18 Burst results for "Marshall Shepherd"

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 2 months ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on KCRW

"So suppose somebody an official from Texas called you up and asked for advice and said, You know where upgrading the infrastructure. We're rebuilding the infrastructure. We don't want an experience like this week to happen again. And, of course, because we're doing infrastructure we wanna think 20 years ahead. 30 years ahead 50 years ahead. What kind of advice would you give Texas? Well, you know, I'm an atmospheric scientist, so I really don't think it's too much about the resiliency and infrastructure. But what I would say is this first of all, Let's kill the sort of misinformation out there on renewable energy and wind farms because it's clear that that's not the sole issue here. Wind farms operated much colder and icier places The decks is, in fact, I'm reading that it it was a combination of various things involving natural gas. When On resilient planning. So what I would say is that we need to move from being a reactive society on these extreme compound weather events to more proactive. What I often say these days is hope or waiting. And seeing is no longer an acceptable acceptable weather Risk mitigation plan. Our weather models are good enough that we can plan ahead 10 days ahead months ahead. And so I would. I would ask these power companies to build in more resiliency in the short term and long term because we can pretty much tell you what's gonna happen now, from a weather perspective. Texas did have some advance warning and one questions why they were not able to take advantage of it, and I'm just going to note. Also, we are reporting elsewhere in today's program. Just what you said The Texas has had problems with every kind of energy source in this cold weather. James Marshall Shepherd of the Atmospheric Science Program.

James Marshall Shepherd Texas 30 years 50 years 20 years today 10 days one questions this week first Atmospheric Science Program
Saharan Dust Cloud Arrives At The U.S. Gulf Coast, Bringing Haze

Environment: NPR

03:37 min | 11 months ago

Saharan Dust Cloud Arrives At The U.S. Gulf Coast, Bringing Haze

"It's a journey. That's a weeks and spend thousands of miles across an ocean floating on currents of air today, a massive cloud of dust from the Sahara desert arrives in the southeastern United States to walk us through this meteorological phenomenon. We are joined by Professor Marshall Shepherd. The Director of the atmospheric scientists program at the University of Georgia welcome. Thank you for having me okay now. I've seen the satellite images, but. But tell us what it's GonNa. Look like from the ground as this wave of dust from the Sahara arrives in the United States. You know we give these things every year and some are bigger than others. These are this year quite large and so I think that's why it's garnering much attention. Typically you lose the blue sky for more hazy Milky Sky. You tend to see more vivid sunsets and sunrises because. Because of the scattering properties of the dust and interacting with the sunlight, so those are sort of the optical effects, but I think people that suffer from allergy to dust or particular matter, they actually might not find it so amusing. They may have some health issues Why is it so much bigger this year than normal? I think one thing that happened this year are e.. Is that that dust in the? The Hell region in parts of Africa sat there, and just collected because the the wind system this African easterly jet meteorologist talk about it took a bit longer to kind of get itself going, and once it gets going, you can belch and Burp that dust out into the Atlantic, and that's what we're seeing now. Because there was somewhat of a delay, there was a lot more desk sitting there the build up. All right so pros you said good sunrises and sunsets, cons, people who have health problems might find that the respiratory problems are worse. What else is this dust system? GonNa do I mean on the whole is a good thing or a bad thing you know one of the things is an earth scientist. The Earth is so connected, and this is just another example so these dust storms they actually can fertilize the oceans in parts of Amazonia. They're carrying things that really help those ecosystems. Ecosystems but on the flip side of that there's been studies recently say they can actually carry pathogens as well so when you think about Mosquitos as a vector born disease carrier some argued that these dust storms can be vectors, they can carry pathogens another perhaps positive however is that the dust? If there were to be a hurricane forming out over the Atlantic hurricanes don't like the dust. If the dust gets into those forming systems, they can weaken those storms quite a bit. How much? Much bigger. Is this one than what we would see in a typical year? You know it's interesting. I saw a colleague tweet scale. They were using some data from NASA NASA Sir several satellites up monitoring air, quality and air constituents, and literally this event was off the chart. It wasn't even the same type of event. It was just so far off the plot scale, and so four people who study atmospheric science like you is a moment totally nerd out and like remember where you. You were when the Great Sahara Dust of two thousand twenty came across the Atlantic I th I think it is I I've seen some sort of very hyperbolic terms like the Godzillas dust storm. Those types of things I don't i. don't tend to like us such hyperbole when I talk about these things, but it is an anomaly event. My good friend and colleague Tom Gill at the University of Texas El. Paso is an expert on dust storms I know he's geeking out on this. I hosted a podcast call, weather, geeks or the weather channel, and we use the term geeking out. I'm certain it. Scientists like Tom. Gillard geeking out over this dust storm. Marshall Shepherd is the Director of the atmospheric scientists program at the University of and former president of the American meteorological. Society thanks for talking with us about this monster dust storm. Thank you for having me.

