36 Burst results for "Marta"

Fresh update on "marta" discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

00:35 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "marta" discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"And <Speech_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Advertisement> i even looked <Speech_Male> at youtube video and <Speech_Male> review <Speech_Male> and everyone was like these <Speech_Male> things are great. So <Speech_Male> safer than an axe. <Speech_Male> I can't <Speech_Male> wait to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to it very thoughtful. <Speech_Male> Get happy <Speech_Male> birthday again. Man <Speech_Male> i'm glad in six bottles <Speech_Male> of champagne. Yeah <Speech_Male> did you drink <Speech_Male> it. All in a weekend suggested <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> not yet but spring <Speech_Male> break is next week and <Speech_Male> we're going to get into <Speech_Male> that shampoo. <Silence> Enjoy <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> very sweet gifts <Speech_Male> is that is that <Speech_Male> it did we. We stop <Speech_Male> talking about electricity. <Speech_Male> I think then we. <Speech_Male> I thought you <Speech_Male> meant like <SpeakerChange> are those <Speech_Male> all the gifts i gave you. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You didn't give other eight <Speech_Male> gifts the <Speech_Male> half case of champagne <Speech_Male> and the log split <Speech_Male> in the hammer. <Speech_Male> The three pound <Speech_Male> sledge. <Speech_Male> That's right <Speech_Male> Well if you want to know more <Speech_Male> about chuck's three pound <Speech_Male> sledge you can email <Speech_Male> them <Speech_Male> But also in the meantime <Speech_Male> if you want to know more <Speech_Male> about the electrical grid <Speech_Male> you can <Speech_Male> just start reading about. <Speech_Male> It's an extraordinarily <Speech_Male> complicated <Speech_Male> complex. <Speech_Male> Marta <Speech_Male> modern marvel <Speech_Male> of engineering. That's <Speech_Music_Male> pretty engrossing stuff <Speech_Male> so go <Speech_Male> to town. And in <Speech_Male> the meantime. I said go <Speech_Music_Male> to town which <SpeakerChange> means it's time <Speech_Music_Male> for a listener me <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> gonna call this. Titanic <Speech_Male> follow up from <Speech_Male> a friend in ireland. This <Speech_Music_Male> is this is a fun. One <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> guy's been listening for a few <Speech_Music_Male> years and now i currently <Speech_Music_Male> work in <Speech_Music_Male> belfast. Port <Speech_Male> where are <Speech_Male> ms titanic <Speech_Male> was built <Speech_Male> in two thousand twelve. <Speech_Male> The titanic museum was <Speech_Male> built in belfast. In the <Speech_Male> building is in the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> shape of a star <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> representing white <Speech_Music_Male> star lines in each point <Speech_Music_Male> of the star <Speech_Male> is the actual size <Speech_Music_Male> of topics <Speech_Music_Male> at <Speech_Male> one hundred and twenty six feet <Speech_Male> high <Speech_Male> standing underneath. It really <Speech_Male> gives you a feel for it size. <Speech_Music_Male> It makes you feel very <Speech_Music_Male> small <Speech_Music_Male> In a good way <Speech_Male> also slipways <Speech_Male> for titanic <Speech_Male> are filled in <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> you to walk over and edged <Speech_Music_Male> with an outline of <Speech_Music_Male> titanic in its sistership <Speech_Music_Male> olympics <Speech_Music_Male> to scale yes <Speech_Music_Male> very cool <Speech_Music_Male> Including <Speech_Male> the actual locations <Speech_Male> of the life boats and funnels <Speech_Music_Male> again. It's <Speech_Male> very cool to walk down. <Speech_Music_Male> You can check out You <Speech_Music_Male> can check it out on google earth <Speech_Music_Male> to search <Speech_Male> titanic belfast. <Speech_Music_Male> Check out the satellite <Speech_Male> view. <Speech_Male> <hes> keep up the <Speech_Male> great work and that is kyle <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> belfast <Speech_Male> northern ireland <Speech_Male> and he has a nice little <Speech_Male> joke <Speech_Male> he says. There's <Speech_Music_Male> a very overused joke <Speech_Music_Male> in belfast. When people <Speech_Music_Male> ask <Speech_Music_Male> us why we celebrate <Speech_Male> something that sank. <Speech_Music_Male> Which is this. <Speech_Music_Male> It was <Speech_Music_Male> fine when it left here. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> That's <Speech_Music_Male> that trademark <Speech_Music_Male> belfast's humor. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> That's gonna do it. An irish <Speech_Music_Male> accent. But i got <Speech_Music_Male> stage fright. Come on <Speech_Male> let's hear it again. <Speech_Male> I don't know what. I <Speech_Male> don't even know it was fine. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It was fine when it <Speech_Music_Male> left here. Oh that <Speech_Music_Male> was great. <SpeakerChange> Man <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> was transported <Speech_Male> to my youth. <Speech_Music_Male> When i was eating a bowl of <Speech_Music_Male> lucky charms <Speech_Male> or hamid. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> It was fine <Speech_Music_Male> when it left here. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> well

Ireland Two Thousand Twelve Six Bottles Next Week One Hundred And Twenty Six Fee Irish Three Pound Eight Each Point Northern Ireland Google Earth Speech_Male Marta Half Case Olympics Speech_Music_Male Titanic Youtube Belfast Kyle
32 years later, man to be sentenced for estranged wife’s Virginia murder

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 5 d ago

32 years later, man to be sentenced for estranged wife’s Virginia murder

"Up on 32 years since MARTA Haiti, Rodriguez disappeared in Virginia. Today. Her former husband will be sentence for her murder posted. Rodriguez crews will be in a Stafford County courtroom this morning. He pleaded guilty last November to the reduced charge of second degree murder for killing his estranged wife and hiding her remains in the median of I 95 they weren't I did as Marta Rodriguez until 2017 After her former husband admitted killing girlfriend Pamela Butler in the district. He could get up to 40 years in a Virginia prison for this murder, but he wouldn't start serving that until he's finished with his 12 year federal sentence for Pam Butler's murder. The

Rodriguez Stafford County Marta Rodriguez Haiti Virginia Pamela Butler Pam Butler
Cardinal Zen condemns St. Peter’s Basilica private Mass restrictions

WORLD OVER

00:51 sec | Last week

Cardinal Zen condemns St. Peter’s Basilica private Mass restrictions

"Two prominent vatican cardinals of weighed in on the recent restrictions on private masses at saint peter's in rome on monday former prefect of the congregation for divine worship cardinal. Robert sarah asked pope francis to reinstate the celebration of those private masses in the basilica then on tuesday retired bishop of hong kong cardinal. Joseph zen issued an open letter in support of cardinal. Sarah's request writing quote if it were not for the restrictions imposed by the coronavirus. I would take the first flight to come rome and get on my knees in front of the door of santa marta until the holy father has this edict withdrawn and quote zana's now the fifth cardinal voice opposition to the ban on private masses including the traditional latin liturgy in saint peter's basilica

Vatican Cardinals Congregation For Divine Worshi Robert Sarah Pope Francis Joseph Zen Saint Peter Rome Hong Kong Cardinal Sarah Santa Marta Zana Saint Peter's Basilica
One suspect in custody following shooting at MARTA station in Midtown, Atlanta

Atlanta's Morning News

00:17 sec | 2 weeks ago

One suspect in custody following shooting at MARTA station in Midtown, Atlanta

"Atlanta. Marta police say the victim was grazed in the leg will on the north bound platform suspects in custody. During the investigation, Marta shuts down train service at the Art center station and used Busses to ferry passengers to Lindbergh. Trains resumed normal operations about four in the afternoon. Do you Why arrest in Georgia Fall by nearly

Marta Police Art Center Station Atlanta Marta Lindbergh Georgia
I'll Peanut Jam Your Brain

Short Wave

04:52 min | Last month

I'll Peanut Jam Your Brain

"Okay so earlier. I did this thing. That probably sounded weird to you. Emily your sentence. It didn't make any sense but you know another day. Another dollar alright. Okay well well so when someone does something unexpected like that when they're talking to you or get this even when you're reading something that doesn't follow the standard conventions of the language. Something kind of cool happens in your brain l. So they can actually measure this right so when we studied brain one of the ways that we can study. Brain activity is by measuring electrical current. That is flowing through your cortex rates so the surface of your brain for the cells to talk to each other. They released electrical current. This is sarah phillips our expert i mentioned earlier. I am a rising fourth year. Phd student in the linguistics department at new york university and also a member of the neuro linguistic slab very cool. She studies bilingualism and code switching which we will touch on in a future episode because it is objectively but for today. She's helping me out as explain. These things called n. Four hundred and p six hundred. He's are measurable responses. That happen your brain as you process language okay so little electrical signals that your brain is always giving off right but these are different from your normal brain buzzing. That would happen. If you're listening to like a quote normal sentence got it basically these phenomena are your brain saying like hey hold up something weird happening here okay so like when i peanut jam your brain that an example of one that can spark some. You know chemistry for you. Oh yeah yeah. I felt wrong and a lot of ways so as i peanut. Jam your brain. That's a good one anyways. Yes in nineteen eighty two psychologists. Marta kunas and steven hilliard published a paper showing that among these electrical signals. There was this big response about four hundred milliseconds person. Reading a sentence came across a word that was like semantic league confusing or the meaning was wrong. Okay so it's like a linguistic oddball sentences thrown your way your brain will produce a end. Four hundred response four hundred milliseconds after you heard peanut gem in that benefits. I peanut jam. Your brain your brain was like whoa. What's that doesn't make any sense. Exactly yeah and your brain. Does this kwong in less than half a second. Which is wild. So sir philip's art linguist from earlier explained. It happens in other scenarios like garden path sentences. So you start to hear a sentence and you think you know what's going to happen next but then something goes wrong okay and so when something goes wrong your brain has to go wait what. I don't think i interpreted this how it was supposed to be. I've got a restart which sarah says can happen with the sentence as simple as he spread the warm bread with socks yummy. This is fun. I like this okay. So how does this compare to. The p six hundred you were mentioning earlier is different than and four hundred the big differences just that they go in opposite directions and they happen at different points so when she says opposite directions. She's talking about how they kind of show up on these science graphs. You've them sure one one shows up in the positive and the other shows up as negative and and okay but for me the easiest thing to hang onto is that they happen at different times so the four hundred happens four hundred milliseconds after the wuxi. The p six hundred. The brain gives off slightly later. That response peaks roughly six hundred milliseconds after the woopsie. That's really it and we're trying to understand when we see this type of fact. What could this affect represent. What is this affect characterizing. What's happening in the brain in. Initially researchers thought that the answers to these questions was that the end four hundred was happening because of semantic errors so involving the meaning of words right and that the p six hundred was showing up because of grammatical errors which not to brag. But i make all this and we've met you for that. Yeah yeah sure okay but but it turns out as research into all this has gone on these effects might be more generalized kind of than researchers previously thought it might just have to do with how your brain processes complex language and this just shows that when we think about language and how we process language. They're actually a lot of steps involved. Starting from recognizing that the sound that you hear is a sound of the language that you speak and how those sounds then combined to form some parts of words.

Sarah Phillips Marta Kunas Steven Hilliard Sir Philip New York University Emily Sarah
Muted Mardi Gras: Closed bars, barricaded Bourbon Street

Terry Meiners and Company

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Muted Mardi Gras: Closed bars, barricaded Bourbon Street

"For celebration before Ash Wednesday in the beginning of Lent, But ABC is Jim Ryan says Fat Tuesday. 2021 is dramatically slimmed down. This'll was Mardi Gras 2020 of thousands float into New Orleans to celebrate its not that one of them carried coronavirus. Louisiana has recorded 9300 covert deaths in the 12 months since then. The decision was made to prohibit the usual parades and mass parties. Bourbon Street is abandoned on this fat Tuesday, and Opal Simpson had a restaurant to herself might not have MARTA ground, but we still got the music and we got the spirit generally in ABC News. Governor Bashir's covert briefing is coming up at

Jim Ryan ABC Opal Simpson New Orleans Louisiana Governor Bashir Abc News
MARTA moves forward on new bus rapid transit line in Atlanta

Atlanta's Morning News

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

MARTA moves forward on new bus rapid transit line in Atlanta

"Him. Marta is moving ahead with plans for a new bus, Rapid Transit line and $11 million contract is awarded for an engineering firm to design the Capitol Avenue Summerhill line in Atlanta. This will be the first new transit line since city voters approved a martyr expansion. In 2016 construction set to begin next year. The line would open in 2024 Martus planning much more expansion in coming

Marta Rapid Transit Atlanta
The Doomsday Clocks Historic Wake-Up Call With Rachel Bronson

