17 Burst results for "Martin Rees"

"martin rees" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Then of course, if you have issues like whether we can meant brains electonic, download brains. We have all these issues of q. Identity. I mean, if you brain machine, oh, you said that it happened. Would you be happy to be destroyed? Would that really you supposing that you can download it and make ten clones of it? Which will be you these issues debates rages, but then becoming positive practical ethics. It's incredible. I remember I had a moment early on in my career where I sitting there talking to two astronauts about how they would prepare to go to Mars, and I had a moment saying like we might actually go to Mars than my lifetime. This is absolute fiction absolute science fantasy and it's become a reality. And it just every day it blows my mind. And I hope I never lose that. I hope I never complacent about that. So I do want. I'm about to close, but I have one final question before my to closing questions. I'm wondering if you think let's see if I can ask this clear, clearly if this is a column a column B or both scenario, I'm noticing more and more. Astronomers theoretical physicists astrophysicists who are starting to write about deep philosophical, existential issues. If you look at Stephen Hawking's posthumous book that was just recently published. He's talking about these big existential issues, a friend of mine who we've had on the show before Sean Carroll history. Simple. It's wonderful very philosophical booking this change. And I'm wondering to think it's a function of the life span. Do you think it's a function of the era? We're living in today. Or is it a little bit of both? Well, it's not that new because I mean, one One of my. of my paid assesses professor here of Eddington wrote books of just type in the nineteen thirties and out of very wide wide reach. So there's nothing new about that. But I think it's the case. System sciences, lend themselves more to these speculations. I mean, the stolen called kitty one of them brain research is clearly another was dentistry isn't. So I think it's not surprising that before in these fields. They think about these. And of course, there is a public interest. And I think whereas some scientists grumbled public is not interested in that work. I'm gonna find that so many people instant in things far away from everyday concerns like the universe black hose on the Higgs, bows on and all that. And of course, most of all in dinosaurs, complete irrelevant but fascinating above all other topics. Two young kids. Showing him archaeopteryx? So. I think it is important. And so I think he's good that many professional scientists, and he many professional communicators meeting this need through food books and other media here here. I absolutely agree will Martin I always close, my episodes. I know that you have to run you have such a packed schedule. I always close my episodes by asking my guest, the same two questions, and my listeners would be infuriated. If I didn't do the same with you. So here they are the quite big picture, you think about these things all the time. So when you look to the future as you did throughout your entire book in whatever context is relevant to right now, you know, the future of humanity the future of the universe or just the future of you yourself, your family or your legacy number one. What is the thing if you had to pick one that really does keep you up at night that really concerns you that you almost are feeling a bit maybe pessimistic or cynical about. But then on the flip side of that. So we end on a bit of a lighter note. What is the thing that you genuinely truly are optimistic about it's not lip service. You really do have an optimistic view of the future. We'll I the pessimism which is short. It is the world is becoming less governable and more will be embittered. And if we take people in countries like Africa, whether disadvantaged to changed, they know what that missing boost mobile phones, etcetera, and mobility is greater so I think we could have big shifts due to that and a big risks of some sort of high consequence Lopo vent, which causes problems, and which causes social breakdown. I'm very well. To society is fragile and brittle and international relations will remain very tense and interest Salang massive inequalities SIS. To even get activated between the countries like those in Africa, those like the US and Europe such one two, that's my pessimistic view..

Higgs Stephen Hawking Africa US professor Sean Carroll Eddington Europe Martin
"martin rees" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Let's get back to the show. And when we look about energy comes sumptious worldwide, which is a massive stress on the global population. We know that we need energy. And we know that we're going to be continuing to stress our research resources because the population is exploding. And we see a lot of resistance in America to nuclear energy. Is that something that you see as well in the UK or on the whole are people quite accepting of nuclear power. I think is I'm Bill. Violence hip, but it's as much because of the extreme cost as about today jus- of says as both things, but. I do think that we've got to explore new designs for nuclear justification explore improvement at all kinds of carbon free energy, so low wind and Ola rest. And indeed, I think this is the one win win situation if we want to cut carbon emissions because if you just have a carbon taxes cetera, it won't be fully effective. But if in fact, you can ensure that carbon-free energy and would include fourth-generation nuclear this can be done economically. Then it'll be helpful to countries like the US and Europe. But also even more so to countries like India, but the moments they don't do much energy, but they just have smokey stowe's pudding wooden dung and people's homes, and they need a grid. And they go to do if nothing else changes is to have Colfax stations importing, cheap cove from Australia. But we'd like to see happen. Viciously is for the cost and officiency of some kind of clean energies to drop to be competitive with coal. And that's why if that can be done it's win win situation. Because those who developed a technology will benefit and India will be able to leapfrog directly to and fantasy. So I would say one of the most important things we can do to address climate change is simply to accelerate. Our energy toes us, the level of our into medical search, for instance. And that I think he effective the other Wedeman situation colonizing on energy. And if we can do all those things than nine billion people can live comfortable lives, maybe not quite alive that wealthy Americans do now those use his much energy, not so must be ups having a decent life an incident from that one very benign technology, in my opinion. Is developing official meets guess richer. Low tech versions of that available now, but really high tech versions where you actually grow the whole thing for one cell is possible. And that's again, a kind of power. Ties. I absolutely agree. I am a massive fan of the impossible burqa, which has really caught on in America, which is artificial meet with hime in it. So it just like meat, but yes lab grown meat. It's going to change the game. Hopefully because that is a huge Welland problem Tony to feed the cop of, but also what hopes eliminate factory farming, which is one of the great evils. Yes, it will hopefully produce necessary perhaps even era land to plant crops. But also, you're right. I mean, it's it's such an ethical issue that so many people are willing to look past simply because their needs are greater in their view than the needs of what they might consider lesser creatures. And I think that's a big struggle in general. It's it's kind of a study psychology. Now, I was studying neuroscience, and I moved to psychology. And I'm quite interested in why people do the things they do and make. Decisions that they make. And this kind of comes back to the conversation. We're having previously about the fact that we think in the short term. I use the example of. Satellites and space debris that we are so quick to get the, oh, we figured out how to do this. Let's throw them up there. But we never quite thought about how we were what we're going to do it. Nuclear waste, and other example. There's so many examples when you really start to dig about as trying to and it's twofold, right? It's rushed to the technology without thinking about the implications. But on the flip side of that it goes hand in hand with exactly what you said. Which is that politicians are considered about the next two years. The next four years, whatever their termite most investors concerned about the next two years or even the next quarter..

