35 Burst results for "Marnie"

Maryland lawmaker said to have tried to bring gun onto House floor

Rush Limbaugh

00:37 sec | 4 d ago

Maryland lawmaker said to have tried to bring gun onto House floor

"Investigating whether GOP representative Andy Harris of Maryland Attempted to bring a gun onto the house for Wednesday correspondent Marnie Bennett with detail following the siege at the capital earlier this month. Magnetometers and other security measures have been installed outside of the chamber. A reporter for the Huffington Post witnessed Harris setting off the metal detectors as he attempted to enter the chamber on Thursday. When an officer with a metal detector wands scanned him. A firearm was detected on Harris. Aside, concealed by his suit coat, lawmakers are allowed to carry guns in their office and on the Capitol grounds, But they're forbidden from bringing firearms onto the house floor. Bernie Bennett in

Marnie Bennett Andy Harris GOP Maryland Harris Huffington Post Bernie Bennett
COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:42 min | Last week

COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

"Hello and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew mullah my guests today sarah wheaton and dr arthur caplan sarah wheaton chief policy correspondent for politico europe. She joins us from brussels. And autho kaplan is professor of bioethics at new york. University's school of medicine. He joins us from the woods of connecticut. This first part of the show. I want to talk more domestically about what. The responsibilities and duties and possibilities are in terms of vaccinations and how domestic governments go about organizing them the second part of the show. We'll talk more about the global picture. But sarah i'll start with you not withstanding the united kingdom which is actually proceeding with the vaccinations at a reasonably impressive clip. The non uk european countries. Actually being too slow by half they'd seemed to have got off to a very sluggish. Start indeed and it's causing quite a bit of domestic problems around the block and as well it's also calling into question european union's unity in fact. There's a huge blame. Brussels faction basically saying that the eu was too slow to buy doses compared to the united states and the united kingdom on the other hand. You also see that many countries including germany. Which has been one of the most vocal in criticizing. Brussels is not doing a very good job of getting the doses out that they have. is it. just a question of polaroid if you will if we focus on one specific example you look at a country like the netherlands which would appear to have every imaginable advantage. Where doing something like. This is concerned. It is geographically tiny eddies rich. It is well organized you would think vaccinating. The netherlands would be relatively straightforward. Is these things go and yet one. They have barely started and to the government has picked this moment to resign on mass over. Something else entirely right. I think it's really fascinating if you look at the databases that lay out. How countries have been doing with their vaccination. There are some things that show number of doses administered per one hundred. And there's not an obvious pattern so again sort of make sense that you can. Denmark are doing very well but then you have italy. You have spain. You have slovenia and lithuania in the top ten whereas you have big wealthy countries like germany and france and the netherlands as you mentioned doing quite poorly and each country is a precious snowflake with a health system and the value said that really drive this so one of the factors in the netherlands. The case in many countries is at one point. It looked like the astra zeneca vaccine was the front runner that was both the cheapest and the most logistically simple. It doesn't need kind of special freezing transportation so i think the netherlands was a country where they were more banking on that particular shot being the one that was available so they didn't think as much about how they were going to be doing the logistics for a more complicated marnie vaccine in germany. They say actually part of the issue is that germany has many different health insurance systems. And so the data about who actually qualifies for this vaccine is not consistently available whereas in countries like spain and italy. You may be due in certainly in the united kingdom where you have the national health service you have various centralized data system author another thing that countries have had a long time to think about is the order in which they roll the vaccines out. Obviously who gets it i. You can't vaccinate everybody the same week. Does it strike you that. There's much in the way of interesting or indicative divergence in in who is prioritizing. What here in the uk of call us where credit where it's due to the government as we were saying they're doing quite well. They started out with old people. Care homes people with chronic illnesses which might make them more vulnerable. Is that the smart thing to do. I wonder myself with a more thought. Should be given to vaccinating. People like retail workers bus drivers refuse collectors. Delivery people the ones who have to interact with the public and the ones without whom society really would grind to a halt. Yes well we spent an announcement of time in the us arguing over who should go first. Who should go second new should go third lots of categories federal advice flying around about prioritization. But we learned a couple of things once. The vaccine went to the states. They all decided their own priorities. So in some parts of the us prisons and prison staff are being vaccinated in other states. The governors have said no. We're not doing that because they don't like prisoners basically even though that's a high risk population and could be a place where the virus easily spreads back to the community. I've talked to a lot of people who run group homes for intellectually disabled people in nursing homes or care homes but out in the community. They're getting no supply they got forgotten. So i'm lis- despite lots and lots of arguing if you had a clientele of down syndrome individuals. Their death rates are six seven eight times as high as everybody else but somehow the prioritization list so we did spend a lot of time arguing but now we have fifty states with fifty different policies. We've seen a little cheating as a result because when you don't have consistency people start to say that. I'm not gonna follow the rules. So we have people who are rich. Flying to florida to get in line to get vaccinated. Florida per usual doesn't seem to care exactly who's supposed to be a priority. The lord help us to even vaccinating canadians. Their her down there snowbirds so that's causing tension among the locals. But here's the take on less than than i learned. It's great to have these arguments. About who goes i. If your logistics don't work it doesn't matter what your list is if you can't get supply out to the meat packers of the delivery. People are wherever if what we do. Is we send the supply to hospitals and nursing homes or care homes as we've done here that's where the vaccinations occur and those institutions will just vaccinate their employees high risk. Or not is. That's where the refrigerator is. As sarah said it's hard to handle stuff. They're not gonna go running down the street looking for the next category person to give it to so logistics as much as ethics or laying out priority groups drives distribution

Sarah Wheaton The Netherlands UK Andrew Mullah Dr Arthur Caplan Autho Kaplan Germany Brussels European Union School Of Medicine Spain Italy Polaroid Connecticut Sarah Slovenia Astra Lithuania Europe
Vaccine Rollout Strategies Vary Between Nations

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:42 min | Last week

Vaccine Rollout Strategies Vary Between Nations

"Welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew mullah my guests today sarah wheaton and dr arthur caplan sarah wheaton chief policy correspondent for politico europe. She joins us from brussels. And autho kaplan is professor of bioethics at new york. University's school of medicine. He joins us from the woods of connecticut. This first part of the show. I want to talk more domestically about what. The responsibilities and duties and possibilities are in terms of vaccinations and how domestic governments go about organizing them the second part of the show. We'll talk more about the global picture. But sarah i'll start with you not withstanding the united kingdom which is actually proceeding with the vaccinations at a reasonably impressive clip. The non uk european countries. Actually being too slow by half they'd seemed to have got off to a very sluggish. Start indeed and it's causing quite a bit of domestic problems around the block and as well it's also calling into question european union's unity in fact. There's a huge blame. Brussels faction basically saying that the eu was too slow to buy doses compared to the united states and the united kingdom on the other hand. You also see that many countries including germany. Which has been one of the most vocal in criticizing. Brussels is not doing a very good job of getting the doses out that they have. is it. just a question of polaroid if you will if we focus on one specific example you look at a country like the netherlands which would appear to have every imaginable advantage. Where doing something like. This is concerned. It is geographically tiny eddies rich. It is well organized you would think vaccinating. The netherlands would be relatively straightforward. Is these things go and yet one. They have barely started and to the government has picked this moment to resign on mass over. Something else entirely right. I think it's really fascinating if you look at the databases that lay out. How countries have been doing with their vaccination. There are some things that show number of doses administered per one hundred. And there's not an obvious pattern so again sort of make sense that you can. Denmark are doing very well but then you have italy. You have spain. You have slovenia and lithuania in the top ten whereas you have big wealthy countries like germany and france and the netherlands as you mentioned doing quite poorly and each country is a precious snowflake with a health system and the value said that really drive this so one of the factors in the netherlands. The case in many countries is at one point. It looked like the astra zeneca vaccine was the front runner that was both the cheapest and the most logistically simple. It doesn't need kind of special freezing transportation so i think the netherlands was a country where they were more banking on that particular shot being the one that was available so they didn't think as much about how they were going to be doing the logistics for a more complicated marnie vaccine in germany. They say actually part of the issue is that germany has many different health insurance systems. And so the data about who actually qualifies for this vaccine is not consistently available whereas in countries like spain and italy. You may be due in certainly in the united kingdom where you have the national health service you have various centralized data system author another thing that countries have had a long time to think about is the order in which they roll the vaccines out. Obviously who gets it i. You can't vaccinate everybody the same week. Does it strike you that. There's much in the way of interesting or indicative divergence in in who is prioritizing. What here in the uk of call us where credit where it's due to the government as we were saying they're doing quite well. They started out with old people. Care homes people with chronic illnesses which might make them more vulnerable. Is that the smart thing to do. I wonder myself with a more thought. Should be given to vaccinating. People like retail workers bus drivers refuse collectors. Delivery people the ones who have to interact with the public and the ones without whom society really would grind to a halt. Yes well we spent an announcement of time in the us arguing over who should go first. Who should go second new should go third lots of categories federal advice flying around about prioritization. But we learned a couple of things once. The vaccine went to the states. They all decided their own priorities. So in some parts of the us prisons and prison staff are being vaccinated in other states. The governors have said no. We're not doing that because they don't like prisoners basically even though that's a high risk population and could be a place where the virus easily spreads back to the community. I've talked to a lot of people who run group homes for intellectually disabled people in nursing homes or care homes but out in the community. They're getting no supply they got forgotten. So i'm lis- despite lots and lots of arguing if you had a clientele of down syndrome individuals. Their death rates are six seven eight times as high as everybody else but somehow the prioritization list so we did spend a lot of time arguing but now we have fifty states with fifty different policies. We've seen a little cheating as a result because when you don't have consistency people start to say that. I'm not gonna follow the rules. So we have people who are rich. Flying to florida to get in line to get vaccinated. Florida per usual doesn't seem to care exactly who's supposed to be a priority. The lord help us to even vaccinating canadians. Their her down there snowbirds so that's causing tension among the locals. But here's the take on less than than i learned. It's great to have these arguments. About who goes i. If your logistics don't work it doesn't matter what your list is if you can't get supply out to the meat packers of the delivery. People are wherever if what we do. Is we send the supply to hospitals and nursing homes or care homes as we've done here that's where the vaccinations occur and those institutions will just vaccinate their employees high risk. Or not is. That's where the refrigerator is. As sarah said it's hard to handle stuff. They're not gonna go running down the street looking for the next category person to give it to so logistics as much as ethics or laying out priority groups drives distribution

