35 Burst results for "Martin Luther King"

How Did We Get Lumped Together Into Racial Boxes?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:48 min | 3 weeks ago

How Did We Get Lumped Together Into Racial Boxes?

"Question I want to ask is, how did we get to this strange place where we are all being lumped together in these racial boxes? Didn't we have a civil rights revolution that was based upon the ideal of the color blind society, wasn't that Martin Luther King's dream? And of course, even though the dream might not be realized, it's after all a dream, a dream is generally an aspiration we want to get there, isn't it odd that we have laws and policies that are actively moving us in the opposite direction. So our aspiration now is not color blindness. But what the left calls equity. And I think what they mean by equity, in fact, I don't think this is what they mean by equity, is that they are trying to respond to the performance differential, quite honestly, the performance inferiority. Of certain racial groups as compared to other racial groups. So if you look, for example, at a pure individualistic admission system, which is the way it should be, we apply to college as individuals. Now, this is not to say that our social circumstances can't be taken into account if the Nash, for example, applies to college. I'm 17 years old. People can say, well, look, here's a kid who was grew up in India in a very different society. He grew up in the middle class family, so he was not deprived in terms of having a decent education, but he's come to America with $500 in his pocket. He's trying to make his way here. So we're gonna look at this kid in the context of his or her circumstances, and we're gonna decide what kind of academic and intellectual promise they offer. And we're going to decide if he deserves admission on that basis. That's the way it should be.

Martin Luther King Nash India America
Why Tulsi Gabbard Left The Democrat Party

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:59 min | Last month

Why Tulsi Gabbard Left The Democrat Party

"Probably saw the news. You probably saw some clips of Joe Rogan or some announcement videos of Tulsi Gabbard saying she is no longer a Democrat. It's fascinating. And she joins us right now. Tulsi, welcome to the program. I've been admiring you from afar for years on your courageous stances against the Democrat party and recently more and more so. So you've left the Democrat party, tell us about that. Thanks, Charlie. It's good to talk to you finally. I feel like we've been around a lot of the same people for quite a while, but this is the first time we're connecting so thanks for having me on. Yeah, look, there's a number of big issues that drove me to this point, increasingly over time seeing how today's Democrat party is not the Democrat party. I joined 20 years ago when I ran for state House in Hawaii. You know, at that point, I was 21 years old, really passionate about protecting the environment. I come from a beautiful place and wanted to preserve it and be in a position to make that change. And so as I was looking at, you know, which party I wanted to affiliate with at that time, I was inspired by leaders like revin Martin Luther King, president JFK, a Democratic Party that was truly a big tent party that was very inclusive that stood for kind of those traditional liberalism principles of respect for individuals kind of a live and let live approach championing civil liberties and freedom and all of these things, that party is, it just doesn't exist today. Today's Democratic Party is controlled by so called woke radical ideologues who are really fanatical in whatever the issue or narrative of the day is that they choose. And fine, okay, they can push their policies, but what they're actively doing is trying to undermine everyone's freedom of speech,

Democrat Party Tulsi Gabbard Joe Rogan Tulsi President Jfk Charlie Democratic Party Hawaii Martin Luther King
The Degradation of Black America

The Officer Tatum Show

02:08 min | Last month

The Degradation of Black America

"They alluded to the fact that Martin Luther King had another agenda. They had a hit and agenda. They would stage these protests. They would stage these marches. They would stage a situations where they can get beat up in the middle of the street and be arrested. They were pushing a Marxist agenda on our country. That's what people said. Man, you can turn a blind eye and say, oh, they wrong 'cause I don't like that unlike what they sound like. Or you could say, well, was it? Look at the look at the out of wet lock births. 22% back in the 30s to 40s, 2030s 40s. Now it's over 75, 76% after the civil rights movement. I want us to understand that. Look at the degradation of black America. Since the 60s, there was no, there was no drill music. Was it? No, no, it wasn't. This gangster rap hip hop music stuff. None of that. That didn't exist. Black people were not viewing themselves and being pimped out, like we see it happening more often today after the 60s. You know, there was a gentleman on Uncle Tom two. I don't remember his name. If you saw the movie you'll know what I'm talking about. He said that Rosa Parks, they make this big deal about Rosa Parks sitting at the front of the bus and before they were going to go out and do this, they had, they were questioning, why would we go there to try to ride on a white man bus? When we have our own bus line, what are we accomplishing? Why do we want to sit at the front of the white man's bus when we have our own bus line? And this is where default happened. And I'm going to need many segments to thoroughly unpack this. But this is where I believe some fault happen. Because instead of black folks building their bus line, they wanted to integrate in a bus line that was not profitable to them in their community. Maybe visually, it was an achievement there, but residually, I don't think it benefited the black community.

Rosa Parks Martin Luther King Uncle Tom America
Danielle D'Souza Gill Joins Dinesh to Talk About Herschel Walker

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:19 min | 2 months ago

Danielle D'Souza Gill Joins Dinesh to Talk About Herschel Walker

"It's always great guys for me to have back on the podcast, my daughter, Danielle de Souza gill, author of the book, the choice, the abortion divide in America, also the weekly host of a program on epic TV. It's called counterculture with Danielle de Souza gill. Danielle, this is a been a crazy political season going on. Let's start by talking a little bit about some of these candidates in the upcoming midterm election. There's an interesting article here and in Fox News dot com and it's talking about the race between Herschel Walker and Raphael Warnock. A race that initially walker seemed to be trailing badly and trailing badly in a reddish or red state, so it was a kind of a bad sign. It looks like now walker has pulled even and in some polls he's leading a talk a little bit about that race as you see it. And then I want to ask you more broadly about the maga races around the country. Well, there's no question that Raphael Warnock does not represent the people of Georgia. He is a radical leftist. He's not an old Democrat or anything. And Georgia is, of course, a red state, and yet Rafael Warnock keys pro choice pastor. He's very radical, of course, big Biden supporter, big Friends with Stacey Abrams, people like that. He's definitely going to be hurt by the fact that Biden's done such a horrible job in office. And yet Herschel Walker, he's actually from there. He's actually, you know, someone who's more in the way of a common man because he was a football player, and of course that's kind of a big successful thing. But at the same time, he actually says in his speeches, hey guys, you know, I'm not necessarily the smartest person, but my values align with people of Georgia. So I think that Herschel Walker should be doing much better. So I'm either skeptical of the polling or I think that, you know, maybe people perhaps just don't know him yet and don't know how bad warnick is because Warren is such a big orator. He thinks he's the next Martin Luther King because he's a pastor and a church in Atlanta

Danielle De Souza Gill Raphael Warnock Herschel Walker Walker Rafael Warnock Stacey Abrams Georgia Danielle Biden Fox News America Football Warnick Warren Martin Luther King Atlanta
John Zmirak Draws Parallels Between MLK and Donald Trump

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:28 min | 3 months ago

John Zmirak Draws Parallels Between MLK and Donald Trump

"Know that J. Edgar Hoover's FBI was wicked. They were evil. They were anti Americans with tremendous power in the middle of the American government. Given that power, they did every kind of harm, we ought not to put it past them to want to murder people. They did kill people. We know just what we know is that they surveilled Martin Luther King's private life. They found out about his extramarital affairs. They found out that he had plagiarized his dissertation in his speech. They found out that he was willing to accept support from communists and black Muslims and other extremist groups. And they tried to blackmail him. They tried to silence him. They tried to blackmail others into not supporting him. The FBI is now being weaponized. You can Donald Trump and his supporters. Worst. I mean, they never raided Martin Luther King's home, although I have to say state police, where the really terrible ones in the case of Martin Luther King. The police controlled in places like Alabama and Mississippi and Georgia, those state police forces were real problem because they were run by openly racist governors. So parallels are not perfect, okay? But they are striking.

