17 Burst results for "Martha Barnett"

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:47 min | 3 weeks ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words, the show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. On our Facebook group, David Neal writes that he has a friend in his 80s from North Dakota who loves coffee, but the thing is that this friend keeps reusing the coffee grounds all day long, which means that by sunset, the guy is pretty much drinking colored water. And his friend likes that brew just fine, he proudly calls it wabash coffee. And grant, I don't know, I have strong feelings about this wabash coffee just sounds to me hideous. It's thrifty. It isn't the thrifty. And we've talked about this term wabash before, meaning to add just a little bit of water to something to get a little more out of it to stretch it a little more. Right, we talked about adding water to catch up to wa bashing it, right? To stretch your ketchup bottle a little bit further like get the stuff that's stuck to the side. Yeah, yeah, watering down your shampoo. And it may go back to an old slang use of the word wabash meaning to cheat. So that might be the connection there, but in any case, this got me to thinking about weak coffee in all the terms there are out there for that terrible stuff. Yeah, I posted a bunch of these to the Facebook group and Martha, not just in English, but every language cares a great deal about how good their coffee is.

grant Barrett Martha Barnett David Neal North Dakota wabash Facebook Martha
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:16 min | Last month

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"The stay. You're listening to away with words, the show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. In English, if you want to express skepticism about something somebody's telling you, you might say, stop pulling my leg or pull the other one. It's got bells on. Which are a couple of phrases I really like, but they're really picturesque phrases in other languages that express that same kind of skepticism. One of my favorites is our acquaintance, which is Spanish for now tell me one about cowboys. Enough of your tall tales. Tell me when to back cowboys. And in tagalog, there's a phrase that literally translates as you're making a rope out of sand, which I also really oh, that's lovely. And French you might say, I taste a lot, which basically means stop with your salads. Which I think refers to the idea of just a mishmash of ideas that you're traveling around. And of course, Missouri, where I'm from, you might say, I'm from Missouri, you're going to have to show me. All right, the show me state. I like stop your salads. Enough put them already. Stopping your salads. Wherever you are in the world, we know that you've got a way to tell people to stop with the nonsense. What is the way that you tell them to shush 877-929-9673 email words that wayward radio dot org or talk to us on Twitter at WA, WOR D? Hey

grant Barrett Martha Barnett cowboys Missouri Twitter
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:19 min | Last month

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words, the show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett, and hark. Who goes there? Behold. Behold. Hark, it's me. Hi, Martha. Hi, grant. I'm sorry to interrupt your harking. But it is time for a quiz. So let's get started with this. Whenever I lose something, I often forget to look inside something else. And I gotta find my keys in my pants or the book I'm reading in the bag of groceries for some reason. It'd be a lot easier if the name of the thing I was looking for was inside the name of the thing that it's in. For example, for example, if there's something you need to scratch and what room of the house would you find it? Oh. Does it have an itch in it? Yeah, that's right. It's got an itchy, which room in the house has an itch in it. Yeah, it would be the kitchen. The kitchen, yes, kitchen contains itch. Nice. Tell you get the premise of this one. Here we go. Let's look for a few other items. So your high school has a baseball game coming up and you say you've lost one of your officials. Well, why not look to the marching band?

