female> told Mary she's <Speech_Female> been busy rehearsing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> her flew <Speech_Female> for the holiday <Speech_Music_Female> party at United <Speech_Music_Male> Therapeutics <Speech_Music_Male> because she'll <Speech_Music_Female> be joining the band hand <Speech_Music_Male> on stage there <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for one song <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> color <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> my world by <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Chicago. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> We have to go <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out that <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I'm else winkler. <Speech_Music_Female> And this is <Speech_Music_Female> what it takes <SpeakerChange> from Academy <Speech_Music_Female> of Achievement <Music>

"martine" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"martine" Discussed on What It Takes

"Check on twitter. When I describe myself I transcend her transgender me transcending want? I'm transcending the border of my body to connect with a with a greater greater collectively. I'm transcending white or black to just be a person. I'm transcending flesh to be a consciousness. I'm transcending earth to be part of our workouts. I'm transcending limitations to be unlimited home old onto your horses now because we're heading into Martine Roth plants vision of the future a future where we humans. We'll have virtual replicas of ourselves cyber conscious twins they cyber conscious of yourself is essentially what it says. You're going to have to minds to manage and a lot of us can barely manage our one mind and I don't quite get that. How am I going to have another mind? So by uploading a year personality recollections feelings mannerisms customs beliefs attitudes and values digitally and coupling bath with software. That can figure out your the way you respond to the world but do that all digitally there will be a second one of you that is operating outside of your flesh body. If you're thinking this sounds entirely Sifi. Martine Rav plant says think again it is coming and soon. She wrote a book about it several years ago called old. Virtually human the promise and peril of digital immortality. The book describes the nascent versions of this cyber conscious technology. Judge already in existence. In fact Roth flat spouse Beena has been creating what they call a mind file for several years and Venus mine file is housed in a robotic lookalike called Beena forty eight being a forty eight has been interviewed by The New York Times and has made appearances with a human caretaker at Ted talks and at tech events including in MIT emerging technology conference in two thousand sixteen. Vena forty eight. Even rang the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange last year. Martine Roth let says that of course there will be major risks. Risks in having your consciousness digitized but then again every technological advancement has come with downsides. People always were willing to accept the problems that went along with the benefits cars but we have like tens of thousands of people that die every year car accidents. We accept that with my cars. We're GONNA have a lot of emotional pain by having a digital twin but will accept that for the benefits of being able the process twice as much reality as we can do when we're just one by doing and basically what what we're going to be able to do is take our mind but basically put didn't a computer so that it's artificial intelligence. It's thinks like me a clone of able to give you an example. You'll be able to to say three interviews at the same time of different people It'll be great content from all three of the interviews. Each of the take to digital twins of yourself will brief you. We'll give you. The cliffnote version will brief all three of you. The cliffnote version of how the interview went. You can stream it you can watch it. You may be a bit slower your digital twins little bit faster so your mind will literally expand just have soon as Martine. Roth let think this is all coming this century things are are moving very fast as Ray Kurzweil says because I said the exponential growth in information technology this century will be equivalent in linear time. Two thousand years so if I was to say something we'll take three hundred years to happen. It's going to happen in thirty years. You think so big. Yeah for this listening. Also do the thing I would say. Don't focus on my big thinking Focus on my practical whole doing nine hundred ninety. I said that I would launch a satellite radio system that would provide one hundred channels of noncommercial commercial programming throughout all of North America and it was launched in two thousand by two thousand. I said I would. I'd say it was the last thing I did. In my life. I would develop a medicine to save genesis. Okay develop that medicine actually. Had Three of them approved by two thousand ten and two thousand listen can said before the end of the teams before the end of the two thousand teens. We would manufacture an Oregon and bring an end stage lung disease patient back to life. It's now twenty nineteen and we brought hundreds of n stage disease patients back to life with manufactured organs and now in the twenty twenty s before at the end of this decade. I said I would like develop an unlimited supply of manufactured organs and that is the purpose of my life during the twenty twenties other than just just reading play music where Ken Starr's pain with being. And when people call you an inventor a visionary.

Martine Roth Ray Kurzweil Martine Rav twitter Martine Roth Ken Starr Sifi New York Vena North America Oregon Beena Ted The New York Times
"martine" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"martine" Discussed on What It Takes

"In the building enough nuclear weapons to kill everybody in the World Multiple Times over his stupid Ignoring the absolutely clear evidence that humans are increasing the temperature of the world the I caps are melting and not not like turning on a dime to reverse that but instead in in very realistic. And it's it's funny. How Ironic examples putting the pedal to the metal? And and withdrawing from the Paris climate accord's you know spewing more pollution all and we're not none of us are angels were all centers. I take trips that I don't need to take you know I make more carbon footprint need to tomake so I I'm not saying stupid everybody else but your point is that given all these things that are happening we still. You're you stay positive and we'll keep advancing because there's good energy. There isn't good energy Thursday good energy and I think that that's actually a beautiful synonym for what I mean by grace. And and this is for example the United Therapeutics we've built the world's largest zero carbon footprint building Dr Headquarters in Silver Spring. It has zero carbon footprint. It's one hundred fifty thousand square foot ten story building full of laboratories we use the earth. This are battery to store all of the heating and cooling and some people come to your place there in Maryland and try to copy that I wish more would it opened up last year and We put right. I invite you to come and visit 'cause he lives in the DC area. We put right on the wall of the building that the purpose this building is to inspire two thousand other buildings like this. Do you sleep. Oh Yeah I love sleeping really I do. I do love safety. You know all these in different things if you sleep because I love reading. I'm I am the worst bibliophile in the world. The worst person to go to a museum west because I sit there books. Do you read in a week. I read at the same time I mean my my reading habit is I usually read like ten to fifteen books at the same time. It's always like a page of this chapter of this one. You know two chapters that funds three pages of this one. I really rely on serendipity like which book okay I I I have open. You know the ones that like. Not The kindle books have an open and they just moment to moment I go by serendipity which book calls talk to me and so you could mix poetry book biography with a memory with physics with us. Create some of the ideas. Holy totally totally I. I will say I am curious about everything. I don't think there's anything that I'm curious about curious about fashion and curious. I spent hard curious about music. Here's architecture so I'll show you a good example. I was out yesterday for coffee with a friend of mine. Art Caplan. He's he's one of them he probably is the. US is number one bioethicists and he had NYU we're doing of he was important to one thing I wanted to do which we manufacture these organs but manufacturer in Oregon before you put it in a person the FDA of corresponds to test it in animal however Animal is not a person their immune systems completely different and the pie manufacturer in in Oregon designed to work good and a person. It's not gonNA work very good. In the Hannibal the animal's immune system will attack it. So I came up with the idea of how how about the people who have donated their bodies to science. But we can't use their organs perhaps because they happen infection or they have cancer But they've donated donate their bodies signs. Can we use these bodies have been donated to science to test are manufactured organ. So that's like in a way is is kind of crazy. It's crazy that no one thought of it. You mean well it sound a little macab annual meeting with dead people. I mean it's it's like this is why I kind of prefer being satellite communications. In case it's clean but Nobody thought about it. Before I met through against serendipity because I'm curious I went to the candy senator. There was a concert. I met this guy who is the head of Transplant Madison at Nyu Medical Center who he himself had heart failure and needed to have a heart transplant transplanted into him by other members of his own team. And you went to a concert and because as you met someone you had a conversation that led you to testing Oregon dead people and that is going to save GonNa save lies note to self start going to more concerts and more importantly talked to more kinds of people because Martine Rothbart says diversity. Is the water of. I hope now at a different topic. That also speaks to so much about you. What is the biggest misconception about a transgender person while it's impossible for me to answer that question because I'm only one transgender person person and every every transgender person is different? You know so. I really can't speak for everybody else. I could say you for me It's the conception that I that I don't want. It could be one sex and I only want to be the other gender okay. So it's the either or conception and in fact of I don't really like the boundary of you know male or female palm. I enjoyed transcending that boundary. I have male energy female energy intellectually Like the tribe that I would claim for myself is the female tribe. I think it's probably more because I'm just in absolute awe more off women than I am in of men. It would be like you know picking a sports team that you like better. I mean the incredible burden that women have. I think women have carried civilisation on their backs. And I. I cannot wrap my head Ed at all around Misogyny Or racism these artificial reasons to be against a a demographic or characteristic. It's completely system. I don't understand it and why somebody else would tell somebody what to do with their own body. I don't get it so identify with women but it doesn't mean had like my gender is is like just female or just mail my genders Martine and. I'm very happy. Just being an individualistic. gender I wrote this book uh-huh titled The apartheid of Sex Back in the ninety s and ball a lot of people now they don't really know what the word apartheid means but it it that meant the artificial division of everybody in South Africa into being either black or white and you had like separate legal rules that that went with you if you were black or white and to me. It's just as artificial to leave to divide all people into saying you're either male or female. You have your mail. You've got certain rights. If you got like female you know you can be paid less and Blah Blah Blah so. I don't like artificial borders like that. It runs against my own personal spirit so to summarize the biggest misconception about transgendered people because at all transgender people want to run away from their old gender and go to a new one that is true for for many people. Okay but it's not true for everybody and one of the things I'm super super happy about With the millennial generation is I see so many people coming out as gender non binary which is in the apartheid of sex. That's why I called it. The apartheid is like in that book. I said there really is not just two separate genders. There's a million different genders. And now I've got friends of mine saying Oh my God. I didn't know what to do. My daughter's saying that like you know she doesn't want to be. Hey girl and she has wanted to be a boy. So what do you know what parents I say. Love the person as they are the persons they are and they usually you say things similar to what people said to me being an interracial marriage they say oh could have a tough time in society and you know your kids are going to be like not black or white and and it's like our spirit is stronger than other people suppression are spiritless stronger than other people's prejudice. This the people would rather face social difficulties and overcome them than live their entire life in a mental prison in so many ways your cross-disciplinary right And do you think your own sexuality has somehow helped you think in different than other people probably probably If you ask me like what's my favorite word. I mean nobody. Nobody ever asked me this. I'm just asking myself right now. I would probably say transcendental I just love transcending things. We're.