Sarah Wheaton The Netherlands UK Andrew Mullah Dr Arthur Caplan Autho Kaplan Germany Brussels European Union School Of Medicine Spain Italy Polaroid Connecticut Sarah Slovenia Astra Lithuania Europe
Eliminating dating road blocks: Helping you get to the bottom of your relationship struggles

Ask Women Podcast: What Women Want

04:50 min | Last month

Eliminating dating road blocks: Helping you get to the bottom of your relationship struggles

"I dive into Germany is done for me. I want domini to explain a little bit about what she does for those who haven't listened to the Past episode that she was on so you explain it and then I'll explain it better for you. Got it. You got it actually sounds great because when I explained I think it's not intense entirely the process love you ladies. Thank you so much for having me back on I'm so appreciative. So what I do is I help single men attractive life Partners through personal and relationship coaching. But what the way I do that is quite fascinatingly very different approach in some ways from the way Marnie does it which is expert in its own right? I sort of approach from the deeper levels those deeper psychological ways in which we hold ourselves back from what we want and I have started recently opening up I work with women and with people in relationships because really whatever it is that you're struggling with in your life doesn't have to be actual dating problem and tends to be a personal problem. That's just manifesting in your dating life. And if that's the case that means is manifesting in other areas of your life as well. So if people come to me because they gain more confidence that they want to be more authentic or they want to be better on stage. I had a guy wants to be a rockstar come to me cuz you had anxiety on stage and he took about a month and anxiety was gone. And so it really can apply a lot of juice. Areas, which makes it quite fascinating work. Yeah. Well the thing is that I have learned from my experience with you is that once you free up this space that you're holding for these negative. I don't even know what to classify them as but negative feelings negative views believe whatever they are that's in place. First of all, you free up your space for so much more time to have a wonderful things instead of focusing on all of these negative. So if somebody does have anxiety or they have bitterness or they feel unhappy what really ends up happening is that you spend so much time fixating and focusing on life being unhappy and bitter and angry that you miss out on all of the great things around you so I can't even remember what I came to you for and that's part of the process is that you forget the purpose in the very beginning. I remember the first time I spoke to you. I was saying that I felt overwhelmed lackluster was probably a word that I said that like I'm doing all of these great things all these great things are happening for me, but I'm just I'm not happy. Enjoying these things and I don't know if it's cold and because life's kind of weird right now or if it's me and so the work that we started doing with each other. I don't know if it was directly related to that what came out of it, but I'll be very transparent and say that I have some difficulties with my husband when we get into arguments because as soon as there is something that says I don't like you in my mind, right that's my belief system. My brain goes into defense mode where I want to protect myself. So I start thinking of all the ways that I don't like him. He doesn't say I don't like me but I assume that him being angry about something or being snippy about something whatever like normal people are is a direct attack how he feels about me and it sent me into this spiral before where I would be like we should get divorced you should be with each other. This is horrible. He's a bad man and then we would make up and we would talk and I know he's totally fine, but I am Hold on to some of that still and it would be hard for us to recover. And so a lot of the work that we did wasn't geared towards my husband. It was geared towards how I defend ourselves from others hurting me cuz that pattern happens with vendors that I work with with no clients that I have with my parents my family members my friends. It was a repeated pattern that I had been doing for my entire life and domini explained to me that it's something I developed in childhood with my childlike brain that made a general rule that if somebody speaks to you in this tone or doesn't like what you said a then they don't like you and they're going to hurt you in the long run. And so for me, I developed my own defense mechanisms, but as an adult, which is the work that domini and I did we helped provide a module explanation and expanded explanation as to what's going on is a long-winded thing, but I can tell you that now when I come across a very similar situation with vendors dead My husband my husband's the one that happens most often that I now try to make my brain go in that direction where I try to think about all those negative things and my brain literally pushes me back and says and then don't go there. It's not right stay in the moment and I can't even explain to you unless you go through this and maybe people who over with Dommy. I don't know if they have different experiences, but that was my experience that they belong if that I had before that was causing me tons of pain and frustration and a disconnect between those that I loved or those that I wanted to work with is now not even part of my programming and I can't go there anymore,

Marnie Germany Domini
Why some Black Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:56 min | Last month

Why some Black Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

"How do you feel about the comeback team as my excellent even have my children american community. We must trust me because we do feel like the first they wanna test on and we're being experimental. We used to be mistreated. We use the ban experimental role and we used to be last any category when it comes to healthcare to words to start off here remember tuskegee public. Health officials are focused on countering distrust toward this vaccine particularly in black communities in our country. Michelle norris from the washington post puts the conundrum this way quote vaccine. Hesitancy from black americans is different from an anti vaxxers stance. It's not that black. Americans don't believe in vaccines. They don't trust a public health system that has in too many cases engaged in grievous harm by experimenting on black bodies without consent or ignoring the specific needs of black people here to talk about we. Welcome to our broadcast tonight. Dr peter hotels he's a vaccine scientists working with a team to develop a low cost cove at nineteen version for global distribution. He happens to serve as co director of the center for vaccine development at texas children's and he is the dean of the national school of tropical medicine at baylor college of medicine also with us tonight. The reverend walker. We are proud to say she started as did a number of us in local news notably as the first african-american weeknight news anchor in boston. And is now senior pastor at roxbury presbyterian. She's been at the center of an effort. Enlisting dr rao cheese help and others to build trust in the vaccine among members of her congregation and the larger city at large Dr houghton. Says i'd like to begin with you and your reaction to this. Fda authorization tonight well it certainly important news Critical first step towards backseat our way out of this epidemic. you know. We're hoping not to have to completely rely on biotechnology solutions but in the absence of a national cove nineteen strategy by. This white house backed us into a corner and now we pretty much have no other major tools now to halt the screaming epidemic. Where we're looking at two hundred thousand new cases a day in three thousand deaths per day. So we're in a dire situation in. Having this vaccine is going to be an absolutely critical tool. And i hope it's going to be the first of four or five ac scenes that will have in the coming months because i don't think we're going to be able to vaccinate the us population with these two marnie vaccines alone. So a major first step but a pretty long road ahead here here on time is of the essence of reverend walker. It's great to have you. I'm looking at pew. Research polling says sixty one percent of white americans are prepared to have the vaccine forty-two percent of black americans. I'm gonna make a sweeping assumption about all of our viewers. The folks smart enough to watch this hour every night. Know their history so we have established the fear and distrust. Tell us what you're hearing in your congregation. However some people are saying they wanna wait it out and see what's going to happen which gives me a little hope. This is a very tragic situation. If we don't take vaccine a lot of people as you have already pointed out simply do not trust systems a not just because of history but because of their daily experiences people who feel that they have been abused and they have been disrespected. They have been ignored by. Hospitals are in general. So you know getting that to change is not going to be an

