36 Burst results for "Martin Luther"

Columbia Public Schools Take Students to Drag Show Without Consent

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:54 min | 2 d ago

Columbia Public Schools Take Students to Drag Show Without Consent

"There is a crazy story coming out of Missouri. This is mind boggling. So parents, you know, they just had MLK day. And parents were asked by this local school, hey, we want to take the kids to this breakfast and it's an annual thing and it's a good thing because it's all about inclusion and they say we want your kids to go see this. So they send the school does the right thing. This is in Colombia. Columbia public schools in Missouri and all the middle schoolers, the parents got these consent letters, so they sent the consent forms the parents fill it out and they say yes, our children can go and participate in this wholesome family friendly. Martin Luther King, junior event. They call it the Columbia values diversity breakfast. I mean, that right, that sounds like a nice wholesome event. Well, when the kids got there, it turned out that it wasn't exactly family friendly. It turned out to be a drag show. And they had adult entertainers that were cavorting about with the children. And the parents were like, what in the holy you know what is going on here? And the parents are fired up because they produce the permission slips, and their permission slept said nothing about adult entertainers. Nothing about drag queens. Nothing. So they're all up in a Twitter over in Missouri. The attorney general is now investigating and he's calling for these school officials to be fired over the adult themed drag show breakfast. And so is the governor. The governor is getting involved now. Everybody's calling for investigations. We understand about 30 middle schoolers attended the breakfast.

Missouri Columbia Colombia Martin Luther King Twitter
Fresh update on "martin luther" discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

01:00 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "martin luther" discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Them, but there are not a lot of them. And hey, that's so nice. So Eric ranked only 48 race prospects this year. So 59 last year, so I guess the system must be thin and out. Yeah, relatively, but also only relatively to itself relative to the rest of the league still quite deep, but sort of like clutch, you know, where it's self referential. Right. So you remember last week when the athletics Dan Connelly had the audacity to question Orioles owner John angelos about the team's finances and the future of the franchise and its ownership and so forth. On Martin Luther King day of all days and John Angelo he got a little bit huffy about it and he berated Dan for questioning him at that time and at that place despite the fact that into us rarely makes himself available at other times and places and of course he had scheduled that event for that day and that time. One of the things he said during his several minute response was that he extended an offer to Dan and everyone else to just come on down to Camden yards next week, which is this week, as we speak on Friday. And he would throw the books open, just tell him anything they wanted to know about the Orioles and their finances. In fact, I'll play a quick little clip of him extending that offer. I'm very transparent. In fact, in fact, I would invite you and all your colleagues. Next week, not on Martin Luther King day. You can come back to this building. You can meet me in this office. I'll take you down on the third floor, and I'll show you the financials of the Orioles. I'll show you the governance of the Orioles. I'll show you everything you want to know. And I'll put all your questions, but today on MLK day, I'm not answering any of those questions. Well, Meg, as we speak, it's about to be the end of business hours on the last business day of the week when John Angela's promised that anyone could just show up at royal park and get a look at the books. And I am just shocked, shocked to report to you that that has not happened that the Orioles and into us have not followed through on that offer. I really, I just, I can't believe it. I feel like my world has shifted beneath me. Yeah. Like I am unsure how to proceed confused, staggered even. Yeah, I mean, when a team owner says something, you can take that to the bank and especially when it's related to team finances. I mean, you can set your watch by that. You can just have full faith that you are just getting the straight dope there and there's no dissembling of any kind going on. So when this offer was made, really an unprecedented promise to just open the books, which other than a couple of teams that are legally required to do that to some extent. No one ever does. And here was John angelis just volunteering just off the cuff. Just, hey, come on down. I'll tell you anything you want to know. Anyway, it's just really has shaken my faith as well. This is not happened. I mean, I expressed some skepticism last week when we initially talked about this about whether this supposed meeting would occur. And still, I'm just really, I don't know who to trust anymore. Yeah, if you can't trust billionaires, who can you trust them? This is the most actively tired of sounded on the pod in a while. That's my, that's my feeling right now. Anyway, the Orioles have just sort of stonewalled media members requests thus far to actually make good on this meeting the Orioles have said that there's nothing to report, which is not surprising. There's usually nothing to report when it comes to team finances, but I don't know what possessed him to make that often at the time. This is my question. Why not just not do that so that you aren't in a position where you look like you're going not just look like are going back on your word, you know? You don't have to do this. I wonder if he was just flustered or he figured no one would follow up. I mean, you had to assume someone would follow up and not follow up about that or whether he just got a little high end his own supply, and he was just, you know, he was rolling and that came out all of a sudden. I really don't know what was going through his mind, but maybe he just thought he would not be accountable for that. Yeah, I don't know, I don't know what the rationale is there, but it feels ill considered, and it's really a shame because, you know, we have gotten guff is too strong. We have been the recipients of exasperation in the past but when fans of teams that feel like they're finally starting to really turn the corner that are emerging from a long period of being irrelevant on the competitive landscape. Like in that the yellow fallow period on the carry carry Matheson is her last name actually Matheson or am I thinking of the. Yep, that's right. You know, like the yellow period on her on her board. The big paranoid board. And you know, the feeling that you want to access most primarily when you're a fan in that situation is excitement. And we want to acknowledge that excitement because we think that's important, but we also have to talk about the game as it is and these owners as they are. And I would just say to the Orioles ownership group like let us say nice stuff about your team, how about. You know, because this is a really exciting squad. It's exciting at the big league level. They have such great young players. They have some interesting complimentary guys. They have reinforcements on the way from the minor leagues that could really, you know, vault them into a new era of Orioles baseball, but instead we're talking about this. So, you know, to stop it. Yeah, what's the season rolls around? I'm sure we'll be pending plenty of time talking about the Orioles of the fields because there's a lot to be excited about. Yes.

Orioles Dan Connelly John Angelos John Angelo Martin Luther King John Angela DAN John Angelis Royal Park Camden Eric MEG Matheson Baseball
It Pays to Be a Victim

The Officer Tatum Show

02:31 min | Last week

It Pays to Be a Victim

"I want to just go back to the subject at hand. I think that at least I got Eric's point. I want to get some other people in, but the tearing down. I hear that a lot and I'm trying to perception lies it. Perceptual it. I see I kind of see what people are saying, but at the same time, it's like, from my position, I'm in a world where I'm seeing black people struggle, I'm seeing black people destroy their own communities and nobody's even talking about it. It's like, it's okay to tout, we got ten new black millionaires this year. You know, we got black entrepreneurs. Like, I get it. That's what we supposed to be doing. We live in America, you know what I'm saying? I don't know if it's shall be celebrating the fact that black people are entrepreneurs. That's what she's supposed to do. People come over here with 25 sin, they pocket, they can't even speak English, and they become millionaires in this country. But I do think that what's being promoted is this idea that black men are being hunted by police. So I dive into that issue and I break that line up. A lot of people come on and we can talk about more Luther King till we blew in the face. But how do we vote? You could say Martin Luther King said I want a dream. I have a dream that, you know, about his kids playing with white kids and us not looking at the color of the skin, but the content of your character. Yeah, majority of white people are looking at the color of the skin. I think it's like you tell my Martin Luther King and you ain't even living with Martin Luther King saying. Can we get the elephant out of the room and call out the BS so we could actually be on the same page? We can actually be on the same page. Because this in is not working. You talk to black people. By and large, I think a lot, not every black person. I think a lot of black people you ask, what's the best interest? What is your interest on? What race is the most important to you? And I mean, most black people say black people. But it's like, well, look, you ain't gonna go, you ain't gonna go far. If you picking and choosing. And then if the white man say white man is most important to me, then people are mad. People can go out and say black power, black power, black power. If somebody said white power, they'd be mad. We took the word back. N word don't have no power no more. Let a white person call you in where you mad. Let's get that stuff out of the way so we can begin to move in a more efficient way.

Martin Luther King Eric America
Chasing the American Dream Without a Handout

The Officer Tatum Show

01:44 min | Last week

Chasing the American Dream Without a Handout

"Town center. When I was growing up in Fort Worth Townsend, it used to be all black ma. That mall gone. It's coffee ester now. They ain't begging you to they not trying to, it's crazy to me, because and I know I'm rambling, but it's crazy to me because I feel like black people are reaching for a begging for handouts. Not all. But it seems like it's a good number of black people with their hand out begging somebody for something while other people are getting it done. These people from Mexico and South America, they come to America with nothing. They ain't asking for nothing. They're not protesting Mexicans get shot in the head by the police they ain't protesting nothing. They out there working. They got 5 or 6 people living one half. I'm not saying all of them. I'm just giving you an example. They got 5 and 6 people living in one 5 6 families living in one house. They working together, helping this person build this, they build this to build that before you know they got a whole landscaping company. They now out here social Justin Warren. Then they're not here talking about my people done wrong. They are here grinding. Now they doing landscaping for everybody in the city. And we still complaining on food stamps crying about Martin Luther King. I'm just telling you, Jewish people bought in a more modern sense were done. Horrible, horribly. The Holocaust, they come over to America. I don't hear Jewish people talking about the Holocaust. I don't hear them complaining about that as much as I hear. Black people complaining about slavery.

