20 Burst results for "Martin Seligman"

"martin seligman" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

On Mic Podcast

05:57 min | 2 months ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

"And now the power of good news as we go on mike with how urban well the good news to begin with is that we're reunited after many many years talking on the phone late night. Yeah i can't remember the last time we we spent a while. But i didn't forget you or your name or your work so i think i get from that children's hospital back in boston every year. That's right that's right. And i am thrilled at You're still doing what you do. So well which is writing and sharing stories and thoughts and ideas and inspiration so the new one is called a power of good news feeding your mind with what's good for your heart and can't think of a book that's more timely. But do we need this now. I think you're twenty twenty. My and arts of twenty twenty. One probably had more bad news than i can remember in in my life and i didn't write the book because of that it just happened to coincide with with all that bad news. I was actually writing about good news while we were surrounded by news. Well there's a great deal of research and everything you do is is well thought out but There is scientific research pretty solid. That says the more we attend to good news in the less we depend on the bed the better for our psyche our spiritual growth and certainly our bodies talk a little bit about what you discovered. Were you know one of the things that i mentioned near the end of the book said i felt like i taken graduate level courses in neuroscience while i was researching for this book and it was really a blessing. I didn't really know. Very much about neuroscience i had heard about the happy hormones like endorphins and dopamine and so on but But i really got into it. And then i got connected with martin seligman who is kind of considered father of positive psychology in the united states. And he still runs a program through the university of pennsylvania so i got a lot of leaves for him and i was in contact with a couple arbor professors to psychology..

mike boston martin seligman university of pennsylvania united states
"martin seligman" Discussed on The Most Hated F-Word

The Most Hated F-Word

03:46 min | 3 months ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on The Most Hated F-Word

"Think is really really important is developed by dr martin seligman and it's called his model and i talked about this on a podcast with dr sarah best. Oh and the perma model. It's a way that we can evaluate our own well-being as seligman has created five miserable elements that make up wellbeing and those five elements are held within the acronym perma so perma spelled. P. e. r. m. a. and it stands for p. for positive emotion e for engagement. Our relationship am for meaning and a accomplishment. I find that the five key measurable areas or elements perma allow people like myself to focus our attention on practical elements or key areas in our life that have been proven scientifically help increase. Our levels of wellbeing. Research has shown the perma model is really effective to help people who might not know what grades happy are good life for them and they might not nowhere to start and the permanent really provides you with an evaluation of your life in one of those five key areas which again are positive. Motion engagement relationships meaning an.

dr martin seligman dr sarah seligman
"martin seligman" Discussed on No Stupid Questions

No Stupid Questions

05:26 min | 4 months ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on No Stupid Questions

"Is it better to invest in your strength or improve on your weaknesses. You might think. I'm really funny. But then other people might say also why do we like and dislike the things that we like and dislike for two years. I have exact same watch on purpose and this is a classic question from a listener. It's an essential question. I would argue. Okay shoot what is it. Did i build it up to my. I know i'm kind of like no question. Can live up to this introduction. But i wanna know what it is so this is from emily ward. Who lives in richmond. Virginia should we capitalize on our strength. We're we're on our weaknesses. This is a great question. Is that not the universe in one question. It is the universe one question. And it's a question i've been thinking about since the first day of graduate school because when i went to repurpose myself as a psychologist i discovered that my adviser martin seligman was the founder of positive psychology and. I say that. I discovered that after signing up to be his graduate student because literally didn't know that's his whole shtick. You thought he was a plumber. Well new us psychologists. But i didn't know that he was trying to revolutionize psychology by getting people think about their strengths and happiness and not focus on weaknesses. Some hardy had an expression of our highest strengths as being our signature strengths. So for example. I might be high in. Actually i know this empirically. I just heard. I might be high. And i yes. Please don't edit it to me..

emily ward martin seligman richmond Virginia hardy us
"martin seligman" Discussed on 99 Problems (but a boss ain't one)

99 Problems (but a boss ain't one)

04:34 min | 5 months ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on 99 Problems (but a boss ain't one)

"To this podcast and things like that and then the other one to me i'd say probably creating communities and connecting people is a big thing for me so like i've got the free lance community that iran and squirts brace clubs. I'm setting up to kind of bring together. People easing space and people who wanted to live with differently. I think a lot of a lot of my work is about like creating those communities connections. And i looked machine to do because it isn't necessarily nine day job as it were. Yeah that's true. They will show up in your in your voluntary. No spare time of course half would you bring that into work could be another -nother one probably from those circles icky and then you mentioned something else. Michelle about kind of five steps to find happiness which vans click article book. Yeah i mean this is. This is some genuinely research. Say there's a book martin seligman could flourish as a matsen selling was ready. The founder positive psychology. So i don't know how much people know about positive psychology. 'cause i asked to occupational psychologists then sounds quite fluffy and lovely but is it i will. Martin seligman found wolves the in the in his field of psychology but also saw related fields of psychotherapy counseling. Lots of work and how to fix people air quotes again on. The podcast is lots of things about their white. People are depressed how to be cool depression but he said it was a long. He lost his book. I think you'd thousand and ten. He says alarming little work about. Actually what makes us happy now. He's wrestled with himself over the word happy because happy can solve suggest a kind of elated temporary state. Where you've got big smile in your face. So i eat settled on flourish but very research. What makes us flourish. So what is it that makes a person feel content and happy in their lives and he identified five things now. It's quite robust work that he did. He wanted to prove these things. He wanted them to be measurable Observable and he had a stringent set criteria for finding he's elements and so it's quite interesting piece of work that you did is expected that book but the five elements that he came up with. He has this model permit. P. e. l. m. a. Now the first one is a sense of purpose so in order to feel happy with the sense of purpose in our lives. Now katy you. And i discussed purpose in episode thirty five. I so just to be clear. Purpose is what purpose means to you. And it's whatever you choose to be purpose. So i still beat people who kind of like i need to find my purpose of this like we explained in episode like it's chosen not not discovered yet which is interesting because i we. We did the episode before. I read the book so it just shows where ahead of the game i think. Look on the right track. Catch these reassuring to the second. One you said was engagement and kate. You mentioned earlier that state of flow. And that's kind of what we're talking about here..

martin seligman iran Michelle depression katy kate
"martin seligman" Discussed on Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

