23 Burst results for "Marshall Project"

"marshall project" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:41 min | 7 months ago

"marshall project" Discussed on KCRW

"The loss of their family and grief looks a lot like Depression, right or they have symptoms of trauma because whatever happened in their family home, so pretty early on, most Children get a diagnosis of PTSD or depression, depression and PTSD. Those air diagnoses that Alex Carter says she got. That's where those social Security checks come in. When the check is written for a minor social Security will send the money to what's called a representative pay. Yay! That's someone who could make decisions in the best interest of the child about how the money is used. Reporters for NPR in the Marshall Project interviewed former foster youth in five states. None knew the state was cashing their checks. We look for workers whose job it is to sign up kids for Social Security. One totals. He never even met the Children. He just went through their records to see who is likely to be eligible for those hundreds of dollars a month. He told us it's all about the numbers just bring in as much funding is possible. Alex Carter was upset that the state made itself the representative. Pay eat without telling her. I could've had my grandfather be my PE. I could have had foster parents. I could have managed my own money with lessons with foster parents. She's right about Social Security's guidelines about who could be a PG We checked the regulations. They rank seven possibilities. Family and friends come first. Then people like foster parents. It's gonna be someone who knows the child and wants to help them. State agency, like a child welfare agency, comes last Alaska in court argued it would have been too burdensome to notify foster you through their family just Nervous.

Alex Carter NPR five states Alaska Marshall Project seven possibilities hundreds of dollars a month first Social Security One totals
"marshall project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:14 min | 7 months ago

"marshall project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Maybe the child's been neglected or even abused. These were some of the most vulnerable of Children. So imagine if the state then gave that child of Bill told them to pay for their own foster care. And NPR investigation with the news organization. The Marshall Project finds that states do just that, NPR investigative correspondent Joseph Shapiro explains. Alex Carter had been in foster care since he was a child. Some years ago, she found out that social Security was sending her a disability check more than $700 a month. It's money for people with disabilities like her to pay for basic needs like food, clothing and shelter. But Carter didn't get the money. The state of Alaska took it. As a payment for the foster care. The state provided the outs. Carter, She was just turning 20. When I met her that seemed unfair. Go ahead and let me just pay for being taken away from my parents. In effect she a child was being charged for her own foster care for something that states are required to pay for my federal and state wall. How are you going to charge a 12 year old child support basically. Which is kind of what they did. Yeah, and they did it for so many years without telling me NPR and the Marshall Project investigated a little known practice of the child welfare system. States routinely claim the benefit checks that go to Children and youth and foster care. Then, when foster care ends, the youth has told the weave with little or no money. You might think of Social Security is something for retirees. It also sends checks to kids with significant disabilities. If their parents have disabilities, or when a parent has died. We found documents that estimate around 10%. Maybe even 20% of foster Children are eligible for Social Security. Officials in Alaska. Another stage told us the benefit checks are used responsibly, the cover daily living costs for the Children. Lindsay showing runs child welfare programs in Wyoming. You know, the court puts us in a position to be the the temporary parents or the temporary guardian, So we use that money in the same way that the biological parent or Guardian would would be using it. Still, those Children who get social Security checks are the on Lee ones told to in effect. Pay for their own foster care. Social Security doesn't report the numbers. But in most and maybe every state child welfare agencies take those checks at least $165 million in 2018. That's from unpublished data collected by the research group child trends, and that's just from what was reported by 36 States and the District of Columbia. The blast is now in session with Dr William Morris presiding, be seated personal. In Alaska. I was Carter sued the state as part of a class of some 260 Children in foster care. Good morning on the record In in 2019, a state court ruled that Alaska violated Social Security's rules because it didn't notify Carter before taking her benefits. But Justice January the same court said Alaska doesn't have to pay back the money it took from Carter and the other foster youth that's being appealed the practice of taking Social Security checks. Isn't well known even among people working in the field. It was if you you can imagine 100 teenagers. That's attorney Jim Davis, talking about a meeting of foster youth from an advocacy group called facing Foster Care in Alaska. At one point the teams in the room we're told. Hey, there's a lawyer here. What do you want him to know? And kids would just start hollers out. Where's my so security money? Where's my sous acumen? So wasn't one kid. It was like a lot of kids all complaining about the same thing. This was like something that was on their mind. Most all the kids were pissed off about it because most all of them are poor. They don't have any money. And getting this so security money would be a huge game changer for them. Davis from the Northern Justice Project, figured these kids and heard some rumor that they got it wrong. The next day back in his office, he did some research and the poster youth were right. Davis brought that lawsuit against the state of Alaska. Because if if somebody takes your money without your permission without telling you, it's called stealing, stealing. That's what it's called Now. If the government does it to you, it doesn't change because it's the government. That was your I think I toned it down in court, but that that zin fact what's occurring to get a sense of how about money matters? I spent some time with the plaintiff in that case, Alex Carter. Hey there. Hey. Was with her before the pandemic as she was turning 20 and about to age out of foster care. A zoo part of that change, she'd moved. This is my living room. Yeah. Into her first apartment, a one bedroom on the bottom floor across from the laundry room. The state gave her a rent voucher for youth leaving foster care slowly version that I see. Yeah, I'm not sure if you knew any more than this. Probably a bigger TV for sure. Sports. We furnished a donated couch Abed, that tiny television At first, she says she didn't have enough money for food, so she dropped by a former foster parent and eat there. Carter had been in foster care since she was about nine taken, she says, from alcoholic and abusive parents, who were often homeless. She tries to imagine what growing up is like for other kids. Like with most families, they have a travel heard house that they can always go back to and you look at the farm memories. There's photo books and all that the consistency and traditions. And being able to say, Oh, I want to have one school my entire School year and just simple things that teenagers do that I craved. But I got over the fact that I won't have it. Harder. Who's Alaska native doesn't have photographs that document growing up. She moved 15 times in 10 years from one stranger's house, toe another and for all that moving, she's never even owned a suitcase. Plastic trash bags had the do instead. You lock a child up. He ripped them from their home. You move them 5 10 times they're gonna have some issues related to that. That's Amanda Maty via she'd come to see Alex. His apartment material runs that advocacy group facing foster care in Alaska. She was once a foster youth herself. Now she's a foster parent. Most Children who have come into foster care are grieving. The loss of their family and grief looks a lot like Depression, right or they have symptoms of trauma because whatever happened in their family home, so pretty early on, most Children get a diagnosis of PTSD or depression, depression and PTSD. Those air diagnoses that Alex Carter says she got. That's where those social Security checks come in. When the check is written for a minor social Security will send the money to what's called a representative pay. Yay! That's someone who could make decisions in the best interest of the child about how the money is used. Reporters for NPR and the Marshall Project interviewed former foster youth in five states. None knew the state was cashing their checks. We look for workers whose job it is to sign up kids for Social Security. One totals. He never even met the Children. He just went through their records to see who is likely to be eligible for those hundreds of dollars a month. He told us it's all about the numbers just bring in as much funding is possible. Alex Carter was upset that the state made itself the representative payee without telling her I could've had my grandfather be my PE. I could've had foster parents. I could have managed my own money with lessons with foster parents. She's right about Social Security's guidelines about who could be a PG We checked the regulations. They rank seven possibilities. Family and friends come first. Then people like foster parents. It's going to be someone who knows the child and wants to help them. State agency, like a child welfare agency, comes last Alaska in court argued it would have been too burdensome to notify foster you through their family..