Fort Worth Townsend Town Center Justin Warren South America Mexico America Martin Luther King
A Justice Denied in the Black Community

The Officer Tatum Show

02:28 min | Last week

A Justice Denied in the Black Community

"This is what I want us to consider. Of course I have my own opinions about Martin Luther King and I think that I'm starting to really doubt if he was if that was his dream or that was a Marxist leftist white liberals dream. But I see the parallel today, I see the parallel. And it's kind of ironic because after the civil rights movement, it seems like black people begin to do worse. And the trajectory became worse. I mean, even to this day, there is a profitability in victimhood. Profitability in victimhood. I just, I've seen it, I've seen a hundred times. I was watching the documentary just the other night on the rapper Lil Baby. I think his name is Lil Baby. The baby. No, it's a little baby. I said, let me see what little baby, 'cause some of these rappers ain't as bad as they look or they rap about. Sometimes you see them and you're like, oh man, they got a good story man. He's got a good heart. I get it. So I'm looking at little baby. And my thoughts are running crazy. And shame and guilt begins to overshadow me. Because of, and when I say overshadow me, shame and guilt for the black community begin to overshadow me. They made a documentary about this rapper and I think his story is quite unique. But in the documentary, they cry about the white man. And they talk about injustice. Because Lil Baby went to prison for like two years. But in the same sentence, they're saying this injustice in the system and white supremacy, yet they're bragging about the fact that Lil Baby was a hustler making over millions of $1 million millions of dollars selling dope in the community. He was a hustler. He was a drug dealer. He was making millions of dollars selling dope to his own people. You said in the millions of dollars worth of dope, you know what I mean, people have died because of the adult, that little baby sold them? In the black community, not the white folks in the black community. But then they go on and talk about the white man in social justice, but then they brag about how he was making millions selling dope to his own people.

Lil Baby Martin Luther King
The MLK We Didn't Know

The Officer Tatum Show

02:20 min | Last week

The MLK We Didn't Know

"Is Martin Luther King's movement any different than Black Lives Matter movement? Because if you listen, they don't talk about that Martin Luther King pushed Marxism. They don't talk about the fact that Martin Luther King pushed government intervention and government assistance. More so than he did self accountability. And people don't talk about the fact that Martin Luther King didn't write that speech. Nobody talks about that part. People don't talk about the part where Martin Luther King, if you listen to any of his other speeches or any of the other things that he did, it was very different. He hung around people who were known marxists. People who did not believe in what they project that Martin Luther King is saying today. Show me a sermon for Martin Luther King. A lot of what Martin Luther King was was an activist. And again, I'm not trying to bash him. I'm really not. I'm trying to give you a different perspective. Because if you look at Jesse Jackson, show me a sermon from Jesse Jackson. Show me a sermon from reverend Al sharpton. They don't, they don't do sermons. They use the pillars of the black community and influence of having the title reverend to be an activist in the community to have some respect. And they use that in my personal opinion to manipulate and to get in the minds of black people to believe them. And I would argue that the certain people and I would argue the white Marxist leftist liberals Ireland call them liberals that mostly leftists, they are finding and using these black people influence in these black people giving them platforms to push their agenda. Because I'll go on for Martin Luther King. I mean, look at the people who hung around Martin Luther King. And people, you know, I seen the documents and information and I want to have my guy Chad Jackson on here. They give you the full perspective of it because he's a lot more knowledgeable, but I saw the video. I saw the content. Uncle Tom two alludes to a little bit of it. But there's an Uncle Tom three that I hope that they put out. That goes into it. I saw it behind the scenes that goes into everything about Martin Luther King.

Martin Luther King Jesse Jackson Reverend Al Sharpton Chad Jackson Ireland Uncle Tom
MLK, The Marxist?

The Officer Tatum Show

01:20 min | Last week

MLK, The Marxist?

"I know that this is holiday for many people. So I hope you're celebrating and eating barbecue and all kind of stuff on the holiday. I want to say happy Marxist Luther King day. I mean, Martin Luther King day, some people ain't gonna like that I called Martin Luther King of marxists, but was he a Marxist? Or was he not a Marxist? This show is going to be hot, so make sure you're ready and prepared. It makes you sitting down. I believe that Martin Luther King wasn't who we think he is, or he was. I think that the media has really recreated a scenario that's very similar to what they've done with the narrative of police brutality in America, the same narrative of Black Lives Matter. I mean, I'm telling you guys, I'm telling you, in 20 years, we're going to look back and they're going to say that Black Lives Matter was an organization that inspired change. It was the new civil rights movement. They're going to tell you that black people were getting gunned down in the middle of the street on by white racist police officers. And it was an epidemic. And that if it wasn't for people like Patrice Kohler's, then Byron Manson white neighborhoods that we would still be suffering from the effects of white racism.

Martin Luther King America Patrice Kohler Byron Manson
Critical Race Theory Rejects Martin Luther King Jr.

Mark Levin

01:59 min | Last week

Critical Race Theory Rejects Martin Luther King Jr.

"It is Martin Luther King Jr. day in the United States a national holiday to recognize a great civil rights leader and one of the things he was great about Was his view of his fellow human being His entire effort in emphasis Was that everybody should be treated as human individuals Regardless of their race And he made famous the line about the color blind society That the color of your skin shouldn't matter It's the content of your character And when I was doing research on American Marxism really digging into critical race theory and in the Marxist ties to critical race theory critical race theory rejects Martin Luther King Jr. its authors its speech givers they reject Martin Luther King Jr. two Our public schools and classrooms reject Martin Luther King Jr. Many Democrats reject Martin Luther King Jr. Joe Biden Previously segregationist and racist He today rejects Martin Luther King Jr. despite yesterday giving a speech at ebenezer church Martin Luther King's church And his speech today Because Joe Biden has pushed the effort of critical race theory And the view that you're a racist regardless of who you are as an individual human being regardless of how you live your life

Martin Luther King Martin Luther King Jr. Joe Bid United States Ebenezer Church Joe Biden
The American Left Doesn't Have the Right to Celebrate MLK Day

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:47 sec | Last week

The American Left Doesn't Have the Right to Celebrate MLK Day

"The American left has killed the dream that Martin Luther King Jr. had. And announced, and promoted, and shared with the rest of the country, maybe the rest of the world. They've killed it. And they've done so intentionally, which is why today, on Martin Luther King day, 2023, I am calling on every American leftist. Every American progressive. Every American liberal. To not celebrate MLK day because you don't celebrate MLK, the man. And his dream. You have intentionally killed that which he strived so hard to build.

Martin Luther King
Has the Left Killed Dr. King's Dream? Bob Frantz Explains

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:17 min | Last week

Has the Left Killed Dr. King's Dream? Bob Frantz Explains

"Decades later, have we achieved the dream? Have we accomplished? What doctor king wanted for this country for his children and his children's children and yours and mine have we accomplished it? No, we haven't. And do you want to know why? Because the American left refuses to allow it. Because the American left absolutely does not dream the same dream. That doctor king dreamed. The American left has no interest whatsoever in color blindness. As a matter of fact, the American left will tell you directly. Colorblindness is racism. They will tell you that doctor king was wrong. Let me tell you that doctor Martin Luther King was striving for the wrong thing because color blindness is racist. This is what we're told. Today, every single day by radicals and marxists, otherwise known as the American left, otherwise known in simpler terms as the Democrat party,

King Martin Luther King Democrat Party
Guest Host Bob Frantz Unpacks the Heart of Dr. King's Dream

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:49 min | Last week

Guest Host Bob Frantz Unpacks the Heart of Dr. King's Dream

"Very few people know a great deal about the legacy, the life, the work, the history of the great civil rights icon, doctor Martin Luther King Jr., most people know him only from his great speech, the I have a dream speech. They may know him from marches, they may know him from some other. You should know him for his pledge of nonviolence, which he asked his marchers and his supporters in his protesters who are screaming for civil rights that he asked them to take was extraordinary. It was very important. I actually reread those today at the urging of one of my callers on my home station here in Cleveland, which is W H K radio, a.m. 14, 20 the answer. You can hear my daily show from 9 to noon. Here, Eastern Time, but he should be known as well as much for that. And of course, all of his life's work of trying to advance the cause of civil rights trying to advance the cause quality not equity, trying to advance the cause of, well, colorblindness. Am I right? Doctor Martin Luther King Jr. had a dream. Today? As he said, so forcefully, his dream was to one day see his children living in a nation in which they would be judged not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character, the literal dream that people talk about. From doctor Martin Luther King Jr., and it's one of the primary reasons that in his tragic assassination that we have a national holiday dedicated to civil rights and to him as a civil rights icon and leader.

Martin Luther King Jr. Cleveland
Recommit Yourself to the Promise of Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:20 min | Last week

Recommit Yourself to the Promise of Martin Luther King, Jr.

"Some people asked, are you taking the day off? No, but we do believe in the spirit of the day for what the day is supposed to be. The day is supposed to be a day. Where we recommit ourselves to the promise of Martin Luther King, you know, some people say, oh, Charlie, he had all these moral failings and yes, he did. He certainly was a flawed person, but I do think the ideal that he pushed for outside of some of the flirting with Marxism and communism was a moral one in a heroic one. And it was one that we should remind ourselves of. Of judging people based on content their character, not the color of their skin. So their character, who they are, their practices, their values, their beliefs, their actions. Not how they look and this ideal was repeated, in fact, I was listening to radio on the drive in and they kept on replaying it. And they talked about how, you know, I have a dream that one day we will have a society where people are judged by the content of their character, not the color of their skin. And then just a couple of minutes later, they're talking about systemic racism and white privilege, and I just thought to myself the very same people today that are going to be telling us about how wonderful Martin Luther King Jr.'s ideals are about how courageous he was. And he certainly was clear. He was clear in the type of America that he wanted to push forward, are now telling us that white people are to blame just because of the color of their skin.

Martin Luther King Jr. Charlie America
MLK weekend to feature tributes, commitments to race equity

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last week

MLK weekend to feature tributes, commitments to race equity

"The reverend Martin Luther King Jr. is being remembered and honored with a mix of tributes and community service events around the country. At a national action network event in Washington, MLK's son Martin Luther King the third says America has a long way to go on achieving his father's dream. Dad wanted to eradicate what he called were the triple evils of poverty, racism and violence. He says the ability is there, but not the will, President Biden, vowing to continue the fight. We have to get the votes in Congress for the John Lewis voting rights advancement act and the freedom to vote act. That legislation, languishing in Congress for two years. Must be guided by doctor king's light. I'm Julie Walker.