Reverend Walker Michelle Norris Dr Peter Hotels Center For Vaccine Development National School Of Tropical Me Roxbury Presbyterian Dr Rao Cheese Dr Houghton The Washington Post Baylor College Of Medicine Texas Boston FDA White House PEW United States
Sean Connery dies, iconic “James Bond” actor passes away at 90

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:13 min | 3 months ago

Sean Connery dies, iconic “James Bond” actor passes away at 90

"As James Bond and in many other roles. He was one of the smoothest actors ever to grace the screen. Sean Connery died overnight in the Bahamas at the age of 90. Born in Scotland in 1930, Sean Connery defined cool for a generation as the suave spy James Bond and Dr No James. He returned his double 07 in from Russia. With love Goldfinger Thunder Ball, You only live twice. Diamonds are forever and never say Never again. Not only was he a box office smash, she was sought by master filmmakers in Alfred Hitchcock's Marnie John Huston's The Man Who would be King Sidney Lumet's murder on the Orient Express and Brian DePalma's The Untouchables, for which he won the Oscar. Get Capone. Here's how you get him. He pulls a knife. You pull a gun, He sends one of yours to hospital. You send one of his toe the mark. His list of beloved Flix is endless. Highlander Hunt for Red October. The rock and my favorite is Harrison Ford's father in Indiana Jones and the last crusade I came here to say, Oh, yeah, and who's gonna come to save you Junior? He received the Kennedy Center honor in 1999 and was knighted in 2000, Remembering Sean Connery, Jason Fraley, Deputy news. Coming up

James Bond Sean Connery Capone King Sidney Lumet Marnie John Huston Brian Depalma Harrison Ford Dr No James Alfred Hitchcock Bahamas Orient Express Kennedy Center Jason Fraley Indiana Scotland Russia Oscar Murder Jones
"marnie" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

10:00 min | 5 months ago

"marnie" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

"So do you find women that come to you, you know are so in fear initially that long, you know, you kind of have to talk about the ledge and and and remind them and this is one of our big messages as you don't have to fear cancer, you know cancer is just the symptom. It's not the cause exactly. Yes. Yeah, I deal with that Fear Factor pretty frequently. How do you how do you how do you talk them off the ledge when they first thing I do is to tell them this is some viable. It's absolutely survivable. This is not a death sentence. Yeah, and and less spoiled that fear down, you know into something wrong. More approachable and just get them to realize that okay, we're all here for a finite period of time. We're not it's not like no one's going to die. We all will be an eventual thing. But the important thing is to realize that you while you're here. You need to be living your life as fully and completely as you can and enjoying it and you know, gosh that's so important, isn't it? Absolutely now you you know, you mentioned initially before your diagnosis that there was a lot of stress in your life. And you know, one of our Essentials is essential number for and healing the emotional wounds and making sure that you know, you're managing your stress because Well tell us what what does stress due to the body and your immune system? Oh, yeah, it undermines the immune system to a huge degree. I mean either one of those epigenetic factors, isn't it? Really? I mean, it's it's huge and it's so important to deal with it because I mean, like I said earlier, I I I work with people all the time who are doing just absolutely perfect with their diet. They're supplements everything exercise doing all the right things but during this toxic relationship or during this horrible job that they hate. Well, I'll deal with that later. No dear really we need to deal with it now because this is important factor in cancers a wake-up call, isn't it? I mean It's it's the biggest wake-up call you'll ever get and to deal with every aspect. You can't leave any stone unturned really long and it's you know, it's about transformation and change right? Because if you keep the same lifestyle that you had precancer, you know, nothing's going to change and and I've see that so much of time, you know, women are doing everything right as far as the supplements but they're you know, they're just not progressing until they deal with the emotional aspect. And then also there's a shuttle aspect which is a huge factor that a lot of people think it's not that important. But you know, we definitely need to look at you know, what's in your mauth oral microbiome on the toxicity of the amount goes the root canals and all of those things. Yeah, I once not too long ago had a conversation with the lady who was a thermal imaging person dead. But I forget now what her exact title was but she worked with thermal imaging and she had some really interesting photos of women who had root canals and you could see how the root canals were affecting those meridians and went right through the breasts. Yeah, seeing is believing Now using fascinating fascinating. I saw that a lot as well. Now, let's talk a little bit about some of the things that you recommend for the women that you coach as far as long. I mean, we you know, as far as nutrition and then as far as the specific supplements or herbs or Chinese medicine, you know things that will really took a good cancer cells. So let's first of all let's talk about nutrition. What are the basic things that you recommend? I recommend the people do daily juicing or smoothies one or the other whichever they prefer or switch off because there's so many things that you can get from that way. It's better than taking a multi-vitamin because you're getting the nutrition at the very basic level and right into the body cells in our bodies love that. Yeah, and there are so many things that you can do like even just even just juicing a stalk of broccoli the things that you'll get out of that. Hi slow. Yeah powerful. So yeah, carrots and beets and all of the greens spinach all those things makes such a huge difference and they taste good too. I mean, it's super simple just takes minutes and you provided yourself with an amazing amount of nutrition organic eggs go ahead and has to be organic. That's that's a whole other subject, isn't it? But yeah, and so and beyond that I just I don't say to people, you know, you need to go off me you need Volkswagen. I'm not I'm not that strict. I just believe that make it as clean as possible, which what you enjoy eat from the rainbow. I hear people say that all the time but it's so true the brighter color than it is the better it is for you. So yeah loads of loads of vegetables loads of fruit. And if you're going to eat meat make sure it's as clean as it can be in organic or free-range just really good stuff. Yeah. Now do you follow the blood type diet? I don't so much anymore. I was reading the books. Mostly someone handed it to me and said, you know, you need to know about this page, right? I do believe that it works for some people. Yeah. Yeah. I did it many years ago. I'm an old blood type. So it made a lot of sense to me cuz I was vegetarian for thirty years and I just after a while it just wasn't working for me, especially as I got into menopause and yeah, okay. And then what about what about targeting cancer cells? How do you how do you deal with that in boosting the immune system? Okay. So I saw it sort of depends on where a person is in their Journey, but for for someone who is considered cancer-free just looking looking forward to home. Staying well and no recurrences. I I strongly recommend people be taking something to work with the hormone levels. Sometimes it's a damn sometimes it's the calcium gluconate depending on you know, there's particular situation. I do like Dem a lot but but for boosting the immune system, I haven't found anything that works better than those medicinal mushrooms the mushroom last. Oh my goodness turkey tail and China and Russia and maitake. They're incredible. Absolutely incredible. I followed Paul stamets four years the the mushroom guy, you know the most mushroom Guru, he knows about mushrooms and gosh the things that are coming out from the research studies just fabulous. I don't think he owns his own mother healed herself with a combination of herceptin and turkey tail mushrooms. So just got off. So human is another thing that I wouldn't be without curcumin is amazing. So many things not just for not just for cancer, but for me, you know reducing inflammation in the body and targeting cancer cells and yeah, really incredible stuff. Let's see. What else do I like em. I do recommend co Q ten for people who are going through radiation and chemotherapy. I think that's a really important one for them to have absolutely. Good, and I've got a whole long list of things. But from Main ones are the you know, dealing with the hormone aspect and you know off the medicinal mushrooms, I think are really super I've heard a lot. I've been I mean dealing a lot with people who are getting mistletoe therapy to 4 a.m. Address of cancers. Is there someplace on the US where people can get mistletoe therapy pretty easily. If you can get a doctor's prescription you can get there's a couple of pharmacies. I know I did it during my second healing journey and it's really simple. It's just the you know Sub-Q injection off and when there is some. Some clinics that I believe offer it i v as well, so yeah, it was great. So Marnie if there were parting words of birth Is dumb for women who are on the healing Journey? What would you what would you tell them? I I I really think that if they can align themselves, you know with their inner wisdom their inner healer and just tap into that. We know our bodies better than anybody else and if you are feeling like a therapy just isn't going to be for you then don't do it. Choose the ones that make sense to you do your research? Dive

cancer Volkswagen Paul stamets Marnie US China Russia
You've been diagnosed, Now What? with Marnie Clark - burst 5