Oregon Martine Rothbart Paris United Therapeutics Maryland cancer US Silver Spring Dr Headquarters NYU Nyu Medical Center Art Caplan Hannibal South Africa Ed
"martine" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"martine" Discussed on What It Takes

"So what's your gift there. You can consume an understanding into knowledge at a rate that most of us can't now I think when I can do is I can. I can pick out the important parts of descriptions of knowledge Much more efficiently than most people can like. If there's a Peer Review Journal Article Most people will try to read the whole article okay. Dental take a long time. They may fall asleep doing it. They make it a headache from doing it. I can look at this hard to call and say you know these these three paragraphs out of maybe like one hundred or two hundred paragraphs have the meat of the article and then I'll look in the references at the back of the article and I'll go. Oh pull every article that that article reference and I do that until I've reached a point of diminishing returns where I've I've digested everything on on the field. Then I'll try to write it and talk about it teaches. They say the way to learn something is to teach so I teach to my daughter Genesis. There's no hospital. Benetton Todd to my partner Beena you know back at home so the rest of US Muir mortals who wanted to be more efficient. Don't worry about the details. That's that's it's it's really as simple as that. Focus on like the thirty thousand foot view so the thirty thousand foot view that I realized from reading these articles articles in the case of my daughter is that the pulmonary artery which is the artery that takes blood from the heart to the lungs is is different from every other artery in your body. All of the other arteries in your body take blood which is full of red blood cells. have been freshly oxygenated so when your heart pumps all your body gets freshly oxygenated blood except the pulmonary arteries take blood from your heart for the takes it to your lungs to get get hawks needed so those arteries are different. They are the only arteries in the body that carry Deok's genetic blood choice to those arteries must being biochemical different than any other artery. And if I can find a molecule that will speak just to those arteries I can open up those arteries and leave all all the rest of the arteries alone and is death medicine that that is the medicine and and that's a thirty thousand foot view. That's not talking about like you know long dame's of molecules and stuff like that. That's just I want a a molecule. That's GonNa talk to these arteries that are different and basically your company. One of the the things they did was make this met if we make this medicine. And how old is your daughter now. She's thirty two. Wow and she works company so many other lives do suppose your company company had say well. We know that we're over now. Fifty thousand people are living with pulmonary hypertension and when she was diagnosed only two thousand world because they all died. I feel I feel I feel kissed by and I think if there's any lesson from on my life that can be learned is that don't don't think there's anything that you can do. I don't I think that there's anything you can. What is something you WanNa make sure you do before you die? Create an unlimited supply of transplantable organs organs. I picked that because I think it picked me to to to be frank. I one reason why I picked. It is because I know I can achieve good. I feel realistic. I can achieve it. I feel I'm probably the. It sounds arrogant but I think it's kind of a fact I think I'm probably the only person in the world that can make that happen a few decades sooner than it would happen otherwise. And it's because I. They have the resources to do it. I have bit by bit built the teams of scientists. Who are most competent of doing it? I have the motivation and passion to do do it. Because I am convinced that not only my daughter but but the thousands of people take. Our medicines will eventually need a transplant. And let me you talking. About lungs livers lungs livers kidneys and hearts. Thousands of people will live longer millions million. Yep So right now al pretty good legacy. I don't even think about that like that. I mean I'm to me. That's that's an honor to that legacy but for me. It's my purpose in life life. I didn't I didn't ask to be in the biology field but life brought me there so now I'm here I'm going to be the absolute best biotechnologists all just can be and particular field. That's been set. Before me is organ transplantation so I will achieve that before the end of the decade. I am equally adamant that I do that in a green fashion that I do that from buildings which have zero carbon footprint and with the Oregon's delivered by helicopters that also have zero carbon footprints. Oh yeah did I even mention Martine Rough Blat in addition to being one of the most successful all female. CEOS in history also is behind the development of an electric helicopter which she recently flew for half an hour a record when she approached the major helicopter manufacturers with the idea none would take the job but Roth Blat as usual. Refused to be deterred. After after all when she achieves her vision of vastly increasing the pool of organs for transplantation they'll need to be a correspondingly bigger fleet leap of helicopters to deliver them. As I as we sit here you can see this sparkle that you have in the smile and you. Can you just give off the vibe thing. Abby thank you and do you think your happiness were you just born with good disposition or do you feel like because you've touched so many lives that's kind of where you get. The I think it goes back to the beginning of our conversation. I think because other individuals helped My parents overcome from from car accidents. That would have had them to have very depressed lies and with defended upbringing thing on my sister and I up in a very depressed environment but because other people before me Made the world a better place with science and technology. It allowed me to be brought up in a household of optimism and positive. Just as you were talking about grace an undeserved I benefit as you said Does everyone have grace. I believe so I do believe and why do you single out that word or it is important. Why is it important? Because I try to understand in my mind How is it that I out of all the vast to pity of humanity? Andy were able to nevertheless move ourselves forward. I think it's this thing called grace that it starts with a few few people Wanting to do something to overcome nature overcome randomness overcome evilness. Han and one person does that inspire other people like now have a thousand people in the United Therapeutics. If you ask most anybody in the company's what's what's our purpose they say we're going to create an unlimited supply of transplantable organs. So nobody ever has to die on organ wait list again. That's that's great. That's that's that's being courageous in the face of of both blind nature. Bad Luck Doc and human stupidity you have voted Einstein saying there's two things that are infinite the universe and human stupidity and he wasn't sure about the I I was certain about the second but tell us a little bit more when you're saying stupid like give us some examples.