Martin Luther King President Biden Washington America John Lewis Congress King Julie Walker
In tornado-ravaged Selma, prayers of thanks

AP News Radio

01:00 min | Last week

In tornado-ravaged Selma, prayers of thanks

"After tornadoes ravaged Selma, Alabama last Thursday, church members are raising prayers for the lives spared and for lives lost elsewhere. The reverend David Nichols told his Selma congregation, there was still much to be grateful for as he held Sunday services on the lawn amid debris from a tornado that hit the cross point Christian church. Mercy in the middle of the storm. At the blue gene Selma church, pastor bob Armstrong told parishioners what he told business owner Mel gilmer, who was inside his one story brick building on broad street when the roof was torn off. He's not done. Church's anchored the community for many in this historic city that played an integral part in the civil rights movement, the reverend Martin Luther King Jr. led a 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery from brown chapel AME church now led by the reverend Leo's strong. My hos us to see that we need really need each other even more. I'm Jennifer King

David Nichols Selma Congregation Cross Point Christian Church Selma Blue Gene Selma Church Bob Armstrong Mel Gilmer Alabama Martin Luther King Jr. Brown Chapel Ame Church Reverend Leo Montgomery Jennifer King
Biden: Americans should 'pay attention' to MLK's legacy

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

Biden: Americans should 'pay attention' to MLK's legacy

"President Biden celebrates Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday at a Sunday service at Atlanta's historic ebenezer baptist church where the civil rights leader once preached. Speaking from the pulpit about MLK, Biden says democracy is at a perilous moment. Doctor king's life and legacy show us the way we should pay attention. But incited kings, I have a dream speech, calling for equality for all. And it's still the task of our time to make that dream a reality because it's not there yet. The president closed by asking MLK's question to the nation, where do we go from here? When we choose the mocktail we're autocracy. A beloved community over chaos. When we choose believers in the dreams. And he says doctor king's path was always keeping the faith. I'm Julie Walker

President Biden Martin Luther King Jr. Ebenezer Baptist Church Biden Atlanta King Julie Walker
‘Avatar 2,’ ‘M3GAN’ hold onto top spots at the box office

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

‘Avatar 2,’ ‘M3GAN’ hold onto top spots at the box office

"Avatar the way of water continues its domination of the box office. With the latest. The way of water connects all things. The Avatar sequel adds another $31.1 million in movie ticket sales, according to studio estimates. It's likely to go higher with the Martin Luther King holiday weekend, avatar the way of water is the number one movie draw for a 5th weekend in a row. Meghan is in second place with puss in boots the last wish in third a man called Otto is in fourth the action movie plane is number 5.

Martin Luther King Meghan Otto
Biden welcomed back to Georgia after lying low in midterms

AP News Radio

01:00 min | Last week

Biden welcomed back to Georgia after lying low in midterms

"President Biden heads to Georgia tomorrow for a ceremony to honor doctor Martin Luther King Jr. after staying away from the state during the midterm elections. A White House adviser says President Biden will be the first sitting president to deliver a sermon during Sunday morning services at the historic ebenezer baptist church, where doctor king had preached. The president will not only reflect on doctor king's legacy, but also emphasize voting rights legislation, which is stalled on Capitol Hill. Senator Raphael Warnock issued the invitation. He presides over the church, but he had kept President Biden at arm's length during the midterm elections because of the president's lagging approval ratings. And now the Atlanta appearances notable, as President Biden looks to a 2024 reelection campaign, now dogged with the disclosure that classified documents have been found at his Delaware home and a Washington D.C. office. Jackie Quinn, Washington

President Biden Martin Luther King Jr. Senator Raphael Warnock Ebenezer Baptist Church King Georgia White House Capitol Hill Atlanta Washington D.C. Delaware Jackie Quinn Washington
Racism Is at the Center of the Democrat Party

Mark Levin

01:38 min | Last month

Racism Is at the Center of the Democrat Party

"Since its establishment racism has been at the center of the Democrat party First the Democrat party hated blacks Now the Democrat party hates whites and Asians too really And they've always hated Jews That's a fact But let's stick with race The Democrat party has gone from hating blacks the hating whites Whatever works But race and racism is central To everything that institution and its leaders and its pseudo thinkers do Race is at the top of the list They can't help it I mean they can but they can't It's nature So they've gone from eugenics to blow out blacks to critical race theory in a hundred years to try and blow out whites They've gone from affirmative action for whites to affirmative action for blacks and other minorities There's a Democrat party They don't see people's people They don't believe in a colorblind society They talk about Martin Luther King but they really don't think Martin Luther King added up to what they need today More sort of a farrakhan sharp and kind of you

Democrat Party Center Of The Democrat Party Martin Luther King Farrakhan
Joy Reid, LaTosha Brown: Black Men Feel Disrespected by Walker

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:50 min | Last month

Joy Reid, LaTosha Brown: Black Men Feel Disrespected by Walker

"This miserable joy Reid. Hannity calls her relentlessly joyless region. And it's a perfect nickname. These people have you think joy behar has joy in her life, joy Reid, they're miserable people, leftists are so angry and so miserable so much of the time, listen to listen to this conversation. This is what I mean about the racism, the bigotry that has been thrown at Herschel Walker. Here's joy Reid over at MSNBC, having to sit down with a Democrat party strategist, a woman named latasha Brown. Check this out. Black people are upset. They're actually, they feel insulted. They feel insulted that hear the Republicans would actually pick a candidate and because he was a ballplayer that in some way that we would end in if they planted this narrative that black men were not going to vote or were upset with the Democratic Party that those two things would be enough for us to be fooled. We're far more sophisticated voters in there. And there's a certain level of feeling insult you. And that is racist. Right. And I think that's a motivating factor. And then there's also a motivating factor of who we're not here. It's we're not if a Southern Baptist preacher, who is the minister of Martin Luther King's church. But at the end of the day, that's a lot of history. That's a lot of connectivity to who we are. Our history and our centering in the community in the south. And so those things are working where I think black folks are saying enough is enough. Yeah. We can show you better than we can tell you. There is a certain and I've heard this from a lot of black men, even if they're not in Georgia. There's a certain disrespect that a lot of black men in particular feel about, particularly the way that walker has been walked around 5 people like Lindsey Graham and sort of use and put forward. They don't seem to respect him. And they don't seem to respect black people.

Joy Reid Latasha Brown Joy Behar Herschel Walker Hannity Democrat Party Msnbc Reid Democratic Party Martin Luther King Georgia Lindsey Graham Walker
"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:27 min | 3 months ago

"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Friday. Special Martin Luther edition. This is actually a special 500th anniversary Martin Luther edition of fun fact. Hundreds of years in the making, 500 years ago, Martin Luther nailed the 95 theses to the castle church, door in wittenberg setting off what we now know is called the reformation, but Alvin, you know, in terms of fun facts Friday, one of the fun facts that I put in my book, which is it's extraordinary, is that the way that that entire thing has been perceived of him nailing the 95 theses to the castle door is completely wrong. People picture him as doing this heroic thing as if he's saying to the Pope and to the church. Hey, I'm going to stick my finger in your eye and I'm going to nail these things here and speak the truth to power and complete nonsense. I know you get the it's like there's a hammer and you hear an echoing effect every time that pounding goes on. These pounding pounding the message through history and through the ages. And the reality is simple. That didn't happen. Well, here's what happened. What I love is that you put the 95 in the book. So people can read all 95 of them. And they can tear the pages out and nail them to any place that they want. Their bedroom door, the you could. Your own controller. Hey, we're not going to stop you. But let me say this. Let me say this. What actually happened 500 years ago is that Luther, as a humble monk, wanted to have a debate with his fellow academics, his fellow theologians, on the subject of indulgences. He wanted to correct what he saw as some wrongs, and he thought that he could help the situation by calling for a debate, but only among his fellow theologians. And so he posts 95 points on in Latin. In Latin, right. On the local bulletin board. So he was tacking this stuff up to the local Bolton board. But guess where was the local bulletin board? It was the castle. Of wittenberg. So people act like he was nailing it on the church door, making a statement. People put, you know, if you were if you were missing your cat and you'd say help me find smokey or Sparky and tear off this phone number and give me a call if you find Sparky. Well, the reality is it was just the bulletin board. People posted stuff. In fact, not only did it probably not happen as it's described. I mean, we know it didn't happen in this heroic fashion that it's a humble monk just tacking something up to a bulletin board and in retrospect it's perceived that way. But not only that, but he may have used paste, he may not have used a hammer and nails. I mean, paste is not. You said it could have been like the church janitor. He could have given it to him and said he could have given it to me. That's absolutely true. We could have given it to the custodian of the church or the sex and whoever it is and said, please post this stuff. Anyway, we're just about out of time, but folks, I got to tell you, the truth of history is more fascinating than the legends, all the legends. I mean, another one is that everybody says that Luther threw an ink pot at the devil when he was at the wartburg. Never happened. He throwing ink of the devil, he was talking about using his ink by writing against the devil. I thought he seemed a little I thought he threw a stuffed monkey or something. Yeah, people say that too. Are we at a time? Well, it's a special 500th anniversary fun fact Friday. We may have to we may have to re air this because it's 500th anniversary special edition. Well, Alvin, thank you for helping me with this. This has been a lot of fun. And well, I guess that's the end of the show. We can't see tomorrow, but we can hear it. And it sounds like a wind farm powering homes across the country. We're bridging to a sustainable energy future, working today to ensure tomorrow is on. Enbridge, life takes energy.

