17 Burst results for "Martha Beeping"

"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

"So it should not be a surprise that senators are approaching this process as elected officials rather than his judges appointed for life. What did it take them for? Senator Bill Cassidy, Louisiana Republican to change his previous vote about whether the impeachment proceeding was constitutional. The House impeachment managers made a very compelling case to him that impeachment of a president who was no longer in office is constitutional. And the Trump lawyers made a very weak case on he was persuaded, but he was the only one apparently who was persuaded enough to change his vote on that particular issue. The Trump attorneys have a very weak hand to play, which is part of the reason why there were so many attorneys who declined to take up the case. Four. Former President Trump there spend some reporting today that Mitch McConnell, Senate Minority leader, Mitch McConnell is advising his members to vote their conscience. How did you read that? On what kind of impact that might have? It's the same thing that Kevin McCarthy told Republican members of the house about the impeachment vote that this was a vote of conscience. This is a vote for history on you should not be compelled to vote according to the way the rest of the senators are voting. S so it's a very appropriate thing to do. I think for a vote of this import and and this much historical significance. Do you think there's any chance we will see a vote to convict from McConnell himself? I really don't know. The answer to that said he doesn't sound like you're holding your breath said it. Avocado plays his cards very close to the vest. And I wouldn't presume to know how Senator McConnell's kind of Oh, yeah, and I can. No, I mean, you're saying you think this is the right thing to do that This is a proper thing to do. But why put it out there? If you're also saying, this is all politics. Because this is a vote that will be remembered by history, and each individual senator needs to make up his or her own mind with that in mind. Last question. We just have a few seconds left. We talk a lot about what the party might eventually look like Post Trump. What do you think It's gonna look like post impeachment. The Republican Party. I doubt that it would look very different than it does today. Post impeachment How it looks like post trump 18 months from now remains to be seen. I have no idea His Republican pollster Whit Ayers. He has worked as a number of GOP senators over the years. He has founder and president of North Star Opinion Research. We thank you for your time. Good to speak with you. To be with you, Mary Louise. Americans who have been fully vaccinated against the coronavirus are still a somewhat exclusive group, which means a lot of couples and families are now divided into haves and have nots. From member station W. Bur in Boston. Martha beeping or reports on how that's playing out. Emergency room doctor J shirt, remembers a flood of relief gratitude and hope that the needle going into his arm would be a turning point. I teared up and cried after I got vaccinated the first time do you cry office now? Lorraine Makoni is sure his wife J. Getting vaccinated for me was the relief that my partner Would live mean because we weren't sure in the beginning and for sure that is a weight off of our shoulder. But but Kony won't be eligible for the vaccine for several months. She has asthma sure says his vaccination is no guarantee he will not infect her. We know it prevents people from getting very sick and dying, and that's fabulous. We don't yet have evidence on How well it prevents infection or transmission. So until his wife gets the vaccine, but Coney and sure will continue wearing masks in their own home and sleeping in separate bedrooms. It's been almost a year part of me. Feels like I've been through all of this. I've been vaccinated. I should be able to let my guard down, but I could transmit it to my wife and I don't want to do that Sure is. Two teenagers are not allowed to hang out with friends indoors. Coney says they want more freedom. Now the dad is vaccinated. It was ground hog day, You have to answer the teenagers again and again, like Can I do this? No, because nothing has changed. It's not just long term couples and families who are trying to navigate this semi vaccinated. Shared life. Alyssa Taro and Rachel Human started dating in October. Here's a taro. I had been having dreams about like And then we're going to go in for the kiss. And then I would like, wake up and sit up straight and be like Cove it. Sotero had a nasty case of covert last March and has some immunity. But human who has diabetes, worried about what might come with that kiss. Then human who works on a Corona virus vaccine trial got the shots, Sotero says Date started to feel a little more normal like to be able Tosu out being like I'm gonna Killed Rachel, Sotero and human Imagine expanding their social bubble to include more of what they call vaccine injected people or VIPs. But human says not right away until we know more. This V I P list the streaming of the future right now, For many people being vaccinated is largely a promise of future privileges. Becky Spare is a physician assistant in a hospital. Er, getting the vaccine being among the first people to get it feels a little bit like being the first one of your friends to turn 21. For some parents who've been vaccinated. There is a profound feeling of doing the right thing for their Children because hasn't even with but it will be a mystery in Tootsie Missing tomorrow, maybe in Carolina Arugula Restrepo translate the question for her mother, Margarita Restrepo was vaccinated at the hospital, where she's on the cleaning and disinfection staff. She feels Really good about being vaccinated and she feels 100% protected. And she feels like with that protection. She can also protect me her daughter, perhaps not from infection. But Restrepo is vaccination virtually guarantees that her daughter.

Senator McConnell Trump president Sotero Coney Margarita Restrepo Senator Bill Cassidy Rachel Human founder and president Republican Party Arugula Restrepo Kevin McCarthy senator GOP Louisiana Whit Ayers Martha beeping
"martha beeping" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To be with you, Mary Louise. Americans who have been fully vaccinated against the coronavirus are still a somewhat exclusive group, which means a lot of couples and families are now divided into haves and have nots. Member station W bur in Boston. Martha beeping or reports on how that's playing out. Emergency room. Doctor J sure remembers a flood of relief gratitude and hope that the needle going into his arm would be a turning point. I teared up and cried after I got vaccinated the first time do you cry office now? Lorraine Makoni is sure his wife J. Getting vaccinated for me was the relief that my partner Would live mean because we weren't sure in the beginning and for sure that is a weight off of our shoulder. But but Kony won't be eligible for the vaccine for several months. She has asthma sure says his vaccination is no guarantee he will not infect her. We know it prevents people from getting very sick and dying, and that's fabulous. We don't yet have evidence on How well it prevents infection or transmission so until his wife gets the vaccine, but Coney and sure will continue wearing masks in their own home. And sleeping in separate bedrooms. It's been almost a year. Part of me feels like I've been through all of this. I've been vaccinated. I should be able to let my guard down. But I could transmit to my wife and I don't wanna do that Sure is. Two teenagers are not allowed to hang out with friends indoors. Coney says they want more freedom. Now the dad is vaccinated. They was ground Hog day, You have to answer the teenagers again and again, like Can I do this? No, because nothing has changed. It's not just long term couples and families who are trying to navigate this semi vaccinated. Shared life. Alyssa Taro and Rachel Human started dating in October. Here's a taro. I had been having dreams about like And then we're going to go in for the kiss. And then I would like, wake up and sit up straight and be like Cove it. Sotero had a nasty case of covert last March and has some immunity. But human who has diabetes, worried about what might come with that kiss. Then human who works on a Corona virus vaccine trial got the shots, Sotero says Date started to feel a little more normal like to be able to test without being like. I'm gonna Killed Rachel, Sotero and human Imagine expanding their social bubble to include more of what they call vaccine injected people or VIPs. But human says not right away until we know more. This V I P list the streaming of the future right now, For many people being vaccinated is largely a promise of future privileges. Becky Spare is a physician assistant in a hospital. Er, getting the vaccine being among the first people to get it feels a little bit like being the first one of your friends to turn 21. For some parents who've been vaccinated. There is a profound feeling of doing the right thing for their Children. Because there isn't even a button will be a mystery. And don't see Miss Tomoe Arabian Carolina Arugula Restrepo translate the question for her mother, Margarita Restrepo was vaccinated at the hospital, where she's on the cleaning and disinfection staff. She feels Really good about being vaccinated and she feels 100% protected. And she feels like with that protection. She can also protect me her daughter, perhaps not from infection. But Restrepo is vaccination virtually guarantees that her daughter will not suffer the pain of more than 460,000 families who've lost someone to covet. For NPR News. I'm Martha Be bigger in Boston. You are listening to all things.

Margarita Restrepo Coney Boston Rachel Human Martha beeping Sotero Mary Louise Kony Doctor J NPR News Alyssa Taro diabetes Lorraine Makoni Miss Tomoe Arabian Carolina partner Becky Spare J.
"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