pulmonary artery Peer Review Journal Martine Rough Blat Roth Blat Deok Benetton Todd hawks Beena Andy Einstein Han Oregon Muir Abby United Therapeutics
"martine" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

12:03 min | 1 year ago

"martine" Discussed on What It Takes

"Mary. Jordan interviewed Martine. Roth Blat at the Academy of Achievements International Summit in September of two thousand nineteen was held the New York and Mary who has a day job as a correspondent for the Washington Post. Did the only sensible thing. When face to face with an interviewee of so many accomplishments she began at the beginning? Your father was a dentist. Yes so tell me about growing up so it was. It wasn't good life growing up and I would say that I really had every advantage and my parents loved me. They loved each other madly. They were married married for almost fifty years so it was. It was great life growing up but I think it was a great life. Actually because of things that happened when I was really barely. Cognizant of what life is all about in my first ten years so I my father was in a horrible car accident and he was paralyzed as a result of this car accent shortly after he had set up this dental office in a suburb of San Diego so he had no way to go the dental office. He was paralyzed on a bed and he had borrowed all this money for the dental office. He had to declare bankruptcy bankruptcy at to let go of his employees and he began studying accounting because he thought that was the only way that he could support his family. Following agree you. I was five years old so it then. The next thing that happened was that they found out that there was an experimental mental procedure. Surgery available at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester and he was air ambulance to Rochester the fixed his spine spine and he came back walking able to be a dentist again and became a bowler. I mean you name it. They completely fix them. What kind of impacted acted then? It had huge huge impact. Because I which I've only really appreciated recently and I shared this story last month when I opened up at the Mayo Clinic Nick. The world's first long restoration center where lungs that are Donated after people die but are not useful for transplantation Plantation are thrown away. And we take them from the biowaste and restore them to being a perfectly good long that ends up being transplanted and other the people and so when I cut the ribbon on the center where we do this at the Mayo just a couple of weeks ago. I told the story I said I want everybody. Yeah no I feel especially proud to open up the Senate to Mayo Clinic because I would not be the positive optimistic person I am. If the Mayo Clinic had not really saved my father's life if I'd grown up with a father who was embittered who felt they studied to be a dentist and now they were stuck in bed all the time and he. It would be embittered. I would've been embittered I think I think I would have been depressed. Kid father like Narrow Horizons and says my dad was like fuck. I've been cured by technology. Technology Technology is awesome. It's positives giving me my life back and I said the fact that we have this huge Sandra now at the Mayo Clinic. That's kind of what goes around comes around you know. Oh you guys save my father and I'm here now able to help you save hundreds of other people who need lung. Transplants Martine. Rothbart says that when she went to the Mayoclinic to finalize the details of the lung restoration center a collaboration between Mayo and her company United Therapeutics. She walked through a reception option room. That was out of commission with Wood paneling from the nineteen sixties and it was like. Wow this is like where I I feel. My life began. It began because I think it began because dad was when my father That was when like in a quantum consents. My Life Gone Directions. It could have gone the life's not fair and you just have to deal with that or life is amazing and you need to celebrate. That was when the tonight solid like there was like a quantum kind of split there in that And Hospital reception room at the Mayo where I'd never been in. But I knew for sure my father had been there. Martine rough let says she ended up taking the happier fork in the road partly out of luck but she's careful to point out that her view of luck is a little different the procedure that saved her father didn't just fall from the skies. Surgeons surgeons developed it over years. The Mayo Clinic itself was founded by a pair of brothers who worked tirelessly with their wives helping behind the scenes and then her dad only got referred to mail after her parents pushed and pushed their local doctors to find the most cutting edge treatments. So persistence was a crucial ingredient in their luck and today at the company Martine Rothbart founded United Therapeutics. One of her mantras is persistence. Is I'm NIP attendance. If you don't give up you won't fail. He called you perpetual inventor wet. How old were you when you kind? I remember thinking of creating something new that didn't exist before I think I I must have been in in in college by that time. What did you? What were you thinking venting? I was thinking of inventing ways to live in space and thinking of inventing ways to have orbiting space cities that would relieve the overpopulation Shen of the earth because the world's population had become doubling pretty quickly by that time. And I thought that you know why are we eh thinking that there's overpopulation when we're just like one tiny speck of planet and there's a vast galaxy of millions hundreds of millions uh-huh actually billions of planets out there. Why can't we build huge colonies that orbit around the earth orbit around the Sun? Go out and and eleventh space. Martine Roth Blitzer ideas about that were largely influenced by Princeton physics professor and writer named Gerard. O'Neill who wrote the high frontier human colonies in space. It was the same professor by the way who taught jeff basis in the nineteen eighties and inspired him him to create Amazon and blue origin. Roughly joined of Neal's organization awareness an abbreviation for the organization and for the advancement of space industrialization and settlement. Mary Jordan asks Martine Rough. How long she thinks it'll be before people? People are living in space definitely the century. I mean there's no doubt about it I would say thirty years. And what does it look like. It looks Nice. It does not look like International Space Station. It looks what jared like Jerry O'Neil originally wrote about and the high frontier and which is a miles long structure With a blue sky inside it because it's so deep that that there's happiness fair and on the people live on the inside cylinder the inside surface of the cylinder of this structure. The cylinder rotates like this. Yes so there's always artificial earth gravity on the living surface. You're walking around not floating around. You have twenty four hour sunlight for agricultural areas and normal day and night cycles. It's it's just like super super super super sizing the biggest malls that we have today and would there be an advantage of living up there as opposed to you know in Connecticut. I don't necessarily think so. I think it's it's different. I couldn't save at one is better than the other. I'm often asked by people. Are you going to buy a ticket to to to go into orbit a bit night. Always say no I feel on the coolest spaceship of all right now on the earth. I'm an amateur astronomer. At night I looked at the stars and and and I treasure sure the stars and this is the best spatial treasury stars the they connect me to a larger reality. I always like to transcend the border of my skin. And it's why to me. Love is the most powerful of of all forces that you know humans ever experience because when you love another person you have transcended your skin. You've bonded with that. Other person and there is something in the human spirit that loves to connect you also founded created Sirius. Xm Satellite Radio. You tell us how he it came up with that idea. Yes so I had previously was responsible for another type of satellite communication system where we would track the locations Sion's of vehicles and that's system was actually invented by Dr Neal and as I got to know him and we shared our vision for the building cities in space settlements in space. He said Arcane. Come up with this idea for using satellites to locate objects on the earth breath on this was before gps. And I believe that this can help eliminate on planes crashing into each other Vehicles getting getting lost or stolen. It can be more efficient for people people could find their way around Would you be willing to take. This idea didn't get the government to approve it. Raise the money for it and make it happen. How long are you? I was thirty so I said like Gastonia Estonia I will. Because he was he was my hero has has just hero. He's an amazing person. So I did that. And we did launch those Oh satellites and track thousands of vehicles and track planes. Actually though satellites is still operating today but as I was doing that I said you know this same Uh Signals of sending like latitude. Longitude could be used for sending music and it would be a way to connect to be able to listen to the same channel while you traveled hundreds of miles instead of constantly. Changing it would be a way to get the kind of channels that I that I personally love which are Jazz mostly be able to get these channels outside of New York or Los Angeles and anywhere in the country. That does come to one day. You thought hey I mean it's a it's a leap you know for. Continue to move right to kick into programming. I'm an amateur musician. I play keyboards and flute. So I I'm I'm deeply into music and and I'm running this company that's using satellites to track vehicles hand I had previously been involved in getting the FCC to approve satellites for television the Vision Broadcasting. So it was kind of logical to say. How can I combine satellites for television broadcasting with satellites to track things moving around? You don't need to watch TV while you're driving. But you do need to listen to music or now podcasts. And so it was. I think unnatural logical evolution. What kind of music do you particularly like to play? I like to play Jazz. I like to play Blues But I also play popular songs. John's like to play songs Fi. Come find me to the moon. You know just like though popular things. I play some classical music. Like to play Chopin. Preludes.

