4 Burst results for "Marshawn Allen"

"marshawn allen" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

14:20 min | 8 months ago

"marshawn allen" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"You said a Charlie Brown Christmas Yorkshire Merry Christmas from the Adam Corolla Show Kevin Pollack in studio. We talked about the Marvellous Mazel. All now have Apparition and three Christ as well movies movies movies all over the place. Apparition is In theaters available elbow on video on demand December twenty seventh. And then you show up with Richard Gere and Peter Dink Lynch and Walter Goggin Walton. Sorry Walton Goggin so I loved in a hateful a That's coming up January tenth. Good see my friend. Hey how are you. I'm doing well excellent. I know what makes you so nice What the Hell's my problem? Well you're it's weird of realized that we like breeds of dogs like summer like the APP irs are sort of laid back summer summer Kinda dumb and Kylie. You're friendly you're nice. What would that be like a labrador? I got a big lab. That's just dumb uh-huh and cuddly and she doesn't Bark at other dogs he's kind of laid back. He's not good for anything and he doesn't do impressions. Do a killer Walkin. Have you ask you know what is his name is. Phil should ask Phil if he doesn't if he doesn't walk and Christopher Walken. Yeah but you're in it's interesting maybe it's the end of the year. We're starting to reflect a little but sure you're in a good mood and you're positive and you're you're you have a good energy and your friendly. Yeah and and my feeling is I think some people are that way because they don't want people because they care what people think about them or something like that way because that's just the way they are Dr. Yeah I fall into the. I don't care what people think about me and I just kind of prefer life and a half filled way and don't you also feel I know it sounds trite but I mean sure to act happy and you are happy. That's not a big chasm between you just acting the happy. Yeah and that's why if somebody says how you doing say fantastic. Don't go oh okay. Yeah 'cause asking to you for you to tell tell them anything negative. You're telling you how to how to feel if you say fantastic then. Guess what. Guess what it's fantastic momentarily. Yeah and also so. I've reached a point in life when things are going super. Well then it makes it so much easier to be nice to everyone. Most of the time I get into big populated areas is and I'm not a fan of what Humanity has sort of become like at your airports or your larger venues where everyone is very focused on their own agenda and needs yes whatever but it really does Come expensive anyone else around them as I walk. Walk through the airports this nation. Yeah dodging dog poop from fake service. Dogs went crazy. Does want to travel to other schnauzers. I I think to myself the self esteem movement man. It's come home to roost. Yeah we started to started to tell everyone to feel good about themselves and when you feel good about yourself then it just just becomes you. Yep and we're trying to live in a society which is very golden Rulli about you but we've convinced everyone to feel good about themselves and that is tough because a society is sort of like a crew team like everyone's got an or and we all got to be doing it in Rhythm Eh. You go dancing to the beat of your own coxswain that ain't GonNa work in terms of the mass getting down. Yeah right so yeah we need a little more of that and somebody needs to start talking about that a little more. You're not that special fucking shut up either new hashtags. Yes yes. You're not that special. Well we made a mistake. which was you may feel good about yourself if you earned that when I can't just crafted on what's going to work in a bumper sticker all the people that's like you look in the mirror? Like Stuart Smalley shirking the most miserable people on the planet like view. People you know go out and earn something. They'll start a business or win a heisman or something. Then we'll talk that's right start a business or when is the two easiest things. Yeah Yeah Yeah at this age at start a business. I don't feel like going back. I could earn a highs wherever could take many four years. Yeah how so. How many heisman? Trophy trophy owners winners are there. Do we think what what would the number be. Well they've been giving it out. Probably something like that. Yeah since the forties forties and I gotTa tell you one time winner Yeah Archie Griffin Ohio State. That's right yeah him. Rock Anthony Davis from USC WHO did win. It wants to not only didn't bell now. Nobody did not win. uh-huh Belden Locker Allan Allan Ma. Marcus marshawn Allen. Oh so No it's funny Archie Griffin didn't turn out to be great in the NFL. went to the bengals won t to Heismans and then the NFL curse the double higher. That's right Oh so nothing for Anthony Davis and nothing for Ricky Charles White and Mark Garrett and then Oj Simpson and then it was until Charles White right and Marcus Allen which one was Oj Oj was the second when already the second one yeah It's been awarded eighty one time since nineteen eighteen. Thirty five eighty four whale feel like why'd he had the market corner for the first forty then. The Brown people's is there to move into the neighborhood. But we're back this year right tomorrow. I just wanted to say that could agree with me when I four back having didn't fight on it no uh-huh so what's your life like you're live on the west side. Finds that are cool with Steve Martin. Martin I don't I don't really run with famous people I host a weekly poker game. And it's quite rare that someone recognizable shows up to play. It happens on occasion. You know there's a high school football coach. There's