"martin rees" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"And it's really hard because they find examples say himself Wilson, lots of other people like that -absolutely, Neil Shubin, Neil degrasse Tyson. We have wonderful example, hopefully, more women soon, hopefully more people have color, but it is there is a bit of a resistance within academia to sort of. I guess there's a push to keep politics and science quite separate is. But really what we need right now is politically minded scientists say that the academic. And the entre preneurs are the ones who could most easily those constrains people in some very large corporation, and those who are in government, but it's condemn IX and the independent of Granada's that the ones who should be speaking of the kinds of the futuristic ideas in the book, this idea of the technologies that could potentially really address some global struggles. But that also could potentially be a bit. And what's the word? I'm looking for. Cataclysmic what kinds of technologies which you lump into that category as being dangerous as potentially being both? When I think most of them are both point. I mean, obviously, gene modification has been affects. But it could it could be used a way gene driveway, Dr extinct species in a way that has ecological damage. It wasn't predicted as one example. Xrays? So that back if possible not just the two single, gene editing, but to identify the combination of genes that affects of the human characteristics, then Natalie to ethical as about new fundamental kind of inequality. We have to decide how to cope with cope with it. So I think all these technologies have been on and Laurean consequences. That's true of these. I will. I mean, I think the internet of being fused benefits, but it allows a new type of crime in a way that wasn't possible before by connecting people up and making all Mon vulnerable to a single cyberattack. All right, guys. I want to take a quick break to thank the sponsors of this week's episode starting with creek start. I know that you guys have been getting excited about creek star. Because I've been talking about it now for a couple of months. Oh my gosh. Yummy snacks made with cricket powder. They taste super good. They're really good for you. And guys, they're like sustainable. They're good for the earth. Cricket powder. It's made from. Yeah. I'm going to say free range crickets, but also seed butters chocolate dates super yummy stuff. So let's talk about them. They are really tasty. I mean, I think that's the number one. That's like the most important thing is that they actually taste good. And we've got lots. Of options here with creek star. We've got these cool cricket flour crackers. And we've also got these super yummy cricket flour protein bar. So they're really good on the go. You've got completely nutrition. They don't have refined sugars than them. And they don't have that like weird Chaki chewy texture that a lot of protein bars have a lot of people don't like that. And you don't have to deal with that with creek start. But I mean, the most important thing for me is that these creeks aren't bars are way to really give back there away to show that you are concerned about sustainability you're concerned about the future of the planet their forty crickets and every creek start bar and they're over one hundred crickets in every cracker bag get this for the same amount of protein compared to beef crickets require twelve times less feed two thousand times, less water thousands of times less land, and they emit. A hundred times less greenhouse gas. If there's any reason for you to try them. That's it right there..

"martin rees" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Nerdy merch dot com. And there have got all sorts of stuff t shirts, and mugs, and tote bags, and I actually have copies of both of the books. I was involved in this year the skeptics guide to the universe, which I co wrote you can buy a signed copy there makes it great holiday gift and the National Geographic almanac. Twenty nineteen. I wrote the forward to that book. And I also am the quizmaster. So I pop up throughout the book at the beginning of the. Sections and kind of ask you some trivia to carry you throughout signed copies of that. I can subscribe or transcribe. Nope. Neither of those words were looking for. I can make them out to whom ever. You would like just denote that when you make the order. There's also really great new merch that features. My little man killer. The science dog super cute. Check it out at talk. Nerdy merch dot com. Okay. Enough about me. Let's talk about my guest this week. It was an absolute honor and privilege to sit down with this, inspiring, and brilliant and incredibly humble individual. So I have to kind of give a little bit of background. I went to Cambridge a few months ago along with the skeptics guide because we were on the book tour and. We were getting a tour of Cambridge. And I had been speaking with the publicist for this individual in advance. And they were like, oh, you're going to be in England. Why don't you just pop in? So I had the honour to visit this individual the reason I haven't said his name yet is because I have to tell you a funny story I walked in to his beautiful historic office. And I told him or asked him, I'm not sure which title supersedes is it Dr Martin Reese, or is it a Sir Martin REEs and his response. I still remember it was like, well, Lord supersedes all things and I was like oh crap. So I I hadn't gotten the memo. But yes, he is Lord Martin Reese, Barron REEs of Ludlow and has a ton of titles after that. Notably astronomer Royal he was the master of Trinity College Cambridge. Two thousand four to twenty twelve and president of the Royal Society between two thousand five and twenty ten guys. This is a big deal. He wrote a beautiful new book called on the future prospects for humanity. His previous books were are 'cause MC habitat just six numbers and our final hour, but his new book, it's actually very short. And sweet I highly recommend it. It's a quick read an important read. It's not about astronomy. It's not about physics. It's about where we're going. It really talks about the existential risks that we're facing as a human society it talks about foibles. You know, the short term thinking polarization alarmist rhetoric cynicism. All of the things that we are really struggling with at the governmental level. But also at the individual level. And I think that this book actually will give you a lot of hope there's humor there's perspective. There's deep reverence and absolute brilliance contained within his pages. It's pages. It's phages. So is without any further ado, I just feel like I'm not going to do it service. You've just gotta hear the interview again, like I said, it was an absolute honor an absolute privilege, so here he is Lord Martin Reese will Martin. Thank you so much for joining me today. And I feel absolutely honored. I am so excited. I'm sitting here in your office at Trinity College at Cambridge. It's beautiful here. It is lovely and Oh, privileged pivots. to be. And the coach way. Oh, sitting look the same. When Newton was. That's incredible. And student has been down to Levinson's. And so how long have you been associated with Cambridge? Are you a professor emeritus now? Miss being in Cambridge full wills and thirty is in various capacities. I've as professor I was head of the Chivas, Tony. And then I was the most fanatical which is of head posted in college. And now, you are astronomer Royal with us retitled really, it doesn't mean very much..