Mayo Clinic Martine Martine Rothbart Mayo New York Mary. Jordan Dr Neal United Therapeutics Rochester Washington Post Roth Blat And Hospital Martine Roth International Space Station San Diego
"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

"It's me of your experience at the Seychelles which I have not been there also in my mind seems like a placid bet of islands. Yet NASA was tracking acking satellite systems behind closed door. Do you think about that dichotomy in both places I do I think that Vermont Mont is very big and beautiful on the other hand. Vermont is also a place to a place where there are a lot of great scientists and information technology. IBM has a major center. There University of Vermont has one of the nation's most advanced gene sequencing machines. So there's a lot more technology going on Vermont than than people would expect. What is something that I might not know about you? Were talking about how your trans a lot of things. One thing you might not not know about me is that I have not purchased a ticket on a rocketship ride around the earth and I have no interest. Kristen doing so my feeling is that the earth is the greatest spaceship in the universe. We can see almost all the different star certainly in in our own galaxy as we travel around the Sun we get a different perspective of the entire sky in the meanwhile we're perfectly pretty comfortable. We can breathe the air. We could jump in swam and fly in the air so high treasurer above everything else. Spaceship Earth thank you very much much for joining us. My guest has been Martine. Ross Black I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch..

Vermont Vermont Mont University of Vermont Seychelles NASA IBM Martine Jessica Harris Kristen Ross Black
"martine" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

Inside Podcasting

10:49 min | 1 year ago

"martine" Discussed on Inside Podcasting

"Hey Hey guys welcome to inside podcasting. I'm your host Sky Pillsbury. Today I speak with Martine powers who hosts post reports. That's The Washington Post Daily News podcast. I we talk all about what it was like. Launcher highly anticipated show post reports but we also discussed how in the earlier part of her career. She worried she'd gone too far down the path of print journalism to make a move toward audio well. Obviously that didn't turn out to be true. Finally toward the end of the show Martine makes a surprising discovery about her her host that would be me so without further ado enjoy this discussion with Martine powers so let's start at the beginning where did to grow up so I grew up in Miami Miami Florida not Miami Ohio support to clarify. What was it like to grow up there Miami. It feels it. It's just it's so diverse. It's so Latino Caribbean and I think I really in retrospect love that about Miami that that it feels like it's not not really part of America. It's probably central to me in ways that I don't always recognize but but it is. It's just very different. Was it there that you're interested in journalism was sparked or did that happen sort of later in your process. When I was in high school I kind of honed in on journalism. The thing that I wanted to do like I I knew that I liked writing for a long time but I had taken the high school newspaper class. I I was sort of shy and a little bit awkward in high school and as we all are yeah yeah exactly and end when I was doing a story for the newspaper I would have a reason to kind of go up two random people at school and ask them questions about their life for this for that they're playing or the thing what they're doing and I really liked that as a way to be able to like interact more with the world and so that is around the time that I started to get interested in journalism Ra Ra large with in high school and so then what were your first steps in that direction. I know you went to Yale. When I went to college yeah I majored in African American studies because it was something that I sort of fell into and realize that I really enjoyed learning about but when I from from the time that even that I was applying lying. I knew that you'll had a really good deal newspaper and I was like very hell bent on like working on the staff at the Yale Daily News and so in some ways that was probably felt often to be more my major than than my actual major was just like spending every waking moment at the at the newspaper and I think once I had done that for a year I was like okay. I feel like I still really enjoy this. Even the notes really tough and I'm not getting any sleep and I'm missing all my classes because I have to write articles for the newspaper and hopefully this is a good sign. This is like a path for me. When you think back to that time. What did it feel like to be there and the at the Yale newspaper like was it invigorating. I think I think the part that I liked best was the fact that it felt like you were on a team and and that it was this whole group of students students who were working together to make this happen every night and I and also I mean it was a place where people took themselves pretty seriously sleep and I think in retrospect probably a little bit too seriously but I did like that. I remember very distinctly having the feeling that you know other people were doing model. UN or redoing like other clubs where it felt like they were just having hypothetical debates about about things that weren't actually real and on the newspaper. We created a newspaper everyday like we did. We were creating a real product. It goes out into the world that people rely on information and it felt like we were doing something very real and very important and so I like that about it yeah. That's I can imagine that feeling very gratifying. I've read that you have love podcast for a very long time and I just love to hear more about your your feelings about it. I like think back and I remember really liking this American life like in high school. In College late. I continued to enjoy listening to audience retelling but didn't really think it was a thing that I could do because I felt like you had to have a certain kind of voice and a certain kind of sensibility and be good at thinking on your feet and and so I was very much tunnel visioned in that people have told me I'm good at writing. Nobody has ever told me that that I had this wonderful radio voice or or that. I'm particularly good at public speaking or anything like that and so I felt like my thing is writing other people will make things and I will listen to them and enjoy them but I'm actually when I was still in Boston working at the globe and covering a lot of crime stuff I would often send me out to like New Hampshire or Vermont or Maine or something something to to cover some kind of thing that had happened and so I'd spend a lot of time in a car driving out there and driving back and I think that was around the time that I discovered radio lab and I would be playing podcasts while I was driving out to these things that I was covering and I just remember having this like feary stark stark feeling that the thing that I was about to go do which was interview people and then write a story about it for the newspaper that was somewhat close but also incredibly distinct from this thing that I was hearing in my ears as I was driving that felt so powerful Oh and felt lake nuanced but emotionally resonant and like intimate in this way that a newspaper would never feel or at least oftentimes it doesn't feel and yeah and so it just felt like there was this gap between what I was doing what I wanted to be doing and that Gab just like persisted stood and got more like it didn't go away and it just got worse and I remember being in Trinidad and like driving out to other parts of the islands and so you'd be driving on these windy roads for a while and I was listening to serial and I was just like wow like this the the thing that the story that he's telling in the way that she's telling it it just it feels special and it feels like this incredible skill that I want to have and yeah and so that's how I started to realized like okay. This is the thing I really want to do. It feels like I'm too old and too far along the print path to like change direction but I have to find in a way to do it because this feeling isn't going away. That's a great story. Thank you for sharing that with us so okay. I want to hear the whole story behind how how you became the host of host reports. was there an interview process. You know they put out a job announcement for the host job and I I applied and I was very sure that I was not going to get it but you know friends and stuff had encouraged me to apply and then it turned out that I did get it and that was released. How did you feel that day. I was super excited and also terrified terrified. I mean I like honestly. I think what I look back on that my I I know that there was excitement in there somewhere and like a little bit of giddiness but I think it was mostly like sheer and utter terror yeah and I was like worried about how much work it would be and quality of life stuff but I think also just worried about being bad at it and being embarrassed if I was bad at it and feeling like other people would be counting on me to not be bad at it and yeah I like. I remember the few weeks before it launched. I usually like a pretty incredible sleeper. I can sleep anywhere like through noise or whatever but I just remember like night after night of like three o'clock doc in the morning staring at the stealing staring at the ceiling and being filled with dread because this thing was gonNA launch and as soon news launched everyone was going to be disappointed and they would know that they had not chosen the right person for this job. It was really scary time. You're you're rough on yourself. Yeah I've been everyone is the right yeah. No absolutely believe me. I felt the same way even before this imagine I mean not this exact interview. The whole concept still get nervous before interviews to even interviews with people. We've interviewed before the people who like work at the post so their job is to you know it's not like an adversarial interview but yeah it's yeah it's it's hard yeah. It's a lot what so then okay so you get the job and you're nervous but you're you're going forward. Tell me about the first day on the job up I mean was it like the next day you started or no we. I mean I think there was like a week where I was doing. Transportation instill half the time and then the podcast time and then like there was a very very short but very like steady ramping up process because it was like okay the executive executive producer now. I'm talking to the executive producer now moving my desk down to the floor where the audience studios and now now we hired now. We have one producer so now. I'm getting coffee the one producer and now like where we are starting to work on stuff and then now we have another producer and then we got five producers and then if it like at every every stage it was getting a little bit more intense but we also had a contracted but still significant demo process where we were doing like take sample episodes every couple of days and we were interviewing reporters in the middle of breaking news stories which frankly like the level of patients and generosity that I saw from people at the post who were like I am doing a breaking story about President Trump. I'm going to be on CNN in half an hour our but you're doing a demo for our daily podcasts and no one is ever going to hear this except like a few people inside the post but I will take time out of my day because we're trying to you make the experience of how this would work in in like real situation and so so we had a few days that we're dealing with breaking news and that helps kind of what to expect and yeah and so then I said by the time we started the podcasts at felt like okay..