J. Edgar Hoover Martin Luther King FBI American Government Donald Trump Alabama Mississippi Georgia
John Zmirak: Donald Trump Is the MLK of the Working Class & Christians

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:05 min | 3 months ago

John Zmirak: Donald Trump Is the MLK of the Working Class & Christians

"I have a surprise for you. Token his name is John's mirac, release this merak. John, I always get happy talking to you, which is a good thing. I want to talk to you about two things which I know you want to talk about. Number one, you did a review of the film that I've been talking about so much. Mister Jones. Yeah. So I want to talk to you about that. I also want to talk to you about an article that you wrote for the stream, which you really going out on a limb by saying what you're saying. I think what you're saying in the article is deadly accurate, but it's still a bold thing. For you to say, so why don't we talk about this bold thing and we'll get to the fun movie review stuff in a moment, so you wrote an article at this stream talk about it. Yeah. The title is Donald Trump is the Martin Luther King of the working class and Christians. No wonder the FBI is persecuting it. Now, when you say Christians, obviously, Martin Luther King was reverend and many of the people following him were serious Christians. What you mean just because I want people to track. Christians were not singled out for being Christians and persecuted or discriminated against in 19 50s and 60s. It was black people, okay? Today, conservative Orthodox Christians are single that singled out and targeted. And disadvantaged by the government and spat upon by the official regime and its propaganda ministries. So today, conservatives and Christians and working class Americans are in a disadvantaged position are detested held in contempt by our elites who hold the power.

Mister Jones John Martin Luther King Donald Trump FBI
 Nichelle Nichols, who played Lt. Uhura on TV's "Star Trek," has died at 89, her family says

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

Nichelle Nichols, who played Lt. Uhura on TV's "Star Trek," has died at 89, her family says

"A grown breaking star of the Star Trek series has died space While she and the rest of the Star Trek crew conquered the final frontier Nichelle Nichols was battling a more EarthBound issue race her role as lieutenant uhura on the original TV series broke barriers in many ways before that black women were basically limited to roles that servants but uhura was the communications officer on a ship headed to where no man had gone before Her interracial on screen kiss with costar William Shatner was something that was unheard of at the time Nichols had said that civil rights champion Martin Luther King was a fan of her role as a pioneer and he personally encouraged her to stay on the series That had an effect on real life space history Doctor made German the

Lieutenant Uhura Nichelle Nichols Uhura William Shatner Nichols Martin Luther King
History Will Not See BLM as a Champion for Civil Rights

The Officer Tatum Show

01:52 min | 4 months ago

History Will Not See BLM as a Champion for Civil Rights

"Just to finish up on the topic of the civil rights movement and all of this. And people were probably thinking of what made Brandon go down his path. And it's because I see what BLM is doing, I see what these black activists are doing today, and they are literally lying to the world about what's really going on. We are going to look 20 years from now. You Mark my word. In the record books in the historical documents, people are going to put that Black Lives Matter was one of the biggest, most effective, civil rights movement, organization ever, and that Black Lives Matter was created to thwart police brutality, police brutality, I'm hearing feedback. So Thorpe police brutality and other things like that. And we know that's not to be true. Know that not to be true. It's going to say that their policing in America was systemically racist. And that nobody on earth should be able to be, you know, to be subject to the racism, from police, and all this stuff y'all here. They're going to push this agenda and we're going to go back and realize or hear from our history books that Black Lives Matter was a great thing for our country. And we're going to hear that Maxine waters and all of these people, Benjamin crump, they're going to have a statue of Benjamin crump saying that he was an activist and leader of his time he was a Martin the next Martin Luther King. When Benjamin crump chase ambulance. And all he wanted to pay out because I ain't never seen that joker when black people need him. I ain't never seen him there. He only show up when there's money to be made. That's what it appears to be in my opinion.

Benjamin Crump BLM Brandon Thorpe Mark Maxine Waters America Martin Luther King Martin
This Is the Clarence Thomas We DON'T Know

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:21 min | 5 months ago

This Is the Clarence Thomas We DON'T Know

"Everybody to see the movie, Michael. I want everybody to read the bookmark. But share if you will a little of the klans Thomas that we don't know. The prior to the hearing, the amazing story of how he grew up, his family, the less than conservative clarence Thomas in college, share a little bit of a history of that the pre famous clans Thomas. Well, as you know, he was born in pinpoint Georgia in 1948. And it's a gullah speaking area. So his English was not his first language. His father left before he could remember, so he was raised by his mother, who then took clarence Thomas and his brother to Savannah, where he suffered dire poverty, hungry, all the time, called in the winter, brought to school, and then left and then he'd walk out and wander the streets of Savannah until his mother brought him to her father, his grandfather to raise, and that justice Thomas life round. And hard work, his grandfather said, the damn vacation is over. Two boys thought, what vacation? And it was work all the time. They went to school. They went home and they worked on the Catholic school, right? That's right. He was Catholic or very unusual thing for black men in those days, and he sent them to a parochial school. Remember, it's the segregated south. It was all black, but run by these Irish nuns that continue to give them discipline hard work, a rigorous curriculum. And he thrived, and wanted to be a priest, which a lot of people do not know. And enrolled in the seminary. Only one of two or the only black seminaries. Right. He was integrating what were formerly all white seminaries. And he would have been one of the first black priests in Savannah. But it was the late 60s, and he experienced racism there. And as you reached a peak, perhaps when he was watching Martin Luther when Martin Luther King Jr. was shot and one of the seminary and says, I hope that SOB dies. And then something snapped. Something snapped, and he became a black radical, as you say, less than less than a conservative. He said, the more radical the better, describes themselves as an angry black man. And he went to holy cross where he got a full scholarship. His grandfather kicked him out of the house when he lost his vocation. And he went through this radical period. And we

Clarence Thomas Klans Thomas Savannah Thomas Life Michael Georgia Thomas Catholic School Martin Luther King Jr. Martin Luther
Cory Booker Criticizes Commercialization of Juneteenth

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:28 min | 5 months ago

Cory Booker Criticizes Commercialization of Juneteenth

"There is absolutely nothing wrong. We should celebrate the Emancipation of the slaves. But pretending to be worried about commercializing Juneteenth of all things, this was Cory Booker, the crazed senator from New Jersey. He appeared with Stephen insurrectionist Colbert last night on CBS. I think the materialism and commercialism and consumerism, those streams within our society often do detract from the nobility and the principles and the ideals, but also for us confronting the fullness of our history. I get very frustrated that Martin Luther King day, we've created this Santa classification of Martin Luther King when he was wildly unpopular. At the time he died. He was somebody that pushed this country to expand its moral imagination. And so this idea that a day about freedom and liberty is descending into consumerism. We can't let that happen. And so of course, companies are going to try to do their best to pad their bottom lines. But we have in a responsibility not to cheapen this holiday and just talk about it and speak about it. And most importantly, try to be about it, try to be and live the ideals that we're celebrating.

Stephen Insurrectionist Colber Cory Booker Martin Luther King CBS New Jersey
Did Twitter's Top Lawyer Cry Over Elon Musk Deal?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:56 min | 7 months ago

Did Twitter's Top Lawyer Cry Over Elon Musk Deal?

"Vijaya got a is the chief lawyer at Twitter. This is the woman who was responsible for kicking Trump off the platform. This is also the woman who suppressed the Hunter Biden story. A very powerful attorney at Twitter. She's been a Twitter a long time, and she's in charge of the whole content moderation operation. Well, delightful report yesterday and political Twitter's top lawyer reassures staff cries during meeting about Musk takeover. She's crying. Oh, it's horrific. It's horrible. Now let's pause for a moment to think about this. She's not crying because she is being restricted. She's not crying because any of her friends are being restricted or suppressed. She's crying because she's being prevented from restricting and banning other people. In other words, this is not the weeping of the victim. It's the weeping of the perpetrator. Kind of reminds me of the scene in The Shawshank Redemption. You remember that vicious prison guard who would beat people up and enjoyed it, took a certain kind of sadistic pleasure in it. But when he's busted at the end of the movie, they go suddenly this big strong man is reduced to tears. Well, that's basically the political vijaya God is the political equivalent of this guy. And if you remember, this is a woman I've mentioned on the podcast before. She came up with a fabulous fabulous here in the sense of made up. Story about her family's encounter with the KKK. And I went into podcast one 8, but yeah, you know what? Give me the contact information. I'll verify it. Whether this story is true, dead silence, not a word. Why? 'cause she was obviously trying to get some civil rights points for herself and make it sound like she's some budding Martin Luther King and her family was like struggling for racial justice in the style of Montgomery and Selma.