Big Brains

05:11 min | 2 months ago

The Doomsday Clocks Historic Wake-Up Call With Rachel Bronson

"Forty five. The united states detonated two atomic bombs over hiroshima and nagasaki. It is harnessing of the basic power. The universe shortly after a group of manhattan project scientists at the university of chicago who helped build the atomic bomb but protested using against people started the bulletin of the atomic scientists. Huge choice is peace or total destruction. the atomic is yeah. They wanted to urge fellow scientists to help shape national and international policy to mitigate the risk of the nuclear technology that they themselves had helped create and they wanted to help the public understand the dangers of nuclear weapons. To the future of humanity world would not be the same. i remember anthony blind from hindu scripture. The by gerrad gita. Now i am become death. Despoil worlds are another in designing the cover of its magazine. The bulletin created something striking o'clock running out of time. It started as artistic piece created by chicago based marta lanes door. She was very to manhattan project. Scientists issues gender stood the scientists concerns about this new technology and the need for public engagement and they had asked her to create some sort of design that would engage the public on. How serious the threat of this new technology. And she said it seven minutes to midnight every year since then. The bulletin set the hands of its metaphorical clock in relation to how close to doomsday. We might be last year. The group moved it to a mere one hundred seconds to midnight. And at the time we got a lot of chiding like it's twenty twenty how come it so close. Do you really believe it's this close and then sure enough. We saw the massive wildfires right outta the gate in in australia. That got repeated in california this year but obviously covid and the inability of the global community to deal effectively with covid is was to us a clear indication of our inability to deal with existential threats. Known some ways you can make an argument that it should have been even closer to midnight this year because you had your existing threats then you had that real life pandemic which is continuing to affect us. How can we didn't go further to midnight. Yeah so in some ways You know we don't want to double count right and so a lot of the warning signs. Were what moved to one hundred seconds to midnight but it is a very dangerous in environment. And we'd we do want to acknowledge that hundred seconds to midnight is dangerous. We do see some bright spots and some opportunities so those bright spots helped us from moving forward but we weren't prepared to move it back. It may be tempting to look at the clock this year and take some hope from the fact that it didn't move closer to but remember it's still the closest to midnight that we have ever been and this year the bolton highlighted new threat one that they said is a threat multiplier to all the other problems that we face with the world health organization called a massive info democ he really grappling with what our trusted new sources. And how do you find them. And how do we share the so. We're all overwhelmed with data and information. But it's very optimistic. When it comes to share it information or what you and i know and so that becomes very disorienting and it becomes Quite dangerous right. It sets up the ability for authoritarian leaders to create their own information and different sites secrete. Their own information will get into the surprising. Ways that this info democ touches every threat factor to the doomsday clock but will start with the issue that was really the canary in the coal. Mine of this info dynamic climate change. The scientists have been warning us for decades and yet they're the ones who have experienced a lot of these issues in terms of misinformation and disinformation. I that denying climate science the marginalization of them the using of science which is kind of about uncertainty and evolution to dismiss what scientists have to say. All of. this was the global warming. And that it's a lot of it's a hoax hoax. Moneymaking industry okay. Climate change is not science. it's religion it pulls the rug out from under scientists and expert exactly the time when such expertise is actually needed and within the context of the us there could be real differences among republicans. Democrats or what you think about market versus regulation. Those are really really important questions that we should be debating fiercely right now that we can when it's being defined as climate change yes or no we can't even have the kind of real political conversations that we should be having

Gerrad Gita Marta Lanes Manhattan Nagasaki Hiroshima University Of Chicago The Bulletin Anthony Chicago United States Australia California Bolton World Health Organization
I-85 shut down in Midtown Atlanta as police investigate shooting call

Atlanta's Morning News

01:05 min | 2 months ago

I-85 shut down in Midtown Atlanta as police investigate shooting call

"I'm 95.5 WSB shooting a 95 before daybreak. This left at least one person dead. Our team coverage continues. Here's Mark McKay kills a lot of police multiple shooting victims. This started playing out just before 5 30 this morning. Atlanta police were quick to shut down the interstate. It is shut down and will remain for a while until they can. Complete their investigation. 85 cell down the shooting scene is under the MARTA overpass just before 17th street before the 75 north bound on rap. All traffic here is the difference now that we've seen since we've all over northeast Atlanta. All traffic on 400 south down is now being put on the 85 doors. Traffic. The stack up on 95 in the cab county is now being put on 400 north. Where effectively you cannot get below 400 pupils Spring connectors being used to turn traffic around back behind the crime seed actually passed. I will help you get around it, So don't even bother with 85 South or 400 south inside the perimeter going through Brookhaven Use Peachtree Road, Peachtree Street, Piedmont Avenue, A good round in a midtown Atlanta also Rosel

Mark Mckay Atlanta Rosel
Journalist In Myanmar Recounts Ongoing Military Coup

Morning Edition

04:53 min | 2 months ago

Journalist In Myanmar Recounts Ongoing Military Coup

"No one quite expected them to do it. That's what a journalist says in Myanmar after a military coup. The armed forces have never been fully out of power in that country. But in 2015, they allow democratic elections won by the party of Aung San Souci. She had received a Nobel Prize for her decades long fight for democracy, including years under arrest. The military's partial retreat allowed me and Marta and its global isolation. Then this week, the military retook full power and on sans Souci is detained again. Parts of the Internet are blocked and Myanmar but we reached journalist Amen Thon and Yangon, which is a city of some five million. There's a curfew union go on at 8 P.m.. Every night, People have been going on to the bathroom ease or outside to the front of their homes and banging pots and pans. It's a traditional Berman's ritual to get rid of evil spirits in your house every night. It's been getting louder and longer, and you could just hear the sound echoing through the city. We should remind people that the coup was over and election result in November and had been feared for some time. Was there a great deal of suspense in recent months? Not really. But it wasn't a complete surprise, but no one quite expected them to do it. People assume that that this was, you know, posturing and threats. But you know, leading up to the last couple days before the coup. There were some really alarming pictures of a tank in London, as well as unusual movements by the military near military installations throughout man lost Even then, people didn't really think they would actually do a real coup. What did you hear from people when it became clear that it really was a co was quite a lot of despair. I think, especially for people of my parent's generation, so people the fifties and sixties and older, I think they just didn't expect it. You know, they worshiped essentially insensitivity all their lives, and I think they had a really difficult time really coming to terms that they hadn't won after all in 2015. I'd like you to explain that perspective because some Americans who follow events from Myanmar maybe only know Aung San Souci as a civilian leader who failed to condemn Genocide of Ranga in Myanmar. What was it that she has done over the last decades that made her someone that they would feel so strongly about? Sure, if you're just having a conversation here, and someone talks about a May your mother They're often talking about her. I grew up in the US, but our house is covered with pictures apparently had annual calendars that have her picture in it. Ah, lot of people breathing really admire her. They see her. Someone who wants she was young woman came back to me in life, despite the fact that she was living a perfectly lovely life in the U. K to take care of her ailing mother. And then stepped up when she could have left in order to fight for the Burmese people. And then decided instead of being with her family to stay in your more and you know people respect that. You're referring to the period after she won an earlier election in the 19 eighties, and it was not accepted by the military, which kept her In prison or in house arrest for many years. Yeah, for 15 years. She basically was in a position where the military said If you want to leave, you can leave. But if you want to be here, you won't be free. Other than climbing the pots and pans at eight o'clock each evening. What are people doing about the coup? There's been a lot of online organizing. There's a couple hashtags feeling around hash tag, civil disobedience movement as well as hashtag justice from you more But part of the civil disobedience movement is doctors and teachers, the majority of whom here work for government institutions essentially going on the strike doctors, especially since Cove, it Still providing medical care, but they just simply choosing not to do it. Government institutions. If I may, there could be some severe consequences for that. Yes, definitely. I don't think we're talking enough about this yet, but It's quite likely that we're going to see a spike in cold cases. What do you expect Ng over the next few days? I'm expecting just more of a reaction to the growing protest movement. There's been what seems to be Very clearly this information campaigns that are intended to kind of paralyzed people through fear and the lack of knowledge, But we're also starting to see more and more people going out into Streets to protest. Amen. Thon is a journalist who is in Yangon. Thank you. Okay.

Myanmar Party Of Aung San Souci Amen Thon Souci Aung San Souci Yangon Marta Nobel Prize Berman London U. United States NG Thon
Amanda Gorman makes history as youngest known inaugural poet

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

02:44 min | 2 months ago

Amanda Gorman makes history as youngest known inaugural poet

"There was a lot of star power on that inaugural stage today couple of ex-presidents the entire political leadership of the united states recording artists who've sold a couple of million albums but a star was also born today though she was already a star to those who know and love her her name is amanda gorman. She is twenty two. A graduate of harvard raised in los angeles by a single mom. She has a twin sister. And perhaps i failed to mention. She is the first youth poet laureate of the united states listening to her. Today it was clear. The united states had chosen. Well we will not marta back to what was but moved to shelby a country that is bruised but whole benevolence but bold fierce and free we will not be turned around or interrupted by intimidation. Because we know our inaction in ursa will be the inheritance of the the next next generation. generation. Our Our blenders blenders become become their their burdens. burdens. But But one one thing thing is is certain certain if if emerged emerged merc- merc- with the might and might with right the love becomes our legacy in change our children's birthright so. Let us leave behind the country barrett than one we were left with every breath from my bronze pounded chest. We will raise this wounded world into a wondrous one we will buys from the gold lind hills of the west we will rise from. The wind swept northeast or forefathers. I realized revolution. We will rise from the lake rim cities of the mid western states. Who will buy it from the baked. South we will rebuild reconcile and recover. An every nook of our nation in every corner called our country our people diverse and beautiful will merge battered in beautiful. When day comes we step out of the shade of flame and unafraid. The new don blooms Free it's for. There was always lights if only were brave enough to see if only were were brave brave enough enough to to be be in. in. Amanda gorman the youth poet laureate of the united states at twenty two having today made history as the youngest person ever to address a presidential inauguration. She has much history of her own to make. We have a few years before we figure out who's going to speak at her

Amanda Gorman United States Marta Lake Rim Harvard Shelby Los Angeles Barrett
4th victim dies after gunman's attacks in Chicago, suburbs

WGN Programming

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

4th victim dies after gunman's attacks in Chicago, suburbs

"Least say a 61 year old woman has become the fourth person to die from a series of shootings this month by a Chicago gunman, who was later killed in a police shoot out. Cook County Medical examiner's office is Marta Tortas of Evanston, died yesterday as a week after she and the others were shot during a syriza of shooting spanning from the south side of Chicago to Evanston. Over roughly four hour period. Three others died. Three others wounded in the attacks again when 32 year old Jason Nightingale died in a shootout with Evanston

Marta Tortas Evanston Chicago Cook County Jason Nightingale
Impeachment of President Trump is Overkill

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:49 min | 3 months ago

Impeachment of President Trump is Overkill

"Wars are on the impeachment conversation continues. Adam Kinzinger from Illinois. Has come out and said quote. It was not a hard decision to impeach. We didn't need to look for evidence. It was brought right to us. Even if that was true. That is not the way that we do. Anything of concern in our country. Look the if you wanted to censure the president, That's something completely different. If you want to decide it like what he said. We know that but impeachment As designed by our founders was never designed as a venting mechanism. It's supposed to be Thoughtful. It's not supposed to be like a parliamentary vote of no confidence. The House has set a terrible precedent with this. Impeachment is going to be like that text message. You sent your friend when you're angry, and then you regret it after you've cooled out, like impeached and you're gonna be like did we really just do that? After not allowing any cross examination of witnesses not allowing Any form at all whatsoever of People to be able to submit evidence. To the other side. And the answer is yes. And one of the impeachment managers was Eric Swalwell. Let's look at Marc Stein here who brilliantly. Talks about how G Ping had his own impeachment manager play tape. Is this or any number of hack mediocrities who could have taken the place off Swalwell on among the house impeachment managers, But she's just deciding to twist the knife. His Parimal thank Fang, the Marta Hari of the California Democrat Party. Was planted an intern in his office. Hey, then bodies the complete formula INTs on dysfunction of the

Adam Kinzinger Illinois Eric Swalwell G Ping Marc Stein Swalwell House Marta Hari California Democrat Party Fang
Indian Farmers Demand Repeal Of Agriculture Industry Reform Laws

Morning Edition

03:05 min | 3 months ago

Indian Farmers Demand Repeal Of Agriculture Industry Reform Laws

"In India. Tens of thousands of farmers living on the outskirts of India's capital have been protesting against new laws that deregulate the agriculture industry. They fear for their livelihood and say they will stay there until these laws are repealed. MPR's social media product has this report. Protesting farmers have made Hy Vee is leading to New Delhi Day New home. They do laundry on the street and sleep in the back of trucks lined with straw and blankets. There's even an open air barbershop offering free haircuts by the more difficult won't get away with this deception. Protesters sing They're referring to Prime Minister Nouri in Ramadi and the three reforms he got past this fall to deregulate the farm sector. You can't take people for right in the name of reforms when they found the bag V. M. Singh is the head off a farmer's association. Most of his fellow protesters come from the northern Indian states of Punjab and Haryana and Millie grow wheat and rice. For years, the government has bought the bulk of the green and a guaranteed rate. It's like a safety net, says Agriculture economist Seema Butler. If market doesn't work, let's surprises fall government is there to buy. So there's a price assurance. But the new laws open up the market to private buyers who will not be bound by a price guarantee. The farmer's field. They lose their safety net. They can barely scrape a living as it is, says Marta. The farmers have this anger that their tractor caused machine recalls. Too many or fertilizer or prices are going up. But their income has not been increasing. Moody says the new laws will give farmers new opportunities Hominy gone on me. Sunoco Dajani. The farmers will have the freedom to sell directly to private companies, he says more the insists that if they have unsold surplus screen, the government will continue to procure it. There are doubts toe all must believe that procurement might not have a long life agricultural economist our drama, Kumar says the government's own advisers have urged it to limit how much grain advice Government warehouses are already overflowing with surplus green. Farmers that also skeptical about the reforms because of the way in which they were rushed through Parliament without much debate. All these come together to create a very bad impression, complete absence of trust between farmers and the government that lack of trust has led to a long stalemate. Five rounds of talks between farmers and the government have failed in the Supreme Court is also trying to mediate. But Farmer leader bm Singh says they'll keep protesting until the laws are scrapped. Farmers have a lot of patients, he says. Then we lose the club. The patient of the farmers said that he waits for the next crop to come. This is a natural patients given by the Almighty to us. Farmers spend their whole lives waiting for the next crop, he says. They'll wait for justice to for NPR news. I'm such me to partake in