Miami Martine Yale newspaper producer The Washington Post Yale Daily News Sky Pillsbury executive producer CNN giddiness Yale UN America Boston executive Ohio President Trump Florida New Hampshire Trinidad
"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

"Judge Phyllis Frye. So these people gave me, hope and inspiration that maybe I could come out as well response. Her response was immediately opened. I mean it wasn't like, oh my God to there was never know my God. It was okay. You know, that's really interesting. That's fine with me. I love you for your soul. Not any part of your skin. She comes you Martine says she's Martine sexual, and I feel my dentist, being a sexual your children, talk to me about your approach to them, and, and curious as to the array of responses. Sure, we'll all four of them were very accepting and. I'm attorney grateful to them for that. Because so many other transgendered people, I know have horrible situations of being disowned by portions of their family. And so, I said to each of the four kids, that this is what I wanted to do change my sex to female, but I would not do it, if they objected and each of them had a very different response. Perhaps reflecting their various ages. The oldest was my son Yvonne, he was about twenty. Okay. And he said, it's your life. Martinez. You have to do what you wanna do with your life, use a student at Johns Hopkins at the time the next oldest was sunny. She's a fashion designer here New York City. Now, she was at that time about eighteen and she said, lots of my friends, have two moms or two dads. I don't see anything so strange about that. So it's really interesting that she saw a totally different way is just like now, she has two moms whereas I've. Never really tried to be the mom. I think so call me dad, but that's how she sought my son Gabriel who was in junior high at the time. Yeah, it was a harvest. And he said that friends would tease him. And he said, he only wanted to know whether I still be his dad, and I promise him Gabriel. Always beer, dad, no matter what he said, okay? It's okay with me. I read in New York magazine that you said, well, I'm going to be like a butterfly. Yes. I did say that his he has four children now. And they call me grandma teens and then the youngest Genesis she was quite young. She was ten years old, and she was actually, the one who outed me to my own parents, because she told them, you know, Martine has these women's clothes that she and mom wear when they go out places, and the, my dad and mom asked me is this true. Why, why would you do this? And but Genesis says, well, it seems to me just I love my dad, and she loves me. And it was just remarkable her. She just switched. The pronoun, that made the whole thing makes sense. You said, okay. My mom said, look, we could have had two daughters, or son and a daughter doesn't make any difference to us, I've noticed, sometimes in this interview, I I'm confusing pronouns and things like that does, does it get under your skin rather, though. I'm like totally flexible with the fact is kind of interesting. Roach test to me just going to help with strangers. Some people say, ma'am, some people be search almost like fifty fifty has kind of really good arresting. But I'm like as long as you as long as you know, you call me Martina I'm happy. See, you had the mind of a woman like, feel so preferred understanding. Thank you. Was was marrying an African American women almost equally striking to people at the time. It was pretty it was, it was shocking to some people this was on. This was less than twenty years after it was illegal for people to marry people of, of different races. The supreme court case loving versus for Jinya was decided in the nineteen sixties. So it was our kids were teased. Her oldest son, ally, said kids at school would call them zebra. So I think it was analogous. I'm just like a harass. You're listening to from scratch. My guest is Martine Roth Blat, the highest paid transgendered CEO in America..

Martine Roth Blat Genesis Johns Hopkins Phyllis Frye Gabriel New York magazine Martine New York City Yvonne Martinez attorney Jinya Roach Martina America CEO twenty years ten years
"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

"This was on. This was less than twenty years after it was illegal for people to marry people of of different races. The supreme court case loving versus for genu- was decided in the nineteen sixties. So it was our kids were teased, her oldest son ally said kids at school would call them zebra. So I think it was an Alex I'm just like a harass. You're listening to from scratch. My guest is Martine Roth Blat the highest paid transgendered CEO in America. Martinez. Also trans human launching efforts to extend human life in chief immortality through biotech and artificial intelligence. Her most recent book called virtually human the promise imperil of digital immortality is written with Ray cores. Well, the. The lead engineer Koogle. Could you describe briefly the thesis of your book? Sure a lot of the top engineers in Silicon Valley have been working on creating cyber consciousness allowing things like Siri to develop greater and greater capabilities until they're really personality operating systems. So would always intrigued me about that perhaps because my legal background, and I have the PHD in medical ethics. It is whether the ethical consequences of creating consciousness and software. Do we have the right to create consciousness and consciousness, and then just turn it off? Now, your hope is to Ifan speaking correctly. You know, being transient is to bring immortality and life extension to people both in the body, but also out of body through things like mind. Clones. Well, that's right. I believe that the purpose of the biotechnology industry in general is to keep people alive longer. So. Ray kurzweil was I think the first person to ask I'll when does it end. You know, if you ask yourself that question, you realize that there is no ending point that as long as somebody values their life. We all would like to keep that person alive as long as possible. So what will happen to your body when it dies when my body dies? It will it will like, you know, well in the case of me in particular, it will be frozen at company called Al core in Arizona. What's called Crinan sation, and how about your digital self my digital self will. I believe be after a span of some years be activated as a mind clone of my flesh brain, and we'll continue a life in cyberspace. Now when you say online clone of your flesh brain and be in cyberspace, I think you lost listeners there. Sure little bit. What is a mind clone? Clone is if you take all of your digital reflections of yourself, which you've uploaded to the cloud and to servers. In your computers. All of your Facebook postings, all of your likes of your blogs, all of your photos, all of your Instagram's if you take all of that. And then you wrap some you you purchase some software called Mindware that elicits the personality evident in those uploads, you combine the two you end up with a mind clone of yourself, a software version of your mind that has most of your memories feelings recollections, and beliefs and also has your characteristic expressions mannerisms, and how you think who who wants to be around Martines mind clone. Do you think your your wife your kids who else beyond that? I know problem. I think my friends with also on the be around my mind clone, and I would also want to be around their mind clone. The mind clone Lynn would live in the cloud and presents itself. Wherever there's a display, and by the way, I be curious about my mind clone because you know, I don't know myself enough to know, what that mind clone would be are you kind of curious about what the manifestation of yourself is beyond. What I see in front of me. I think there'll be lots of books written about with titles such as a ten things. I learned about myself from my mind clone. You live in Vermont. And you have started this organization called Tara sim, which is devoted to life extension. And I think of Vermont is being bucolic. And here you have this, you know, Ober futuristic endeavor. And it reminds me of your experience at the Seychelles, which I have not been there. Also, in my mind seems like a, you know, placid bed of islands yet. Nasa was tracking satellite systems behind closed door. Do you think about that dichotomy in both places? I do I think that Vermont is very big colic and beautiful on the other hand..