Martin Luther castle church wittenberg Alvin Sparky Luther Bolton Latin Enbridge
"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:44 min | 3 months ago

"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Singing songs about software I'm so fine that was getting up and saying yeah. Hey there folks, it's fun facts Friday on the Eric metaxas show a little Skynyrd for ya. Yeah. Alvin, this is crazy. We're talking about this is a special fun fact Friday edition because we're talking about my Luther book. This was your idea because you realize there's so much quirky weird stuff in there. And one of the quirkiest to me, this was one of the most entertaining wacko things in the book, and I'm now going to reveal what the duchess of Bavaria saw through the people. And can I say this to before you reveal? You know, this book is not a true haggie, right? It really is for everybody. Whether you're religious or even irreligious, it's not Catholic bashing, it's not protestants, rah rah rah. What it is, it's a story of a time in our history and human history, I should say. Right? And the reason why I think your number 7 on The New York Times list is because even though it's called Martin Luther, it's not religious in a sense. It's a pilot a time. Well, look, it thrills me to hear you say this. And anybody who knows you as I do knows, you're not psycho fantic and you're not saying this because you're on this program or whatever. I mean, if you feel this, I'm thrilled because I know you're just an honest guy. But I agree. And that's why I got so excited. And I got to put stuff like this in there, which is just, it's just flat out entertaining and wacky. But actually, I better get to get on with them, but we haven't even scratched the surface. We might have to do an hour, too. Right, we have to do the relics yet. There's so much. All right, so we're going to do.

Eric metaxas Alvin Bavaria Martin Luther The New York Times
"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:06 min | 3 months ago

"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Now. And then I'm in my hotel room in Dallas, just grooving down. Okay, now we're talking about the curious case of Anna lamina. Now this is a fun facts Friday special fun facts Friday edition of the Eric metaxas show and we're talking about Martin Luther and this was your idea because you said there's so many weird ideas in your book Erica that it would be a fun for a fun fact Friday and I thought, well, there's enough for ten fun facts Friday because there is so much weird. Right. Right, and this whole thing about Anna, you pronounce it on. I guess, but because she was supposedly this very holy and pious woman. And of course the question that he asks are in her answer. No, no, no. But I'm not going to get away from the way. Okay, so I was just saying that Luther is sent to Rome. He goes on a long trip 800 miles from wittenberg to Rome. He has to walk. He goes with it with one of his fellow monks, we were not sure who it was for sure, but he goes, he walks to Rome, it takes months. You know, it's like 2025 miles a day of walking. And he gets there, you see some stuff, and then he comes back. Okay. Well, all of the details are in my book, but one thing that he sees on his way home, he comes to Germany, and in a certain city, I don't remember is it Augsburg. I can't remember. It's in my book, but the point is that he hears that there is a woman who lives in the city, who is very, very holy. She has become famous as an ascetic. Now in those days, asceticism was very popular, people who it can become works righteousness to use that theologically loaded term, but where people like the desert fathers would deny themselves food, water they would fast for prolonged periods of time, which of course is a wonderful thing to do if you do for the right reasons, but it almost became a fetishistic in a way people became famous for being ascetic. And the focus in a way came to the person. And so this woman named Anna laminate was very famous for being a holy woman who and hold on to your hats because this is what this is what this is true. Because I did my research. She was famous for never, ever eating a bite of food or drinking anything, and as you would expect, she was equally famous for never going to the bathroom. To put a delicately, yes. To put it semi delicately, yeah. So Luther said, I want to meet this holy woman. Now, she'd become famous. A lot of the wealthy people would visit her and she actually became very rich. Because she didn't pay taxes because she was considered a holy woman. And all this weird stuff, but it gets weirder and weirder. And I don't know if I should tell the whole story because it's complicated and weird. But the bottom line is Luther visits this woman. And he suspects because he was a sharp Saxon, he suspects something is wrong. Something is off. All these people are celebrating how she's so holy and she's so amazing. And as a serious monk, there was something awry with the whole picture, something fishy. And Luther, at some point, and this is from memory you have the book in front of you, but at some point he asks her, do you long to go to heaven? Because if you think about it, the goal of this kind of asceticism is to say, oh, I don't want to be in this world. I don't want to get food or drink anything. I don't want to live in this world. I want to be like an ethereal ghost. I want to live in heaven. I don't want to live here on earth, which in itself is a kind of heresy because we're supposed to enjoy life here on earth to say that I hate this world. I mean, their aspects of this world that we hate were supposed to long for heaven. But these people were trying to achieve it in a way on their own efforts. And so Luther says to the woman, do you look forward to going to heaven or wouldn't you rather be in heaven? And she gives him the weirdest answer. If you want, I could read it right from the book with the answer is. Her answer to the question shocked Luther. This is you writing, oh no, she answered, and then by way of explaining herself, said, here I know how things work, but there, I don't know what will happen. Right. So Luther is stunned because he says, this doesn't make sense. If you are a holy woman, you should long for heaven, and she kind of gives this weird thing like, I know how things work here, and it was almost like revealing that she is a kind of, she's a very canny woman. And so then we find out I found out the backstory and it turns out that this woman was a 100% fraud. Well, how they exposed the fraud, too, was very funny. I think I have to tell I have to tell that. The way to expose the fraud is that this woman became very popular with the highest figures in the land, including the emperor of the time. The emperor would bring his wife and they would visit her. So she is hobnobbing with the rich and famous and the emperor himself, big deal stuff. And I think it was Maximilian at the time. But the emperor's sister who was a duchess, her name was Kuna gonde. Bavaria. Yes. The duchess of Bavaria kunig Kondo, which is the same name you have in Voltaire. There's a figure named Kuna Gandhi in Voltaire's, what is it? The famous novel. I can't think of it. But anyway, the point is that she smells a rat. And she decides that this woman, this anal laminate, is a fraud, and I'm going to expose her. So she being the sister of the emperor invites and a laminate to a monastery for the weekend or for the week or something like that, on alumni, climbs into the trap, so to speak, comes to the monastery, and they put her in a certain room. And the duchess of Bavaria, the sister of the emperor, could watch Anna through a peephole. Well, you know what I imagine? There's a painting on the wall and they remove the eyes and there's two eyes looking like that. From a three Stooges movie. That's what it looks like. Since it's fun facts Friday, it's important to mention the three Stooges. To use the slide whistle whenever appropriate. But anyway, thank you anyway, when we come back, I will tell you what the duchess of Bavaria saw when she looked through the peephole at Anna laminate who neither ate nor drank nor went to the bathroom as we understand, wait till you hear this, we'll be right back with fun facts Friday, special Martin Luther edition..

Luther Anna lamina Rome Eric metaxas Anna laminate wittenberg Augsburg Martin Luther Erica Anna Dallas Bavaria Germany Kuna gonde kunig Kondo Kuna Gandhi Maximilian
"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:47 min | 3 months ago

"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"To sell quickly, so order now with promo code Eric at my pillow dot com promo code Eric at my pillow dot com. Every night a different town see my soul I'm playing sing and pack my things and move along a pretty face another day I never get what you know what not stand another show hey there folks it is fun facts Friday on the Eric metaxas show fun fact Friday starring Albin sadar. We lower the music. Hey pal. Hey. Hey pal. I thought it was starring Martin Luther. No, it's starring Alvin Seder with a slide whistle. And of course, Martin Luther special fun facts Friday Martin Luther edition. Okay. Because there's a lot of fun facts in the Luther book. I'm glad you picked that up because I keep saying that to me, that's one of the fun parts of writing the book. But what else should we talk about? About the stuff that didn't happen? Yeah, some of the stuff that didn't happen. Yeah, I think that's because you mentioned 7, although I got to tell you, and you did mention that it's at the beginning of the book, you say, there are these 7 things. But I'm reading along and of course I don't know Martin Luther very well at all, but I'm reading something saying like, wait a minute, I thought that was true about him. Oh, that's not true about him. So I think there are more than 7, as you go along the start to reveal a few other things, of course well, it's been said over and over and over that he was a gigantic three Stooges fan that he had posters and a collectibles from the three Stooges. That's simply not true. No, he didn't. He didn't like Joe besser, for example. He can I tell you what nobody like curly jokes. No, no. Any Stooges fan. That's not fumes. Fumes at the idea of anybody besides the original curly. Martin Luther did not. He accepted everybody, and that was part of his name. And of course, curly Joe besser also played stinky in the Abbott and Costello TV program. Now that I didn't know, okay. And not to be confused with curly Joe derita. That's right. Who is the worst of all the curves? Yeah, okay, we don't want to say when the three Stooges made movies like, you know, the three stood just go to the moon. Yeah. Curly Joe besser was the original curly had died by then. Yes. And so, and of course, shemp was out of the picture, alas. Chimp was out of the picture. So he was a different breed of stooge. It just dawned on me. Yeah..