"But Republican opposition to conviction has hardly budged. Republicans are overwhelmingly opposed. The latest polling shows no more than 9 to 10% of Republican voters. Supporting conviction for former President Trump. And fully 87 88% are opposed. So Republican voters are who Republican senators air listening to as much as if not more than the evidence presented in the trial. Now we'll note these polls were taken before the trial opened yesterday. Democrats even by the acknowledgment of Republicans have presented some pretty compelling arguments. There was that 13 minute tape yesterday, which was something How do you rate the chances that anything that comes out in this trial might sway of Republican voters or the Republican senators listening to them? Mary Louise. The House impeachment managers are making a very compelling case, but we need to remember that impeachment is a political process, not a judicial proceeding. As evidenced by the fact that the presiding officer in the Senate trial, Senator Leahy is also a witness, and he gets to vote on the outcome. So it should not be a surprise that senators are approaching this process as elected officials rather than his judges appointed for life. What did it take them for? Senator Bill Cassidy, Louisiana Republican to change his previous vote about whether the impeachment proceeding was constitutional. The House impeachment managers made a very compelling case to him that impeachment of a president who was no longer in office is constitutional. And the Trump lawyers made a very weak case on he was persuaded, but he was the only one apparently who was persuaded enough to change his vote on that particular issue. The Trump attorneys have a very weak hand to play, which is part of the reason why there were so many attorneys who declined to take up the case for former President Trump there spend some reporting today that Mitch McConnell, Senate Minority Leader, Mitch McConnell is advising his members to vote their conscience. How did you read that on? What kind of impact up might have It's the same thing that Kevin McCarthy told Republican members of the house about the impeachment vote that this was a vote of conscience. This is a vote for history. On. You should not be compelled to vote according to the way the rest of the senators are voting s. Oh, it's a very appropriate thing to do. I think for a vote of this import and and this much historical significance. Do you think there's any chance we will see a vote to convict from McConnell himself? I really don't know. The answer to that said it doesn't sound like you're holding your breath said it. Avocado plays his cards very close to the vest. And I wouldn't presume to know how Senator McConnell's kind of Oh, yeah, no. I mean, you're saying you think this is the right thing to do that This is a proper thing to do. But why put it out there? If you're also saying, this is all politics. Because this is a vote that will be remembered by history, and each individual senator needs to make up his or her own mind with that in mind. Uh, last question. We just have a few seconds left. We talk a lot about what the party might eventually look like Post Trump. What do you think It's kind of look like post impeachment. The Republican Party. I doubt that it would look very different than it does today. Post impeachment How it looks like post trump 18 months from now remains to be seen. I have no idea His Republican pollster Whit Ayers. He has worked as a number of GOP senators over the years. He has founder and president of North Star Opinion Research. We thank you for your time. Good to speak with you. To be with you, Mary Louise. Americans who have been fully vaccinated against the coronavirus are still a somewhat exclusive group, which means a lot of couples and families are now divided into haves and have nots. Member station W bur in Boston. Martha beeping or reports on how that's playing out. Emergency room. Doctor J sure remembers a flood of relief gratitude and hope that the needle going into his arm would be a turning point. I teared up and cried after I got vaccinated the first time do you cry office now? Lorraine Makoni is sure his wife J. Getting vaccinated for me was the relief that my partner Would live mean because we weren't sure in the beginning and for sure that is a weight off of our shoulder. But Bocconi won't be eligible for the vaccine for several months. She has asthma sure says his vaccination is no guarantee he will not infect her. We know it prevents people from getting very sick and dying, and that's fabulous. We don't yet have evidence on How well it prevents infection or transmission so until his wife gets the vaccine, but Coney and sure will continue wearing masks in their own home. And sleeping in separate bedrooms. It's been almost a year. Part of me feels like I've been through all of this. I've been vaccinated. I should be able to let my guard down, but I could transmit it to my wife. I don't want to do that sure is. Two teenagers are not allowed to hang out with friends indoors. Coney says they want more freedom. Now the dad is vaccinated. They was ground Hog day, You have to answer the teenagers again and again, like Can I do this? No, because nothing has changed. It's not just long term couples and families who are trying to navigate this semi vaccinated. Shared life. Alyssa Taro and Rachel Human started dating in October. Here's a Taro. I have been having dreams about like And then we're going to go in for the kiss. And then I would like, wake up and sit up straight and be like Cove it. Sotero had a nasty case of covert last March and has some immunity. But human who has diabetes, worried about what might come with that kiss. Then human who works on a Corona virus vaccine trial got the shots, Sotero says Date started to feel a little more normal like to be able Tosu out being like I'm gonna Killed Rachel, Sotero and human Imagine expanding their social bubble to include more of what they call vaccine injected people or VIPs. But human says not right away until we know more. This V I P list the streaming of the future right now, For many people being vaccinated is largely a promise of future privileges. Becky Spare is a physician assistant in a hospital. Er, getting the vaccine being among the first people to get it feels a little bit like being the first one of your friends to turn 21. For some parents who've been vaccinated. There is a profound feeling of doing the right thing for their Children because hasn't even with but it will be a mystery in Nazi missing tomorrow, Maybe in Carolina Arugula Restrepo translate the question for her mother, Margarita Restrepo was vaccinated at the hospital, where she's on the cleaning and disinfection staff. She feels Really good about being vaccinated and she feels 100% protected. And she feels like with that protection. She can also protect me her daughter, perhaps not from infection. But Restrepo is vaccination virtually guarantees that her daughter will not suffer the pain of more than 460,000 families who've lost someone to covet. For NPR News. I'm Martha Be bigger in Boston..

Senator McConnell President Trump Trump Republican Party Boston Mary Louise president Coney Margarita Restrepo Rachel Human founder and president Sotero Senator Bill Cassidy Senator Leahy senator NPR News Kevin McCarthy Arugula Restrepo Senate
"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Two of the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. It's three or six. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly. It's Day two of former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial. And after arguing over the constitutionality of the trial itself yesterday, Today, the impeachment managers began presenting their evidence. It's been an afternoon of tweets videos, arrest documents, all of which Democrats say prove that Trump incited the riot at the U. S. Capitol. Here's how lead impeachment manager Jamie Raskin set the day up. The evidence will show you That ex President Trump was no innocent bystander. Evidence will show that he clearly incited the January 60 insurrection. Will show that Donald Trump's surrendered his role as commander in chief and became the Insider in chief. Democrats combined the extraordinary events of last year and the first few days of this year into one narrative, describing a single minded effort by Trump to undermine American democracy. Starting with Trump's urging his supporters to reject a Biden win than falsely claiming the election was rigged, pressuring Republicans at the local, state and federal level to overturn results asking courts to toss out ballots. And finally, in the weeks leading up to January, 6th helping publicize the rally and encourage people to come out and fight. Now Democrats need 17 Republican votes to convict Trump And so today, they tailored their arguments to Republicans, many of whom have spent months defending Trump's attacks on the integrity of the presidential election. Eric, Small well of California tried to give them an out. What our commander in chief did was wildly different from what anyone here in this room did to raise election concerns. This was a deliberate, premeditated incitement to his base to attack our capital while the county was going on later, Stacey Plaskett, a delegate from the U. S. Virgin Islands, ticked off a list of times, she said Trump supporters acted violently in his name. Building up to her conclusion that it is false to claim no one could have predicted Trump's rhetoric would lead to the attack on the Capitol, Donald Trump. Over many months cultivated violence, praised it. And then, when he saw the violence his supporters were capable of he channeled it. To his big, wild historic event. So that is how the child has been playing out today for some analysis on what impact it's having, particularly on Republicans. Let's bring in Whit Ayers, longtime Republican pollster political consultant. He's advised GOP senators over the years. Would air welcome back Hello, Mary Louise. How are you? I am hanging in there. Thank you. So we've got a number of polls out these last few days pulls from major news organizations. What are they saying about Republicans support or lack thereof for impeachment? Is there any movement? Well. Overall support for conviction among all voters today is somewhat higher than it was in the first impeachment trial a year ago because the circumstances are completely different. That Republican opposition to conviction has hardly budged. Republicans are overwhelmingly opposed. The latest polling shows no more than 9 to 10% of Republican voters. Supporting conviction for former President Trump and fully 87 88% or opposed so Republican voters are who Republican senators are listening to. As much as if not more than the evidence presented in the trial. Now we'll note these polls were taken before the trial opened yesterday. Democrats even by the acknowledgment of Republicans have presented some pretty compelling arguments. There was that 13 minute tape yesterday, which was something How do you rate the chances that anything that comes out in this trial might sway of Republican voters or the Republican senators listening to them? Mary Louise. The House impeachment managers are making a very compelling case. But we need to remember that impeachment is a political process, not a judicial proceeding, as evidenced by the fact that the presiding officer in the Senate trial, Senator Leahy is also a witness. And he gets to vote on the outcome. So it should not be a surprise that senators are approaching this process as elected officials rather than his judges appointed for life. What did it take them for? Senator Bill Cassidy, Louisiana Republican to change his previous vote about whether the impeachment proceeding was constitutional. The House impeachment managers made a very compelling case to him that impeachment of a president who was no longer in office is constitutional. And the Trump lawyers made a very weak case on he was persuaded, but he was the only one apparently who was persuaded enough to change his vote on that particular issue. The Trump attorneys have a very weak hand to play, which is part of the reason why there were so many attorneys who declined to take up the case. Four. Former President Trump there spend some reporting today that Mitch McConnell, Senate Minority leader, Mitch McConnell is advising his members to vote their conscience. How did you read that on what kind of impact up might have? It's the same thing that Kevin McCarthy told Republican members of the house about the impeachment vote that this was a vote of conscience. This is a vote for history on you should not be compelled to vote according to the way the rest of the senators are voting. S so it's a very appropriate thing to do. I think for a vote of this import and and this much historical significance. Do you think there's any chance we will see a vote to convict from McConnell himself? I really don't know. The answer to that center doesn't sound like you're holding your breath said it. Avocado plays his cards very close to the vest. And I wouldn't presume to know how Senator McConnell's kind of Oh, yeah, no. I mean, you're saying you think this is the right thing to do that This is a proper thing to do. But why put it out there? If you're also saying, this is all politics. Because this is a vote that will be remembered by history. And each individual senator needs to make up his or her own mind with that in mind last question, we just have a few seconds left. We talk a lot about what the party might eventually look like Post Trump. What do you think it's kind of look like post impeachment. The Republican Party I doubt that it would look very different than it does today. Post impeachment How it looks like post trump 18 months from now remains to be seen. I have no idea His Republican pollster Whit Ayers. He has worked as a number of GOP senators over the years. He has founder and president of North Star Opinion Research. We thank you for your time. Good to speak with you. To be with you, Mary Louise. Americans who have been fully vaccinated against the coronavirus are still a somewhat exclusive group, which means a lot of couples and families are now divided into haves and have nots. From member station W. Bur in Boston. Martha beeping or reports on how that's playing out. Emergency room. Doctor J sure remembers a flood of relief gratitude and hope that the needle going into his arm would be a turning point. I teared up and cried after I got vaccinated the first time do you cry office now? Lorraine Makoni is sure his wife J. Getting vaccinated for me was the relief that my partner Would live mean because we weren't sure in the beginning and for sure that is a weight off of our shoulder..