grant Barrett Martha Barnett hark Hark Martha baseball
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:36 min | 2 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"More of what we say and why we say it as a way with words continues. You're listening to away with words. The show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett and joining us now is that international man of many mysteries, John chinaski. Hello, baby. How are you? Hi, Martha hi grant. How are you guys doing? You have a quiz for us? I do. This week, it's one of our Staples. The take off. Now, it's a variation on a national puzzlers league puzzle type, but it's very simple. You take a word, take its first letter off, hence the take off and a new word is left behind. Now I'll read a sentence that contains clues to both the original word and the resulting word and you tell me both of them. This week we're taking off the letter H from the beginning of all these words. If you have a pencil nearby, maybe this could help you. Okay? For example, I crept down the passage from room to room and the entire house was empty. Now, the word passage clues the word beginning with H, hall, right? And the word entire clues the word. All right, that's all there is to it. I mean, that's all there is. Well, it's all that's all there is to it. Yeah, here we go. Put a flame under that chicken and get ready for lunch. Put a flame under the chicken and get ready for lunch. Right. It's not fire and ire. It's not remember all these happen to begin with H yeah. Oh, H, okay. Heat and eat. And eat, yes, now you've got it. Just keep following the row of shrubs around the boundary of the property. The hedge and the edge. Hedge in the edge, yes, nicely done. From where the ship was anchored, we could see the house and the green shelter of shrubs and vines beside it. The harbor and arbor. Yes, very nice. Good. From bottom to top, the doorway is a little more than 7 feet. Tricky. Height, height and 8. Yes. From very good. From bottom to top is height and a little more than 7 is 8. Remember in a Back to the Future two in Marty and his levitating transporter made those guys crash into manure. That was a little too much.

grant Barrett Martha Barnett John chinaski Martha hi grant arbor harbor Marty
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:16 min | 2 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words. The show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett, not that long ago, we were talking about indefinite hyperbolic numerals, you remember that conversation grant? Right, 40 11 zillions Gillian's and all those other approximate numbers. Right, those indefinite approximate numbers. Well, a couple of weeks ago, I was visiting family in the mountains of North Carolina and I heard another one that I really love and I'm going to adopt, which is humpty 12. Humpty 12, about a dozen, but maybe not a dozen a little more, a little less. Yeah, yeah. I went on vacation and I came back and they were humpty 12 pieces of junk mail. Sounds like a cousin of umpteen. Yes, I think it probably is, but it just, I don't know. It's just something delicious to roll around on your tongue. And you know what? I was also looking around a little bit more. And you may be familiar with this one. You can also use the term telephone number or telephone numbers. Apparently since the 1940s, if you were talking telephone numbers, you were talking about a really big number. So people would talk about that in terms of a large sum of money. That house cost telephone numbers, or it could be applied to your time in prison. You know, he's doing telephone numbers. I can imagine a time in the history of the world where most people didn't encounter a big number until they got a telephone number our saw one. I gotta say, we have umpteen 12 things to talk about on this show. And if you'd like to join us here's our telephone number, 8 7 7 9 9 9 6 7 three, you can also email us words at wayward radio dot org and you can talk to us on Twitter at WWE Y, WOR D hi there, you have a way with words. Hey Martha, how are you? My name's Paul. And I'm from mount Sterling, Kentucky. Oh, excellent. Welcome to the show. Here's my thing. I was born in Toledo, Ohio. And moved away from there when I was like 11, but while I was there, my brother, who is ten years older than me, would often come in and say, hey guys, what's slow down? And I would be like, what does that mean? The love down. You know, being a kid, I was like, I didn't understand, so I later in life, I'm really never heard it in Kentucky, but often would go back and visit family in Ohio. And again, people would say what's low down. And I never really understood what it meant I just always assumed it meant what's happening. Okay. Yeah, that sounds about, right? What's the lowdown? So just tell me, tell me about the situation. Well, I can't really give you a situation. It was just like he would come in from being out and just, you know, the family be all around and he'd come in and say, hey guys, what's the lowdown? Yeah, usually when people see that they mean give me the skinny or the scoop or the details or tell me what I don't know. Well, I never really understood the lowdown part. I was like, is the talking about the bottom line? The bottom line is let's slow down on the bill. That's a good guess. That's a good point. Oh no, it comes from the idea of low meaning shameful or naughty or bad. You know, when something is low, it's near the ground, it's dirty. And so that would be my brother. Excuse me, what? That would be your brother. That would definitely be my brother. He's so bad. Well, originally, and when this first appears in the early 1900s with the idea of information, it was the idea that the information might be secret or that the secret is shameful or naughty or that sharing the secret or the information is shameful or not. Kind of makes sense. But I'm curious, grant, is it more geographical? Because I've really never heard it from people in Kentucky. And I didn't know if there was something more widespread in the United States. It comes from an older word, an adjective lowdown, just as in like, you slow down dirty dog, something you might hear. Oh yeah, yeah. From around the 1860s, which itself meant disreputable or unworthy or shameless or trashy or contemptible. And cool. Yeah, and it's got a modern slang derivative too. This is the adverb, the down low. So if somebody says something on the down low, they do it secretly. So they've switched the it's not low down, it's down low or on the DL, right? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, so it's all related. So this has got all these tributaries from this one, main idea of low meaning contemptible or naughty or shameful. Well, I'm really appreciate you clearing that up for me. Thank you so much. You got the lowdown, Bobby. I finally got the lowdown. Take care now. Thank you so much. Bye bye. Bye bye. We'll give you the lowdown, the scoop, the skinny, the scuttlebutt on whatever your language question is. One 8 7 7 9 two 9 9 6

