37 Burst results for "Mars"

Fresh "Mars" from Ben Shapiro

Ben Shapiro

00:33 min | 3 min ago

Fresh "Mars" from Ben Shapiro

"For all news is next first WLS Weather Channel Forecaster Drive for the rest of this afternoon was sunshine and a high headed to 76 degrees, Then clouds will stream in tonight and some showers will develop overnight with a low of 60. Rain will move out early on Wednesday. Then cloudy and warmer with a high of 81 Thursday party cloudy with an isolated afternoon thunderstorm and high of 83 from the weather Channel. I'm Jeff Mar wls am 8 90 with another update in 30 minutes, right now at O'Hare 71 midway 73 along the lakefront 70 degrees. Now is the time. To get a new job. Express employment professionals never charges job seekers of fee and has more than 35,000 job openings with high demand and construction, driving, logistics and administrative jobs. Find a location near you at express pros dot com or on the express jobs, app. That's right. And the Chicago resident over the age of 12 can now get a vaccination at home. The city announcing today it's expanding its Protect Chicago program Here is public health director Dr Allison are witty. We want to encourage people who may have folks in.

76 Degrees Allison Chicago 70 Degrees 30 Minutes Tonight Today Jeff Mar First Wednesday 81 This Afternoon More Than 35,000 Job Openings Thursday Over The Age Of DR WLS 60 O'hare 71 83
China Launches First Astronauts to Its Space Station

Kottke Ride Home

02:08 min | 4 d ago

China Launches First Astronauts to Its Space Station

"Yesterday. China successfully sent three astronauts or taikonauts to their tian module which will eventually become their completed. Tian gong space station. Nia haisheng bombing and tongue hongbo whose identities were kept secret until a press conference on wednesday will spend three months aboard the module bringing it into service and preparing it for the next phase of the space station's construction. It will be the longest crude mission by the chinese space agency to date the tian gong. Space station will end up looking. Like a big cross and will include crew quarters science labs and even a hubble class telescope when completed it will be a fifth of the mass of the international space station in china is open to having foreign on board to collaborate three more. Crude flights are planned to complete construction which is scheduled to be done sometime in twenty twenty two quoting the bbc. A fighter pilot nia haisheng. Fifty six is said to be china's oldest astronaut in space. He's a veteran of two previous flights which included a fifteen day visit in two thousand thirteen to the prototype station tian gong one this has since been de orbited his crewmates leo boming fifty four and tongue hongbo forty five are also from air force background lease earlier spaceflight experience was on the shenzhou seven mission in two thousand eight. That's all him participate in china's first ever spacewalk mr. Tung is the rookie on this occasion. Having never before gone into orbit and quotes in addition to landing a rover on mars last month china became the first country to send an un- crude rover to the far side of the moon in two thousand and nineteen while the us has been prohibited from working with china's space program for a passed by congress in two thousand eleven which is part of why china has to make its own space station because with the us leading the international space station partnership china therefore can't be a part of it. Nasa has been outwardly congratulatory of china's recent achievements with administrator bill nelson sane in a statement yesterday quote congratulations to china launch of crew to their new space station. I look forward to the scientific discoveries to come and quotes

China Tian Gong Space Station Nia Haisheng Tongue Hongbo Tian Gong Leo Boming International Space Station BBC Tung Air Force UN United States Congress Nasa Bill Nelson
Fresh update on "mars" discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:28 min | 17 min ago

Fresh update on "mars" discussed on Press Play with Madeleine Brand

"Of took root in science fiction. Um And then the cosmology came along and supports that idea as well. Would it really mean that there are multiple versions of Let's say this interview right now happening? And I'm in a fish tank and you're in a fish tank. And Yeah, possibly that's that's one version. There's the multiple the many worlds hypothesis. That's the kind of one that's One of the more popular ones in pop culture of instead of turning left, you turned right and There's that whole other universe where you turn to left. That all these other different things happen to you for every decision that you made. The other decision was made and that split off into a multiple universe or a copy of the universe, And it's an infinite number of universes. There are other simpler versions of that that we of the multiverse when we think about our observable universe, our little bubble that we can't see past the edge of because Of how light travels What's past the edge of what we can see in our universe? Well, there's no reason to think that there's not more universe or more space with stars and stuff in and out there. That functionally What's outside of our observable universe is another universe to us because we can't get there. They don't know that we exist. We don't know they exist. But It's out there. It's kind of like a patchwork quilt type of thing that just keeps getting bigger and bigger. And that brings us to alien life form because that is a constant theme in Rick and Morty and you attack that one early on in the book and We are talking in the country right now. Possible UFOs alien life form, but Guess. Where is science on that right now? Is there consensus that there could be some life out there intelligently? There's I think there's a lot of hopeful feelings. Um, there's no evidence. Um, it's part of what perseverance is looking for on Mars. I I know there's a Always kind of at NASA and JPL. There's a mission on some burners somewhere to send send a probe to Enceladus, which is a moon orbiting Saturn or Europa, which is around Jupiter and drill through the ice on the surface to see what's in the water underneath the relatively warm salt water that's underneath. Life is when you break it down to the physics and the energy and the chemistry. Life is Almost inevitable. It's going to happen given enough time and the right ingredients and the right amount of energy now whether that life evolves up to something that walks on two legs or six, uh, and drives a spaceship to go visit its neighbors. That's a whole other question. But I think I'd like to think within my lifetime or maybe within my students lifetime, um will get some kind of positive results from somewhere in our solar system. But there's other bacteria. There are viruses. Maybe there's little brine shrimp in the salty moon of Enceladus Insult the ocean of Enceladus there. Um, but finding Aliens that can drive a spaceship to come to earth. I know we're supposed to hear about UFOs and some big report, um That I'm not buying into that I'm on the More worried side of things that if they have the technology to build a spaceship to come to earth and fly in ways that we can't even understand They're not going to come down and be friendly. Necessarily. Or ask us to join their big nation of of different star systems. Um I don't have to. The only hope we have is that they're not like us. And they don't just see us as a new, unspoiled land to take everything from well speaking of, um, let's get back to the pickle because he eventually arrived after slaying a bunch of demons in the form of rats and others as a pickle. In his coverage body. He finally arrives to the family therapy session, and, um, engages in a spirited debate with the therapist about whether or not her profession is valid. He seems to think not. And here is her response. The only connection between your unquestionable intelligence and the sickness destroying your family. Is that everyone in your family you included use intelligence to justify sickness. You seem to alternate between viewing your own mind as an unstoppable force. And as an inescapable curse. You chose to come here. You chose to talk to belittle my vocation. Just as you chose to become a pickle. Yeah, I love that. Just as you chose to become a pickle, right, right, And and I know what you said there. Rick Rick kind of thought he was going to get some shots in therapy because it's kind of the Inside rather than doing in the action that he is all about, and she got her shots right back at him. And you know, it's one of those things that this was real.

Europa Rick Rick Nasa SIX Saturn Two Legs Jupiter Mars Enceladus JPL Earth One Version ONE Rick And More Morty
Venus Missions: All the Burning Questions NASA Hopes to Answer

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

02:01 min | 5 d ago

Venus Missions: All the Burning Questions NASA Hopes to Answer

"The long the newseum drought is over. Here's planetary society editor. Ray pauleta ray. Welcome back and thank you for this. June ninth article double venus missions all the burning questions nasa hopes to answer no pun intended. I'm sure double it's now triple right. Tell us about this new announcement from the european space agency. Yes so we're actually getting not one not two but three missions to venus which is to be super exciting. The third mission is actually called envision. Yes say just announced. Recently that they're going to be sending their own spacecraft to venus which is just incredible. I mean it's been thirty years since nasa has sent spacecraft venus. The last one. I believe was magellan. So it's kind of wild that everything is just turning up venus. It's about time thirty one years since that. Lots of magellan. It's just absolutely crazy that we had to wait this long. We hope to have the principal. Investigators for both of the nasa missions. On pretty soon maybe we can get the vision Equivalent of a pi as well. There are a lot of questions that we hope. These missions are going to help us to answer. Even if they don't provide full answers you cover a lot of them in this article. One of them we go back to that drought. I mentioned at the top of this segment. Water there's all the speculation about did venus. Was it a much wetter place. Billions of years ago like mars. Is this going to help us with that. Yeah it's really incredible. I mean when you think of something like venus. It's hard to imagine that there is anything ever even just resembling an ocean on the planet right but was actually a good chance that hey there might have been a watery past so i think that with davinci plus the spacecraft is actually going to drop a sphere through venus's atmosphere and measure some of those noble gases that could be there and that seems to be a big clue in finding out whether or not venus ever had an ocean. And