Professor Marshall Shepherd United States Atlantic Director Tom Gill Milky Sky Nasa University Of Georgia Gillard Scientist Paso University Of Africa University Of Texas El President Trump
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Share research or at least visualizations that. I think the public might enjoy. So that's the best place to get a hold of me And of course my. My website is just Stephen M. Straighter Dot Org. That's a place where you can find a lot of the research I've talked about today And in particularly My email address if you have any questions but the hope is that the things that I'm doing are useful to other individuals. I think that's the point I want to drive. Home is his. I WANNA My goal is to help people. That's that's what I hope to do. And you can also check out the something that professor straighter wrote in. Salon Dot Com in December on whether in climate disasters. But before we get out of here you know what time it is the time for the Geek of the week. This week's Geek of the week is James. Youngblood service engineer for weather radars in his position. James has probably installed more weather radars than anyone on the planet on top of that. He's even installed mini ground based receivers for the goes weather satellite. His work has taken him to all seven continents and to more than sixty five countries his favorite kind of weather and Jim. Cantore he would love. This is thunder snow but nothing beats tracking tornadoes with a mobile ex-man radar. Thanks for all your hard work James. If you or someone you know would be a deserving candidate for next week of the week. Check out our social media pages on facebook and twitter. Stephen Thank you so much for joining us on. The weather podcast. Yeah thank you for having me. I really appreciate it. Yeah I'm Dr Marshall Shepherd. It's been great conversation. We'll see you next time on whether Geeks took..

James Stephen M. Dr Marshall Shepherd engineer professor facebook twitter Jim
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Favorite we it stopped i every week and i take them on a little journey like rohan journey now. We're going to go see their godparents. In indiana we're at a place in jacksonville mediterranean restaurant and my daughter's a picky eater and there was some hamas i do i i. I did a diplomatic row travel the world. It's a diplomat food. I'm getting ready to go to jordan but i spent some great since some time in salaam in the old city and there was some hamas on the table and i said i want you to eat that. She said that's jesus food. Jeez i said yeah i said how miss is a very old old foods. I've been eating and that part of the world for a long long long. I writes like in whatever it takes. I a twelve year old and lives off of chicken fingers and you're getting no subject how it is. We honestly have run out of time. I can show ever with you. This is just been an amazing conversation. Thank you for joining us is a pleasure thing. It's a pleasure on behalf of both of us. Thank edmund sorry for making this connection possible. <hes> i'm dr marshall shepherd from the university. It's the of georgia before we get out of here can work and people find your website or social media. Okay you can go to these chef art. Smith on instagram or you can find me chef art smith on twitter. We have common threads dot org.