Donald Trump president Trump Senator McConnell Mary Louise Republican Party Whit Ayers GOP Mary Louise Kelly NPR founder and president Jamie Raskin Ari Shapiro U. S. Capitol Senator Bill Cassidy Doctor J Stacey Plaskett Martha beeping
"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

"Insights to help finance team's plan for what's next Work Day, the finance, HR and planning System for changing world Maura Workday. Don't come. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. How can public health officials speed the delivery of vaccines, many states reported is hard to administer the vaccines as quickly as the doses arrive. This is an enormous task. And so we're going to talk this morning with Martha Beeping Heard of W bur in Boston Blake Farmer at WPL in Nashville and will stone In Seattle will catch up on what's happening in three different states. Three different regions of the country. Good morning to you all. Good morning. Morning, Martha. Let's start with you. How frustrated her officials in the Northeast. Well. Here's an example. Steve Yesterday New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he's going to start finding hospitals that don't get vaccines into people's arms fast enough, But many states in the Northeast are falling behind with injections as supply picks up. Massachusetts, for example, has injected 40% of vaccines it has received to date and one reason Steve is that it just takes longer to get these shots than it does with other vaccines. Why would this be harder to do than other vaccines? Well, let's take the flu shot. For example, you could be in and out there in less than five minutes, but with Corona virus vaccines, you might spend that five minutes just answering intake questions. And then you may have some questions yourself about the shots. Once you are injected, then you're monitored for 15 minutes. And before you leave, just in case you have a reaction. Dr. Asif Merchant, a nursing home medical director near Boston, said the whole experience took him about 30 minutes when he got vaccinated on Saturday, and Merchant says there just aren't enough vaccinators trained and mobilized for even this early stage of this mammoth project. That's caused much more for delay that I would have anticipated. I think when it comes to general public that is going to be an even bigger problem. We really need all hands on deck here. Steve. We had one example this weekend of what happens when delivery is too slow. One vaccinate her had thought Maura of the Fizer vaccine and they could use so they dropped off several 100 doses to a Boston hospital system just to try to avoid wasting it. Well, this whole idea of dropping off doses elsewhere seems to be happening a lot. I hear anecdotally you guys have been reporting about people who aren't In the first priority groups who end up getting vaccine just because it seems to be lying around. Why is that happening? Yeah, This is Blake Farmer and here in Tennessee. We've We've even had some local health departments who've set up some lists of folks who are willing to be on site within 30 minutes to take any of those left overdoses. And this is will in Seattle and just to pick up on Blakes point. Usually, this is only a handful of doses. It's basically the leftovers and here in Washington hospital say they put together a reserve list of people who are at high risk, either because of age or some of their health condition. And the number one priority. If you ever have any extra doses is never to waste any vaccine. Well, how is the rollout going in the Western states where you are well On the West Coast, Oregon, California, Washington. They're all vaccinating at about the same pace they've used anywhere from 24 to 25% of the doses. So far, there are some states that are moving, especially quickly. New Mexico and Colorado. It's above 40% and some of the most rural, hard hit places that states like Montana north in South Dakota. Those are actually at the front of the pack nationwide. And then on the other end, you have some states where it's been slower, like Arizona and are now just picking up. But even within a state, the story can be very different. Based on where you are. What do you mean? Some of the hot big hospitals in Washington are very much in the middle of working through their lists. In this first phase. It's upwards of half a million people in the one A one major hospital system I heard from said they had both the Fizer and Madonna vaccines and the process for each is different. So that complicates the logistics. But then you have other places that are way ahead and Cindy Chase's head of nursing at Ferry County Memorial Hospital, which is in rural eastern Washington, We're just kind of waiting for the go ahead to get moving on the other phases. Because the town here they know everything. And they want to know why. Why aren't you using your vaccines? We don't you have them? So some of this is going to almost random people. Of course, No vaccine truly goes to waste. But you've got certain people with priority what's happening with long term care facilities where so many people have died? Yeah, These places are absolutely desperate to start giving shots. A record number of people are dying right now. In long term care states have started vaccinating nursing home residents. But some say it's not fast enough and the facilities I've spoken with, say they're basically at the mercy of when CVS or Walgreen's schedules them. But some states are being very aggressive West Virginia plan to get the first shot toe all long term care facilities by the end of last week. Well, that moves is back to Apple. Acheson. Let's go back to Blake Farmer in Nashville are all the people who are eligible for vaccines in your region actually taking them? Well, not everybody, You know, even among health care workers. There is lots of vaccine hesitancy as it's known, especially in rural areas. I'm told some have great reason. Perhaps they're pregnant or planning to be. Others are thinking, you know, I've already had covert, so I'll just hope that provides enough immunity. Individual hospitals are working to convince more frontline workers to get vaccinated, but Tennessee's public health officials and more like you know, you snooze. You lose. Tennessee, along with Texas and Florida have opened up vaccinations to seniors, and that's all seniors whether they live in a nursing home or not. This is creating a bit of confusion. In some cases, you've got counties using sign up genius and surveymonkey to coordinate appointments. One counties just doing a big first come, first served drive through them this week, you know, really, It depends on where someone lives. Here. In Nashville, for instance, there's still more health workers and first responders waiting for their doses. Smaller communities like will said, have been able to move on to the masses a bit more quickly. Well, how does this get even more complicated as people began showing up for their second dose? It is supposed to be a relatively smooth process where the second dose comes automatically. But already some hospitals are here in Washington, say there are delays and there are not quite sure when that second batch of doses will arrive. And any hiccups you can imagine like that do make it harder to focus on getting the vaccine to new people. Let's circle back now to the Northeast. Martha be bigger because the big question is is we get a few more weeks into this? I mean, this is a huge process. Are people administering the vaccines likely to catch up with supply. Get it out A little quicker, Well, Steve, Dr Anthony Fauci said on Sunday that he thinks the pace of vaccinations will pick up quickly. Other experts say the timeframe for getting vaccines out is just too optimistic. There is about $8 billion for vaccine distribution in the latest covert relief package, But this is one of the biggest covert challenges facing President elect Joe Biden..

Steve Inskeep Martha Beeping Blake Farmer Nashville Northeast Maura Workday Seattle Tennessee Washington Boston NPR News Noel King flu Washington hospital Governor Andrew Cuomo Massachusetts Arizona
"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FM in San Francisco and 89.3 of them in Sacramento. I'm Dave Freeman. Morning Edition continues. Now it's 7 35. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. How can public health officials speed the delivery of vaccines, many states reported is hard to administer the vaccines as quickly as the doses arrived. This is an enormous task, and so we're going to talk this morning with Martha Beeping Heard of W bur in Boston Blake Farmer at WPL in Nashville and will stone In Seattle will catch up on what's happening in three different states. Three different regions of the country. Good morning to you all. Good morning. Morning, Martha. Let's start with you. How frustrated her officials in the Northeast. Well. Here's an example. Steve Yesterday New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he's going to start finding hospitals that don't get vaccines into people's arms fast enough, But many states in the Northeast are falling behind with injections as supply picks up. Massachusetts, for example, has injected 40% of vaccines it has received to date and one reason Steve is that it just takes longer to get these shots than it does with other vaccines. Why would this be harder to do than other vaccines? Well, let's take the flu shot. For example, you could be in and out there in less than five minutes, But with Corona virus vaccines, you might spend that five minutes just answering intake questions on then you may have some questions yourself about the shots. Once you are injected, then you're monitored for 15 minutes. And before you leave, just in case you have a reaction. Dr. Asif Merchant, a nursing home medical director near Boston, said the whole experience took him about 30 minutes when he got vaccinated on Saturday, and Merchant says there just aren't enough vaccinators trained and mobilized for even this early stage of this mammoth project. That's caused much more for delay that I would have anticipated. I think when it comes to general public that is going to be an even bigger problem. We really need all hands on deck here. Steve. We had one example this weekend of what happens when delivery is too slow. One vaccinate her had thought Maura of the Fizer vaccine and they could use so they dropped off several 100 doses to a Boston hospital system just to try to avoid wasting it. Well, this whole idea of dropping off doses elsewhere seems to be happening a lot. I hear anecdotally you guys have been reporting about people who aren't In the first priority groups who end up getting vaccine just because it seems to be lying around. Why is that happening? Yeah, This is Blake Farmer and here in Tennessee. We've We've even had some local health departments who've set up some lists of folks who are willing to be on site within 30 minutes to take any of those left overdoses. And this is will in Seattle and just to pick up on Blakes point. Usually, this is only a handful of doses. It's basically the leftovers and here in Washington hospital say they put together a reserve list of people who are at high risk, either because of age or some of their health condition. And the number one priority. If you ever have any extra doses is never to waste any vaccine. Well, how is the rollout going in the Western states where you are well On the West Coast, Oregon, California, Washington. They're all vaccinating at about the same pace they've used anywhere from 24 to 25% of the doses. So far, there are some states that are moving, especially quickly. New Mexico and Colorado. It's above 40%. And some of the most rural, hard hit places of states like Montana, North and South Dakota. Those air actually at the front of the pack nationwide, and then on the other end, you have some states where it's been slower, like Arizona and are now just picking up. But even within a state the story can be very different. Based on where you are. What do you mean? Some of the hot big hospitals in Washington are very much in the middle of working through their lists. In this first phase. It's upwards of half a million people in the one A one major hospital system I heard from said they had both the Fizer and Madonna vaccines and the process for each is different. So that complicates the logistics. But then you have other places that are way ahead and Cindy Chase's head of nursing at Ferry County Memorial Hospital, which is in rural eastern Washington, We're just kind of waiting for the go ahead to get moving on the other phases. Because the town here they know everything. And they want to know why. Why aren't you using your vaccines? We don't you have them? So some of this is going to almost random people. Of course, No vaccine truly goes to waste. But you've got certain people with priority what's happening with long term care facilities where so many people have died? Yeah, these places are absolutely desperate to start giving shots of record number of people are dying right now. In long term care states have started vaccinating nursing home residents. But some say it's not fast enough and the facilities I've spoken with, say they're basically at the mercy of when CVS or Walgreen's schedules them. But some states are being very aggressive West Virginia plan to get the first shot toe all long term care facilities by the end of last week. Well, that moves is back to Appalachia. So let's go back to Blake Farmer in Nashville are all the people who are eligible for vaccines in your region actually taking them? Well, not everybody, You know, even among health care workers. There is lots of vaccine hesitancy as it's known, especially in rural areas. I'm told some have great reason. Perhaps they're pregnant or planning to be. Others are thinking, you know, I've already had covert, so I'll just hope that provides enough immunity. Individual hospitals are working to convince more frontline workers to get vaccinated, but Tennessee's public health officials and more like you know, you snooze. You lose. Tennessee, along with Texas and Florida have opened up vaccinations to seniors. And that's all seniors, whether they live in a nursing home or not, And this is creating a bit of confusion. In some cases, you got counties using sign up genius and surveymonkey to coordinate appointments. One counties just Doing a big first come, first served drive thru event this week, you know, really, It depends on where someone lives. Here. In Nashville, For instance, there's still more health workers and first responders waiting for their doses. But smaller communities like will said, have been able to move on to the masses of it more quickly. Well, how does this get even more complicated as people began showing up for their second dose? It is supposed to be a relatively smooth process where the second dose comes automatically. But already some hospitals are here in Washington, say there are delays and there are not quite sure when that second batch of doses will arrive. And any hiccups you can imagine like that do make it harder to focus on getting the vaccine to new people. Let's circle back now to the Northeast, Martha beating her because the big question is is we get a few more weeks into this? I mean, this is a huge process..