Ray Pauleta Ray Nasa European Space Agency Magellan
An Event That Struck Terror Into Portland Oregon Residents

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

02:06 min | 6 d ago

An Event That Struck Terror Into Portland Oregon Residents

"Over eighty years ago. Today people across america woke up to discover that the night before they had been the victim of a theatrical radio presentation. the date was october thirtieth. Nineteen thirty eight. The radio show was orson welles mercury on the air version of h. g. wells war of the worlds nineteen thirty. Eight war was brewing. As germany invaded austria japan was strongly aligned with the invader prior to world war two. It was forecast. That britain would suffer night air bombing attacks causing large numbers of civilian casualties and mass destruction. It was widely agreed that navigation targeting would be more difficult if manmade lights on the ground could be extinguished as early as july nineteen thirty eight. American citizens were urged to practice lights out beginning at dusk it would not be called blackout drills until nineteen thirty nine. Fear across the country as rumor spread about coming to the aid of our british allies. Should war break out that the sounds of war that came over the radio that october thirtieth nineteen thirty eight were not from europe but from mars. This was a live broadcast across america five. Pm in the west which would have made it eight pm eastern time meant. There was no time to warn the west about what was to come a wave of hysteria that swept across the united states at night before halloween as a realistic radio. Dramatization reached all the way to portland oregon. Two thousand five hundred miles from the scene. The fictional invasion the telephone switchboard of the oregonian newspaper was swamped by hundreds of excited calls. People rushed into the business offices of the newspaper demanding information. Hundreds of calls were made to the portland police wanting to know what protection the city offer. And what place might be safe in the event that wholesale destruction spread to the pacific coast.

Orson Welles America Austria Wells Germany Britain Japan Europe Portland Oregon Pacific Coast
Caller Says Teaching Marxism Is the Stepping Stone to Communism

Mark Levin

01:32 min | 6 d ago

Caller Says Teaching Marxism Is the Stepping Stone to Communism

"My mother used to say, the more you stir at the more you stir it the speaker against and that's just what the liberals are. Are doing Mars there, stirring this racism and they're stirring this white supremacy. I guess that's what Joe is. These must be the white supremacist because they're stirring it, Brother. Got pulled over by D O t today for a random check. We got the chit chatting about it had to ask him if he listen to you. He says he didn't listen to Mark Levin. They listen to Dan Bongino. I told him I says, Well, you need to listen. The march he's the one Well, Dan Dan is tremendous. Yeah, Dan. He's a great guy, too. So anyway, and he thought we got to talking about these Children about this Marxism and stuff because I was telling him when I was in high school back in 74 when I graduated 73 74 They were talking about this smart system, I says, But you know back then, uh, we just discerned it. We didn't even think about it because the teacher would talk to us a trying to teach us about instep. We said, Jeez, that's just the stepping stone. That's the socialism stepping stone to communism. You know, right? He says, Yeah, that's the way it was back, then with the kids, But today's kids they're trying to brainwash them and convince them that and now they're trying to brainwash him at an age where they can't even debate there. Just now, forming, uh, Thought processes. Logic processes, reasoning processes.

Dan Bongino Mark Levin Dan Dan JOE DAN
The Importance Of Creating Space For Minorities In Tech and Marketing

MarTech Podcast

02:20 min | Last week

The Importance Of Creating Space For Minorities In Tech and Marketing

"Calvin welcome to the mar tech podcast. Thanks for having pleasure to have you as a guest. I appreciate you reaching out and honestly appreciate you for multiple reasons. One the subject that you've brought up his one that i feel like a lot of people wanna talk about an honestly aren't really sure how to talk about. And it's how to create space for minorities and marketing. And so most everybody that reaches out to me to be a guest on the show whilst talk about dsp's or software or branding and you actually have a real world topic in the real world. Things that are happening today happens to be the one year anniversary of the unfortunate and tragic murder of george floyd so feel like today's the best day to talk about minorities and your experience as a black man in technology. Tell me about why isn't important for marketers specifically to think about creating space for minorities in tekken and marketing. It will thanks for the question that it is unfortunate. That today has to be day right. The one year anniversary of a person's death but sometimes these opportunities present themselves the have a conversation about these things even though it's not easy from a marketer's perspective. You have to understand that i've been doing this in tech since ninety six about twenty six years and it still surprise so i go. Wow guys in tech loses some form of new building. It's happening having been around that period of time and so when it comes to marketing and what things look like marketing kinda shapes the view the way that people see products way people see industries. I would say now if you think of the tech industry because so much worse outsource now you think india you think silicon valley those types of things but there is an enormous black population. I myself have a group of. I think it's eleven or twelve hundred people. now. I haven't checked lately but called blackman coating was just kinda codifies a group of individuals just to say. Hey we're here and they have all these amazing talents and there's no space right now for that to even exist because you have all of these kinds of disparate individuals who may work for companies. But there's no groups are. There's no organizations that support that so martyrs creating space for that to even make it a reality would be similar to anything else that you see didn't exist until you saw it on. Tv sorted ads. Things like that so it helps to shape the dynamics and it helps to bring more balanced to thanks. There's just different things at different cultures. Bring any industry

George Floyd Calvin DSP Blackman India
How NASA engineer Diana Trujillo's Pursuit of a New Life Led Her to Space

Latina to Latina

01:55 min | Last week

How NASA engineer Diana Trujillo's Pursuit of a New Life Led Her to Space

"For diana through a life in a different place in just bring her to the united states. it brought her to space. Diana is an aerospace engineer. She works at nasa where she's one of flight directors for nasa's perseverance rover which is looking for signs of past life on mars. Her journey to get here is remarkable. It was fueled by some really powerful women and her deep conviction. That latina's need to be in the room. When we learn that there is life on this planet. I want to start with the women in your family because it seems to me that the entire trajectory of your life is informed by your mom and by the women who raised you. So would you start by telling me about them. My mom my grandma. My great grandma any general. My grandma's sisters my cousins. This was a group of women that will get together on my grandma's house which was a block away from my house and we will always have you know it got his seat. Though in the kitchen they will talk about their marriage life but was going on with her husband what was going on with their kids and it was funny because all of them were older women and i think that the only kid was me and sometimes my mom's cousin but jimmy. Their home wasn't like first second thirty. I was like mighty s watching them. Talk to each other about the dig. Said they wanted in their lives that they wanted to keep for their own personal development but at the same time how hard it was for them to make that trade with their significant others. So i think that hearing all of that but at the same time hearing them try to find a way to get what they wanted made me think two things one of them was. Why are you not choosing the thing that you wanna do. Why are you not going for that thing. I hear you say one. But i wanted but i can

Nasa Diana United States Jimmy
China’s Zhurong Rover Snaps a Selfie on the Surface of Mars

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:38 sec | Last week

China’s Zhurong Rover Snaps a Selfie on the Surface of Mars

"Iraqi Martian surface center, Chinese rover and lender bearing small national flags were seen in photos released today that the rover took on the Red Planet before pictures released by the China National Space Administration also show the upper stage of the Euro, Grover and the view from the rover before it rolled off its platform. China landed the Chan win one spacecraft carrying the rover on Mars last month after it's been about three months orbiting the Red Planet. China is the second country, the land and operated spacecraft on Mars. After the United States, the six wheeled rover is surveying an area known as Utopia Planitia, especially searching for signs of water or ice that could lend clues as to whether Mars ever sustained life. Ernie Bennett

Iraqi Martian Surface Center China National Space Administr China United States Ernie Bennett
Jeff Bezos to Fly to Space in Blue Origin Flight

Dude Soup

01:33 min | Last week

Jeff Bezos to Fly to Space in Blue Origin Flight

"Former amazon. Ceo and real life lex luther. Jeff bezos is made headlines this week for a pretty bizarre reason in february. He announced that he would be stepping down from his leadership. Position at amazon to refocus on outside projects and probably also divorcing his wife. But on monday morning he announced that one of those projects was coming to fruition just fifteen days after his official departure date is scheduled to be Jeff bezos will be one of the crew members on blue origins debut launch into space. Oh my god they're reusable rocket will shoot up sixty five miles into the sky which is apparently the edge of space which i did not know. That's less then. The the the the mileage from los angeles to san diego strata going up to five miles really far san diego's pretty out there. Imagine san diego was in was almost in space. That sounds yeah. He'll be reaching the edge of san diego and returning to earth without going into orbit. That is a very important part of this is that they're not. They're not flying to the moon. They're not going to mars. They're shooting up sixty five miles into the into the sky and then they're going to hopefully safely return back to earth without going into orbit