02:59 min | 11 months ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

"And there is a psychologist woman. Professor of psychology. Cool martin seligman. You may may have had. And there's a pneumonic which i often refer to when i to people about this called permit p. e. r. m. so he writes about the fact. You need all of these different things. Ideally in abundance to be happy and is positive emotion tasks doing things that you just enjoy essentially ease engagement and that can be just something that way. You're completely absorbed in focused. Everything else goes out the window like reading a book and being sold a book or is relationships is meaning doing something meaningful which is clearly for me. This is something that is meaningful in an accomplishment. Also seeing some success with things that you do but in all of that. I think i read another very interesting book and plugging these books. But a great love folks venture again. He's a harvard. Professor has a course. I think the most popular causing harvard on being happy new book called happier and he says that nothing is that the most. I think the single most important factor for happiness is meaningful relationships. So i'm very lucky and fortunate christina. They have a lot of good family and friends around me. That gives me a lot of emotional support but ultimately what he says is the most the single most important factor determinant of happiness is is your intimate relationships and that as you know is still an issue in society at the moment we have. Divorce rate's to fifty percent i myself. I'm divorced from eight years ago amicably. Luckily but i know it's a problem. It's an issue. Never achieve perfection. But i can't complain. I've got a roof over my head. I've got enough finances to be able to enjoy doing what. I'm doing and be passionate. Be this public health advocate. I very supportive parents and friends around me. So i can't complain. Yeah of course there are something that still want to try and strive for to make myself have dream dream and on that..

martin seligman harvard christina
"martin seligman" Discussed on Mindset for Life

Mindset for Life

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on Mindset for Life

"Up and down from this happiness set point and we generally go back to that set point. The idea. is that when something comes up. That moves our happiness meter. We feel happier for a short time. We have a new relationship or something happens in our professional life and initially. We feel that experience made us happy. We move into a new house. We go on vacation and again. We feel a little happier for a short time. Then after that initial elevated level of happiness we just go right back to our happiness set point and we don't feel that increased happiness anymore we keep moving up or down with a little more happiness and then returning to our set point over time because of this experience. We're having we start to think that we need to do more or get more to feel happy again instead. We're focusing all on the external things that don't really bring lasting happiness at this point we've explored the ways we're chasing happiness and why we should stop looking for happiness in doing more or in getting things or in chasing achievement. I'd like to propose that we focus on these five things instead. That's right instead of running this race looking for happiness by giving or obtaining all these things focus on these five things instead martin seligman tells us that there are five things we can focus on every day every week and throughout the year and these five things will create wellbeing. our sense of wellbeing is just another label for happiness and life satisfaction the five things that create happiness are pleasant or positive emotions engagement or flow relationships that are positive and supportive meaning and accomplishment for. Its own sake together. These five areas create the acronym perma p. e. r. m. a. And you can look at your five areas together for an idea of what creates your own happiness. This will help you. Also look at it to see where you can change it where you can increase your efforts and your own happiness. The idea behind perma and positive. Psychology generally is that not everything is going to work for every person you have to pick something. That's going to work best for you. And i have to work something. That's going to work best for me. Let's just start with the area of positive emotion. We can increase positive emotions in a lot of different ways. One of those is cultivating gratitude. We can also develop our level of forgiveness and letting go are positive. Emotion can also be connected to mindfulness which is really living in the present moment and not dwelling on the past or the future pervasively. We can also have positive emotions about the future like building. Hope and optimism. Now if you're a natural pessimist or if you consider yourself a realist. There is such a thing as learned optimism. You can figure out how to reframe things even if your whole way of being does not change on the engagement side. This is the experience where you get to use..

martin seligman
"martin seligman" Discussed on Zen Parenting Radio

Zen Parenting Radio

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on Zen Parenting Radio

"And then it goes on to say positive. Psychology scientific approach to studying human thoughts feelings and behavior with a focus on strengths instead of weaknesses building. The good in life instead of repairing the bad and taking the lives of average people up to great instead of focusing solely unmoving those who are struggling up to normal. So it's again this gets all into language and scientific theory and how you're going to study at what you're going to look for to to bring it into layman's terms like understanding gratitude. Practice falls under positive psychology. So i was telling todd that the even though he's right martin seligman was the Posterchild i would say the father behind positive psychology. I usually use sean acres work. And he studied under all of these people. There's so many positive psychologists out there. it's just. His books are the ones that i've used for my classes. And all of his is the research behind. How to thrive so you can get up to a base level of doing fine. But then how do you thrive in so instead of focusing you can be. You can be fine and be like i don't have any problems to speak of and this is not twenty twenty. This is it before this year. I don't really have any problems to speak of. I just don't feel like i'm thriving and positive. Psychology can be that. Focus where it's like. Okay i want to focus on gratitude. Journaling i want to focus on reaching out and caring for others. I want to focus on and it could be about my own feelings. It could be about taking care of my body. It could be about recognizing what. I'm good at so positive. Psychology is just the ability to also put some attention toward what is already working. So here's what i do. Sometimes and this is the word that just came to me is sometimes weaponize positive psychology. A lot of people do. I will be like well. It's not worth getting upset over..

sean acres martin seligman todd
"martin seligman" Discussed on Capital Partners Private Wealth Advisers

Capital Partners Private Wealth Advisers

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on Capital Partners Private Wealth Advisers

"Join us as we take a good look at understanding the importance of work and incorporating this in the second phase of our lives. In our previous two episodes, we discussed the work of Dr Martin Seligman and his Perma formula for happiness a quick recap on Pinna. An acronym for positive emotions, engagement relationships, meaning an achievement and wrapping all of that up to living a life full of tally and today we're going to look at ways we can. Look at activating audio perma through understanding the role that workplace loss and look at some thoughts on how this impacts perception of what the second phase of. Look like. leaving, potentially leaving work on to whatever extent works Fosnat when we look at Work Emerton Fun that people contemplating this notion. Of retirement understand what they are retiring from but don't necessarily have a really clear picture of what our retiring to and David. You mentioned in your book, a study completed by the economist, which found that a majority of families who sold the family business. Felt a roof sense of loss in in the years after the sale going from that moment with a business owner or a an employee's fully engaged in what they're doing. The next thing that searching around for something to occupy tunnel may be to the point searching around for purpose, in the from your experience in working with a host of families who who's stewards of maybe retard. How you approach encouraging them the price of fishing attention to where the going. Wall then managing this of technically shoes that they feis in the lead up to their retirement. So. Great question the. Come across very few people who report the height. There were dead vigils living this grinding. Ending, reality of of something I really enjoy them. I just can't get out of it. And that just pay the people I get to work with nine. vast majority of people really do at some level, get some significant benefit from it will. And With them family business when a family businesses sold, the can be a really significant feeling of loss but similarly when someone revised from John. Big. SIGNIFICANT FEELING OF LOSS BECAUSE There's all sorts of things get out of their word. Not. Not. Not The least of which is there is a very important part of this social interaction. So. So to your point about people not being sure what the people being clear about what they retiring from I, get that. But. Not being sure about what they were retiring to is a really really important topic for people to come to terms with and really important topic. The people spend quite a considerable amount of time on. will associate. It speaks to a lot of the things that you and I have chatted about dame over the last. episodes of our podcast on that is that. Retirement people just seem to treat as a state. So you're going to move from the work state to retirement state. But you're forgetting that you are the same person and I think just in talking about work that we need to spend. Some thoughts and some serious bod on what value work action brings us. And therefore, if we understood that, maybe we wouldn't dismiss it out of hand as the end of an era in the beginning of this new prolonged leisure that we're talking about. I think that's absolutely lot. So if we look at the reality, what were provides for us part of the reason is that holiness when people actually do? But they're looking into life afterward before key reasons why people feel that saints Dina's diamond, and at some the I I think he's dissented unfinished business. I am I really ready to be put on the site code scrappy. That's awful. Piece a ton of fries, but but a lot of cable. With. Sixty or sixty five or even seventy five still got an enormous amount to contribute. Their projects that they're not yet finished with their people who that mentoring, who they care about their all sorts of positive rewards that I get from. The second is the satisfaction among each into the mom and a guy wear put some people really love their work in a major speed it. It's the second family they really enjoy the table. So I think that's stopping the we need to be really. Contemplate about on the stands, the social network and making shorter, we've got social networks in annexed phase of. Good obviously is the financial situation and you you might reference to these people tend to spend a lot of time. Planning the financial side of retirement which makes sense because there is appointed, which if you're going to save you las? Ha. But you know some people will decide one more year will make a difference. One more year will make a difference right now during the uncertainties that we face economically decision. Or the pressure that as my will be on people financial situation situation. Really. Is Tom to retire and the Fawn one is you help? People. People sometimes get a lot of energy from. The flip side is if you've had some some health challenges. Facing he look. I made to I need to get on the stick second stage of my life because I don't really have a really not how much time off. Think. There's much more discussion hr those four points that we could we could have. Really. Great points into. Berries. Berry mentioning that we are the same person and not considering this as a separate stage of life but a lot of identity is linked is often linked to our role the business. Barry Hadas that way when we can place a lot of emphasis on our work identity as part of Julia instead of A. Who we are in character in general, there are different approaches to what we think about work. Some people look at it as if it's a paycheck and they really don't like to be there are a means to an end and one of those necessary evils in life. A lot of people can fall back into that but there's there's other personalities, specific personalities that that have personality traits that are very goal oriented or persistent or. Want to do things where they feel energized by in those people and a lot of them who gave it deals with in his homework a lot of those people wouldn't look at work as a means to an in, but it's really self affirming. It's it's It's making them feel like they've got relevance in value. and. So if you look at that personality type, then work as especially as you get to the point where you can actually control what you do. Then work becomes very important because as one of the few things that we have that can channel a lot of this energy that we have to create goals and to feel good about ourselves. Good.