Steve Inskeep Blake Farmer Nashville Northeast Martha Beeping Tennessee Seattle Washington Boston NPR News San Francisco Noel King Dave Freeman flu Washington hospital Governor Andrew Cuomo Massachusetts Sacramento
"martha beeping" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And I believe the election was stolen in the state of Georgia. Absolutely believed. Look around. No way by then won this state no way. No, the facts point. Otherwise, as you know, Biden did when Georgia but Trish wait is one of many, many, many people we met here Who does not believe it. Well, how are the people who ran George's election responded to the president's phone call? Very differently. Steve Yesterday we interviewed the election chiefs for Fulton County and Cobb County, those two of the big Four counties around metro Atlanta. They're also to the ones who that were mentioned by name by the president on that call. Thies. People are not political appointee use their offices are non partisan. They Said they were disheartened. They used the word stunning when we asked him about the trump tape on green while they are they are in the middle of trying to pull off another vote in the middle of the pandemic. You know something that they're not losing sight of the Cobb, Election director Janine Ev alert told me she's getting emails right and left every day. Somebody new on her staff just tested positive. So they are flat out trying to make sure they can just keep the polling stations up and running today in this environment where millions of people have already voted, and who knows how many more will vote today, the final day how much effort of the two parties putting into turnout? They're doing everything. My paint you a picture. You landed the Atlanta airport. From the second you leave. You're saying Bill. It's like every billboard every direction out of town. We spotted one on the highway near the airport, vulture us off. This is a reference to Jonah's self Today. That's running for Senate. Uh huh. Ah, another one on Peachtree Street. This is a Kelly wet floor billboard. She's of course, one of the Republicans candidates here, her sign says, Save the Senate. Save America. So they a literal sign there of how her campaign views the stakes. Mary Louise Kelly of NPR's All Things Considered has been reporting from Georgia will keep listening for you. Thanks so much. Thank you. Okay until very recently. The big question about the coronavirus bank vaccine Woz whether there would be enough doses for everybody you but that is turning out to not be the urgent problem now. The Trump administration said 20 million Americans would be vaccinated by the end of last year, the CDC says less than feel less than five million people have been vaccinated so far. The problem is that a lot of states are getting doses of the vaccine faster than they can actually vaccinate people. Let's check in on the northeastern United States with Martha Beeping Girl who's with our member station. W bur in Boston. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. How frustrated her public health officials in the Northeast. Well yesterday, Stevie Heard New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he's going to start finding hospitals that don't get vaccines into people's arms fast enough, But really many states in the Northeast are falling behind with injections as supply picks up. Massachusetts, for example, has injected 40% of vaccines that has received to date and one reason is that it just takes longer to give these shots than other vaccines. Why would that be Martha? Well, Picture your annual flu shot, Steve. You could be in and out of there in less than five minutes. Sure, but with the Corona virus vaccine, you might spend that five minutes just answering intake questions, and then you may have some questions yourself about the shots. Once you get the shot, you are then monitored for 15 minutes before you leave. In case you have some kind of reaction. So Dr Asif Merchant he's a nursing home director near Boston. He said. The whole experience took about 30 minutes when he got vaccinated on Saturday, and Dr Merchant says there just aren't enough vaccinators trained and mobilized for even the early stages of this mammoth project. That's caused much more for delay that I would have anticipated. I think when it comes to general public that is going to be an even bigger problem. We really need all hands on deck here. And Steve. We had an example this past weekend of what happens when delivery is too slow. One vaccinate Er had thought more of the Fizer vexing then they could use so they dropped off several 100 extra doses at a Boston hospital system to try to avoid waste. Wow, I'm just doing the math here if it could be a five minute process, but it's a 30 minute process and you multiply that by millions of people who want the vaccine. This is a problem on now we have the matter of people needing a second dose starting this week. How does that complicate things? Well, it's supposed to be a smooth process where hospitals automatically receive the same number of second doses. But some hospitals say there may be delays. They aren't quite sure when they're going to get the second batch of vaccine vials and any hiccups like that, of course, make it harder to focus on continuing to vaccinate new people. Are people who are distributing these vaccines, administering them going to catch up to the arriving supply. Well. Dr Anthony Fauci said on Sunday that he thinks the pace of vaccinations will pick up quickly. But other experts say the timeframe for getting vaccines to the general public by the spring, which is another one of the projections. We've heard that that's just not optimistic. There is about a billion dollars for vaccine distribution in the latest covert relief package, and that supposed to help local and state health departments ramp up, But.

Steve Yesterday Georgia president Martha Beeping Atlanta Senate Boston director Mary Louise Kelly Dr Asif Merchant Northeast Dr Anthony Fauci Biden Jonah George United States Trish flu Thies Governor Andrew Cuomo
"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Would come before home health care workers at all the hospital and clinic employees who do not care directly for covert patients. Told this was a unanimous recommendation from the States Vaccine advisory group. Dr Paul Bidding her who chairs that group, spoke on a webinar last night. He said the recommendation was based on the large number of outbreaks in prisons and other group residential settings. Group elected to consider all congregate Cara settings with high priority because of the risk of spreading transmission so quickly to so many people, both affecting staff and, of course patients residents themselves. Massachusetts is one of six states that include vaccinating everyone in prisons and jails in Phase one. Another seven plan to vaccinate in clinics in prisons. But just for staff, not inmates, That's all. According to the prison policy Initiative. Ping I can imagine someone saying, Hey, that's unfair. But what is the public health reasoning behind vaccinating prisoners? Well, sure. I mean, prisoners and other people who are jailed or who live in correctional facilities are a group that are at a particularly high risk recovered because of their living situations. You know, they live in cramped quarters with poor ventilation. They can't physically distance and You know, Staff and prisoners moved between facilities. So once it's introduced, it spends really quickly can, you know? And at this point more than one in 10 incarcerated people the U. S of Coptic coronavirus. More than 1500 have died and a lot of staff have been infected as well. States like California, Texas, Florida, you know, states with large incarcerated populations have had the most cases and the most deaths so It is up to the states who they decided prioritize for a vaccine. And there are a lot of other groups that could also be next in line, you know essential workers, people who work in grocery stores or die Busses, teachers, farm workers. And of course, you know people with underlying health conditions. So these are all open questions in the CDC is playing and coming out with more guidance and priority groups in the coming weeks. Then you can understand the logic. You have a super spreader event in prison that can very quickly spread throughout the community because you have guards and other staff that go back and forth. And that seems to be the same logic of some of these other groups that you mentioned like teachers or in contact with lots of Students or people in a grocery store in contact with all kinds of shoppers, so they're making these choices now because there is a limited supply. When does the supply get to the point where it's not so limited? Absolutely well. One big decision that's coming this week could really increase the supply of vaccines. The Food and Drug Administration is considering a second vaccine made by the drug company Madonna for authorization this week. And if that one gets authorized, the government says they have six million doses of that ready to ship out. And in fact, that's actually something that the federal government is banking on on their estimates. They say that 20 million people could get there first vaccine shot this month if they pull what they have for both the Visor and Madonna vaccines. And they say 30 million more people could get shots in January. So in terms of when there's going to be enough vaccine for everyone to get one, they're estimating the end of the second quarter next year. So if all those right maybe around June, but tens of millions in the next couple of months Ping Thanks so much. Thank you for having me That's NPR's science reporter Ping Wong, along with Martha Beeping Garnet member station W bur in Boston. Thanks so much. Thank you. Thistles. NPR news. Let's check in with Joe McConnell with some traffic.