Hy Vee Prime Minister Nouri V. M. Singh Seema Butler India MPR Ramadi Sunoco Dajani New Delhi Haryana Punjab Marta Government Moody Kumar Bm Singh Parliament Supreme Court Npr News
Indian Farmers Demand Repeal Of Agriculture Industry Reform Laws

Morning Edition

03:01 min | 3 months ago

Indian Farmers Demand Repeal Of Agriculture Industry Reform Laws

"Of thousands of farmers living on the outskirts of India's capital have been protesting against new laws that deregulate the agriculture industry. They fear for their livelihood and say they will stay there until these laws are repealed. MPR's suits me to product has this report. Distant farmers have made Hy Vee is leading to New Delhi Day New home. They do laundry on the street and sleep in the back of trucks lined with straw and blankets. There's even an open air barbershop offering free haircuts. My God, by loved the more difficult than any Danny Gelati. They won't let me get away with this deception. Protesters sing. They're referring to Prime Minister Nouri in Ramadi and the three reforms he got past this fall to deregulate the farm sector. You can't take people for a ride in the name of reforms when they found the bag V. M. Singh is the head off a farmer's association. Most of his fellow protesters come from the northern Indian states of Punjab and Haryana and Millie grow wheat and rice. For years, the government has bought the bulk of the green and a guaranteed rate. It's like a safety net, says Agriculture economist Seema Butler. If market doesn't work, let's surprises fall government is there to buy. So there's a prize assurance. But the new laws open up the market to private buyers who will not be bound by a price guarantee. The farmer's field. They lose their safety net. They can barely scrape a living as it is, says Marta. The farmers have this anger that the tractor caused machine recalls. Too many or fertilizer, or prices are going up. But their income has not been increasing. Moody says the new laws will give farmers new opportunities Hominy Gone on, man. It's a noble deed, The farmers will have the freedom to sell directly to private companies, he says more the insists that if they have unsold surplus green, the government will continue to procure it. There are doubts toe all must believe that procurement might not have a long life agricultural economist our drama, Kumar says the government's own advisers have urged it to limit how much grain advice Government warehouses are already overflowing with surplus green. Farmers. It also skeptical about the reforms because of the way in which they were rushed through Parliament without much debate. All these come together to create a very bad impression, complete absence of trust between farmers and the government that lack of trust has led to a long stalemate. Five rounds of talks between farmers and the government have failed in the Supreme Court is also trying to mediate. But Farmer leader bm Singh says they'll keep protesting until the laws are scrapped. Farmers have a lot of patients, he says. Then we lose the club. The patient of the farmers said that he waits for the next crop to come. This is a natural patients given by the Almighty to us. Farmers spend their whole lives waiting for the next crop, he says. They'll wait for justice to

Hy Vee Danny Gelati Prime Minister Nouri V. M. Singh Seema Butler Ramadi New Delhi Haryana Punjab India Marta Government Moody Kumar Bm Singh Parliament Supreme Court
Mirror, Mirror, On The Wall: Can You  Reveal An Animal's Inner World At All?

Short Wave

07:31 min | 4 months ago

Mirror, Mirror, On The Wall: Can You Reveal An Animal's Inner World At All?

"Okay nelson gordon. Gallup came up with this mark test. And i assume he actually you know like tested some animals. The one that made the splash was chimpanzees. So he put this big mirror just outside their cage and at first the chimpanzees acted in the way that a lot of other species do like the mirror. Image was another animal a stranger. You know that you might attack After a couple of days though that changed the chimpanzees started using the mirror to look at parts of their bodies that they couldn't normally see like opening their mouth and looking at the keys. They looked at their bottoms and their genitals. I mean of course they did know of course they did then gallup with the chimps under anesthesia and marked their ears and their foreheads. With a red dye the animals woke up. They saw themselves in the mirror and what they did was to reach out and touch and examine the marks on their faces only be seen in near so they realized the marks were on their own faces by looking in the mirror. Okay so that's chimps are close relatives. What about like monkeys. So he told me that monkeys could be exposed to mirrors for literally years and would never spontaneously use the mirror to do any kind of self examination like that but if quietly snuck into their room and you know in a mirror was there and the monkeys saw the person in the mirror. They turn around to confront them. They could use the image of of us me and my students in the mirror to bonaventure our behavior and respond appropriately. Okay so just like my creepy low dog. That is just like your. I mean. I don't know if your dog responds appropriately. Yeah i told them about your dog and he totally thinks your dog could be using mirrors to spy on you. I mean it sounds like her no honestly but in in terms of using a mirror like people do to look at yourself. How many species can actually do that. Well if you ask him he thinks it's just humans chimps entering. That's his view okay. So you're saying if you ask him that makes me feel like there are other views out there. Yes so if you ask diana at hunter college she'll tell you that dolphins and elephants can recognize themselves. And you know it is hard to test dolphins. I mean think about it. They just don't have hand right. You can't really like poke your own face with the flipper. Yeah yeah so. She had to come up with variations of the mark test. Like in one experiment. They used a marker to kind of draw on a dolphins body in different places But they didn't do it secretly so these dolphins could actually feel the marks being made the idea was. Would they race to the mirror afterwards and orient immediately to the place where they've been marked as if they had something in mind on their way to the mirror they were going to use it as a tool to look at the mark and we. That's exactly what we found. Wow okay that's that's pretty cool. What about What about elephants. They have trunks right so it feels like you do this kind of mark test. Maybe we'll she and some colleagues did study elephants at the bronx zoo and so again. Not so easy. They had to get this big jumbo eight by eight foot unbreakable mirror and she says the elephants seem to look at themselves and they did all kinds of unusual things like they'd rhythmically move their trunk or you know one of them would use a trunk to pull an era forward in front of the mirror like it was looking at it One of them touched this white x shaped mark that they put on her head. You know she used her own trunk and sort of investigated but two of the others didn't do that with the marta. So you know recess. She's tested other elephants since then and she does think they get it you know. She thinks they just recognize that what they see in the mirror is them okay. So so back to the original mark test developer. Gallup doesn't buy that. Dolphins and elephants no themselves in a mirror. He just doesn't think it's been conclusively shown. I mean there's been claims over the years about weird behavior with mirrors in all kinds of species. Birds fish aunts manta rays. And you know he says there's always this problem of if you have an animal doing strange stuff in front of a mirror and they do odd stuff right. There's this danger of seeing whatever it is you want to see. You know what their behavior actually means can be hard to figure out. Well i mean for that matter now what does it mean if an animal unequivocally passes gallup's mark tests like does that mean that they're actually self aware gallup thinks that the tests means they're self-aware. He basically thinks that self awareness is like being able to make yourself the object of your own attention and he says that you know if you're looking at yourself in mirror and recognizing yourself in the mirror. You're kind of like literally doing that. And that this says something about the animals internal world and its ability to understand other animals mental states But you know that's kind of romantic idea in a way you know that that that just as muir recognition says something really profound animals internal world. And so you know daniel pov- anneli doesn't really buy it. So he's a researcher and he told me when he first read about gallup's mark test for mirror self recognition in highschool. It made him wanna spend his whole life studying chimpanzees. You know. I bought into the story of mirrors and sulfur ignition hook line and sinker because it is a compelling story. Yeah i mean like wow there are creatures out there just like him just like people and all it took was a mirror to uncover this magic secret about that more whatever exactly but i gather from his tone. No longer feels that way. No no i mean. He's a researcher with the university of louisiana at lafayette and he spent years studying champs and mirrors and self recognition all this stuff and he says you know just think about when you go to a mirror say in the morning when you wake up you drag yourself there. You're looking at your image and like maybe you're all but drag with sleep in your eyes and you start having all of these thoughts. You're just like geez. I look older and you think about time and time is passing and then you start thinking about who you once were and your future and what other people think and on and on but is that which required do i have to think about any of that in order to brush my teeth in front of the mirror. He says you do not need all of these higher order concepts of self and self awareness to use a mirror in a practical way to just understand that like your physical motions are connected to the mirror in some way. Yes we saying like when a chimp interacts with its own mirror image. We can't know what it's thinking about. We have no clue and finally pointed out to me with training. In how mirrors work rhesus monkeys can actually learn to recognize themselves in mirrors and. Pass the mark test you know. So what does it mean if an animal with training can do this. He said he doesn't think dolphins been shown to do it yet but he says oh it could probably be taught to do it sure. What about my dog. Now what do you think. I don't know i mean maybe i mean. Some people have suggested their dogs. You know. the visual system isn't as important and like self awareness or self recognition might be more like smell related. Yeah yeah that makes sense so we need some kind of like olfactory mirror. Scientists have been working on that mattie. No okay no well thank you for this tour through the muir amazed that is research on animals and mirrors. I will think of you the next time. I see my dog gazing at my reflection. Which i imagine it's going to be in like five minutes. Enjoy

Nelson Gordon Gallup Dolphins Hunter College Anesthesia Bronx Zoo Daniel Pov Anneli Diana Muir University Of Louisiana Lafayette Mattie
Halting the Holiday Hustle by Rose Lounsbury

Optimal Living Daily

05:18 min | 4 months ago

Halting the Holiday Hustle by Rose Lounsbury

"Altering the holiday hustle by rosebery of rose lounge buried dot com. If you enjoy the alliteration the title this post as much as i do. Give me a digital fist-bump english nerds unite. But i digress. Haven't even really started yeesh. Today's topic is the season that is upon us. You've seen the wreaths and the stores heard the beginning strains of those old familiar tunes. And maybe vince bruce. W behavior to ensure top spot on santa's coveted nice list. The s midst of time again and with that comes the inevitable holiday hustle. Marta least we seem to think it's inevitable. In america we go from store to store buying trinkets for loved ones and glittery decor of our homes. We bake we send cards. We are in a bit of do-goodery after all it is the season for giving we feel an obligation to squeeze in at least one act of goodwill toward men amongst the holiday parties and tinsel and above all we try to make memories those indelible treasures that last long for the trees on the curb and the last bits of shiny paper find their way to the trash. The trouble is all this holiday. Hustle often isn't available in fact. It's worse than that is downright stressful recreate so much anxiety. About having a good time enjoying the holidays we often fail to do. Just that the irony again. English nerds correctly used literary term fist-bump. This is on my mind today because my friend. Michelle recently posted this on facebook quote. I've been thinking about christmas cards this week specifically about not doing them for the first time ever. I love christmas cards. My joy sending them in receiving them. I have fun selecting a design but every year. They are source of some stress for me. What photo will we use. Do we take our owner higher photographer. How will find the time to get them all done. We typically sent around two hundred. I've also been thinking a lot about time and how we spend it very recently of known or heard of several young people who have passed away in their thirties and knowing this has been an important reminder to treasure each day in the people. I love for the gifts. They are some thinking. No christmas cards this year. I'm not saying i won't do them again. But who knows maybe not thinking that we will donate the money. We save children's charities more time for our family money to charities and less cards in the trash. This really is a tough decision for me breaking away from the tradition in the ritual of taking the time. Send something personal in the mail. That is why. I'm putting it out here so i can hold myself accountable to my choice and quote. Michelle received some very interesting comments from request to not join the anti christmas movement to light hearted individuals who wanted to halt the crazy holiday hustle and actually enjoy the season of love and giving which got me thinking to eat all feel this way about the holidays secretly for example of notice that my mom love you. Mom sometimes seems a bit stressed about baking holiday. Cookies mom if you're reading this and i know you are because you're one of those awesome moms who actually read her grown daughters blog about minimum. I wanna say this. We don't come to your house for the cookies while they are delicious. We come to see you to love you to enjoy the season of giving because we are lucky enough to be with those we love. If it stresses you out. Skip the baking all of you just as much over a package of holiday themed us. In fact i'm inordinately curious to find out if the red holiday filling tastes different from the everyday white thereof. Said it mom. You're off the hook for the cookies. If you want to be note this does in no way apply to the anchovies spaghetti. You make for christmas eve. That stays the holiday. Hustle stress stems entirely from the expectations. We put on ourselves. No one else really expects us to have the best lighting display in the neighborhood or fill each of our children stockings with themed presents. We expect that of ourselves so my suggestion. This holiday season is. Let's give ourselves a break. Just say no to. The hustle ignored the stores of you. Want to don't bake unless it brings you joy forgo the holiday cards unless licking two hundred envelopes as your idea of a good saturday night please. No i am sarcastic. But my don't judge my flaked my fair share of holiday card envelopes and may well do so again this year. What do i propose instead of being a straight up holiday hustler. Do something you love. Spread some joy. That's what the season is all about. Greet your neighbors with cheerful smile. And hello surprise them by shoveling the driveway when they're not looking note to my neighbors your totally welcome to fulfil your need for cheerful giving in this fashion and i promise to act very very surprised. Spend your baking time selecting and donating non-perishable goods for local food pantry. Better yet do that with your kids have a holiday movie marathon with your friends and copious amounts of holiday snack. Ary basically teacher self imposed expectations. And just do whatever truly brings you joy this holiday season now view. Excuse me. I'm off to buy a package of holiday oreos. I believe they're already on the shelves