hamas art smith jacksonville dr marshall shepherd indiana twitter edmund georgia twelve year
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"We are back on the weather. Geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. I'm speaking with DT and lead senior meteorologist, Stuart Williams, you can think of him as the PGA tour is meteorologist in the sense because that's what he does. He's an onsite meteorologist, and he's helping to keep people safe and player safe in terms of weather events. And we were just talking about the decision making process for major events like the masters and we have the PGA championships coming up soon, I'm sure you'll be involved there, do you. And this is something that just came to mind. Do you think a much much about sort of sort of climatology of the locations where you see that tournaments are going with the master's? We know it's the same place every year. So you kind of understand what, what to expect you're, you're talking about summertime and thirty percent, chance of thunderstorms. But do you sort of have a feel for the courses, and sort of the, the tendencies of the weather and climate in those locations? You kind of consider that your deliberations. Oh, yeah. You know. Me having doing this done this for over twenty some years, you know, we the PGA tour has always had a scheduled where, you know, January we're in Hawaii. And then we go to California, and Arizona in February March were in Florida and then April were in the deep south. And then we kind of work our way up a little bit northward, and then we're in Texas in may, and then June, July and August. We go up to the northeast midwest and so forth and Canada, and then we work our way back down in the fall. So, you know, knowing where we're going for the whole year. You know, obviously, when we go to California in February. That's their rainy season. And so we went there in June or July, it'd be totally different than when we're there in February. So, you know, working these events every single year you pretty much learn what the look for in, if we go to a new place that we never been to before, then a lot of times, you know, I'll ask the locals. Hey, what kind of happens this time of year? Kinda give me a feedback of what you think the typical weather pattern is and even the volunteers tell you a weather never comes from this direction. It always comes from this direction or comes from the south is a lot worse than if it comes from the north. So, you know, little tips like that kind of help us plan ahead and then obviously us as meteorologist we go to these places every single year. Well, we ride a report each week of things that happened things to look for typically in this departure fee. You know, north wind does this look out for the seabreeze here that kind of thing. So if you've never been there before we have documentation that a meteorologist can go look and say, okay, this is what I need to look for when I go here. So we do have a good database as far as meteorology is concerned things to look for now, now you are meteorologist, and you have a team of meteorologists Lithgow too. Little bit. On the weather. What, what are some of your forecasting observational tools that are kind of, in your tool kit? And do you have a favorite toy? If you will, that, that really is your go to HR model or the European Jeff s or what do you like to us? Oh, well, we look at all those obviously, but, you know, in the summertime convective pattern, obviously, aged triple ours, very useful because, you know, as you know, when it's when it's on it's very good, and, and it's really accurate as far as helping us pinned down where things are going to develop and move towards at a certain time and, you know, but we do look at the Namm the three k nam the GFMS the, the European model and, and in house, we can sector those to the southeast northeast or traveling internationally, the GIF s new European model we, we can sector those to wherever we go with the PGA tour. So you know, as very nice for us to be able to have that at our fingertips to be able to make forecast. Fast and that kind of thing, and, you know, obviously to, you know, we have that electric Phil mill we have an amount Matre, that's attached to that. Because the.

senior meteorologist Namm California Dr Marshall shepherd Stuart Williams university of Georgia Texas Canada Jeff s Hawaii Florida Arizona Phil mill thirty percent three k mill
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"The skies above the finely. Manicured blades of grasping their feet. Today's guests knows how important it is to get the forecast right for the PGA tour were sitting down with BTM's lead senior meteorologist, Stuart Williams, who has spent the last twenty years, providing forecasts for the PGA tour and it's world renowned golfers while the players have their own game plan, mother nature. Sometimes has her own plan as well. We'll discover how simple wind shift or a wilted blade of graph can make a huge impact on course conditions. Plus, when severe weather threatens will get an inside look into the decision making process that helps keep golfers and people safe. Thank you for joining us on the weather geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd Stuart thank you for joining us takes forever. Yes, it's been a pleasure. I'm a golfer, and I was certainly watching the masters and I just want to first of all a out anyone that was involved in the weather decisions. Assoc. Hit with a masters golf tournament because I thought it was brilliant. And I just wanted to get you on whether geeks to talk about the process by which meteorologist works with the PGA tour where did you get into all of that on the on the podcast? But before we do that, Stewart, lemme tell tell the listeners a little bit about, you gotta be s and applied science with an emphasis in meteorology from UNC ashville, your promoted to lead senior meteorologist at DT in which stands for data transmission network in two thousand twelve I found this interesting. Your first job was with a startup called mobile weather, or is it mobile weather you work five tournaments the first year. I is it mobile Alabama? Or is it mobile mobile as mobile weather? So wanna hear all about that? You twenty years experiences an onsite meteorologist, but.