a small practice doctor there's you know it's there. There might be writers and producers producers but not necessarily famous looking people. Who's the biggest name that's ever showed up biggest sake pollock please? Well I'm partial to a Chefs food. Oh so bobby flay oh damn yeah. Yeah Yeah Yeah. Who is the best chef? Oh you know my better half and I just got obsessed with this ridiculous show below deck. Can't get enough can't get down so I hired aired Chef Adam from below deck Mediterranean cooking. My place for my birthday for like a little party of nine people. He was spectacular You know they're Michelin Train. What have you guys in women that are that are chefs on these boats? Below deck is sort of what goes on with the crew on one of these the luxury yachts and people who chartered a boat are just getting drunk and being rich assholes. That's the bounce that superfund you gotTa know what you signed up up for though like when I sit there wearing power packs they know their miked robbery one of them from the charter guests to the to the work. But also like when you sit next to someone on a southwest th West flight to Phoenix and they turn out to be Douche. Come on there but when you go on a private yacht and the the woman's a little needy you have to expect that that's coming with the territory territory right. Yeah but his very watchable show. Sit as we don't tune into reality. TV otherwise but that show a friend of KNBR is a producer. And we're talking about. Let's watch this and Oh man just all in say I feel a lot like the exacerbated captain yes the world is my like. I do a lot of walking into rooms going really. Yeah Jesus Christ we talk about this. I The babysitting. Yeah there's a lot of that old girlfriend is the executive producer. You guys know the person which one there's a couple executive Portland are co executive producers. He's afraid I we have a mutual. Your friend Jason. Antoon this wonderful actor. Portland was my roommate for many years. He just sent us some some paraphernalia. Korea shirts and hats from the think Chirac. Oh was the boat from that. Show the great shots were roommates. Is My last official roommate. The last roommate I wasn't poking God is exciting as my wife. The now we we went we had three places together. Like I moved with Portland from where we live in Lock resent which is sort of? What van is is to Sherman? Oaks folks you think locking Yada is good but locker sent a not so good. Wait a house up the hill with Ralph garment and Cortlandt and mean Portland. Lived back at the end of the hallmark. Share the bathroom and I'd like a miniature little room and then at some point I started the have some k rock success or at least a little bit of traction and I think the owner of the house was going to sell the house out from under US I actually got. I got jobbed twice because it the house that mean Portland lived that with row up. Unlock for Senate. There was two miniature sure bedrooms at the end of the hall very small and then there was a master suite. A- now the deal with everyone paid the same rent five hundred bucks a month interesting. What whoever's in the master suite that guy was in charge of mowing the lawn and taking care of the pool chores? That guy did not do either one of those things. I did that stuff but we still just paid the same amount live in hell later on Cortlandt and I move to apartment into Luca Lakes and there was a master suite and then aside room like there would be like for most apartments. They had the bathroom attach and was bigger and I said well well you want to just flip a coin and see who gets the master suite and he said Yeah and I said Okay but whoever gets the master suite should get for like six months and then the other person should be able to do it because it shouldn't just be the coin toss and flip the coin and he won and he was there for eighteen months. And then we I then we moved again but this time we moved into my house bought a house in the Hollywood hills and then he lived my roommate right. Sure in the house. He got the masturbate. He did not but we lived in three separate. That's crazy dwellings. A rented house an apartment and and then my first house under the Hollywood sign you stay in touch and he tells you life at sea with the show or no no. I haven't talked to him in a long time. Always got along. Well you know you wouldn't do multiple room moving sake so yeah yeah unless there was some sort of falling out that you didn't know about possible well all of them on the phone. It's your show but I asked him to call in we got along fine and the last The last we live together it was probably like. I don't know ninety seven or something. When he moved into an apartment out of my house in the Hollywood hills I spoke to him? Recently coincidentally very very fond memories of Nice things about you living together said you were very well. The thing Adam didn't say a Portland said that you were very generous and basically letting him crash in your house when he wasn't doing so well and he appreciates that. Yeah well I'm fresh new is like you've done enough for me. Come out over here. I'm a heated needed. Here's the thing about me that I talked to people about a lot. I'm fucking reasonable reasonable. person other people who aren't reasonable think you're the one who's not being reasonable my new thing. There's like two of you and they're going. Why are you being unreasonable? Am I going. I've a long track record of being reasonable. Yeah such is is now and I don't even remember things in a reasonable way. Just assume he owed me ran a charge them rant or whatever but I probably let him crash out in my house because at that the time we were both struggling in the business and I started to get some traction plus. I