"martin rees" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Usual outside the normal pattern see climate change. See your quick, you're very shrewd out there to notice this, sir. Because it's all part of the politics of selling it here. This afternoon. CNN international Christiane Amanpour has a show, and she was talking to you astronomer Royal Lord Martin REEs about his new book on the future prospects for humanity and Christiane Amanpour said when you look towards what is the biggest existential threat to our planet. Is it an asteroid colliding with the mothership that would be earth through? What is the biggest exist? Threat to our most the kinds of risks produced by us humans either collectively on the climate's all the environment all individually because technology so powerful that even a few people can have a really catastrophic effect that custody as globally, and as I said in my book, I look at this aspect perspective and ESPN Iran, full, forty five billion centuries. But this is the first species human species has the future of the planet at his house because what be doing this century will determine whether we leave a depleted planet for choosing generations, or whether we can survive sustainable, I remember fifty will thirty years ago when I started telling people, you wait, they're gonna start saying the greatest threat to the earth is humanity. And they're now doing it and this guy Lord Martin REEs, Royal? Lord. Martin REEs new book on the future prospects for humanity. We are the first species in forty five million centuries that hold the fate of the planet. In our very hands. Now, if I had been hosting this program instead of Christiane Amanpour, I would've said, okay. Well. Let's say that somebody ordered you to destroy the planet at gave you a government directive destroy the habitat destroy, whatever your what would you do? What would you advise forget, whether you agree with it or not your superior demands that you destroy the what would you do? How would you do it? I would love one of these clowns. Because I know what they would say. Well, nuclear designate, wait a minute nuclear detonation isn't climate change. If you want, but and you're not going to destroy the habitat, you might destroy it for human beings, but you're not going to start life on the planet. Nobody's ever going to be able to do that life will survive. No matter what somewhere somehow the point is. This is how they get people hating themselves blaming themselves. This is when they set up redemption for all of this damage or causing you can make.

Christiane Amanpour Royal Lord Martin REEs Martin REEs CNN Iran forty five billion centuries forty five million centuries thirty years
"martin rees" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on WRVA

"You ever noticed when it's a cold day people say, well, what about climate change? They say you can't compare the weather every day to climate. There are two different things. And yet. When it's one hundred and ten degrees in July. They say see climate change. But overall, we're wide temperatures are down the past two years. So they had to come up with a new term climate change since there wasn't any warming. And that allows any weather event to be portrayed as extraordinary unusual outside the normal pattern see climate change, your quick, you're very shrewd out there to notice this, sir. Because it's all part of the politics of selling it here. This afternoon. CNN international Christiane Amanpour has a show, and she was talking to you K astronomer Royal Lord Martin REEs about his new book on the future prospects for humanity and Christiane Amanpour said when you look towards what is the biggest existential threat to our planet. Is it an asteroid colliding with the mothership that would be earth through? What is the biggest existential threat to our? Pedic most the kinds of risks induced by us humans either collectively on the climate's all the environment all individually because technology is so powerful that even a few people can has a really catastrophic effect the cascades globally, and as I said my book, I look in his perspective and ESPN Iran for forty five million centuries. But this is the first species. Human species has the future of the planet his hands because what we do doing this century will determine whether we leave a depleted planet for generations, or whether we can survive sustainably, I remember fifty will thirty years ago when I started telling people, you wait, they're gonna start saying the greatest threat to the earth is humanity. And they're now doing it and this guy Lord Martin REEs, Royal Lord, Martin REEs new book on the future prospects for humanity. We are the first species in forty five million centuries that hold the fate of the planet in our very hands. Now, if I had been hosting this program instead of Christiane Amanpour, I would've said, okay. Well. Let's say that somebody ordered you to destroy the planet at gave you a government directive destroy the habitat destroy, whatever your what would you do? What would you advise forget, whether you agree with it or not your superior demands that you destroy? What would you do? How would you do it? I would love one of these clowns. Because I know what they would say. Well, nuclear definitely, wait a minute. Nuclear detonation isn't climate change. If you want, but and you're not going to destroy the habitat, you might destroy it for human beings, but you're not going to start life on the planet. Nobody's ever going to be able to do that life will survive. No matter what somewhere somehow the point is. This is how they get people hating themselves blaming themselves. This is when they set up redemption for all of this damage or causing you can make.