Alex Carter Joseph Shapiro 2019 15 times Amanda Maty NPR Jim Davis 2018 Davis Carter Alex 20% 20 10 years Wyoming Lindsay five states 100 teenagers William Morris Bill
Chicago Officers Must Now Give Medical Aid After a Police Shooting

Morning Edition

02:02 min | 7 months ago

Chicago Officers Must Now Give Medical Aid After a Police Shooting

"Footage of police killing 13 year old Adam to later last week captured the violent end of that boy's life. It also showed a particular policy change in action officers attempting to give medical aid after a shooting. Patrick Smith of member station. WBZ reports and awarding this piece includes some audio from the body cam footage of Toledo's death. In the moments after Chicago police shot 13 year old Adam to Lehto. Officers on the scene, including the one who fired. The shot immediately began trying to save the boy's life in videos. Officers can be seen giving the boy CPR and desperately calling for an ambulance. Within seconds of firing the fatal shot. Officer Eric Stillman started talking with to Lehto. Resentment reshot. Stay with you Stay with Temple, Get an ambulance rolling. Somebody bring the medical kit. Now their life saving efforts were urgent, but ultimately futile. It was a much different scene than one captured in Chicago's most infamous police shooting video, the 2014 killing of teenager Laquan McDonald. And that Dashcam video after MacDonald had been shot repeatedly. 16 Times, Chicago police officers stood around as McDonald lay in the road, never doing anything but kicking the knife out of his hand. University of Chicago law professor Sharon Fairley used to run the Chicago agency that investigates police shootings. The incident that really sticks with her is the 2016 fatal shooting of 18 year old Paul O'Neill. An unarmed van shot by Chicago police. Young Paula Neil was shot and he's lying on the ground and They're just standing around waiting for the ambulance to show up, And they're not doing anything to help him fairly recommended police change policies and instruct officers to give medical aid after injuring someone. That ended up being a part of the Chicago police consent decree. A recent report by the Marshall Project found that most police departments across the country give first aid training to police recruits. And half require officers to provide aid whenever possible.

Lehto WBZ Chicago Officer Eric Stillman Adam Patrick Smith Laquan Mcdonald Dashcam Toledo Sharon Fairley Paula Neil Macdonald University Of Chicago Paul O'neill Mcdonald Marshall Project
"marshall project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:31 min | 10 months ago

"marshall project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Openly in favor of abolishing the death penalty. This is in stark contrast to his predecessor, former president Trump, who in the final few months of his term, ordered the execution of 13 federal death row inmates after 17 years without a federal execution. Switch in Weisshaus attitudes towards the death penalty is a microcosm of trends in national public opinion. No national support for the death penalty increased in the 19 seventies following a Supreme Court decision that named then current capital punishment laws as unconscious. ITU sh inal and support Climbers Highs 80% in 1994. By 2019. Polls show that a majority of Americans favored life imprisonment rather the death sentence. However, in the state of Texas capital punishment has remained an integral part of its criminal justice system of the roughly 1500 prisoners executed in the United States since the 19 seventies. Texas has been responsible for more than 500. More. Shama, a staff writer for the Marshall Project makes Texas the focus of his new book, Let the Lord's sort them the Rise and fall of the death penalty over the course. The book Maurice examines how the specificities of Texas law have left the door open to arbitrary and bias decisions in death penalty cases. And he tells the story of those involved in carrying out the sentences from defense teams and prosecutors. Judges and expert witnesses to chaplains and the men who restrain the prisoners as they are being executed, But its support for capital punishment continues to trans downward. Will we see reform even in the staunchest, pro death penalty state You know, it's an author's author. Morishima joins us now welcome Hi. Thanks so much for having me today. All right, So please correct me if I get any of these statistics wrong, Since you are the expert and wrote the big book, There are 28 states with the death penalty. What is unique about Texas's death penalties the laws there compared to other states that have capital punishment. Texas has really been the epicenter of the death penalty. There have been roughly 1500 executions since the 19 seventies in the United States, and more than 500 of them more than a third have been in Texas. The reasons for that, very, you know, there's a there's a political story in which we've had political leaders, you know famously Governor George W. Bush and Rick Perry, who were very pro death penalty. We've had a court system that in which elected judges have been interested in sort of speeding cases along and then we have a unique law that was written in the 19 seventies that put an emphasis on Um, jury's meeting to decide that somebody to get the death penalty would need to be dangerous in the future that there was a fear that they would commit further crimes if they weren't executed, And that became a mechanism for, um prosecutors to get in a lot of sort of fear and speed cases along to death row. I'll say finally, that there is also a cultural story A Texans think of themselves in general as being just sort of a death penalty state. And on. There's a tendency to have a kind of nostalgia about the death penalty that connects it back to, you know, the old West and the frontier and cowboys. And I think that that is a piece of the story that's hard to document in evidence. There's a statistics to document it, but it More interview, they did, the more that kind of came out as a major feature of why the death penalty is so popular here. Wasn't always popular there. It wasn't so. Texas, along with the rest of the United States almost abolished the death penalty got very close to it. In the 19 sixties. There were no executions for a number of years. In that decade. And 1972. The Supreme Court finally said that the death penalty system as it as it existed at the time. Um you know violated. Constitution and in the years leading up to that holds were showing that the duck penalty was very unpopular. You know, people could run for the top prosecutor of major cities in Texas and say they didn't really support the death penalty and no one penalize them for that at the ballot box. But the Supreme Court's decision in 1972 sparks a kind of backlash. You know there were Throughout the sixties, a lot of civil rights and you know, criminal procedure rulings that made a lot of Southern states feel like Washington was sort of trampling their state's rights. Trampling their ability to catch criminals. There was kind of racially coded language going on for sure. Back Then I bring up the movie Dirty Harry in my book as Ah, movie that really encapsulates the zeitgeist back then, as feeling like Um, you know, we're being robbed of our ability to fight crime, so that backlash is really what set in motion the contemporary death penalty. But what about this sort of at a not sure This is the right word about that. Supreme Court decision firm Envies versus Georgia. Loophole. Was there a loophole in that decision that left something open for future death penalty laws or interpretation with your word? Yes, Precisely. So what it did was it said that the death penalty system the laws that we are on the books around the death penalty violated the Constitution but not the death penalty itself. There was still a feeling even among liberal judges that you know, Constitution says You can deprive people of life with due process, But it does say that you could deprive them of life, right so So what That meant was there was an open door for states to go back and rewrite their death penalty laws and Texas along with numerous other states across the country..