Twitter Hunter Biden Vijaya Musk KKK Martin Luther King Montgomery Selma
How Can You Justify Breaking the Law?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:08 min | 7 months ago

How Can You Justify Breaking the Law?

"I want to talk in this segment about the concept of natural law. And I want to do it by looking at an article, one of my favorite publications, the quarterly journal called first things, and the article is by POJ named David Novak. Who is a chair of Jewish studies at the university of Toronto. The article is called the bottom line. And it gets to the some of the conundrums around this concept of natural law, which I think a very illuminating. So Novak begins by talking about reading Martin Luther King's letter from the Birmingham jail. And he says what's really interesting here is that Martin Luther King is breaking a law. It's the segregation law of Birmingham. And yet Martin Luther King is arguing that he is right to do this. He's right to break the law. So David Novak raises the obvious question, how can you justify breaking a law? And Martin Luther King answer is, in effect, I'm breaking the law because the law itself is wrong. The law is unjust. So since the law is unjust, it is just to violate the law. Now, if I'm punished for doing that, so be it, but I am in the right and the law is in the wrong. This is king. It just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law of the law of God. So here's Martin Luther King saying in effect that there is a law above the law. Well, what law is that? A kind of a higher law. And this is a very direct appeal to natural law. The concept of natural law is nothing more than the idea of a higher law, a kind of a God given law, a law embedded. You may say in the code of nature itself and what king is saying is that our ordinary laws are positive laws, so called laws that are passed by legislatures and so on need to be judged themselves by this higher by this higher standard.

David Novak Martin Luther King Quarterly Journal POJ Birmingham Jail University Of Toronto Novak Birmingham
How Did Dinesh Conceive the Idea for '2016: Obama's America'?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:53 min | 8 months ago

How Did Dinesh Conceive the Idea for '2016: Obama's America'?

"I did mention Debbie. My name is Austin and I'm an aspiring filmmaker from Georgia. My writing partner and I bring some projects, but we're most excited about a conservative show concept. We'll finalizing this word. From a story standpoint, it compares the analogies of the famous books warnings to the current reality of the United States. Anyway, we would love to know how did you conceive the idea to make 2016 Obama's America with no filmmaking experience and how did you get those who are willing to help you make it such as funding, filmmaking, et cetera, because we're looking for that up to. Well, in my case, the idea of making the film arose out of a book that I had already published called the roots of Obama's rage. So I felt that I had a powerful new insight into Obama. And that would be intriguing as a film. Now, the conventional view of Obama was he was kind of a civil rights guy. He came out of the kind of tradition of Selma and Montgomery, the Martin Luther King tradition. And my point was no. Obama, it's not that he was born abroad, but he comes from a foreign perspective. He is absorbed, if you will, the dreams of his father. So I thought this was an interesting topic to be able to convert into a movie, although I didn't quite know how that would be done. As it turns out, a movie is a journey, and I would have to go to Hawaii and Indonesia, Kenya, and kind of track down almost physically the Obama story. But once I got the idea, I realized that, you know, I'm not on the left. I'm not like Michael Moore. I can't go marching into a studio and collect $10 million and say, okay, I'm going to make a movie now. So on our side, you've got to sort of build it out from the ground

Barack Obama United States Debbie Austin Georgia Selma Martin Luther King Montgomery Kenya Indonesia Hawaii Michael Moore
Zelensky Knows What's Good for His Country, Do We?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:36 min | 9 months ago

Zelensky Knows What's Good for His Country, Do We?

"Ukraine president zelensky made an impassioned appeal to Congress to impose a no fly zone over Ukraine. Kind of up the American and western and NATO involvement in the war. And he was very well received, kind of a standing ovation, not just the Democrats, so fair number of Republicans as well. And zelensky was pretty shrewd. He kind of tapped all the right chords. He invoked 9 11, Pearl Harbor, quoted Martin Luther King. And after it was over, the Biden policy toward Ukraine appeared to be, well, pretty much the same. And so you had this specter of reporters. These kind of metrosexual reporters calling on Biden to do more and one of the kind of consistent themes is, well, zelensky knows what's good for his country, why aren't you just doing what he says? Doesn't he understand the situation on the ground better? Isn't he the world's expert so to speak on Ukraine? And the question of the presumptive answer to that question is, yes, he is. But that's really not the question before us. Obviously he knows what he needs. He knows what he wants. He knows what's good for his country, but this might be a little different from what we need. It might be a little different from what we can afford. It might be different from what we are prepared to do or what's good for our country. In other words, it is up to us to assess the level of commitment that we want to make, and also the risks that we want to take.

Zelensky Ukraine President Zelensky Biden Nato Pearl Harbor Martin Luther King Congress
Zelenskyy Leans on MLK Jr. In Speech to Congress, Pleaing for More

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:00 min | 9 months ago

Zelenskyy Leans on MLK Jr. In Speech to Congress, Pleaing for More

"His speech today that was carried, of course, via a Zoom call. He was on a big screen in the auditorium on Capitol Hill, Pelosi introduced him, he spoke for about a half hour. And he made an appeal for the United States to sort of lead the way to enforce the no fly zone. Inviting us to shoot Russian planes out of the sky. And he invoked our Pearl Harbor. He reminded us of our 9 11. He even brought up Martin Luther King. And his eye have a dream speech. A man pleading for help in what is a real humanity catastrophe. As we continue to see, Putin's army obliterating Ukraine.

Capitol Hill Pelosi Pearl Harbor United States Martin Luther King Putin Army Ukraine
Charlie Chats With Dr. Paula Price, Founder of Price University

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:48 min | 9 months ago

Charlie Chats With Dr. Paula Price, Founder of Price University

"Hey everybody, Charlie Kirk here. We are at the national radio broadcast association here in Nashville, Tennessee and you meet all sorts of wonderful people at these types of conventions and they come on your show and you learn from them. So with us right now is a new friend. Doctor Paula price, founder of price university. Welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thank you for having me. I'm looking forward to it. Great. Nothing but sparkling things about you. So we're going to have a blast. You've been talking to my relatives. Well, I'm not actually that's not true. Not all of my relatives would say that about me. So doctor price introduce yourself to our audience. Well, I am doctor Paula price. I have a church administrator called well actually called the embassy on the pastor and founder of congregation of the mighty where God's lands and I am the founder of price university author of the prophet's dictionary prophets handbook. I have a talk show called taking it on with Paula price. I train leaders and ministers around the world. So you're an underachiever, basically. You have a school, you have a church, you have the whole thing. So your outspoken Christian, you know, you believe in the natural law. I'm also the state committee appointment for Republican Party district one in Oklahoma. In Oklahoma. Oklahoma. Well, that's awesome. So let me just kind of ask you, we can kind of go from there, kind of go from this sort of topic, which is traditionally in the last couple of decades, the black community is not conservative, not Republican. What is your theory as to why that is the case? Well, I actually have a historical fact on that black Americans were Republican until Nixon. Nixon refused an audience with Martin Luther King, and because he did Martin Luther King, went to Kennedy, and Kennedy gave them the platform. So he took and brought black America under the Nixon was vice president. Yeah, well, part of that. Nixon was president after Kennedy was. I know, but when he wanted to have a meeting for him to back them, according to a book I read, I could be wrong. No, I know it would make sense because it would be in the 50s when Nixon was Eisenhower's vice president. Right. And the reason that I say that is because everybody talks about how we only voted Republican. Yes, that's right. Because of Martin Luther King, he shifted us to vote democratic. Got it. So would you think that mainly in the black community, their values are conservative in nature? Yeah, we are very conservative, but the issue is we don't, and I talk to on us because Republicans since I was 18. I've never been anything else. I mean, I did not like the way the Democrats were running and my neighborhood and my community. So I didn't. But I do know that we feel like we're ignored or we're misunderstood or we are pretty much not

Paula Price Charlie Kirk Price University National Radio Broadcast Assoc Nixon Oklahoma Republican Party District Martin Luther King Kennedy Nashville Tennessee Eisenhower America
Will America Return to the Fundamentals?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:22 min | 9 months ago

Will America Return to the Fundamentals?