Dr Martin Seligman business owner Fosnat Pinna David Barry Hadas Wall Berry Dina John Julia Tom
"martin seligman" Discussed on Building Psychological Strength

Building Psychological Strength

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on Building Psychological Strength

"You're listening to the building psychological strength podcast brought to you by Peak mind the center for psychological strength. This is mindset minute Monday. Martin Seligman is the founder of the positive psychology movement rather than focusing on what's wrong with people this branch of psychology focuses on what package right? What are the factors that lead to a good life what helps people thrive in his book flourish. He talks about one of the single most impactful activities that you can do to create long-lasting. Joy and happiness in your life. And it's a really simple activity think of someone you're grateful for them and spend the next fifteen minutes writing a letter to them telling them how grateful you are and why be specific and let it come from your heart. That's not although then call that person and read them the letter research shows us that both of you and the recipient will experience long lasting change. Joy from this simple Act of connection. It's a small investment for a massive payoff particularly during a time when we can all use a little Joy off try this out and see how you feel DMS on Instagram at Peak line psychology to let us know how it went. And if you want even.

Martin Seligman founder
One small activity proven to deliver a BIG boost in happiness

Building Psychological Strength

01:12 min | 1 year ago

One small activity proven to deliver a BIG boost in happiness

"Martin Seligman is the founder of the positive psychology movement rather than focusing on what's wrong with people this branch of psychology focuses on what package right? What are the factors that lead to a good life what helps people thrive in his book flourish. He talks about one of the single most impactful activities that you can do to create long-lasting. Joy and happiness in your life. And it's a really simple activity think of someone you're grateful for them and spend the next fifteen minutes writing a letter to them telling them how grateful you are and why be specific and let it come from your heart. That's not although then call that person and read them the letter research shows us that both of you and the recipient will experience long lasting change. Joy from this simple Act of connection. It's a small investment for a massive payoff particularly during a time when we can all use a little Joy

Martin Seligman Founder
"martin seligman" Discussed on 5 Things With Angie B

5 Things With Angie B

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on 5 Things With Angie B

"It's something I think a lot about and I wonder how do we? Is it. So we create boundaries what how do we get around that? Then protect our personalities and our hearts from getting hard from getting jaded. What what's something that we? You know? Obviously, yes, we can watch less news and and create these foundries but what about social media and? and. Maybe maybe people around us that are toxic will how do we? How do we do that to protect our who we are to protect our personalities from getting too jaded? Well we have to acknowledge that we are all human and this is a human experience and so science studies, human behavior, and they show through the research that all of us respondents, certain ways with certain factors just naturally, and then we can build skills in those areas. So spreading boundaries like you're same is spot on Dr Caroline Leaf in her book think learn succeed she conducts research she's a cognitive neuroscientist. Her recommendation is limiting social media to two hours a day. and. So what we recommend is if the social media is at five hours, you can't just go to two hours to create a schedule to less than it without distress every day just a little bit even if it's five minutes a day that'll make a big difference in thirty days. Sounds like working out. It sounds like the same type of behavior that you need to have. When you're starting a workout. Right? You're not gonNA, go from. Never. Not running all the time to running two miles rather you you ease into it. In this case, you ease out of it out of social media for a little while and and start gradually cutting back because I feel like doing that will make it. Will help you keep the behavior versus going cold Turkey and then binging on social media the next day. 'cause you missed it so much. Exactly and what's interesting People are having disrupted sleep, and so there's exercises that we can do a doctor Martin Seligman, the modern pioneer positive psychology recommends every night to pink on what.

Martin Seligman Dr Caroline Leaf Turkey
"martin seligman" Discussed on Suburban Folk