grant Barrett Martha Barnett Kentucky Gillian mount Sterling Ohio North Carolina Toledo Martha Twitter Paul United States Bobby
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

03:08 min | 3 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words, the show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. One of our Australian listeners is rob McKay hill, and he lives in cairns Queensland and shared with us a little poem that he learned from his grandfather. Now the first time I read it, I completely misunderstood it. It's a mixture of numerals and letters, and I'm going to try this. I don't know how it's going to work in audio, but I'm going to try it. I read it as 11 was one race horse. 22 was 12. 1111 race, 22,112, which makes no sense, right? No, but I think I know where it's going. You think, you know? Yeah. You think there might have been two racehorses, one named 11 and another named 22? Right. Yeah. If you read it that way, it's 11 was one race horse, 22, was one, two, 11 one one race, 22, one one two.

grant Barrett Martha Barnett rob McKay cairns Queensland
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

04:23 min | 3 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"And how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. If you need more evidence that language is constantly changing, look no further than American sign language or ASL. Decades ago, people used to use those old fashioned candlestick phones and so the sign for telephone at that time was one fist at your mouth and another one at your ear, imitating what the phone looked like. And over time, deaf people adopted the sign that many hearing people use too that familiar pinky and thumb up to the side of your head, the one that looks like call me. But now that term is evolving again, an increasingly people who use ASL will sign the word phone just by curving the fingers of one hand and holding it up to their ear, like they're holding an invisible cell phone. And another thing that's really interesting about how sign language is evolving is the fact that because there's so much communication over video these days, a lot of times the signs that are used by younger people are shrinking to accommodate that smaller space on the screen on the phone or on the computer. For example, instead of the old sign for dog, which is Tapping your thigh as if to call a dog over to you, it's just a flick of the fingers. It's just signing the letters D and G, which doesn't take up that much space. It's really fascinating to see how that is changing and developing. You mentioned that telephone science switching from a two handed sign to a one handed sign, and that is, by the way, one of their very common ways that dialects of sign languages differ a lot of times there will be a two handed sign and a one handed version of it that can vary from place to place within the sign language community. And sometimes it's done for expediency where a two handed sign is difficult if you're carrying something or if you are in a workplace and a one handed sign is more necessary.