"Boomer generation of which I am a member. Grew up in an America that was obviously had issues. No society in history has not had issues. I mean, obviously in the 60s, Kennedy assassination, the Vietnam War, by the end of the 60s, Martin Luther King assassination Robert Kennedy, what year was Robert Kennedy assassinated? Was he in the 60s as well? I think so. I mean, there were a lot of the watts riots. When would the watts riots also 60s? So believe me, they were issues. But the fundamental American society was holding very strong. And then gradually dissolved. Beginning with honoring of parents, don't trust anyone over 30, that was the motto of the dissolution of the traditional America. But gave people on the 2030s, 40s, 50s in the United States peace, for the most part. Not for everybody.

Robert Kennedy Martin Luther King America Kennedy Vietnam American Society
What's Under the Lincoln Memorial? Sec. Ryan Zinke Explains

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:22 min | 10 months ago

What's Under the Lincoln Memorial? Sec. Ryan Zinke Explains

"Secretary zinke, will you explain to those who have no idea what's under the Lincoln Memorial? Well, the memorial is the only memorial on the mall that has actually dug down to bedrock. And I think the placement of the Lincoln Memorial is divine. Because it sits across the river is Arlington national cemetery. And the fight for freedom and the ability for our country to reach out and have an opportunity for everyone. The Civil War is a tough period in our history, but to get to where we are today, we had to go through and fight for our freedom and fight for those that needed freedom. And across the Potomac across the memorial bridge and it leads you to Lincoln Memorial. And going underneath it, you understand the majesty and complexity of that building, but also it should be recognized that linking is facing into the mall. And there are some that would say, well, you know, general Lee. General Lee and old America was across the river, which is true. But Lincoln is now ahead of Lee. And Lincoln is facing also Martin Luther King. And they're all facing in one common direction, and that is our capital.

Lincoln Memorial Secretary Zinke Arlington National Cemetery General Lee Lincoln America LEE Martin Luther King
"martin luther king" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:14 min | 11 months ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Martin Luther King day This is the day we honor the reverend doctor Martin Luther King Jr. and over on MSNBC yesterday Ellie miss stahl made the point that people he said and I quote people like Joe Manchin and Kirsten cinema These are the white people that Martin Luther King Jr. warned us about Now what was he talking about He actually king's warning was to the black community kind of indirect inasmuch as when he came when it was announced back in April of 1963 that he was coming down to Birmingham Alabama to participate in a peaceful march A group of his colleagues are there other pastors They were all white There was a one Jewish rabbi and one Catholic priest and a bunch of Protestant ministers It was 8 people all the 8 white men altogether And they published an open letter in the Birmingham newspaper The headline is white clergy urge local negroes to withdraw from demonstrations And the and they say we the undersigned issue an appeal for Law & Order and common sense in dealing with racial problems in Alabama We are expressed we expressed understanding that honest convictions in racial matters could properly pursued in the courts But urged that the decisions of those courts should be in the meantime peacefully obeyed Responsible citizens of undertaking to work on various problems which cause racial friction and unrest They talk about it And then they say these recent events they're talking about king coming to town Indicate that we all have an opportunity to be constructive and realistic However we are now confronted by a series of demonstrations by some of our Negro citizens directed and led in part by outsiders We recognize the natural impatience of people who feel that their hopes are slow and being realized but we are convinced that these demonstrations are unwise and untimely Just as we formally pointed out that hatred and violence have no sanction in our religions and political traditions we also point out that such actions as incite hatred and violence however technically peaceful those actions may be have not contributed to the resolution of our local problems And then they end the thing It goes on for a more paragraph than they ended by saying we therefore strongly urge our own Negro community to withdraw support from these demonstrations and to unite locally and working peacefully for a better Birmingham When rights are consistently denied a case a cause should be pressed in the courts and negotiations among local leaders and not in the streets We appeal to both our white and Negro citizen rate to observe the principles of Law & Order and common sense This was a letter from 8 white pastors Published in the Birmingham newspaper telling Martin Luther King to stay out of town and telling the local civil rights folks don't dump don't play with him Don't participate with him So he shows up and he gets arrested and thrown in jail And in jail he's given.

Martin Luther King Ellie miss stahl Kirsten cinema Birmingham Joe Manchin Alabama MSNBC king
"martin luther king" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:57 min | 11 months ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The association of American Indian physicians and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention remind you there are now booster recommendations for all three available COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. You may choose which COVID-19 vaccine you receive as a booster shot. Getting the COVID-19 vaccination protects you, your family, and your community. More information at AAP dot org or CDC dot gov slash coronavirus who support this show. Your tuned in to native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. Do you take time? On Martin Luther King day to reflect on the progress that native people have made toward self determination, sovereignty, and equity. Or do you feel that there are still too many barriers to overcoming? Colonization that still remain. Let us know what you're thinking. On this day, set aside to honor doctor king. Jonah discussion, one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. Before we went to break, we were chatting with Suzanne, harjo and she was sharing her experience working to make MLK day a federal holiday only a federal holiday since 1986, so I can still remember my own life before that time when it was not a federal holiday. I'd like to bring in Darius Lee Smith into our conversation. He's a director of Denver's anti discrimination office. Darius, what are you thinking about today? MLK day, where are you at? What's your thought? Wow. It's so impressive to hear miss harjo's history lesson. And I was born in 68. So the day after he was assassinated, I was one. I had just turned one. Action was born in 67. He was assassinated in 68. And it was interesting because when I came to as an undergrad student in the late 80s, I remember Arizona being the last state to recognize Martin Luther King junior as a national holiday. And I'm just reflecting on her words, what we're talking about and really just proudly to say that I'm a bit a factor of the civil rights movement. I have this amazing job in Denver, which I've been doing for 18 years. As the director of the Denver antidiscrimination office, and again, I have the opportunity to serve in that position because that was one of the things that Martin Luther King Jr. and people like Hank Adams. They were demanding a seat at the table. And in a lot of ways, I feel that that's what I do. I have a seat at the table and I get to be an activist and an advocate and a civil just a civil servant around civil rights and social justice and I'm so proud of Martin's became junior in this day. So thank you. Well, thank you, Darius, for explaining and sharing that background. You mentioned your amazing job. Tell us more about your amazing job. How did you get started doing the work you do now? So Denver has an agency called the agency for human rights and community partnerships. And in 1990s, they created the Denver, the city council created the Denver anti discrimination office. And I believe I'm the second director. I think we're just over 30 years past that and in addition to that in 2008, the city of Denver created these commissions. And two of the commissions that I had the pleasure of serving as the staff liaison, we were creating to give voice to African American folks in Denver as well as American Indians. And so I've been doing the American Indian commission for beginning so 15 years and 6 years. I've been staff lays on for the African American commission. So it's just I was so amazing because that's my background. I strongly identify as Navajo and black and it just feels so rewarding to have a job to get aid to do the type of work I do. And I'm in a really good situation. And Darius, I know you grew up primarily in Denver currently, you're on a little weekend holiday in Phoenix, but as a child, I understand you spent summers among family in loop, Arizona. And I had an uncle from one of my great ants, she married a Navajo. In fact, I think they met at that old boarding school there. But let me just say loop Arizona, that's the res. Red dirt and sage as far as the eye can see. And I'm interested Darius. What unique perspectives do you offer to both groups, Native American and African American as a person who shares both cultures and experiences? Great question. It was very unfortunate to grow up with family in Navajo country that were very supportive of us being black. And when I say us, I have four siblings and it's I think it was made easy for us because we were celebrated because my brother and I, my sisters, we were all great athletes. And when we would take trips to loop and to the city, western side of it was so important for me to understand what Indian country looked like. And I think for me, also, I understood what poverty, as well as what it looked like in Denver and other major cities. And so I think early on, I kind of had a firsthand experience about what poverty looked like, but also what cultural look like in terms of like language and just the proudness of being around Navajo people and then during the school year when I was around. I grew up in an all black neighborhood in Denver. And being there, I was also really uplifted and supported by my black coaches who really encouraged me to celebrate maybe in Navajo me being American Indian. And I think it was heavily supported by, again, my community to really explore and express my Navajo identity. Darius, you mentioned the comparing and contrasting the urban poverty that you saw up in Denver versus the rural poverty that you experienced on the Navajo Nation in Arizona and I always find it fascinating how those two different types of poverty are very different in many ways similar but different. Could you explain a little bit more depth, how they compare and contrast? Yes. I like to use the story of when we would come to loop our to the city. And we would go back at the end of the summer. We would it down with commodity food. So.