Suburban Folk

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on Suburban Folk

"Planner for retirement. So in two, thousand, seven, two, thousand, eight, I began to look around for some help I couldn't find any. And then I decided that this was an area. This was field that people needed helping because I couldn't be the only one I'm kind of on the the front edge, the boomers, and there was a huge wave of boomers coming and nobody there to focus on how to really successfully and happily retire. And then two, thousand eight happened and I had just started my business but third act and it was not a great time to start a business. So if you remember. It wasn't and the last thing anybody wanted to talk about was retirement and I would good at dinner parties are cocktail parties in people with sable what are you doing and I would say, you know I've started this business called the third act in its reinventing yourself in retirement to end people would just turn around and walk in the other direction. It was really a subject that was scary to people or they. They just didn't have a clue about retirement or what it could possibly be. So. That's the back story. You mentioned being a baby boomer and I think some of the stereotypes that I am aware of is baby boomers never want to admit that they're getting older and never want to be considered put out to pasture. So I imagine just the word retirement is toxic when you're talking to a baby boomer is the concept of calling something the Third Act I e you're not being put out to pasture something that speaks to baby boomers and that kind of indicative of what other factors they should be looking at in retirement. You know you're absolutely right greg. The baby boomers went to reinvent everything and they don't want to think of themselves as older put out to pasture and retirement is advair it's a word that people really dislike really do not relate to. So I tried every which way to change that talked about reinvention and Redo, and Redo work and all different kinds of ways of renaming retirement but we're kind of stuck with it. and. So I add the third act, which is not the fourth at, but the third act and it's a great act. So this is the time where people can really thrive in really grow. It's not time to wind down its not a time to sit in front of the TV and watch TV or knit or playoff it's time to really get. In and do more, it's an exciting time. You mentioned some of the activities that people might be interested in or the other way things that they may think of of retirement like, Oh, I don't WanNa do that all the time. So can you give us examples of what these non financial factors are and how you walk a potential clients through making a plan for themselves? It's really interesting to think about this stage of life as a different one than the second act. So the second to act is when you're raising your family or your growing your career. It's time where you really focused on growth and development in the societal way, and so the third act is quite different from that you're thinking about your time in a different way. So as you said before boomers don't want to think about growing old or even the D. Word death when you wake up one morning and you realize that you have less time. Then, you had a two years ago in your life where you're looking at maybe half of your life is over. Two thirds of your life is over and it tends to focus you in a different way than it does in the second act when you're focused on raising your children and advancing in your career or your profession. So this is more of a a life stage that's a new developmental stage for adults and I've named it the Third Act. Usually in the past people just didn't live this long one, hundred, fifty years ago people did not. Did Not live to this age but now we're living longer. We have pretty good health. We have pretty good well. and. So we have this big bonus of time that's often twenty to thirty years after weeks finish work or the typical kind second act work. Do you find that people need to be refocused into one area of life or another? Of course when we think retirement, we think the end of whatever your primary career was. So for example, would you primarily have to encourage people to look for a different career or pursue a passion ideally that doesn't have a dollar requirement behind it or is it something else like family or living somewhere that they've always wanted to live? It's really a combination. It can be a combination of things in your design it's your plan. So so what we do in the Third Act is help you look for what gives you meaning and purpose now in your life sometimes people can. Ask Me is is what aged third act to begin and it's not really an age. It's a state of mind part of it is what I was saying before when you you kind of wake up one day and you go, Oh, my goodness, I have less future ahead of me than I used to what do I want to do with his precious time? What do I want to do with this crushes life that I have people design all different kinds of life plans for themselves in the Third Act, and because they may have had talents and skills in their second act. that. They don't WanNa do anymore. For instance, they might be really great at. For instance, organizing files were doing that kind of work and they don't WanNa do that anymore they might be really good at it, but they just don't want to do it anymore. They WanNa to do other things that they haven't had a chance to do, and so we have people look through their lives in see what skills and talents they wanNA take forward. With them. It's kind of like going on a journey and you kind of decide. Let's see what do I wanna pack in my suitcase or what do I WANNA put in my backpack? What's important to me now and one of the May be one of the through lines is that you really love helping people and maybe you were a nurse in your second act. and. You don't want to have that kind of life anymore that those kinds of demands but you still WanNa give back to you still want to help that's part of your character. So we we help folks kind of read those into their plan as they go forward. And we also use Martin Seligman psychology positive psychology, and what he's found can help people develop a really wonderful life plan and their five ingredients to that, which we include in the design of a.

Martin Seligman greg
"martin seligman" Discussed on Thedowhatyoulovepodcast

Thedowhatyoulovepodcast

10:28 min | 1 year ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on Thedowhatyoulovepodcast

"Welcome to another episode of the do what you love podcast. I'm your host Amanda. He'll this is part two of my series on values in which I speak to Jackie lefebvre's from magma effect. Now in part one. I spoke to Jackie about the importance of knowing what values are and in this part of the series. I talked to Jackie about how we can discover at Personal Valley's so how do we? How do we find out what alleys oven a case advisor in the unconscious there in the LIMBIC system? And there's no vocabulary there which means somebody's don't naturally exist in the form of words it's feelings as things we all drew him woods and things we are repelled by so I thanked people often. It's literally about what's hot and what's not hot one way to do it is to. You'll absolutely peak. Moment may have been in work. It may be in study it may have been with a friendship group. It might be have been by yourself but just those moments where you think back and you think was so good on loved i. I wish every day could be like that. Reflect on that and figure out what with beating heart of that sensation of it being really really great so like yourself. I do some speaking and I happen to know because I have a copy of my buddies. Pray that one of my high priority. Values is transformative communication which is sharing days of those people in such a way as they are equipped than to think about things in a new way. So that explains why I love public speaking so much I was chatting with a guy on a few weeks ago. Now he done these values profile. But I hadn't given him the results yet and we ran around type situation and I'm just saying to everybody. Okay tell me just recalled. A moment was great a moment that you saw love this love this. Look this up this this And around to Michael and Michael all it said running training and trying to get something across it is a bit complicated and you look at people and all of the sudden the light goes on in your in your eyes and you think. Oh yeah you got it. You got it yet. So I said to him. I've seen about profile you haven't yet. I'm not surprised that moment is halt for you because you've got transparency communication at number one. So it's went. Our highest priority bodies are alive in the moment that we feel most alive. Most we have a great sense to the agency. They said this idea of personal power. We feel full of the resources that we need to not just survive. But thrive and I meant psychologists say the values are very closely interwoven with our sense of self kind of foam much like the neck of an hourglass through which information flows into us from the outside world. We make sense of it for who we are in our world. So there is sense making framework because they're a sense making framework survey they filter out things that have no meaning for us. And guess to focus on the stuff that's most significant. That's how they can then drive off behavior they shape decisions because of what does somebody like me do in a situation like this and the answer is specified like me does X. Not why you were talking about values for. How do you get one of those? You can get one of those in a number of ways that few am free online price into like personal values profile which is a product of Barrett Value Center days. Also Martin Seligman values in action profiler which is is more about signature strengths and is about values per se. But it's GonNa Bundy's dimension to it one that I work with is Vanessa's framework. There is linked to that on my website. If anybody would like to have a look at that I'll put that in the Shinar you very much. Indeed and that enables you to take an inventory of your values. So it gives you the opportunity to explore within the municipality's framework which contains one hundred twenty eight different and distinct humor about which ones all front of mind which one's top of the pile for you at this time. So some of those other buddies spray mokes. I mentioned earlier. The free ones tend to be a lot shorter so they Barrett what I think is called. Fifty eight are using. It will sixty bodies in it in my opinion to be really useful. You want as fine level of detail on the values are significant for you as you can also be get shave so some of the other profiles will will give you report and kind of Jackie. You'll number one is communication. Then explain what communication means in that sense whereas are missing. I know that it's transformed communication. So it's particularly communication about sharing messages in such a way that people are able to pick them up with the which is different to just transmitting information. You can use to go away streets to the end and if you don't like it for whatever reason no it doesn't feel interesting for whatever reason that doesn't cost any money you don't have to take any further another way. That coaches encourage people to do it. Is I reflect reflecting so sitting with a pen and a piece of paper or sitting with addict own. Whatever it happens to be thinking back you know those times when you haw sings and the todd the things that make your heart sing because if something makes your heart sing. The likelihood is eight dishonors high priority values via. Yes that's why you'll so passionately angry. Oh passionately repulsed by whatever. The thing happens to be the problem with reflective exercises the limitation with reflexive exercises as you can only put onto the piece of paper ideas that you already have words full. Yes so you get to. You will ready. No because values are up strikes and they don't exist in vocabulary. That means that you will get a version of the truth. But not the whole truce necessarily because be some things in there that that you don't have language for and that's what when we get into things. I focus groups inside organizations. An folks is put together to come up with the values that should be put onto the plaque behind reception. Yeah whatever happens to eat. Limited to ideas people got language full and also a human beings. We're interested in really interesting. Animals human beings wanted to connect social which means that when somebody puts us on the spot so when we selves on the spot and say well what are my values. I'm going to rights and list with vulnerable to think who social desirability bias. Where Even though we don't realize we're doing it with painting a picture of ourselves that we think will make us acceptable to other people. Because everyone doing it'd be honest and have integrity and an unbearable at times. There isn't even in the message. Values framework of a new cold integrity because value. In that sense. It's a practice. It's a it's the practice of being true to the things that actually Massa so yeah that you're absolutely right. We come in focus groups while I generally find people's integrity trust onus stay respects just thinking will get a surely if you have to shine a light on that then. There's a big problem because that should be taken for granted being a decent human being inside the well so yeah vulnerable to social desirability without realizing it we produce an edited version of ourselves so one of the things I say is values on the why behind the wall that we get to reduced up. Why did we do that? The analysis in our values. So you're really interested in Neil. I think getting a quality after Barth And has a client. I've done your tool which I found very helpful and I also did the reflective exercises and also I just choosing words from released and to be perfectly honest. I actually found your tool the most helpful one because it gave me examples and words for things that I wasn't quite sure how to put into words and it also allowed me to prioritize the valleys. Not just in a be going list of one hundred words it put things down into manageable size paces actually really did enjoy that that tool and do recommend it for anyone who wants to to try it out and I will put the link in the shrine arts. There's still a lot more to say about values so in part three of this series. I will talk to Jackie about the studies which have been conducted that shows the impact that values have on our well being and self esteem hype even joy this episode of do what she love podcast until next time a great day and do what you love. You've been listening to the do what you love podcast. He'll feeling unfulfilling and frustrated and unclear what to do next axes amandas living at your purpose quiz and resources to get you started on your jury to doing what you love at. Www DOT purpose vision future dot com that purpose vision future dot com.