Martin Luther Eric metaxas Albin sadar Alvin Seder Joe besser Eric Joe derita Costello Abbott Curly Joe besser shemp
"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

09:03 min | 3 months ago

"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"God is the one that has purchased us for having been reading very carefully. You're making me happy because this is the point I'm trying to get across in the book. And again, this is all true. In other words, this is not my interpretation. I try to be very careful, you know, to put in the book what is very clear. And so you can imagine people like Luther and some of these really intelligent educated people beginning to question and wonder is the church right in some of this, in fact, when Luther was in Rome in 1510, he climbs up the sancta Scala. These are the very stairs upon which Jesus was supposed to have climbed they'd been transported all the marble stairs had been transported from Jerusalem to Rome. They're still there today, and you can see them today. And Luther was told that he can save somebody in purgatory by climbing up these stairs on his knees and reciting the Potter nose to the father, and the fact of the matter is that when he gets to the end of the climb, he kind of wonders what if this isn't true. I think we're at a time in the segment folks. It's fun fact Friday special Martin Luther edition, thank you for listening. We'll be right back. Trouble. Speaking words of wisdom let it be. And in my own darkness she's standing right in front of me you've heard and seen the raw uncut truth about the brave men and women, patriots that were wrongfully arrested on January 6th by the tyrannical Biden regime and corrupt DoJ, but with your support, Jake Lang and all the January sixers can find justice. Here is his message. Hello. My name is Jake Lang. I'm a January 6th political prisoner who has been held in solitary confinement for over 21 months by the Biden tyrannical regime. I'm not going to lie to you. The need is great. The corrupt DoJ and wicked FBI have doubled down on hundreds of innocent J 6 patriots and pushed for harsh prison sentences of up to ten years. We are putting together a legal fund that can help out the January sixers and we need your support. Please go to Jay 6 legal dot org right now and give from your heart whatever God tells you to. We need your support, the need is great. It's time to donate us now. Thank you. And God bless you. I know my love again I know to me again and you know it's all pretend I know it's raining and too bad hey there folks is the argument taxes show it's fun facts Friday special Martin Luther edition Alban you're in New York and I'm in a hotel room someplace in America, but I got to tell you this was not my idea to do fun facts Friday on Martin Luther. And it thrills me because there's so much quirky stuff in the book and the fact that you appreciate it. So we're sharing the quirky stuff in the Luther book, which I'm not sharing on any of the other interviews. No, no, it's very serious what you do with the other interviews. That's why people have to, if they missed our one, they have to catch our one of this whole discussion because there's so much fun, good juicy stuff there. And like I keep mentioning, I haven't even gone through. I've read maybe one fourth of the book and there's still like three quarters of this crazy stuff to go. Who knew that it was loaded with goofy gags? Exactly. You know, Bond hoffer, very serious German. The Nazis and all that, but we have a and the other thing is this is an age, of course, that we really know very little about, although what a Michelangelo was doing David, he did just completed doing the David Scott. It's an extraordinary thing when you think that Luther visits Rome, but on the way to Rome, he goes through Florence. And there's no doubt that he saw the just completed David of Michelangelo. Isn't that crazy? It's 17 and a half feet tall. I saw it when I was in Florence in 1984. And I have to say, no kidding. It took my breath away. I've never experienced this with a work of art. I walked into the room and I gasped because it's so beautiful and so awesome. Luther laid his own eyes on it just as it had been completed. Before the dust settled, right? There was a dust at the very first time. Yeah, so there's a lot of weird interesting stuff. And then there's some animated clock that had just been completed that's still there today. You write that. This is one of the most amazing things. There's certain things that when you do the research, you suddenly can't believe what you're reading. There's a clock in, I think it's mannheim, I think. You may have the book in front of you, but he's making his journey south from wittenberg. Right. He's on an 800 mile walking tour as it is his father confessor Johannes von shutout that says, hey, this kid needs to get out of the house. Why don't you go take a walk, pal, and he sends him on an 800 mile journey, 1600 miles round trip, obviously, to Rome. And on the way to Rome, Luther passes through mannheim and sees the recently created frauenkirche, which is the our ladies, the church of our lady. And it is, I think, this is from memory. I think it's 530 feet tall. Yeah, I don't have a page Mark. Okay, so I want to say that it was in Luther's day. It was the tallest church on Planet Earth, and guess what Alban, what? Today, 500 years later, it is still the tallest church on Planet Earth. And you have been inside it, have you not? No, I've not visited that, but it's on the outside of the church. It had this extraordinary medieval clockwork with all of this, you know, like these automatons that come out and shoot ray guns with the Goldberg in a way. But it's beautiful. It's classic, you know, high Middle Ages, and they built this clock where when the clock struck 12 where the clock struck any hour, these figures would come out, these huge figures, which of course very, very high up so they don't look huge when you're on the ground, but you look up and you hear the bells and you hit and it's just this magical thing. And if it's magical to us, can you imagine what you would like to Martin Luther, a humble monk from wittenberg, it must have been amazing. So there's a lot of cool stuff from the period and I try to put that in the book just to give us a flavor of what it would have been like for Luther at the time. And by the way, you took some lovely pictures too that are also in the book, photo credit, the author. So you did some nice work there too as well. Well, I thank you because you save money as an author. People don't know this, but you have to, you know, you have to pay for photo rights and credits and stuff, and I thought, hey, I'll take my own photos if I can. And a couple of times I did. And then I'll take the family out to, you know, ponderosa first steak dinner. Yeah. There you go. On the money we saved. So now you also have a part of the book where you talk about some of the things that we believe are true about Martin Luther down through the ages, but really are not. I think you had to put a number on it like 7. I think there ended up being 7 things that I, by the way, I identify this right in the preface in the introduction. So you don't have to read the whole book. It's right in the beginning. I say that there's 7 things that I saw or not true, which is hilarious. And the most colorful one probably, everybody talks about how he married a nun named Katie and when she escaped from the nunnery. Now, people don't know that in those days, nuns were held against their will, that she was sent there as a 5 year old, and then you're in your 20s, and you might say, hey, you know what, I don't want to be a nun, and they say, well, tough luck kiddo, you are a nun and you can not escape under penalty of death. It's like escaping from a prison. And so Luther thought this is not right. If somebody has not made the choice themselves to take a life in holy orders, they should have the freedom to leave. So he actually finds out that these nuns inim, which is not too far away, that they want to get out. And so he figures out a plan to bust them out of the nunnery, and everybody says that he traveled in a wagon of barrels that had held herring, smelly fish barrels they held, they hid in the fish barrels, and you hear this over and over, it's in every single book and I discovered that is absolutely not true, never happened..

Luther Jake Lang Rome Martin Luther sancta Scala sixers DoJ Biden patriots Bond hoffer Alban Michelangelo mannheim Florence Johannes von wittenberg David Scott
"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:32 min | 3 months ago

"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Well, you even titled the section of the chapter the curious case of Anna laminate which is like a Ripley's. It is. That's exactly right. Because and this is early on in the book. This was the first hundred pages or something, but Luther, when he was a young monk, he was, I guess it was 1510. So he's in his mid 20s. And he is driving his father confessor, Johannes von staubitz, who's another incredible figure in the story, just what a heroic figure who was very influential in Luther's life. And who stayed faithful to the Catholic Church did not follow Luther out of the church, its dramatic that that's the case. And of course, you can read about it in the book. I'm not going to get into that. But the point is that he was Luther was driving bunched up it's crazy. Because he was confessing incessantly every tiny thought, every and he was just driving him crazy. And so von schutz kept thinking, you know, there's got to be a way to they didn't have electroshock therapy in those days. But how can I reboot the computer that is known as Martin Luther King? And it sounded like he had OCD, right? Because it was like he had a constantly confessed, constantly confessed. Oh, no, I got to confess the fact that he didn't confess. He had, that's about right. So ventured out, it's figures, you know what I'm going to do. Let's get him out of the house. Let's give him a different something to see. Maybe if he takes a walk. And so he decides to send him to Rome. Which was 800 miles away. On foot. And that's just in one direction. Now this is a curious case. If you walk there, it's 800 miles from wittenberg to Rome. But from Rome to wittenberg, it's only 250 miles. Okay. That's not true. No. They discovered a tunnel through the Alps or something. Yeah, no, that's not true. Okay, when we come back, I will tell you what happened to Luther, who he met on the trip to Rome. This is at least entertaining and weird and interesting, but it also gives you a picture of the religious world of that time. It's one of the reasons I included it not just because it's wildly entertaining and funny and sad and crazy, but because it gives you a picture of the pietistic ascetic activities that were popular when Luther was.

Luther Anna laminate Johannes von staubitz von schutz Rome Catholic Church wittenberg Martin Luther King
"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:12 min | 3 months ago

"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"He was the only one that didn't know which is really cruel if you think about it. It's actually cool. And so they wanted to crown him the arch poet. I can't remember the details, but they want to crown him in the arch poet. And everybody's in on the joke that it's a mockery of him, maybe some of them thought he was sort of in on the joke, but it seems that he was not in on the joke. His family tried to talk him out of it, and he said, oh, you're just jealous because they're celebrating me as a great poet. And the Pope had, how do I put it, Alvin? The Pope had an elephant. Yes. The prince, I'm sorry, the king of Portugal as a way of curing favor with the Vatican, sent an elephant by parcel post all the way to the Vatican in Rome from Portugal and elephant. And the elephant Pope Leo was so thrilled with the elephant. And again, the details are in the book. You can find the details because I'm just giving an overview. But the Pope so love the elephant. He named him hanno, and hano was involved in everything the Pope did. And I don't know if he slept with the elephant or what, but he was so close to this pet. He loved this pet. And so he wanted hano to be involved in the mockery in this huge celebration through the city of Rome. So they had a moment where the Pope forced the archbishop Lang. This was a dour German ecclesiastical figure who did not find any of this funny, but it was his job to crown. With The Crown in front of everybody and then when barbaro was crowned as the greatest poet who ever lived, he would then climb, he had to mount the back of the elephant and the African mahout who accompanied the elephant had to help was a heavy elderly figure. So he had to get on top of this elephant and then ride through Rome while the people jeered and laughed. It's funny and sick at the same time, but it illustrates the depravity of the Vatican at this time that it was no longer the Vatican and had been and it was not the Vatican it is today. It was a very weird time. It was strange and of course what happened to the elephant. Now, I don't know if we can get into that or if you want to get into what happened to the elephant. Of course I do. That's beyond the pale too. Well, look, the book is loaded with scatological humor. People say, what scatological humor? You'll have to look it up, but it's spelled SCA TA scatological humor. And one of the most amazing things that I read is that when hano the elephant got sick, the Pope was so upset that he called the finest doctors from miles around to heal the elephant and all they could do. They had never dealt with the constitution of an elephant before, so they prescribed a gigantic laxative. For the elephant to purge the elephant and when we come back, it's a fun fact Friday on the Eric metaxas show. I'm going to tell you what the laxative contained on the ecma taxis show we're talking about Martin Luther and laxatives and elephants will be right back..