senior meteorologist Dr Marshall shepherd Stuart BTM Stuart Williams Stewart Alabama ashville UNC DT twenty years
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. An amazing conversation today with John Davis chief meteorologist at risk pulse. Been doing this about thirty years clearly knows his stuff. And one of the interesting things is he is illustrating that there so many different career pathways, and sort of tentacles of the weather enterprise into daily, life and society and commodities. I want to shift the discussion now and talk a little bit about how you convey your messaging to your clients. How how do you gear your forecast to your clients? And do you find that it's difficult to communicate the forecast to non meteorologist, well, no that's one of our jobs in. So that's something that I've been doing since I graduated Wisconsin back in nineteen eighty-five. So communication is one of the most important things that we do so ways that we communicate. There's lots of different, you know, methods and mediums of communication we write morning wires. Some agriculture some energy that those are sent out very early in the morning to our clients. We also have screened shares with many of our clients. So we'll have a sometimes though sessions or ten minutes. Sometimes they're forty minutes. And we'll talk about, you know, via maps, you know, different things that are going on different risks out there risk to the forecasts out there in really get in depth here when you do that for quite some time. And then the other way that we communicate risk is we have data analytics we have software programs. One of our software programs is called sunrise. And so within sunrise data analytics, then convey that risk individualization or data standpoint to the overall client so that communication, which is really more important than anything in in for. The most part we do not talk to meterologist and in the people that we talked to have remarrying levels. You know, some individuals..

Dr Marshall shepherd chief meteorologist university of Georgia John Davis Wisconsin forty minutes thirty years ten minutes
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"We call precipitated water, which is kind of a column integrated or how much water vapors, president the atmosphere. If you start from the ground and go up to the top of the atmosphere, and then from what I understand the the water vapor. The simple water is a attenuating source for the GPS signals. So it it came to mind that the amount of humidity. Their mount of precip water could be problematic for some of the GPS precision that you're talking about in these systems. Yeah. I mean, and that's the thing you see we are as a company were experts on the system and really when you're talking about on automated vehicle, it's a system of systems. Of course, you can you know, there are deep dives into obviously, you know, censor base cameras or a radar. You know technical challenges that lie deep within within that field. You know? We're not subject matter experts so much on you know, what you know, how those signals get offset and so forth. I mean, we're more more at the systems level. And and that brings up another point that I wanna make about these Thomas vehicles. You've. You can't rely on any really on any one sensor in itself to get the job done. You really need to fuse together. Multiple sources of data, and we call it sensor fusion in the industry where were we have to fuse in real time. You know, all of these all of these signals together, and you know, so collectively you have a higher confidence level than if you relied on on on one individual, you know, sensor technology. And we are back on the weather. Geeks podcasts, I'm Dr Marshall shepherd and talking about HANA mated vehicles and weather now, I'm meteorologist by by degree. And and this is the show that many me, you're all just when many weather enthusiasts. Listen to clearly weather is a very important part of what you do. But you're not necessarily experts in weather in your company, perhaps others that are doing this type of work. Do you consult with me, you're all just have meteorologists on staff in terms of your testing? Not really we. It comes up a lot though. Because you know, here we are. We're a company here based in Minnesota that is doing developmental work.

Dr Marshall shepherd president Minnesota Thomas
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"One of the busiest companies getting packages from here to there is UPS and we are joined today by David Inman, an airline meteorologist with the company. So just how does whether play a role in. Meaning the delivery deadline Hauer logistics changed as a result of the forecast. And how about this time of year does the pressure ramp up, especially if the surface pressure dives down all of this end more on today's episode of weather keeps I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia and David thank you for joining us on the weather podcast. Thanks for having me. Yeah. This is really interesting because I think people are very familiar with UPS and your trucks and your delivery in your services globally. But I don't suspect that they have an idea just how much meteorology and the weather play in your operations. And the fact that there is even a meteorology department. At UPS before we kind of go into that. Tell us about UPS how big is the company, and what's what's the goal of your company? What are you trying to do? Well, obviously were very large company and our goal is the Trotta get the packages to the customers in a timely fashion whether plays the role, you know, we don't want our packages to the end customer to arrive late. So we have to work around the weather, and that's where meteorology department comes into play. We're really trying to help the airline and the ground network deliver the packages on time despite the.