got the house so when I started to get some traction. I thought and he wasn't getting the traction. I thought well you're supposed to have a little mercy on the guy's not getting the traction. He'll come around his time. Oh yeah yeah now. He's living on a yacht killing now. I'm backing locker. Santa what's happening. He's not reaching out to me. I didn't know that was I. Guess I did know. That was his chef Jaffna. That's interesting too. It's got to be on season. Eight or seven windows up some shows. Kind of flounder. They the below deck and then they did a bunch of seasons blow deck Mediterranean. So altogether may be eleven twelve thirteen. God Wow yeah well I hope you remember. Remember that when I'm looking for a job. Seven seasons on main show so all right. So are you a foodie now. No I just sort of annoyed by that term which is like to eat at staff. I don't need to make thing. Yeah I just like better food as opposed those to not but could do five guys in a heartbeat also Let's stay off a sex renown just focus on third. Okay sure I thought we were going to be all over the map. Let's do five guys in six women that restaurant Yeah Yeah.

Portland Chef Adam Christ Walton Goggin Marcus marshawn Allen producer Anthony Davis Richard Gere Cortlandt Archie Griffin Adam Corolla Kylie Charlie Brown Hollywood hills bobby flay Steve Martin Jaffna Kevin Pollack Christopher Walken
"marshawn allen" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

23:15 min | 10 months ago

"marshawn allen" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"His case he was he was given a multiple life sentences without the let's see if we can get marshawn Allen back on the phone here but Marsha Levick talk to me a little bit about a read the facts of marshawn case here I mean is that that's part of the the big picture that we have to look at that he did he someone who didn't even pull the trigger and but ended up with a life sentence without the possibility of parole at the age of fifteen that's life without parole under the exact same circumstances and his case highlights how we cannot think about these cases we cannot examine them through one lens everybody is different and that's precisely the point of the Courts decisions. Well let's see if we have Marshall Allen back on the line here marshawn are you with us from here okay thanks so much for joining us today in this discussion here you just tell us a little bit about when you were fifteen and you began serving your your life sentence without the possibility thirty of parole I mean take us back to that that moment in time who what what were you like what kind of person were you then at fifteen well at the age of fifteen have to step back and explain that I had an older brother who I looked up to who was involved in drug dealer and and I my my dad was using drugs and he wasn't around and my mom's brothers who actually introduced my brother to selling drugs they were actually the only male role models I had around so those were the people I was looking up to so growing up in environment and I just didn't my community but also the family household where selling drugs and was was acceptable You know it played a very very impressionable role in my life but I was a youth I was in high school I was very into fixing things with my hands and working on cars and things like that I wasn't a bad kid I 'cause I got into trouble like every kid does when they're especially boys get into trouble when at age but I was not at that point I had never been charged or convicted or a comedian he acts of violence when my case happened and circumstances will be happening was as you know his his drug deal that went bad individuals head of came to buy large amount of drugs from my brother and and putting a gun to my head and forcing me to take them to the apartment when my brother was a hit his drugs and money well he's business from and especially on the ground and they out that he made the drug do they actually kidnapped me and made me take them back to the location where he had picked him up and so is the situation it'll add to it my role in a crime was still in the vehicle that was used and and that came about with me being a teenager I was really into cars I love cars I love driving him fixing on them and everything so I learned at a very young age how to drive and actually was still cards from like of individuals in my neighborhood Masan if I can just interrupt here we've just got a minute before I have to let you go here you were released in two thousand sixteen you served twenty five years right and now you you manage an advocacy group called the Restore Justice Foundation. I mean just a minute we have before I have to let you go here what do you you think your experience what lessons should should we draw from your experience about how we ought to be looking at at questions of juvenile sentencing well as Marcia said in that science says that you ju are different than we do change that we shouldn't be have this sentence Espn impose on every that should be individual consideration that should be made before citizens I made in there shouldn't be as we you say that there is no no crystal ball for the election no at the time we'll send the scene how individuals WanNa turn out so there there should be some mechanism in place in in place where a youth can be read review ten years and with instant sentenced to decide where he's at whether or not he's been rehabilitate it can be safely released to society we shouldn't just be categorically finishing youth without parole without giving them a chance to themselves well marshawn Allen he is a man he manages the advocacy and out at an outreach for the restored Justice Foundation and is a board member of the campaign for the fair sentencing