grant Barrett Martha Barnett
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:22 min | 5 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words. The show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett and joining us now is that international man of mysteries wrapped in enigmas, John shansky. Hi, Martha. I grant. At least two countries. So yes, it does count as international. Hello, Canada. Anyway, short emigrants today is the title of our quiz. You know, anagrams are a staple of wordplay, but we don't do them much here because they're not always easy to do in your head, but we're gonna try some simple, short anagrams, and we're gonna add hints. I'll give you a sentence that sentence will contain a short word that anagrams to another word, also in that sentence will be another word that defines the answer. For example, I can get no research done because the room is so dusty. The definition is research and the anagram word is dusty, which anagrams to study. Study, yes, research study, dusty is study. That's the anagram, okay? Let's give it a shot. We sat around the fire and wept into our mugs of hot cider. Not smug. Hot. Cider. Sounds like cider is the key word. Yeah. It's gotta be something parts and an S and is a sign for wept. Yes. No, I think it's like crying. Yes, cried is an is the anagram of cider and the definition is the word wept, nicely done. Yeah. This summer, I want to sample the grits in every southern state. This taste and sample. Yes, exactly. Anagrams to taste. Nicely done. A dark hairy thing crept out of the closet. Oh, night. Thing anagrams tonight, which is a good one. For dark, yes, that was the tricky part was the definition. Here we go. I'm going to toss this poem because it's not worth my time. You're not going to emit it. No. We're not anagramming this. No. Are you moping?

grant Barrett Martha Barnett John shansky Martha Canada
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:29 min | 6 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett, and I am sorely tempted to start a new hobby if only for this slang. What's it this time painting bridges, naming clouds? No, no, no, I got tired of those. But the vocabulary of the hobby I'm talking about includes terms like coin ball, nighthawk, gold dance, and my favorite can slaw. Cancel out coin ball? Is this like a something you buy at the fair? I'll have a cornball coin ball corn dog. And an elephant ear. No, these are all terms that come from the field of metal detecting. Oh, right. So a coin ball is a chunk of dirt you find with a coin inside, and maybe in their lingo, it has friends, that is their other little coins in this same hole that you dig. And can slaw is shreds of aluminum cans left after a lawnmower ran over them, which I think is just so picturesque. And a nighthawk is somebody who detects illegally at night and a gold dance is what you do if you actually discover gold. Oh yeah, the little happy jig. Yes. Discovery, yeah. Smile on your face. Yes, and I was all excited about this having watched the wonderful BBC series detectorists, which yes. Have you seen that? I've seen a couple episodes. It's fun, but weird. Exactly. Well, it's like us. It's a couple of passionate nerds. Or maybe socially awkward, but yeah. Keep going? Yeah. I think it's just hysterically funny. I am really luxuriating in this show. But apparently, metal detecting is becoming very trendy in this country. You can go on Instagram and see very fashionable photos of women with their metal detectors. There are Instagram metal detecting influencers. Is this what you're telling me? This is what I am telling you..

grant Barrett Martha Barnett BBC Instagram
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