Texas United States Supreme Court Um Weisshaus president Trump Governor George W. Bush Shama Morishima Maurice Rick Perry staff writer Washington prosecutor Georgia
1 in 5 prisoners in the US has had COVID-19, 1,700 have died

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

1 in 5 prisoners in the US has had COVID-19, 1,700 have died

"As the roll out of new coronavirus vaccines begins staggering infection rates in the U. S. prison system are posing difficult decisions for policy makers according to data collected by the Associated Press and the Marshall project one in every five state federal prisoners in the U. S. has tested positive for the coronavirus new cases in prison to reach their highest level this week since testing began in the spring more than seventeen hundred prisoners have died Homer venters is the former chief medical officer at new York's reikers island jail he says that number is a vast undercount he's conducted more than a dozen court ordered Kobe nineteen prison inspections around the country he says he's encountered prisons and jails where when people get sick not only are they not tested but they don't receive care Colorado's initial vaccine priority plan put prisoners before the general public the governor Jerry Polish told reporters there's no way it's going to prisoners before it goes to the people who haven't committed any crime health officials say when it comes to the corona virus we have to stop thinking about prisons as a place apart with correction officers and other employees traveling in and out of them each day Jennifer king Washington

U. Homer Venters Reikers Island The Associated Press Jerry Polish Kobe New York Colorado Jennifer King Washington
"marshall project" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on WTOP

"Michael Cooker. Whom they had a dispute with over a marijuana operation. Reston's Fabian Alfaro and Jimmy Marcel McRae of Sterling. Both pleaded guilty to their roles back in March. Prosecutors claim Alfaro and McRae hired cooker to shit pot from California and sell it in Northern Virginia. An apology from the mayor of Chicago after body camera video was released, showing 12 male police officers breaking into the wrong apartment and detaining an innocent woman. Anjanette Young sued the city over its failed attempt to arrest a suspect who lived next door to her and it's part of the lawsuit. A judge force the city to release the video nearly two years after the incident happened. Now. Chicago's mayor, Lori Lightfoot, says she wants change and accountability. Here's WBBM stave Savini In a press conference Thursday afternoon, Mayor Lightfoot said she wants to sit down with young Young and her attorney Don't believe it is sincere. She sent that email immediately prior to her walking into that press conference and then telling everyone that she's requested a meeting. And so that was the first time we'd ever heard that light would admitted on Thursday she was wrong when she said her administration didn't tell her about Young's case until this week, acknowledging she was told in November of 2019. So far, none of the officers involved in that raid has been disciplined. One in every five state and federal prisoners here in the U. S. Has tested positive for Corona virus. That's a rate more than four times higher than in the general population, and the Associated Press and Marshall Project data show that in some states, more than half of prisoners have been infected. So far, at least 275,000 prisoners are known to be infected in the U. S. More than 1700 have died. New cases in prisons this week reached the highest level since the testing began back in the spring. Sir Paul McCartney says he's ready to be among the first entertainers to get vaccinated against Cove in 19. When asked by the BBC if he would get a coronavirus shock, the 78 year old McCartney said, Yeah, I will, and I like to encourage people to get it, too, because with this is much more serious. The ex Beatle also downplayed the likelihood he go on tour next year to support his latest album, released this week. McCartney three Saying it depends on how successful virus countermeasures are, he adds he loved to play as Britain's blessing re festival in 2021, though he's skeptical..

Mayor Lightfoot Anjanette Young Sir Paul McCartney Fabian Alfaro Michael Cooker Jimmy Marcel McRae Chicago marijuana Reston Associated Press Sterling California Northern Virginia BBC Cove Britain attorney Marshall Project
"marshall project" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Can Xena Vega with criminal justice reform an issue in this election, The voices of incarcerated people are as relevant as ever to the national conversation. But it's often a group that the media talks about, but rarely to the Marshall Project is a nonpartisan nonprofit news organization focused on the U. S Criminal justice system. And they've been doing just that by conducting surveys of thousands of incarcerated people about their political leanings and beliefs. Their most recent survey was a 2400 incarcerated people, and it focused on how that population feels about proposed criminal justice reforms, including de funding The police. Joining me now to talk about these surveys is Nicole Lewis, a staff writer for the Marshall Project. Nicole, Thanks for joining me. Very nice to be with you again. So we've been talking. We just wrapped a segment about efforts. Tio defund the police in Minneapolis. What did your survey find about what incarcerated people thought about that issue or not specifically in Minneapolis, but just the more broader efforts to Defund the police. And also, how is it defined? Sure so we had We took a pretty narrow definition, eh? So we asked people what they thought about defending the police, which meant taking some money away from the police departments and allocating that funding to services and two programs that could have prevented violence. And so what we found was that overall, many of the respondents were supportive of this. Many more black respondents than white were in fever. But across the board, there was I'm sort of broad support for this definition of defund. One of the things that was this really stood out to me was that we often rarely here we rarely, I should say here from people who are currently incarcerated. What was the goal in attempting to get these voices? Thousands of people that you all have spoken to Yeah, That's right. I mean, this is a community is often talked about on the campaign trail talked about when we talk when we're thinking through policy, but we rarely hear directly from them. And so this was an opportunity for us to say, Hey, something like defund something like black lives matters were thinking through these policies is were reckoning with The way we think about crime. The way we deal with it. Why don't we actually ask people who are potentially most impacted by the solutions that we come up with, and also who have, like a direct experience and deeper insight into the kinds of situations the kind of circumstances A person might find themselves in when they turn a corner and go down the wrong path, right when a crime is committed, what was going on in their lives? And can they help us understand if we can work backwards? What right have made a difference to prevent that crime from happening? And so I just think This was a real moment to get their voices and to get some of those ideas out from behind bars and in back into the general public while this conversation is going on nationally, I think it's critical work that you all have done here. And I think often when we hear about political engagement around, for example, people who were formerly felons Who are attempting to vote. We've talked a lot about what's happening in the state of Florida. It's often people who have already left the criminal justice system. When we think about people who are currently in the criminal justice system who are currently behind bars. There's certify, I think an assumption that there is not a lot of political engagement you found what in your reporting. So, yeah, I mean, this survey is I should say the second serving that we conducted and so in March, we actually released A broader survey. That was 8000 people, you know, between prison in jail and we found a ton enough political engagement. Right? So this is a place prisons and jails are a place where there still is some access to news, however, limited People do get, I should say they are able to listen to the radio. So we found a ton of people who listed NPR as their main source. Right, so they're still tapped in and they're still engaged. By and large, They're thinking a lot about how politics on the outside affect their families. They're also for the first time. Many people seeing very clearly the impact of decisions that have been made of the representatives who are put in place of the judges who have been voted in of the prosecutors who are trying their case, and they're coming to a greater understanding of why You know representation matters right? Because they're going through this system that is headed up by many elected officials. And so there's an increased understanding of Oh my goodness. This vote really my vote really matters. It's really important that I pay attention on for many people who may never see may never get out right for folks with longer sentences. We found, in fact, that Prison had politicizing effects that they were even Mohr engaged than people who come in and have been in jail or prison for just a few years on big part of that is that in order to get out if they have any hope of seeing the real world again, that they're going to need to press for legislative solutions, right, so in many cases The way that their sentences is tied up in statutes and laws. Right, So they have a deep understanding of how this country works in and where they can advocate for some, you know, hope of relief. President Trump has made a big deal about how much he's done for criminal justice reform, specifically referencing his first step act Did that resonate with the folks that you interviewed that you talked to So we were really curious to see if there was any sort of interest or support for first step act behind bars. So we did ask people and what we found was that you know this Particular survey 2400 folks, you know, split between President jail, I should say specifically at the state level, right, so these are not folks incarcerated in federal prisons. And they said, Oh, it's hard to tell right first, Novak what difference did it make? And I think a lot of that is because this is ah, policy that that only targets people held in federal prisons. And so the majority of our respondents were incarcerated at the state level. But you know, you never know. Sometimes people, just the perception enough the perception of being Friendly towards incarcerated. People of wanting to make a difference can have an impact. But we didn't see that in this case. I'm wondering. Also with so much attention focused on getting people who have already left the criminal justice system, the right reinstating their their right to vote. Whether or not you heard that people really want to have that right to vote in, even if they're behind bars. I think absolutely, You know, Despite all of the many differences that we found in the survey, overwhelmingly, respondents were clear that they felt they should have the right to vote wanted the right to vote on. Do you know this set expressed an aspirational sense of if they had it that they would use it. So and to be clear people who are in jail can in some instances, vote correct. That's right. So the majority of people so part of this package, we released Ah story about efforts to franchise folks in jails. The majority of them are still eligible, not convicted, or they've been convicted of misdemeanors. But sheriff's jail officials do not make it easy for those folks to have access to the ballot, so volunteers are really working overtime right now. To try to make sure this population.