Rosebery Of Rose Lounge Vince Bruce Michelle Marta Santa America Facebook ARY
Iran scientist linked to military nuclear program killed

Hammer and Nigel

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Iran scientist linked to military nuclear program killed

"In an apparent assassination and the country's foreign minister is accusing Israel. Fox is Benjamin Hall with the latest This is a major blow to the Iranian nuclear program must've factors are they is not only the head of that program. He is the man known as the father of the Iranian bomb, and he's reportedly being on a Mossad hit list for many, many years. This is someone that Secretary Pompeo Netanyahu have mentioned by name and he was ambushed in a wealthy suburb outside Tehran. The Attackers reportedly blew up a truck as he passed by with his bodyguards. Then five of them got out and opened fire on his car. It is a remarkably audacious, sophisticated operation in the heart of Iran. Iranian foreign minister is already blaming Israel on an adviser to supreme leader Khamenei has said the U. S. Is seeking war, adding that Iran would quote descend like lightning on the killers of this oppressed Marta. Have you bought a mega million's ticket? Yet? The

Benjamin Hall Pompeo Netanyahu Israel FOX Tehran U. S. Iran Khamenei Marta
Trials show Oxford's COVID vaccine works well in older adults

Squawk Pod

04:10 min | 5 months ago

Trials show Oxford's COVID vaccine works well in older adults

"The coronavirus vaccine that's being developed by the university of oxford and astra zeneca was found to be safe and that triggers an immune response among all adults that's according to preliminary findings of peer reviewed phase two trial phase. Three trials are already underway. Matt news comes just a day. After the united states reached a total of two hundred and fifty thousand covid. Nineteen deaths joining us right now. Is marta leany. He's former aetna chairman and ceo an markets. Great to see you. It's been a while since we've talked to you but obviously the events that we've seen now you have an understanding of how things play out of developing those vaccines has been the really hard work but the next step isn't going to be all that easy either. We need to figure out how to safely. And effectively distribute the vaccine to millions of americans. And i know. Cvs is going to be playing a role with that. Aetna is going to play a role with that. Where where do you think we stand. What are the challenges that we face. And how do you think this will play out to see becky. Joe raw andrew. I think the real issue here is vaccines great. More the more than area. I think we need more innovation And it's been amazing but the pharmaceutical companies able to do but it's one part of an arsenal they're really goes back to a broader and democ mc framework. Where we i have to. I'd early identifies so get back into the wall. World health organization get get active there again. Secondly have the diagnostic antibody testing strategy the population. So whose immune we also know who we need to protect so that we can keep working while we protect americans that are at risk and then is the vaccines come along. You need to have the ability to track and trace diagnostics. Antibodies and the vaccine is because we don't know yet in any of these vaccines along the media's and when that immunity wears off you need to understand when it happens. What kind of booster shot. The people need a man. How do we keep that going over arm. So the amount the enormity of the data and the framework around doing that is going to be really important to build. We don't have that yet in large part because we don't have a national plan. There's a lot of things that we can kind of jump into their. I want to start with one thing. You said that we need to figure out who is going to be most affected by this. I mean i think that's part of the question. We know the demographic split that older people happen to be in worse shape with this that people with co morbidity have a worse time with this but are we any closer to being able to figure out why some people are so greatly impacted even if they don't have co morbidity even if they're younger while others seem to do just fine with it. I think we're learning more everyday day. Becky i'm i we'll continue to learn. It's gonna take a while you get a real deep understanding of this disease and of the vaccine impact. But i think it's important that is as long as we have a national framework around this. You begin to approach all the public health issues but even more importantly the capacity models we need to understand. Mpp e hospital beds skill sets and in ventilators and other things that along have a buffer economy. So we're not doing just in time. Responses depend as emerged. This is not spend Will have more mark. Were pretty long in the tooth in this pandemic at least feels like if you're sitting at home. Why do you think we don't have a better plan at this point at least for the testing and at least for contact tracing. We don't have a framework to do nationally across the board. We could be learning so much every part of the country if we had a way of aggregating the information or understanding. And who's sick why they're sick. What kind of. Antibodies are we seeing out there can be used for their units and as the vaccines developed our these vaccines working which ones are best for which population that requires a national database. A national way of looking at this information and we've decided to allocate up to the states. I think that's wrong headed.

Astra Zeneca Marta Leany Aetna Joe Raw Andrew University Of Oxford Becky Matt United States
"marta" Discussed on Glowing Up

Glowing Up

03:24 min | 6 months ago

"marta" Discussed on Glowing Up

"So much. Hot. Hock. On twitter. There's more water has. Like impurities or whatever the fuck you know. Are you putting bottled water on your face like hello. Thome. Point you're you are standing on shaky ground right now. You're basically saying that you've heard daughter has. Martin Holding. Up. Old. School, New York water did a fall campaign. Skin should always be wet. Where y'all. Do you remember when you heard that they sold said Aerosol thing takes me back to a simple time when you when I first heard that celebrities use that on planes to keep their skin. The YOU WANNA trap it. You can't just have water said under thinks it's GONNA evaporate. Yes. It will take moisture but if you lock it in with like oil or moisturizer a vassal lean. That's what you even. Trapping the water. Got Two thirds, Thursday trout, Thurs trump most of the skin. Okay. But what if that water has whatever a door? Ignore Tap Water I'm not the person to ask I'm like I don't know Charlotte, can you give any advice to your to the oily skin neck naic ladies that are listening I'm personally dealing with a lot of mass kccne right now every time I wear a mask I get pimple the next day it's just It's just a done deal. Do you have like a an acid or hero product or like? Something you recommend to the ladies and gents listening mask. Knee is probably one of the hardest things to deal with because if you start throwing acids at mask knee, it's basically happening because of Yester- trapping bacteria, it's really humid environment. It's like basically just like a heyday for irritation to the skin, but you also have like chafing and it's raw skin like I get like masks shade like when we're my keep, he eats aestheticians full of I'm wearing the proper K ninety-five. My nose is bleeding by the end of it because it robs just against the end of it though literally bleeding. So the worst thing you can do in that situation is to throw an asset I'm top it's really boring, but all you can do is baby the skin. So apply moisturizer damn skin maybe can do spot treatments like we love star face rights, hydrocholoride patches, but it's not about stripping the skin further because your skin's already traumatized. So if you put an asset like sauce like acids will people use for acne and for black heads and breaks up like basically the bonds in your skin and then basically eats up the oil. In normal case that's fine like maybe get away with a very low percentage like a like acid face wash. But to us like a two percent you're gonNA. You're GONNA wound yourself. Okay. So be careful just basic water as. I'm like I've never done this before I gotta start now and then with a moisturizer over it. Seal it. I just I'm so confused as is water moisturizing drying you have to sell it in its hydrating if neither hydrating and then you have to lock it with the moisture with something that is moisturizing..

oily skin Martin Holding twitter Thome Yester New York Charlotte
"marta" Discussed on Glowing Up

Glowing Up

02:07 min | 6 months ago

"marta" Discussed on Glowing Up

"Guys. Thank you. Here. So this is so exciting Marta Esther said you've been ongoing up before you a fan favourite gassed people have been begging pleading with us to have you back. And Charlotte. You're not only. Just. The founders and CEO founders of do but Charlotte you are a viral Tiktok skin-care star in your own right and p no more about that I found. What does that mean? So you're are you like teaching us all skincare tricks on Tiktok I need to learn everything right now me out all we're forgetting one CO founder Joyce to actually recently joined the team and she's actually a cosmetic chemist who's like made some pretty incredible cult products. So she's actually where we get a lot of science side, the brandon she. taught me most of what I now? Okay. Literally did Cotton Clinical Studies love her and so yeah. When quarantine started I was like, well, I'm by myself. So I just started talking into my phone and posting Tiktok but doing like very basic things like things you don't do to your face like don't throw acid at it all day and wonder why you have Arash. And it did really well for me. So yeah, I found a little community on on tiktok singer. It's a niche that I. Love. What's your most viral Tiktok skin-care video today I mean probably something around Black Ed's Ono Vassil Lean and slugging which to me was like the least controversial thing like as well vastly people been using that forever and I got a lot of. blowback particularly from like the natural skincare community like this new trend and I'm like it's been around for one hundred and thirty five years guys like it's not it's not know. Is What is slugging? So. Basically when you have really dry skin putting like an occlusive layer over your face helps reduce what they would call Trans Dermal water loss, which is like basically a water evaporating I,.

Charlotte Marta Esther dry skin Cotton Clinical Studies CEO CO founder Joyce
"marta" Discussed on Knight Reader

Knight Reader

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"marta" Discussed on Knight Reader

"People more in your life as well. earful month I. Thank you so much. Thank. You so much. For saying that been so great today It's been such joy to half you. I guess I'll just ask you a final question. I don't really have I don't like. You said it all for me. Really. I don't know how else to gone off that but Is there. Anything you'd like to talk about maybe like plug your your podcast coming up in your instagram page if you wanted to share that with listeners. Yes. Of course. So they my podcasts is the empowered woman podcast have amazing women guests talking about you know of different ways of how the themselves and giving different tips on how to. For you to become empowered as well. my instagram is smart spark I do have the instagram for the podcast empowered woman podcast One thing that I do with my coaching besides one on one is that I have a virtual school. So it's a membership site where we talk about personal development. There's lots of different tips or books that you can read a similar to what I mentioned here in different practices, you can take on to really make personal development a habit and make sure that you're an expert in yourself. Right so which I cannot your instagram and your podcast be talking about those and I'll plug India description in on instagram as well. and. So Marta, from the empowered woman podcast, it's been such a joy to have you here in the keep here on the Knight Ridder Podcast I think people are GonNa be blown away by your amazing insight on these books and hope I can become better interviewer in the future but you're doing great. Thank you. I just really I'm really happy to have you and Yeah. You just set a lot of amazing things and. I'll take it to heart. I'll do my research channel Episode for us. Yeah but thank you so much..

Marta India
"marta" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"marta" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic idea. And I'm not to say that she wasn't sad and as you note her neuroses postseason her later years were very real but they almost never didn't include this very soothing grounding an inspirational relationship with plants that she had absolutely and and some of you know her networking if you will. There's a a recent Dickinson scholar named Marta Warner that that published this book called the Network Recluse Right so her networking also included plants and flowers so she sent pressed flowers hours to people she made knows gays and left for people There is a an author that I'm doing some work on now named and Francis Hodgson for net. Who wrote the secret garden she had lunch at? Emily Dickinson's brothers home. Who who lived next door? And she recounts in her diary that she received this unusual poem. We don't know what the poem was from my host sister on a bed of heart disease which were little pansies kind of it. It grabs my heartstrings. That this was all part of a and I guess you know I should really like read a poem because we've been talking cream. Emily Dickinson and and so I picked this one for you because it includes your name and because it has vis the sense of I don't know like the FM role and it. It goes like this. I held a jewel in my fingers angers and went to sleep. The day was warm and the winds were pros e I said Twelve Cape. I woke and Chad my honest fingers the gem was gone and now an MFS. Remembrance is all I own. I'm Jennifer Jewel. And this is cultivating place. Martin McDowell is a writer and Gardner living in New Jersey. She's always been interested in and writers who garden and Gardiner's who write her first book and the one that pulled Marta fully into the field of garden. Writing was Emily Dickinson's gardens a celebration of poet and a gardener published in two thousand four. Were speaking this week with.