08:16 min | 6 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words. This show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett, and joining us now on the line from New York City is our quiz guy, John Shannon, hey John. Hey, Martha, hi grant. You know, I had a science teacher, mister hannigan. He once told me that a pun is just two thirds of a joke. And two thirds of a pun is PU. But of course, nothing stinks like a good cheese pun. Now I'm gonna give you some hints to some puns about cheese and you work out what it is. For example, I don't trust the new guy behind the cheese counter at the store. Very suspicious of him. I think he's up to no Gouda. Okay, gotcha. That's the kind of response I'd expect to hear. If you pulled out a pun like that. So here's some cheese based puns you're gonna help me finish ready. Here we go. Okay. All right. Sadly, a tornado swept through my local cheese shop, all that was left was debris. Debris. You know, I never want to be out of cheese, which is why I keep a wheel of cheese behind a glass door in my kitchen. Now I only use it in okay, so emergency. Queso emergency. Yes. I like fries. I like gravy, and I like cheese curds, but I'm only 50 50 on poutine. And my feelings are neither black nor white, it's more of a gray Gruyere. Gruyere. Now, if I'm at a friend's house, and I see some cheese in the fridge, I'll just grab it and wolf it down. You know what they say. It's better to ask forgiveness than. Oh, ask for Parmesan parmigiano Parmesan. Parmesan, yes. Teamwork. You know, guys, cheese is in the Bible, you know? In genesis, they mentioned the very first couple to enjoy cheese. Yeah, Adam and Eve. Eat them. Eat them and eve. I maintain that you can lose weight just by eating cheese. Try it. I bet that you will. Shattered, a lot of weight. There you go. You'll Cheddar a few pounds. I'm sure. I guess our time apart has endeared me to you guys. You know what they say, absence makes the heart grow fondue. Is it sure does? All right, this is just about all the cheese puns I can take. I've had it up to here. In fact. I'm fed up. I'm fed up with this. Those are all the cheese buns I have today. I hope you thought they were great. Well, any way you slice it, Martha, that was a lot of fun. Yeah, we had a total mind melt. Well, if it's puns that you want, and puns that you have, share your favorites with us, words that wayward radio dot org, or tell the world about your puns on Twitter at W ay, WOR D hello, you have a way with words. Hi. My name is Valerie, and I'm calling from Los Angeles. Hey, Valerie. Hi, Valerie. What's that? Hi. Well, I came up with a phrase that I thought would be perfect for you guys. I love learning more about language and this is a phrase I've been using a lot recently. Given everything that's been going on and my feelings about it, I was trying to look up the phrase, don't buy the hype. Or don't buy into the hype. And I thought, you know, what an interesting phrase and hype itself is an interesting word to me. And so I started to look it up, just for fun. And then I thought about you guys. And I was like, oh, this would be perfect for them if they haven't already covered it. I'd love to make them do the research for me. Looking up words for fun. You're definitely one of us. Yes, I do. I mean, it's a daily thing for me, I love language, so wonderful. What immediately comes to mind is the public enemy song, I grew up with 80s hip hop, so don't believe the hype. Do you know that one? Absolutely. Yes, yes. Don't believe the hype it to sequel. It's an equal kind of get this through to you, my 9 8, booming with the trunk of funk all the jealous punks can't stop the dog. Yes. Yes. And I was thinking like, I was wondering if it came, you know, if that was the actual origin of the song because it is a very popular from public enemy all the way back as a long road. Actually, let's work backward from there. So what we're talking about is hype. Let's hype is the key word here. I think really in your phrase, don't buy the hype. We're going to talk about why you wouldn't want to buy the hype or why you wouldn't want to believe the hype. Hype we're talking about is what? How would you define that? Hype to me, as I understand it, is anything that's being really talked about and encouraged to be focused on or bought into something you buy into. Yeah, excessive praise or talk about someone or something, exactly. But there's a specific sense here. And I think this is what chuck D and public enemy were talking about. And that's unwarranted or inaccurate talk. This is where it's especially excessively positive or promotional language in a marketing or advertising context about something that doesn't deserve it, right? Yes. And this is the hype that we need to follow backward. As far back as the 1950s, hype was advertising lingo for wild marketing or a promotional effort, maybe one that had a big stunt or a gimmick or had misleading ostentatious or inflated out of proportion chatter or talk or banners or signage, or whatever. It was just outrageous. And this is exactly where our verb and noun hype come from today. But that type, that advertising hype came from street language where hype meant exaggeration or lies as far back as the 1930s. And at the same time, and even a little earlier, it referred to confidence games and swindles, con games that involved persuading a mark of something that wasn't true. A mark is the person that you're trying to oh wow. Wow, that's very insidious. Yes. So a typical con game in these kind of this kind of hype was the one where the con would try to persuade the clerk that they'd given them the wrong change. Sometimes by convincing they had given them a bigger Bill. So this is a very typical kind of hype con that people would do as far back as the 1930s. There were many, many, many more. And now it's older than that though. This is where hype gets murky. If you look in a lot of reference books, they'll say or suggest that height comes from hyperbola. But that doesn't really sound right to me. Do you hear there's kind of a tone mismatch, right? A bit hyperbole is this fancy word. Wouldn't you say Martha? It's kind of academic. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, it's academic. Are literary even? And hype is non academic or it's of a lower register or it's even commercial speech. Would you consider it like slang? The word hype? Yeah. Yeah, some uses of pipe are slang. And hyperbole isn't at all, right? Hyperbole is a fancy word, a hype is not a fancy word. Hype is comfortable slippers and hyper release is black.