Food and Drug Administration prison policy Initiative Dr Paul Bidding NPR Coptic coronavirus Joe McConnell Massachusetts federal government Cara Ping Wong CDC California Boston Martha Beeping reporter Texas Florida
"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

"30 health care workers got shots there and awe. Schnur Medical Center in New Orleans, Dr. Leo Swanny was among the first in line. It's been a privilege to be up here and get vaccinated and tell all of my Hispanic brothers and sisters. It's safe. It's okay. And we need to do it. He says that because he knows communities of color have been especially hard hit. This Christmas is gonna be a tough Christmas for us. Next Christmas. We want to be with our grandmothers or I will eat. That said No. I will eat those now as we consider the next steps. Let's make an analogy to war. When we tell stories about war. We focus on stories of individual courage. But the war may be won by logistics, getting people and supplies where they're needed. Something similar is true In this pandemic. We tell stories about government that focus on speeches that conflict and hot takes. Hot button issues and tweets. But saving lives in a pandemic takes logistics, most recently getting a vaccine where it's needed. So how's that going? NPR's science reporter Ping Kwan is here, along with Martha Beeping, Girded member station W bur in Boston. Good morning to both of you. Good morning. Morning. Okay. Martha will start with you in the shrine of Medicine. Is the vaccine starting to reach Boston? Well, the shrine got shut out, Steve. No, I'm kidding. A little bit Good. Here's the deal in Massachusetts. Five of the 75 hospitals that expect to start visor vaccinations this week received the shipment yesterday. The explanation seems to be shipping glitches and delays during a crazy time. So while there was some grumbling, all of the large hospitals are expecting vaccine shipments today and the smaller ones tomorrow. So in the end, hospital leaders say, what difference does one day really make? Yeah. Hopefully it is only one day now. Once the vaccine has arrived, how's the rollout work? Well, we have already started to vaccinate a few people out of a hospital north of Boston. They started yesterday with a 96 year old World War two veteran named Margaret Claessens. Few hospitals will have media events today, vaccinating hospital leaders or range of employees, especially staff of color. You just heard on the show a little bit about why that's important. It's to build more trust in the vaccines. And tomorrow on Thursday, we'll start to see the clinics with a couple of 100, nurses, doctors, respiratory therapists and members of the cleaning staff coming in and out every day. Okay, so that's one location across the country. This is happening everywhere or as many places as possible and ping as you Monitor operation Warp speed. How do the next few days and weeks look? Yeah, well, Boston's not alone here, you know, around 140 or 150 sites got there. First Vaccines yesterday and more than 400 are expected to get them today. Here's Health Secretary Alex. These are speaking in Washington, D C yesterday by Wednesday. Vaccine will be delivered everywhere from sites here in Washington to the shores of Guam to the northeastern corner of main. All in all, around three million vaccines are going out this week, and government officials were saying this is just the beginning. You know, every week, states will be getting more vaccine shipments. And most of those first doses we've seen so far have gone to healthcare workers. But next week, some states we're gonna start immunizing nursing home residents as well. Or they're expected to through a federal partnership with CVS and Walgreens. Teams from these pharmacies will be visiting nursing homes to give shots to both residents and the staff. Martha Ping is just there talking about who gets this first. Is there any debate about who is getting the vaccine first? There's been some controversy in Massachusetts, Steve about including prisoners in Phase one, along with people who live in other group settings, like homeless shelters. In Massachusetts prisoners will follow hospital staff who care directly for covert patients, nursing home residents and staff and they'll follow first responders, but prisoners would come before home health care workers at all the hospital and clinic employees who do not care directly for covert patients. Told this was a unanimous recommendation from the States Vaccine advisory group. Dr Paul Bidding her who chairs that group, spoke on a webinar last night. He said the recommendation was based on the large number of outbreaks in prisons and other group residential settings. Group elected to consider all congregate Cara settings with high priority because of the risk of spreading transmission so quickly to so many people, both affecting staff and, of course patients residents themselves. Massachusetts is one of six states that include vaccinating everyone in prisons and jails in Phase one. Another seven plan to vaccinate in clinics in prisons. But just for staff, not inmates, That's all. According to the prison policy Initiative. Ping I can imagine someone saying, Hey, that's unfair. But what is the public health reasoning behind vaccinating prisoners? Well, sure. I mean, prisoners and other people who are jailed or who live in correctional facilities are a group that are at a particularly high risk recovered because of their living situations. You know, they live in cramped quarters with poor ventilation. They can't physically distance and You know, Staff and prisoners moved between facilities. So once it's introduced it, Spence really quickly or can you know? And at this point more than one in 10 incarcerated people the U. S of caught the coronavirus. More than 1500 have died and a lot of staff have been infected as well. States like California, Texas, Florida, you know, states with large incarcerated populations have had the most cases and the most deaths so It is up to the states who they decide to prioritize for a vaccine. And there are a lot of other groups that could also be next in line, you know essential workers, people who work in grocery stores or die Busses, teachers, farm workers. And of course, you know people with underlying health conditions. So these are all open questions in the CDC is planning on coming out with more guidance and priority groups in the coming weeks, and you can understand the logic. You have a super spreader event in prison that can very quickly spread throughout the community because you have guards and other staff that go back and forth. And that seems to be the same logic of some of these other groups that you mentioned like teachers or in contact with lots of Students or people in a grocery store in contact with all kinds of shoppers, so they're making these choices now because there is a limited supply. When does the supply get to the point where it's not so limited? Absolutely well. One big decision that's coming this week could really increase the supply of vaccines. The Food and Drug Administration is considering a second vaccine made by the drug company Madonna for authorization this week. If that one gets authorized, the government says they have six million doses of that ready to ship out. And in fact, that's actually something that the federal government is banking on. In their estimates. They say that 20 million people could get there first vaccine shot this month if they pull what they have for both the visor and maternal vaccines. And they say 30 million more people could get shots in January. So in terms of when there's going to be enough vaccine for everyone to get one, they're estimating the end of the second quarter next year. So if all goes right, maybe around June, but tens of millions in the next couple of months Ping Thanks so much. Thank you for having me That's NPR's science reporter Ping Wong, along with Martha Beeping Garnet member station Deputy bur in Boston. Thanks so much. Thank you. This is NPR news. It's 5 42 on KCRW. Plenty Still to come on this Tuesday installment of Morning edition, including you'll hear from Dr Anthony Fauci,.

Boston Massachusetts Martha Beeping NPR Food and Drug Administration Steve Martha Ping reporter federal government New Orleans Ping Kwan Dr Anthony Fauci Schnur Medical Center Dr. Leo Swanny Martha prison policy Initiative Washington
"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:59 min | 2 years ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The listeners and members of KQ weedy it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin without a cure for covered nineteen doctors are desperately trying to figure out the best treatment regimen for these patients and what they're trying may look very different depending on the hospital joining us now to talk about this living experiments we've got Michigan radio's Kate wells and W. B. U. R.'s Martha beating her in Boston thank you both for being with us thanks Rachel thank you Rachel Kate can you give us an idea of the range of medications and treatments that a patient with cover nineteen might be given yeah it's a pretty big range right now patients could get anywhere from an assortment of about a dozen or so treatments a usually hospitals are trying various combinations of those for example at the Henry Ford health system here in Michigan doctors say that they are seen early but dramatic results from convalescent plasma which is plasma from somebody who's already recovered from cove it in the hopes that it might help a patient actually fight off the virus and then over at Michigan medicine some doctors there are really enthusiastic about these anti inflammatory drugs they're often used for rheumatoid arthritis and the hope there is that this might help calm down the immune system when it has an over reaction to cove it sometimes but when they're all these different treatments being tried at different hospitals I mean I never totally patients are gonna get confused right yeah I mean it's it's a lot for even doctors to keep track of right now I see I spoke with the CEO of the Henry Ford medical group his name is doctor Steve how can S. and this is how he put it we just don't have all the answers and I think that people need to understand that if it's okay if you're constantly reassessing our policies based on the evidence that's coming in because all of this is happening in real time I will say it right so that one thing that I've been really struck by when I'm talking to doctors and different health care systems is that it is almost like they are treating different diseases it's all cove it right that they all have these different patient relations like one hospital I talked to gets a lot of patients from these nearby nursing homes and cove it doesn't look the same in every patient like those nursing home patients they may not have a fever or chills each hospital right now is kind of basing their treatment on what they've seen work best in their patients right so let's bring in Martha beeping a month here in Boston are using the same kind of a wide variety of treatments right now absolutely doctors in Boston or trying all of those things that Kate just mention plus others and over the counter antacid called pepcid and also nitric oxide it's is something patients can inhale and doctors think it might improve oxygen levels so why is that I mean why are patients seeing so many different approaches to treating covert nineteen well the ritual as you mentioned doctors are desperate to find something that's going to work this is a new virus a new disease that's causing so many deaths Boston hospitals are running dozens of trials and now doctors are investigating a new condition in children that may include dangerous inflammation in their skin or their blood vessels but there is one drug that patients and their families are asking for that's room disappear it shows improved recovery maybe by four days or so in the I. C. U. tho it's not been proven to save lives I talked to doctor Eric Ruben he's the editor in chief at the New England journal of medicine so we are still far from something that's going to make a huge dent in the amount of disease out there even if it hopefully makes it more likely that you won't get as sick how much room does appear is available in many hospitals in Boston but that's not true everywhere in the country okay what about the other drugs that that we've heard the name bandied about now for so many weeks hydroxy Clark when this is the drug that president trump at one point to mistakenly called a miracle drug right this one has been controversial and it's an anti malarial drug people take it to treat lupus and initially at the start of the pandemic some small studies looked really good for it but now we're getting more evidence that actually point to dangerous heart problems so at Michigan medicine for example Dr Vineet Chopra it tells me that it was actually making their patients worse they were already having trouble breathing and they take Hydroxycut work when suddenly they would start vomiting be nauseous at but he says when they stop using that you know they got a lot of pushback and I remember kind of getting a lot of folks very angry about what's what do you have to lose this is you know it's sort of a no brainer to give it to people and it wasn't a no brainer because ours were real we saw liver toxicities we stop you after all taxes duties to the heart mmhm you know Rachel I will then talk to other hospitals that or tell me exactly the opposite you know the save we're monitoring these patients really carefully but we think it's helping keep them off ventilators and then you've got large trials going on this drug still like Henry Ford health system is testing how drastic work went on three thousand health care workers and first responders to see if I might actually prevent coved and Martha you've been reporting on other areas of medicine where there is also so much uncertainty for corona virus patients right what if you found so we took let's go to a labor and delivery for take a new mom who's tested positive for the corona virus and has just given birth well how do you protect the baby from getting infected at one Boston hospital the protocol is to separate the mother and infant immediately that mom can pump breast milk that will be used to feed her baby because so far there's no trace of the virus found in breast milk but at a hospital just a few miles away the baby is allowed to sleep in the mother's room at a distance of at least six feet and that mom would be allowed to breast feed as long as she wears a mask a fresh down and cleans her hands carefully well Sir just as such completely different prescriptions for the same condition I mean given all these different treatments and protocols what's the takeaway for patients I mean do they have a choice about which hospital they want to use I mean if it's a matter of getting to be able to be with your new border not right to in the case of a newborn many mothers would have made that decision months ago and not know that protocols in hospitals are changing for most covered nineteen patients in an emergency and ambulance is going to take them to the nearest hospital whoever has room for you in any case it probably doesn't make sense for those patients to shop for any particular treatment because the options are changing so rapidly now doctors hope the situation will all come down soon and patients will have equal access to whatever works I spoke with Arthur Kim he's an infectious disease specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital we really look forward to a fair and equitable process so that whether you are in Boston or whether you're on the other hard hit areas such as the Navajo Nation that you will have equitable access to these types of therapies but it's not clear when that will be the case more the beeping with W. B. you are in Boston and also K. wells of Michigan public radio thanks to both thanks Rachel thank you Rachel coming up this afternoon on All Things Considered states are setting rules for social distancing but some police officers and officials worry about how to enforce them tell your smart speaker plan PR or just ask for your member station this is morning edition from NPR news John McConnell has some traffic.

Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin NPR
"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot com it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin without a cure for covered nineteen doctors are desperately trying to figure out the best treatment regimen for these patients and what they're trying may look very different depending on the hospital joining us now to talk about this living experiments we've got Michigan radio's Kate wells and W. B. U. R.'s Martha beating her in Boston thank you both for being with us thanks Rachel thank you Rachel Kate can you give us an idea of the range of medications and treatments that a patient with cover nineteen might be given yeah it's a pretty big range right now patients could get anywhere from an assortment of about a dozen or so treatments a usually hospitals are trying various combinations of those for example at the Henry Ford health system here in Michigan doctors say that they are seen early but dramatic results from convalescent plasma which is plasma from somebody who's already recovered from cove it in hopes that it might help a patient actually fight off the virus and then over at Michigan medicine some doctors there are really enthusiastic about these anti inflammatory drugs they're often used for rheumatoid arthritis and the hope there is that this might help calm down the immune system when it has an over reaction to cove it sometimes but when they're all these different treatments being tried at different hospitals I mean I never really patients are gonna get confused right yeah I mean it's it's a lot for even doctors to keep track of right now I see I spoke with the CEO of the Henry Ford medical group his name is doctor Steve how can S. and this is how he put it we just don't have all the answers and I think that people need to understand that if it's okay if we are constantly reassessing our policies based on the evidence that's coming in because all of this is happening in real time I will say racial that one thing that I've been really struck by when I'm talking to doctors and different health care systems is that it is almost like they are treating different diseases it's all cove it right but they all have these different patient populations like one hospital I talked to gets a lot of patients from these nearby nursing homes and covert doesn't look the same in every patient like those nursing home patients they may not have a fever or chills so each hospital right now is kind of basing their treatment on what they've seen work best in their patients right so let's bring in Martha beeping a month your Boston are using the same kind of of wide variety in treatments right now absolutely doctors in Boston or trying all of those things that Kate just mentioned plus others and over the counter antacid called pepcid and also nitric oxide it is something patients can inhale and doctors think it might improve oxygen levels so why is that I mean why are patients seeing so many different approaches to treating covert nineteen well the ritual as you mentioned doctors are desperate to find something that's going to work this is a new virus a new disease that's causing so many deaths Boston hospitals are running dozens of trials and now doctors are investigating a new condition in children that may include dangerous inflammation in their skin or their blood vessels but there is one drug that patients and their families are asking for that's room disappear it shows improved recovery maybe by four days or so in the I. C. U. tho it's not been proven to save lives I talked to doctor Eric Ruben he's the editor in chief at the New England journal of medicine so we are still far from something that's going to make a huge dent in the amount of disease out there even if it hopefully makes it more likely that you won't get as sick how much room does appear is available in many hospitals in Boston but that's not true everywhere in the country okay what about the other drugs that that we've heard the name bandied about now for so many weeks hydroxy Clark when this is the drug that president trump at one point to mistakenly called a miracle drug right this one has been controversial and it's an anti malarial drug that people take it to treat lupus and initially at the start of the pandemic some small studies looked really good for it but now we're getting more evidence that actually point to dangerous heart problems so at Michigan medicine for example Dr Vineet Chopra it tells me that it was actually making their patients worse they were already having trouble breathing and they take Hydroxycut work when suddenly they would start vomiting be nauseous at but he says when they stopped using that you know they got a lot of pushback and I remember kind of getting a lot of folks very angry about what's what do you have to lose this is you know it's sort of a no brainer to give it to people and it wasn't a no brainer because ours were real we saw liver toxicities we saw electrical toxicities to the heart you know Rachel I will then talk to other hospitals that or tell me exactly the opposite you know the save we're monitoring these patients really carefully but we think it's helping keep them off ventilators and then you've got large trials going on this drug still like Henry Ford health system is testing how drastic work went on three thousand health care workers and first responders to see if I might actually prevent covert and Martha you've been reporting on other areas of medicine where there is also so much uncertainty for coronavirus patients right what have you found so Rachel let's go to a labor and delivery for take a new mom who's tested positive for the corona virus and has just given birth well how do you protect the baby from getting infected at one Boston hospital the protocol is to separate the mother and infant immediately that mom can pump breast milk that will be used to feed her baby because so far there's no trace of the virus found in breast milk at a hospital just a few miles away the baby is allowed to sleep in the mother's room at a distance of at least six feet and that mom would be allowed to breast feed as long as she wears a mask a fresh down and cleans her hands carefully while so just such completely different prescriptions for the same condition I mean given all these different treatments and protocols what's the takeaway for patients I mean do they have a choice about which hospital they want to use I mean if it's a matter of getting to be able to be with your new board or not right to in the case of a newborn many mothers would have made that decision months ago and not know that protocols in.

Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Dot NPR
"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KQED Radio

"B. U. R. health reporter Martha be bigger joins us now Martha thanks so much for being with us you're welcome Scott and why Massachusetts trying to do this the organizers call this the offense of strategy they say wrapping up hospital capacity to defend against the pandemic Scott just is not enough so the group is going to run this project partners in health has lots of experience with contact racing to slow the spread of epidemics in West Africa Ebola cholera in Haiti still this is a very daunting and difficult challenge to right now Scott Massachusetts has more than twenty thousand positive cases that's a lot of people to track down as well as all of the people they may have had close contact with it's all about trying to stop the spread of the coronavirus though reduce deaths and maybe loosened the social distancing rules so people can go back to work and school how does it work well partners in health has a state contract to hire a thousand people who will start making calls many of these people will be health center workers from community health centers they've had to lay off staff recently because they lost a lot of revenue from elective procedures so the tracers will start calling everyone has tested positive they'll ask about their close contacts and work backwards from there the referred people for tests and medical care if they need it everybody who is positive for the coronavirus whether they're sick or not will have to be in isolation for about two weeks so that they don't keep spreading the virus but how does any of this work if there are enough test well that's a big question you can't trace the spread of the corona virus if you can't figure out who has it and people may be willing to isolate Scott in a room alone if they are sure they are positive but asking them to isolate while they wait days for a test result I mean that's a really tough ask for a mom with kids or a younger person who still working so the project organizers here in Massachusetts are banking on those promises that we hear every day from the White House that more rapid test will be available in the coming days they're moving on many a kind of parallel tracks at once trying to get this effort off the ground that no other state is trying to do for all of its residents with the coronavirus and what else illustrate have to do to try and make contact tracing work well if you know the idea that you're going to put tens of thousands of people into isolation is doable if everybody has a home but many people live in crowded apartments where they don't have a spare room and of course we have many people on the street to who don't have a home at all and so they need to stand up find some dorms in hotel rooms and maybe other types of isolation centers we don't have the details on that yet I'm Martha any idea how much this might cost the budget is forty four million dollars it seems some of that money will come from a federal disaster relief grant but we haven't seen the details yet W. B. R. health reporter Martha beeping her thanks so much so happy to be here Scott now to Yemen where aid workers say they're bracing for the worst after the country recorded its first coronavirus case this week after five years of fighting between a Saudi led alliance and the Iran backed Hootie rebels the health care system in Yemen is already battered and peers Jana Raff has this report from Amman Jordan seven children are treated at the Yemeni hospital for malnutrition and disease three quarters of the population now depends on food and medical aid most of it delivered or funded by aid organizations Yemen has been largely cut off from the world by fighting this week recorded its first covert nineteen case these Grande the head of the U. N.'s humanitarian program in Yemen spoke to us from the capital sana'a she says the country is not prepared as virus spreads authorities on the north end of sorties in the south they have stopped the arrival of passengers they've gone into lockdown we're struggling to get the kind of equipment and the kind of resources on the kinds of medicines that we need here UN agencies are competing for things like ventilators in corona virus tests in what has become a global competition for lifesaving resources Yemen imports almost all of its food and medicine the new restrictions made getting food and medical care to people even more difficult the Norwegian refugee council's advocacy director Sultana Begum speaking to us from London says she has appealed to Yemeni authorities to allow aid operations to continue but you haven't heard past there are new restrictions that are being put in place restrictions in movement and our restrictions in terms of road closures in terms of you want like carrying a black kids coming in and out of the country so our appeal to them really is when they're preparing to combat the virus eight find safe measures to what with us D. U. N. is also facing a funding crisis in part because last month the United States cut off tens of millions of dollars in aid to Yemen saying some made was at risk of being diverted by armed groups there are forty one major you when programs and thirty one of those programs what I shot this month of April we're talking with the programs health programs water and sanitation programs protection program shelter program so we have the quote is created by the war we have a crisis created by cove it is indeed a fragile cease fire the US political envoy says he'll try to bring the two sides back to talks even if it's a virtual negotiating table.