David Inman Dr Marshall shepherd Hauer university of Georgia
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And so we have to understand those types of forecasts are made for those who may be in the utilities industry where guests. Suppliers will be buying more natural gas overall for a winter because it may be deemed colder than normal for a certain area and a lot of the forecasts have been based on global parameters such as well Nino. The tropical warming of these Pacific, researchers now Judah Cohen and others have looked at other high latitude forcing Arctic sea ice snow cover in Siberia, these types of factors that also can help modulate the winter overall. It's fascinating to see and the the meteorological emails and chat rooms are full of a lot of information now over the past week or two here that the back end of the winter could be really interesting some Some of of the United United States. States. Setting up a pretty cold pattern across the eastern US. When original seasonal forecast. A lot of them were suggesting warmer than normal overall. I because I like winter. It's going to be interesting to see I might put my money on the fact that we could have a very interesting back into the winter, and we are projecting. At least I've seen some Noah stats projected El Nino setting in as a week El Nino the last I had seen in the last couple of weeks here and week. Only news can have all different. They can go in of different directions for the east one of the weaker El Ninos produce one of the coldest winters on record in seventy six seventy seven back when when I was in school. And so it's going to be interesting to see how it plays out. But Marshall when I used to get called a national weather service to give a winner forecast, regardless of the forecast. I would always ended by telling people to keep their snow shovel their skis handy that that is good advice. And I think that's a good place where we're going to end it today. Tom. Thank you for joining us on the weather needs podcast. It's been great to get your expertise great to be here. And thank you again for joining us on the web gates broadcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia.

United States Dr Marshall shepherd El Ninos Judah Cohen Arctic Siberia Noah university of Georgia Tom
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Smashed icicle, the absence of do or maybe a dry patch of road that should be wet all seemingly bystanders in an active crime scene, but to forensic meteorologists. These are powerful clues that can help solve the mystery Dr. Elizabeth Austin, a forensic meteorologist who has worked on countless cases joins us to discuss this unusual meteorological profession and how she will be appearing in a new show this fall on the Weather Channel called storm of suspicion. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. Thank you for joining us today. Thank you for having me. So I wanna start off with storm of suspicion. We're gonna talk a little bit more about it throughout the podcast today, but just give us a little teaser of what it's about before we find out about forensic year old. It's series of eight episodes, and each episode focuses on one crime, and so they get to go very in depth with with what happened with the weather. I witnesses, they interview pass family members, past law enforcement agents that worked on the cases so it. It's really nice because one gets the look quite in depth at each case. So this is essentially a CSI meets. The weather is actually really interesting. So we look forward to that debuts October seventh and eight PM on the Weather Channel by the way. So make sure you check on the. I wanna kinda give Dr Austin her do before I talked to, I just want to give you some of her credentials. She's a world renown atmospheric physicist and founder and president of weather, extreme limited. She is one of the foremost experts in the world on weather and extreme weather has been an expert witness on many cases, fifteen hundred or so her clients include NASA, Federal, Express, Air, France, Rockwell..

Dr. Elizabeth Austin Dr Marshall shepherd Rockwell NASA university of Georgia founder and president France
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And welcome back to the whether beats podcasts and Dr Marshall shepherd university of Georgia. And I'm talking with Bryan Norcross and you just heard a really interesting and fascinating story about the evolution of the hurricane cone of uncertainty. And I think that a lot of people might not have known that story before listening to that. So I wanna now enter a little rapid fire topics phased talking about some areas related to communication of whether, but the first one I want that the route and I wanna spend about a minute with each of these Brian. The first one is sandy superstorm sandy think is another storm that people resonate with familiar with temporary times you I understand had something to do, or at least with coining the term superstorm. I know Ryan Maui and I've talked about this in the past, what what were you thinking in terms of the superstorm or. No, you're trying to sort of capture this notion of a tropical system that was going to become extra tropical. What was your goal there? Well, at that time I was doing hurricanes on the Weather Channel was one of the hurricane specialists, but also I was in management. I was in charge of whether presentation and content and sandy was coming up the coast, the National Hurricane Center in one of their discussions mention that they were not going to put up hurricane warnings, north of Virginia. I think it was because they were thinking that sandy would transform into more like a nor'easter, which in their technical parlance would be called a post tropical cyclone gets so getting its energy from air mass differences or rather than the water that hurricanes do from the exact right well. So when I saw that and we all thought all along by the way that regardless of that kind of meteorological transition that still..