harjo Denver Darius Martin Luther King Jr. association of American Indian Centers for Disease Control an Sean spruce Darius Lee Smith Denver antidiscrimination offi Hank Adams agency for human rights and co United States Denver anti discrimination off Arizona American Indian commission African American commission Jonah Suzanne Navajo city council
"martin luther king" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:18 min | 11 months ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on Native America Calling

"That native people have made toward self determination, sovereignty, and equity. Or do you feel that there are still too many barriers to overcoming? Colonization that still remain. Let us know what you're thinking. On this day, set aside to honor doctor king. Jonah discussion, one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. Before we went to break, we were chatting with Suzanne, harjo and she was sharing her experience working to make MLK day a federal holiday only a federal holiday since 1986, so I can still remember my own life before that time when it was not a federal holiday. I'd like to bring in Darius Lee Smith into our conversation. He's a director of Denver's anti discrimination office. Darius, what are you thinking about today? MLK day, where are you at? What's your thought? Wow. It's so impressive to hear miss harjo's history lesson. And I was born in 68. So the day after he was assassinated, I was one. I had just turned one. Action was born in 67. He was assassinated in 68. And it was interesting because when I came to as an undergrad student in the late 80s, I remember Arizona being the last state to recognize Martin Luther King junior as a national holiday. And I'm just reflecting on her words, what we're talking about and really just proudly to say that I'm a bit a factor of the civil rights movement. I have this amazing job in Denver, which I've been doing for 18 years. As the director of the Denver antidiscrimination office, and again, I have the opportunity to serve in that position because that was one of the things that Martin Luther King Jr. and people like Hank Adams. They were demanding a seat at the table. And in a lot of ways, I feel that that's what I do. I have a seat at the table and I get to be an activist and an advocate and a civil just a civil servant around civil rights and social justice and I'm so proud of Martin's became junior in this day. So thank you. Well, thank you, Darius, for explaining and sharing that background. You mentioned your amazing job. Tell us more about your amazing job. How did you get started doing the work you do now? So Denver has an agency called the agency for human rights and community partnerships. And in 1990s, they created the Denver, the city council created the Denver anti discrimination office. And I believe I'm the second director. I think we're just over 30 years past that and in addition to that in 2008, the city of Denver created these commissions. And two of the commissions that I had the pleasure of serving as the staff liaison, we were creating to give voice to African American folks in Denver as well as American Indians. And so I've been doing the American Indian commission for beginning so 15 years and 6 years. I've been staff lays on for the African American commission. So it's just I was so amazing because that's my background. I strongly identify as Navajo and black and it just feels so rewarding to have a job to get aid to do the type of work I do. And I'm in a really good situation. And Darius, I know you grew up primarily in Denver currently, you're on a little weekend holiday in Phoenix, but as a child, I understand you spent summers among family in loop, Arizona. And I had an uncle from one of my great ants, she married a Navajo. In fact, I think they met at that old boarding school there. But let me just say loop Arizona, that's the res. Red dirt and sage as far as the eye can see. And I'm interested Darius. What unique perspectives do you offer to both groups, Native American and African American as a person who shares both cultures and experiences? Great question. It was very unfortunate to grow up with family in Navajo country that were very supportive of us being black. And when I say us, I have four siblings and it's I think it was made easy for us because we were celebrated because my brother and I, my sisters, we were all great athletes. And when we would take trips to loop and to the city, western side of it was so important for me to understand what Indian country looked like. And I think for me, also, I understood what poverty, as well as what it looked like in Denver and other major cities. And so I think early on, I kind of had a firsthand experience about what poverty looked like, but also what cultural look like in terms of like language and just the proudness of being around Navajo people and then during the school year when I was around. I grew up in an all black neighborhood in Denver. And being there, I was also really uplifted and supported by my black coaches who really encouraged me to celebrate maybe in Navajo me being American Indian. And I think it was heavily supported by, again, my community to really explore and express my Navajo identity. Darius, you mentioned the comparing and contrasting the urban poverty that you saw up in Denver versus the rural poverty that you experienced on the Navajo Nation in Arizona and I always find it fascinating how those two different types of poverty are very different in many ways similar but different. Could you explain a little bit more depth, how they compare and contrast? Yes. I like to use the story of when we would come to loop our to the city. And we would go back at the end of the summer. We would it down with commodity food. So.

harjo Denver Darius Darius Lee Smith Martin Luther King Jr. Denver antidiscrimination offi Hank Adams agency for human rights and co Denver anti discrimination off Arizona American Indian commission African American commission Jonah Suzanne Navajo city council Martin Phoenix
"martin luther king" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:31 min | 11 months ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Learn from the civil rights movement and its leaders? I think the lessons learned were. In humility in what happened to people who were enslaved over and then impoverished in a suffocating poverty kind of way. Over generation and generation and generation and seeing no way out. And that's very different from people who are poor, but are ankle to conscience fish and grow things on the land and know where our sacred places are. We haven't been uprooted in that sense, even though there's been a lot of removal and upheaval and it, but at the same time, it's been very different from being brought all the way across an ocean and then subjected to subjugation in a foreign land. So those kinds of things were very important for our people to learn and to hear the oral history of the people there at the March on Washington. And of course, later in the 1968 and the poor people's campaign that whole area. And doctor king actually put two of the people on his stirring committee, they had one meeting before he was assassinated and those were melting and Hank Adams who were on the steering committee itself. There was a lot of interaction and people were understanding what hard times mean to each other. And what enemies we have and that they're the same enemies, but they're widely and they change their rhetoric and try to involve the other people of color against native people when they talk about equality equality, quality. That's really, really fascinating little historical fact. I had no idea about mail Tom being selected by MLK to serve on that committee. It's just fascinating. Thank you again for providing so much insight and so much depth into this history. So the work of doctor Martin Luther King, his words, his writing, so prolific. How have they personally affected you and the work you do? Well, they certainly made me work very hard for MLK day. I was one of the people who was part of the great coalition organized by the legislative group and the policy group in Washington, D.C. and of many, many organizations. And I was given all the races to go visit jeez. Who were never, ever going to support Martin Luther King, junior day, but who hid behind native people, so they wouldn't have to support black people. And so I had some of those on my list and of course I didn't change their minds. But one of them was very interesting. He said, he tried to change mine, saying, oh, we shouldn't have a black man have a day, we should be for the Native Americans have a day. Should don't you agree, don't you want a day for Native Americans? Who would it be? Would it be sitting sitting bull or pricing for us or you tell me? Who would it be? It was appalling what he was doing. And he said, we'll go get the flow of right now and all introducing Bill for a Native American day and we can name it after a person we can just say negative American day. We can do that right now. And I said, well, you know, I'm just going to have to get back to you because we have to go through a process and we have a lot of different native nations who will each have their own heroes and so we'll get back to you on that. But isn't that just low that was that it Suzanne that is so sleazy that like that classic divide and conquer pitting people against each other? Yeah, wow, wow. I just can not believe that. Folks, we're talking with Suzanne harjo again today, Martin Luther King day, native America calling, discussing his legacy and how it intersects with the Native American narrative. I'm.