hano Rome Portugal archbishop Lang Pope Leo hanno Alvin barbaro Pope Eric metaxas Martin Luther
"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:18 min | 3 months ago

"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"That I set my science on Monday and I got myself there folks as your taxes show I'm coming to you on this special fun fact Friday. I'm on the road, Albin you're not. I am not. You're not on the road. You're in New York. I'm firmly planted in New York right now in the studio in the studio. Can you be firmly planted in New York? There's something about New York that makes me think you can't be firmly planted there. But I know what you mean. You're in New York. Yes. I'm on the road in a hotel room doing the radio show from a hotel room. I've got this great thing called a comrex box, which if there's an Ethernet cable in the hotel room, I can do the show from the hotel room. You know, if need be, I prefer to go to a studio, but today can get to a studio, so we're doing fun facts Friday well, I got to say you sound as clear as a bell or a slide whistle. You know, coming into something about that slide whistle that suddenly, no matter where you are no matter what time of day it is, no matter anything, suddenly it's fun fact Friday. It puts a spring in your step. It's like the pavlovian dog with the bell except this is the slide whistle suddenly being its fun fact Friday. Well, okay, fun fact, it's Friday. This is a special Martin Luther edition because this was your idea. You are reading my book. I didn't tell you to do this. And you didn't have to do this, by the way, you've got to know what to do. I know, but I'll tell you, it's like, what makes Eric tick? I read bahnhof for blown away by that book. And I learned a little bit about Eric, not just about bahnhof, or now I'm reading Martin Luther and just I'm having fun with your phraseology. Yeah. And a lot of other, just these quirky little stories. The Martin Luther book is a thousand times more entertaining and fun than the bond. Well, just because when you're writing about not seeing the Holocaust, you know, there's a certain timbre that runs through it, whereas this is in many ways very funny and entertaining. And that's why you wanted to do a fun fact. Friday based on the book. Yeah, like, for example, and I thought you could expound on this little story about that self diluted poet named Barra bolo. Oh no, this is when I found this out. You can imagine I flipped. I flipped. I said, this is so up my alley. Can I put it in the book? Because it's very little to do with Martin Luther. And by the way, by the way, people might say like, well, they're telling me the whole book. I don't even have to get the book. I'm only like a hundred pages into the book, and there are I'm not kidding. There are dozens upon dozens. I'm closing in on probably a hundred quirky weird things. And I'm only like a fourth of the way through this book. Yeah. But can you talk about this? You have the book. You have the book because I'm on the road and I had to pack for three weeks on the road. I didn't carry this heavy book with me, right? I thought it was funny that I said to you, okay, so you've got the book. I got the book and you're like, no, I don't got the book. I don't get the book. I don't get the book. I know it's kind of stupid, right? Not to have a copy of my own book, but somehow I missed it. But anyway, here's the thing. I think I gave him a copy to Suzanne when we were on the road together because she wanted to read it. I said, probably be a good idea. People may have assumed that you read the book because you're my wife. And so she's reading the book. I mean, look, she hears me when I'm writing the book. She hears all this stuff. But anyway, look, so here's the story. The reason this is in there is that I thought to myself, when I told the story of when I told the story of bahn hoffer, I had to tell the story of who he's fighting against and to give this some shadow school to give it some context to give it some contrast as well. But the point is that Luther was dealing with a Vatican that was so far from our view of the Vatican today. In other words, the corruption and worldliness and all kinds of crazy stuff had crept in. And the Pope at the time of Luther was Pope Leo X, hard to believe that there were ten Pope Leo's, but cope Leo the tenth is a figure so colorful. And I thought to myself, you need to know who this figure is to understand what Luther was dealing with. And Pope Leo X, he was a little bit more like a depraved Roman Emperor than a Pope. He was, he had fabulous wealth that people, you know, every every faithful believer is sending their widows mites to the Vatican. And he's using it to create incredible art and all kinds of stuff, but he was a spendthrift. He basically was somebody who really liked entertainment and whatever. And so he really wasn't somebody you'd describe as a holy man, even though he was the Pope. And so he would do these crazy things. And one of the craziest things he did when I read this, it was so entertaining and hilarious to me. I said, I've got to put this in the book. This is just too crazy because it reveals what this Pope was like. In other words, if you want to know what is Martin Luther dealing with, you got to tell the story. And the story, this is all for memory, of course, because I don't know if the book in front of me, but this story deals with there was there were a lot of versifiers and poets in the Vatican. And it was almost like if you had a court, right? The king has a court, and he has these people that are schmoozing and trying to get it. He was like a court jester, but he was a court poet or something, right? Yes, this poet, his name was barbaro. Of course, Italian. Now, if you can believe this, he was the archbishop of gaeta. Now, archbishops in those days, it was simply a title that you either bought or it was awarded to you when you were 20 years old or it has no correspondence when we think of archbishops in the church today. And so he was the archbishop of gaeta, which kind of like was he had a duke dumb or he was a prince or he was whatever, you know, and so he was hanging around the court and he was a poet. And he kind of at some point went crazy. And what I found really sick was that the Pope Pope Leo, who was actually extremely young, he became Pope when he was 37 years old. He seemed to want to make fun of this barbado like he's a court jester. And I thought this is actually sick because barbado was clearly a deluded maniac and he thought that he was greater than the great petrarch. People know, of course, petrarch, the great poet petrarch, and you can't imagine that a Pope would do this, but the bottom line is that Pope Leo the tenth created something. It was like a festival in the city, a big celebration where they spent an infinite amount of money. And at the center of the whole thing was this public mockery of barbado even though barbaro didn't realize he was being mocked. Yeah, it's like he was the only he was the only one that didn't know..

Martin Luther New York Eric tick Pope Leo Barra bolo Albin Luther bahn hoffer Eric Suzanne Leo barbaro Pope Pope Leo Vatican gaeta barbado
"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:31 min | 3 months ago

"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Bell. So you can use that for everything. Yeah. Okay. So we're going to talk about Martin Luther, obviously, maybe I should talk about my tour first, because Friday. Set it up. This is, I mean, this has been an extraordinary journey. If it's Friday, that means I'm currently, even though I'm taping this from a hotel room in Dallas, right? Yeah. On Friday, when you hear this, I will be in Albuquerque. Okay, because tonight actually not tonight tomorrow night. Tomorrow night in Albuquerque, Saturday night, the 21st of October. If you're listening to this, that we may play this as a rerun, but I'm speaking in Albuquerque at calvary church in Albuquerque, Saturday night, the 21st, and Sunday at three services. I'm gonna be fatigued. Three services on Sunday, the 22nd at calvary church in Albuquerque, and then I'm speaking in cherry creek Denver, it's Greenwood village actually Colorado, cherry creek on the 24th of October. So they're expecting like 8000 people or something at this cavalry 8000 and one. And that's right. Yeah, they didn't tell me. They didn't commit you. No, they did not. So yes, and then I'm speaking at Michael Yusuf's church in Atlanta. That's going to be on the 29th of October. And then that evening I'm speaking at peachtree in Atlanta that is 5 p.m. service at peachtree. That's also the 29th of October Sunday. I'm looking at this calendar. I'm going to be at Greg Laurie's church riverside harvest church in Orange County, California. That's going to be on the weekend of November 5th. Holy cow, November 5th, that's right. So if my air this, if we re air this, people can still go to that, but that's what? That's my birthday, November. Your birthday. Wait a minute. Your brother and you. Have the same birthday. We figured it out. We got it, got it right. My parents worked it out. It's a fun fact, Friday right there. There you go. You will nod to my mom and dad. Yeah. But you know guys, you cheated. You cheated. We cheated, right? Because you're twins, aren't you? We are. We can't fool me. Yeah. We were pushing and shoving to see who would come out first, and it was me, I won, yay. I crossed the finish line. Wow. Okay. All right. All right, well anyway, so I guess that means on your birthday, I'm gonna be, I'll be in California. So I won't be able to watch you blow out the candles on your cake. But let's see, after California, I go to Phoenix, I'm speaking in Phoenix. I don't know if that's a private event. It might be a private event. And then, oh my gosh, November, 11th, I'm speaking in Wichita, Kansas. I'm gonna see my old friend Tim ragland, Tim ragland lives in independence, Kansas. He is the illustrator of the uncle mugsy books if you don't know the uncle monkeys. Oh, yeah. Those are my favorite children's books. My favorite. His illustrations blow your mind. I never get to see Timmy lives in Kansas. I'm gonna be in Wichita, Kansas at eastminster Presbyterian on actually I think it's on the 12th, the Sunday, the 12th of November..