Christiane Amanpour Royal Lord Martin REEs Martin REEs CNN Iran forty five million centuries thirty years ten degrees two years
"martin rees" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Catastrophic affect the cuss gays globally. And as I said in my book, I look at this aspect perspective and ESPN Iran, full, forty five million centuries. But this is a I love species. David the human species has the future of the planet is because we'll be doing this century will determine whether we leave a depleted planet for future generations, or whether we can survive sustainable, I remember fifty will thirty years ago when I started telling people, you wait, they're gonna start saying the greatest threat to the earth is humanity. And they're now doing it and this guy Lord Martin REEs, Royal Lord, Martin REEs new book on the future prospects for humanity. We are the first species in forty five million centuries that hold the fate of the planet in our very hands. Now, if I had been hosting this program instead of Christiane Amanpour, I would've said, okay. Well. Let's say that somebody ordered you to destroy the planet at gave you a government directive destroy the habitat destroy, whatever your what would you do? What would you advise forget, whether you agree with it or not your superior demands that you destroy? What would you do? How would you do it? I would love one of these clowns. Because I know what they would say. Well, nuclear definitely, wait a minute. Nuclear detonation isn't climate change. If you want, but and you're not gonna destroy the habitat, you might destroy it for human beings, but you're not gonna strike life on the planet. Nobody's ever going to be able to do that life will survive. No matter what somewhere somehow the point is. This is how they get people hating themselves blaming themselves. This is when they set up redemption for all of this damage or causing you can make.

Lord Martin REEs Christiane Amanpour Iran David forty five million centuries thirty years
"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Yeah. We don't have that word. Yo who's me? It's not invented yet. Okay. Stars. Just like keeping perfect. I'm like, yeah. It might. And they the the famous L G M. I think was written on the page th that's right, right. It was so different than before. Right. Right. And that would be that's an example of a signal. So we're so our our history field says if you see a signal that is regular and perfect. The is it is it just something. We've yet to discover a nature that has regular perfect. Yeah. Or is it intelligent sending us and the history of this is that it's a new phenomenon in nature. It's not a it's not alliens. Unfortunately, because we all wanna meet the aliens wasn't it kind of you know, when the human spent it sends out the golden record. They had like instructions on the side of how to decode what do you think? What do you think of that? In fact, you were you were also blurred by Andrian who was the creative director of love you the Of regular. the regular golden records Voyager is. So that just I'd be curious. Yes. This is our attempt. People may remember. Yes. Just Google the golden record their pictograms on the side. Yes. Yes. That of course, it's not written in English. But Graham that our attempt to share our scientists. Yeah. With them. Yes. What am I think if it's a good exercise to do that? And I think there's a plan for an to do similar competition to schools to find something similar to design something, and that's a great idea. But I think the chance of picking that up on decoded his fall smaller than the taking sort of radio and TV transmissions from the that are already making. Emitting whole bubble to wherever you are in any direction. You're going to receive this bubble. Whereas you gotta be right in line with. Yes. Some people say we should beam some signal and other people say you shouldn't do that. We should hide I contact. It because I think if they're more advanced than us, they probably know all about us. They probably watch us already bothering with us. Yep. Yep. You wouldn't give your Email address to a stranger who is human in the street, much less. The return address of earth to aliens in the universe. We saw those movies. We know they'll do. They they would know about this already. Okay. I think the the direction zoo for them all about they MO. Well, see us with interest of interest. All right. Keep going. All right. So so this is from Instagram the seabird as an SEA, this is is it more practical to research inter dimensional travel rather than faster than light travel. More practical. Well, I think neither is very practical. Going send things at the speed of light. Of course is okay. If it's information, and of course, one of the ways of of sending information across the galaxy will be descended code for DNA or something like that. That's the speed of light. Because. Yeah. Yes. So I think those probably be on the science fiction fringe, you'll know lunch and never say that because we have no idea what will be done in the future. We've got about two minutes left. And I wanna make sure we have I wanna hear Martin's deepest sorta summit reflections on where we are. We we've been where we're headed. Yes. What can you do for? Well in my book on the future. I emphasize that this century is very special because depending on what actions we take now began either leave a depleted world with mass extinctions and up eating climate or we can figure the transition to spacefaring civilization where human evolution will be succeeded by a post human era, which could spread beyond the solar system. Indeed entire galaxy said the stakes very high and the concern not just about ourselves. I'll children or grandchildren, but about the long term future of humanity and of post human life, but when you think of post human wet can't we just think of better humans. So we have access to the genome now, I get rid of disease live twice as long. Yes. Maybe reduce the chemical inefficiencies in your body. So you can eat as much about that. Already managing to do that like indigenous communities live in harmony with the with the earth. You know, let's one possibility some people might like that some people might know, some people might..

Google Andrian Graham director SEA Martin two minutes
"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"And so if you're going to have a system that creates a magnetic field around your ship, this the weight of that versus the weight of what might just simply be human. Yes. There's nothing lead. Yeah. That was a good question. Yeah. What else and given this is from few bullet out given the departs because of interaction with the Higgs field is what gave this mass. Is it conceivable that in future when we understand this interaction? More thoroughly we could devise a machine by which we could completely nullify spaceship and its contents interaction with things failed rendering a completely massless and therefore capable of light speed and beyond. That's just. I think. Say that become conceive of. That's a that's a very. But needs a bigger brain. That'd be yesterday. Except. You have to watch out, of course. Because for almost everything that we've discussed there's that off ramp of the weaponization of that new technology, and so you can imagine if you had control over the massive something that became weaponize. Well, I mean, one of the themes of my my book on the future is that the stakes are getting high because every new invention has benefits and the downside, but they getting bigger, but the concept, so I'm knife can can cut your food kill someone. But a knife can't kill people, but people will kill you or your knife kills people, but other kinds of weaponry that equation is different. Yep. And does the risk of as well as design right, right? This one is about communicating I think with with liens Timothy Conan has anybody thought to watch for coded patrons in star light. It could be used as communication as if a very advanced civilization intentionally put large objects into orbit around a local star to create an obvious message. That distant intelligent service would recognize it as a message. I could imagine our civilization attempting something like that in the future if we could. Yeah. Well, of course, there was this optical tabby stop if he before not happening, but he's previously indication read like smoke signals the, but I. My view is that if said he says, she's a tectonic thing said he search for extraterrestrial don't. Yeah. Yeah. If they'd take something it won't be anything like our civilization. It'd be such a machine created by some long dead civilization. And it might be sending out some sort of transmission unlikely. This is a message we could decode so I'm pessimistic about being able to decode a message because if they're in any way smarter than us their simplest thoughts will transcend, our deepest thoughts. They might not be interested sending a message. But if you might find evidence for something which is manifest yard official. Nothing would be of course, big break food. And of course, you were around for the for the discovery of the pulsar correct student, then yes. Cambridge. So Anthony Hewish. Jewish bell and Jocelyn bell. Star that is that is blinking at us radio..