Hank Adams legislative group Martin Luther King Washington, D.C. Washington king Tom Suzanne harjo Suzanne America
"martin luther king" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:28 min | 11 months ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on Native America Calling

"National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. Support for law and justice related programming provided by Hobbes Strauss dean and walker, a national law firm dedicated to promoting and defending tribal rights for nearly 40 years. More information available at Hobbs Strauss dot com. Support by the center for indigenous cancer research at Roswell park comprehensive cancer center dedicated to cancer research medicine and cancer care for indigenous population. The no charge online risk assessment tool is available at Roswell park dot org slash assessme. Native voice one the Native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. In his 1963 book, Martin Luther King wrote that America was born in genocide. Before Africans were brought to this continent as slaves, king noted in his words, the scar of racial hatred had already disfigured colonial society. King's campaign to achieve social justice for African Americans in the south naturally included Native Americans and all people of color. Of course, it's a struggle that continues today, even as we mark a federal holiday in king's honor. Today we'll get the native perspective on Martin Luther King, both the man and the movement he led. We'll talk about the foundation for civil rights, king helped build, and the progress, or lack thereof, since. And as always, we'd like to hear your perspective as well. What does Martin Luther King mean to you? What lessons do you draw from his life and his mission? What's his legacy among Native Americans? Please join the discussion by calling one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's a one 809 9 native. Joining us today from Washington D.C. is doctor Suzanne shown harjo. She's a founding trustee of the Smithsonian, national museum of the American Indian, and president of the morning star institute. She's also the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States highest civilian honor. Suzanne is Cheyenne and muskogee. Suzanne, welcome back to Native American calling. Always a pleasure to have you on the show. Thank you so much, Sean. Happy MLK day. Happy MLK. It is. And joining us from Phoenix, Arizona, we have Darius Lee Smith. He's the director of Denver's anti discrimination office, staff liaison for the Denver American Indian commission, and Denver, African American commission. He's Navajo and black. Welcome to native America calling Darius. Thank you for having me. I look forward to today's call. Absolutely really excited to have your voice in today's discussion. Joining us from Portland Oregon is amber Starks. She's an activist who is Afro indigenous and muskogee creek citizen and African American. Welcome back to native America calling as well amber. Hello, everyone. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really looking forward to this discussion. And yes, happy and located. You bet amber and thank you for taking time out of your busy day to join us. And also joining us from Phoenix, Arizona is Dion Mitchell. She is an educator, artist, storyteller, and creator of butterfly kisses. And she is Afro indigenous and black. Welcome to Native American calling Dion. Yes. And thank you for having me. I'm so excited and honored to be part of this discussion happy and marquee day everyone. Yacht day to you as well. Suzanne, MLK day, attempt to reflect, attempt to honor the legacy of a great man. A time to evaluate race relations in America today and how we got here. However, as native people, I think we might not always consider the legacy of doctor king within our own cultural and historical contexts. Suzanne, is it a mistake not to do so? Oh, it's certainly is. Some of our greatest native leaders worked with doctor king and were part of the March on Washington in 1963. Tank Adams assiniboine Sue and from Frank's landing Indian community in Washington state. Was one of the main people organizing with melt home and others Bruce wilkie from macaw, and others from the national Indian youth council and Marshall bridges was there from Frank's landing rose crow flies high mad bear Anderson from tuscarora nation. People from the northeast and from the dakotas and Washington state primarily were there Martha grafs also from Oklahoma, so lots of native people were there and worried about the exercise that was treaties that was being thwarted. And part of their mission was to work with other people of color, although that term wasn't used at that time. And let them know that in the civil rights movement, everyone is looking for equality and that's equality of opportunity equality toward justice and the like. But that the most severe critics and enemies of treaty rights were those also using the language of the civil rights movement and saying that native people should not have treated you should not sovereignty should not be recognized and everything should be equal. So their mantra was equal rights for everyone while they were trying to innocent kill native peoples. Okay, well, thank you for that background in Suzanne. You mentioned a lot of names that go back a few years, melt Tom, for example, the national Indian youth council. So we're going way back into the very early days of what grew into what we consider native activism. And I'm curious, what did some of these early Native American activists.

Martin Luther King America Hobbes Strauss dean Hobbs Strauss center for indigenous cancer r Roswell park comprehensive can Suzanne Roswell park Sean spruce foundation for civil rights Washington D.C. Suzanne shown harjo morning star institute corporation for public broadca Darius Lee Smith Denver American Indian commiss African American commission cancer amber Starks Dion Mitchell
"martin luther king" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

06:48 min | 11 months ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"How Martin Luther King Jr. changed his mind about America. By Kermit Roosevelt the third, Roosevelt is a Professor of constitutional law at the University of Pennsylvania Kerry's school of law, and the author of the nation that never was reconstructing America's story. More than 50 years after his death, Martin Luther King, junior remains a towering figure in the history of American civil rights, as with most influential thinkers, there is a certain amount of ambiguity in the public understanding of king and his legacy. White Americans were very skeptical of king while he was alive, but as his reputation and popularity grew advocates of very different positions, tried to claim him for their own. Nowadays, conservatives are fond of invoking his most famous speech, 1960 threes I have a dream, with its vision of a world in where people will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. Progressives are fonder of the other America, a more radical speech from 1967, where he said that we may have to repent in this generation not merely for the vitriolic words of the bad people and the violent actions of the bad people, but for the appalling silence and indifference of the good people who sit around and say, wait on time. Those two kings are once we know, but there are other kings. We need to listen to as well. The I have a dream speech gives us the standard story of America. According to this story, America starts with the Declaration of Independence, which states our foundational values, particularly equality. The founders constitution turns these values into law imperfectly at first, but American history is a progress towards redeeming the promissory note of the declaration, and one day we will live out the true meaning of all men are created equal. This story is comforting and reassuring, but it is actually a barrier to progress as the king of the other America came to see. For one thing, it supports what he called the indifference of the good people. The idea that social progress rolls in on the wheels of inevitability. For another, it tells us to look to founding America and the Declaration of Independence as the source of our fundamental ideals. But doing that tells us that those ideals can coexist with white supremacy. The truth is that founding America was not a nation dedicated to our idea of equality. The Betsy Ross flag shows us 13 stars in a circle, and every star represents a state where slavery was legal. The idea that the declaration provides the way forward is deeply problematic. A younger king saw this as a junior in high school in 1944, competing in a debate contest, he delivered a speech called the Negro and the constitution. Like I have a dream, this speech examined whether the treatment of blacks in America was consistent with American values. But unlike I have a dream, it did not locate those values in the founding. America gave its full pledge of freedom 75 years ago, king said. In 1868, when the Fourteenth Amendment was ratified. The Civil War and reconstruction created a new order, he said, backed by amendments to the national constitution. It is these amendments, not the declaration that promised equality. The focus on reconstruction gives us a different origin story. This one tells us our mission is to take up the struggle of a war for liberty and a remaking of society in pursuit of justice and equality. It is less reassuring, which is presumably why king abandoned it and I have a dream seeking to enlist white moderates in his cause, but the allies he won turned out to be the good people of the other America, who sat by and counseled patience. And if this story is more divisive, it is also more true. In the Civil War, the U.S. issued an Emancipation proclamation in the revolution, the British dead, in the reconstruction constitution, the U.S. banned slavery in the founders constitution, they protected it. And it is more inclusive it locates our values not in documents written by white slave owners, but by those who fought to end slavery, blacks, as well as whites. This is a better story, and it is the story that king came back to, the day before his assassination in 1968, he spoke in Memphis, where sanitation workers were striking for decent wages and working conditions. King was ill that night and had asked a friend to speak in his place, but when he heard that hundreds of supporters were waiting to hear him, he went to the mason temple, took the stage and spoke extemporaneously. I've been to the mountaintop, start by considering the question of what moment in human history, king would like to live in. He considers some of the high points of antiquity, classical Greece, and Rome, the renaissance. He ignores the founding entirely, the first moment of American history that gets a reference is the signing of the Emancipation proclamation. In the end, king says he would like to live just where he is because something is happening an hour world. The masses of people are rising up, and the cry is always the same. We want to be free. We march for freedom, king told us listeners, and we will win if we stick together. He knew that freedom had a cost. I may not get there with you, but we as a people will get to the promised land. And he sent the audience out into the night with one final spur, invoking the great clash where white and black Americans fought together for the freedom of all. The last line of the last speech that king ever delivered is not from the declaration or the constitution. It is from the Civil War. It is the first line of the battle hymn of the republic. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the lord. That is when our America was born, not with the revolution, and the founding, but with the Civil War and reconstruction, the values we must carry forward are not those of Thomas Jefferson, and the framers of the constitution. They are the values of Abraham Lincoln and the reconstruction Congress. It is time for us to see this. It is time for us to join that march. Tell your plastic containers to take the night off. That their services won't be needed because they won't be any leftovers in sight, and they can thank ragu for that. It's the sauce that helps you cook up a crowd pleaser. The sauce that makes them kick each other under the table over the last helping. The sauce that started in an Italian mother's kitchen cook with ragu sauce and cook like a mother..