grant Barrett Martha Barnett John Shannon mister hannigan Valerie Martha New York City Adam John Los Angeles chuck D Twitter
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

03:55 min | 7 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to a way with words, the show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. In English, if we're talking about something that's not going to happen, we might say it's going to happen when hell freezes over, or when pigs fly. But in Spanish, you can describe something impossible by saying it's going to happen on the day when cows fly. And in Italy, it's not cows or pigs flying improbably. It's donkeys. They say the equivalent of when donkeys fly. And it turns out that there's a fancy name for this rhetorical device. It's called an aton. That's a DY NAT ON at a not and it comes from the Greek word that means impossible. And at naughton's go all the way back to antiquity, and you'll find them in lots and lots of languages around the world today. In the Malay language, for example, they'll say that's going to happen when cats grow horns. Cats get up to all kinds of trouble. I wouldn't put it past them. Well, grant, here's one of my favorites. It's from Bulgarian. It translates as, oh yeah, that'll happen when the pig in yellow slippers climbs the pear tree. Not.

grant Barrett Martha Barnett naughton Italy
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:11 min | 7 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words, the show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett. On our Facebook group, a lot of us have been having fun with a game that was started by member Kelly D guest. And she asked, what does your garden grow and then she gave some examples of different professions like veterinarian might plant dogwood and catnip. So what is your garden grow? That was the question and it led grant to a regular pun fest. Oh boy, so the makeup artist plants tulips. Yep. Let's see. What is the gardener plant? That's a tough one. I don't know, but I think the gardener is very handsome. He's quite a rake. What is the plumber plant? Well, that one's easy. We know that one that leaks. Right, leaks. The jeweler? Did you learn plants? Think about how much a diamond weighs. Oh, carrots, of course. That makes a lot of sense. What about the ophthalmologist? I don't know. What does the ophthalmologist plant in her garden?.

grant Barrett Martha Barnett Kelly D Facebook
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

02:44 min | 9 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words that show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett and joining us now is that man of many mysteries, John chesky, our quiz guy. Hi, John. Hey Martha, hi grant. Welcome once again to what I call a play with words. Let's play with them. I have a special quiz for you today. It's a little weird. You know, these days we all wish we could get out more. It's as if all of us are living in a massive escape room, this is a wordplay based audio escape room, and you're stuck in it. Hope you can get out. Uh oh. The two of you are in a standard hotel room, complete with a standard things you find in a hotel room. Somehow you've been locked in and have to find a way out. Now, search the items in the room, and you'll find word puzzles, which will help you escape. Now go ahead and pick an item at random item. Now be sure to take notes, write these down. The Gideon's Bible. The Bible. All right. You know, it said that the Bible is this four letter term, but in 1963 song by the trash men claims that it's bird, what is it? The word bird is the word. Right, your answer is word, write that down, word. All right, you've got the Bible. What do you want to look at next? How about that remote control? The TV. You know, there's a puppet show on. Maybe sit back and watch this classic slapstick character while sipping a same named 5 letter fruity drink. Oh, punch. Punch, yes, good punches your answer. Write that down, yeah. What else do you want to look at in this room? Phonebook. On the phone. Yeah, the phone. Let's see. Now, if groucho was a grouch, and Chico chased the chicks and hope played the harp, what did a famous drummer wear to earn his name? A ring. Ring ring is the phone answer, yes, right down ring, very good. What else would you like to look at? We have a few more bathroom. Bath. Oh, you know who could use a relaxing bath and perhaps a refreshing beer. A 6 letter worker who sleeps all night and works all day. 6 letters. Isn't there a song that has lyrics like that? Yeah. It works all day..

grant Barrett Martha Barnett John chesky Martha John groucho Chico
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:12 min | 11 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You are listening to a way with words the show about language and how we use it. I'm Martha Barnett. And I'm grant Barrett and we're joined by that gigantic and handsome man, John Cena, our quiz guy in New York City. Hi, John. Hi. Hi, grant. Hi, Martha. It's so nice to be here again..