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

10:00 min | 5 months ago

You've been diagnosed, Now What? with Marnie Clark - burst 5

"So do you find women that come to you, you know are so in fear initially that long, you know, you kind of have to talk about the ledge and and and remind them and this is one of our big messages as you don't have to fear cancer, you know cancer is just the symptom. It's not the cause exactly. Yes. Yeah, I deal with that Fear Factor pretty frequently. How do you how do you how do you talk them off the ledge when they first thing I do is to tell them this is some viable. It's absolutely survivable. This is not a death sentence. Yeah, and and less spoiled that fear down, you know into something wrong. More approachable and just get them to realize that okay, we're all here for a finite period of time. We're not it's not like no one's going to die. We all will be an eventual thing. But the important thing is to realize that you while you're here. You need to be living your life as fully and completely as you can and enjoying it and you know, gosh that's so important, isn't it? Absolutely now you you know, you mentioned initially before your diagnosis that there was a lot of stress in your life. And you know, one of our Essentials is essential number for and healing the emotional wounds and making sure that you know, you're managing your stress because Well tell us what what does stress due to the body and your immune system? Oh, yeah, it undermines the immune system to a huge degree. I mean either one of those epigenetic factors, isn't it? Really? I mean, it's it's huge and it's so important to deal with it because I mean, like I said earlier, I I I work with people all the time who are doing just absolutely perfect with their diet. They're supplements everything exercise doing all the right things but during this toxic relationship or during this horrible job that they hate. Well, I'll deal with that later. No dear really we need to deal with it now because this is important factor in cancers a wake-up call, isn't it? I mean It's it's the biggest wake-up call you'll ever get and to deal with every aspect. You can't leave any stone unturned really long and it's you know, it's about transformation and change right? Because if you keep the same lifestyle that you had precancer, you know, nothing's going to change and and I've see that so much of time, you know, women are doing everything right as far as the supplements but they're you know, they're just not progressing until they deal with the emotional aspect. And then also there's a shuttle aspect which is a huge factor that a lot of people think it's not that important. But you know, we definitely need to look at you know, what's in your mauth oral microbiome on the toxicity of the amount goes the root canals and all of those things. Yeah, I once not too long ago had a conversation with the lady who was a thermal imaging person dead. But I forget now what her exact title was but she worked with thermal imaging and she had some really interesting photos of women who had root canals and you could see how the root canals were affecting those meridians and went right through the breasts. Yeah, seeing is believing Now using fascinating fascinating. I saw that a lot as well. Now, let's talk a little bit about some of the things that you recommend for the women that you coach as far as long. I mean, we you know, as far as nutrition and then as far as the specific supplements or herbs or Chinese medicine, you know things that will really took a good cancer cells. So let's first of all let's talk about nutrition. What are the basic things that you recommend? I recommend the people do daily juicing or smoothies one or the other whichever they prefer or switch off because there's so many things that you can get from that way. It's better than taking a multi-vitamin because you're getting the nutrition at the very basic level and right into the body cells in our bodies love that. Yeah, and there are so many things that you can do like even just even just juicing a stalk of broccoli the things that you'll get out of that. Hi slow. Yeah powerful. So yeah, carrots and beets and all of the greens spinach all those things makes such a huge difference and they taste good too. I mean, it's super simple just takes minutes and you provided yourself with an amazing amount of nutrition organic eggs go ahead and has to be organic. That's that's a whole other subject, isn't it? But yeah, and so and beyond that I just I don't say to people, you know, you need to go off me you need Volkswagen. I'm not I'm not that strict. I just believe that make it as clean as possible, which what you enjoy eat from the rainbow. I hear people say that all the time but it's so true the brighter color than it is the better it is for you. So yeah loads of loads of vegetables loads of fruit. And if you're going to eat meat make sure it's as clean as it can be in organic or free-range just really good stuff. Yeah. Now do you follow the blood type diet? I don't so much anymore. I was reading the books. Mostly someone handed it to me and said, you know, you need to know about this page, right? I do believe that it works for some people. Yeah. Yeah. I did it many years ago. I'm an old blood type. So it made a lot of sense to me cuz I was vegetarian for thirty years and I just after a while it just wasn't working for me, especially as I got into menopause and yeah, okay. And then what about what about targeting cancer cells? How do you how do you deal with that in boosting the immune system? Okay. So I saw it sort of depends on where a person is in their Journey, but for for someone who is considered cancer-free just looking looking forward to home. Staying well and no recurrences. I I strongly recommend people be taking something to work with the hormone levels. Sometimes it's a damn sometimes it's the calcium gluconate depending on you know, there's particular situation. I do like Dem a lot but but for boosting the immune system, I haven't found anything that works better than those medicinal mushrooms the mushroom last. Oh my goodness turkey tail and China and Russia and maitake. They're incredible. Absolutely incredible. I followed Paul stamets four years the the mushroom guy, you know the most mushroom Guru, he knows about mushrooms and gosh the things that are coming out from the research studies just fabulous. I don't think he owns his own mother healed herself with a combination of herceptin and turkey tail mushrooms. So just got off. So human is another thing that I wouldn't be without curcumin is amazing. So many things not just for not just for cancer, but for me, you know reducing inflammation in the body and targeting cancer cells and yeah, really incredible stuff. Let's see. What else do I like em. I do recommend co Q ten for people who are going through radiation and chemotherapy. I think that's a really important one for them to have absolutely. Good, and I've got a whole long list of things. But from Main ones are the you know, dealing with the hormone aspect and you know off the medicinal mushrooms, I think are really super I've heard a lot. I've been I mean dealing a lot with people who are getting mistletoe therapy to 4 a.m. Address of cancers. Is there someplace on the US where people can get mistletoe therapy pretty easily. If you can get a doctor's prescription you can get there's a couple of pharmacies. I know I did it during my second healing journey and it's really simple. It's just the you know Sub-Q injection off and when there is some. Some clinics that I believe offer it i v as well, so yeah, it was great. So Marnie if there were parting words of birth Is dumb for women who are on the healing Journey? What would you what would you tell them? I I I really think that if they can align themselves, you know with their inner wisdom their inner healer and just tap into that. We know our bodies better than anybody else and if you are feeling like a therapy just isn't going to be for you then don't do it. Choose the ones that make sense to you do your research? Dive

Cancer Volkswagen United States Paul Stamets Marnie China Russia
You Don't Have to Fear Cancer

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

01:15 min | 5 months ago

You Don't Have to Fear Cancer

"Find women that come to you, you know are so in fear initially that long, you know, you kind of have to talk about the ledge and and and remind them and this is one of our big messages as you don't have to fear cancer, you know cancer is just the symptom. It's not the cause exactly. Yes. Yeah, I deal with that Fear Factor pretty frequently. How do you how do you how do you talk them off the ledge when they first thing I do is to tell them this is some viable. It's absolutely survivable. This is not a death sentence. Yeah, and and less spoiled that fear down, you know into something wrong. More approachable and just get them to realize that okay, we're all here for a finite period of time. We're not it's not like no one's going to die. We all will be an eventual thing. But the important thing is to realize that you while you're here. You need to be living your life as fully and completely as you can and enjoying it and you know, gosh that's so important, isn't it?