Emily Dickinson Marta Warner Jennifer Jewel Francis Hodgson Twelve Cape Martin McDowell New Jersey Chad Gardiner Gardner writer
"marta" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

15:01 min | 1 year ago

"marta" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden certain from north state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Jewel. Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread. And when you say the museum you are specifically referring to the Emily Dickinson Museum Museum in Amherst. That's right so you know they've been lovely to work with through the years on various programs and I work in the gardens. And you know it's it's it's really been great so I mean I I definitely want to get to that. I want to hear about your gardener for in residence Experience which I think is just so wonderful and volative and inspiring to me and I'm sure many other listeners as even a concept Marta. But let's go back to that very first article then burning into a book the first I kind of iteration of what is now your second edition give us just a basic. What were you trying to accomplish? What were you trying to document went in there so that we have the context from which to understand how this updated one is is different and expands on that original regional heart? So for me. The big surprise was that Emily Dickinson was a gardener. I don't think think of her never popped into my mind because the poems that I knew were things like oh because because I could not stop for death he kindly stopped for me. They were all along. That line of death and immortality and and I had this image of someone standing at a bedroom window in a white dress and I think that many people share that you know if they know Emily Dickinson they know of the name that image would sort of pop into their mind. That and that you know sorta pulled back hairstyle that you see in the area type and I wanted to say look. This was a person who had this interest. That's totally counter to this idea of this. ghostly hermit yeah you know stuck indoors you you know. And I'm not saying that she wasn't reclusive because she was she. She didn't go out in society in her later years. That's all true. Who but despite that she still garden so you know she got outside anyway? Yeah Yeah and I I want to And I think this is a great time to do it before we get into the details of who she was Gardner. And what we know about that. And and some of the more current research and Interpretive Materials being Put out into the world about this but why does this matter. Marta and I think it's it's actually really fascinating like why isn't important at a variety of levels that we up end this myth of this incredible poet and what inspired her how she took care of herself what she found valuable in the world world. Why is it important that we changed that? From the myth that was created early on almost as a sales pitch and what is actually true about about her to me. It's water the sources of creativity. Now you can still. You can appreciate shape Emily Dickinson. You can study. Emily Dickenson entirely without knowing that she was a gardener. I don't WanNa take away from her. Creative live genius as it stands alone but you know just as when you find out. I'm going to pick like the Beethoven Hoven was deaf right. It sort of puts it in a different context. And you go. Oh you know so. There's someone who had this. You know terrible disability and still be genius in musical composition. So you know. It's that Emily Dickinson had had various sources for her creative output and so the garden was a source for her but it also wasn't different outlet. Right it was a different way. She was expressing herself and the the vast fastness of her genius was she could take these sort of everyday things and distill them into something that speaks. I can speak to all of those. Yeah and I was thinking about this over the weekend in preparation for our conversation today and one of the things that occurred to me is that by by providing this real life woman with a more three dimensional persona sonal in the common understanding and the current understanding. We actually we add a little bit of fresh air and health and three dimensionality -ality to all of the people we might consider creative or artistic or or talented and that to know that she she was actually quite a happy and Inter related person with her family and with her friends through letters through the garden through plants food and community. You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Museum Museum Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse emily writer Marta McDowell New York Botanical Garden Massachusetts New Jersey California Jennifer Jewel Laura Ingalls Wilder Book WanNa Amherst The New York Botanic Tena Gard president America Beethoven Hoven Gardner
"marta" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

15:01 min | 1 year ago

"marta" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden certain from north state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Jewel. Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread. And when you say the museum you are specifically referring to the Emily Dickinson Museum Museum in Amherst. That's right so you know they've been lovely to work with through the years on various programs and I work in the gardens. And you know it's it's it's really been great so I mean I I definitely want to get to that. I want to hear about your gardener for in residence Experience which I think is just so wonderful and volative and inspiring to me and I'm sure many other listeners as even a concept Marta. But let's go back to that very first article then burning into a book the first I kind of iteration of what is now your second edition give us just a basic. What were you trying to accomplish? What were you trying to document went in there so that we have the context from which to understand how this updated one is is different and expands on that original regional heart? So for me. The big surprise was that Emily Dickinson was a gardener. I don't think think of her never popped into my mind because the poems that I knew were things like oh because because I could not stop for death he kindly stopped for me. They were all along. That line of death and immortality and and I had this image of someone standing at a bedroom window in a white dress and I think that many people share that you know if they know Emily Dickinson they know of the name that image would sort of pop into their mind. That and that you know sorta pulled back hairstyle that you see in the area type and I wanted to say look. This was a person who had this interest. That's totally counter to this idea of this. ghostly hermit yeah you know stuck indoors you you know. And I'm not saying that she wasn't reclusive because she was she. She didn't go out in society in her later years. That's all true. Who but despite that she still garden so you know she got outside anyway? Yeah Yeah and I I want to And I think this is a great time to do it before we get into the details of who she was Gardner. And what we know about that. And and some of the more current research and Interpretive Materials being Put out into the world about this but why does this matter. Marta and I think it's it's actually really fascinating like why isn't important at a variety of levels that we up end this myth of this incredible poet and what inspired her how she took care of herself what she found valuable in the world world. Why is it important that we changed that? From the myth that was created early on almost as a sales pitch and what is actually true about about her to me. It's water the sources of creativity. Now you can still. You can appreciate shape Emily Dickinson. You can study. Emily Dickenson entirely without knowing that she was a gardener. I don't WanNa take away from her. Creative live genius as it stands alone but you know just as when you find out. I'm going to pick like the Beethoven Hoven was deaf right. It sort of puts it in a different context. And you go. Oh you know so. There's someone who had this. You know terrible disability and still be genius in musical composition. So you know. It's that Emily Dickinson had had various sources for her creative output and so the garden was a source for her but it also wasn't different outlet. Right it was a different way. She was expressing herself and the the vast fastness of her genius was she could take these sort of everyday things and distill them into something that speaks. I can speak to all of those. Yeah and I was thinking about this over the weekend in preparation for our conversation today and one of the things that occurred to me is that by by providing this real life woman with a more three dimensional persona sonal in the common understanding and the current understanding. We actually we add a little bit of fresh air and health and three dimensionality -ality to all of the people we might consider creative or artistic or or talented and that to know that she she was actually quite a happy and Inter related person with her family and with her friends through letters through the garden through plants food and community. You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Museum Museum Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse emily writer Marta McDowell New York Botanical Garden Massachusetts New Jersey California Jennifer Jewel Laura Ingalls Wilder Book WanNa Amherst The New York Botanic Tena Gard president America Beethoven Hoven Gardner
"marta" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

15:01 min | 1 year ago

"marta" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden certain from north state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Jewel. Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread. And when you say the museum you are specifically referring to the Emily Dickinson Museum Museum in Amherst. That's right so you know they've been lovely to work with through the years on various programs and I work in the gardens. And you know it's it's it's really been great so I mean I I definitely want to get to that. I want to hear about your gardener for in residence Experience which I think is just so wonderful and volative and inspiring to me and I'm sure many other listeners as even a concept Marta. But let's go back to that very first article then burning into a book the first I kind of iteration of what is now your second edition give us just a basic. What were you trying to accomplish? What were you trying to document went in there so that we have the context from which to understand how this updated one is is different and expands on that original regional heart? So for me. The big surprise was that Emily Dickinson was a gardener. I don't think think of her never popped into my mind because the poems that I knew were things like oh because because I could not stop for death he kindly stopped for me. They were all along. That line of death and immortality and and I had this image of someone standing at a bedroom window in a white dress and I think that many people share that you know if they know Emily Dickinson they know of the name that image would sort of pop into their mind. That and that you know sorta pulled back hairstyle that you see in the area type and I wanted to say look. This was a person who had this interest. That's totally counter to this idea of this. ghostly hermit yeah you know stuck indoors you you know. And I'm not saying that she wasn't reclusive because she was she. She didn't go out in society in her later years. That's all true. Who but despite that she still garden so you know she got outside anyway? Yeah Yeah and I I want to And I think this is a great time to do it before we get into the details of who she was Gardner. And what we know about that. And and some of the more current research and Interpretive Materials being Put out into the world about this but why does this matter. Marta and I think it's it's actually really fascinating like why isn't important at a variety of levels that we up end this myth of this incredible poet and what inspired her how she took care of herself what she found valuable in the world world. Why is it important that we changed that? From the myth that was created early on almost as a sales pitch and what is actually true about about her to me. It's water the sources of creativity. Now you can still. You can appreciate shape Emily Dickinson. You can study. Emily Dickenson entirely without knowing that she was a gardener. I don't WanNa take away from her. Creative live genius as it stands alone but you know just as when you find out. I'm going to pick like the Beethoven Hoven was deaf right. It sort of puts it in a different context. And you go. Oh you know so. There's someone who had this. You know terrible disability and still be genius in musical composition. So you know. It's that Emily Dickinson had had various sources for her creative output and so the garden was a source for her but it also wasn't different outlet. Right it was a different way. She was expressing herself and the the vast fastness of her genius was she could take these sort of everyday things and distill them into something that speaks. I can speak to all of those. Yeah and I was thinking about this over the weekend in preparation for our conversation today and one of the things that occurred to me is that by by providing this real life woman with a more three dimensional persona sonal in the common understanding and the current understanding. We actually we add a little bit of fresh air and health and three dimensionality -ality to all of the people we might consider creative or artistic or or talented and that to know that she she was actually quite a happy and Inter related person with her family and with her friends through letters through the garden through plants food and community. You add this sense. That creativity can come with great great happiness and health as well not this sort of again mythic.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Museum Museum Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse emily writer Marta McDowell New York Botanical Garden Massachusetts New Jersey California Jennifer Jewel Laura Ingalls Wilder Book WanNa Amherst The New York Botanic Tena Gard president America Beethoven Hoven Gardner
"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"PTSD <Speech_Male> PEOPLE CAN <Speech_Male> Find out more more <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> MD <Speech_Male> PTSD <Speech_Male> DOT org. That's <Speech_Male> being funded by maps. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> want to contribute money. <Speech_Male> They can <Speech_Male> donate to maps <Speech_Male> dot org <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and also you all if you <Speech_Male> use offer code <Speech_Male> Kette. Jesus <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you'll get one hundred <Speech_Male> percent off their treatment. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I don't <Speech_Female> think now <Speech_Male> we <Speech_Male> will not be <Speech_Male> care of the clinic. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> one <Speech_Male> thing I just wanted <Speech_Male> to say <Speech_Male> for the sake of our <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Our staff <Speech_Male> fear <Speech_Male> We do not offer <Speech_Male> treatment <Speech_Male> here <Speech_Male> There's a a <Speech_Male> lot of interest in it <Speech_Male> and it's very promising. <Speech_Male> We hope to do the <Speech_Male> suicide and research <Speech_Male> that's been proposed <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> to get involved in <Speech_Male> that more <Speech_Male> And when it <Speech_Male> becomes clinically available available <Speech_Male> we hope to have <Speech_Male> it here but <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But yeah unfortunately <Speech_Male> it's not something <Speech_Male> that <hes> <Speech_Male> we are researching <Speech_Male> or offering clinically. <Speech_Male> Here <Speech_Male> at this time the <Speech_Male> we're <SpeakerChange> keeping a very <Speech_Male> close eye on it. I'm <Speech_Male> so thankful <Speech_Male> that I live in a <Speech_Male> universe <Speech_Male> where that sentence <Speech_Male> is being <Speech_Male> said seriously <Speech_Male> if I back <Speech_Male> in the nineties <Speech_Male> if I knew <Speech_Male> that there was going <Speech_Male> to be the possibility <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> a doctor <Speech_Male> would be saying <Speech_Male> you know right now. We're not <Speech_Male> offering <Speech_Male> mushroom therapy <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but it is possible <Speech_Male> that soon we <Speech_Male> will be near few <Speech_Male> child. It'd be overjoyed <Speech_Male> and I'm <Speech_Male> so glad that you're one of <Speech_Male> the people at the home <Speech_Male> of the <Speech_Male> ship. I know there's many <Speech_Male> other hands on deck by either <Speech_Male> way you'll <Speech_Male> all deserve accolades <Speech_Male> as a <Speech_Male> real comfort to know <Speech_Male> that you <Speech_Male> y'all or laying <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> tracks so to speak <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> beautiful it <Speech_Male> should. There's beautiful <Speech_Male> train that <Speech_Male> is you know <Speech_Male> I think is going to <Speech_Male> be one of <Speech_Male> the historically <Speech_Male> is going to be looked at <Speech_Male> with the same <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> the same way we look at. Ah <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> various <Speech_Male> medical breakthroughs <Speech_Male> that have <Speech_Male> changed the <Speech_Male> way humans heal themselves. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Thanks <Speech_Male> man thank <Speech_Male> you thanks for having go <Speech_Male> cool. <Speech_Male> Thank you so much <Speech_Male> other