reporter Martha Scott Massachusetts B. U. R.
"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

"Problems for carefully selected patients among twenty one active drug users all but one completed the treatment at home that patient was readmitted there have been three relapses but no one use the antibiotic line to inject illegal drugs I think we've shown through this pilot that it is safe and feasible for certain patients and saves money price estimates eight hundred and sixty six thousand dollars in savings based on the number of days these patients stayed out of the hospital doctor Serra hole is a cardiologists and bioethicist at the Yale school of medicine the key here is rather than relying on emotional arguments or knee jerk reactions I think it's really critical that we use at an evidence based approach on to making sure that that we're treating these patients appropriately in only a handful of hospitals are trying this counter intuitive approach the evidence is promising but not robust what nurses and doctors do know is that infection rates among drug users are rising and that too many patients are not getting or completing needed treatment for NPR news I'm Martha beeping in Boston Martha story came from NPR's partnership with W. B. U. R. and because your health news this is NPR news you're listening to KCRW on the next greater.

NPR W. B. U. R. doctor Serra Yale school of medicine Martha beeping Boston
"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:15 min | 2 years ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

"You're listening to KCRW it's a dose of it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning the past few days of violence in Iraq have highlighted a reality of how president trump administration views the Persian Gulf region the United States sees Iraq as a battleground in its conflict with neighboring Iran now this view is not new president trump said out loud early last year explaining why he wanted US troops to stay in Iraq one of the reasons I want to keep it is because I want to be looking a little bit at around because Iran is a real problem well that's news you're keeping troops in Iraq because you want to be able to strike in Iran no because I want to be able to watch your and all I wanna do is be able to watch in recent days those troops became targets for mortar attacks US warplanes then struck and Iran backed militia that was blamed for the mortar attacks supporters of the militia then attacked the United States embassy in Baghdad suddenly some Iraqi politicians are talking off throwing out U. S. troops that the president wanted to keep him what is happening here following Nasser is a Mideast scholar and a former state department policy adviser to president Obama and he's in our studios welcome back to the program thank you what makes Iraq a place where the US and Iran would clash when they have been competing for Iraq ever since the American invasion of Iraq in two thousand three two thousand three that basically took away the Sunni dominated the autocracy in Iraq eight it and power did majority Shiite population which has cultural religious historical and social ties to Iran many of the leaders of Iraq actually had spent exile time in Iran and and over the past the two decades we've had the growing people to people relationships economic relationship political relationship and the current Iraqi government is is on certain about American commitment is sitting in a sea of hostile as soon new powers who don't like if she had dominated government in Iraq as much as Iraqis are are are not happy with the Iranian meddling in the region still Iran is the one country that rely on you just said the thing about Iraqis are happy with the running and meddling you traced some history where a Ron has reasserted more and more influence inside Iraq weren't there mass protests up until the other day in Iraq against Iranian influence effectively on the US side of the argument absolutely I mean that there does were nationalist sentiments against Iranian meddling in Iraq and now with attacking a base in Iraq killing Iraqis add without consulting the government of Iraq without even letting no the government in Iraq that that that that that the United States was going to hit this base at the United States has not inflamed Iraqi nationalism a game itself it's diverted attention from Iranian meddling in Iraq to American and behavior in Iraq and and in a way this is this is a self inflicted wound by president trump he's relieve pressure on Iran and diverted attention from the most serious crisis Iran has been facing in Iraq since two thousand three I want to ask the blow back is really that bad there with protesters outside the embassy they finally agreed to take down their camp and move away in exchange for an Iraqi promised to try to legislate the United States out of the country that go for a law that would throw US troops out of the country but could that really happen are Iraqis really that angry that they would do that could probably will not happen but but something else has happened Iraq is right now in the middle of trying to form a new government choose a new prime minister this political jockeying in the country and in the midst of that the anti American faction and the militias and their political backers have gained strength they've gained leverage at at I'm and in a way it this is change the dynamic within Iraq itself we don't know who's going to succeed the current prime minister but the United States a ability to decide that has now been significantly diminished and US is not on the defensive two argued why it should be in the country it's our it's it's it's and also the Iranians and they're back there's an Iraqi politicians have learned that now they can believe the United States they can show up at the embassy any time now next time they can go further than they can provoke the marines are there burn airborne divisions that we're sending to Iraq to actually shoot at demonstrators and escalate this to something much bigger so in a way this entire episode is gone away but this is not a victory for the United States but I'm going back through the sequence again Iran backed militia attacks Americans the US response leads to these protests did you have any choice really I mean Americans were being attacked well you could say basically Iran put a banana peel in front of the United States and president trump place would right on it but he could have handled this a bit better he could have consulted the Iraqi government president trump called the leaders of Israel Saudi Arabia and you a before the attack but not the Iraqi prime minister so the Iraqis were kept in in the dark he could have chosen to hit Iran directly rather than hitting the Iranian backed militia any time the United States carry he's out to unilateral action in another country killing civilians in that killing citizens of that country it's going to be problematic Peter Barnard who's an analyst who's riding in the Atlantic yesterday observed that president trump has in binders few ruled out diplomacy with Iran president trump does say wants to talk to Iran but with extreme extreme demands so did diplomacy isn't going to happen right now the alternative to diplomacy is war president trump doesn't want that either doesn't want to the Mideast war binder argues that the third alternative that's left the only thing that's left is a series of Messi humiliations which is how he sees these events in Iraq is that true well even if we did in college humiliation is because the United States doesn't have a clear strategy to initiative is not in Iran's hats the Iranians are provoking the United States putting pressures of on of their own in at asking the United States the either come to the table with lesser demands and we can negotiate or will you have to risk confrontation the US doesn't want to do either and as a result has lost the initiative to Iraq and and Iran is actually have no incentive right now to behave any other way and and and I I mean even if I coming to January sixth in a week's time the Iranians would be taking the next step in in moving away from their nuclear deal which will put even more pressure on the another step after the US withdrew from that deal falling usher thanks so much thank you he's a Mideast scholar and former adviser to president Obama last year state lawmakers were busy with one of the most controversial issues in American politics twelve states passed laws to ban or severely restrict abortion nine other states passed laws to protect or expand abortion rights in Massachusetts lawmakers are still debating a proposal that would strengthen abortion rights as Martha beeping at member station W. B. U. R. explains a key part of that bill would extend new rights to teenagers often viewed as a bastion of liberal laws Massachusetts only gets a grade of C. for access to abortion from an abortion rights group one of the main reasons the state requires that miners have a parent's consent that did not work for this young woman whose name we've agreed to keep private I found out I was pregnant when I was fifteen and I knew I wanted an abortion right off the bat but I knew I couldn't tell my mom or my immediate family members because my pregnancy was a result of sexual assault from I'm a family friend and then my home wasn't necessarily a a safe or healthy one at the time so the fifteen year old pursued her only legal alternative permission from a judge the young woman remember staring up at a man who never made eye contact during a short conversation about grades and whether she played sports she says the judge never asked about the assault or her planned abortion and then right before I was leaving he just encouraged me to to think harder next time before I had sex that was to take care the judge issued an order granting the abortion the additional time it took push the fifteen year old pass the period when she could take pills to induce an abortion she had the more invasive surgical procedure instead but that's not what weighs heavily on the young woman who is now twenty three has a master's degree and works for a nonprofit in Boston the feeling that I have from seeing the judge and those last words he said to me about being more responsible were really what happened haven't left me this woman always assumed her lawyer told the judge she was raped but she can't be sure he knew how she got pregnant having a judge or parent involved is supposed to help protect such vulnerable young women says David Franks with the anti abortion group Massachusetts citizens for life in our laws we need to do as much as we can especially given the kind of epidemic abuse so we're we're facing that that we do as much as we can to interrupt that cycle after the roe versus Wade decision in nineteen seventy three Massachusetts a heavily Catholic state was among the first to pass a parental consent requirement for minors twenty five other states in force a similar law no state has repealed this restriction Rebecca Hart holder is with the abortion rights group NARAL Massachusetts it's really been difficult to repeal barriers across the country and this is a moment for us to take back that narrative and to say you know those barriers are not acceptable the Catholic church's political influence has waned in Massachusetts since the seventies now there's a bill in the Massachusetts legislature that would remove parental consent for abortion it would also allow abortions in the third trimester if a doctor diagnoses of fatal foetal condition and would establish the right to an abortion in state law the bill's sponsor state senator Herriot Chandler argues that abortion is more widely accepted now as part of Jen all medical care Chandler who is eighty two says she remembers the days when abortion was illegal I think if people realize what a post wrote world would be that would make it even more reasonable to do this bill we're going in a different direction than the rest of the country well not yet jailers bill is still in committee Massachusetts governor Charlie Baker a Republican says he generally supports access to abortion but not channelers proposed expansions still abortion rights advocates think the bill could help Massachusetts become a haven for women who can't accessible version in other states they are already focusing fund raising appeals on the idea of even more women needing help with abortions in a post row world for NPR news I'm Martha beating her in Boston.