Cancer
Jordan Younger Albrecht On Eating Vegan Again

The Ultimate Health Podcast

06:53 min | 5 months ago

Jordan Younger Albrecht On Eating Vegan Again

"Coming up on the ultimate health podcast. I. Believe that we those of us who got sick with chronic illness is because we are being called to wake up deeper being called to wake up to who we are in our heart, our soul, our spirit, and maybe somewhere along the way we got out of alignment with what we came here to do not. Okay. That's part of the human journey. So finding the modality that helps us, he'll and helps us reel line with who we are i. that's what it's all about. Hello and welcome see autumn it all podcast episode three, hundred, Sixty, eight, I'm Jesse Chapas and I'm here to take your health the next level each week, bring you inspiring and informative conversations about health and wellness covering topics of nutrition lifestyle fitness mindset in so much more. In this week, Jordan younger all practice back on the show. She's the blogger behind the top red spirituality and wellness plugged the balanced blonde. She covers all things wellness high vibration living the plant based lifestyle healing from chronic illness tapping into your creativity in psychic nature and so much more beyond the blog. She is the Creator and host of the top podcast. So on fire where she goes deep on a range of topics from nutrition to aliens entrepreneurship to medium ship, and it's been about three years since Jordan? Has Been on the show and a ton has happened in her life. Last time she was on the show we were discussing her book breaking Vegan. So she went from Vegan to no longer Vegan, and since she was on the show, she has now Vegan again and we get into that she's had a wedding she was diagnosed with lyme disease and so much more. We had time to catch up on and just really appreciate Jordan's Rawness surrealness and the depth she goes into sharing her story on today show. Some of the highlights, include her soul searching trip to Bali where she hit rock bottom the overwhelming truth about lyme disease in co-infections microdosing suicide been for chronic pain how psychedelics have helped. Jordan the most healing journey and how water fasting cleanses the body. I really enjoyed this conversation and I know you will too and I'd appreciate if you could help spread the word share this with somebody in your life, a friend, a family member there is so much great information and inspiration here spread the good word. Thank you so much here I go with Jordan Younger Albrecht. Jordan welcome back to the podcast how you doing had. Jesse. Thank you so much for having me back. I'm doing really well, I'm excited to talk to you today I'm excited to chat with you too. It's I went and looked back at our previous episode. We did with Marnie there and it's been years. So a long time and a lot has happened in both our world. So back when we did that last episode, you weren't married now you're married, you've had a new diagnosis lyme disease and you're back on the Vegan Diet. So lots we can get into. Yeah. Life has changed a lot. I remember recording that with you. Guys in my old apartment where I lived alone with my cat and life has certainly changed quite a bit since then we'll at that time we did that recording it seem like your health was in a pretty good place for a timeline point here let's let's talk about where your health was at at that time. Yeah. So I may have thought my health was maybe in a good place, but it was around that time. I'm trying to think around three years ago. Exactly is when my health started to decline and really take Depp I think when we talked may have been maybe the very end of me feeling pretty good and. Then I started to experience different symptoms like full body hives I had a uterine cyber ahead which I ended up having surgically removed. I started to be very chronically fatigued, but I do believe when we last spoke I was still holding onto the final shreds of feeling good or saw it and then yeah things kind of exploded from there. So toward the end of twenty, what would this have been twenty would have been twenty seventeen that we chatted. Yeah. Toward the middle to the end of twenty seventeen is when these health issues started popping up and I was very confused about all ams and what was going on and. At the time it didn't even cross my mind that all of these health issues could be intertwined and could have the same root cause thought my entire body was just breaking down bit by bit and piece by piece, and ultimately what I finally did realize the following year that this was all the same root cause similar root cause and I was diagnosed with lyme disease then I realized okay. The hives, the fatigue, the brain fog lack of energy. The fiber that I had hormone imbalances got issues. All of this could be drawn back to lyme disease switch ended up being a chronic lyme disease diagnosis meaning that I had had my. For, at least a year. But when I look back on my life, it seems that I actually had lyme for more like both likely a decade dot was a pretty wild time in my life and I'm sure we'll get into all the details, but I've been treated for the last two and a half years and it's been quite a journey. So after we talked and the symptoms started to creep up on you what was. The first step you did before getting diagnosed, did you were you already seeing a doctor at that time that you brought these issues up to or did you find a new doctor? What did the path look like to getting that diagnosis? So I was seeing a few different doctors at that time I've always geared toward a more holistic approach. So I was seeing a functional medicine doctor which really combines Western and eastern medicine practices. I went to my functional medicine doctor and he really didn't know what was going on. He saw the hives that I had all over my body which were so itchy. So terrible. So read they lasted for ten months and during that time I couldn't even sleep at night because I was so itchy I was in so much pain. It covered every single inch of my body except for my face. And my feet actually it was on my face to just not as bad as the rest of my body

Lyme Disease Jordan Younger Albrecht Jesse Chapas Lyme Bali Marnie
"marnie" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:25 min | 5 months ago

"marnie" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"In the mid to upper eighties Sunday. Partly cloudy chance with storm 83 Monday Partly cloudy 81 Walking shot 65 Milwaukee 78 W T. M. J. Washington County. Humane Society is an independent agency dedicated to the health and welfare of animals, and they're going through a major extreme makeover. I guess you could call it Joining us on the first Miss West Bank hotline is the executive director of the Washington County Humane Society. Marnie Brown, Marnie, It must be so exciting to see these changes because animal shelters 30 years ago were much different than the bright light warm places that that they are now. They sure were. It was ah. They were sort of gloom and doom places actually, and I started 31 years ago. And so much has changed over those 30 years and I've been so fortunate to be a part of it. It is delightful to see again. There now they're more like visitor centers. I think when I when I think of newer, humane societies, is that kind of what? You're what you're going towards. That absolutely were so much more community centre than we used to be. So are welcome area is just going to be beautiful and so welcoming to everyone who walks in our doors and I would imagine to money more is being asked of you and people expect more services. So you have to be able to accommodate that from people that are maybe looking for a pet. Absolutely we, You know, we service a resource for everyone out there. They might have behavior problems with their dog or litter box problems with their cats, and we try to work through that with them, And we hope to be doing more of that once we're in the new building. Ernie Brown is the executive director of the Washington County Humane Society, Independent Agency there in Washington County and gosh 31 years, Marnie. Good for you. I never expected to say this, isn't it Remarkable too, though? How I can remember again 20 years ago, when you would tell people that you had you adopted a shelter dog. And you were almost looked down upon having a month. Now. It seems like everybody. Everybody adopt shelter dogs. Everybody wants T rescue an animal if you know you want a family member, But you also want to be doing something good. So coming to a shelter is an excellent way to get a new person in your family person. A new dog, a new friend, a new friend. Marty, Honey, have you turned the phone over to K. Am Lin? She's the director of development for the Washington Humane Society. Okay, You have this big capital program going on right now. Is that correct? What was that? I'm asking you about your your capital program out Days. Four is coming up, right? Yes. So this is how we have $7 million capital campaign. And we are about to cross the finish line We need to raise about $450,000. That's going to fund phase four, which is the final phase of our project. And that is to re redo our adoption wards. And how can people help out if they would like Tio help you cross that threshold? I'd love it if they wanted to make a naming gift. We have naming get starting at $750 going up, too. A little bit higher price take. They can call here and asked for to tour the building. They can go online and learn more. They confirmed a check and it could be any amount. Right K it all it all adds up. So many of our donors are $25 donors and we rely on them. And you You have an interesting back story to with how you got involved with the Washington County Humane Society. Yeah, this is definitely a coming home for me to have this position here. My mom was one of the founding members of the organization back in the late sixties. So this has been a part of my life ever since I was a little child. Oh, she wouldn't She must be smiling wherever she is. Yes, absolutely. Well, we hope that we can get help get you to that 2 450,000 bucks and get face for completed The Washington County Humane Society, Km Land and Marnie Brown joining us this morning on the fund log. Thank you so much, ladies. And by the way, you can text the word tub. T u B text the word. Hub to our AC unit, mortgage talk and text line at 85561616 20. I really believe firmly. We all need funny videos of bears in tubs to you Be TB. That's easy. 8 26. Ft is that it's a buck's playoff game day here,.

Washington County Humane Socie Marnie Brown W T. M. J. Washington County Independent Agency executive director K. Am Lin Washington County Miss West Bank Ernie Brown Ft director of development Marty Km Land Honey
Sayer Ji - Unlocking Your Body's Radical Resilience