Jeff Bezos Lex Luther Amazon San Diego Los Angeles
NASA Perseverance, The First 100 Days

Astronomy Cast

02:19 min | 2 weeks ago

NASA Perseverance, The First 100 Days

"So perseverance. What is it. It is a next upgraded version of curiosity rover. It's built on very much the same hardware plan but as happens when you get a few years. From one designed upgraded the systems and part of upgraded. The systems meant it has a belly full of crazy robotics and electronics. And they're going to use that crazy belly to gather up samples of rock. It also is carrying the first ever microphone on mars which people are far more excited about than i ever dreamed of like me. Well yeah it. It's still caught me by surprise. And they have an experiment for creating oxygen. They have a laser and they are putting rocks. Left and right and then of course. There's little ingenuity helicopter. Alright so then like compare and contrast like if we had perseverance and curiosity side by side and we were looking at them trying to spot the differences there the same size right same size and the roughly built on the same chassis. yes okay. The heads look very similar. It's when you start looking at the arms in the underbelly that everything radically changes. It's when you look at the underbelly. An armed that everything radically changed so arm does not have the little divet scraping machine that they have on curiosity that they've been using to up to rocks and remove a layer of weathered rock to see what's underneath instead. The arm has sherlock which is an ultraviolet violet spectrometer and it has a laser and they are literally zadran rocks and listening to hear how the zap sounds and using that sound getting an assessment of the density and other characters things of the rocks. This this is not something i imagine. This is the moral equivalent of doing science by knocking on wood except thursdays outing rocks.

High Court Asked to Review Men-Only Draft Registration Law

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 weeks ago

High Court Asked to Review Men-Only Draft Registration Law

"The Supreme Court could announce as soon as today whether it will hear a case involving the military selective services act which requires men to register for the draft the justices are being asked to decide whether it's sex discrimination for the government to require only men to register for the draft when they turn eighteen the registration requirement is one of the few remaining instances in which federal law treats men and women differently the director of the American civil liberties union's women's rights project ria tabacco Mar says it sends a harmful message that women are less fit than men to serve the country and that men are less fat than women to stay at home it's care givers my camp in Washington

Supreme Court Ria Tabacco Mar American Civil Liberties Union Government Washington
Ballots and Bullets: Mexico's Elections

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Ballots and Bullets: Mexico's Elections

"Mexicans wants to the polls yesterday in a set of elections in which ninety three million people were able to vote on more than twenty thousand positions and yet the person who has figured most prominently in campaigning. wasn't on any of the ballots. andres manuel lopez. Obrador was applauded as he cast his vote. Yesterday is halfway through a six year term as president when he came to power promised to transform the country he vowed to stand up for the poor to fight corruption to address the drug related violence that has long plagued the country. His critics say he's failed in all those emissions and that he's used undemocratic methods to push through his policies across the country. Election campaigns have been marred by violence. More than thirty candidates have been murdered. The votes are still being counted but early results suggest. The president's party has lost some of the legislative stranglehold. It had been enjoying these mexico's biggest ever elections in terms of the number of price for grabs. Sarah burke is our central america bureau. Chief all five hundred seats of the lower chamber of the legislature. The fifteen governors of the thirty two states there are thirty state. Legislators and thousands of local positions is also going to determine the president lopez operators influence over the next three years or serve his term push a six year term and twenty twenty four as it stands marina. His party has the simple majority in the house. And with its allies Supermajority the initial results the projections. That are coming out at the moment. Suggests they're going to lose the supermajority with allies keep the simple majority with the allies. Put loser on their own. So they're going to have stood lot more negotiating in the second passive his time.

Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador Sarah Burke Mexico Legislature Lopez America Marina
How to Win at Work and Succeed at Life with Michael Hyatt

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:24 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Win at Work and Succeed at Life with Michael Hyatt

"Today. We have a lot of celebrity entrepreneurs advocating what we call them the book the hustle fallacy. Where you just work hard. Keep your nose to the grindstone crank. You'll put in the hours crank out the work. can eventually. you'll be able to slow down. Give attention to your health. You most important relationships and and be able to have some semblance of balance. There are some people that choose sort of the opposite approach and we call this the ambition break where they just pump the brakes on their career. And they say look. It's it's not worth blowing out my personal health or my most important relationships so i will settle for less than what i know. I'm capable of in my career. We think and by the way. I wrote this book with my oldest daughter. Megan who is the ceo. Michael hanalani albany now but the we believe that's a false choice that that it's not either or as you said but it's both and and that's the double win double win fire nation and. I hope you're listening to michael right. Now you're asking yourself these important questions. Are you right now. Claiming a false summits about that. Are you putting yourself in a situation where you're facing an impossible choice. These are hard questions but imported ones. You wanna answer now not five years ten years from now and your book's subtitle michael is five principles to free yourself from the cult of overwork. Why did you choose to subtitle. We really came to the conclusion as we listen to. A lot of people like elon. Musk for example which has done amazing things in the world. But when he advocates that people should be working eighty to a hundred hours a week and he's done that at numerous entrepreneurial conferences because he said if you can put in that kind of time you can do three to four months what your competitors will take a year to do and that will give you a competitive advantage. But what he doesn't share is he's now on his third marriage his five sons by omission. Don't speak to him. You know it's come it at considerable cost and i know you know. His driving. Passion in life is to go to mars but he might be there alone when it's all said and done and and this is kind of a cult and it has all the same kind of addictive properties that you know. Alcoholism would have or any other substance abuse or even unhealthy religion. And that's why we named it

Michael Hanalani Michael Megan Albany Elon
Brain Chip Will Hopefully End Elon Musk’s Outlandish Musings

The Gargle

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Brain Chip Will Hopefully End Elon Musk’s Outlandish Musings

"Musk has announced that he's neuralink. Brain chip will end language in five to ten years which is just such great news because then and five to ten years. We won't have to hear elon. Musk saying things like this. Must spin on the rafer again because it did he say this on on joe rogan. I think that mentioned that in the article right. And i just find it so weird like the certainty that these men have of their hypothesis of the future. Like you know. I used to make up a language me and my sister bible study to covertly communicate rebellious desires. And like just. Because i don't have the money to throw behind that know. I'll never know if it has any legs behind swindon kingdom who just has to stop there but he gets to try all this stuff out. Did you have a secret language as a kid. You know where you would hide the words. Yeah back slang but it was just like a verger so like a guy of a gum. Spaghetti kevin gang of attacks gang and it was great. Because if you didn't tell anyone how it worked she just split the words and stick it in the middle. And i think is pretty easy to walk out but look we needed a way to communicate with each other is either that or handwritten notes of who we fancied so. Yeah i appreciate any made up language. The great thing about elon. Musk is that he will consistently say these kind of things and then continued to say them despite the fact that he said things like this before that haven't come true like he promised that at this point we would be going around and driverless cars for example or that we would be on mars or that a again. I really wanted to get inside the head of the dude bro. Phenomenon where you're like. Imagine feeling that the answers to life being funneled to you directly because you're a wealthy entrepreneur. You do martial arts

Musk Elon Joe Rogan Spaghetti Kevin Swindon
NASA Will Launch Two Spacecrafts to Venus

BBC World Service

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

NASA Will Launch Two Spacecrafts to Venus

"Or Rupert Wingfield Hayes there? Now let's go back more than 30 years to a key time for space exploration. After a 15 month long cruise, the Magellan spacecraft will go into orbit around Venus Jelen will orbit Venus for one Venus Day equal to 243 Earth Days. Well, that was from 1989 1 of the most successful missions of its kind. It was the first spacecraft to take pictures of pretty much the entire surface of Venus before it burned up in the fiery atmosphere about five years later, now the US space agency Has announced to new missions to the planets. NASA's administrator is Bill Nelson. Very Tass Truth. And eventually, plus These two sister missions, both aimed to understand how Venus became an inferno like world capable of melting lead at the surface, So after all, the focus of late being on Mars Why Venus now question for our North America correspondent David Wyss. Despite the fact that Venus is the closest planet to earth and similar in size and mass and density and composition. It's received less attention than Mars and other destinations in the solar system in recent years, primarily because it's so hot, it's dense atmosphere traps heat from the sun, and that leads to temperatures. Of more than 470 degrees Celsius in some places, but scientists have long believed that Venus may once have harbored. Seas of surface water potentially suitable for life before unknown forces triggered that extreme greenhouse effect, and their interest was rekindled recently when astronomers said that they detected compelling evidence for the presence of a molecule in the clouds around Venus called Falls Feen, which would seem to