Jackie lefebvre advisor Amanda Barrett Value Center Personal Valley Vanessa Martin Seligman Michael Shinar Barrett Barth todd Massa
An Excerpt from the book Youve Got This: The Life Changing Power of Trusting Yourself by Margie Warrell

Optimal Living Daily

05:48 min | 1 year ago

An Excerpt from the book Youve Got This: The Life Changing Power of Trusting Yourself by Margie Warrell

"An excerpt from the book. You've got this the life changing power trusting yourself by Margie. Worrell growing up on a small dairy farm in rural Australia. I learned early. That courage trump's confidence as I mustered up my courage learning to ride my first horse as he towered over me or at least felt that way that a couple of years later had trained the brave all over again as I mastered my second horse. A Wild Brumby. We won in a raffle. Who went from zero to one hundred miles per hour in five seconds flat? My lifelong lesson growth in comfort can't ride the same horse of course if you've ever wished he were confidence you're not alone. The biggest hurdle we ever have to face fairly stories. We spin ourselves about not having what it takes to achieve what we want mired in misgivings. Many people tiptoed timidly through much of their lives arriving safely. Life's end with a large gap between the life. They did live the life they could have lived if only they act themselves more and doubted themselves less. Of course we're all wired for caution cognitively bias to overestimate the risks. Underestimate ourselves man. Focus more on. What scares us like being rejected or exposed as a fraud than on. What inspires us? Little wonder one of the regrets of the dying is that they lived to safe and risks to little which begs the question. Is it confidence. We really need to forge meaningful careers and driving our lives or is it courage to take action amid or doubt fears and misgivings Bill Marriott. The legendary hotelier. Who took the business? His father had started as a nine seat root beer stand and turn it into the world's largest hotel empire believes it's the ladder during a fireside chat for Marriott headquarters. I asked him what he learned about building confidence. He threw his head back and laughed. I've learnt that don't have as much as people think I have. He chuckled ye confidence by doing and learning and making mistakes and fixing. Your mistakes is true. Confidence is inbuilt through. Knowing you can't fail is built through risking failure daring to act with very confidence. We wish we had and trusting ourselves that even if we fall short we'll figure it out and be okay. Martin Seligman a leader in the field of positive. Psychology said that positive self image by itself doesn't produce anything in cannot be sustained without action in other words. You can't think yourself confident rather a Soliman road quote a sustainable sense of security in oneself arises from positive and productive behavior and quote. Ask anyone who's ever done anything worthwhile. And they'll tell you that it wasn't confidence in their invincibility that fueled their endeavors rather their desire to do something trump. They're feared they'd fall short in their attempt or my case as an aspiring equestrian fall of my oars which by the way I did many times ensured their mission exceeded their fear compelling them break ranks from comfort. Time and time again sometimes. It was semi confident actions. Sometimes it was not in the gut knees shaking nervous action but always action as prime minister of New Zealand. Jason Arden said quote. If you sit and wait to feel like you're the most confident person in the room. You were probably going to be left by yourself and quote so too. It is for all of us. We cannot build the confidence. We like sitting safely on our couch. Waiting for a thunderbolt of unstoppable self-belief to strike us from above does not say confidence doesn't have its merits. However with the exception of cereal narcissists confidence waxes and wanes. Waiting until you feel confident you cannot fall short before you take a brave leap toward your bold. His aspirations in your work relationships and life Camino long long wait far more useful to focus their energy on cultivating courage or training. The brave as I did each time saddled up after a fall all those years ago after all. Courage is not dependent on being completely self-assured that you'll hit a bullseye. Every time rather as about daring to do something despite your misgivings or lack of mastery as research has repeatedly found people build confidence by adopting a growth mindset and wish they give themselves permission to get better as they go along first allows you first draft then a slightly less lousy second. Dina half decent third draft. No one writes bestseller first time. They put pen to paper. So if you've been waiting until you're one hundred percent confident you know exactly what you are doing or of achieved. Davinci like mastery before you set out. Consider the hidden tax of letting your doubts. Call the shots on your career on your relationships. On the value or adding or failing to add for others on ever unleashing your full brilliance on the world cheating behaviors proceeds changing self perception rather than dwelling on all the reasons why not to take action. Shift your focus onto your future desired outcome and then take some action any action toward it doesn't matter how small or insignificant your action is. It just matters that you reclaim the power you've previously given your doubts in fears then notice how you feel nervous. Perhaps but definitely more empowered because he realized that the ground beneath you didn't open up and actually it wasn't so bad after all and then tomorrow repeat and continue every day thereafter until whatever one scared you no longer does at which point. It'll be time to raise your size again by deliberating. Refocusing your attention onto what it is that you do want. It creates a subtle shifting your psychological state than by taking action toward it. You subconsciously affirmed for yourself your commitment to achieving it courage confidence life rewards action only by daring to defy your. Taos and act with the confidence. You wish you had. Can you ever realize how little reason you ever had to doubt yourself?