Marshall Project Nicole Lewis President Minneapolis staff writer NPR Florida Mohr Novak Trump
"marshall project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Conversation. Hi, everybody. I'm Bridget Bergen in for tan Xena Vega and this is the takeaway national conversation around police. Violence has focused on police shootings, but a comprehensive yearlong investigation from the Marshall Project is shedding light on another lesser known form of violence. It causes harm to thousands every year attacks by police dogs, according to their report. There's little oversight on how departments train and use these animals. Despite cases like this one out of West Montgomery, Alabama. In 2018, there was a call late at night about a person in an unoccupied house. The police in Montgomery City police send in the canine unit. They found Joseph Pet away 51 in the house. He had been fixing up the house earlier in the day, the family said he had a key and have permission to sleep in the small house. The canine found him bit him and the vital lasted maybe two minutes and Joseph thataway bled to death. That's challenge. Stevens, editor, an investigative reporter for the Birmingham News, Huntsville Times and Mobile Press Register, who co reported the investigation. That case is the worst case scenario, but it points to the risks of a system with little accountability. So is the nation examines policing? Why isn't there more attention to how and when police dogs are employed? Abbie VanSickle is here to talk about all of this. She's staff writer for the Marshall Project covering criminal justice. It was the other reporter on this investigation. Abby. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. Abby. Why did you begin this in this investigation about police dogs. You know, I really started with a string of cases in Alabama where challenge and I started. Tio try to understand the scope of how often police dogs are used to bite people. What kind of injuries People would suffer from these fights? And then what oversight there, Wass and with the more cases that we saw The more we realized that this was not just happening in Alabama but was actually happening, You know, coast to coast and everything in between. When researching police dog bites. How tough was it to find that information? You know some things we're we're pretty simple to find If there had been local news coverage of an incident, especially if there's sort of a video involved. We would see local news stories. But what we really didn't see was any kind of national examination trying to put these incidents together. And that's when we started requesting data from departments and it got a lot more difficult to find things like, how often are these dogs used? How often do they actually bite people? And what kind of accountability is there when a bite happens? Especially if there's a dog that has, you know, bitten? Numerous people or an officer has been involved in lots of incidents We started to see. You know, we wanted to see if there was any kind of national database tracking this and we didn't find that so we started to try to build something where we could see the scope. Abby. What kinds of injuries do these dogs inflict? This is one of the thing was that surprised me Most. And the reporting is the severity of some of the injuries so What we found is that it's not a dog bite like you might think of, you know? Ah, like a nip from a family pet. What we saw where injuries that you know, people would suffer lifelong consequences from thes dog bites. We saw people who had lost their scalps who had lost limbs who had these scars that you know they would carry with them throughout their lives. And so that seemed to be Hell, an important thing that came from a lot of the interviews we had with victims of the fights that they really carried this with them forever. We'll be right back with more on police dogs in a moment, stay with us..

Abby Abbie VanSickle Alabama Marshall Project Bridget Bergen Joseph thataway Montgomery City West Montgomery reporter Wass Birmingham News Stevens Mobile Press Register investigative reporter officer Huntsville Times editor
"marshall project" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on KCRW

"Is the airline industry. Air travel demand is down a wop a whopping 70% from last year and tens of thousands of airline pilots, flight attendants, a reservation agents and other industry workers are poised to lose their paychecks next week if Congress doesn't extend federal aid for airlines. NPR's David Shaper reports. A nation's airlines are at a crossroads. Or maybe I should say cross runways at the start of the year. On average about 2.5 million people were flying every day. Now that's plummeted to around 700,000, and until there are widely available vaccines or treatments for covert 19. Most passengers won't be coming back any time soon. You can't run an airline that a third the size it was and expect to keep all the same people. Elaine Backer is an airline industry analyst for investment Bank Cowan. I feel like in this country we've shifted from flattening the curve to waiting for a cure or a vaccine, and and that just means the pain is going to be longer in the cares act, Congress provided $25 billion a direct payroll support to the airlines so they could keep paying their employees through the end of September. Already, tens of thousands of workers have taken early retirement or other incentives to leave their jobs. But now the airlines air notifying another 75,000 that they may be out of a job. October 1st getting that for letter in the mail. Completely shocking. Isaiah Gonzalez is an aircraft maintenance worker for united at New York's LaGuardia Airport. The first thing that came to mind with how I was going to support my family people who depend on me. How was I going to keep the income? I was going to keep the family afloat, and Gonzalez is not alone. Me. Getting fellow is like this devastating. Tony Valentine is a reservations agent for United Airlines in Detroit. I have six that depend on me Arrange it age from 2 to 22, Valentine says. That's a houseful with a whole lot of bills. In addition, she says her husband suffered a serious stroke last year. And knowing that I may not have insurance to finishes is like I feel like I failed often at loggerheads. The unions representing these and other airline employees are now in rare harmony with airline CEOs in pressing Congress for a six month extension of the payroll support program. The industries in dire straits Nick Calio heads the industry group Airlines for America at one point Passenger traffic was down 96%. It's now down 70%. Still, one third of our planes are parked not flying, and we're losing $5 billion a month. The airlines unions and bipartisan majorities in Congress agree that the six months of payroll support worked in keeping airline employees off of unemployment rolls. In the tens of thousands of layoffs now might send shockwaves through the economy. Missouri Congressman Sam Graves is the ranking Republican on the House Transportation Committee. We absolutely cannot let an entire sector of the economy collapse, and that's exactly what will happen if we do not get this extension done yet. The airline funding is tied to broader Corona virus relief that the White House and Congress cannot agree upon. Here's American airline CEO Doug Parker. I just can't believe that we may not be able to do the right thing. Simply because our elected officials can't come to any sort of compromise agreement were better in that. Still, someone of providing billions Warren taxpayer money doesn't just put off the inevitable as airlines will need to restructure to match the reduced demand. Legislation that would extend payroll support for the airlines was introduced in the Senate this week. But if it isn't passed soon, thousands of airline employees may be out of work One week from today. David Shaper NPR news

Jim Miles Lartigue Briana Taylor 700,000 David Shaper Marshall Project NPR Congress
Loughlin, Giannulli get prison time in college bribery plot

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Loughlin, Giannulli get prison time in college bribery plot

"A a new celebrity analysis couple suggests have been sentenced the to number prison of lives for lost bribing to their the corona daughter's way virus into in a university the U. S. as crew is significantly recruits higher actress than Lori the official Loughlin told who played aunt Becky the tally on by full Johns house Hopkins University has been sentenced shows to two the months number behind of people bars who have died while from her fashion covert nineteen designer husband in the U. S. Mossimo approaching G. a newly one received hundred a five and seventy month five sentence thousand they were among dozens but the analysis of prominent parents of government who pled data guilty by in the what Associated federal prosecutors Press dubbed and operation the Marshall project varsity blues finds in the may number the of couple deaths admitted during paying the first half seven a million months dollars of in the bribes year funneling what is money many through a as sham two hundred charity and operated fifteen by Rick thousand singer to get their two above daughters what into might the university have been expected of southern California in a more as typical crew recruits year even though public neither health of authorities them was a rower have long U. said S. district some judge corona Nathaniel virus Gorton deaths expressed especially outrage early at on the couple's greed were mistakenly fighting attributed back tears to Laughlin other told causes the judge she admitted in the awful crisis decision may have led and indirectly allowed herself to be swayed to the loss from her of moral many compass other lives I'm by Jennifer preventing king or discouraging people with other serious ailments from seeking treatment Ben Thomas Washington