U.S. Kermit Roosevelt University of Pennsylvania Ker Martin Luther King Declaration of Independence Roosevelt Betsy Ross mason temple kings king Memphis Greece Rome King Thomas Jefferson Abraham Lincoln Congress
"martin luther king" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:53 min | 11 months ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on WTOP

"In Alexandria Virginia and at select auto imports dot com It's 1128 Traffic and weather on the 8th and when it breaks Steve dresner in the traffic center In the district we're dealing with a closure in southeast Howard road between first Sterling avenue and Martin Luther King Jr. avenue the roadway is blocked due to an ongoing police investigation where very slow on the south bound side of D.C. two 95 roadwork is set up after east capitol street block in the right lane Over on I two 95 first the northbound ramp to Malcolm X avenue is blocked for the work zone southbound side after the suitland Parkway that works on has a single right lane getting it by In Maryland traffic doing pretty well in both directions on the capitol beltway we are slow though on the northbound side of the BW Parkway now delays up near one 97 we have a mobile work zone working the right lanes of state to the left then be heading up to one 75 then turning around and hitting southbound white oak area southbound 29 after New Hampshire avenue the work's own currently has a single left lane getting by Jammed up and Braddock heights he's found ice 70 after U.S. 40 alternate and Braddock heights exit which is exit 49 networks owned with a big delay has only a single lane getting by Jeff healed service centers keep you moving from oil changes entire rotations to filters and wipers to a full range of services Visit jiffy Lu D.C. dot com for a location near you Steve dresner wtp traffic Storm team forest Lauren ricketts He's today lots of clouds around and maybe a few late showers I would say later of this evening through the overnight and then scattered showers throughout the day tomorrow.

Steve dresner Martin Luther King Jr. suitland Parkway Alexandria D.C. Braddock heights Virginia Maryland New Hampshire Lauren ricketts U.S. Jeff
"martin luther king" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"So hopefully I done my part in what John catch. Maty dish owner and operator of Red Apple Media's W. A. B. C and 107.1 FM had asked us to do. Is to bring light to the life and times of Martin Luther King Junior on this The national holiday in his honor. And I think I've done so in a manner in which you learned a hell of a lot you might not have known because I lived through it. And more importantly, we didn't get all wrapped up into the jargon of if he was still alive. This is what Martin Luther King Jr would have thought said or done. I don't know of anyone out there who's a soothsayer, a swami or a tea? Leave reader who could have known any of that. But it's been a great day so far, and it will continue on and you will learn quite a bit about Martin Luther King Jr Talk radio for New York and all of America. 1071. W L I. R FM, Hampton Bays and You may be concerns about inaugural security. I'm rich Dennis and Fox News. The FBI is conducting rigorous background checks into National Guard members deploying to the nation's capital to provide security for Wednesday's inauguration. Defense officials are worried about some type of insider attack by service members involved in securing President elect Joe Biden's inauguration. This concern has the FBI vetting all 25,000 National Guard troops coming to the U. S. Capitol for the event. This massive undertaking highlighting security concerns that have gripped Washington since the January 6th insurrection. Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy says he's seen no evidence. It's of any threats, adding the vetting hasn't flagged any issues. Fox's Jackie Baniyas much of Washington, D. C is locked down ahead of this week's inaugural activities. Heightened security led to a brief lockdown of the U. S. Capitol building today after a fire was reported near the complex. Officials say that fire was in a homeless camp and posed no threat. President Trump's expected to grant up to 100 pardons and commutations before leaving the White House. Sources tell Fox News. A large batch could come tomorrow. All have to be issued before noon Wednesday. Rapper Lil Wayne, who pleaded guilty to a weapons charge last month, is suspected to be on the list. Wikileaks founder Julian Hassan's not expected to get a pardon is still unclear whether former Trump advisor Steve Bannon, charged in a fraud probe will get a reprieve. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham has said the president should not give pardons to those who stormed the U. S. Capitol. Fox's Rachel Sutherland in Washington Vice President elect Kamila Harris today resigned her California U S Senate seat ahead of Wednesday's inauguration. Areas will continue playing a key role in the center. Dashi is expected to be called upon to break ties in the chamber. Now that Republicans have lost the majority California's secretary of state Alex Padilla, will Phil Harris.

Martin Luther King Jr Washington Fox News FBI President Fox National Guard President Trump Kamila Harris Ryan McCarthy Red Apple Media Vice President Senator Lindsey Graham John Lil Wayne Joe Biden Alex Padilla W. A. B. C California
"martin luther king" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"And i have been kind of digging into this. Mlk awhile like for you know very deeply for the past few days i mean what's your takeaway i think with so much surveillance from the military from Co into intact pro. Some people call a coin coin. Tell pro is that was the fbi spying on all the civil rights leaders to the point. I mean there are stuff or Wasn't fred hampton killed by them. Kinda gunned down in bed. Basically there's also other evidence that the black panthers was actually militarized and giving guns to buy an fbi operative. I mean there was definitely some dialectic at foot. Some give and take some two sides of it in the civil rights movement in the sixties and look how it turned out total conspiracy around. Mlk the lone wolf thing to me seems absurd in this case. Yeah i agree with that. I think it's it's the people are like. Oh you're conspiracy nutjob you'd have to be a nutjob to think in. What read one of these books by william pepper. Mean his and and what you were talking about them. Martin luther king. The king center website has thousands of pages of the evidence that was brought up in the civil case against lloyd jr hours which the king family one that he was part of a conspiracy right so so give us a closing tweet and then we have one from bill who tweets great show today listening from abu dhabi. 'wow that's i guess. That's what the heck times it novel idea. Well it's almost seven o'clock here and that is time for urban canes encore of the alka commemoration. This is monica parents..

william pepper today seven o'clock bill two sides sixties thousands of pages king center Martin luther king civil rights movement fred hampton lloyd jr hours one abu dhabi monica one of these past few alka
"martin luther king" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"Not working today and what. What do we need to do. We don't. I'll tell you what we play. I'll know facebook. Youtube will allow with player. Martin luther king before the tonight's for this morning's over how about that barbie. Because then if i play a few little bit martin. Luther king's speech. I think i will feel better about myself and i won't feel so guilty. That is being. You've been glow selfish. 'cause it's freecell the is being a little because you know we honored this man that i i didn't recognize it at all so i think Right now while we had the moment well before the show when we're playing that down because lord knows i don't want to forget we're someone looking but probably not one you don't feel guilty not one bit or you just push right right right. Yeah you'd be so so. I say this everyone doing this for bob. Insignia myself before shows for the show. Today will play a little. Two minutes of dr martin. Luther king how about that. Yes i do anybody and yeah they care. Do you guys care number one. If you even put the cam take care. Shown black folks why folks are listening latinos even care a grassy. Say he always celebrate our movement. Okay come on let me know. Let me know if you care. I'll just say they.