The Ultimate Health Podcast

05:56 min | 8 months ago

Sayer Ji - Unlocking Your Body's Radical Resilience

"Jesse Chap. AC- with Marnie Wasserman and we are here to take your health to the next level each week. We'll bring you inspiring. In formative conversations about health and wellness, covering topics of nutrition, lifestyle, fitness, mindset, and so much more and this week. We're speaking with CEO G. He's the founder of green. Info the world's largest open access natural health database. He's the author of the recently released regenerate unlocking your body's radical resilience through the new biology, and Sarah Somebody. We've had on a raider for a long time, and wanted to have honest guest, and I'm really. Really happy with this conversation and how it turned out and I know you're going to get a lot from it. Some of the highlights include Sayers. Health struggles and becoming a natural health advocate Mike Ernie's in foods, and how they impact our genes, the Apple Mono Diet, Y raw foods are important to eat at every meal and falling in love with his wife Kelly, and how this was his medicine. Lots of other great information shared in this episode as well. We really appreciate it. If you could help, spread the word shared the show with somebody in your life, and without further ado here we go with Sayer G. Hello Sayer welcome to the PODCAST. Yeah really say to have you on the show. This has been a long time coming. And I really loved your new book regenerate, and in there you share your story, which wasn't familiar beforehand, and and it goes all the way back to childhood, and the sickness that you went through as a kid and a teenager, and you share a whole bunch in there that you went through such as money having your tonsils removed, and you ended up having hip surgery later on, and it goes on and on overweight unfit. You ended up I think it was about at age seventeen. You had surgery on your sinuses, so you went through quite a bit. And my question for you is what was the catalyst behind all that well yeah I think for me. Getting into natural advocacy was allies were destined sesame given. Experience by. Acute episodes the Bronco Asthma you know. They checked me up enough in US multi fight lungs working. So from very early on I just. I struggled allies, and then came later in my life to ernest on nutrition, exercise and mind body practices so ultimately. That was guest that I felt so much because than it needed a passions. WanNa share you know the alternatives. Natural Approaches that I know can in some cases provide so much humor well. Let's talk about that. Turning point and I know this took place in your first year in college so. I become exposed to alternative health ideas. Well, you know my sister was someone who is naturally inclined to health food stores for example, I was way more conventional member over time I started to. Like the of that way than starts looking to literature that you'd find in these helped stores and taking on raw shrewd in the mucus diets, as it was known by Arnold era and a member thinking well. I've never not eaten. Save Council products. What would happen if I ate raw? And within three days of just going ahead and eliminating house, my asthma went away and never came back. It wasn't so raw. Fruit is, but the BUFFY Diet says exclude common engaged delicious. Western foods such as cow smoke novas like my. Moment, and when you hit that piff any moment, obviously, you've been going through a lot for so long. What was your initial reaction? Were you angry that you've been through so much? And you're just finding this information now or obviously? You're excited about digging in deeper in seeing what could come a vet, but talk about those initial reactions when you start to feel better over the course of a few days. That's such a great question because I think it's true that while I was elated excited, because for the first time in my life I didn't have to carry an inhaler around and think that you know. My body was fundamentally cursed. You know cloak in I was shocked to fine that you know something as simple as excluding cosmic for my genetics type would have prevented me from the Medical Mary around downward cycle. You know that I went to some level. There was a part of me that became. Hannah triggered to like oh my. What is my parents? Know this you know. You. Pour me. A. Journey retakes. One of these starts reclaim. Our health is you do? Realize there is a bit of. archetype underneath some of the symptoms. You know would've been more convenient for me to say. The doctors are right. This pathway humid of causes it, but you manage symptoms by ways. You should thank us for saving your last person. Sandwiches that the way we eat in this country. Is Disease Camale, N detectives and I'm barely one of the things that happened for me to sort of took the red pill that speak event. Lady but I was also like Gosh. We need to change things people now. There are these ways to heal known. About and this big shift in your life in your health happen when you're early in college as I mentioned. What were you taking at the time? The time you know, it was sort of just exploring the why started out actually went to university as an art student, and Mason Gross and I found it a little bit more fizeau. I ended up. Just go to college proper and. Just. Five years trying out pretty much anything that interested me. It ended up getting a degree in philosophy, so it's like a deep expiration time both in an hour.

Sarah Somebody Marnie Wasserman Jesse Chap Sayer G. G. He Mason Gross CEO United States Apple Sayers Mike Ernie Founder Arnold Era Ernest Medical Mary Kelly Hannah
"marnie" Discussed on Huddle Up with Gus

Huddle Up with Gus

09:04 min | 9 months ago

"marnie" Discussed on Huddle Up with Gus

"Who's your Mount Rushmore Philadelphia? Sports legends? My well I would say probably forgetting football but I do love Jawara Ski and I do. Love went Gumri. Those old. No thousand nine hundred eighty-one one eagle. But I think that the one thousand nine hundred phillies might be tug McGraw. Mike Schmidt does that team. Just the Grit Bob Boone. That team to me and watching them and I was there when they won the world series. That was something just so fun because it was the first national championship that I'd ever seen happen so being able to be part of that so I would say that and then of course you know the most. I love coach Peterson and Nick. Foles and Carson Wentz those guys the new the new crop. Although nick is not self anymore but coach Peterson's Mazel never be forgotten. That's for sure. Definitely not okay. What is your favorite album or song? Okay well I would say that my favorite album. I Love I mean. Of course I'm going to say this but I do love the ban. The Eagles Hotel California could be one of them but certainly more current. I am a huge fan of Florida. Georgia Line Florida Georgia line. I love them and pretty much all their all their songs. I think are great. If I had to pick one of their songs I would probably pick. Let's see here Cheese I like somebody their songs I might have to now. Change it to Now I'm GONNA go with. Let's see Florida Georgia lie. And what's my favorite Song Cruise Cruise? We'll take it. We'll take it okay. So your mom. Your mom was one of these women who broke all the rules. Right she was. I am legal counsel. She did all these things that that no woman has done before. And if you think about that there's been women who have led the way for equal equal opportunity injustice and everything else What do you think your Mount? Rushmore would be of women who of who have broken that glass barrier that ceiling. Well certainly. My mom is definitely at the top of that list and I think as far as women you know getting an opportunity to a lot of my friends who might not necessarily be in the in the public eye but I have so many friends who are great teachers and my best friend Stacy from college. She's a teacher in Pittsburgh and I'm so proud of her and seeing watching how she's done my best friend from college and she's done a lot of public health and world health things so I think that for me. It's you know not necessarily about the women that are in the in the public eye. It's really more about just doing the heavy lifting of the day to day responsibilities often get overlooked just because they're not You know posting about it on their social media site so much so I give a huge shout out to all of my girlfriends and also now I would say this that certainly because my mom has not been able to be as vocal of an advocate of mine. I you know my Mount Rushmore of the women out there. My friends my my heart sisters. I call then who really picked up the the the ball and are now advising me the way that my mom probably would have in. Certainly I am so grateful for that young. I liked the word to use all the heavy lifting right There's this tweet that's going around and says you know this is what the world would look like if women were in it and it was just like is going crazy running and no stop lights and it was. There's no is just everything was on organized and I'm like that's so true like if if like the world would just be a crazy crazy place. If it wasn't for the incredible women we have in it. Well thank you guys. That's definitely true and it's nice that you are so sensitive and understanding of that. I know you know you have a great wife. And she's lovely and my mom is a big fan of hers and I you know I definitely am grateful that I threw my mom and some of her relationships that I get the opportunity and that's really through football to that now I'm friends with people like vents coach for meal and a lot of other people just through my family connections and that is something that I am very appreciative and Youtube. Because I you know I met you through my mom's connections and that's so nice it's really nice and It's it's been and and you know I know everything to my wife went through raising our kids and and then after they were off to college she goes back to college. She gets her masters degree and now she's a social worker and You know almost almost a licensed clinical social worker. A few more hours to go before she can take your test so she's been working really hard and Really proud of her for everything. She's been doing So a couple more question adulation. Thank you thank you so if you could switch with one person out of all the people that have ever lived in this world alive or dead who that person be one person for how well. How long have I doing one day? I get one day with that person as that person I mean I guess like for me. It would probably be Tom. Brady Tom Brady. And you WanNa see what that's like. I WanNa see you know. I'm curious to see what at this point now. I mean Tom has had such a legendary career. And you know. I'm curious to see what day in the life of Tom? Brady really is like because we all think we could do that job. I've always had like a great game. Show would be like. Oh when people are like oh I could have made that pass. Oh Yeah if you do that pass. You can eat. Oh you put somebody in that kind of scenario and see if they could make that actual play or whatever and then they could get a salary for that day or whatever it is but I think you know certainly I would like to see what it's like to be one of the best. Maybe it doesn't have to be Tom. Brady been and I'm pretty open to being put into a position of of anybody's job for one day anybody. That's really done something for a very long time. I wanted I'm Cheri about that versus somebody that just kind of starting out. Yeah I think I would want to go back in time. Just because like now everything is recorded in you know so much about people through social media and and and how video is just sent out like to me to go back in time and be somebody that is you knew about but you really didn't know anything about you know what I'm saying to. Who WOULD IT BE? I don't know like sometimes I look and like go back. Okay what would what was it like to be? Johnny Unites Right. You know you know what he does on a football field that every day. Today you don't know like I just think for me. It would be going back in time a little bit and find somebody that was famous but not joe name it. Yeah well yeah I mean. I don't know like you take. It might be enough. That's for sure right. You know what was it girlfriends? Three or something. What was the name of the Bar? Y'All know I don't remember something. Okay One last question in an we'll wrap up okay. Why should somebody go and visit Philly? Okay well you know Philadelphia wealth the city of brotherly love for one all right and that we document that in the book but I think that Philadelphia Philadelphia gets a bad rap. I mean I. Luckily I grew up in Philadelphia because it's really truly before. Dc came along Philadelphia's the birthplace of our country so you get history there you have great great people. I mean Philly. We can sometimes be a little rough on on our on our sports teams and so forth. But I think that's dissipated a little bit now that there's been some winning but I think Philadelphia is a great place. If you're going to get an opportunity to go see some of the historical sites learn about Ben. Franklin Betsy Ross at Great Art Museum there mazing food and it's an easy city to get around and if you're on the east coast it's an easy city to get in and out of and I think that you would actually Learn a lot and feel connected to the United States of America from visiting Philadelphia. I love that answer. Love the answer. Okay so tell us and all of our people that are listening where they can get a hold of you how they can get your books. And what every every connection that you have I mean there's so many the let it rip. Okay so they can go to football Freddie Dot com and that's where they can start to research the books they can go on instagram. And I'm Marnie Schneider one on Instagram and follow me on instagram. They can go to facebook. I'm really active on facebook and instagram. So Marnie Schneider on facebook. Send me a message Linked Dan also is another great resource for me. I love linked Dan. I love learning about business and hearing what people are doing and kind of sharing with other people about what they're doing and seeing how I can help out and.