Timothy Conan Jocelyn bell Anthony Hewish Cambridge official
"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"This is start talking. We're back from final segment cosmic queries that future of humanity. Featuring the recent book by my friend and colleagues or Martin Reese on the future prospects for humanity. So let me just lead off. She's got her list of questions from our people. But I'm just curious is there how important will science? I think I know the answer to this. But I want to hear it from you how important will science literacy be going forward as science becomes so much more centered in decisions we have to make about our own fate. When I think it's crucially important that everyone should have a field facade. And that's why things like your outreach are so important because so many of this have to take on Energie health environments, and you need to have some field facades not to be bamboozled by bad sticks and things like that. And so it's important to everyone. Have feel facades. But also, it's part of our culture, isn't it. And you know, everyone wants to know about place in universe. And of course, nothing fascinates kids more than dinosaurs. And even though they completely irrelevant. So. Nobody educators. These relevant that argument. I said one our asteroids to catch dinosaurs. So we're done here. Dinosaurs in space. Eight year old children, just weeping. So what else you got this our last segment so making good, okay? Are you ready? This is Jim Jake win. He got unto us through Instagram. And he asks what's the next E equals MC squared? Meaning what do you anticipate will next shake the foundations of physics on that level of why factor Rudge of well? Of course, the biggest wow is now coming not from physics. But from biology understanding, the brain and complications and a lot to say physics is easy. Subject styles and atoms are easy to understand and even insect. So big challenges to understand life and the braid. But if you want to ask about physics, then the next big step is to unify the very large in a very small unify what Einstein did with the physics of atoms in the micro was quantum theory. And until we have that revolt understand. Mt. Space in the bedrock sense. And we astronomy. Doc energy, which is a full Layton empty space. Dark. Yeah. That's a big challenge. For physics. Is there some state of the universe that is on the brink of collapse? And we don't know what if you don't know. Like onto your customer. That's a. We could be we could be walking along the. Edge of the cliff is not visible to us until you step there. Everything collapses th that's possible. But another point I which I make in in in my in my book on the future is that the maybe some important aspects of reality, which our brains just con- cope with. I mean, the monkey cont understand quantum theory. And likewise, the maybe deep issues, which is just beyond our brains and have to wait these post humans. They may. The question deeming like right after they pets. Yes. Rescue. Do you mean like we can't understand what's happening in front of our eyes like something like remember when some people saw ships for the first time, they just didn't see them because they didn't know what they were. That's what you mean. And because at relevant to alliens because they may be so different from us. If we wouldn't recognize their manifestations. Oh my God. Okay. So this is about the Hadrian collider. Isn't there? A part of the large Hadron collider that emits a magnetic field stronger than that of earth. Why can't we somehow place something similar on our future? Spaceships that's where Ramon Hamilton to protect us from from solar radiation. Well, maybe we can people talk about talk about that. But you need soco superconductor or you need power to maintain the magnetic field. But certainly radiation damage is an important constraint on manned space, and that's why then his Tito idea of sending people around Mars and back five hundred days and his favorite crew amid lays couple to be cooped up a five hundred days happily and to be enough not to care about radiation does to become sterile at the end. Yeah. Couple. They're happy to sit in silence together for long. Yeah. Volunteer yet. So yes. So this. It's an interesting fact in the point Martin was making was that you you, you know, every pound every kilogram matters that you're setting into space..

Martin Reese Jim Jake Mt Tito Layton Einstein Ramon Hamilton five hundred days Eight year
"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"One more quick. Mark fest question from Facebook where he asked we'll companies such as SpaceX eventually make NASA obsolete. Yeah. But let me let me give a counter argument there. I'm to do something. I yes, that's expensive and dangerous. Doesn't really come with a business model? That's very short venture capitalist meeting. What are you doing? Humans on Mars. How much the cost? I don't know trillion dollars dangerous. Yes. When people die probably what's the return on investment, nothing. Yeah. So how do you do that? I I my research of the history of this exercise. Yeah. Says the governments do this first then they find the trade winds and the patents that are candid. And then private enterprise comes up behind that that I'm saying you would never have that band is goal of sending a million people. You would just have a few pioneers who would go. I mean, the point is that space is it's not like climate change governments have to coordinate. It doesn't have to be everyone agree in it can be just one corporation doing it individually. Therefore, there's much greater freedom to feed them and decision. Yes. And a greater capacity for accepting risks good point because the FAA doesn't want people dying note in so that might so that might actually be a delaying force compared to what you're. He wants the wild west. Who smoke around the back of the school? Yeah. Yes. Yes. All right. We gotta take our next break. And when we come back more cosmic queries on the future of humanity with sir. Martin REEs and may Figgins Clinton.