Rupert Wingfield Hayes David Wyss Bill Nelson Venus Nasa North America United States
Volcanoes On Mars Could Be Still Active

Astronomy Cast

02:37 min | 3 weeks ago

Volcanoes On Mars Could Be Still Active

"Bars is cold and dead today but the massive volcanoes tell us what the planet used to be like millions and even billions of years ago. But how volcanically. Active is the planet today. That's what nasa mars insight. Lander is to figure out alright. Bars insight volcanoes is there active volcanoes on mars. Today may be and in. This is such a new result. We picked this topic before the science result was published through peer review. And it's kind of awesome when randomness like that occurs. There is a new paper out with lead. Author david horvath and it discusses. How in serbia's fosse there appears to have been explosive. Volkan ism only as within the last fifty thousand years fifty thousand. Wow and soon that's rabid. That counts as active vulcan. Ism today and what's kind of awesome. Is that location. Matches up loosely. With where insight has seen some well seismic activity. Okay so then the question. So i guess the answer then is maybe. Let's let's go back to the beginning here now. I don't know if we've actually done. We haven't done an episode on insight in detail yet. I don't think so. So can you just give a brief overview of what mars insight is. Is there to do so. This is a fabulous little spacecraft that has proven that sometimes a world can defeat the most well intentioned of spacecraft insight landed on mars with two major missions. The first one was to put down a seismograph that would be able to detect faint earthquakes. And it's such a sensitive seismograph that it can see the waves of an earthquake if everything is perfect not just propagate through the world once but actually bounced through multiple times and because of this they can use a single seismograph to do the kind of science that we require multiple seismographs to do here on earth. Were things are a little bit more noisy because we have like trucks mining and things like that.

David Horvath Volkan Lander Nasa Serbia
NASA Releases 3D Video of Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Flight

Innovation Now

01:05 min | 3 weeks ago

NASA Releases 3D Video of Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Flight

"Ingenuity flights in the mars atmosphere began as a technology demonstration intended to prove that powered controlled flight on. Mars is possible. Now those flights will serve as an operations demonstration exploring how aerial scouting could benefit future exploration cameras on. Nasa's perseverance rover provide key data to help engineers navigate and scientists choose interesting rocks to study but those same cameras enable the public to follow the rovers daily discoveries and now a team at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory have stitched. Some of these images together rendering a video in three d. seeing the sequence is a bit like standing on the martian surface next perseverance watching ingenuity flight firsthand. Put on your three d glasses. You can find directions to create a pair on the nasa website and watch ingenuity ascend hover then zoom out of your field of vision but keep watching completing its flight. The helicopter returns to nail a perfect pinpoint landing

Nasa
Receivers to Target in the Late Rounds of your Dynasty Rookie Draft - burst 05

Daily Dose Football

04:09 min | 3 weeks ago

Receivers to Target in the Late Rounds of your Dynasty Rookie Draft - burst 05

"Was drafted another god. I'm fairly high on From clemson at cal. I'll let you discuss him. I think about what rogers. I'm not nearly as high on rogers as they consis I think a lot of people saw him when he went to green bay. I think everybody's been so ready for the green bay packers to have another wide receiver inserted in the draft. You know and we're just intimidating in anticipating but you know. I really don't think amari rogers profiles is the number two wide receiver in the fact. That rogers is a situation is so up in the air to say the the to say the least you know. I am not projecting broader. You're gonna be there long term and if that's the case you know is jordan love gonna be all support a wide receiver you know. Are we even sure that amari rogers is better than allen. Lazard now is dead fund as the guy that they went out and got in free agency it to be the number to receiver going into last year before he opted out. You know he's back on the roster as well and he's only twenty seven years old. I think people are really forgetting about devin. Funchess to be honest with you You know this is a guy that has already been a top twenty wide receiver in his career. So i think there's a lot more competition in green bay than a lot of people are are are getting Giving them credit for and The roger situation really makes me uneasy. Amaury writers has some talent. I i just don't think he's anything special. I just think that he's at best a middle level starter of the nfl. And i don't see much of a window of him being much higher especially as long as davante adams is on that team. 'cause i just don't see that the target share i mean it's a. It's a team that clearly wants to run the ball as much as possible. So i'm not nearly as how marta riders. I i know a lot of people are people are taking them in mid second rounds now and i think that that's a mistake. I think he was the best of water. She would come out clemson for the tape stuff that i watch. Those are good points. There's a reason as to why. I say fairly high. It's because i have a lot of the same reservation that you do. But and i do. I'm generally concerned about aaron rodgers in the future in green bay with the quarterback situation. But i have to look back at amari rogers talent and what he did in his last year and clemson and what he did was ball out in my opinion. Seventy seven receptions. Thousand twenty yards seven touchdowns. Yes he had. Trevor lawrence thong him. The ball but still in a shortened season are very impressive. Numbers and amari. Rogers is a guy that has pretty much been undervalued this entire process and now all of a sudden he's going green bay people hiding him and i'm not high on him because he's going to green by on more high in him because of the talent and the potential that i see and i do think that he has the potential to be the number two receiver in green bay S a good gig. Because even if aaron rodgers is not there in a long term disturbance excellence head coach matt floor and they still have a quarterback enjoy jordan love and we really don't we haven't seen much from during love so we can't make a lot of assumptions. But he was still you still first round pick in an quarterback the has a lot of potential people were comparing him to patrick mahomes and he. He was more of a quarterback they just needed to be developed. So i think that. I think that there's a good chance that jordan love could turn into a successful quarterback if the packers ended up do and not Having rogers under center. So i think the during the love isn't a terrible option there and lathered and function function all could be a lot number two receiver in that office. But i think long term that amari. Rogers is the better prospect for may so that is why i tend to be a little bit higher on the mar bader's

Amari Rogers Green Bay Rogers Funchess Clemson Amaury Lazard Packers CAL Jordan Aaron Rodgers Trevor Lawrence Thong Devin Allen Adams NFL Amari Matt Floor
Steve Chien Talks About the Possibility of Intelligent Alien Life

STEM-Talk

01:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Steve Chien Talks About the Possibility of Intelligent Alien Life

"Are your thoughts on the likelihood in our lifetime or the lifetime of our listeners in discovery of life apart from that on earth. That's a great question can oddly enough. What did i get remarkably frequently. I kind of have to answer to that. One is a pragmatic answer. And then one is kind of like the answer that i'm hoping for and the pragmatic answer is that it just seems to me not likely that we would find life in the immediate future just because going to these places is so hard if we're looking at going to the sub ice ocean on europa we have to fly jupiter which is pretty hard. We have to land on europa which is hard for then we have to melt through this ice crest which is ten kilometers sick. That might even take a year or two and then we have to explore this under ice ocean. And we're actually practicing things like that on earth had to explore underneath ice shells underneath the ice shelf the ross ice shelf in antarctica. Because we want to study that to understand the effects of climate change on some of these pristine antarctic environments. But it's very hard on earth much less to go to another planet in do that. So the pragmatic answer is. I'm not holding my breath waiting for such a mission to happen in in my lifetime but if you look out thirty fifty years. It's just very hard to project. So i would. I would have a hard time predicting. But if you ask me as an optimist in what i hope for. It's quite possible that we could hear some signals. That might indicate to us that there could be somebody trying to contact us a little different from going there and literally visiting