Youtube facebook today Today Luther Two minutes this morning tonight martin Martin luther king lord Luther king dr martin. Insignia latinos one bit bob one
"martin luther king" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"Erik. Erikson we're back. It's monica perez and for ericsson and we're talking about. I threw a new wrinkle. I've had the Martin luther king story. The true story has power the assassination what it was really about and then i mentioned that i stumbled upon in my research that just this november the trump administration and in a kind of document dump about the about jfk had this this twenty page fbi dossier on mlk which just detail the connections between mlk and some members of the communist party in the us very damning document in my opinion if you still care about the threat of communism and you look back it looks to me like it's a way to kind of get people to feel that. Mlk is a serious threat for that reason as a communist as opposed to anything else. I think that the reason he was killed was not that but for other reasons. Maybe i don't know. But i wanna know what you think. Eight hundred wsb talk. I'm going run in snowville heireann with monica. Hello monica how are you. I'm good my point is simply this We need information. We would like to know exactly what happened. I don't think you need to worry about a resurgence or or or of You.

Erik ericsson monica monica perez Erikson twenty page mlk Eight hundred trump this november snowville heireann Martin luther Mlk jfk
"martin luther king" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"Monica perez and prayer erickson. Eric back tomorrow So before the break we were talking about how A caller called and i agreed with them that. Mlk was the only person whose name who says the single person celebrated on a federal holiday but basically pointed out there are actually still to federal holidays that celebrate individuals binding gopher brinkley. Yes contrary to popular belief on a national level. There's no such thing as president's day. The federal holiday is officially called washington's birthday and celebrating george washington's birthday and columbus day while some states have started to not celebrate it on the federal level. It's still a holiday. See i did not know that. Thank you very much. You got a little handy dandy fact checker here. That's good keep me honest and if you ever hear me say something you think is wrong. Got always call. Because i love to be corrected. Four zero four eight seven two zero seven fifty one eight hundred wsb talk. I'm going to tony in conyers. Hi tony you're on with monica monica. Good to talk with you. Thanks so that last caller actually did kind of remind me of something economy thinking a little bit about that. And dr king was great civil rights leader and i think Definitely a cause and voice for the civil rights bill of. I'm sorry but i wanted to say was what about president. Lincoln i mean wasn't either ultimate civil rights lawyer. Well i'll tell you why i respect. Mlk more than linkin is that. What with martin luther king. He was Into passive resistance. Change through nonviolent means Far he what he did was legal. I would not have agreed. With some of the policy. Initiatives i think he was going to take But with with lincoln really was not the that war. I think it was necessary. And i don't think he was His motivations were hundred percent pure. I think states rights were violated. I think that he probably he wanted he. Maybe could have solved the problem. I know it's difficult issue that it took a long time to try to get through. But i feel like he killed a lot of people. I'm martin luther. King was not going to do that. And possibly achieve more in the ant. And i think that's extremely powerful so for me. I think it's when when martin luther king was taken out it was really like with the other guys the the end of the first amendment and i believe in the power of the law. And if you can effect change in a lawful manner. I have to respect that as the american way. But i'm going to put a new twist on the story right after the break. This is monica paris..

Monica perez Eric martin luther Lincoln lincoln linkin george washington tomorrow martin luther king first amendment monica paris washington Mlk monica erickson tony single person seven Four four
"martin luther king" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"Own herman. Cain his special. Our to commemorate martin luther king day it will be replayed right after the shadow nights. Seven to eight right here on sp but if you do listen to my show you know. I always go a little bit deeper. I'm always getting into the deep history stuff you don't read some well certainly stop you. Don't hear from the cable news. That's screaming at your from the glowing box in your living room. It's but on martin. Luther king's is a very interesting opportunity. Which i haven't stumbled upon a few weeks ago. I think only without. I know i would have a show. Today wasn't really thinking about martin luther king day but i saw a mention of a book called orders to kill and it was. It's a the subtitle is the truth about the assassination of martin luther king. So have you listened to my show you. I'm a hardcore libertarian. But once you once you're that hardcore and really lose faith in the government's and in the system and the media the dialectic between left and right you can you realize that there is a lot of times you're not getting all the truth that the media on the left or the right is going to tailor the facts they give you to support their own position so i always dig a little deeper and when you do that. A common weapon used against that approach. Is this allegation. That you're a conspiracy theorist that there's no support behind it your tin foil hat. Your irrational whatever. But if you and this martin luther king expose is a conspiracy theory but it is so well documented in. Its i would say you say was proven. In a court of law that It's a ideal paternity to debunk to to realize that allegations that conspiracy theories are all bunk are bunk in themselves. It was written by a guy named dr william pepper. Who was a friend of martin. Luther king and he ultimately became the lawyer for james earl. Ray who was went to jail. Yeah james who went to jail for killing martin luther king but he didn't have trial. He pled guilty supposedly by some funny business of his lawyer. And i and the the story that this guy relates about. How james earl ray got railroaded and what really happened is absolutely riveting. There's tons of evidence of it. So i'm going to walk you through a few of the facts. Tell you how to get more information on that. You can draw your own conclusion. And then we have to ask the big question if it isn't some lone nut gunman if martin luther king was killed as a result of a conspiracy that included the government and the mafia. Why then you have to ask why and and did it work. Did it change the course of events. So let's talk about that. Gonna take down the rabbit hole now and bingley my producer. Brinkley's here hyping clear how you doing. I'm good how are you. i'm good well. I guess So i remember just telling you a little bit about this and you as fascinated as i was by the story right i mean. I don't think this is common knowledge. You yeah. I was blown away by the first time i heard about it yet because the evidence is so good..

james earl james james earl ray Brinkley dr william pepper Luther Today martin luther king day martin Ray martin luther king first time eight Cain bingley Seven few weeks ago tons
"martin luther king" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on KCRW

"2000 and 21. Anything the Monday Here in Al a clear morning. Very still right now. 54 F around 12 Celsius. Today. I was thinking about Martin Luther King Jr. Talk about a man with courage. He had the courage. Just stand up. And peacefully fight. Against tremendous opposition. Just stand up and peacefully fight. We're freedom. For a justice. Equality. Very few people with this kind of courage. God bless Martin Luther King Jr. Should be going up to around. 80 F this afternoon around 27 Celsius. And it looks like we're going to be enjoying once again. Beautiful blue skies and golden sunshine. All along the way. Everyone. Have a great day..

Martin Luther King Jr
"martin luther king" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"For violence. Uh, we're having a hard time finding anything but a couple of crackpots. I mean, I know it's what crackpots do, but Violence that is being, uh, predicted way can't find evidence off anywhere. We'll get into that. And, of course, Martin Luther King. It's Martin Luther King Day in 60 seconds Glenn Beck program. 18 of weight loss regimen night. Dear diary. The doors are locked. Hear drums in the deep I I may have stolen the sacred leftover cheeseburger and Running down a long corridor to the bedroom and my wife may have discovered it before had a chance to destroy the evidence. I feel she may wait me out on the other side of the door. But you'll never get it back. It's mine. It came to me. My own cheeseburger. My fresh is Love Glenn. Well, that was really weird. But sometimes when you're you know, eating healthy food, you kind of lose your mind. I want to talk to you a little bit about build bars, low calorie, low sugar, high protein, high fiber, and they taste like a candy bar. It's healthy for you, but it tastes like it's made with real chocolate. And yet it's healthier than your average protein bar. I don't know how they do it..

Martin Luther King Martin Luther Glenn Beck
"martin luther king" Discussed on Wendell's World & Sports

Wendell's World & Sports

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on Wendell's World & Sports

"A a system. Aw a love matter plus..

"martin luther king" Discussed on Wendell's World & Sports

Wendell's World & Sports

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther king" Discussed on Wendell's World & Sports

"We'll see song says leave long. Lets you the law. Your thanks a When the world is. I'm your host wonder wallace so glad to be with us. A.