Mark fest Facebook Martin REEs NASA Figgins Clinton FAA trillion dollars
"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Was a national trauma, whereas adventures and test pilots prepared to take high risks in that. So I think the future lies in cut-price high risk ventures bankroller by these private companies, and I hope very much that the will be a community of people like that have gone knowledge by the end of the century. But I disagree with musk and with my late colleague, Stephen hawking in that. I don't think mass immigration is ever going to happen. Every sense. But was nowhere in the solar system is as Clement as the top of Everest all the south pole and dangerous delusion to think we can solve the problems by going. Tomorrow's dealing with climate change is hard. But it's a dull compared to tear forming laws. I agree one hundred percent. And I'm publicly I'm gonna. Opposed to mass migration. But I just I don't mind if we all want to live on Mars, but we need to. I don't think people fully understand what that involves. If you mess up your, you know, your bedroom, then you move, we'll watch what happens. So if we're really going to ship a billion people, tomorrow's you because something bad happened on earth. There's a lot of the argument, especially put forth by your colleague the late. Stephen hawking the argument was and you can see the argument. It makes a good headline. You wanna be a multi planet species in case something really bad happens on one of the planets. So your species prop can still property guy. Get that. But if you want to ship a billion people tomorrow's to protect humans Tara form it in advance to do. So it seems to me whatever takes a tariff or more resources you could tariff on earth back into earth. If you that's all. But but but I think he's right. I mean, I think the will be these crazy pine is on MAs. Yes. I'd rather than coming that the planets that they will modify themselves to adapt by the end of the century. We have genetic modification techniques inside book techniques. So my view is at a post human era pioneered by these people on us because they've got every incentive to adapt themselves to a hostile environment their way from all the regulators. And so th they will evolve into a different species, they quickly biological regulators. So they can actually introduce variation. Yep. For the Martian, baby. That stays they can download their brains into cetera. Cetera. And that means that the species will have its descendants who will be generated by those people in my brain. To replicate. A separate question. Another show. I don't know maybe me, but what like just in silver body form. People address in silver. Okay. What else are you? Fast forward a decade, or if you decades and imagine this permanent Mars colony that we were talking about assuming the NASA were the ones responsible. What changes do you think that that would mean to the role of NASA? Well, we're responsible have to go on. But my my line, which I discussing in in my book on the future is that the role of Nasu we just that of a an airport rather than airline as it were in that they may provide some basic facilities, but it'd be the private companies that's a provide the space craft and take the people prepared to accept high risks. So I think NASA would be phased out, and it'll be public money not spent and private money spent as you may know, the F A has recent legislation. I don't know if it's been fully voted on. But it's been does not much resistance to it where they will. Now be the shepherds of the future space launch sites space ports. And you can propose spaceport. Yes. And may would be responsible for checking the safety of it. Yes. The safety of the down range launches is there Saint here that we're like so this is a first step. Yes. Precisely what did they shouldn't be too stringent because they should remember that some people prepared to go on Monday tickets and people like Steve Fossett, and these guys who go hang gliding in sympathy, they'd take high risks, and they all to allow people like that to risk their own lives. Someone who wanted to go in these one way trips tomorrow. Show. And I said, well, what does your wife think about it? She oh, she encouraged. Have you thought? He's doing a gofundme main then come on. Malls. But on impact. Oh, good..

NASA Stephen hawking musk Saint Everest Steve Fossett Clement one hundred percent
"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"In the in the mountains and say, oh, why are they breaking they were made hundreds of years. Hundred years old all my gosh. Yes. More generally, even allow cosmic arises in time so much larger planning horizon, it's got to short you. Don't plan ahead even twenty or thirty years. And so again, this is on climate is from Tim show patriot. What kind of pressure on those are the people who actually pay? Right. Influence disaster. You will need to happen before the majority of the world take serious action on climate change and optimistic that human race possesses. Everything we need to find climate change effectively. But I'm pessimistic when I see the current trends, especially in politics. Yes. But mystic to. And I think the problem is the politicians think parochially ensure that whereas climate change has to be thought in terms of beneficient people in a long term and helping people in remote parts of the world. My personal view is that the only effective thing is not have contact his and things, but to accelerate research and development into all kinds of clean energy as win win situation because the countries develop it for have a huge market and countries like India, which need more power will then be able to afford to leapfrog to clean energy and not Bill code five power stations. So I think to promote our in D in energy and things like batteries and stories and all night on. Level closer to the level of research in defense. And in health is the primary mission, they US spend all the money. They spend on defense on RND for clean energy. Wouldn't that be great like billions of dollars? It's trillions. It's it's really. All right. So this storm any questions about space travel. Everybody wants to hear bringing Gabby Metais through Google pass in the near future will space travel be possible for everybody. Well, not everybody but for a lot, but it's interesting I'm old enough to remember the Apollo program. And at that time, I thought that ten years afterwards that before prints on Mars, but of course, because the US government has spent full percent of its federal budget on the Apollo program. And it was no motive was done for superpower, rivalry reasons. Of course, we know what's happening. Now, my personal view is if I was an American I wouldn't support NASA spending any money on manned space spaceflight. That's because I think it should be left to these companies. Okay. It should be left to the private companies like a space x and blue origin. And that's because they can take risks. Trouble with new on musk blur his book. But the trouble is that NASA is risk averse. I mean, these Tuttle failed twice in one hundred thirty five launches each.