Antarctica
"mars" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

02:55 min | 4 months ago

"mars" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Space human beings aren't going to live in space. There's no place to so i know do you. Do you need a mars. Outpost to learn how human beings live on mars outpost. The gravity is a lot less. It's not like in mars in the movies. People don't kind of bounce around but actually years and years and years ago road. The the vomit comet the nasa airplane that does the parabolic arcs and that at the top of them. There's free fall so that you feel what it's like to be in zero It's the vomit. Comet is appropriately named and but also they can they can adjust the the shape of the parabola to simulate different kinds of free fall so they do a couple of arcs. They did when when i did it. They did an arc. That was the moon in an arc. That was mars and it doesn't feel like just walking around so even just being there will be quite uncomfortable. I guess you get used to it. I mean people stay on the s for your more but but it's it's not would not be easy living. You can't grow food that soil. You have to take all that with here. You have to take the tv dinners that astronauts So the inside of that early station would look a lot more like a space station than it would look like the lars family evaporator farm on tattooing at least initially. All right. adam last question for you. Would you go to mars at this point in my life. Though it pains me to say. I probably would not. Why why is this point in your life. Different from any other point in your life because i have responsibilities to other humans here on the ground. You mean like credit card debt. Whoa whoa you mean. I could get out of that if i go to know. That'd be the one thing that works calms will be like no. You're bill showed up its online billing so you can i mean i mean that i think that the The risk of that trip for a very long time even from now even when we start to send humans. The risk of that triple be so high that i feel strongly that like no i i have a family here and i i i want that to be to be a priority. I think in think my partner probably would do it though. Not because not because not because she feels differently about this but because it's mars because she is compelled like it's like yeah but no. That's that's the thing you get that chance. You take and i understand that too i do. I've seen it on the. It looks great. I mean. I'm not the only one watching those old ninety science fiction shows in my house. That's a family thing right. Well i look forward to her life. Instagram posts as should be a great astronaut. All right let's take a break and then we'll come back with recommendations and a special guest for recommendations.

Instagram triple adam ninety science fiction mars one zero couple of arcs lars nasa
"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

05:00 min | 4 months ago

"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"Designed to snow. The mineral makeup of the of the moon will moss when no djilas just as being roaming around for years with that lama. Thanks very much love the show. take care bye. I love that a liberal. I'm i would have had little. I'm on the moon. Because i think in policy there was a geologist wasn't they yes geologist with look at what you're saying. Andrew pete bigs like from the love of what kid all. It's actually what's amusing is. The electronic means that hugh uses to turn the audio into text is made into a little hover with a capital h. Because obviously thinks it's a vehicle that drives over the surface of the moon on mars. It's still make sense. But i know what it means. Beat me level. And that's what i'd say is well. He's a great question and actually it's got does have links with with our question a couple of minutes ago because i thought i kinda suspected we'd be going down that that particular path about spectral analysis i suppose spectrum analysis that's what it is exactly that spectrum analysis so with it's such a rich field this an it's it's what allows astronomy and space science to work because he can detect things at great distances from from the makeup of stars themselves because all the chemical elements in the atmosphere of a star put their fingerprints on the on the light that we received from the straw and you can always not using a spectograph device. That blake brakes the light up into its rainbow spectrum. Cars different wavelengths sharp individually. And so. That's how we know unequivocally what stars and galaxies made of the same works for for surfaces as well looking at reflected light. So you've got the light of the sun and if you if you pass that through a spectrum spectrometer or spectral graph doxa for the first thing..

Andrew pete mars first thing couple of minutes ago hugh a
"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

04:09 min | 4 months ago

"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"Coughed into that orbit heads halfway round one orbit and then you basically you're breaking rocket so that goes into orbit around the other body which is mars and that's that's the thing that gives us the standard said month or so travel time seven to eight months. Sometimes nine months depends on the orientation of mars in the earth. But the other point about that is you can only do it. Every two years which is why we have this rush of spacecraft being launched last july. Because if you if you miss window you send your rocket off its transferral but when it gets to the over to mars. Mars is already somewhere else moved along so the timing has got to be perfect. That is why you've got this two year window. It will be very good to be able to change a lot and that's why people are once again. Starting to look at a nuclear rockets have been many nuclear rockets tested. In fact never. I think going into space but certainly tested on the ground dating through the late nineteen sixties. Plenty about this stuff on the web but the the program kind of in the post apollo era was shut down in fact in nineteen seventy three in the united states. Nuclear rocket technology has been tested in russia. We know that but not in the united states was shut down in nineteen seventy three with the basically the of the space shuttle program when the idea of going to mars were shelved because the us wanted to build a space station and wanted to have a reusable spacecraft special which then basically took over so the there are well. Let me just take a pause. Their nuclear rocket research started nineteen seventy three nuclear research. Didn't the we now know much more about new nuclear technology than we did back in the nineteen sixties and in fact. There is difference in the kind of fuel that you might use. Its it was always highly-enriched uranium. That was used. That was proposed. Back in the sixties which is kind of the stuff that you may nuclear weapons out of. It's not very nice but it's something you could stop here. This there is a there. Is low enriched uranium which might now open the way because the technology has moved on. Basically what you tried to do. Just let me explain. Our nuclear rocket works. A radio from going. Caputo yet can love me. I shouldn't do that. It's wrong if it does. And you're you're you're in bad shape. It's it's basically a pellet of uranium that is that is undergoing fishing which is the process that a breaks up the atoms and release heat. The amount of heat is released is enormous. And what you do is heat up a gas. It's usually hydrogen up to about two and a half thousand degrees celsius. And then you blow that out through a through a venturi the back which gives it a very high velocity and the key point about that is you. You end up with two to three times. The efficiency the propulsion efficiency of a chemical rocket. One that uses liquid fuels the standard thing. So you've you've you've got you've got this sudden increase in efficiency by a factor of two and that means the same size of rocket you two or three times more power and more of the so..

nine months two russia Mars last july united states late nineteen sixties nineteen sixties seven mars eight months three times earth two year sixties nineteen seventy three about two and a half thousand post apollo era One nineteen seventy
"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

02:40 min | 4 months ago

"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"Is a way of keeping the podcast live and where ultimately aiming to get a thousand patrons if we can and mike the things self funding through the listening audience which i think would be wonderful and thank you to all of those people who have already signed op. It's a wonderful thing and it's not going to cost you an arm and a leg unless your arm is worth three dollars that that could be a problem. But yes if you'd like to look into that guy to wear website and click on the support space nuts a link and find out how to do it. They fred still on the subject of mars. We've dedicated chunk of this episode to my favorite rocky planet and they now want to get tamaz fast faster. Now he's depending on when you go and you know Fuel it up. It's a long journey. It is very very long journey sometimes longer than it should be. Suppose you've got to laugh so many factors when you're traveling across the expanse of space or just going to the next door neighbor's place as is the case with mars but they wanting to get there fast which makes perfect sense and the answer might be nuclear rockets. Yeah that's right. I watched idea really do like this Yeah it's not a new one other it goes back back to the sixties early stages of rocket flight People were talking about using nuclear nuclear rockets to wiz around base. In fact we were thinking of doing everything by nuclear power in those days. But just talking about mas. The standard journey time for mars as we've seen with the spacecraft are currently on their way. They launched in july last year. They will arrive in february this year. So let's just seven months trip and that's actually about as quickly as you can do it with normal chemical rockets. Because what you're doing is you're looking for the lowest energy transfer between the orbit of the earth and the orbited mars. Something called colder hohmann. Transfer orbit hmo remember rightly is name a chapter. The guy a while ago is an engineer. But he was. I think in the fifties proposed the the way to get from one planet to another worse to essentially put your spacecraft into an orbit around the sun which is elliptical. It's you know. Basically a stretch to not circular but one. That's quite elongated. and you..

july last year seven months february this year three dollars earth sixties one planet mars thousand patrons mas one fifties hohmann
"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

05:19 min | 4 months ago

"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"So it's it's a mission with a high chance of success would be very very interesting. It will be brilliant if we could just to the vocal a book archive of the past atmosphere of mars. That says yes back in three point. Eight billion years before the common era. Mas this this climate is particular level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. That's basically what you're looking for because not will be what kept mas warm so yeah says a fantastic fantastic possibility and hope you took about twenty twenty four hudson to oppose what mystifies me to a certain degree is how he was that. Mas was able to maintain for some period of time a wet warm environment and then it couldn't. I mean what changed or was. It just was always destined to fail. It was because it's too small to hold onto a thick atmosphere. So so this actually another aspect to it as well. And that's that it doesn't have a magnetic field but these these are the two factors that come about because mars is small smaller than the earth by two so. It's time to half the diameter of the earth and that means its core would have cooled much more rapidly than the earth's core has done that means that there will be no chance of supporting plate. Tectonics which is one of the crucial things that stabilizes our atmosphere factor would have stabilized mars atmosphere plate. Tectonics are driven by internal heat. There is some evidence from sort of residual magnetic fields on mars here and there look as though they might have been formed around the boundaries of plates of continental plates but they must have solidified a very very long time ago because we believe that mars is crossed these now sort of continuous like an orange and orange peel and we believe it's been like that for a long time. Because that's the explanation. As to how moses volcanoes grew so big in particular olympus mons volcano in the solar system is because there was no plant tectonic shuffling it around over the the nine paul hawks spot that was driving. It is the hawaiian islands. Have done they moved around above the hot spot..