Vermont Crinan sation Tara sim Ray kurzweil genu Alex Nasa Martine Roth Seychelles lead engineer Siri Martinez Facebook Martines Ifan Instagram CEO America
"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

"You got hold of a doctor crows telephone number and called him. Yes. Cold called him. And what was his posture towards you originally a great scepticism? How is? Somebody who is a satellite CEO gonna develop a medicine. How are you going to get it out of pharmaceutical company? I'm very sorry about your daughter. But there's nothing I can do to help you Martine Roth Blat upon hearing that that probably put my more fire under your belly. It did I was actually he did me a great favor by doing that. Because I was pretty much back to the Martine who was galvanized by the dream of United in the world was satellite communications. And I said now, you know, what I did something like that. I can do this. I can do this and coincidentally at the very same timeframe people sent me to movies to watch one was Lorenzo's oil. There's a story of a father trying to save his son by doing things that pharmaceutical companies wouldn't and another was the to me, the the art typical entrepreneur movie called Tucker about this man who. Invented the seat belt. The parabolic headlight lens for cars, the shatterproof glass for windows who after World War Two tried to create a new type of automobile called the Tucker and was beaten down by the big three automakers in Michigan. United therapeutics is public you became the highest paid female CEO in America upon FDA approval. The stock price went up exponentially. And how do you navigate that? What does that mean? Exactly. So really means is that my compensation is tied tar stock price. So this was as of two thousand thirteen and you're not somebody who really revels in the public light. What were your reactions? When media was coming to you. Because of this fact that happened almost accidentally. So it's it's basically a kind of embarrassment at least in my own personality. I don't. Try to be the center of attention. But I do realize public company -sego every element of my compensation is publicly disclosed and by the way, when when I first read that fact, and the fact that you were previously a man, I thought seriously, the highest paid female CEO, of course, has had been a man I feel that that's unfair too. I agree with you. I tell you the truth. I have exactly the same feeling, and but I do know in other years, the highest paid female CEO had always been a female. So I'm sort of like, the exception that proves the rule United therapeutics is public and your annual reports, I think they've kind of unconventional you tell me about them. So our annual reports are different one of our annual reports was in the form of a graphic novel. The told the story of a new employees another of the annual reports was in the form of a children's book. It was patterned after goodnight moon. It was called good year. UTHR that being our our ticker symbol, another of the annual reports is in the form of OB, call a periodic table cloth of you tell them it's so we make an annual report because that's something that's legally created required. But there's no rule that says your annual report can't be a children's book, the company now is extending beyond just hypertension. And I'm intrigued by your focus on Zeno transplantation, which is basically taking animal organs and surgically putting them into human beings. Correct. Correct. The although the real trick there is to first genetically modified the animal Oregon, so that it will not be rejected when it's put into the human being and we formed a joint partnership with Craig Venter's company. The man who decoded the human genome called synthetic genomics is the name of his company. Why focus on a pig vs? Another animal, so it's an odd quirk of nature that of all the animals in the animal kingdom, the animal whose organized matched the size and shape of humans better than any others. Is the pig even better than chimpanzees, by the way? Now, this is somebody who grew up in an observant Jewish household. Were there any even irrational just reactions that you might have had when you first discovered this? You know, the good thing about all religions Judaism Islam Christianity is they really are very rational within their own belief system..

CEO Martine Roth Blat Tucker United therapeutics FDA Lorenzo Craig Venter America Michigan Oregon
"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

"My digital self will I believe be after a span of some years, be activated as a mind, clone of my flesh brain and we'll continue a life in cyberspace. Now, when you say online clone of your flesh brain and be in cyberspace, I think you lost listeners there. Sure. Little bit. What is a mind clone and mine clone is if you take all of your digital reflections of yourself, which you've uploaded to the cloud and to servers in your computers, all of your Facebook postings, all of your likes of your blogs, all of your photos, all of your Instagram's. If you take all of that and then you wrap. Some you you purchase some software called mind wear that elicits the personality evident in those uploads and you combine the two, you end up with a mind clone of yourself, a software version of your mind that has most of your memories, feelings, recollections, beliefs, and also has your characteristic expressions mannerisms and how you think who who wants to be around Martines mind clone. Do you think your your wife, your kids? Who else? Beyond that? I know problem. I think my friends with also on the be around my mind clone and I would also want to be around their mind clone. Where would the mind clone live would live in the cloud and presents itself wherever there's a display. And by the way I be curious about my mind clone because, you know, I don't know myself enough to know what that mind clone would be. Are you kind of curious about what the Ataman is station of yourself is? Beyond what I see in front of me. I think they'll be lots of books written about with titles such as a ten things I learned about myself from my mind clone. You live in Vermont, and you have started this organization called Tara sim, which is devoted to life extension. And I think of Vermont is being bucolic and you're, you have this, you know, oh, futuristic endeavor. And it reminds me of your experience at the same shells which I have not been there. Also, in my mind seems like a, you know, placid bed of islands. Yet NASA was tracking satellite systems behind closed door. Do you think about that dichotomy in both places are? Do I think that Vermont is very big, colic and beautiful. On the other hand, Vermont is also a place to place where there are a lot of great scientists and information technology. IBM has a major center there. University of Vermont has one of the nation's most advanced gene sequencing machines. So there's a lot more technology going on than for Mont than than people would expect. What is something that I might not know about you? We're talking about how your trans, a lot of things. One thing you might not know about me is that I have not purchased a ticket on a rocket ship ride around the earth, and I have no interest in doing so my feeling is that the earth is the greatest spaceship in the universe. We can see almost all the different star certainly in in our own galaxy, as we travel around the sun. We get a different perspective of the entire sky in the meanwhile, we're perfectly comfortable. We can breathe the air. We could jump and swim and fly in the air. So high treasure above everything else, spaceship earth. Thank you very much for joining us by pleasure has been Martine Roth. Glad I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch.