sandy National Hurricane Center Dr Marshall shepherd universit Bryan Norcross Ryan Maui Virginia Brian
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Welcome back to the weather gates podcast, Dr Marshall shepherd university of Georgia, and I'm talking with my colleague Dr. Dave Novak from Noah's weather predictions, intern learning the ins and outs of how weather forecasting is done with the role of Debbie. PC's is within Noah. And you know, one of the things that we were talking in you, we're talking in the last segment, Dave, I wanna pick your brain because you mentioned winner forecasting in winter storms. And there've been a few storms over the last couple of years where their forecasts certain way, and you know, they may have gone twenty thirty miles east or west of the sort of central tendency or the mean line. And depending on where you're living. If you're in a big city along, I ninety five or not, you might say, oh, well, I thought it was going to be this way, but if thirty miles west, it was that way. So the question I have is, are we victims of our own success to some degree? And what I mean by that is that I think a lot of times the public may not understand that you know forecasts is probably pretty. Good, even though it may have the potential for that uncertainty that you mentioned, twenty thirty degrees on either side of the line of that nor'easter that hurricane like an arm, for example. So I often sort of hypothesize that we sometimes victims of our own success people think we can actually do a little bit more than we can actually do without that uncertainty. So what are your thoughts on that? Yeah, you know, certainly, I think it's really important to highlight that the forecast have improved, you know, all relate, you know, I get a haircut, and sometimes you know, you're chatting with the the, the person and comes up on the weather person. Well, maybe before that doesn't have to make that decision of die, tell them person..

Dr. Dave Novak Noah Dr Marshall shepherd universit intern Debbie twenty thirty degrees
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"I'm Dr Marshall shepherd and I'm talking with Dr Dave Novak. He is the director of Noah's weather. Predictions are one of the premier forecasting centers in the world and a part of the national weather service, and I wanna pivoted discussion. Now, Dave you, you don't take a break. You don't get summers off like some people. So in terms of each season, are there particular challenges forecast challenges that Debbie PC for example, we're in summer. Now, what would you say is the most challenging aspect of forecasting in the summer versus spring? Winter fall. Well, it's true. We don't get a break, but I tell you what we love it. We love every season and all the different challenges that we have. You know, we're in the summer season and I have to say the extreme rainfall challenge is is, is, is is a huge challenge. I do want expand on that, but the other challenge is winter storms. So if we go to the winter storms here, I, you know, such a minor change in the meteorology in the in the weather here can have dramatic impacts on the amount of snow weather. It's snow or ice rain. And obviously those small differences can have a huge impact on on actually the impacts of event. So. So that is challenging in in winter storms. No question. We are getting better, but the expectations are tremendous and growing. And so we're applying the very best science and as well. As communication science to provide the decision information for for key decision-makers attorney back to the summer challenge. Extreme rainfall is very challenging to get the details right..

Dr Dave Novak Dr Marshall shepherd Debbie PC Noah attorney
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"To podcasts and welcome back to the weather geeks podcast i'm dr marshall shepherd and i'm speaking with craig fugate former fema administrator and he is now the chief emergency management officer at one concern i'm also now joined by laura light body project directorate pews flood prepared communities thank you for joining us we'll talk a little bit with you and then we'll bring everybody back in for a round table here so what what what are how did you sort of meet craig fugate and wouldn't you guys have going on together well peel entered the space in two thousand fifteen where we took a look at the what the policies that we have in place when it comes to our nation dealing with flood related disasters and said we need to fix a big problem that we have which are money of the policies that are in place are old antiquated they've been on the books for a long time today's understanding of risk is very different than it used to be and disasters are just simply costing more and more than they used to so until we were talking line and tell us about your simple statement of why that is in terms of floods share you know we the numbers do tell us that flood events are becoming more common whether or not they're becoming more common we simply just have more people and more stuff in harm's way there is you know core logic just came out with a report that showed how many billions of dollars of assets are at risk from hurricanes justice year so we we simply are seeing more houses more concrete more people people wanna live along the water makes sense it's beautiful but that means we're putting more people and things in harm's way so we looked around we saw that the former administrator was coming out of the administration and said who better to serve as a partner and an advisor to our work than someone who has rolled up his sleeves for more than eight years you know before he was with the federal government he was in florida doing the same thing and so he think awfully joined up with us and has served as you know a senior advisor to our work to really guide what we're doing and we can go to him and say what what works and what shouldn't you know what doesn't work and how can we improve really from a federal perspective the way that our nation prepares for response with the pews fled prepared communities and so you you've now kind of tag that with craig fugate now strong partner there what's your goal the goal is to fix policies that are in place that are leading to more disasters and to better prepare community so i want to deal with that i when i and it will come back for the second how do you fix policy so are are you lobbying policy makers are you conducting studies to provide evidence that this needs fixing so we're looking at policies that have been in place that have worked that have led to better prepared communities more mitigation measures so what policy can drive communities to prepare right so make investments before disaster strike rather than after disasters strike our country's very good at spending money and delving.