Lori Loughlin Becky Johns House Hopkins University S. Mossimo Rick California Laughlin Jennifer Ben Thomas Washington Official U. S. Nathaniel
The Latest: US deaths mount, virus takes toll on minorities

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

The Latest: US deaths mount, virus takes toll on minorities

"A new analysis suggests as many as two hundred and fifteen thousand more people that might have been expected dined in the U. S. during the first seven months of twenty twenty half of them people of color blacks Hispanics native Americans and Asian Americans make up just under forty percent of the U. S. population but they accounted for more than half of all the deaths above normal through July that according to an analysis by the Associated Press in the Marshall project earlier data revealed the especially heavy toll on black Hispanic and native Americans but the latest numbers also reveal a disproportionate burden on Asian Americans deaths in each group were up at least thirty percent this year compared with the last five years Ben Thomas Washington

Associated Press Ben Thomas Washington
The Latest: US deaths mount, virus takes toll on minorities

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

The Latest: US deaths mount, virus takes toll on minorities

"A new analysis suggests the number of lives lost to the corona virus in the U. S. is significantly higher than the official told the tally by Johns Hopkins University shows the number of people who have died from covert nineteen in the U. S. approaching one hundred and seventy five thousand but the analysis of government data by the Associated Press and the Marshall project finds the number of deaths during the first seven months of the year what is many as two hundred and fifteen thousand above what might have been expected in a more typical year public health authorities have long said some corona virus deaths especially early on were mistakenly attributed to other causes in the crisis may have led indirectly to the loss of many other lives by preventing or discouraging people with other serious ailments from seeking treatment Ben Thomas Washington

Johns Hopkins University Associated Press Ben Thomas Washington Official
"marshall project" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Speaking to a conservative group in Virginia. He also called the Democrats just finished convention, the darkest and gloomiest and said he's focusing on a bright future for the country. Republicans hold their convention. Next week, a new report suggests the number of lives lost to Corona virus in the U. S may be significantly higher than the confirmed count and analysis of government data by the Associated Press and a nonprofit group. The Marshall Project finds that as many as 215,000 more people than usual, died in the US during the first seven months of this year, and half of the dead were people of color groups that have been disproportionately impacted by the virus. Meantime, Tennessee now confirming over 2000 virus cases and chill In ages. 5 to 18 over the past two weeks as most Tennessee public schools reopened President Trump Morning again today that the country isn't prepared for millions more mailed in ballots even is the new postmaster General Lewis to Joy assures Congress, the Postal Service can handle any volume of election male. He also denies trying to have any negative impact on the election. I have never spoken to the president about the Postal Service sells it in to congratulate me. You accepted the position. Recent postal changes now on hold or blamed for slowing mail delivery, prompting multiple lawsuits. House lawmakers could vote tomorrow on a bill aimed at blocking any pre election changes and boosting a postal funding. The former California police officer known as the Golden State Killer, just sentenced to life in prison, telling victims in court that he's truly sorry, Joseph DeAngelo now 74 was convicted in a decade long string of rapes and murders suspected in dozens more attacks. America is listening to Bach's duties. This report is sponsored by the podcast. Why I'm voting radio 9 21 047 FM traffic We got delays out there this afternoon, folks trying to get into the weekend. A crash just cleared route 10 North bound at Union AB 1 95 Westbound Heavy is a gift from the state line and out to Broadway Strip on 95 south found a slow by branch have I'm damn Acela on NewsRadio. 9 21 of 47 f m. Have you ever wondered if Will Ferrell likes to wear his? I voted sticker. I'll even wear it into the next day. Or what makes Stephanie rule so passionate about voting about what kind of country do you want to live in? Listen to why I'm voting on the I heart radio app or wherever you get your podcasts and your friend Sean Hannity here to tell.

Postal Service Tennessee president Will Ferrell Sean Hannity Virginia Associated Press US Marshall Project Joseph DeAngelo Stephanie California Trump Congress America General Lewis Bach officer
"marshall project" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on WTOP

"Sent to the state Psychiatric Hospital for more testing near Lord consisting W GOP news. There has been a major drop in the number of people behind bars in this country. The Marshall Project, along with The Associated Press, find that between March and June of this year, more than 100,000 people were released from state and federal prisons. That's a drop of 8% compared to just 2% the previous year. But the lower head counts or not all attributable to the virus raging in prisons, the report finds. It's also because prisons have stopped accepting new prisoners from county jails in an effort to avoid importing the virus. Two escapees from a Chesterfield County juvenile facility in Virginia are still on the run. 20 year old Jabbar Taylor of Spotsylvania and 18 year old Rashad Williams of Washington overpowered a guard at the Bon Aire Juvenile Correctional Center on Monday and escaped in a waiting car. There was a $5000 reward for information leading to their arrest. Taylor was convicted of two counts of second degree murder and was scheduled to be moved to an adult facility. Once he turned 21. Williams was convicted on robbery charges. Police believe the two were headed north were both escapees have significant ties. Police aren't sure if they are still together. Coming up next. Wall Street is heading lower today, a better shot it finding a home. I'm Jeff Global, 12 24. And now the small business buzz packaged by the UPS store as small businesses struggle, the real, but it's creating more opportunities for freelancers. Freelance job posting site Flex Job says Hiring freelancers is an economical way for some small companies too slowly. Rebuild their business, and it's as if the past is any indicator. It's likely that a healthy amount of freelance jobs will be available across industries and career levels. Despite the economic downturn. I'm Jeff label. Hi. Welcome to the UPS store..

Jabbar Taylor Marshall Project Rashad Williams Jeff Global Bon Aire Juvenile Correctional state Psychiatric Hospital UPS GOP Chesterfield County The Associated Press second degree murder Washington robbery Virginia
"marshall project" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on WTOP

"For a comprehensive list. It is 11 06 Most of our jobs have been affected in some way by this pandemic. Now Virginia becomes the first state in the nation to institute workplace Corona virus safety standards. The temporary measures are part of the state's safety and health codes. Besides mass, social distancing, pp and sanitation standards they require business is to make sure employees suspected of having Corona virus don't show up to work. And the company has to notify coworkers of possible exposure within 24 hours Cos can't retaliate against a worker who expresses concerns about infection to government agencies, reporters or on social media. Violations. Khun bring a $130,000 penalty. A group of small Virginia businesses says the rules will make it harder to compete with other states near logged in staying W T L P News There's been a major drop in the number of folks behind bars in the U. S. And analysis by the Marshall Project and The Associated Press finds that between March and June, more than 100,000 people were released from state and federal prisons. That's a drop of 8% compared to a drop of just 2% the previous year. But the lower head count's heir, not all attributed to the virus raging in prisons. Instead, the report finds its do Teo the fact that prisons have stopped accepting new prisoners from county jails in an effort to avoid importing the virus and because courts have been closed, fewer people have been sentenced to prison. In Virginia. About 250 prisoners are released between March and June. Which is just a 2% decrease in the population Figures for Maryland and D. C are not yet available. Coming up doctors. They're learning some disturbing new details about Cove in 19 We'll.