"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"That's not always based on what the data says. That's what happening seventy one from what I understand was. They did a genuine Investigation and report on the dangers of drugs and alcohol. And you know recommendations to how to classify if I things and they just when it wasn't. What was the political motivation? They ignored that data and just made a system in place that that was based on politics. And if we aren't careful with that other community that other community isn't careful and I self policing or even developing some sort of apprenticeship guru tradition or martial arts teacher or psychotherapy syrupy lineage or some. If there isn't some tradition in place we are at risk of not making it a scientific decision anymore. Listen I don't get a cultural decision. That's what I think happened in the sixties. Well my wife and I I know what you mean and my wife and I are taking up this mantle and we decided to be the leaders at the psychedelic community. And we'RE GONNA make love to you. I WanNa make love to your wife excellently. You're GonNa what about my money. We will make love to your money and then through this process process. I think we're going to like discover way to make sure that the we'll come up with Some methodology to license people are going to do training programs probably going to start like a series of centers and nephew. Anyone comes and says we will sue your ass. So that's all right. What do you think pretty good? I think I think I think that's the kind of thing that I would expect to emerge urge and Sido a place where this is legal and taken seriously run. I think genuinely that's what happens. That's what we have Kevin all of you know You know we have the conferences. For example. Now we have these societies. We have the American Psychiatric Association. It has it's big conference It has a review board an ethics committee People don't always follow the rules. And when they don't follow the liberal's there is a way of enforcing the rules. Sure and I think that's I think that would be important thing to do and I think that's what I mean. That's sexually an example of emergent phenomenon. When you have these problems you have a growing interest in this thing with with these powerful things and a certain part of the community is saying? Hey Hey hey we need to be careful a certain part of hey we need to get to as many people as possible the ball and then you know a a natural emergent phenomenon is that somebody comes up with the idea and that idea sticks because it makes sense inst- everyone yeah that we should have some sort of board. We should have some list of questions that you ask somebody if they are you know purporting being to be a medicine person. Yeah than you know water ten things you should know to ask your person and who puts. What's that list of ten things together? This yard of people in you know like those kinds of things I consider immersion phenomenon. I think that like they're like the the invitation to the various communities that exist out there link-up and come up with some like like real simple publication for people to look at. I think that's a good question. What would it look? What are the things where we take a look and we? You can look at these models of things that have come before us in the same emergent when they're when these emergent entities facing these same questions. What did they have an the ethics board How do they disseminate information? I have a conference of some kind. I think I think You know especially with decriminalization That kind of stuff is going to be a natural important thing and there. Are these awesome awesome awesome communities. You know the aware project in Los Angeles this that and the psychedelic community. The broader psychedelic community is by its nature Thoughtful people and so you know I hope that. That's you know something that we can promote In this podcast to those communities entities that you know that they take they undertake that That responsibility with integrity and and An honesty I think burning man's and example of like a I think they have come up with some pretty sophisticated methods. Lord not just for dealing with psychedelic all the various things that come up when people are using psychedelics together but just also like you know. Pretty healthy ways of allowing aren't people to simultaneously be autonomous free thinkers but also like an overarching code. That seems to fit really well within radical article. Self reliance that stuff you know and and I think that these things are going to emerge in the more. We hold ourselves accountable and all each other accountable. And and hopefully a forgiving way which is to me one of the cool aspects of burning man as the youth they really are good at not involving the cops if someone's freaking Out in a responsible somebody has to be right like yeah. They can't just not have the cops. Yeah right sure and soon as you get to three or more people arguments are going nuts and peaceful resolution of those disagreements becomes uh-huh. How do we manage that now as a community? If we don't like the old way you now what is the intention what can we do. And what. I'm what what I'm seeing you know in this pather I went from. You know thinking that we were you know what. I'm perpetually a pleasantly surprised by in trying to do this research is that people before us and the solutions nations. They came up with Were those emergent thing like right. They're not there because someone's trying to control necessarily they're there because as a community we were like. Hey we need to make sure our foods like not covered in shit right. We need to make sure after that the when we buy medicine at the store. It's got in it what it says. It's got an bottle and that people aren't saying it's is going to do something that it isn't and like this is a reaction to us asking for those things a lot of the time that's emerging phenomenon. I got as you know the burning men. If you have a camp of one hundred or more you have to get like a food certification right like a lot of these bureaucracies spring naturally truly out of trying to govern right. Well this is the yeah. I think eliminating the superstitious idea all bureaucracies or a nightly evil is a good first step and I think there's a good reason many of us have that sense. Because we've seen the failing of archaic you know money motivated anti truth. bureaucracies popped up all over the fucking place and I know personally the frustration of that. That is so great that eventually just lazy thinking you demonize the entire structure itself instead of seeing the structure is malleable and potentially can can can be shifted back into harmony with with with like being being human motivated or peace motivated or life life motivated instead of money motivated. But I now listen I. There's do you have about ten more minutes Cole. Yeah okay so this question is because it might take a little while for you to answer answer it sure. And and I think it fits into the discussion of producing some kind of like structure within which the new relic experience which is very often doesn't seem structured at all can happen in this. It goes back to something I've talked about before but I remember going the. Da Website reading the the how you follow the flow of LSD. Through through the United States by the grateful dead touring schedule his housing distributed around the country. And then also that. What was really funny to me? He is the acknowledgment that the problem with LSD dealers trying to bust LSD dealers. Is it somewhere. The actual capitalists drug dealing thing begins to break down because the LSD dealer is taking LSD. And eventually the LSD dealer decides besides that they don't want to sell it anymore they just want to give it away to help to help because they're realizing it's like a very healing Madison. And they they don't care about money in the same way I I'm sure there's LSD dealers out there like motherfucker. That.

LSD American Psychiatric Associati United States Los Angeles Sido Kevin Lord relic Cole Madison
"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

15:35 min | 1 year ago

"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"You're almost taking away the possibility that it won't go poorly when do our expectation on and and your projecting all of your behaviors onto it that you would of something that would go poorly. Okay Yeah right right that that is you know what to me. That's the that is where my understanding of the positive thinking stuff. That's where I think what they're saying is achieve the state of as you are nece and there will be a natural Remission of have the anxiety that comes from living in denial because some part of you is aware of the fact can strip it of all of that Valen silence and Filter than yeah. You're you're you're essentially living in the present moment right. Yeah and that's and that's wage and devoid of anxiety and depression. Because you know anxious. Thoughts are about how things are going to be changing and some unpredictable predictable way How this is going to go? You know like like this very moment you know if we can drop into this moment where we're just looking at each other. Everything's going great story but soon as I think what time is it like. Does Duncan have two times. Don't going to have to go home. That's where the the anxiety comes. Thank the anxiety is that this isn't going to be okay sometime in the near future. And what can I do to stop that from happening. You know its ruins right now which is great great hats right right and it's great we again the difference between positive thinking would you you tell yourself it's great. You're shitting bricks. That's positive thinking. Where is this other thing is like no you actually? The greatness is there. It's just being. It's being drowned out by the overlay is that you're putting on top of things and so the one one experience I had a with Ketamine. Therapy was plagued by fear of death. And I had this Realization that wasn't just a mental realization. But I realized Oh my fear of death my love of life. It's just my I love life so much I don't want it to right and that's the ultimate you know. I don't have anything to to to to back this up from a scientific standpoint but like that's kind of at the heart of of a lot of anxiety at least a lot of anxiety is ultimately death breath of death and and things coming to an end and how we can protect things from bad from happening because is than something. Some miniature death will happen when something bad happens right right Something like Something will end come to an end. That's going so great right now that we want to hold onto it so much that attachment yeah and so So uh it gets where anxiety gets debilitating as one that ruins your ability to enjoy when things are going fine. Yeah which which is most of the time most of the time all. That's one of my favorite sayings he says dying is completely safe and you know and and someone messes it up. You can't mess it up and you're you're GONNA die safe. We and also when I've applied mindfulness just doing my anxiety Zayed's states themselves. I've noticed that the anxiety has a quality of ecstasy in it. It seems to be a it seems to be some kind of bliss Some kind of joy that's misplaced. It's like out of alignment or something. It's an excitement to be alive. But it's an unpleasant experience. Because it's so hyper charged or something but it if if if you look at it it's like this is why I love the new cult. Two people taking cold showers you know. Take taking ice baths and showers because when you take a cold shower your attention as focused on that also you can you really you know if you I've realized that with the pain of a cold shower is at least fifty if not sixty percent not wanting it to be cold. It's my mental reaction to it which is like this fucking sucks whole change. The how can I changes fucking until you remove that and just feel the cold water. It's really nice. It's invigorating. It's harmless uh not least over short periods. It's powerful it's crisp. It's just nice. It's intense it's not getting electrocuted cute. It's like something wonderful and then before you know it the cold starts feeling good and you don't even want to turn it up in the same way you did initially so to me me. It's that analysis of the seemingly unwanted state the aversion to it realizes the what's seems to be exhausting costing you versus the state itself. So I mean I. I don't know where I'm going with this but I am really curious about. I'm sorry I diverted in Iran. We start you know we. We both went. I'm trying to actually remember if we got to the end of the discussion about about you know how did how did things change in the government. Yea like I think I went on this tangent about the the The not looking at things and the positive thinking versus and she's great so you want to. Yeah I think it's it it comes up so much and And it is a curious thing I think in my experience and working in government bureaucracies. I did my training and a Va.. you know there's lots of love. I'm really interested in And EPI phenomenon an emergent phenomenon. Things happen that are just the are the natural results of the of the setup and a group of people so like How you know one example is like you know how did every civilization end up with a pretty similar city structure right right like because They needed to have markets. And then it's if you're GONNA sell fruit and somebody else's going to sell wheels goals for your wagon like why not have them be like roughly in the same area and then wagons need to get there needs to be a road right so like roads woods main roads where the main businesses are housing. Wants to be there. You need to have roads to get to those businesses from the housing. You need a decent amount of room between between the Houses for privacy and so like that kind of gadget thing I think you know in bureaucracies. There's a lot of reward mechanisms for Implementing a new policy. And but there's not much reward for getting rid of an old policy. That sucks now right so you get these like you know you get these Almost insurmountable red tape obstacles to do anything much less like to undo something. That was a mistake right. You need a lot. Basically you need like a lot of excitement and energy and belief in your thing. If you want to change these huge bureaucracies you need to have a lot of momentum to to tolerate it and people believe in their idea but they don't have that same energy and enthusiasm to withstand the like process right to undo someone else's bad and just like Oh pile up and they get people get jobs around the bad ideas I mean there's an agony promoted for coming up with the idea that seemed great lasts like there's now in the way of the new good idea this week but industries form around the bad idea. You know like certainly the idea now. There's an industry around record systems in this example like medical records system doesn't have a place to now. You know run a search coach for all people fifty five and over for you know right cardiac thing so then those sort of things kind of accumulate. And so I think that's cam to bring it back to the discussion. It's like there was a questionable idea about starting this war on drugs right and and the amount of momentum needed to have made these rules was very little to create the system to create. You Know Nixon started needed. It and and Reagan reinforced it and to try to undo those kinds of policies. UNROLLS takes an incredible amount of energy and momentum and it's taken it took fifteen years for Dublin to come along and for map frank and other similar organizations to have the tolerance to go through that whole process to see where see what kinds of policies they can do. What kinds of what kinds of bureaucratic opportunities are there to continue? We need to do this kind of research. For example right to find those things within those systems to find the sort of to pioneer the path to how we reopen this kind of research right And I think that is. That's more like the reason for the slowdown. I don't think it was. I think the starting of the war on drugs and the reinforcement of the war on drugs had a million reasons was politically beneficial to those guys. That did that. Sure but I don't think it says as active of ongoing fight it I think the Cold War generation is passing like the people who are in charge during the cold. The New People are not as passionate about how find anymore the new people who are in charge of these departments Our Slough get there because they're solution oriented and and you know and the data seems to be on the side of at least in the research that we're doing the data's seems to be on the side of that these things might be powerful medicines. Jesus Christ Cole What Are you trying to do. Make us all feel good. Yes trying to give you enjoyed. We can still optimistic. That's right maybe. The entire system itself is not filled with hissing reptilian. Warmongers that inside there. There's people who actually authentically respect scientific data on a change things in implement things to make life on the planet not quite so horrific for people people that might actually be something that isn't just in the United States but a lot of communities across the planet right now. Is that what. You're trying to tell us what I'm trying to say. I'm trying to say you know like in the same kind of approaching things with openness and curiosity. I've found that the government agencies that I'm interacting with it's a much scarier when when my language wasn't as precise when I was just they when it was just the governor governed right but now that I'm having to you know in in one way or another interact with these different departments within the government. It's it's like my language is getting more precise and it's like well the FDA their sort of their their agenda and what they do who is this function right and the DA. Their agenda in what they do is this function. And they don't always you know are not always his communicating on X.. Like there isn't a concerted effort among all departments of anything right in particular but the FDA's job is to have a pathway for finding new medical treatments making sure that those medical treatments are safe and effective making sure that the manufacturing of those treatments is done in a safe and non-contaminated away the DA's job is to enforce laws Drug Enforcement Agency so it's jumps to enforce drug laws as they stand the the FDA has to deal with drug companies who are trying to manufacture drugs of all kinds. Sure They also have to deal with you know the research that. There's some psychedelic funding now. There's some money for funding psychedelic look studies that are going to go through the FDA process and so far. I've not found some Nixon character in there. WHO's you know not not willing? I haven't heard of any sort of draconian like well. We don't care what the policy says. It's not it's not for you for are you guys because of what you're trying to study right it's It's the same rules. Seem to apply. Well you know the depressing thing is when people like Biden come out and talk around. Marijuana is a gateway drug and shit all over the research. That's that's just miseducation right. But that's running for president. You still see these old dinosaurs when the good news is I think even trump his somehow said something good about. MDA therapy or therapy or something like like that and you know people on both sides are completely admitting that seems to actually you know medicine is not on a single. It's not a partisan issue that's good news. Yeah but the so. I think this is why in this larger conversation and I'm saying that's like super important. You know the science is moving very very slow. The excitement about the science is moving very very fast. The excitement about you know Some new psychedelic movement is upon US or right around the corner on as I would say And yet yet politicians don't always listen to US may putting myself in the science community right historically.