of youth joining us from Chicago go marshawn thank you so very much and Marsha Levick Sam by here for just a moment we have to take a quick break this is point this is on point I'm Meghna Chakrabarti we're talking with Marshall Levick she is chief counsel and founder of the Juvenile Law Center Public Interest Law firm that's been advocating for children's rights since nineteen seventy five we're talking with Marsha because this week the supreme court heard another case that as asking the court to reassess sentencing for juveniles who commit needed murder and Marsha let me ask you I mean you have been deeply involved in this work since nineteen seventy five it seems as if in the past enter fifteen years we've been seeing a kind of rapid pace of change in how the courts are looking at juvenile cases like this even the most extreme ones because I mean wasn't it just in the in the nineties where one of the prevailing theories about juvenile offenders was that of incorrigible superpredators. Yes yeah and I'm glad that US question When I think about the trajectory of my work and the work of my colleagues in this field the cases the the recent cases decided by the US Supreme Court in the last fifteen years I think are very much a response to what happened is a consequence of what we now was the Super Predator myth of the nine hundred ninety this notion that we were coming upon generation of violent teenagers who terrorize our neighborhoods that proved to be false else but before it was recanted by the scientists who came up with it we saw hundreds of thousands of children being tried as adults in the criminal justice system the numbers at some points during the nineteen nineties whereas highest two hundred thousand children a year were being charged as adults and what that meant was is that as they pass through that system if they were convicted they were subject to the full brunt of adults sentencing that included of course the death penalty in some states and it included life without parole or very very long term of your sentences and so when the Supreme Court was finally when they made the decision to reexamine the constitution nowadays the death penalty in two thousand five I think it was very much in part in response to the concern that we had so many youth in this country being convicted and sentenced as adults and also the coincidental emergence of science that had come out really beginning a research net were convened by the Macarthur Foundation in the late in the mid nineteen ninety s that research began to make its way into both the academic conversations As well as I think the public discourse and of course as I said was very foundational on the Supreme Court's decision and so as you you know you you kind of have this comment where you had hundreds of thousands of youth in the criminal justice system and very compelling research that they were different that they were less blameworthy and Enj- those I think those things coming together really did lead to I think what is fair to say revolution in sentencing juveniles in this country yes there's they wanna come back to you with you Marsha because I wondering how should we be looking at at the issue of culpability the question of culpability and here's here's why I ask because I mean you said earlier that there is a deep streak in the American criminal justice system that is is punitive right and so I wonder that's for a reason and bear with me here as I walked through this thought experiment okay because you know for example in case his of sexual assault in college. Now we're not talking about minors here we're talking about college students but I've heard frequently people say well look lots of lots of college students get drunk but even in their inebriated states most of them don't sexually assault people is that I mean that that's an interesting analogy to me because it should the same question be asked of youth offenders that that most seventeen-year-old most sixteen years most fifteen-year-olds even with their developing being brains they don't commit these terrible crimes so shouldn't shouldn't punish there's a reason why punishment is part of the criminal justice system even for juvenile else yes and I don't think that we can ignore the role that punishment plays the role of holding people accountable for what they do is certainly a lament I think of any justice system but I think that the the fact that not everyone does it is not a reason to throw out those or throw away those who do because this is you of culpability is also relevant to our concern I think a constitutional concern for proportionality ensuring that when we do in fact punish people and hold them account double we do it in ways that are proportionate to their culpability for the crimes that they commit so I think we have to focus on those who get caught up in the justice system not those who don't and what we know about these individuals is that again as as youth is adolescence their ability to make mature decisions to make good decisions is poor they are impulsive there impetuous and it would be wrong I think is a matter of constitutional law I really think that's what the US Supreme Court has said in this a series of the last three decisions on sentencing that we simply cannot as a matter of constitutional law treat in the same as we would adults because levels of culpability are less and their levels of maturity and judgment are less and it is very much about as I as I said this concern for proportionality and this comes directly out of how we think about our eighth amendment ban on Kroll unusual punishment Well let's go to Gary Calling from Montgomery Alabama Gary you're on the air thanks for taking me call I'm retired law enforcement of the city of Montgomery