Virginia Khun Maryland Teo Cove Marshall Project The Associated Press
"marshall project" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Two years ago, the trump administration began the process of separating thousands of migrant parents from their children at the US Mexico border, but within the United States itself family separation continues with undocumented parents being deported two countries. Many of them have been to in years. What good! Came out of. My husband, being deported. And is the country a safer place? What good came out of it? That's less Hernandez whose husband Pedro was deported to Mexico by the US government in twenty seventeen, despite having a green card application in the pipeline, the trump administration considered pedro a quote, repeat immigration offender, having crossed the US border three times without the proper documentation, and that triggered a visit from immigration officials, who then deported him losing her husband Meant Celeste also lost a critical source of income for the family something that happens to many mixed status families when the main breadwinner is deported, only thing that I know is. May, The boys, my kids are friends. The family sits in disbelief, struggling unnecessary struggle unnecessary suffering of the separation. Unnecessary worry. Celeste family is not alone and analysis from the Marshall Project on the Center for Immigration Studies shows that about six million American children in the United. States live with at least one undocumented family member at risk of being deported and today. The Supreme Court sided with the trump administration to quickly deport some immigrants in the United States without seeing a judge Julia Preston is a contributing writer for the Marshall Project and she interviewed Celeste and two other families. We tried to show how broad the scope is of the families that could be subject to deportation There are six million American citizen children in in the United States who have apparent is undocumented and could be deported. We found that a win. Red Winner is taken out of a family. The income of a family drops by almost half so the. Economic impact on these families is potentially devastating, and we know from immigration and customs enforcement that just in five years up to twenty, eighteen, more than two hundred and thirty thousand parents who were deported, said they had US Simpson children. So our purpose here was to really focus on the impact on American families, an American children of these deportations, this devastating lasting impact. A lot of times when we talk about undocumented folks who were here in this country, we refer to them as this mass of millions of people, but your work you went and really profiled three families for the story in Ohio. We're about to hear some audio from Liam. Suma who's Esperanza was deported to Mexico and here's Lia describing some of the immediate feeling she had when her mother was taken away. The house was just like. It. Has That vibe that my mom would give to it like it was just so like. If felt cold, it felt dark like there was just like we need my mom there and we still do to this day like I still feel that vibe where it cold and like. It's just dark. When they said that she's getting on a plane and that she's leaving like. That just like a hurt, really really bad. I felt like. That shouldn't happen because. Like if they're taking a mother away from a child lake. The chows should at least like. Hugger say her goodbye like something and it just I just. I was so like angry at like the whole system. Julia SPIT UNSA had four daughters one of them. Was Leah who were left in the United States. What do we know about? The psychological effects that is been on, says deportation hat on her children. These four American teenagers were cast adrift Their father is very loving man, but he had to work just to keep the family afloat, and he could rarely be home, and over the course of two years after Espinoza was deported. Two of her younger daughters Ah tried to commit suicide. In one instance as been on, so was actually on the WHATSAPP video in Mexico with Talia as one of her daughter's was unconscious in a suicide attempt, and it's been ons ahead to talk her daughter through a process of saving this girl's life, and getting her to an ambulance, and getting a relative to take her to the hospital, and then it happened again. These young girls just felt so Barath. Vet Their mother. who had been very hands on very loving and caring mother, had been deported, and was separated from them. You can hear a lot of that in the Leah's voice when she speaks to you. Julia you also write about Al? Fadl Ramos and his family. What happened when Alfredo was deported to Mexico? Alfredo was a case of. An immigrant who self deported so ice started to come after him after many years, Alfredo never had a criminal record. He had been a very good.

United States Mexico Alfredo Celeste Leah Julia SPIT UNSA Julia Preston Fadl Ramos Julia Barath Center for Immigration Studies Supreme Court Ohio Marshall Project pedro Liam Simpson Hugger Espinoza Hernandez
Police unions dig in as calls for reform grow

1A

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Police unions dig in as calls for reform grow

"States across the US are in their second straight week of protests over the killing of George Floyd by a police officer many hope to see police reform they have reached a current though and that's often the police unions to talk about the role of police unions and the power they hold over reforms we have Booker Hodges assistant commissioner at the Minnesota department of public safety and let's bring it round the lord a police union labor negotiator former police officer and the former president of a state wide police union in Texas run thank you so much for joining us well thanks for having me we're getting a lot of comments from the moment given example one listener tweets it seems all other unions are under attack but police unions only gets stronger what accounts for this and then Richard tweets the left is finally realizing public unions make it very difficult to remove crappy employees teacher police if you suck at your job you've got to find another job these these questions Rauner kind of centered around what makes police unions different I think and could you answer that for us to can we look back to the history of police used to get the answer well sure and I think the I always call it kind of the duck billed platypus of unions they're in a union but they don't look like other unions and there's a big reason for that because of the nineteen nineteen Boston police strike it pretty much wiped out unionization in America until really into the nineteen sixties they do said paternal so ninety eighty five ninety percent of all the police United States do not belong to the AFL-CIO they have one chartered union and it's a it's a small percentage so the police were late getting into the labor firefighters had an international in nineteen eighty S. all the public employee unions construction units you know that some of those are a hundred years old so police were late to the game they were used in many times as strike breakers and picket lines and so they didn't gravitate in there tend to be conservative by nature so their unions look different but they're still just working people their blue collar working people who form the groups who have become adept at using the American political system to increase our wages and pay in for job security so I'm not ashamed to be in a policeman or representing the police they can only do in a increase their strength or get their message out it's all illegitimate nature so different than people that are anti gun and pro gun you know free speech no free speech in America everyone has a right to speak out on things so well of concern to their members we got this tweet Booker from Tracey Wheeler and she mentions what Ron just said about the fraternal order of police Tracy says the police union's name the fraternal order of police is symbolic of the fact that it operates like an old boys club officers who speak up about bad cop behavior are ostracized in this culture and I want to put this book or in the context of what we heard earlier from you lie at the the Marshall project who was saying that often times African American cops don't want to join leadership because they don't want to be part of that culture yes so yeah I think there's there are some differences between African American officers on what offices regarding union membership I mean mia love the vast majority of my career I was in the union I was a union president you know so I didn't have some of those issues but a lot of the other people I know who are in other organizations did have issues regarding how that they didn't feel that the union represented them or didn't defend them as strongly as they did white officer so I I I'm fully aware that that issue does exist within the labor unions run it sounds like you wanted to respond to that as well well that issue exist in America so you could say I'm a seventy two year old white man who grew up in the south where our view the world may be different than a black person my age who grew up different but men and women officers have different views about things Hispanic officers have different views are Asian awesome so that's in it in and of itself but you have to say policing in America is eighty five percent means there's been no woman firefighter president that I'm aware of any part of union in America ever so so we look at it and then we say yes but they appear to be older white men yes but there haven't democratic elections welcome back officers in America only about twelve percent of the police no less maybe nineteen so that's wrong but the pollution is not hurting anybody the city hires the city provides room recruitment in six cities were even worse off when it comes to female officers their lesson about twelve percent of the police which is half the number of Canada Australia and other European countries so thank you in that profession is eighty five percent median and whatever sixty seventy percent white means that white men tend to gravitate up yes but lots of officers don't become involved in the