Martha Barnett Barrett John Cena New York City John Martha
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

08:25 min | 11 months ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You're listening to away with words. The show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett and hark. Who goes there is challenge and esky. Behold. This guy. Behold. Hark, it's me. Probably Martha hi grant. I'm sorry to interrupt your harking, but it is time for a quiz. So let's get started with this. Whenever I lose something, I often forget to look inside something else. And I gotta find my keys in my pants or the book I'm reading in the bag of groceries for some reason. It'd be a lot easier if the name of the thing I was looking for was inside the name of the thing that it's in. For example, for example, if there's something you need to scratch and what room of the house would you find it? Oh. Does it have an itch in it? Yeah, that's right, it's got an itching. It would ruin the house has an itch in it. Yeah, it would be the kitchen. The kitchen, yes, kitchen contains itch. Nice. Till you get the premise of this one. Here we go. Let's look for a few other items. So your high school has a baseball game coming up and you say you've lost one of your officials? Well, why not look to the marching band? I'll bet you'll find him hiding in one of the instruments. And the trumpet? Yes, you'll find the ump in the trumpet. Tiny little teeny, tiny little un hiding in the truck. Now, in what planet would you find your lost collection of paintings and sculptures? Mars? No, not on Mars. R's AIS is yeah. Yeah, what about that? That's a Latin in there. Yes. But all of these are English, and all of them, by the way, are in the middle, not at the front or back of the word. Oh, I see. Okay. In the middle. Let's see. I don't know. How about earth? How about earth? Yes. What are we looking for? Art. You were looking for our art and art is in Earth. Yes. Now, if you're looking for a large wooden ship used to transport animals, what item of clothing should you examine? It's an arc and something really warm, I guess. Oh, yeah. Yeah, I guess it would be a parka. Yeah, a seasonal seasonal advent clothing, of course, the parka. Yes, the ark is right in the middle there. Suppose you're thirsty for yes. No, I just think of jumper and up, but never mind. Oh, I could be hiding in a jumper. You never know. Similarly, if you want to pave your driveway, what continents should you search? Pave my driveway, what am I putting down? Am I putting tar? Yes. Yeah, so maybe an entire. Yes. Now, groucho said, outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend, inside of a dog. It's too dark to read. However, inside a certain breed of dog, you can find a cooking implement. Now, if you finish reading and you're ready to make dinner, that's useful. Wow. There are so many breeds of dogs dude. Yeah. But how many common cooking implements are there? No, I'm kidding. A beagle has an eagle what I'll see. Pants spaniel? Spaniel, yes, it's because be careful when examining your spaniel for a pan. All right. I am finished for the day. Goodbye, you guys. Talk to you next week. Bye, John. Take care be well. Bye bye. You know, we do a lot of goofing around on this show and it's even more fun when you join us. But you can call us and say your piece, say 7 7 9 two 9 9 6 7 three are send us your thoughts, questions, comments, stories, ideas, to words at wayward radio dot org. Hello, you have a way with words. Hi, it's Kathy Donnelly. I'm calling from the UConn account of Beaumont, Pennsylvania, which is kind of near Wilkes barrel. Hi, Cathy. How are you? We're doing good. Thanks for asking. What's going on? I have a son who is currently dating a trans so that's the thing. They're not really. They decided they're just binary, that they're not really trans one or trans together or anything, really, which is fine. But I am having a hell of a time with a pronouns. The main reason is, I think it's a brain thing. I swear to God I do because this person looks and sounds like a woman. And but they prefer either he or they. And they were visiting. They brought their child who is a girl, it's ten up, and they were visiting. And very first thing I did, I mean, talk about embarrassing yourself. The very first thing I did is I come down and it's morning and I say, good morning, ladies and then I just wanted to die and kill myself and just jump into a big hole. And you apologize and you say I'm sorry to mean that blah blah blah, but don't forget it's in there now and it's just it's like, why am I having such a hard time with this particular aspect of language? You know, it's like my brain just won't do it. I ascribe that to being old, but I'm not sure that's what it is. It's just it's making me crazy. I mean, I teach college and I have students that identify as trans. They look and sound more like what their transitioning into. Do you know what I'm saying? So it's not as hard. The things they tell you is, if you meet somebody and they say, my name is Robert, but I like to be called bob. You're not going to call them Robert. You're going to call them bob because that's what they like to be called. Exactly. Could you call this person what they like to be called? And it's just like, I am trying so hard. Nobody has better intentions than me, but you know what the nun used to say. The road to hell is paved with good intentions. So I don't know how to switch that switch in my brain or whatever. I think we can help you a little bit here. Martha, don't you think that Cathy's starting from a good position? I think you're starting from a fantastic position. I'm curious how your son and his sweetie reacted. Oh, they know very much that I am an ally and that I will do everything I can to support whatever they want to do. So they're just like, yeah, you're old. We get it. But it's like. I want to do this right. I really want to do this right. And I am having a hell of a time. Well, talking about communicating, it seems to me that you're really communicating your good intentions in a big, big way. I mean, this is new to so many people and it takes practice just like learning another language would take practice. But I think as grant said, I mean, you're way out in front with communicating your attentions. And I think that that's such a huge part of this because ideally language should be about connecting people. And I think if you look at it from their perspective, you know, if somebody tells you their provenance, not what tells me the language part, the connecting part, it feels like I'm not doing my part. It feels like I'm not, you know, reaching out to the double yellow line. They are, they have to because they live in the society. I want credit for reaching out to the double yellow line. But I can't get that until I get the damn pronouns right. You know? I think you get credit for trying and trying and you get a ribbon. Your love and affection will show through as you keep trying and trying. And the conflict here is that you worry about being seen as a bad person, rather than as someone who just made a mistake. And there's a.