Bill Marriott Marriott Margie Australia Worrell Martin Seligman Fraud Prime Minister Jason Arden New Zealand Dina
"martin seligman" Discussed on Mentored Podcast

Mentored Podcast

09:06 min | 2 years ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on Mentored Podcast

"I'm in my counseling. Office office converted studio with my friend. Unique in how're you doing my friend. Good Morning Great. You have a nickname doctors. SD The zesty one zest. Let's start there talk about it. What does this mean in your life? Where did that nickname come from? What's your relation was asked? I love to hear them thank you. I was teaching a EH class in research statistics to PhD students at Oregon State. You know my habit of getting on the world's smallest soapbox from time to time. We were talking about psychological traits. And one of the things I started talking about was how in psychology for so many years. Here's the focus was on mental illness. And so then a man. By name of Martin Seligman became president of the American Psychological Association. Asian started doing research on I on learned optimism and and now he talks about authentic happiness. And so I share with my my PhD students. Let's let's switch the way we talk about the human experience and instead of trying to to help people recover from mental illness. Let's really focus on. What do we need to do to to help young people I children adolescents but in Te- throughout the entire life span experience positive? Look at One psychologist calls it floor shadowy. We flourish How do we experience? Happiness outta experience optimism and So you've heard me talk about going up the river to stop them from falling in the river and the need of rescue. What what do we need to do? So when I went back in just a side story and when I went back and and for my PhD. That's what I wanted to focus on rather than focus on traditional psychology and traditional counseling which is about pulling people out of the river so in that class one of the character traits positive Kerry very to traits. That selectmen talked about was zest. And my students Said said Dr Aken that's you even in a research. I institute class which can be really boring. You're you're just you're zesty. Your loss of enthusiasm you know. You're you're really show Suzanne excitement and that helps us learn and so that was the first group of students who gave me that pseudonym. I am of doctors zesty. And then so many people who have been in my classes. They're they're comment is you're so passionate about the school counseling. Profession and so- zest as you know really communicates that passion love for something sense submission sense of purpose I just learned a new word yesterday. Called Ikey guy is the Japanese word but it means means sense of purpose and and why why do we wake up in the morning. You know what is it. We feel like we're put on earth to accomplish accomplish. So that's kind of the background zest and I love that suited him doctors S. channel. Think there's a better student in that people could have given me Achey guy. What is your what is your purpose? Why do you wake up in the morning? Still do what you do well right right now where I feel like I'm in kind of transition from having run the program there Oregon State. That's a great question for me because for about five six years this action longer than that I was probably working sixty seventy hour week. I mean it was Weekends not uncommon for me to be up and at my computer by by the later in the six in the morning probably worked till four in the afternoon and then we try to do something in the evening to. Osu Women's basketball game or or whatever So at that point kind of my my icky guy. My sense of purpose was building the Hybrid Masters Program Because we hadn't had a master's program at all and so I really feel like I gave in a sense gave birth to the program that you went through at Oregon State So now I've I've kind of said okay. You know what. What is it that I wanted to do going forward and I and I I keep coming back to Schering motivational strategies with school counselors and and then also sharing the three principles of Mine Thi- consciousness with school counselors and and Mason. Anybody who's WHO's interested in learning more about psychology and how we function psychologically and you know so little things to happen like watching a TV program where this eleven eleven year old. I mean as a fictional program but eleven year old girl commits suicide and and Parents are rather strange. And I just I Man This this should not be happening on the planet earth and yet we've seen teen suicide aside rates go up we've seen teen anxiety rates teen depression rates teens stress race. Just go off the charts and I I feel the three principles of my consciousness is is the way of helping people understand how we function psychologically and by understanding that we can deal with anxiety and stress and depression and suicidal thoughts More readily Mason. You've you've been there so jeans is talking about suicide rates teens. You've been there multiple occasions at least two serious ones. I would love if you feel comfortable all sharing your story where you've been and then gene for maybe you to share the three principles and how it might apply to either mason now or mason back. Then then I'd say what the most recent one I was playing basketball for. The high school had always been like a goal of mine to play basketball for the high school. I never thought it'd be good enough to do that. Epoch I did it. I was playing baseball for the high school was doing super good was passed it all my classes and if you know me you know that that's not not something that I would do. I was eligible every single week with decencies but do not always passing every single week. Never failing class and then I got in some trouble Got Kicked off off the team. I caught a felony charge. Got Put back on probation. Pu went back into the courses some back in jail. You know back all. I had overcome that problem. Um You know that that that old Mason and then with one mistake I was right back into it almost worse than I was before and so it really liked destroyed me mentally like I do not know don't do can I handle myself just like I said just destroyed me. I beaten depression to at the time I was I was really happy. I was in every day I wake up and just the nowhere nowhere. The depression thought would run through my mind. I thought I'd just completely beat. That was a new man ready to move on but then every day it just got worse and worse and where is she now like the the thought started coming again he came back to the depression. Came back and eventually it just kinda caught up with me and attempted suicide or took a bunch of pills at a seizure. I got sent to the hospital here in Lebanon. They didn't know what I took or how to deal with it. Because I was so out of it I couldn't even tell you my mom was Couldn't tell you my own My own name was making any sense of the semi dorm bekker's Portland. I was there for a month. Then got sent to Albertina Kerr which is really just like a intense therapy place now. was there for another month for finally got released I was supposed to get therapy so for the sake of the story. I'll see release on Tuesday. I was supposed to get therapy by that Friday like they pretty much already. Had everything set up really supposed to walk in to a therapy session start there. I'm committed being two three weeks before is even able to get therapy appointment. I went in four or five times. They told me that they were full therapist there. They couldn't schedule appointments for data. Excuse excuse in the book so I couldn't get therapy and then I got into therapy. Finally there was a child's therapist which I guess I mean technically. I'm still a child. You know I think he. He almost didn't really know how to handle what I'd been thinking. 'cause I've been to some pretty serious things a lot of adult situations so I mean yeah just he. He didn't know how to handle it. Therapy was not helping opinion. Upsetting some silly goal. Tell me that I need to asleep. More instead of Jenner. Pick apart my brain almost and try to figure out why I was sad when I was feeling this way he was more. Just churn out me sleep and saw.