NASA US Gabby Metais Tuttle Google Bill India Hundred years thirty years ten years
"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Humanity was happens to be the exact title of, sir. Morton rhesus book, a longtime friend and colleague of mine and astrophysics from the university of Cambridge. And I've got with my co host may may you got question got the question questions. Does he have the answers mind out? Okay. Who do we have? Okay. This comes from Facebook at Kato's clover. Asks do you think that one day, we'll have a worldwide United science and or space organization? That's cool. Well, of course, science is global culture protons on proteins in the same everywhere in the world. And so that's why science is valuable for straddling political divides, and devise a faith we it come in common. And of course, sometimes we have to work together because we need big bits of equipment telescopes. Not funny bussing country cetera. Taking turns to use telescopes in some cases. Do do do it is on your flight about it. Over billion the world's biggest tennis cope. And we we worked together to thumb that sort of thing. But I think also the challenges of the application of science for health and energy and all that need to be tackled globally as does climate change. Has there been a problem in the past though with scientists knocked sharing information and the competitive nature and Willamette, I think obviously sometimes it's competition to be first. But I think scientists fumble corporate of the most people they share the culture, and they they realized that this accumulative endeavor everyone adds their brick to a big structure is it what I think the the lesson. There is scientists are human like everybody else. But at the end of the day we. We serve a higher goal. No, no at the end of the day either. I'm right or smarten is wrong. So Martin is right. And I'm wrong or Ribaud throng. Okay. We both know that going into the conversation and for so much dialogue in the world. There's conflict to the point of bloodshed because opposite sides think they are have the absolute truth, but that's partly because science deals with the exit world, whereas sort of ethics and morality and politics things where. Right. And this one is from Facebook to tavist the alley. How do you think generations will judge our actions regarding climate teens? Well, I mean, I the moment I think than have lot to blame us for because we realized that we've inherited a huge amount from earlier centuries, not just cathedrals and all that, but all infrastructure from the NAS NGO to and the main concern is that when we have far more benefits than any previous generation, if we leave a depleted will for the future that would be a terrible legacy, and that's a serious threat. If in fact, we don't address these questions soon, so interesting point because in the United States, one of the great legacies of the country were all the pro the mega projects from the work project administration. The Hoover dam Akwa docks. The roads. There was just a huge movement to build an infrastructure for the country. We only recently here in New York City. We only recently twinned our water pipes from the reservoirs up.

United science Facebook university of Cambridge Hoover dam Akwa New York City Willamette United States Ribaud Martin one day
"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"So here's a question to ask you ever since I read this button, his a famous quote from from Ray Bradbury when asked I'm paraphrasing, We're going to quote, quote, what are what you? are you when I'm paraphrasing? But when asked why do you write such Topi in stories about our future is this what you think will happen to us? And he says, no, I write these stories so that you know to avoid them. And so let me ask you there restorative forces in society that tell me that I think we will never land where this topic storytellers tell us, you know, member in in in soil and green, you know, we're eating I mean, just just pick any any movie any movie where there's a descent of humanity to some rock bottom aren't there forces that will restore it. We'll be hope so end, of course, red bribe's right that if we are aware of the bad things can happen. That's a motivation to try and prevent them. And I think one of Raines the rain. might disagree because the whole time they're telling us about awful things that happened in the past. And we're just like all right. Keep it down. Did happen. Well, th that's right. But I think there's a sense of the concerns which I highlight in my book about the downsides of technology. And we aware of two types of concern. One is the precious. We're putting on the human habitat by the growing population more demanding evanger resources, so we're risking some tipping points that 'cause lots of extinctions and make the possibly our own extinction. And yet, I'm so that's one class, but the other type of threat is because even a few people are now empowered to create by aero by design a consequence that could cascade globally will about cyber attacks could do and that goes to get more serious and also similar concerns about misuse of. Biotech and said, there's a two technologies was getting very powerful. And in fact in Cambridge. We've set up a group to study these issues because even though huge numbers of people are starting small risks, like paying crashes Kosta Janzen food, the radiation doses is not very many people are thinking about these low probability, but catastrophic consequence risks and in our group in Cambridge. We feel that if we can reduce the probability of those by one thousand people in Cape because the stakes are so high. They must be the most fun people at at dinner. Whatever. Chicken is cooked. And they're like, well, I can tell you that something's coming. Good plots to these things. So they they shouldn't mind your liberations. Yeah. And come up with stories for future movies. Yes, we do plan. These scenarios university like Cambridge can convene experts to decide what is complete science fiction, and what is a serious threat and experts in all the different branches of Pugh. Way in. Yes. In my opinion, because the experts of they often wrong, but then more likely to be up to see a threat before the single biggest threat that you think of is what single biggest way in the short term. I Bahri about bio and cyber. Uh-huh. Weed I think they're going to make governance they difficult because the be the tension between privacy, liberty and security. Yes. Because any journal tension actually getting worse because you know, Electra say the global village for that village idiots, and they would have a global range. So we compass. Oh, benign and tolerance voted They in the voted palm. in the local village idiots. Nobody once the wall. Well, I mean, this this is true, obviously by cyber ready, and I think with biotechnology being so likely dispersed, I mean, by hacking, even a student sport. Then we have to worry about this sport. You know, we say we can regulate these things, but regulating these techniques globally is hopeless as regulation, the drug laws globally or the tax laws globally and not even Americans events to do those and your biggest concern fifty hundred years out what I've I've already then about the environmental effects. Okay. And of course, we don't know how powerful computers nee I will be then we've got to cope with that. Okay. Well, we gotta take a break. And when we come back, we will take questions from our fan base that are all directed on this very subject, and maybe you've got the question. Dog going to him. Ran star talk returns bluffed my way. On. This is actually a cosmic query is up to start talk with our special guests surf Lord Martin REEs. Talk about. Writing. Even..