Brady Tom Brady Philadelphia football facebook Florida Mike Schmidt Bob Boone phillies Gumri Marnie Schneider coach Peterson Mount Rushmore Rushmore Jawara Ski Nick Georgia Dan legal counsel Franklin Betsy Ross
Focus Friday - Our Ultimate Birth Story

The Ultimate Health Podcast

09:18 min | 11 months ago

Focus Friday - Our Ultimate Birth Story

"This is definitely a story. We can't wait to share. We know a lot of you've been following her journey all the way along from the first the second third trimester and now we are on the other side of birth. Our baby girl. Sarah is here and we are just so excited to share this story with you. You guys have been here through the whole journey and Roxie GonNa do one more follow episode down line after this one sharing the fourth trimester and our adjustment to becoming new parents. Yeah we are almost three weeks into being new parents. Sorelle is three weeks old tomorrow. Which is crazy to think about when it's been an amazing journey. So yeah as Jesse said. We'll share fourth trimester stuff little bit later. Once we've gone deeper into the first trimester although we've learned so much already but today is all about the birth but I I want to acknowledge all the women out there who have given birth all the Mamas I give you such kudos hands down. You are amazing because now being on the other side of birthing a baby. It is unbelievable. What goes on mentally physically spiritually. There is so much and you can hear bursts over and over again. As I did Justin I listened to many stories from our friends to different podcasts. But there's nothing like going through your own experience and it is magical. It is challenging. It is scary. It is exciting. It is beautiful but I just wanted knowledge all the MOMS there. You are incredible. Yeah and me too. I mean I knew this was going to be super long and challenging or most likely at least and Marnie by the way we're going to get into the details but she did amazing and I just had this new level of appreciation for women out there that have given birth is well and it's just such an endeavor and it's beautiful so now the question is where do we begin. There's so many beginnings we could start at but I think the most realistic wine is. Kinda hitting the Forty Week. Mark kind of coming to full term. You know anytime. After thirty seven weeks we knew we could go into labor. 'cause that's considered full term and that would have been a really healthy time to give birth to the baby and I would have allowed for our home birth. Yes exactly the thirty seven weeks. Mark is kind of that marker. Check off to be at home. So thirty. Seven weeks happened thirty eight weeks. Thirty nine weeks to forty and at that point not that there is an urgency. But suddenly you hit forty weeks. You're like okay. I hope this baby comes in the next two weeks so it's not too late. It's funny how things work out like that and I know Jesse. Have like some thoughts on this. Yeah for sure. It's like you're trying to get to that milestone of forty weeks forty weeks and then when you get there instead of really you know celebrating and you know reaching that milestone being an exciting time in this makes sense in a way you're already thinking ahead and kind of feeling that pressure of are we going to have this baby before the forty two week mark and it was just interesting. How that whole thing with the midwives that conversation opened up and we started talking about what if what if this baby is in Mommy for another week. And what does that mean? And what's that GonNa look like so it was an adventure to get to the forty week mark and then afterwards it was like? When's this baby coming so it was interesting. Yeah we weren't stressed by it but we definitely started to allow natural induction protocols to take place where before it was just kind of like the becomes bay becomes and then I started to ramp things up so not only was already consuming my dates and my red raspberry leaf tea so I think I'd just up that even more. I started getting acupuncture. I went to someone who does acupuncture specifically in pregnant women so she could hit specific points on my feet and on my body. Actually she did my legs. Think my hands. My reflexologist who had been seeing all throughout my entire pregnancy now was doing a protocol to tell the body. It's ready for Labour not to induce Labor specifically just to let the body no. It's time I was walking Justin. I went for walks bouncing on a ball at home. We took advantage of nature's prostaglandins. So use your imagination for what that is and we were using clary sage. On my body eating pineapple we got our hands on a machine for my chiropractor and that was also part of the whole protocols. Wellpoint see the chiropractor regularly to open my hips. So lots of little things were taking place between forty weeks and about almost a week later because things started to progress in that week and I want. I mentioned that my mom came down during that time too so my mom was down. She was going to be here for the entire birth as well as postpartum which he is right now so she had come down during that week so we had you know just some nice quality family time and we got to make sure we got some meals prepared and just mentally. Get ourselves ready for the birth of this baby. So let's get into the details of when things started to actually happen and it's funny that I knew that there was a full moon coming on February ninth and people had said. Oh you're probably going to labor around that time so it was kind of in the back of my head like that'd be cool and interesting but suggesting I went to bed on Saturday. February eighth listen to podcasts. At actually was talking a lot about water and talking about space it was was kill. Rogan was yeah new southern to was an astronaut. Yes somebody that was actually went up in space was on the space station and also spent I think it was two weeks on one adventure underwater and now is the part of the podcast. We ended on so you had water on the brain going to sleep that night so interesting so go to sleep. I'm in a deep sleep. Having a dream than I'm on this sinking ship and water is flashing in and flowing in and I got scared and woke up and I woke up. I noticed that there is some water beneath me and not at times but enough to be like. What is this? Could this be my water's broken? Could this be something else? A guy had an inkling that it was my waters breaking but it wasn't that much that it was still kind of curious so went to the bathroom. Check things out. I knew I didn't peon myself. I knew it wasn't something else. So and it's interesting. My mom was also here so I went downstairs to talk to my mom. Like what do you think so I you know just put that information away for the night I went to bed. Welcome in the morning and kind of re check things and then at that point Jesse and I were like okay you don't. Let's call the midwife. Let's just see what's going on? So he did had an appointment. She had us come in right away because to her. That's pretty significant. Even if it was or wasn't she just wanted to know what was going on so she did a check on me and she confirmed that waters had broken but it was my hind waters. It was a high end water leak as opposed to a full rupture of membranes. So that's why it wasn't that much liquid coming Outta me. It was just enough to be noticeable. So with that information comes okay. Labor has kind of started or something has started. We need to act on this and just actually take you back to two days before that where she got a call from the midwife to get a stretch and sweep because she knew that we were past are due date and there was an opportunity to maybe do a stretch and sweep to progressing along. But Jesse and I didn't feel comfortable with that so we opted out of that and that was yeah. I think the Friday before and again this comes back to what I mentioned before. Where as soon as you get to the forty week mark things like a stretch and sweep the abroad onto the table. So you just getting there and it's like okay. Let's Kinda progressing along so we opted out and then on Sunday when they checked you just continuing on from your your story there. We found out you were. I think it one centimeter dilated right. So we realized at that time that we couldn't have actually gone to stretch and sweep even if we wanted to previously at one centimeter. I don't think we could get one at that time either. Now exactly. Yeah so. That's the interesting things. We found that out so glad. We didn't even waste our time on the Friday before so things were as they were on Sunday and she checked things and given that information that it was a hind water leak and things needed to progress. We had to take that information and figure out what that meant because most people associate going into labor especially with the movies a woman just walking around and all the sudden her waters break and labor progressives really quickly while eight doesn't happen like that not everyone has their waters break I and be. It's very rare to have a hind water leak. Which means Little Tub at this point? It was tough Mozzarella yet. Little baby had kicked or poked or something in my body to cause a little pinhole leak way up in my uterus so it was a very small trickle. That wasn't that noticeable but was notable enough to know that Labour had to start sometime soon because the risk of infection was imminent and this was kind of the fear that we had and our midwife sharing the information that like okay guys you have between forty eight at the most seventy two hours before we have to do something such as an unnatural induction like going to the hospital and using Petrosian. So Jesse had a really tough time absorbing this information

Jesse Justin Mark Sorelle Roxie Sarah Wellpoint Little Tub Marnie Mozzarella Rogan
Entering the 3rd Trimester of Pregnancy