grant Barrett Martha Barnett hark Hark Kathy Donnelly Martha groucho Cathy un baseball UConn Wilkes Beaumont bob Robert Pennsylvania John grant
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"The show about language and how we use it. I'm grant Barrett. And I'm Martha Barnett, not that long ago. We were talking about indefinite hyperbolic numerals. You remember that conversation grant? Right, 40 11 zillions jillions and all those other approximate numbers. Right, those indefinite approximate numbers. Well, a couple of weeks ago, I was visiting family in the mountains of North Carolina and I heard another one that I really love and I'm going to adopt, which is humpty 12. 12. About a dozen, but maybe not a dozen a little more little less. Yeah, yeah. You know, I went on vacation and I came back and they were humpty 12 pieces of junk mail. Sounds like a cousin of umpteen. Yes, I think it probably is, but it just, I don't know. It's just something delicious to roll around on your tongue. And you know what? I was also looking around a little bit more. And you may be familiar with this one, you can also use the term telephone number or telephone numbers. Apparently since the 1940s, if you were talking telephone numbers, you were talking about a really big number. So people would talk about that in terms of a large sum of money. You know, that house cost telephone numbers, or it could be applied to your time in prison. You know, he's doing telephone numbers. I can imagine a time in the history of the world where most people didn't encounter a big number until they got a telephone number or saw one. But I gotta say we have empty 12 things to talk about on this show. And if you'd like to join us here's our telephone number, 8 7 7 9 9 9 6 7 three you can also email us words at wayward radio dot org and you can talk to us on Twitter at WA Y, WORD. Hi there. You have a way with.

grant Barrett Martha Barnett North Carolina Twitter
"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"martha barnett" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"The nonprofit that produces and distributes this program. You're listening to a way with words. The show about language and how we use it. I'm grant barrett and martha barnett in nineteen ninety-one kentucky poet. Frank x walker looked up the word.

grant barrett martha barnett Frank x walker kentucky