depression Oregon State mason Mason basketball Oregon Martin Seligman American Psychological Associa Portland Dr Aken baseball Kerry Suzanne president Jenner Lebanon Albertina Kerr Pu
"martin seligman" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Is that it increases your sense of agency because you're exercising your agency when you decide to do those things that's exactly right now that that's I really that's a beautiful thing. You decide I you know, because when we are sitting, you know, we essentially are in. In some ways communicating that we're stock and more and more people, you know, people I coach in my work. We talk about this. You know, when I asked him to review will tell me about a typical day in your life. And what is it like, and, you know, I pay attention to how much time are they actually, you know, moving around and for a lot of people who feel very stock in their lives. Simply moving more has has has enormous impact, you know, again movement boost creativity in fluid thinking it jump starts motivation. And you know, if you're sedentary for long periods of time, it basically can produce what the psychologist Martin Seligman referred to as learned helplessness, which is that, you know, you just don't you know, you feel trapped you feel stock. And so, you know, it's very important to to move your body. I mean any of us can relate to that. Right. If you you know, you sit around for a day or two and. Don't do much. Anything you start? You. Don't start you start not feeling. So great, right. You're thinking is less clear, you know, your emotions can get out of whack the other point. I'll make you know on on the chapter on move is importance of being outdoors getting time in nature because part of you know, what's happened over the last thirty years is not just that we are sitting too much, but we're also indoors too much. So getting outside is so beneficial to our sense of agency in improves our mood. It improves our creativity. So, you know, get outdoors and even if literally just if it's ten for ten minutes it could be a game changer. So those are the behavioral principles. Let's talk about the cognitive principles in the I mean, you talked about is position yourself as a learner. What does that look like? And why is that important to increasing agency? Yeah. You know? This is something that has become more important now. Now than than ever before. And it position yourself as a learner. We talked about this. I talked about this a little earlier the bottom line with this principle is when we are well informed, we make better decisions. So our book teaches you how to get the best information. We also help you to identify your best learning style. Everyone learns differently..

Martin Seligman thirty years ten minutes
"martin seligman" Discussed on Female Criminals

Female Criminals

05:06 min | 3 years ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on Female Criminals

"According to John dean, a reporter who covered the nineteen sixty six trial and subsequently wrote the book house of evil, the Indiana, torture, slaying Gertrude was a quote, psychologically, passive woman among her peers, but she had a way with children and evil way for whatever motive she was able. To mobilize children's play energy to serve her own dark purposes with Sylvia likens, and quote, Gertrude motives as part of her borderline personality disorder seemed mundane and understandable and at the same time quite complex being still fairly young only in her mid thirties and suffering from low self esteem and emotional immaturity. Gertrude possibly felt less like a parental figure and more like one of the gang of teenagers, so to speak, but still the leader of that gang Gertrude likely didn't feel she had much control over what happened in her life. But she could control what happened in her household. She couldn't control the adults who abused her. But she could control impressionable young people who didn't know any better it would give her power in an existence in which she felt powerless on October fifth Lester and Betty likens visited their daughters at Gertrude for the last time. They brought another twenty dollars for Gertrude and gave Sylvia and Jenny school close. They were pleased that Sylvia who had quit school the year before was now going back to high school. No, one told them Sylvia wasn't really going much anymore. The girl said they were hungry. So their parents took them out for coke. The month of September had been particularly bad for Sylvia. She'd endured beatings and abuse from Gertrude her children and their friends Jenny had been abused as well would Lester and Betty of noticed that Sylvia was thinner possibly with bruises on her face or arms, if so they didn't say anything it was likely at this meal that their parents told the girls they were traveling with the carnival to Florida and wouldn't be back for another three weeks. It's heartbreaking to think that had Sylvia and Jenny spoken up about their abuse here. And now the horrific events that were to take place in the next few weeks might. Have been averted. They might have believed that there was no way out of the abuse. Even if they spoke up in the nineteen sixties and seventies psychologist, Martin Seligman and Stephen Meyer started conducting experiments in what is called learned. Helplessness learned helplessness is a phenomenon observed in humans and animals that have been conditioned to expect pain suffering or discomfort without a way to escape it when they believe they have no control over what happens to them. They begin to feel as if they're helpless eventually after enough conditioning. They'll stop trying to avoid the pain at all. Even if there's an opportunity to escape it Seligman and Maier conducted experiments on dogs and rats using electric shocks the animals who were given shocks. But learned there was no way to stop them. Eventually just gave up even when they were later presented with the opportunity to avoid the pain in a later experiment. Human participants were subjected to a loud and unpleasant noise. Those who had learned they could neither stop the loud noise, nor scape. It eventually didn't attempt to turn it off even when given the chance Seligman and his colleagues found that putting their subjects through negative situations that were out of their control caused a depressed state based on this research and important connection was made between learned helplessness and depression, one finding was that those who have felt helpless over a long period of time are more likely to suffer from the Prussian learned helplessness has also been observed in victims of domestic violence. These victims are often asked why they stayed with their abuser. Why they didn't tell someone get help or just leave after all it makes no logical sense that a victim would choose to stay with someone who is hurting them when there are ways to escape the pain. But in these cases the. Abuser maintains complete control. And the victim learns they're helpless to do anything about their circumstances. Given these findings it's understandable that Sylvia's gradual conditioning to Gertrude abuse lead to depression and learned helplessness Sylvia felt there was no one she could turn to. And so she lacked the will or motivation to escape at any rate if Lester and Betty likens noticed anything unusual about their daughter's behavior on October fifth. They didn't seem to think it serious enough to cancel the next leg of their trip with the carnival Lester gave Sylvia money for new school shoes. And the girls were dropped back off at Gertrude 's Sylvia and Jenny's parents would learn.