Vermont Tara sim University of Vermont Martines Facebook Jessica Harris Martine Roth Instagram NASA IBM Mont
"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

"In one thousand nine hundred eighty s people like the ophthalmologists. Renee Richards who also became a tennis star, and I read other biographies of transgendered people who had come out and there's a judge in Houston, Texas, judge, Phyllis, Frye. So these people gave me hope and inspiration that maybe I could come out as well response. Her response was immediately opened. I mean, it wasn't like, oh, my God to there was never know my God. It was okay. You know, that's really interesting. That's fine with me. I love you for your soul, not any part of your skin. She calls you Martine sex. She's Martine sexual and I feel my dentist being a sexual, your children, talk to me about your approach to them and and curious as to the array of responses. Sure will all four of them were very accepting and. I'm attorney grateful to them for that because so many other ended people I know have horrible situations of being disowned by portions of their family. And so I said to each of the four kids that this is what I wanted to do, change my sex to female, but I would not do it if they objected and each of them had a very different response, perhaps reflecting their various ages. The oldest was my son, Yvonne. He was about twenty. Okay. And he said, it's your life Martinez, you have to do what you wanna do with your life. He was a student at Johns Hopkins at the time. The next oldest was sunny. She's a fashion designer here in New York City. Now she was at that time about eighteen and she said, lots of my friends have two moms or two dads. I don't see anything so strange about that. So it's really interesting that she saw a totally different way is just like now she has two moms, whereas I've. Actually never really tried to be the mom, I think so call me dad, but that's how she sought. My son, Gabriel who was in junior high at the time. Yeah. Yeah, it was a hardest. And he said that friends would tease him and he said he only wanted to know whether I still be his dad and I promise him. Gabriel always beer dad, no matter what he said. Okay. It's okay with me. I read a New York magazine that you said, well, I'm going to be like a butterfly. I did say that his he has four children now and they call me grandma teens. And then the youngest Genesis, she was quite young. She was ten years old and she was actually the one who outed me to my own parents because she told them, you know, Martine has these women's clothes that she and mom wear when they go out places and the my dad and mom asked me, is this true? Why? Why would you do this. And, but Genesis says, well, it seems to me just, I love my dad and she loves me. And it was just remarkable how she just switched the pronoun that made the whole thing. Makes sense. You said, okay. My mom, my mom said, look, we could have had two daughters or son, and a daughter doesn't make any difference to us. I've noticed sometimes in this interview, I I'm confusing pronouns and things like that does. Does it get under your skin dog? I'm like totally flexible with it. In fact, it's kind of interesting, ROY charge test to me just going to help with strangers. Some people say ma'am. Some people be search almost like fifty. Fifty has kind of really interesting, but I'm like as long as you as long as you know, you call me Martine happy. See you had the mind of a woman like Phil so understanding. Thank you. Was was marrying an African American women almost equally striking to people at the time. It was pretty, it was. It was shocking to some people. This was on this was less than twenty years after it was illegal for people to marry people of of different races. The supreme court case loving versus for Jinya was decided in the nineteen sixties. So it was our kids were teased her oldest son. Ally said kids at school would call them zebra. So I think it was an Alex. I'm just like a harass you're listening to from scratch. My guest is Martine Roth Blat the highest paid transgendered CEO in America..

Martine Roth Johns Hopkins Genesis Gabriel Renee Richards Martinez Martine Frye Texas New York magazine Houston tennis Yvonne New York City Phyllis Ally attorney Jinya Phil America
"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

"Scratch. My guest is Martine Roth Blat the founder of the pharmaceutical company, United therapeutics Martinez transgender. She became a woman in one thousand nine hundred ninety four at age forty. After having had sex reassignment surgery, I wanna talk about your trends, gender life. How has this physical change change the way you feel. That's a really tough question to answer, especially, you know, briefly, I think the answer that really bubbles to my mind is as being core and essential is that I've always felt like a woman. So I found myself as I went into my teenage years, identifying with the women in the room where I would be instead of the men in the room he had. I was totally obviously aware that everybody considered me a boy and then a man. And I was totally aware that when somebody deviated from those socially accepted roles that they were sanctioned they were laughed at. I didn't want to be laughed at. So I kept my feelings of being a woman tightly bottled up inside myself because I didn't really want to be laughed at. I would think a man who understands women would be very attractive to women. I did. You have girlfriends and I did. I always, I mean, when you're talking about like sexual orientation, side of of being a woman. My sexual orientation has always been to women as a woman. So if I was to give the label would be lesbian label yet I was faced with this contradiction to the had the body of a man. Let's an example of, you know, a year identifying with the women, the room. I'd say like if there is a topic being faced in the room and one group of people are kind of hard edged about solving the problem and the other group of people, or maybe like maybe there's a way we can massage the situation. I just naturally go to the massage situation in one thousand nine hundred five. You wrote a manifesto called the apartheid of sex, which demystified or criticize the classification of things by gender? That's correct. And my point of view was that was really based on the research on that came before me specifically professor and Faustus terling from Brown who had written that. There are not too sexes. There are actually multiple different sexes. She discovered, for example, that it's not as simple as saying. Women have two x chromosomes and men have excellent. Why? Because there are people born with two Xs, a one y to rise one x, all kinds of variance in between. But in most cases, these intersection. Well, these were not so manifest that they were observed by surgeons at the time of birth. So nobody said, oh, this is intersex child these, their genetic mutations. Yeah, I would say it's it's part of the natural diversity of human life. And so that got me thinking, well, if there's all of this fluidity in the body, there must be just as much fluidity in the mind you you said that separating people by gender is similar to separating blacks and whites, which of course had by the way, when I wrote the, it was considered like crazy, but now in Germany and a couple of other municipalities parents can. Decide not to stamp male or female on a child's purser, Tiffany, and the idea of being gender queer, basically, self defining one's own gender has gone from being, you know, totally on the margins to, I would say for people who are like millennial generation, it's beginning to be like, you know a thread of that culture, speaking of of race, your wife is African American being Aspen. You married her in nineteen eighty one when you were a man, and it was surprised to her ten years later that you wanted to undergo this sexual reorientation. How long were you thinking about this before you actually mentioned it to her? Well, would think about it the whole time because I've been transgendered feelings since I was a teenager. So I've thought about the whole time, but it was something that I thought just had to be bottled up forever. And fortunately there were pioneers who came before me in the nineteen seventy..

Martine Roth Blat Faustus terling United therapeutics Martinez Aspen founder Germany professor Tiffany Brown ten years
"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

"I just went to the library and began doing research. Now you mention you into the library, but it was you and she who would go to the library and that's true. Seven year old Genesis, we would together. She was very, very helpful. And I would say to her, I know there was an article by Dr rich and she would say, wait a second. And this is Stuart rich, a physician in in Illinois, and she looked through the pile of of Xerox copies of articles and say, here's the doctor rich article. You launched United therapeutics with your own capital. That's correct from serious the drug which later got FDA approval was developed by gentleman, James Crowe. Correct. There was a gentleman Dr crow had GlaxoSmithKline who had a solution for pulmonary hypertension, a new medicine, but Glaxo would not let him develop it because the patient population was too small and GlaxoSmithKline had recently purchased the Burroughs Wellcome company Burroughs Wellcome was a very old line pharmaceutical company and they would develop things whether they were profitable or not. So SMithKline Glaxo bought them and when they bought them, the first thing they said is we are not pursuing any more of these. You know, fairytale dreams. We have a filter. We will only pursued drugs that promise a billion dollars or more in revenues which are called blockbusters. You got hold of a doctor crows telephone number and called him. Yes, cold called him. And what was his posture towards you? Originally a great scepticism. How is somebody who. Is a satellite CEO gonna develop a medicine. How are you going to get it out of pharmaceutical company? I'm very sorry about your daughter, but there's nothing I can do to help you Martine Roth Blat upon hearing that that probably put my more fire under your belly. It did. I was actually, he did me a great favor by doing that because I was pretty much back to the Martine who was galvanized by the dream of United in the world was satellite communications. And I said, now, you know what? I did something like that I can do this. I can do this and coincidentally, at the very same timeframe, people sent me to movies to watch. One was Lorenzo's oil. There's a story of a father trying to save his son by doing things at pharmaceutical companies wouldn't and another was the to me the the art, typical entrepreneur movie called Tucker about this man who invented the seat. Belt, the parabolic headlight lens for cars, the shatterproof glass for windows who after World War Two tried to create a new type of automobile called the Tucker and was beaten down by the big three automakers in Michigan. United therapeutics is public. You became the highest paid female CEO in America upon FDA approval. The stock price went up exponentially. And how do you navigate that? What does that mean? Exactly. So that really means is that my compensation is tied tar stock price. So this was as of two thousand thirteen and you're not somebody who really revels in the public light. What were your reactions when media was coming to you? Because of this fact that happened almost accidentally. So it's it's basically a kind of embarrassment, at least in my own personality. I don't try to be the center of. Attention, but I do realize as public company CEO every element of my compensation is publicly disclosed. And by the way, when when I first read that fact and the fact that you were previously a man, I thought seriously, the highest paid female. CEO of course, has had been a man. I feel that that's unfair, too. I agree with you. I tell you the truth. I had exactly the same feeling and but I do know in other years, the highest paid female CEO had always been a female..