United States George Floyd Officer
"marshall project" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Was. I was still very much a generalist that when I came to the Houston Chronicle and I started here here at in Houston as a general assignment reporter and then after year when I got hired permanently. Because I'd started on a fellowship when I got hired permanently. They were like. Hey when you take a mini beat or something you know. Death Penalty reporter just retired. You WanNa take that and I was like sherm sounds perfect and You know because it seems like a very sort of defined beat. That wouldn't be a whole job and it was an area that interested me and was you know it's still technical and complicated to cover. But there's very human stories involved right so sort of excited and it was overlapping into prisons. A little bit which was at least somewhat interesting to me But I didn't really have the intent to be a prisons reporter and then he just sort of expanded like it was like. Can you stop writing so many death penalty stories to then it was like okay? I'll do prisons and I sort of expanded prisons and then it was like well. Okay can you do jails or mental health and and they kept being like stop writing so many prisons story so he kept expanding to sort of more criminal justice. And you know by the time I left and came to the Marshall Project. I'd you know become very much. A sort of criminal justice generalist. I guess And now at the Marshall Project. I'm doing a lot of prisons of I think it's changed. The I think the Krahn virus has changed her job descriptions a little bit. I probably doing little more generalist criminal justice anywhere but Since this happened we've had to sort of take specific beats within criminal justice and So I'm sort of responsibility for the prison INS and P Part of it. Oh in Congress the criminal justice system. I don't feel as you you sometimes. I feel like the coverage early conversation about criminal. Justice focuses a lot on Men who are incarcerated or just like the criminal justice system as a whole so I wanna ask you specifically about issues that are particular to women's prison in just issues that you've experienced personally hugh. Yeah I think that I mean I think part of the reason. I think there's a few reasons that men get more coverage first of all I mean men obviously make up a bigger part of the system. You know But I also think that You Know Women Women's prisons in an don't have like data on this and there's a few reasons the data would probably be difficult to to. Parse but you know women's prison sort of in my experience variance of my friends that I've talked to tend to have like less less cell phones and less drug contraband than men's prisons. Just women tend to not have the means to to get it in And that means that they're harder to reach through illicit means like you're less likely to get a contraband cell phone call from a women's prison so all of these the NFC think about it. All these facebook live videos you see popping up during Corona Virus. Seen a lot of them out of prison. They've all been men's PRISS. You know And I mean I think this is a number of reasons for that but I mean that that does seem to be a trend fit. I've observed but also women's team often less likely to reach out to the media Not that it doesn't happen but You know this. This is something that I noticed when I was on the inside This is something that I see in just the proportions of my mail because I get a ton of jail male and it is overwhelmingly male. You'd expect but even more than can be explained by existing proportion so I think there's a few factors as to why we don't see as much coverage of women You know they're invisible. Part of a system in which most people are invisible to begin with a lot of ways. Now that's really interesting. Do you know you're saying that you think women are more hesitant to reach out. Why would that be in your.

reporter Marshall Project general assignment reporter Houston Chronicle Houston facebook Congress
"marshall project" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"For joining us today. You're on or at the Marshall Project so I'm curious about what your journals well for me I. I started writing for the local newspaper when I was in high school There was a section of the paper that was mostly written by teenagers You know a lot of movie reviews book reviews and some Petri Things And I started doing that and I liked it even though it certainly wasn't hard news and And then from there. I guess in didn't really do anything with journalism when I was in college initially Because there wasn't a strong student newspaper rockers. Then I transfer to Cornell and They had a strong student newspaper there so I got involved Even though it was also addictive drugs that point so I was doing heroin and also working at the student newspaper and marginally attending classes. I guess so so I after college. I I got arrested and doing a little under two years in prison but then when I got out There was a an editor from the local newspaper. In Ithaca who was trying to write a story about women in jail and she asked if she come out and interview me and so I talked to her and afterwards she was like. Hey Google do you you know. I read some of your previous stuff from the student. Newspaper seem pretty good. Do you want to try writing for us? So I was about a year out of prison. I think at that point and I said sure and started covering these small town board meetings in upstate. New York and houses like one. Stop light like five thousand. People in the biggest issue is sort of backyard chickens and that sort of thing But I really liked it anyway and You know from there. I just I stuck with it I went to the New York Daily News and the Houston Chronicle and I'm currently still in Houston but working for the Marshall Project. Insist through all of these different newspapers that you've worked at. Have you covered the same thing or did kind of change over time and I guess I'm wondering what's lose year focusing on now within criminal justice. I mean it's evolved over time. I started with doing general assignment at a small paper. Like I said so as soon a lot of government municipal government type stuff and then When I was New York Daily News I was doing national breaking news so it was you know basically just sort of the six or seven worst things that happened in the country on any given day. You know a lot of aggregation but Actually very depressing aggregate and also get some coverage of the New York prison system and rikers island's a little bit when I was there I sort of jumped into help the existing rikers island reporter on how he was amazing and is now at city So I I.

New York Daily News New York Marshall Project rikers island Cornell Google Ithaca heroin Houston editor Houston Chronicle reporter
"marshall project" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Because Imprisoned is like a Petri dish but his viruses spread. So I change a few things up. I put in cove nineteen relevant relevant articles inside as well as the new. Psa that won't talk too much about but it's appear steak that that's helping people inside deal with it. Knowing that they have limitations on cleaning supplies social distance thing and many of Safety Practices that we have on the outside so I try give means to adapt to their circumstances and stay as healthy as possible though. That's yeah that sounds like a really interesting addition speaking of doubting kill you wrote something similar for the Marshall Project that just published this week which was in Article Abou- An Essay about how you're twenty seven years in prison repaired you for this pandemic in You talked about how learning to adopt in prison in was similar to self-isolation. At your home now I was wondering talk a little bit about Blake what keep block is for people that might not be familiar on the outside and why this moment feel similar to you. Well keep block is when a person the something wrong that doesn't rise to the level of solid circle but just like solitary keep lock. A person is.

Blake
"marshall project" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Onoda the land mines to a good chance of getting into prison in jail anywhere interesting. I I had no idea that there is a scoring metrics to get information in there so thinking about that like what has the response has been kind of just across the spectrum like how our prison officials responding to in most importantly how are incarcerated needed east responding well I've learned to game relationships with prison officials and a lot of it is due to like some of the interviews have gone and in that. Try to be honest all the time and I and I I would I explaining about how hard it is to get material. Inconsistencies always mentioned that I understand what prison officials are going through. Because they don't want any rice the poppel anything related to escape the being the publication of weapons of something like that and they want to keep everyone safe on notice the job. We're just not intentionally trying to be released most so I know that an and they hear me discussed those things you know. They Kinda they listen they said Okay. Maybe give this guy a chance that he is speaking the language that we kinda stand and What I also do is I send that the lead screen is still early. I sent.