FDA United States Nixon Valen Duncan Ketamine Zayed Va.. Biden Marijuana Iran Dublin Drug Enforcement Agency Reagan frank
"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

08:50 min | 1 year ago

"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"I'm don you can't even like claim it in the way that in the heavy use of the term around. Somebody's really doesn't work. It's just threat loving field and if it's just very sweet and there's not there there's just not much there it's So that seems like a possible model. I was thinking also like the way that martial arts are like you know that that school of of psychedelic work in. Oh they have their own legal battles ahead of them and everything however like you know and it happened with and it's with psychotherapy to if you're if you're a strict analyst then you can trace your lineage right back to fried why you know it's like because because we're still only one hundred and fifty years removed from him so you know it's like Freud and fried or young and and then it's like you know this pyramid of teachers yes And and it's an it's an it's a field in a profession that seems best learned through an apprenticeship kind of yes format because each individual student has their own ego to be grappling with right. Yes which comes up in psychotherapy especially psychoanalytic therapy and psycho dynamic psychotherapy So you can't make some you know prescribed training program for dealing with the Hugo that's like the pursuit of the entire field right now on into infinity and the practice of of that's the practice practice is you know exploring these things about not only yourself but with your with your patients and so I think perhaps that's a way I don't know how that's let's enforce then when there's you know it has to be consumer getting bad behavior for whatever reason I'm stuck on that because I think it's out there her it's definitely out there and right now unfortunately it's probably going to be the responsibility of the Seeker or whatever you WanNa call it the client the person who's is going under the care of these people to have discernment and to be able to you know. I think it's going to be a lot easier to educate people on what to look out for and if these things are happening it's a you know a red flag in have a place where they can go talk to people. Right is that is nondenominational. You know that's just is based on the kind of understanding of. Oh you know that you can reality. Check here and that's fucked up right. That doesn't sound right than it is to implement lament across the board and all that weird subcultures in groups a standard. That people can attach to you. I do think just a across the board. Yeah transparency. If you're you know whoever you're with if that's like an element you know when it's illegal. That's an element that still can be allusive transparent transparency whereas if it's underground work and people you know there's a there's a certain level of of Discretion necessary. God Oh my God. You're right you can't really reveal. Yeah I guess what I need is more like I think any guru in there have been sex gurus out there it starts off to saying like yeah. I love Sax Aksa Bargain and try to have sex with you. I like to have sex. That's part of this cult. That's what this is what you're signing up for. That's informed consent that you're not gonNA re later down the line. They see idea of informed consent. Yeah Yeah Yeah that kind of selling a boundless love energy fields and and then later the sex part of that. Yeah so that. And I think that's actually a a real healthy question should find yourself around someone claiming to be Guru and certainly claiming to be your guru. Can you not just say hey down the line and you're going to try to fuck me. Is that on the menu here like after presence. And what about taking my dough or you're going to take my stuff or you don't want to take my money right and then also are you going. If you're not gonNa try to fuck me. Are you going to my wife. It's you know whatever it may be like. What's your is there a scheme boundaries? Yeah and I think if we really want to like deal with this problem. That's I think we're we're seeing not just in spiritual and psychedelic communities and psychological news but literally an all communities where there's skewed power dynamics you get these things that pop up so I think like it's GonNa it's more empower. I don't WanNa call them consumers because I hate that word empower power. The seeker sure with a series of questions. It's okay to ask. And here's an. Here's the conundrum is people who are desperate. You know we have a line. You know There are a lot of people who are hoping to get into into our study and we have a limited number of positions. Those are the people that we just know about because they've reached out to US specifically right. So so how do we How do we prevent vulnerable people because that doesn't that remove the ability to really make an informed decision when you're desperate desperate aaliyah can you really make I mean it amplifies the power dynamic at the very least career when the seeker believes you have the solution to their suffering. Yeah they're not just going to hold a safe place for you to have an internal experience and then be you know Compassionate and decent human beings not to you know tell you that your experience was somehow invalid or something right like You know how do we with the pace of science And the excitement about psychedelics. I think these are important distinctions to be making yeah That there is a lot of research going on for people who are vulnerable and who people who have in a medical conditions that they think psychedelics useful for they can go to clinical trials dot Gov and you can. There's a search engine and you can search any compound you can search any condition To find any studies any it's part of with the You know built in sort of Safety Measures of doing clinical research with human subjects as they have to be registered on this public public website. Allow clinical trials DOT GOV so that people can't you know secretly be doing human subject research or Or burying results or anything anything like that bearing results right. Why would they do that because they didn't get the results that they're hoping? Is that a big problem. Is that been happening. People bearing airing results in the less likely to publish results If the results aren't what they were hoping for. But I think you know as far as in the drug development world it just means that that drug is a dead end and they're not gonNA spend any more money researching it right It's very uncommon for for you know for A study that didn't yield any meaningful results to to be published. First first of all not a lot of periodicals are going to find it interesting enough to publish in their papering by who cares. Yeah so but there is clinical trials that go where you can track. What's studies have been done for different conditions in at least recently? I can't wrap my head around. Call is an old school conspiracy theories you can't during the war on drugs as you did. Yeah a lover of PSYCHEDELIC. Since I was in high school I developed a pretty healthy distrust for the US government and for governments in general there were opposed opposed or make criminalising psychedelics. Because anyone who's experienced a psychedelic and then has also had to deal with the fact they're taking a thing with a five year mandatory minimum sentence. You know it. It's not it doesn't take too too many like doesn't take take too. Many moments is suddenly realize like Oh. The problem is in the PSYCHEDELIC. The problem is whatever entity is criminalising. This psychedelic why in the name of the God in the name of Viga. The only God the.

US Hugo Freud Viga DOT
"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

13:29 min | 1 year ago

"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"Dr Marta yes. It's so good to see you man. It's good to see you too and to see you here yes in. What is the name of this clinic? It is is the California Center for Psychedelic. Therapy and K and it is as far as I know the first of its kind I can certainly in La and Yeah we specialize in psychedelic therapy at our clinic. What makes it different from other academy clinics? Here why is it the first of its car So it's not the first Ketamine Clinic But I've been doing ketamine since twenty fifteen and what I think is different about our approach here is that all of the members of our team also do psychedelic research coach For other research projects like the MAPS MD Mesa psychotherapy for PTSD. Study right and So they're they're experienced experienced in working with psychedelic experiences So we ketamine assisted psychotherapy. We don't just administer Mr Ketamine. For example many clinics they just are administered ketamine and then the ketamine induces a psychedelic or otherwise powerful awful experience and they're left kind of just to digest that at home right so our rooms are designed to be comfortable set and setting And we have trained therapists to work with the psychedelic experience in integrating that experience after the treatment. I got you is in this. This is a this really diverges. From what some ketamine clinics are doing I mean. I know that I've gotten calls from friends. Who have gone into Ketamine therapy? And they've just had the experience right and they confused and the doctor has said something along the lines of. Yeah just make sure you get an uber. Don't drive and they've had a real like ego shattering. Experience right so is ketamine. Therapy is just follow up or do you. Prep people beforehand with some sessions. So we do an intake take session with most people and then we'll do a series of treatments typically in the beginning because that's what the data recommends actually is a series of treatments And we'll do ninety minute sessions. Ninety minutes to two hours is the amount of time we recommend people stay here. It turned out when this Intra Nasal Ketamine Hit the market For S Ketamine. They were really pushing hard. They're sort of their safety standards and safety fifty recommendations based on what they had and luckily our clinic was sort of pretty much entirely in line with what they had recommended. They recommend recommend people not drive. They recommend people under direct medical supervision for ninety minutes. They recommend people have to our appointments. So we really had to like adjust very little and the ketamine experiences You know forty five minutes at the most so we have time in that ninety ninety minutes to two hours To have our you know all of the people who work with Patients here are a licensed or training psychotherapists. So they're working with mental health professionals and They have that forty-five additional minutes to stay here and integrate those experiences Sousse. This brings me to something. I've been wanting to talk with you about and come up and other podcasts. And in just conversations a general the ketamine experience especially when with. I'm just naming the therapies. That I know of that are happening. Legally goalie right now it's Ketamine and MDA with your study right but study the Kademi experience is at least for me and other people have chatted added within also if you read John Lilley's writings and his very detailed map of the Kademi universe. It is so powerful and so- PSYCHEDELIC and so so other worldly that people experience visionary states right profoundly alien encounters very odd things things. So I'm curious. How as a scientist and not just you? But the scientific community in general is is grasping lease hyper dimensional states right and addressing it in a way that when you communicate with someone who just went through it you you can connect to that to to whatever that the mystical Sherzai things in a non dry scientific way right. Yeah I think I think it's important that therapists At least the way that we work with these states is not that we we need to get this. Get this experience right. That we you know are saying they're using the right words or or that people are correct tweet reflecting the experience that they had to us in fact we encourage them not to worry about that. Because it can be distracting what we've found clinically in a lot of the data has has shown from suicide and research working psychedelic or with mystical states. Is that. It's just important that people have these experiences so our approach scientifically as more applying our cycles psychedelic therapy and just general psychotherapy tools for creating a comfortable environment for that experience to unfold. There's no way to predict really exactly what experience people are going to to have. People can have vastly different experiences at the same dose. And you know two days apart But the important thing is to you know that is an incredibly important to them and to allow them to express that to To help them put words words to things if there if that's what they're trying to do And generally just treat it with respect. Okay I see yes so you don't have to. Obviously obviously you're not going to be going scientific materialist with somebody just said they turn into a flock of birds or something like that right right but there are like you know. There's the mystical all states questionnaire That that breaks down sort of known categories of the mystical experience. Yes and I think that was was originally developed in theology but I wouldn't be quoted on that but but the mystical states experiences questionnaire You know has there are some predictable qualities of these valuable experiences inevitability is one of them so another reason that we don't you know give people the impression that it's important that they are able to communicate correctly. Yeah a lot of times. There aren't good words experienced that they have yeah and a a- An effective ketamine could be that they could have some word finding difficulties. So we really we invite them to speak after forty five minutes but we explained that to them before they may not be in any condition to may not feel compelled to do that. They certainly don't have to well. This is to me and I absolutely love that. Finally we can legally study these states of consciousness. It's beautiful but and and I love that you have this wonderful meeting that is happening. Between the scientific and the mystical and the scientific traffic is attempting to translate the experience of the mystical into data. That could be analyzed. is which I think is incredible but to me there's other particularly funny. Yeah almost monty python level funder when you hear mystical experience agreeance questionnaire right or this is the cool thing. Yeah like this is a this is the kind of conversation I'd like to have especially with Duncan trussell is like you know. How else do we validate it? Though how do we how do we show that. It's not just the dose of Silla Cybernet. I've been that someone gets or just the dose of Ketamine and someone gets because two people might get the same ketamine experience but one of them is highly anxious terrified and never ever done a psychedelic before has read. Weird things on the Internet is generally a nervous person especially about new experiences. Everyone is And then that person gets experience in the whole time they're resisting the experience for example. Then another I think it's the same dose and they are an experienced meditators. They're they're used to going into weird mental spaces they understand the idea of sort of surrendering and letting go and they have a total eagle. Disillusion Ozanich boundless nece You know cease to exist experience yet at grand unifying you know unified with one consciousness. snus kind of thing. Yes how how do we. It's important that we show the value in my in my opinion and it's incredibly important that we show that it was that experienced. That may have been the difference between the person the two people who got the same exact dosing right that that experience can be valuable. So you know it's not necessarily because we're trying to define the experience for its own sake AAC. Yeah it's so that we can have a common language about what is that might be the actual key factor in these medicines for example in the suicide study for smoking cessation. They showed just that they showed that changes in the mystical states question there or correlated to success in smoking thank cessation. Not Dose of Civil Silent Right and this matches doesn't is that what. Aa says this is the higher a power idea. That's what's going to help you addiction possibly and but with Ketamine. I'm really interested in it because I have had some pretty good luck as far as Being someone who's suffered from depression more than a few times and if got not medication for depression and it's something that when you've been depressed and you're not depressed you do so. I sometimes feel that thing like man you have to watch out you know. Oh good still like the. You don't want it to come back and that's terrifying it's terrifying. Yeah Yeah Yeah that but I my experience with it was so uh-huh profound and it really did. I'M NOT GONNA say I'm cured of depression like I get down low. Sometimes I feel abnormally normally low sometimes but since that you know experience and a few after it's just not the same anymore it doesn't hit me as hard anymore. It just hasn't happened yet. I'm not saying won't have run into so to me. I'm really curious about what happened. I'm curious about is there there. Is it the mystical state the ego dissolution the reminder that the identity that you think you have is not necessarily the entirety of your right entity in the subsequent relief that comes from that understanding or is it that there is some physiological change. That has happened in my brain and in my brain is producing some mental transmitter. Some rich and I wish so I guess my question is which came first. Yes the mystical experience. That's the the fifty thousand dollar question or whatever. Yeah but we do know that in all of the data that's validated ketamine for treatment resistant. Depression They did not value the experience necessarily or they didn't maybe the researchers did but that's all that's a whole nother layer of study than just demonstrating that the medicine has an effect on depression oppression so in all of the studies that were done That I reviewed There was There was no integration. There was an attempt to actually get rid of those unwanted side effects as they were sort of termed in the papers largely that I saw and and so the the ketamine would be administered fairly slowly over a longer period of time and And so I you know that that data was extremely promising. And you know that data has led to all of these clinics you know feeling justified in offering ketamine for trimmers depression.

ketamine Mr Ketamine Ketamine Depression La Dr Marta PTSD California Center depression Duncan trussell MAPS MD Mesa Silla Cybernet MDA Ozanich Aa John Lilley
"marta" Discussed on Coming Out Stories