actually responded Wanda DC sniper scenes when they pass through Montgomery we're not born human beings we learn how to be a human being and when the child is raising an atmosphere that's inhumane then that's what they know and it's such a young age they don't have the opportunity to control their impulse behavior so if he's sentenced to life in prison and hostile environment they were Steve WHO's calling from New Orleans Steve you're on the air thanks for taking my call when I was eleven years old the person who is still in jail for the crime has the possibility of coming up with role now because of the change in the I mean we received death threats call to my house after the crime saying that if we testified they would come after us dear Steve I'm so sorry to have to interrupt you there is running out of time but thank you so much for your call and for sharing what happened to to how would you respond to both Gary and Steve Well I think they both present very real and important perspectives on what we're talking about And and I think to Gary Point I appreciate his understanding from the position where he is that precisely the kinds of issues that he raised the family background how someone that he and his family experienced but I can say to Steve that Since Miller and Montgomery came down we have had hundreds of men and women released like marshawn individuals who have come back to their communities who are giving back who are many of them working in advocacy or social so to the concern can we manage them coming back into our communities I say yes because I think we're seeing play out in real time every day right now across the country Maryland Congressman Elijah Cummings died early this morning in Baltimore he was sixty this is on point.

marshawn Allen US Supreme Court Marsha Levick Marsha Restore Justice Foundation US Marsha Levick Sam Macarthur Foundation restored Justice Foundation Juvenile Law Center Public Int Chicago Marshall Levick Marcia Espn assault Meghna Chakrabarti murder chief counsel founder
"marshawn allen" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

13:31 min | 10 months ago

"marshawn allen" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Of the Ted Radio Hour from NPR on our latest episode were exploring anger what it is when you feel it whether some get to feel it more openly than others and why listen now this is on point I'm Meghna Chakrabarti we're talking this hour about the case of Lee Boyd Malveaux he was one of the DC snipers back in two thousand and two he was seventeen at the time when he received multiple life sentences for those murders his case now before the United States Supreme Court where he is asking for a reassessment or a chance at another sentencing hearing because the core Shen is what constitutes justice in these cases of juveniles convicted of murder should they ever be sentenced to life without the possibility of parole well I'm joined today by Marshall Levick she's chief counsel and founder of the Juvenile Law Center Public Interest Law firm that's been advocating for children's rights since nineteen seventy five and she's been a a key legal voice in several of the other cases at least one of the other cases that has previously appeared before the court on these matters so let's go quickly to the phones let's go to Sean calling from Charleston South Carolina Hello I just wanted to say I I work in the correction system around seventeen years on a regular basis and before I did that I would have the view that she has or a lot of people have they shouldn't have life sentences but haven't been exposed to them on a regular basis they're they're young men they're not children are boys anymore they're very very mature they're very aware of the crimes that they commit in the situations that they put themselves in a lot of them frankly are proud of the things that they do I just I absolutely feel that they're they're old enough they know what they're doing they're making the choices that they are and there will be willing to accept the complex the the consequences that come with it and they're they're okay with it frankly I mean it's it's it doesn't even seem to fade as them you know when they're looking at fifteen or twenty years we tell whenever it's fifteen or twenty but you know I've done so much here and I'll do half their day it'll be out like ten eight and the being ballroom at seventy well Sean thank you so much for your call and your perspective there and Marsha Levick I'm just want to piggyback off Shawn's observation here and wind back the clock back to that two thousand twelve Miller v Alabama case that appeared before the court that upheld that mandatory life senses without the possibility of parole for juveniles was unconstitutional and Justice Alito filed a dissenting opinion in that case and here's a clip from what I read from the bench in June of two thousand twelve think of the worst possible seventeen year old murderer perhaps a seventy in your old who previously was convicted of several murders was tried in family court and has resisted any attempt at rehabilitation where think of the seventeen year old a seventeen and a half year old perhaps who goes to school and guns down a dozen or more teachers and students the opinion the court delicately refers to all murderers under the magic age of eighteen as children and holds every single one of these children must given a chance to persuade judge to impose a lesser sentence Justice Samuel Alito in two thousand twelve? Marshall isn't as as you said this is one of the core question like is there a magic age here does it have to be in the justice system well I think that let let me just take a moment respond though to the to the issues that were raised by the caller and