Cambridge Ray Bradbury Lord Martin REEs Kosta Janzen Raines Electra Pugh fifty hundred years
"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"When he's in very good company. You can see the other people. Before pay good focal pages. Musk governor Brown governor Brown. My blurred. If I may, okay. From climate change to biotech to artificial intelligence science sits at the center of nearly all decisions that civilization confronts to assure its own survival, Martin Reese as created a primer on these issues, and what we can do about them. So that the next generation will think of us not as reckless custodians of their inheritance. But it's brilliant shepherds of their birthright. Wow. That is great. That makes people actually want to read them. So Martin let me just give people just a little background. I don't know if I told anyone this publicly, but when I was a graduate student at you were eminent now and forever you've been eminent in my field is an astrophysicist at the university of Cambridge in England with the original Cambridge was from. Okay. Bridging. Starter cambridge. And as a graduate student at one of our sort of society conferences, I think I had a poster paper where you you. You're not sort of Farner for long for them to let you give a talk. So you just you put your paper up on a poster, and you wait for people to come by so passive delivery of your of your science, and you came up to my paper, and you looked at it. And you ask me questions about it. And you didn't have to do that. And I felt that my future as a participating scientist was blessed. If you will. And so I just want to thank you. Well, I don't know what you how often you do that. But I just want to thank you because what may be little for. You was big for me at the time. The great. So now, it's it's the other way round. It's great for me. Yeah. But but then of course, you're at Princeton University. This wonderful calls which I didn't attend. But I read the book about you did. Okay. Yes. Post doc at Princeton. Then I've talked there. But so just want to thank you for all the work you've done just and you're like he's like the last gentleman. Oh. Oh. That's really good for science to because they think ethics and morals I needed in science, right? So I'm just saying there aren't they don't make them like him anymore. Do you had a good book for you, the smaller? You'll books are the better they sell your turns out. You don't like to read. I think. Yeah. Yes. Now in the it's tweets. Read, you know, two hundred character, the image of you were you like in a row of graduate students, and then the reasons just start walking by and you're like pick me. The bachelor. I'm sure he's supposed to more graduate students than me on that day. So let me just go down your your four line bio here astronomer Royal this didn't Edmond Halley have this or something. But that's right. Because it was the person who ran the bench observatory, but that became a museum from the nineteen sixties on budge. When of course, we could have telescopes under clear skies. Elsewhere, but they kept the title. I so I have this just as a title, and there's only one astronomer, Royal? Yes. But there are no juices just Honore, and I'd like to say that Jesus so executives I could do them. Plus, you Mr.. Awesome. Somebody else would like the role. Yes. Wow. So strana road. That's so. My day job is a professor at Cambridge professor in Cambridge. So you're previously master of Trinity College director for the institute of strana me at Cambridge University. And you are currently professors that we have similar ranks professor of astronomy. Yes. At university, Cambridge. Yes. Yes. And a member of the UK house with Lewis, I'm bit of a politician to I got the member UK house awards and former president of the Royal Society, which is like you'll National Academy National Academy. Good, okay. Our National Academy is where scientists elect the most eminent among us. So it's a peer voted representation of who in what we are internationally into the government, especially..

graduate student Cambridge University Cambridge Martin Reese professor scientist Royal Brown governor Brown Princeton University Musk National Academy National Acad National Academy bench observatory Princeton UK England Honore
"martin rees" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"martin rees" Discussed on The Science Show

"The Sancho on our end and a former president of the Royal Society of London is next Martin Reese, Lord, Reese astronomer. Royal has a new book called on the future. His last book was called Allah last century, so it's good to see that we may well have a future looking at your book. I'm struck by the fact that there are some authors and you mentioned the manure book. Steve pinker is one of them Matt Ridley whom you don't mention his another, who write about how things are going terribly well, if you analyze some of the indicators, it seems as if progress, even with violence, even with war we're getting on. All right. But you have a record of looking perhaps at our last century question Mark. You didn't have the question Mark in the title. So what do you think of those rather positive books by people are Ridley and pink? Are they some way skating over the. The problems we have. I think those books are half, right? And I think the recent pinker book with all these grafters very impressive and no gain saying that we've made huge progress in health diet, life expectancy, and all these things to important. And this is used the technology without which we couldn't be looking after seven billion people as well even as we can now. So I think there's no denying that we've benefited hugely, but I think there are two respects in which I would add an extra gloss to what they say. I pink in particular things. We are making ethical progress, and that I'm skeptical about because it's true that lives are better than those in medieval times when was pretty miserable. But in medieval times, the wasn't much they could do about it. Whereas now there's a very big gap between the way the world actually is and the much better way it actually could be. For instance, the top sixty people in the world in terms of wealth could make a huge difference to the life of. The entire bottom billion in the world, and so does a huge gap. And so I think we can't claim any ethical progress in my opinion. And there's another thing which they miss out, which is a new class of risks, the kind of risks which are of immense impact, but of low probability. And these, I think they downplay these are new risks which are getting stronger and we need to worry about and there because we have powerful technologies and the consequences are going wrong could cascade globally. So just like in the stock market, it may rise steadily for ten years, and then you lose all those games. Likewise, we can be complacent because nothing bad happens, but the may be a new class of risks, which is so serious that even one occurrences too many. So I think they make exaggerated claims about ethical Vence. And I also think they completely overlook this new set of risks, which is very threatening because our societies. May brittle. They vulnerable, variants connected. Let me ask you about one of the obvious ones in your own area, and that is the asteroid coming towards so that we may need to intercept. It is possible as it not you say to calculate the nature of the risk and how much it is. Well, the good thing about asteroid is we can calculate it. We know how many asteroids there are. We can calculate. They're all bitches cetera, and it is a non zero risk..

Matt Ridley Mark Steve pinker Royal Society of London Martin Reese Royal Sancho Vence president ten years