Coming Out Stories

09:32 min | 2 years ago

"marta" Discussed on Coming Out Stories

"Am. Mine and you're not going to change. Oh, you know, like, but it took me some years sexually make it for myself work for anyone else. I I was like a terrified because like my father. I didn't live with them for many years ready. But I see wanted to have a family, especially what you foreigner leaving Rhode have close family around you. So he's not like you can go for a coffee to your mom like every second weekend or every second day. So when I visited them from time to time it was good to have like a family and a relationship with them. But it took us like two years actually to make straight. And I said to him that he never prepared me for who. Is who is who? He's yes. So why would I prepare him and giving tenure centre sent but how? But how was the conversation with your mom? Did they have to explain she says she knew about me when I was in love with this first girl. But there wasn't subjects like people didn't talk about this. So I had always friends female friends around me. Any better in Poland? No, we've our politics. Stay. No. But I think people are more educated. They traveled the world. Like my generation is. Okay. I believe like degeneration of father like my parents. It's something new to them. So they need sometime actually to understand illegal as it. But you can't get married some signs this not being legal because like I won't be thrown today prison. It's not like that yet. They're actually going to right direction towards things like that. But we don't have rights. There is no tolerance. Like, I can the heat on the street and no one will act. So he's not like I will go and kiss my wife because it's too intimate to me. So I won't be doing this on this way. But if I was doing this, I could have been hit face depending on what city I was like if I went to capitol probably being Nord, and could you report that to the place? Well, I could I wouldn't expect any reaction was Paul reason for moving to the I've been travelling since I was nineteen due to my career ity, and I wanted to see the world and meet people. So it's not the first country I live in but the one I live in the longest so far. I'm not I'm not saying I would be thinking forever, but we would house probably will for some time. And you mentioned why I did have a happy ever after that in the end of your love life. Perfect half after my previous. But relationship. We started with very close friendship. And there was no discussion about building anything out of it because I wasn't relationship and I wouldn't do entering go. Anything wrong behind back. If I'm really in the relationship so friendship with Barbara. I and I'm guessing you got the to country that whereas legal to get married to same sex partner. Yeah. Totally. Yeah. I, you know, we have neighbors who actually are like lovely disease in the garden doing the gardening or whatever. So there is no weird comment about this. Or just like, you know, easy things you do in your life. No. And then when you have a moment you saying, oh, gosh, people are actually being killed for things like that. I'm lucky so that are the moments. I feel I'm incredibly lucky to be in this country. And we have my life the way I would wish you know, to have a house to have lovely wife, and you know, just to work and make my dreams to come through. So did you parents goes your? Your word. Yes. Suffice fries. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So how was it? When you told them you getting married, so they are. So my dad he needed actually dicate to get over. The fact I am gay, my mom, always supportive. My sisters. Both totally like hundred percent of support. So for my that, it was his actually responsibility to come to terms and understand except I told him on once, you know, you'll lose if you want accent it so that you choice. This is factor, and you have to accept it or reject objected. So we'll never decide. Wow. So how did that feel that moment where you're marrying your wife in the UK and your whole families come over from Poland to support shaking? I was shaking like Barbara. I wear for six years together. And we decided to get married because some people aware fighting for it, you know, so it was like saying thank you to these people that there was some people fighting for the fact that we can get married now. So. So obviously we are in. But when you had this chat about getting married that was one of the things we brought to our conversation that we should actually take advantage. And we wanted to take advantage of the fact that we can actually do it in Poland. There is like six hundred five hundred kilometers distance from one city to another. So our families never met. So we thought we will invite them doing and for a wedding. We hired some caravans in Wales. And so we took the hell familiar for three nights. So we could spend some time altogether. And have this moment with everyone. So the families could relate is relationship. So your wife is from Poland as well. All she's from politics. It doesn't sound like that. In this country. We've met online she was leaving and fallen under time is and then she had to give up her life in Poland to come over you worse. Let's say. She's still with me. So. So what do you have any advice to other people into accepting sexuality and coming out to the parents in difficult circumstance? Like, I'm not saying it's easy. It's not it's terrifying. And while I remember the time when I was actually exchanging rings wedding rings. I will shaking like my legs were like dancing 'cause I knew my parents are behind me. And like, I didn't know how they read me. You know, how they see these two women exchanging rings. So my grandma she she didn't tell to drama because I like shoot she's very loving. But I dunno all generation, I don't know if they will accept it. So I want them to feel sad or don't know mixed feelings. I don't know. But I see them from time to time. So I would let them live the life. They have in Conway. So that Dr not like a religious like a ticket or something like that. But there is no grey people in our family. So that will be something new but going back to your question, I would suggest to talk to people like to have your supportive friends around you. So even if you feel you're going to be rejected by family, you're surrounded by people who actually will take care of you. I put myself in a corner, and I wasted seven years. So I wouldn't like anyone to do this as well. So talk to people that said, yes, I mean, let's talk about your work little bit actually because you've chosen to be very out to newer haven't. Is it tell us what you didn't advertising advertising for the river. It is what I do for living. So I run a business along with barber. My wife who is an illustrator. So we've merged the talents to offer like a broad over our customers so advertising is over fulltime job and just to keep our life going and just to get some more opportunities to travel and meet people network, and socialize we decided to set up fashion line called down thirteen down thirteen in lesbian, freshen Ryan's go. Isn't it? Really? Yeah. Yeah. So we actually built the line with women in mind. It is what we would wear if we were if we went shopping. So yet, we think about us, but in a wider perspective like about women, so yeah, we started with T shirts and yesterday with lounge travelers so the response was quite positive, which is nice because we are only second in this business. So, yeah, let's let's let's think this will grow. Yeah. Cross. How great your Sarah? I'm proud the lesbian fashion which is. Yes. So yeah. Yeah. So we've got plenty of ideas, like withdraw scratch, my background is also interior designer. So the design was somewhere I was somewhere like always surrounded by design in any form. And then I'm at Barbara is a designer as well. So all the first nations, and observations and whatever is connected to design. It can be like interior, design or fashion design. Let me explore a little bit more of me. So. Yeah, fingers goes for it. Queue to Malta for telling me her story. And so thrilled and ends with a happy ending and her finding love with another polish lesbian. Please do subscribe wherever you get your cost from what up to hear from you on Twitter. You can find us there. Come out stories. I'm swell coming out stories is what goes on media production and the next poke caused again to hit quite a harrowing story from Lucy Lucy came out in the one thousand nine hundred as in Cumbria was homophobic bullied at school went on to say psychologist and even given electric shock treatments for being gay. I was thirteen year old this time the psychologists restoring cigarette boxes on me 'cause I did catch. All you must be. You must be gay because you can't catch.

Poland Barbara Rhode Twitter partner Wales Lucy Lucy UK Paul Malta Conway Cumbria Ryan Sarah six hundred five hundred kilom hundred percent thirteen year seven years six years two years
"marta" Discussed on Coming Out Stories

Coming Out Stories

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"marta" Discussed on Coming Out Stories

"On media. This is coming out stories is about cost about one of the most important conversations. If you life, I'm an ago swell. From Malta she's from pilot, she identifies as being a lesbian and she spent years trying to come to terms with her sexuality. I believe it was high school when you're actually starting feeling like some kind of attraction to the other people. And so I have fallen in love with my classmate for used to be my best friend, and she actually responded, positively although she had a friend. Pulsa typically gave me a green light years. As in you had a relationship. Well, she had she wasn't a relationship. But I think I was something new to experiment. We're still kids like teenagers Moore. But yes, it was experienced put me like depressed for six seven years believe it made you depressed because I ended up this relationship, she heart already, so although there is some promises that she will get rid of the other life, and she will be worth me. It never happened that way. So I was in this very place in that moment to meet this person and probably to fall enough because this experience brought some painful moments after all so you're in love with annual having a relationship, but she still had VoIP friend for how long she's still with him. He still with their married. They have kids. They can have talent. You know? I don't think. So no. Know how long we eat together the whole high school almost four years is like he didn't start like second week. After like since we started the -cation was like a year after I believe because the first thing was to build relations like friendship people do. And then I knew I am lesbian like you can feel. It is not like trend. You follow is something within new. You're just explore. I mean, this is more about you than her. But did think she identifies as bisexual or? No, no, no. I only women. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Like one hundred percent sure gosh, that's hard to deal with. I couldn't put myself back on track for seven years. So I didn't then a relationship during that time as just put myself in a dark corner, like pain crazy destructive very here. And was the whole relationships. It didn't tell anyone secrets hundred percent because she was still in relationships though. He didn't tell your other friends. No, no, no one like they now. No because we like my friends from high school. We still have friendship like we are still in contact, although I live in different country, but it was easier actually to talk about this now to them and share actually because like if we are still friends for so many years like twenty blues. So I just thought they should know what was their reaction when you finally told a friend of mine, like the classes one she said that she had a feeling, but you know, in Poland is not a common thing. And no well twenty. Years ago, even worst like there was no such a terrible like lesbian, gay is more popular now because like we are talking about this openly say twenty years ago, you didn't even know the term. Well, I didn't know I was gone. I I just had this feeling alike woman. So obviously, I knew the term lesbian because like I've read books, and I come from a small city. So there was no pickups underground what was the Student World. Skype people in Poland. There wasn't subject to be honest. No, I think like they took a lot of all this now, although there's zero tolerance imporant, but yet when years ago now, no one think about is like no one thought about this. Now, he didn't know any of the even gay men. No, no. Maybe they were so living in the closet. Same as me. No never open conversation about relationships. Keepers incredibly isolates. Yeah. Yeah. I did feel isolated and then after this break down I should put myself like in verd- dark corner like isolated myself from relationship at all for some years. We regret today because I should meet people, and at least because people so what stage did you find any feel? You could come out this place and tell people. To see psychologists. So I had the Turkey because I needed someone who I could talk. I could talk to obviously I've paid Herrmann Izzo. She had to listen to me. So that was that was the time. When actually I started talking about this. And then I found the best supporting my although Caesar so she brought me back to life her Salomon. Her husband my law. They took care of me. So what was it like coming out to your family them? My mom brilliant. My mom, brilliant, always supportive. Always by my side, my dad's. He didn't take it. Well, like, we didn't speak for two years. She years. Can you? Remember the conversation. He was gone like, obviously, I was a weirdo in the family and the black sheep as you say. So yeah. Like history's first reaction was like he they're angry. Very like I had to leave the house. Otherwise would probably find physically physically. Yeah. I think it was the state. She actually hit me. I was worried like I still wanted to have father at the time. And then I thought well, I bother if you don't tolerate me the way I am.

Moore Pulsa Poland verd- dark corner Malta Herrmann Izzo Turkey Caesar one hundred percent hundred percent six seven years twenty years seven years four years two years
"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"The duncan trussell family our podcast dr martin dr kohl marta welcome back thanks man it's great to be here i am so excited to chat with you because what's going on in your life right now crazy shit you've ever experienced right it's definitely crazy and it's been a wild ride but yeah i mean this is you are the leading gator in the face three clinical trials for india may in los angeles which is potentially one of the most massive shifts in at least the united states treatment of india may you you are one of the people who very well might be laying the tracks said indie making become prescribable rather than just a party drug well that's very generous but yes i'm part of large tam of people that are working to actually try to demonstrate whether tests the existing evidence for md assisted psychotherapy for the treatment of ptsd out how big is that team my team here in los angeles alone is myself and seven other people and there are twelve twelve other sites around the united states and canada and unknown you know dozens of people throughout the years on this particular project through the face to trials through the phase one trials all the people at maps difference between phase one face to face three i think it'd be held her sure many of us have no idea that means excellent yeah so one you're proposing drug for fda approval it has to go through a rigorous process of scientific study so the first phase is that you have to demonstrate that what you're proposing would be safe so phase one studies are done on human subjects this is how it works for psychiatry anyway phase one studies done on healthy human subjects and they measure all kinds of pre and post parameters on like physiological functioning and lab tests and things like that to just make sure that before we go giving sick people some potential medicine that we're not giving them something poisonous or something terrible so safety safety safety safety study continues through all phases of of the trials face two is faith one cat scans and stuff or addy how could include cats tunes if there's reason to believe that it might be damaging to brain fun.

dr martin dr kohl marta india los angeles united states canada duncan trussell
"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"marta" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"Government that one of these medicines has the potential to treat ptsd which is a psychological disorder that ironically people get from following the orders of the government and going to other countries to blow people up just around the corner is a conversation with dr kohl marta who is leading the phase three clinical trials for md may in los angeles he is part of maps the multidisciplinary association for psychedelic studies and we're going to talk a little bit about mda therapy and ptsd we're gonna jump right into that but i some quick business this episode of the duncan trussell family our podcast he's been brought to you by the value lords and ladies over hellofresh dot com hellofresh is a meal kit delivery service shops plans and delivers favorite step by step recipes in pre measured ingredients so so you you can can cook joy in that water cheeser delivery date whatever works best for you and your very busy schedule get food on the day these so when between doing all of the mountain climbing probably to burrowing under house hidden treasure you think it's been less thereby pirate or exile prints point is whatever works best for your burrowing mountain climbing schedule or whatever it is you may do that's today you can get the food delivered pause the account for weeks at a time out of town perhaps climbing k two being incarcerated for a misdemeanor offense that you didn't take care of.

ptsd dr kohl marta los angeles duncan trussell
"marta" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"marta" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Other health care providers maybe you could talk a little bit about the integration back hair delivery model can definitely as i mentioned earlier marta uh be pointing out the importance of having primary care and this this primary care figures she really is the one that over stephen manager the individual overall how they are the driver if you're well uh future or upcoming kerber and determine whether or not there are any netted cleanup berry treatment or for the individual and durant yeah and win partners that are involved you know you're talking uh especially when you're talking pharmacies maybe you're no rather uh aren't denver act rarity energy ignoring it with a girl oh you have these different kooky aren't working together all colonel under one roof under one roof allow right and we've been if you get older that might be the the answer you know going back to an orchestra you know right that's a great example what age feige there are all working towards tentative carried for you orchestrated right this is really awesome and i bet you know as you get older um it it's really nice no that you have an expert you have the market leader here you don't bringing in the excellent needed people are living longer and bear is but i got the chance that.

denver marta stephen durant