"marshall project" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

PEN America Works of Justice

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"marshall project" Discussed on PEN America Works of Justice

"Up like a wellspring of emotion because they're trying to prove yourself you don't know you're GonNa make it and people in the population who saw you as always done right a champion besides Lawrence doesn't make it. We're not gonNA make you come back here. Everybody asked me what happened when we in you know a vision Bob at ten minutes. Athletes Person Appears what a parole board. But it's me twelve fourteen days after every time I appear to get by decision. Storing all those days wondering what's going on and and that's the win is being exacerbated by not only people incarcerated but staff asking me. Did you make it what happened so it was stressful? So going through that process a friend of mine said that I should write it down. I kinda right. My sperms is now and not told that this is not comedy right marks burbs and now. I'm fighting my life not only for my life. I'm fighting for the future of my choosing in in my wife. You know. They respected me to come home and on so I you know she. She told me to do that. But I I was against it at first but I wanted to myself one night and Started really to ponder on told myself that if I write it down I won't just be writing it down for me. The feelings that I I'll be I'll be sacrificing. The ill feelings in doing. It would be for the sake of someone else. Who's not as articulate as me and can't put his thoughts down on paper could they may be going through the same thing. I wrote it down on. Luckily Tamasha project published it and and they published it in April and out are one mile release. Earn my release the following month and I was released in May and They called me into their offices to talk about the peace talk about parole and from that me and they called me back again a few days later and asked me if I want to work. That's wow that's an amazing journey in it. Sounds like a lot of what you're doing at news inside kind of inspired by this friend of yours that encourage you to write it down. Sounds like a lot of what you're doing now is back to that exactly that bad after all that bit of advice helped me. It helped launch a career. Prematurely great are up truly knee in. So you're the founder of news inside. Which is this free. News resource that relates directly to encourage her to lie. Could you share a little bit? Just about the journey of that project. Like what you're wearing for beginning and challenges you faced in work out the process. Well being I was special incarceration explain when I started working. Put Him entrepreneurship. And I was trying to find my niche. You know and And during that I was presented with this award ridden journalism that reproduced and and the subject was criminal justice and mind. It boggles me that people incarcerated a not privy to the work that we have unless they have family members. Look.

Lawrence Bob Tamasha founder
"marshall project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"marshall project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This proposal unveil yesterday, and we're talking about it with MAURICE chamois reporter for the Marshall project which covers criminal Justice Jonathan Littman, the former chief judge of the New York state court of appeals and chair of the independent commission to close Rikers and Kong, president of the Chatham towers, housing complex and co-founder of neighbors United below canal. They're opposing the proposal for a borough gaol from an Hatton on white street. In the Chinatown area. And let's see judge Lippman. I mentioned the three locations for three of the boroughs. You have the Brooklyn one in front of you. That's the one I don't have the Brooklyn one is where the Brooklyn house detention is now so that's an existing detention facility structured three of the four. Brian are in existing footprints that exists now the Bronx where there's been controversy about is a different location. And by the way, I see no reason why they should also be facility on Staten Island. But that is not the president dealer process. And why to Staten Island get off the hook here? I if the idea is that people who've been living in each individual borough who can they crimes and Amanda to jail judge. Why does Staten Island not make this list? You are exactly right. There is no reason why they shouldn't make this list of the. The city it said because they think it would be so small it won't be worth it. I disagree. I've done the commission, and if it is a burden, and I think Martin jails, you know, are can be an asset to give me any not a burden. But if it is everyone should share in that effort. And there's absolutely no reason why they shouldn't be a jail on Staten Island. Whether it's for political reasons or any other reasons, I think that the optics of it a bad. But again, it would have to be a separate process. That is not in the present Euler process. Jim in the South Bronx, you're on WNYC hijack thanks for calling. Good morning. Thank you for taking my call. I wanted to make this comment. But I heard that they were playing the close writers and build local facilities. I it's my neighbor. Just you wait. I guarantee you they will dump this prison right in the middle of the South Bronx. And that every new one of these facilities will be built in poor neighborhoods. They will never be one on someplace like your avenue where the mayor. He lives in park slope side along with the shelters and the drug rehab facility. Speaking to dump this stuff on us. And that's exactly what's happening. This is a big fraud, but people like hope progress with like the Blasios credits for for what they're doing at our expense. Bring that up judge that meant talk to Jim in the South Bronx. Well, let me say first of all that certainly the facilities in the Hatton. Brooklyn. We'll be in two of the most upscale, you know, areas in the city, but I agree that that the locations in the Bronx is not perfect. None of the locations of the perfect. We recommend that be closer to the courthouse. But I think in its present incarnation. The city believes that it's not politically or practically viable to build it causes a quote out. So I think again the answer here Jim is dialogue with the community. You can't push this down the throat of the community, and they have to be talking and engaging. And I think they've gotten the idea in the city understands at this point that they've got to if that facility is going to be in. Diego Beekman area. They've got to convince the community that it will be beneficial to do everything necessary to get that done. I think councilwoman I yellow has been done a good job in talking with the community. And we gotta have a lot more of that in the dialogue. And that's why the process is so important while not losing sight of why we're doing this of the again, victimization, the brutality of Rikers. We still have to have a process which is meaningful and that makes the community a partner in these efforts Chen. Thank you. We're going to get one more call in before out of time for this segment, and we heard from Jim in the South Bronx. We've heard from Nancy Kong who still with us representing the community in Chinatown a jail proposed? So let's talk to Dominic in queens calling in Dominic. Hi, hi, Nancy. It's dumb. This the radio to have a conversation. Apparently. Are you in a coalition of people from different neighborhoods? People in Chinatown, the people in boerum hill on the people in the in the South, Bronx, wonderful, Marlene parks. We disagree that Diana. I Allah has done. Anything anyhow, I'm here to speak about the fact that when the commission before I came out we read all hundred and forty nine pages. The mayor has picked one thing out of commission report close Rikers. He didn't do any early community outreach report recommended doing it the beginning of or he's a very late two thousand seventeen or really two thousand eighteen the mayor didn't start until November. They have these neighborhood activity neighborhood advisory committees they had five in queens. I've been to all five and beginning with the very first one you can tell it was going to be a waste of time. Dominic just for for time. Let me jump in. Here. Ask you if you and Nancy and the others in your coalition proposing specific alternative sites. Because otherwise the public might just right? You are even if you are the public might write you off as all perpetrators of Nimby, not in my backyard. Wouldn't facility. Sure we wanted to know why they didn't look at the courthouse in Long Island city. Why do they look at the courthouse on something boulevard? This is in queens. I I really don't know. In the other boroughs, but there are at least two other sites in queens. They could've been looked at. And the big thing is. The commission. Never did it nobody ever mentions it what would it cost to reform Rikers, the mayor has managed to yoke criminal Justice reform and closing Rikers. If the two sides of the same coin Dominic I'm gonna leave it there because we're running out of time MAURICE from Marshall project. I'm gonna give you the last word politically, how do you see this going forward? But hearing from these various community members from various boroughs, and it sounds like this is a proposal. This is not a done deal. This is going through a land use review process. That's right. And I think the most important thing to say is that the real kind of political pressure going forward. So we'll come on the mayor. But a lot will come in the city council members Yala Levin in Brooklyn cost fluids, in queens, and in Manhattan who ultimately kind of formally and informally need to kinda give the sign off and their support. And the fact that there's so much community support for changes means that they have some political leverage. So that's really where I'm going to be watching and seeing how this all plays. Out going forward MAURICE from the Marshall project judge Jonathan Lippman Nancy Kong from Chatham towers. Thank you all very much for joining us. Thank you, Brian. Thank you, Brian Brian Lehrer on WNYC more to come. I would like to read the entire report and come to my own conclusion that the country was put through two years of I'm not inclined to take William bars word for the content of the report what the Muller investigation means for our trust in American institutions from the media two branches of government, I'm tansy Nevada. And that's next time on the takeaway, weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM..

queens South Bronx Rikers Brooklyn Bronx Jim Nancy Kong Staten Island Dominic Brian Brian Lehrer MAURICE chamois Jonathan Lippman Nancy Kong Chatham towers Marshall project president Hatton chief judge Justice Jonathan Littman New York