Albuquerque calvary church Michael Yusuf Greg Laurie's church riverside Martin Luther Atlanta cherry creek Bell Dallas California Tim ragland Denver Colorado Orange County Phoenix Kansas Wichita eastminster Presbyterian Timmy
"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:28 min | 3 months ago

"martin luther" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Okay, now stay tuned for my interview with Albin or Alban's interview with me. Alvin. First of all, we have to tell we have to tell our audience it's a fun fact Friday. I am in Dallas. Yes. In a hotel room doing the program from a hotel room in Dallas, not from the studio in Dallas, but from a hotel room in Dallas, and we are pre recording. So in my world, it's not really Friday. In your world, it's I guess it's not Friday either, but we're doing a fun fact Friday because we had a moment here. And I got to say for Todd wilkerson. Oh boy, to refer to pop off, I think that's a vodka, and I think that's not appropriate for this kind of an audience Todd. Well, Todd, in a bubble bath is not appropriate either. You know what? Have you seen Todd? I have seen his bathing suit. No, not that. You want to talk about anything. I can't unsee that. No, I don't want to. He looks like if you see him walking down the beach, he looks like Abraham Lincoln in a bathing suit. Does he really? Yeah. Picture Abe Lincoln in a bathing suit. It's just uncomfortable to look at someone like that. And that's exactly what Todd looks. As long as he's not wearing that stove top hat. No, he doesn't need it. He looks like Abe Lincoln, even without the beard. You just say, holy cow, it's a blinken, and then you realize that it can't be a blinken because Lincoln never wore bathing suit and walked on the beach, and by the way, he died a 150 years ago. Okay, listen. We're doing Alvin. This was your idea. This was to a fun fact Friday and said, hey, Eric. Let's do a fun fact. Can I explain how I came up with it? Because I've been having a great time reading your book. I haven't gotten all the way through it yet. I read it on the train to and from Terry town, you know, I'm having a great time, but I realize Martin Luther lived in quirky times. I mean, really strange and odd times, right? This is exactly what persuaded me to want to write the book. I've said a million times I didn't want to write any more biographies. I figured I'll go out on a high note, everybody seemed to think that the bond hoffer book was a good book. But Greg thornburgh, the president of kings college, and my friend, our mutual friend, Marcus speaker, said Eric, you've got to do it. Here's why. And I began to realize that Luther lived in such quirky times that this could be a very, very entertaining. There's no doubt about it. No doubt it's hilarious little facts and weird things. It's in the story. It's one of those things you know how they'll say like a boy, if we told this story, nobody would believe it. They think and that's kind of this story. I'm reading this and saying, no, this can not be true. This is just wild wild stuff. I mean, really funny. Right. And that's so was your idea to do a fun fact Friday. And by the way, since I'm in a hotel room, excuse me, since I'm in a hotel room in Dallas, my question is, are my sound levels okay? Are your sound levels okay? I mean, it's crazy to do radio from a hotel room. I know I'm looking back at James and the control room. He's given the big thumbs up, right, Jim. Yeah. Well, anyway, so it was your kooky idea that we need to do a fun facts Friday on the Luther's story. And you said there was only there were only two things that you needed. You said you needed the slide whistle. And you needed the bell, but you know the bell I don't have the bell right now to say yes, ding, ding, ding, ding ding, you got the answer correct. Well, the slide whistle is in some ways better than the.

Dallas blinken Todd Todd wilkerson Abe Lincoln Alvin Albin Alban Greg thornburgh kings college Abraham Lincoln Eric hoffer Lincoln Martin Luther Terry Luther Marcus James Jim
"martin luther" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"martin luther" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The association of American Indian physicians and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention remind you there are now booster recommendations for all three available COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. You may choose which COVID-19 vaccine you receive as a booster shot. Getting the COVID-19 vaccination protects you, your family, and your community. More information at AAP dot org or CDC dot gov slash coronavirus who support this show. Your tuned in to native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. Do you take time? On Martin Luther King day to reflect on the progress that native people have made toward self determination, sovereignty, and equity. Or do you feel that there are still too many barriers to overcoming? Colonization that still remain. Let us know what you're thinking. On this day, set aside to honor doctor king. Jonah discussion, one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. Before we went to break, we were chatting with Suzanne, harjo and she was sharing her experience working to make MLK day a federal holiday only a federal holiday since 1986, so I can still remember my own life before that time when it was not a federal holiday. I'd like to bring in Darius Lee Smith into our conversation. He's a director of Denver's anti discrimination office. Darius, what are you thinking about today? MLK day, where are you at? What's your thought? Wow. It's so impressive to hear miss harjo's history lesson. And I was born in 68. So the day after he was assassinated, I was one. I had just turned one. Action was born in 67. He was assassinated in 68. And it was interesting because when I came to as an undergrad student in the late 80s, I remember Arizona being the last state to recognize Martin Luther King junior as a national holiday. And I'm just reflecting on her words, what we're talking about and really just proudly to say that I'm a bit a factor of the civil rights movement. I have this amazing job in Denver, which I've been doing for 18 years. As the director of the Denver antidiscrimination office, and again, I have the opportunity to serve in that position because that was one of the things that Martin Luther King Jr. and people like Hank Adams. They were demanding a seat at the table. And in a lot of ways, I feel that that's what I do. I have a seat at the table and I get to be an activist and an advocate and a civil just a civil servant around civil rights and social justice and I'm so proud of Martin's became junior in this day. So thank you. Well, thank you, Darius, for explaining and sharing that background. You mentioned your amazing job. Tell us more about your amazing job. How did you get started doing the work you do now? So Denver has an agency called the agency for human rights and community partnerships. And in 1990s, they created the Denver, the city council created the Denver anti discrimination office. And I believe I'm the second director. I think we're just over 30 years past that and in addition to that in 2008, the city of Denver created these commissions. And two of the commissions that I had the pleasure of serving as the staff liaison, we were creating to give voice to African American folks in Denver as well as American Indians. And so I've been doing the American Indian commission for beginning so 15 years and 6 years. I've been staff lays on for the African American commission. So it's just I was so amazing because that's my background. I strongly identify as Navajo and black and it just feels so rewarding to have a job to get aid to do the type of work I do. And I'm in a really good situation. And Darius, I know you grew up primarily in Denver currently, you're on a little weekend holiday in Phoenix, but as a child, I understand you spent summers among family in loop, Arizona. And I had an uncle from one of my great ants, she married a Navajo. In fact, I think they met at that old boarding school there. But let me just say loop Arizona, that's the res. Red dirt and sage as far as the eye can see. And I'm interested Darius. What unique perspectives do you offer to both groups, Native American and African American as a person who shares both cultures and experiences? Great question. It was very unfortunate to grow up with family in Navajo country that were very supportive of us being black. And when I say us, I have four siblings and it's I think it was made easy for us because we were celebrated because my brother and I, my sisters, we were all great athletes. And when we would take trips to loop and to the city, western side of it was so important for me to understand what Indian country looked like. And I think for me, also, I understood what poverty, as well as what it looked like in Denver and other major cities. And so I think early on, I kind of had a firsthand experience about what poverty looked like, but also what cultural look like in terms of like language and just the proudness of being around Navajo people and then during the school year when I was around. I grew up in an all black neighborhood in Denver. And being there, I was also really uplifted and supported by my black coaches who really encouraged me to celebrate maybe in Navajo me being American Indian. And I think it was heavily supported by, again, my community to really explore and express my Navajo identity. Darius, you mentioned the comparing and contrasting the urban poverty that you saw up in Denver versus the rural poverty that you experienced on the Navajo Nation in Arizona and I always find it fascinating how those two different types of poverty are very different in many ways similar but different. Could you explain a little bit more depth, how they compare and contrast? Yes. I like to use the story of when we would come to loop our to the city. And we would go back at the end of the summer. We would it down with commodity food. So.

harjo Denver Darius Martin Luther King Jr. association of American Indian Centers for Disease Control an Sean spruce Darius Lee Smith Denver antidiscrimination offi Hank Adams agency for human rights and co United States Denver anti discrimination off Arizona American Indian commission African American commission Jonah Suzanne Navajo city council
"martin luther" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"martin luther" Discussed on Native America Calling

"National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. Support for law and justice related programming provided by Hobbes Strauss dean and walker, a national law firm dedicated to promoting and defending tribal rights for nearly 40 years. More information available at Hobbs Strauss dot com. Support by the center for indigenous cancer research at Roswell park comprehensive cancer center dedicated to cancer research medicine and cancer care for indigenous population. The no charge online risk assessment tool is available at Roswell park dot org slash assessme. Native voice one the Native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Sean spruce. In his 1963 book, Martin Luther King wrote that America was born in genocide. Before Africans were brought to this continent as slaves, king noted in his words, the scar of racial hatred had already disfigured colonial society. King's campaign to achieve social justice for African Americans in the south naturally included Native Americans and all people of color. Of course, it's a struggle that continues today, even as we mark a federal holiday in king's honor. Today we'll get the native perspective on Martin Luther King, both the man and the movement he led. We'll talk about the foundation for civil rights, king helped build, and the progress, or lack thereof, since. And as always, we'd like to hear your perspective as well. What does Martin Luther King mean to you? What lessons do you draw from his life and his mission? What's his legacy among Native Americans? Please join the discussion by calling one 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. That's a one 809 9 native. Joining us today from Washington D.C. is doctor Suzanne shown harjo. She's a founding trustee of the Smithsonian, national museum of the American Indian, and president of the morning star institute. She's also the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States highest civilian honor. Suzanne is Cheyenne and muskogee. Suzanne, welcome back to Native American calling. Always a pleasure to have you on the show. Thank you so much, Sean. Happy MLK day. Happy MLK. It is. And joining us from Phoenix, Arizona, we have Darius Lee Smith. He's the director of Denver's anti discrimination office, staff liaison for the Denver American Indian commission, and Denver, African American commission. He's Navajo and black. Welcome to native America calling Darius. Thank you for having me. I look forward to today's call. Absolutely really excited to have your voice in today's discussion. Joining us from Portland Oregon is amber Starks. She's an activist who is Afro indigenous and muskogee creek citizen and African American. Welcome back to native America calling as well amber. Hello, everyone. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really looking forward to this discussion. And yes, happy and located. You bet amber and thank you for taking time out of your busy day to join us. And also joining us from Phoenix, Arizona is Dion Mitchell. She is an educator, artist, storyteller, and creator of butterfly kisses. And she is Afro indigenous and black. Welcome to Native American calling Dion. Yes. And thank you for having me. I'm so excited and honored to be part of this discussion happy and marquee day everyone. Yacht day to you as well. Suzanne, MLK day, attempt to reflect, attempt to honor the legacy of a great man. A time to evaluate race relations in America today and how we got here. However, as native people, I think we might not always consider the legacy of doctor king within our own cultural and historical contexts. Suzanne, is it a mistake not to do so? Oh, it's certainly is. Some of our greatest native leaders worked with doctor king and were part of the March on Washington in 1963. Tank Adams assiniboine Sue and from Frank's landing Indian community in Washington state. Was one of the main people organizing with melt home and others Bruce wilkie from macaw, and others from the national Indian youth council and Marshall bridges was there from Frank's landing rose crow flies high mad bear Anderson from tuscarora nation. People from the northeast and from the dakotas and Washington state primarily were there Martha grafs also from Oklahoma, so lots of native people were there and worried about the exercise that was treaties that was being thwarted. And part of their mission was to work with other people of color, although that term wasn't used at that time. And let them know that in the civil rights movement, everyone is looking for equality and that's equality of opportunity equality toward justice and the like. But that the most severe critics and enemies of treaty rights were those also using the language of the civil rights movement and saying that native people should not have treated you should not sovereignty should not be recognized and everything should be equal. So their mantra was equal rights for everyone while they were trying to innocent kill native peoples. Okay, well, thank you for that background in Suzanne. You mentioned a lot of names that go back a few years, melt Tom, for example, the national Indian youth council. So we're going way back into the very early days of what grew into what we consider native activism. And I'm curious, what did some of these early Native American activists.