dr marshall shepherd craig fugate eight years
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Welcome back to the weather keats podcast i'm dr marshall shepherd and we're talking with katherine wilkinson she's an author speaker strategist on climate action and senior writer at project draw down and that's where i wanna go next with this discussion project drawdown i i'm familiar with project drawdown and obviously you are but give us the one oh one to our weather geeks listeners on project drawdown irate weather geeks this is exciting just to share with you all i'm sure some of you already have a copy of the book draw down sitting on a bedside table or coffee table or a desk and your in your home or office but yeah let's start with defining what we mean by lower case d draw down which is which is the most important really in terms of climate change drawdown refers to that point in time when the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere peaks and and then begins to decline on a year to year basis this is what we think of as as the most common sense climate goal for humanity we where we are headed the wrong way down the down a road towards the cliff we don't want to go down at more slowly we actually want to turn around and head back the other day the other way so draw is really about that threshold heading back to the conditions that we know have been most conducive for life on this planet that have let human society develop in in the way that it has so if you want to get to draw down there are kind of two basic things you can do and the first we focus on most of the time which is try to stop sending greenhouse gases up this is what the technically some of us talk call mitigation is that writer mitigations motion it's it's a word i don't love okay tell us one because so i'm going all word geek on you know.

dr marshall shepherd writer katherine wilkinson
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Welcome back to the weather geeks podcast i'm dr marshall shepherd from the university of georgia i'm here with the storm tracker jim cantore and we're talking about his years here at the weather channel his coverage of storms and i wanna revisit this conversation because we're talking about craig fugate one of the in my opinion and yes yet some challenges with the sort of notion of onsite reporting and so you talked about why why this value lists kinda shifty i think you mentioned ninety four yeah her that you cover us what's been your most challenging coverage for those ninety four what do you remember most and terms of honestly this is gonna kinda blow your mind a little bit but it's now really okay so the microwave comes out we don't have to put the oven on and warm up our food we can just nuke it in thirty seconds all right so technology has made our lives graders my point our phones i in my life technologies made it a little bit worse because because of the fact that we can now not have to go down during the middle or the height of storm we stay up during the height of it okay if you remember mike's coverage in naples then it led into mike coverage right in fort myers we never stopped we went through the entire i wall in both of the city's so technology for me is actually made my job a little bit worse right because if the videos great in the shots are great they're gonna wanna stay on that so we've gone from broadcasting based back in the studio to broadcasting based in the field it's because of technology an audio and video signal on an hd hd audio video signal out you know over the internet has has just made mid hard really hard yeah that's an i wouldn't have weather somewhat surprising answer but it certainly makes sense given sort of how i know how cover the satellite truck when those winds hit sixty seventy eighty miles an hour at dishes gotta come down where you lose it right and then you lose all the rest of your coverage so we now take the dish down there park it safe place put don't even use it during the height of the storm us live you as it's called which is using the you know the phone lines cell phone lines and.

dr marshall shepherd jim cantore craig fugate mike naples fort myers university of georgia thirty seconds
"marshall shepherd" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"marshall shepherd" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And with us from athens georgia is marshall shepherd director of the atmospheric sciences program at the university of georgia he's also host of a talk show whether geeks on the weather channel it's a and he's like weather and climate contributor to forbes marshall shepherd welcome to you also to one point are you happy to be here john and marshall could you first talked to us a little about the science so when you began seen this on your screens on your your your modeling devices let us know what you saw developing john can you started off or herbert hoover refocused on the equip regularly of last week but we have uh a former tropical storm paul harvey the her the foreign move aniko him and it it had been uh uh weaker than a remnant her drifted across the caribbean in an appropriate envelope celebrities lot of rain there but the mall her forecast thing with doerum who then uh commend are favorable environment and health of high over the war'martyr who the gulf of mexico and i've i've taken a calling this sort of stormed short fuse hurricane where it uh warms and intensifies rapidly and then make landfall all within a threeday period and those are particularly dangerous because there's very little time to prepare people tend to want to see a storm part advance to be able to plan for it but this one uh even though the computer models were forecast here to develop uh it wasn't expected developed so rapidly and become quite so intense eastern hudson more time to prepare what do you think texas would or should have done differently.

athens georgia director john paul harvey caribbean mexico texas university of georgia forbes marshall shepherd herbert hoover threeday