CEO Burroughs Wellcome United therapeutics FDA Martine Roth Blat Dr rich SMithKline Glaxo Stuart rich Dr crow Xerox James Crowe Tucker Lorenzo Illinois America Michigan
"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

"Their content on our satellite network. So I went to see Mel Karmazin who was at that time the CEO of Infinity radio network, which hosted the Howard Stern show, um, nationwide. And I went to and I did my satellite radio pitch. And I said, this is going to be the future everyone that's gonna listen to satellite radio, and he just he laughed at me and he turned pivoted on his desk to his credentials. And you said, you see these piles of paper here. He said, these are audience research reports that high commission to find out what the audience listening to each of our radio station thinks what their demographics are, what their age is, how many of them are he said, now how higher those piles going to be the day you launch your Sirius XM radio system. I said, well, on the first day they'll be nobody listening to it. He said exactly. He said, Martine get a real job. So the funny code is phone. Few years later and who becomes the CEO of serious smelt karma zone. Yeah, and I loved having a chance to recount the story to him when I was on the Howard Stern show, he remembered it, but it just goes to show what he was saying was not incorrect. But my vision for serious was pay radio and his whole, the whole paradigm of regular radio was commercial advertiser supported radios in higher paradigm shift that had to be promoted. What else surprised you about launching a service like serious was the regulatory hurdles, or I expected there to be regulatory hurdles that process always involves taking the radio frequencies away from somebody else. So there's always an adversarial process involved, but what has surprised me with serious to this day? I would say more people come up to me and thanked me for providing Howard Stern and other content to them via serious. Then people come up to me and thanked me for saving their children with the medicines that we produce. That United therapeutics. What does that say? I think it says that information is very, very important. In fact, there's a quotation of heard that says, information is the necessary if not sufficient basis for development, you left serious and you found yourself in another industry, the pharmaceutical industry, and I purposely use the passive because it didn't seem like an active decision to go into the pharmaceutical industry just on the face of it. You have a daughter, Genesis whom you discovered has disease Opole menagerie, hypertension disease, and she's the one who came up with the idea that you launch this company. Is that correct though this, correct? It's true that my first love and actually most lasting love is space technology, satellite communications. If I could snap my fingers and sort of like, you know, reimagined the whole universe. I would be right back running either Sirius XM or probably. Even like a Elon Musk SpaceX type of company. But the fact the matter is that I, I love my children and my youngest daughter who is just a beautiful simple child gets diagnosed with this life threatening to seize pulmonary hypertension. There were no medicines available, so it was. It wasn't a matter of thinking about it..

Howard Stern Mel Karmazin Sirius XM radio CEO Elon Musk Sirius SpaceX Genesis United therapeutics Opole Martine
"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"martine" Discussed on From Scratch

"I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch. My guest is Martine Roth bled a pioneer in the satellite and pharmaceutical industries. She's the founder of Sirius satellite radio and United therapeutics. A public pharmaceutical company initially focused on treating cardiopulmonary disorders. Martine also helped to launch the car navigation system GIO star, and the satellite service provider PanAmSat, which was sold to a division of General Motors in nineteen ninety-five, five for three billion dollars Martine lives in Vermont. She's a helicopter pilot, an apparent afford children. She also used to be a man named Martin, welcome to be here. You are trans. A lot of things I'd like to start with a your trans corporate life. Okay. You are a pioneer in the satellite industry and it all started in the Seychelles strangely and a group of islands off of Africa. Can you describe the linkage between your discovery and the Seychelles and your career? Sure. I really had no idea of whether while to do in life when I was in the Seychelles. In fact, I'd read a Newsweek article that this was supposed to be an ideal IQ said the violence where you could just catch fish literally with your hands and drink coconut milk. So I dropped out of UCLA and went traveling over there feeling just really oppressed by the l. a. and firemen. So I get to the Seychelles, but it was really pretty dirty. I rented a small hut every night. The floor would fill with gigantic cockroaches. But I was there. So I just, you know, hung out and did the best. I could one day one of the show while friends I met asked me if I wanted to go with him up to the NASA tracking station, I didn't even know there wasn't asset tracking station. I went up with him and there it was like I stepped into another reality. I went from, like, you know, like the past to the future, everything was super clean and shiny and high-tech looking with blinking lights and a very nice NASA engineer gave us a tour and explain what they were doing. And I asked him, why is this in Canada? You have so humongous because it was bigger than a house. And he said, it's because the signals were tracking from gape space. Probes are so faint. They don't even have enough energy to light a light bulb. So we have to have a humongous collecting area in our giant satellite dish to receive the signal and I asked him back, well, what if the satellites. Signals were very, very strong and powerful. He said, well, it's not pow possible to launch those type of satellites today. But if it was then are receiving station could be very small and tiny, and the idea dawned. My head that if I could figure out a way to launch a powerful satellite, then everybody in the world could have their own tiny satellite receiving dish. I made a beeline back to UCLA kids like I received a kind of quasi religious epiphany in the Seychelles that I was going to connect the world with satellite communications, and this was a technologically practical thing to do. So I went from having a c. average at UCLA to stray days because I had a passion that I was going to be the world's expert on satellite communications. You are in your late twenties. Correct. Other examples in your life of, you know, having the moxie to say, you know what? I'm going. Transform something. What we're examples of that in in your childhood by transformed the examples where from biographies and also from science fiction, I was fascinated with the Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asimov series of books and those examples of people who transcended their background to become, you know, the man who purchased the moon and people who went to Mars. Those books inspired me. Your mother always thought there was something unique about you, but I just thought, well, you know, welcome to being a Jewish mother. Did you ever have a sense of self that kind of extended beyond what you thought other peers experienced though? I didn't. I really felt myself pretty much a totally average person and lazy almond do usually trying to figure out the way to get something done with the least amount of work. And how about your parents? My my parents were hard-working and great people, but my dad was a dentist for the retail clerks union. So he had kind of like a nine to six job. I'll my mother was a speech pathologist at San Diego State college, so she would go there and.

Seychelles Martine Roth Martin UCLA Jessica Harris cardiopulmonary disorders Newsweek PanAmSat Martine NASA General Motors Sirius San Diego State college Africa GIO Vermont Robert Heinlein United therapeutics