Martin Luther King America Hobbes Strauss dean Hobbs Strauss center for indigenous cancer r Roswell park comprehensive can Suzanne Roswell park Sean spruce foundation for civil rights Washington D.C. Suzanne shown harjo morning star institute corporation for public broadca Darius Lee Smith Denver American Indian commiss African American commission cancer amber Starks Dion Mitchell
"martin luther" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"martin luther" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Org to the christian nobility of the german nation by martin luther translated by see a bouquet to his most serene and mighty imperial majesty and to the christian nobility of the german nation. Doctor martinez luther. The grace and might have. God be with you. Most serene majesty most gracious. Well beloved gentlemen. It is not out of mere arrogance and perversity that i a single poor man have taken upon me to address your lordships the distress and misery. That press all christian estates more especially in germany have led not only myself but everyone else to cry allowed to ask for help and have now forced me to to cry out and ask if god would give his spirit to anyone to reach a hand to his wretched people. Councils have often put forward some remedy. But through the cunningness certain men. It has been adroitly. Frustrated and the eagles have become worse. Who's malice and wickedness. I will now. By the help of god expose so that being known they may henceforth ceased to be so obstructive and injurious god has given us a young and noble sovereign charles. The fifth was at that time. Not quite twenty years of age and by this has roused hope in many hearts now. It is right that we too should do what we can. And make good use of time in grace. The first thing that we must do is to consider the matter with great earnestness and whatever we attempt not to trust in our own strength and wisdom alone even if the power of all the world were ours for dod will not endure. Good work should be begun trusting our own strength and wisdom. He destroys it. It is all useless as we read in the thirty third psalm. There is no king saved by the multitude of an host. A mighty man is not delivered by much strength and they fear it is for that reason that those beloved princess the emperor frederick the first and second and many other german emperors were in former times so piteously spurned oppressed by the pokes though they were feared by the world perhaps they trusted rather in their own strength than in god therefore they could not fall. And how would the sing winner retirement. Julius the second have risen so high in our own days. But that i fear france. The germans and venice trusted to themselves. The children of benjamin slew forty two thousand israelites. For this reason that they trusted to their own strength judges twenty and so forth that it may not happen thus to us into our noble emperor. Charles we must remember that in this matter we wrestle not against flesh and blood but against the rulers of the darkness of this world he fees. It's six twelve who may fill the world with war and bloodshed but cannot themselves be overcome thereby we must renounce all confidence in our natural strength and take the matter in hand with humbled trust in god. We must seek god's help with earnest prayer and have nothing before our eyes but the misery and wretchedness of christendom irrespective of what punishment the wicked may deserve. If we do not act thus we may begin the game with great pomp but when we are well in it the spirits of evil..

martinez luther martin luther eagles germany Julius venice benjamin france Charles
"martin luther" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"martin luther" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Introductory note martin luther. The leader of the protestant reformation was born at eisleben. Prussian saxony november tenth. Fourteen eighty three. He studied jurisprudence at the university of erfurt where he later lectured on physics and ethics in fifteen o five. He entered the augustinian monastery at erfurt. Two years later was ordained priest and in fifteen o. Eight became professor of philosophy at the university of wittenberg. The starting point of luther is career as a reformer was his posting on the church. Door of wittenberg. The ninety five theses on october thirty first fifteen seventeen these formed of passionate statement of the true nature of penitence and a protest against the sale of indulgences in issuing the theses luther expected the support of his ecclesiastical superiors and it was only after three years of controversy during which he refused a summons to rome that he proceeded to publish those works that brought about his expulsion from the church. The year fifteen twenty saw the publication of the three great documents which laid down the fundamental principles of the reformation in the address to the christian nobility of the german nation. Luther attacked the corruptions of the church. In the abuses of its authority and asserted the right of the layman to spiritual independence in concerning christian liberty. He expounded the doctrine of justification by faith and gave a complete presentation of his theological position in the babylonian captivity of the church he criticized the sacramento system and set up the scriptures as the supreme authority in religion in the midst of this activity came his formal excommunication and his renunciation of allegiance to the pope. He was proscribed by the emperor. Charles the fifth and taken into the protection of prison in the wartburg by the friendly elector of saxony where he translated the new testament. The complete translation of the bible issued in fifteen thirty four marks the establishment of the modern literary language of germany. The rest of luther is life was occupied with a vast amount of literary and controversial activity. He died eisleben february. Eighteenth fifteen forty six..

eisleben university of erfurt university of wittenberg luther erfurt martin luther rome Luther supreme authority sacramento saxony Charles germany
"martin luther" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"Martin luther noblesse about it and It was when my mother was was too shy. vary very tough very hard vary much discipline a to be in the church and everyone have to be in this church and it's sad about those Those people that cook that have alexis. That couldn't couldn't read because the the the preachers was coming to their home. People were not going always to search the Appreciator the story was coming to their home. Because i hear have to write up have like controlled. Who lived in that household. If you'd have coming a baby that they have not bring to the church sign in and those things son like It's a if you read all the books church books they also can make a no ties if someone is not so good in their head and and that can whatever they the tanking as the on their own. There was no dog talent but they could say that this is. This is a boy that this behind the various ago behind the counter to learn and of course those Alexis though those slept quota read they were looking at there was stupid. The mental sick end the but still they wanted them to to talk about what the the cata cheese Martin luther spoke. What is say that they have to know it to know it by heart because They didn't have books. They have to know it in their heads and that was not to force people that were disabled and if there were too bad so they didn't know anything then they have to see outside the church a the is like a bench where they have to have the relax inside the bench and receiving there and people That one the people were going into the church days On them and talking bad about the people and the it's so cruel because they can be people that was disabled. The they were okay. In the brain battery were discern. Disabled celikkol. couldn't hold it by heart all the words and the have to sit there on the f. they.

Martin luther Alexis
"martin luther" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"Not working today and what. What do we need to do. We don't. I'll tell you what we play. I'll know facebook. Youtube will allow with player. Martin luther king before the tonight's for this morning's over how about that barbie. Because then if i play a few little bit martin. Luther king's speech. I think i will feel better about myself and i won't feel so guilty. That is being. You've been glow selfish. 'cause it's freecell the is being a little because you know we honored this man that i i didn't recognize it at all so i think Right now while we had the moment well before the show when we're playing that down because lord knows i don't want to forget we're someone looking but probably not one you don't feel guilty not one bit or you just push right right right. Yeah you'd be so so. I say this everyone doing this for bob. Insignia myself before shows for the show. Today will play a little. Two minutes of dr martin. Luther king how about that. Yes i do anybody and yeah they care. Do you guys care number one. If you even put the cam take care. Shown black folks why folks are listening latinos even care a grassy. Say he always celebrate our movement. Okay come on let me know. Let me know if you care. I'll just say they.

Youtube facebook today Today Luther Two minutes this morning tonight martin Martin luther king lord Luther king dr martin. Insignia latinos one bit bob one
"martin luther" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"martin luther" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"For violence. Uh, we're having a hard time finding anything but a couple of crackpots. I mean, I know it's what crackpots do, but Violence that is being, uh, predicted way can't find evidence off anywhere. We'll get into that. And, of course, Martin Luther King. It's Martin Luther King Day in 60 seconds Glenn Beck program. 18 of weight loss regimen night. Dear diary. The doors are locked. Hear drums in the deep I I may have stolen the sacred leftover cheeseburger and Running down a long corridor to the bedroom and my wife may have discovered it before had a chance to destroy the evidence. I feel she may wait me out on the other side of the door. But you'll never get it back. It's mine. It came to me. My own cheeseburger. My fresh is Love Glenn. Well, that was really weird. But sometimes when you're you know, eating healthy food, you kind of lose your mind. I want to talk to you a little bit about build bars, low calorie, low sugar, high protein, high fiber, and they taste like a candy bar. It's healthy for you, but it tastes like it's made with real chocolate. And yet it's healthier than your average protein bar. I don't know how they do it..

Martin Luther King Martin Luther Glenn Beck