Iraq United States NPR Steve Inskeep president Persian Gulf
"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

"Alternative to diplomacy is war president trump doesn't want that either doesn't want another Mideast war binder argues that the third alternative that's left the only thing that's left is a series of Messi humiliations which is how he sees these events in Iraq is that true well even if we did in college humiliation is because the United States doesn't have a clear strategy the initiative is not in Iran's hats the Iranians are provoking the United States putting pressures of on of their own in at asking the United States is that you either come to the table with lesser demands and we can negotiate or will you have to risk confrontation the US doesn't want to do either and as a result has lost the initiative to Iran an Iran is actually have no incentive right now to behave any other way and and and I I'm even if I coming to January sixth in a week's time the Iranians would be taking the next step in in moving away from their their nuclear deal which will put even more pressure on the another step after the US withdrew from that deal falling Nasser thanks so much thank you he's a Mideast scholar and former adviser to president Obama last year state lawmakers were busy with one of the most controversial issues in American politics twelve states passed laws to ban or severely restrict abortion nine other states passed laws to protect or expand abortion rights in Massachusetts a proposal to strengthen abortion rights is still being debated as Martha beeping at member station W. B. U. R. explains a key part of the bill would extend new rights to the state's youngest women often viewed as a bastion of liberal laws Massachusetts only gets a grade of C. for access to abortion from an abortion rights group one of the main reasons the state requires that miners have a parent's consent that did not work for this young woman whose name we've agreed to keep private I found out I was pregnant when I was fifteen and I knew I wanted an abortion right off the bat but I knew I couldn't tell my mom or my immediate family members because.

trump Iraq United States Iran Obama Massachusetts W. B. U. R. president Messi Nasser Martha beeping
"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:23 min | 3 years ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

"Is six twenty nine at KCRW coming up on All Things Considered a conversation with Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro we'll talk about a proposed settlement with Purdue pharma he says failed to hold it accountable for its role in the opioid crisis several states pose a settlement that would allow produ to create a new company and continue to sell opioids but with proceeds allegedly going to communities hurt by the crisis later Saudi Arabia has been planning to sell off a slice of its state owned oil company Saudi Aramco when a massive IPL but done things could change after the attack this weekend and state and local news at six thirty two is Merrick our cities arms are really open for president trump on helping with homelessness in LA after this from NPR. live from NPR news in Washington I'm Amy held oil prices are spiking closing more than fourteen percent higher today after Saturday's attacks on Saudi oil facilities disrupted some five percent of global crude production speaking at the White House today president trump stopped short of definitively blaming a Ron for the air strikes well let's look in that way we'll have some pretty good to to having some very strong studies done but it's certainly looking that way at this moment and we'll let you know Iran denies involvement trump said today he'd like to avoid war with Tehran states across the country are fighting a bankruptcy filing and proposed settlement from Purdue pharma over its role in the nation's opioid epidemic from member station W. B. you are in Boston Martha beating reports state say the company's plan does not go far enough produces bankruptcy would preserve billions of dollars to settle lawsuits and find solutions to the opioid crisis state AG more Healy says she opposes the deal because produce owners the secular family would not have to admit wrongdoing or give back any personal wealth from sales of the company's blockbuster pain killer this settlement is only going to be made possible through the future and continued sales of oxycontin the sales specifically of their foreign corporation I reject that it's offensive to me attorneys who support the deal say more than two thousand communities stand to benefit from produce offer of money for prevention overdose rescues and recovery from addiction and they need the money now for NPR news I'm Martha beeping in Boston the governor of Maine has ordered flags state wide to be flown at half staff for the next two days after propane explosion in Farmington this morning left one firefighter dead six people were injured including the town's fire chief the building which serve people with disabilities have been evacuated at the time of the blast you're listening to NPR news Hey this is Casey are W. news on Monday September six. I'm Larry Pareil here's what's happening at six thirty two president trump is scheduled to visit LA Tom Morrow he is set to visit San Francisco first before flying into LAX around three the head of an evening fundraiser in Beverly hills is also slated to attend a fundraiser in San Diego Wednesday before he heads back to DC the trip comes a week after the trump administration officials toward a Skid Row what other Ellie locations where large numbers of homeless people live the feds did not meet with any city or county officials president trump has surprised local leaders with his sudden interest in California's homeless crisis we all have seen this playbook of kind of games whether it's around sanctuary cities whether it's around homelessness whether it's around inclusion gender equity stuff we get passed by Washington all the time for standing up for American values Garcetti says he's talked with San Francisco mayor London breed and Sacramento's mayor about trump's proposal to house homeless people in converted federal facilities city says he does have some questions about the sincerity of this initiative you know I hope that it wasn't a stunt I hope it was a legitimate effort to do something but I'll believe it when I see the trump administration has not shared details of a plan to get homeless people off the streets of LA governor Newsome is taking executive action against vaping and E. cigarettes today he announced he's launching an information campaign to highlight the dangers of the practice KCRW's not Gillam reports Newsome's planned comes amid a national epidemic of bape related illnesses governor Newsome is telling state regulators to act boldly and look for ways to ban counterfeit any legal E. cigarette products those unregulated vape products ruling to a nationwide outbreak of a mysterious respiratory illness federal health officials have confirmed three hundred eighty cases so far six people across the country including one person in LA county have died from the condition Ventura county public health officer Dr Robert Levin says five patients in that county are confirmed to have the vapor lated illness symptoms are severe respiratory disease many of these patients wind up hospitalized many in the icy you. and a quarter of the patients wind up on ventilators governor Newsome's as immediate action is needed to help the public health crisis and dramatic rise in youth vaping that is K. C. R. W.'s Matt Gillam reporting governor some new some is directing the state to spend twenty million dollars on a public awareness campaign about the dangers of vaping nicotine and cannabis the executive order aims to address those rising health concerns from vaping there have been hundreds of reports of people a contracting serious lung illnesses related to vaping cannabis based oils and flavored E. cigarettes isms order also directs the state's public agent or health agency to see if we can step up warning signs that retailers that sell vaping products and he says he wants the state tax agency to see if they can increase the taxes on the cigarettes which typically have lower taxes than.

trump Purdue pharma NPR Saudi Aramco president Boston LA KCRW Saudi Arabia Washington Attorney General Josh Shapiro produ White House Martha beeping Maine Merrick
"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"martha beeping" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news in Washington I'm lecture me saying police are confirming that two of the victims killed in the mass shooting in northern California yesterday were children the six year old boy and a thirteen year old girl the third victim was a young man in his twenties more than a dozen people were injured all were attending the annual Gilroy garlic festival which attracts tens of thousands of people every year in an update to reporters a short time ago your police chief Scott Smith he said nineteen year olds and Tino William llegan snuck into the venue armed with an assault style rifle that he legally purchase in Nevada earlier this month Smitty says he believes that had it taken longer than a minute for his officers to take down the government more innocent lives would have been lost we have thousands of people there in a very small area and feel good about it so much worse so so fast police are still trying to determine of a second person might have helped the gunmen the FBI is assisting it's trying to learn everything you can about the gunman such as ideological leanings affiliations with groups and motivation president trump has signed at nine eleven victim compensation fund bill for first responders and peers rank or doing as reports on the fight first responders had large to make sure it happened president trump said it was a solemn duty to protect the police officers and fire fighters who rushed toward the World Trade Center on September eleventh two thousand one he called out many first responders by name they included police detective Louise Alvarez who testified before Congress he died last month after battling cancer he said he contracted from months of breathing and smoke from ground zero the whole world with just the might and resilience of our nation in the extraordinary men and women of the New York fire department and the New York police department the comedian Jon Stewart who fought to ensure Congress passed the legislation did not attend the ceremony Franco or down yes NPR news Washington a federal agency the tracks drug seizures is raising alarms about the stimulant methamphetamine from member station W. B. you are in Boston Martha beeping reports it's widely available across country federal drug data show met seizures have been rising steadily since two thousand eleven they spiked last year more than doubling as compared to two thousand seventeen John Edie monitors emerging threats for the federal system of high intensity drug trafficking areas seizures indicate extended trafficking in these drugs so if there's been a doubling and seizures it probably means there's been a doubling in trafficking in methamphetamines and with that going to some bass there does not appear to be any single reason for more math it sometimes but not always used with opioids the D. E. A. says most math comes from Mexico for NPR news.

NPR John Edie Martha beeping Boston stimulant New York Louise Alvarez president assault Tino William llegan Scott Smith Gilroy Washington Mexico E. A. methamphetamine