mars earth two two factors olympus mons one Eight billion years before hawaiian islands Mas three point four hudson about twenty twenty nine paul hawks
"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

05:34 min | 4 months ago

"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts

"This is the idea that maybe some of these water features could have been formed underneath huge glaciers. So you've got this sort of almost like a snowball mars but with the river rivers a made of meltwater effectively flowing underneath. 'these place your sheet. So that's slightly new idea. He's got some support bu- think the overwhelming view is still some time even if it might have been only for brief periods. Mars had a warm and wet climate. The trouble is howdy probe back into mas climate. And that's where question begins because there is being able to do so or are they looking at ways of doing so. Yeah it's it's a future. It's a future possibility. But one this really intriguing and with good reason to believe that this will be a very successful venture when it finally gets going so we know from spacecraft. That's already in orbit around the house. It's called marvin or maven somewhere. I've got hit the acronym which is mars atmosphere and volatile evolution. The you are that you've got to stick the enemy and evil but mars atmosphere volatile evolution. What it means is sensing the atmosphere of mars. It's been there for six years actually collecting data but one of the things that maven has uncovered is there is a flow of actually charged particles from the words what we call ions in signs s particles that have lost electrons and these particles of oxygen carbon nitrogen argon. These have been coming off. The surface of mars for billions of years maven his detected them. I've seen results. From from from those detections which are really interesting. Yeah but what has watched new and this is the work that we're talking about today. It talks you come from university of berkeley and other institutions. What's new is the recognition that those ions those charged particles found their way into space but also onto the surface of mars is largest moon larger. Moon there only two which is fobel's phobos and objects thirty forty kilometers across really interesting in. Its own right because it's got a very low density. It's probably something a bit like pumice in its in. Its makeup space. Scientists are not sure where it came from and how it got to be like it is but the bottom line is that phobos is in the flow of these of these ions and they will essentially deposit on the surface of phobos which is not subject to any other kind of phenomena apart from radiation from the sun which is well understood. And you can deal with that..

Mars six years thirty forty kilometers today billions of years mars things two one berkeley
"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

05:34 min | 4 months ago

"mars" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"This is the idea that maybe some of these water features could have been formed underneath huge glaciers. So you've got this sort of almost like a snowball mars but with the river rivers a made of meltwater effectively flowing underneath. 'these place your sheet. So that's slightly new idea. He's got some support. I think the overwhelming view is still some time even if it might have been only for brief periods. Mars had a warm and wet climate. The trouble is howdy. probe back into mas climate. And that's where question begins because there is being able to do so or are they looking at ways of doing so. Yeah it's it's a future. It's a future possibility. But one this really intriguing and with good reason to believe that this will be a very successful venture when it finally gets going so we know from spacecraft. That's already in orbit around the house. It's called marvin or maven somewhere. I've got hit the acronym which is mars atmosphere and volatile evolution. The you are that you've got to stick the enemy and evil but mars atmosphere volatile evolution. What it means is sensing the atmosphere of mars. It's been there for six years actually collecting data but one of the things that maven has uncovered is there is a flow of actually charged particles from the words what we call ions in signs s particles that have lost electrons and these particles of oxygen carbon nitrogen argon. These have been coming off. The surface of mars for billions of years maven his detected them. I've seen results. From from from those detections which are really interesting. Yeah but what has watched new and this is the work that we're talking about today. It talks you come from university of california berkeley and other institutions. What's new is the recognition that those ions those charged particles found their way into space but also onto the surface of mars is largest moon larger. Moon there are only two which is fobel's phobos and objects thirty forty kilometers across really interesting in. Its own right because it's got a very low density. It's probably something a bit like pumice in. Its in its makeup space. Scientists are not sure where it came from and how it got to be like it is but the bottom line is that phobos is in the flow of these of these ions and they will essentially deposit on the surface of phobos which is not subject to any other kind of phenomena apart from radiation from the sun which is well understood. And you can deal with that..

Mars six years today thirty forty kilometers billions of years mars university of california one two berkeley
"mars" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"mars" Discussed on TechStuff

"Level of precision to to ensure the health of anyone who's living on one of these colonies, not to say that it can't be done, but when you are doing this on another planet. That's already essentially trying to kill you. It's a really really tough challenge. The way the way of seeing it described his that it's. It's not so much. That at a certain point. You're never going to get the dirt completely separated from your living quarters, and so it's almost more of a of a. what can we do to combat the issues that the state is going to cause some sort of chemical scrubbing process could make this inert or some kind of medical process that we can act upon the poor human people that are out there because it's GonNa. It's GonNa Affect them right right to to to even think that we could create a system that would negate all of this is probably being a little, too. You definitely can't just assume because as soon as you do. Then tragedy can strike. well, there are other challenges as well. Not just the dirt of there's also radiation, and before you get the planet. Yeah, because a journey to is going to take months. And that's because the way that Mars and earth line up. You have to figure out the right trajectory to launch to get from Earth or even Earth's orbit. To Mars in the most efficient way possible so when the curiosity rover launched now if you were to look at the closest point between wall when Earth and Mars were closest together, if you were somehow able to maintain that distance and go from Earth to Mars. It might take you a few months to get there. It took us over more than I think like eight months to get. There might say well. Why is that so well? It's because we can't get those plans to stop moving. They keep going around the sun. is moving through space itself. So what you're talking about is trying to create a trajectory. That's the most efficient pathway between Earth and Mars. And it's not A. It's not a straight line because you can't do that, you know you would end up being where Mars was as opposed to where it is, so you have to actually aim for where Mars will be so. That means that your journey through space is going to take some time. If if you did it. At the speed of light, it would be fourteen minutes right. We cannot go at the speed of light, so it's going to take months to get there and The downside of that is that spaced has got some nasty radiation out there that can kill you. So if the vacuums not bad enough, the radiation is is worse so unearth. We are very well protected. In fact, one of the reasons why we have life as we know it here on our planet is because their plan has two things really helping us out. One is the atmosphere.

Mars
"mars" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"mars" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"Let's talk about something really cool. The Mars helicopter Amar. Okay. So a helicopter on Mars. This is the sounds like science fiction, that sounds like something from like a nineteen fifties scifi movie where like martians land on the earth. In they take over, but the us helicopter. So, you know, something crazy, like a Mars helicopter. Okay. So let's talk about that for a second. So on the Mars twenty twenty mission, there's a helicopter right, there will be launching a helicopter to Mars during the March twenty twenty mission and the aim of this helicopter is a test the feasability of flying heavier than air vehicles through the atmosphere on the red planet. It just passed some really important tests. It is now moving into the final stages of preparation ahead of the July. Twenty twenty Mars launch, and this isn't a big helicopter. It's four pounds so easily lift it up in your hands, but it's going to be flying to Mars in the twenty twenty mission in, it'll be deployed once the Rover sets down in Mars Jazirah crater. And that's supposed to happen on February. Eighteenth of? Twenty twenty one and it's going to take, you know, numerous months to get to Mars from earth in the helicopter will also have a camera on board in. Also used solar power to get the job done. So this camera that doesn't have any sensors or anything. I mean the the helicopter has empty censor is ready thing like that. It's just to do the flight test. That's it, it's only there to see if it's possible to fly a helicopter on Mars. That's all it's gonna

Mars twenty twenty Rover Mars Jazirah crater President Donald Trump NASA Twenty twenty Walden Jim Beck Twitter Jim Breitenstein President us administrator fifty years four pounds
"mars" Discussed on The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel

The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"mars" Discussed on The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel

"And now you're here. Yes. Where's Jonas Jonas wasn't able to get away from his parents? It's just us. Oh, too bad. We could've used this help getting cross the island. Not really what do you mean? I mean, we're not here to go to prep with you. You're not now we're here to stop you from going, but I won the bet. And that's why we came tonight because a deal's a deal. But this is all wrong Mars wrong like veggies. Nachos wrong. What's wrong about trying to find the truth about where I am? And how I got here and how could trying to find catty be wrong because it's messing up here. Life marce. You have everything a great apartment could creates a successful. Mom, who loves you, a dad who's a world famous billionaire, and most importantly, you have us. What about where I came from? I know it was real. I saw droning. Let's go home ours. It's creepy here. It's starting to feel that way. What am I call your mom? No. I'm not going home. I'm going to prep. Where's the ferry? There's no very Marce. There never was one. Yes. There was it had a hologram Oliver Pruitt and let it go. There's ferry we can take a little both last time. I know you weren't there arose. But we borrowed this rowboat that was tied up. It's over Marce. This fantasy is over fantasy. That's the same word pick used. Can we leave Morris? It's really dark and I'm getting scared. You know, what guys are right? I'm sorry. I scared you pick since the code red. I've been all over the place, but I'm done. Really? Yeah. I won't pull you guys to any more of my fantasies. Let's all get our bikes net. Home finally making you lead the way JP what's the road. What are you doing stay away? You're making a mistake. I don't know what's gotten into you guys have to do. I have to find out the fruit and fine Coty. Would it hurt me? Right. Those are friends say look like my friends. They don't. Like my friends. His current going the wrong way. No motorboat. They're coming. KP? To help you. What did I believe come on faster faster? Don't make this on yourself. Leap be alot. Best friends. Let us hope stay away. Stay. Rony? What are you doing? What's going on this lace? Catty mars. Yes. Just caddy. I hear you. Best robot ever dot com. Ex-?.

Marce Jonas Jonas Oliver Pruitt Morris
"mars" Discussed on The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel

The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel

06:34 min | 3 years ago

"mars" Discussed on The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel

"Toothpick. All feeling at the moment. What is p. thinking about. That kind of thing. And yes, I know this is just underneath the. Out credits, the credits that role at the end of end of show end of and if you listen to a lot of shows a lot of movies, take the time to sit in the theatre little bit longer and listened to the music they play at the end because oftentimes those are the things that the composer spent the most amount of love on because. Well, they figured that everybody's just going to get up and leave. But listen to how beautiful what Shawn's written here. So for me, this is one of the nice moments and for me as the person that chooses the music and where goes on the show. This makes me very happy. When I listen to this. Sorta says job, well, done guys. Really, really nice work. And so what I wanna do, I'm going to give Sean call out in Los Angeles and we're going to bring him on. He's gonna talk a little bit about this, and then I'm gonna let a whole bunch of music place that you and your family can sort of listen to it wherever you are maybe driving a car. And can kind of enjoy it from front to back with just maybe some of the stuff you've recognized from the show. Some will be short. Some will be longer some stuff you haven't heard because a lot of the times us not the entire piece of the piece of music that we composed and then at the very end all play the themes again. So it's kind of a way for you to sort of have a little bit of extended listening to the Potomac in maybe a way you haven't before. So let me get on the phone here in dall- Sean, see what he has to say. Hello, there he is. Are you there you know, working hard you getting back into the swing things after your vacation -solutely. Well, I just wanted to give you a ring. You know, we are recording live here a little thing for the Mars Patel. Listeners, young and old, and I want them to meet the man. The one of the two people have already met me behind the music, Mars Patel. So it was great. So we have been sitting here talking about, I've been going on and on about underscoring and what that might mean. And if you're sort of a young person, what that might mean in terms of listening for it in in TV shows and movies, and I thought I wanted to hear you talk a little bit about that and see see what your take on it is and and sort of what to listen for. Well, that's it's a broad topic, but it's a fun one that it's interesting and I, I've been thinking about Mars, you know what Mars overall meant. To me with you, asking me to be part of the show and it's it was it's unique in my particular experience because I'm used to working with images that you see versus the kind of images that you don't see. Right? Those those ones, the non image. It's actually funny because what what I think that you guys have done so well with Mars and telling the story is you do get this unbelievable mental picture of what's going on without actually seeing something on screen. And this is the part of this for me that I find fascinating. It's like reading a book. It's like being told to you, you picture your own images and where that differs from what I do regularly, which is writing music for moving pictures. I'm trying to employ the same techniques and being inspired by an image and right to the moving image with Mars. It's all about the story and you're writing with the image that you're that you are creating yourself as listener and whether there's an actual picture or a mental picture, it's all about supporting story. Music almost becomes a little more important without the picture does. It's really all about listening. So you're, you're hearing a story being told and music is, and the way the way that you you produce the shows and mixed. The show's music is very much a voice very much, especially marris's become somewhat of a character for the very signature sound. I think that we came up with for the show. You know, I picked out one great. Example that I really loved and it was it was this this music of one of your cues that you wrote that played behind the end credits on the show, and I talked a little bit about how that just, you know, mates music can even make somebody reading credits, sound good, you know. But I also there's this other key that I really love and happens in season two. And I don't wanna give anything away for people that haven't listened to the show, but there's a scene in the second season where catty is sort of given up that moment where like she thinks all is lost and there's this great q. with with a violin. That's just a single held note, and it holds for quite a long time before the sort of emotional music comes in here limit. Let me play it for you right now. I'll play it for everybody right now so they can hear about and we'll chat about it. So

Mars Sean Mars Patel Shawn dall- Sean Los Angeles marris
"mars" Discussed on The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel

The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel

09:08 min | 3 years ago

"mars" Discussed on The Unexplainable Disappearance of Mars Patel

"The music of Mars Patel. Everybody's Chris, Terry. I'm one of the co-creators Mars Patel and the guy that's behind the music as it were, and we get a lot of questions. A lot of requests for people who enjoy the Mars Patel music, and I can't tell you how great that makes me feel as a musician. I've been a musician most of my life and it's just so exciting to hear that not only the story which is so wonderful to create an and. See so many people enjoy, but also the fact that that they think that the music sort of also worked so well with the story and we thought it'd be really fun in your long. Wait for season three. If maybe we did a lap zone here on the sort of behind the scenes behind the music behind the Mars Patel music and maybe tell you a little bit about it. Maybe tell you how some of it was created and then sort of let maybe some of the clips play from some of the seasons, two seasons and hopefully will you know, help bridge that gap between season two and the wait for season three. We're in the middle of writing season three rate now my partners. So there's myself. David cries, Christman Benjamin Strauss, and Jenny Turner hall, and the four of us together created the show and and create these stories and everything that you've come to love Mars Patel. So it's very exciting for us. Yes, hopefully. This is a little bit of fun. And what I wanna do is kind of explain a couple of the key songs that that that are featured on Mars Patel. Also be able to sort of let a lot of plow. So you have a way of playing it in one sort of big chunk. This podcast is not a CD so us no. Individual tracks. I was trying to figure out the best way to do this. And I thought we sort of do it. As kind of learning experience, but then also great listening experience. So this is the music of Mars Patel with out any of the Mars Patel stuff. So. Bliss, I guess the best best way is just to just jump in and start with the original theme. So I'm gonna play that for you. Now, the original theme from season one, and then I'll give you a little backstory behind it here. It is. So there it is. That's the original theme from season one of Mars Patel. And when I sat down to write it, we were not very far in the production part of the show. I think we had maybe come up with the first couple episodes and maybe written a little bit of the story. But I as a musician, I should say a little bit about my background. I'm a, you know, a bass player in a writer, been a musician for most of my life and writing always sort of taking a bit of a behind the scenes thing for me. And so when it came time to do more Patel, it was sort of a great meeting of two things that I love to do, which is tell stories, right stories, gray stories on also do music. So I've got a little bit of background doing some music for film TV and also other things. But mainly I'm a jazz bass player and have a bunch of albums out under my own name, that kind of thing. So I wanted to sort of come up. With a theme that would maybe inspire us a little bit to sort of come up with the sound of the show, like, what would it sound like? And I sat down and wrote that piece that you just heard, played bass on it. The rest of it is programmed with the exception of the violin which is played by a really great friend of mine who lives around the corner from me names Zach, Brock, you can look him up really great famous violinist and he came over to my house and I had written the theme and he just played it and that was that was very simple. Like a lot of things as I'm sure most of, you know, when you're creating something, I mean, maybe you're maybe you've done some art projects or whatever you do maybe did something in school. You know, for the adults out there, we all know what it's like to sort of create something. And sometimes the best stuff happens sort of by accident. I would have to say that that theme was kind of one of those things. I didn't really know what I wanted it to sound like. And so you sort of have to ask the question. Does the theme come and in the show comes or does, or do they work together or just one inspire the other? And it's always. An interesting thing when you're creating something from nothing and in that was that was that listening to it now, it's interesting to me because it does have that kind of really rough, indie sort of sound very done quickly. I think maybe took me a day. And when it came time for season two after March Patel had become somewhat of success. I wanted to redo it and I wanted to sort of up the game a little bit and make it sound a little bit more like it's suited the the success of the show. So I went back and a lot of the music in Mars Patel is written by myself or my writing partner and longtime friend named Sean Pierce who we're going to hear from an a bit. He lives in LA. I live in New York and we call right a lot of the stuff. He writes a lot of the incidental music. You hear behind the show and I did the themes. So it's a great collaboration. We've collaborated on many projects, many albums for years and years and years and Mars Patel just happened to be this thing that you know he, he does a lot of work in film and TV, so fluid to LA Los Angeles and. We sat down and we worked on sort of coming up with new version of the theme. And if you listen closely, you'll hear it's the exact same baseline. I don't know if if you guys out there if you're old enough to sort of understand what the baseline is, it's like a guitar. It plays a lot lower, and it only has a few four strings instead of six. So what we did is we we needed to be the same length. So we kept the exact baseline. I didn't actually play anything new and then recreated the song all around it. So you'll hear me singing there. There's a voice now instead of violin doing the melody like that. So let me play it free. Now you'll see if you can hear the differences peering back toback Rio. So