even by Justice Alito comments because I think that focusing on how someone behaves if the agent seventeen what we observe about at the age of seventeen is actually precisely the point of these cases and that is that how the appeared seventeen is not at all and not necessary early who they will be twenty five thirty five forty five fifty five years old and it is impossible to ignore the science whether it's the neuroscience the social science that really conclusively establishes this capacity for Change and to the concern that someone has committed a horrible crime at the age of seventeen we should never contemplate letting them out we need to keep in mind that when we talk about providing this opportunity to be eligible for parole it is not a ticket out of jail that at that moment when someone goes before the Parole Board the Parole Board has to ask itself questions and frankly ask that individual wins that will go to whether or not they have matured whether or not they have accepted the consequences whether or not they have demonstrated rehabilitation whether or not they are able and ready to return to their communities in many instances that won't happen that's precisely what Justice Kennedy recognized in his two thousand ten decision prohibiting without parole and non homicide cases we all understand in this space that many of these young men and women won't get out of prison even as they go before a parole board but we Augmon for the scientific recognition the scientific finding about this capacity for change and as we think about as I said sort of you know what is this search tell us going forward it does raise questions that I think we need to be having a conversation about that it's probably not a magic boundary at eighteen that the same aspects of immaturity the characteristics of maturity that we see in youth under the age of eighteen they often carry forward many individuals past the age of eighteen and certainly brain development continues and as we contemplate again as you as you said at the opening of the segment contemplate what does justice mean what is the purpose of our justice system we need to be thinking about again where research might take us as we try to ensure that we are serving justice so let me ask you Marcia I mean what do you think justice means in these cases because I mean by definition yes I mean neuroscience this showing us the the youth brain not only has the capacity for change it changes dramatically but if we're speaking of justice writ large I mean isn't the conclusion that that everyone does have regardless of age everyone does have the capacity to change and if so what does what does that mean for the hire process or or act of sentencing in in these most terrible crimes well I think that the capacity for changes different and so we know that capacity for change among young people again let's say individuals under the age of twenty five in most strongly individuals under the age of eighteen that's a that's a capacity for change that is especially dynamic that the kinds of judgments and decisions that they make think about ourselves as teenagers if my daughter's teenagers not so long ago the kinds of judgments that young people make appear in the moment they will say sometimes I know exactly what doing so it can appear as if there is some thoughtfulness behind the decisions that they make but we know that there isn't and so I think that this while yes it's true everyone can change and I think we want to believe that everyone can change as we grow older ourselves as we examine ourselves we may want to change aspects parts of ourselves even so but I think that we're we're talking a little bit about apples and oranges and when we think about the the possibility for rehabilitation Asian and real transformation of character that that is something that really is unique to a particular segment of the population it's the young population in this country let's go to Christine who's calling from Buffalo New York Christine you're on the Air Hi thank you for taking my call I was actually a freshman at George Washington University the network has happened and to this day I'm still afraid of white conversion man so I just think I'm so glad that you were talking about this topic because I I'm from New York we just had the raise the age past and I think a really important distinction is the difference between violent and nonviolent crimes and how I think it's a really slippery slope when you start opening the idea of changing you know mandatory life sentences for violent crimes because then it kind of opens the door for everything and you know it's not like some kid that was in jail the drug offence or a you know robbery or something like that that was not violent like this was calculated murder of multiple people and he terrorized the city and I think you can't like like your guest saying apples to oranges you can't compare These type of calculated island crimes like a non violent crime will Christine thank you so much for your call Marsh Likud like to respond to Christine sure let me say first of all I have certainly many friends who were in DC in two thousand when who are still there and I I understand completely appreciate the fear not only that you and your friends and family members felt them but of course what people continue to caller remember about that time but I think that the Supreme Court went it really rolled in Miller striking mandatory life without parole sentences what Justice Kennedy sorry which this Kagan said was that that there was no reason to treat the science differently though scientific findings differently with respect to individuals who commit violent crimes nonviolent crimes and while I think that we live in a culture that is highly retributive