Gertrude Sylvia Martin Seligman Lester Betty Jenny Jenny school John dean Indiana reporter Florida Stephen Meyer depression Maier twenty dollars three weeks
"martin seligman" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"I mean to point the finger at ABC's unfair considering you could put at a whole field of psychology. I mean, it's not like anyone else any of the other mainstream psychologists at the time were bringing in Dushi thing. Yeah. Absolutely. And there are some people who documented the incredible amount of influence indigenous thinking had on psychology that has been unacknowledged sale. Let's talk about that for the rest of this podcast. I think yes, I mean like there are teachings that occur in terms of whether balanced questions of balance of questions of spirituality, a lot of people don't acknowledge their sources a lot of the you're right about aid. He was careful like take, for example, the notion of synergy. I've written about synergy in the book talks about synergy was very careful to talk about Ruth Benedict. Yes. Yes. And I'm very careful about Ruth Benedict. Abe, and of course, Buckminster fuller who started the whole thing and who knows before Buckminster. No ideas are our own. Yes. In any sent colleges like positive psychology. What do you think a positive cycle? I noticed that. You didn't mention positive psychology at all in your book. I mentioned it. But in a fairly negative way. I I must have missed it that what positive psychology is done Scott is to ignore Abe, and I couldn't agree with that more that I wouldn't say positive psychology has ignored about say Martin Seligman who is the founder of the field has dismissed aid. You know, the founding of the field, but I know a lot of positive psychology who may be in part due to the fact I can't stop talking about a to them. Has back knowledged in their work, the huge debt give a specific example can Sheldon has done really good work on trying to test. Some humanistic theories from Colorado's and others has said how deeply influenced by Mazza self determination theory, individuals DC and Ryan talk about their debt to the humanistic is. But I do share your frustration for certain aspects certain is typically the ending of the field, and how it was founded as in a way that was pitted against a humanistic psychology or just dismissive of that was just the spiritual you know, like non scientific field. Yeah. I do share that restriction or days. It was narrative resurgent psychology eight year right smack in the middle of that whole again imperial. Yeah. Wave and to think of to dismiss as nonscientific, that's the worst. Because that's what he faced when he was. Yeah. Practice. You're not a scientist. So to to bring that up again. That's not right. But the whole notion example from his point of view talking again about the book one of the teachings is that we don't own knowledge, we share and one of the teachings is unless you share knowledge it dies. So none of its original. Scott. What could be originals already been said we package we restate we try to bring more relevance. But we don't create we don't invent ideas, and from an indigenous point of view, we don't invent them. Because part of the task is to listen to the teachings that come over the generations. The good Alba was saying I'm only telling you what I was told. They won't say to you. I'm telling you what I discovered. Understand now when they say, I'm only telling you what I was told they have proven it in their own lives. Like elder will say to you. And this is what I mentioned the book. Here's the story. If it makes sense to you good. If it doesn't take tested out is saying, but it's not original knowledge is a story. Witnesses story come from the old people say the old people there is nothing new light when digits people talk did the sun ever rise in the west. So when you say look at the sun rising people done that for thousands of years. So western psychology is very much into kinda like I've got a new theory. I've got a new thing and you look at it..

Ruth Benedict Sheldon Buckminster fuller Abe Scott Dushi ABC Martin Seligman scientist Colorado Alba Mazza DC founder Ryan eight year
"martin seligman" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"martin seligman" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Point of view, some of the people who were living there or maybe whose relatives our grandparents talk to aid, they might have a different view. But I'm talking about I'm going from aimed into the blackfoot territory, not from the black foot territory s. Yes. So they're air that other people might different. And I think if you read the material from heavy head and so forth. I don't think it's an angry reading. No, I don't there's other aspects assault Twitter exchange that that I sent you. It seemed I agree. And I think that was unfortunate I can very very much sympathize with the point that he could have brought, but the same point could be made to anyone any living psychologist today. Right. It's not. I mean to point the finger at seems unfair considering you could point at a whole field of psychology. I mean, it's not like anyone else any of the other mainstream psychologists at the time were bringing in Dushi thing. Yeah. Absolutely. And there are some people who documented the incredible amount of influence indigenous thinking had on psychology that has been unacknowledged sale. Let's talk about that for the rest of this podcast. I think yes, I mean like there are teachings that occur in terms of whether balanced questions of balance of questions, spirituality, a lot of people don't acknowledge their sources a lot of the you're right about aid. He was careful like take, for example, the notion of synergy. I've written about synergy in the book talks about synergy, a was very careful to talk about Ruth Benedict. Yes. Yes. And I'm very careful about Ruth Benedict. Abe, and of course, Buckminster fuller who started the whole thing and who knows before Buckminster. No ideas are our own. Yes. In any sent colleges you see like positive psychology. What do you think a positive cycle? I noticed that you didn't mention positive psychology at all in your book. I mentioned it. But in a fairly negative way. I must have missed it that what positive psychology is done Scott is to ignore Abe, and I couldn't agree with that more that I wouldn't say positive psychology has ignored about say Martin Seligman who is the founder of the field has dismissed aid. You know, the founding of the field, but I know a lot of positive psychology who may be in part due to the fact I can't stop talking about a to them. Has back knowledged in their work, the huge debt give a specific example can Sheldon has done really good work on trying to test. Some humanistic theories from Colorado's and others has said how deeply influenced by Mazza self determination theory, individuals DC and Ryan talk about their debt to the humanistic. There's but I do share your frustration for certain aspects certain ending of the field. And how it was founded as in a way that was pitted against a humanistic psychology or just dismissive of that was just the spiritual you know, like non scientific field. Yeah. I do share that restriction or days. It was narrative resurgence psychology eight year right smack in the middle of that whole again imperial. Yeah. Wave and to think of dismiss as nonscientific that's the worst. Because that's what he faced when he was. Yeah. Practice. You're not a scientist. So to to bring that up again. That's not right. But the whole notion example from his point of view talking again about the book one of the teachings is that we don't own knowledge, we share and one of the teachings is unless you share knowledge it dies. So none of its original. Scott. What could be original? All ready been said we package we restate.

Ruth Benedict Sheldon Buckminster fuller Abe Scott Twitter assault Dushi Martin Seligman scientist Colorado Mazza DC founder Ryan eight year
Overcome Learned Helplessness

Curiosity Daily

02:28 min | 3 years ago

Overcome Learned Helplessness

"Can you? Remember a time when you assumed you had no control over a situation. Even though you really did. And because of that assumption, you just gave up that's a psychological phenomenon called learned helplessness. And here's some good news. It can be fixed. You've come to the right place. Because today, I'll teach you how we've all had to deal with this for sure so you probably know how it feels to be hopeless. If you've ever been unemployed or you've been laid out with an injury or you voted for a losing candidate learned helplessness is a more extreme version of that feeling. It's when you stop looking for work after a handful of failed interviews, or when you give up on starting an exercise routine because you've hurt your back too many times, or when you stay home on election day because past results have made you feel like your vote doesn't matter in the extreme. It's white people don't leave their abusers. And why prisoners don't try to escape there is a way to reverse? This tendency though, and it comes from an experiment in the sixties by psychologist Martin Seligman. When he was a young graduate student. He worked on a study on Pavlovian responses in dogs. You know, how you can teach dogs to drool when they hear the sound of a bell because they associate the bell with food. Well, this experiment was a bit darker. This study looked to see if dogs would be trained to jump when they heard a certain tone. But in this case, it's because they associated the tone with an electric shock. I told you it was dark. Well, it turned out that yes, they would jump out of the way. But Seligman noticed that some dogs just stood there when they heard the tone. They didn't try to avoid the shock. It turned out that one small tweak could drastically change. How subjects responded to a bad situation. If dogs had their first shocks in a situation where they could get away. Even if they were trapped for future shocks. They put in a lot more effort to avoid them Seligman found that this also applies to people the way we interpret bad situations has a big impact on our depression risk. If you think that bad things will keep happening, and you're always to blame you're more prone to depression. But if you think. You're bad situation will go away soon. And then it wasn't your fault. You tend to have a better outlook on life. Overall in a nineteen ninety-five study Seligman and his team came up with an idea called learned optimism which therapists use in cognitive behavioral therapy. The trick is to reframe your thoughts to be less pessimistic and self blaming. So the next time you think you have no control think about this. Maybe that's just the story. You're telling yourself, maybe you really do have control the moment, you give up you've learned to be helpless, try to unlearn that. And who knows what you might

Graduate Student Seligman Depression