Mars Patel Patel March Patel Chris Jenny Turner hall Terry writer LA Christman Benjamin Strauss David New York Zach LA Los Angeles Sean Pierce partner Brock
"mars" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"mars" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Uh then we had a robotic arm to dig down its found that depending on exactly where we dug between four and 15th centimeters deep we found this uh ice layer where in a couple of places it looked like it was almost pure water ace and most of the area that we uncovered was ice cemented soil so you could imagine taking a dish full of dirt adding water to it and throwing it in the freezer an at these temperatures are at the mars martian temperatures that i was talking about earlier it's as hard as concrete but just a hard to dig then proud yeah so we could dig into that the best we could do we could kind of scrape along the surface in it and collect what we scrape but we also had a drill um that could drill about a centimeter into the ice in and we'd collect the the uh the tailings okay but to get back to the human expiration point so one day i am on mars were digging with the phoenix lander a and so what you do ray say okay dig here and then dump here uh so dig in this area that we define and the dump often some other area on the surface right on on that yeah all on the surface okay so the um the the the arm is digging and it goes to dump and it just so happened to choose a path between the dig location in the dump location that there was a rock in between at that wasn't a big rock media was you don't maybe eight to ten centimeters across not a huge rock on but so on like the very first group and it was supposed to be it's supposed to scoop for a while on the various first kubik it's grabs a scoop of dirt hits the rock.

phoenix ray ten centimeters one day
"mars" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"mars" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"So i just had this kind of walked into this great opportunity of getting involved in an actual mars mission as a as a graduate student and just loved working on mars love the the mission operations aspect of it in one of the most exciting times in my life has been that the twotimes when i've been able to remotely witness of robot a robot landing on mars and just the the absolute thrill that that is the the you know ten to fifteen minutes of okay this is ed this is gonna you know everything everything comes down to this moment and then the thrill of seeing the first pictures from these landing sites that no one has ever seen before like it has just added absolutely amazing experience to see these pictures coming in for the first time from another planet and just having that feeling of discovery and exploration i can imagine because n having you have such a passion forces he pursued so far you know getting a phd end in planetary science you know being fascinated with planets and then being able to work hotter are you know learn from a robot that was actually on the surface an of another planet your dad is crazy that is awesome um so that makes me think why so you know you're your specialty is mars and that is a huge part of nasr's journey to mars right we we really wanna put boots on yeah but why that planet you know they're obviously we have we have venus we have uh you know titans looks pretty cool enceladus him you know what what what is it about mars that so intriguing so as far as the boots it all kind of comes back down to the boots on the ground aspect that you're talking about like titan in enceladus are very interesting places europa others other really cool places in the solar system a including if you're looking for for life outside of earth there's other places that you can go look.

nasr titans solar system graduate student fifteen minutes
"mars" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"mars" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Imagining mike and star wars like luke skywalker his house at that the big little don tatta made of that yeah on tattoo he made that it look like sand so yes like making like a sando yet so you need something like that uh because again you know like when we went to the moon the lunar lander was i forget put it all i as i recall like paperthin ray thicket wasn't a long duration uh or they weren't said they were planning on staying there for a long time say on mars if you're going to stay there for like a year and a half um which is generally mission architecture says about six months a trip to mars to get to mars a year and a half on the surface six months back so if you're going to spend a year and a half on the surface of mars you need to do something to shield yourself from radiation when she get there definitely so um in the moving the marsh and there was a severe duststorm yes i understand that's when really happen correct show and this is so i i gotta say though because it no not a knock against anywhere at all when he was at jesse a couple years ago uh he gave a presentation and and said okay before you guys ask any questions i know that they die storm was in real estate used brought it very nervous about his audience he's like the as no i associate said you know uh i wanted to write a book about kind of like robinson caruso on mars and i had to do something to get him strand there right so the dust storm is not realistic because mars as atmospheric pressure again is less than 1 percent of the earth a earth's atmospheric pressure so even when you have very fast wins they're not very strong so you could have like a 100 mile an hour gusts and it'll feel like less of a less than ten mile an hour wind on the surface.

mike don tatta paperthin ray thicket mars real estate robinson caruso six months 1 percent
"mars" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"mars" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Uh then we had a robotic arm to dig down its found that depending on exactly where we dug between four and 15th centimeters deep we found this uh ice layer where in a couple of places it looked like it was almost pure water ace and most of the area that we uncovered was ice cemented soil so you could imagine taking a dish full of dirt adding water to it and throwing it in the freezer an at these temperatures are at the mars martian temperatures that i was talking about earlier it's as hard as concrete but just a hard to dig then proud yeah so we could dig into that the best we could do we could kind of scrape along the surface in it and collect what we scrape but we also had a drill um that could drill about a centimeter into the ice in and we'd collect the the uh the tailings okay but to get back to the human expiration point so one day i am on mars were digging with the phoenix lander a and so what you do ray say okay dig here and then dump here uh so dig in this area that we define and the dump often some other area on the surface right on on that yeah all on the surface okay so the um the the the arm is digging and it goes to dump and it just so happened to choose a path between the dig location in the dump location that there was a rock in between at that wasn't a big rock media was you don't maybe eight to ten centimeters across not a huge rock on but so on like the very first group and it was supposed to be it's supposed to scoop for a while on the various first kubik it's grabs a scoop of dirt hits the rock.

phoenix ray ten centimeters one day
"mars" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"mars" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"So i just had this kind of walked into this great opportunity of getting involved in an actual mars mission as a as a graduate student and just loved working on mars love the the mission operations aspect of it in one of the most exciting times in my life has been that the twotimes when i've been able to remotely witness of robot a robot landing on mars and just the the absolute thrill that that is the the you know ten to fifteen minutes of okay this is ed this is gonna you know everything everything comes down to this moment and then the thrill of seeing the first pictures from these landing sites that no one has ever seen before like it has just added absolutely amazing experience to see these pictures coming in for the first time from another planet and just having that feeling of discovery and exploration i can imagine because n having you have such a passion forces he pursued so far you know getting a phd end in planetary science you know being fascinated with planets and then being able to work hotter are you know learn from a robot that was actually on the surface an of another planet your dad is crazy that is awesome um so that makes me think why so you know you're your specialty is mars and that is a huge part of nasr's journey to mars right we we really wanna put boots on yeah but why that planet you know they're obviously we have we have venus we have uh you know titans looks pretty cool enceladus him you know what what what is it about mars that so intriguing so as far as the boots it all kind of comes back down to the boots on the ground aspect that you're talking about like titan in enceladus are very interesting places europa others other really cool places in the solar system a including if you're looking for for life outside of earth there's other places that you can go look.

nasr titans solar system graduate student fifteen minutes