we think about again this question what is justice many of us in this country think about justices really being about punishment and revenge and when something horrible happens we want to do something horrible in return but I think that is we volve honest we think about what our values should be certainly from my perspective I think that our values need to include for certain populations not only consideration for retribution but also again this opportunity for rehabilitation this opportunity for second chances and to recall again I think that we it's it's wrong to inflate the idea of eliminating life without parole sentences that prohibit someone from ever getting out of prison from giving them an opportunity to be to be considered for release because as I said many of those individuals won't get relief many of those individuals who committed perhaps the most brutal the most heinous violent crimes may never be candidates for release but but we cannot know that when they're seventeen or sixteen or fifteen and two I believe to to meet this goal of justice in our society we need to be willing to reexamine those individuals said a later point in time the thing about cases like Malveaux says is that it brings these core questions about what is justice regarding juvenile and murdering people from you know as snipers so yes in in ability of parole but the bigger picture also is that other youth offenders get similar sentences for very different kinds of crimes right so so let me turn now to Marshawn Allen who joins us from Chicago Illinois because he when he was fifteen years old he was sentenced to life without parole he was involved in a drug deal and robbery that ended in a man being killed marshawn Allen didn't pull the trigger but he was charged with two counts of fifteen a first degree murder ended up being released in two thousand sixteen after serving twenty five years because of one of the Supreme Court's decisions the Miller v Alabam Emma decision so marshawn ellen welcome to you can you hear me precisely right and I think that your comments really underscored this principle that the exception can't make the role and it is hard to have a conversation about a more generous or lenient view of sentencing of adolescents teenagers who commit even homicide crimes and about it in the context of Lee Boyd Malvo which is which is a horrific incident that we hope will never be repeated I think in Martians case there are many individuals across the country just like him who did not pull the trigger who might have been present at the time when a crime was committed in the course of that crime and the victim died at somebody else's hands they were sentenced identically to the individual who was directly responsible for that murder and that is an enormous travesty of justice that goes on every Day in my state of Pennsylvania we many individuals who were sentenced to life without parole mandatory sentences of.

NPR Marshall seventeen year twenty five thirty five forty twenty five years seventeen years fifteen years twenty years
"marshawn allen" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"marshawn allen" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"Gaps. More attention is being given to the idea that juvenile offenders can make radical changes as a result measures aimed at rehabilitation are spreading across the United States. Marshawn Allen was one of many teens in Chicago during the nineteen nineties who was sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole. He was part of a bungled drug deal in which two teenagers were killed though. He was not directly involved in their deaths at the time lawmakers argued that tube Niles who committed adult crime deserve adult time, and he was convicted of first degree murder. Ultimately, the US supreme court disagreed in two thousand twelve it rules in Miller versus Alabama at the mandatory sentencing of juvenile. To life without the possibility of parole was unconstitutional. This ruling was followed by two thousand sixteen decision that applied Miller retroactively to all prisoners given mandatory sentences of life without parole as juveniles. Thousands of inmates were suddenly up for resentencing and juvenile Justice. Experts say it helps gin a nationwide reform juvenile sentencing in Illinois, Mr. Allen spent more than twenty four years behind bars, but the supreme court ruling enabled his release. Now, he works as a project manager for the restored Justice foundation, Chicago, it was a great feeling to come home. And no I was able to start my life over again, he says this story was reported by John Colin Marston for the monitor. Eager to erase its communist past Ukraine recently launched a campaign to destroy Soviet era symbols but efforts to preserve these works point to the value of art as an important relic of history towering over a busy avenue in central Kiev is a series of apartment buildings emblazoned with brightly colored Soviet era. Mosaics highlighting phases of Ukraine's history. Made up of thousands of pieces of colored glass, the mosaics features workers soldiers scientists and in one the hammer and sickle. The iconic. Symbol of communism was like these are scattered throughout Ukraine since two thousand fifteen however, they have been under threat, I from de-communising laws aimed at removing symbols of the Soviet Union. Yeon and now from neglect. But in recent years, some Ukrainians have begun campaigning to preserve these unique works seeing them as important if complicated relics of the nation's history..

Marshawn Allen Ukraine United States Chicago Miller Soviet Union supreme court John Colin Marston Yeon Niles restored Justice foundation first degree murder Alabama Kiev Illinois project manager twenty four years