The Ultimate Health Podcast

10:18 min | 1 year ago

Entering the 3rd Trimester of Pregnancy

"Yeah we've got lots to talk about about what's been taking place but I think the place that I want to start is how this trimester started which which is with a baby shower which was literally at twelve. Just after the start of trimester three it was at thirty weeks. We had a beautiful baby. Shower put on in by. My Mom. Jesse's MOM Jesse's aunt and future sister-in-law were all part of this and they are such an amazing team. Just how amazing was the shower. You're all it was perfect and the interesting thing too. Is that this group arranged the decorating for our wedding and for your wedding shower and now the baby aby shower so there's been a real consistency with the look and feel of each of these milestone events in our life. Yeah well a lot of it is. Diy they all Are Very crafty very artistic and they do everything from scratch like all the things that are hanging in the banners and everything's very rustic Artsy Z.. So the decor was amazing and beautiful and so me. The theme was kind of a tea party which was perfect. It was an afternoon tea party and it was a great opportunity to you. See Friends and family celebrate me and the baby and Jesse and obviously it was a great way to get some gifts of things that we need. And because Jesse and I are first first time parents. We don't have any siblings. That have kids. Were the first in the family. So there's not really a lot of ham down coming our way. We decided that we need a lot of stuff and having to be a great way to do that so we were very lucky. We're very grateful for all the beautiful gifts that we got and we are well stocked up. There was a couple of interesting things that we took on with the shower. One being that instead of cards we decided that people would bring a book their favorite kids book doc and right inside it as if it were the card so we actually in the nurse three three or four bookshelves floating ones put up by the crib. And and we've now got those loaded. In more of all these amazing books that have been vetted and curated by our family and friends which is just amazing and Marnie. I've actually been periodically reading these in bed at night to the baby and yeah it's just so much fun. I can't wait taxi. Read it when the baby abuser side to the little one. Yeah just so excited. I have to comment actually help finding some of these books are. They're so cute. I don't think I've ever read like newborn early early early. Baby Bucks to like some pages one word on it or it's like rough or or they're so cute they make me laugh. It's quite about the picture. It's about time times and the story is a little bit short grain. There are a lot of fun over so grateful though we have literally enough books to carry through till five years of this child being and alive. So we've got lots of education and lots of beautiful presence as they said and things that are very functional that we've put into place in our home. Yeah we're very grateful. We got a really good start to this baby's life. Yeah we really WANNA put out there thank you for all the generosity from family and friends and we were embraced with love and warmth and yeah we just got so much incredible stuff so thank you guys and we even got a couple of gifts from some of our listeners. So we just want to thank those of you. Who took the time to send in a gift for tab so kind? Thank you so much something else. I wanted to mention too that we did actually actually in trimester to was a photo shoot Jesse and I wanted to capture the moment of my belly bump and and you know I was going through this phase together and how special it is and because it was fall and trimester to. We figured that was a beautiful opportunity to get some photos done. And it's great. It's great to have them printed. We've been using them on. Social media is just so nice to look back at them between me Jesse the baby and go. Gee We have some beautiful photography so for those of you who are going through pregnancy. I highly recommend booking a photo. Shoot either in your second trimester in the late trimester or in Trimester Mr Three depending on the weather for us. It's winter mostly trimester three so we wanted to have an outside photo shoot. That wouldn't work so well but yeah. This is something that I highly recommend you do as a couple. Yeah we had a lot of fun with it and it's interesting because we did do it early on but that day in particular while we're by the water for once I think think that influenced the temperature but that day was frigid cold and obviously we don't WanNa have like our coats on for every picture tooks gloves but we had. I had a fun time. Go Gee was there like Marty mentioned and we're just so grateful. We took the time to do that. And I think it's really important to capture a lot of images during your pregnancy anyway anyways like whether it's on your instagram or just for your own use you're gonNA WANNA look back on those and see the growth of your belly to see changes in your body and you. You don't WanNa miss out on that. I've spoken to a few people who regret not taking enough pictures during their pregnancy. And something that I've done over on my instagram account. If you do happen to follow me. It's at Marnie Wasserman. Every single week and for me. The weeks change on Wednesday and every Wednesday. We've been posting picture ever since week. Fourteen of the size of the baby in a fruit or vegetable or some food item. And it's mostly been fruits and vegetables and it's been really cool. Jesse's been awesome at being the photographer for these. We've been really creative around our a home and outside to capture these and I just love having it as a little story book and a Memory Bank for me to look back on just to see the progression of the pregnancy. I think it would be really fun because these turned out so well to collect them put them all together a little tiles and frame it and maybe put that in the baby's room just thinking talking of as as we're talking here but yeah it's been really fun to be creative each and every week and try and figure out a different setup and pick from the different fruit and vegetable options. So we've had a a lot of fun with it. So speaking of which this week I think baby is the size of or the length of a leak. I think that's what we're coming up on at thirty eight weeks six. And Yeah just in terms of my body changing over the last trimester. It's been interesting the baby's still growing and I'm definitely my belly is getting bigger. But it hasn't been as much of a difference as the second trimester when she say jazz like Second Trimester. It's like Whoa all of a sudden my belly just came out of nowhere and now it's like slow growing. Yeah I noticed that you notice it. But it's hard to see the difference. Yeah it's not as dramatic for share but I guess every week when we go now to our midwife appointment and they take the measurement tournament we are seeing that growth. But it's like all of a sudden you go from nothing to showing that bomb. It's really yeah dramatic. And then now it's more subtle but we are seeing it through the measurements because the measurements. Actually line up to the week. So yeah the funnel height of the baby matches up typically to the week which which is really cool. So the baby's been moving lots throughout this entire trimester. Lots of wiggling lots of jobs. Lots of pokes we we sit and sometimes watch my belly during the day or at night because this baby is very very active. It's not just one time a day. It's all day long and it's been really cool just to try and figure out the body parts. I've been trying to do a little. Bit of belly mapping which is something you can look into that. There is a way technique to try and figure out where exactly exactly the baby's position although this can change but it is kind of cool just to see where the feeder where the back is where the head is and often. I know where the head is because it's hiccuping and I can feel it down in my lower abdomen and I feel these hiccups and it's just it's really cool. That's always superfund when Jessie Mary feeling the hiccups at and a little bit of a hint tour. We're GONNA get into later. We actually have some definitive imaging to show the position of the baby. And there's a story behind that we're going to get into a little. Oh Bet but yeah. It's been really fun to watch. The movements feel the movements and we've tried to capture the movements because they are so dramatic now at the end of pregnancy we tried to take video and capture. But I don't think it's really translating that. Well 'cause we just want to have that memory to be able to go back and and look at that someday so luckily were slowing down and being present and embracing in the moment if the video doesn't work which it looks like it's not but it's been fun to try and capture especially for my parents who aren't aren't here and they're living in Toronto so they are not really getting to see me and my belly often so be so cool for them to see the movement but as he said it so hard to capture so we can only describe it and hopefully they'll see it soon will since we're talking about the baby's positioning. We'll just get into something that came up during this trimester. That was kind of unexpected which was at around week thirty two we were at amid with a point and they were feeling around and they were like we have no idea what position. This baby's end we just. I can't figure it out I'm like I don't understand. I feel the hiccups down low so to me it seems like the head is down but they were really unsure so they kind of have left it and left me feeling that this baby was in a frank breach which is the position where the bum is down. The legs are up and the head is up. So it's kind of this really awkward position but again Jesse and I were like all right. This is kind of weird. This is right before the holidays and I was a little uncomfortable with that information formation and because it was the holidays there is going to be a time lag between when we saw the midwives again so being proactive. People that Jesse and I are we got on top of it. We started doing research. I I had heard about a website and a resource called spinning babies and I was looking into a trying to figure out that these are the exercise I need to do just in case. His baby needs to flip but I wanted a second opinion so we went to a chiropractor that specializes in the webster technique which is a procedure that helps loosen the MOMS ligaments in her legs to encourage the baby to have room. They're not actually doing any manipulation on the baby. It's just strictly on the mom to help the process so we went and had that done and she also confirmed that the baby was not head down at that time this was at thirty two weeks and she was like okay but we can do

Jesse Marnie Wasserman DIY Instagram Toronto Marty Frank Memory Bank Jessie Mary
Family gathers for vigil after brother allegedly killed his teen sister, stuffed body in garbage outside Denver home

Broncos Country Tonight

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Family gathers for vigil after brother allegedly killed his teen sister, stuffed body in garbage outside Denver home

"Twenty five year old Josh in Kelly is currently being investigated for the death of his sister seventeen eurotrip Marnie Kelly mills a witness discovered the body of the team in a duffel bag disposed inside of a trash can police evidence reveals doorbell video footage showing a male who appeared to be Kelly dragging a black bag and putting the bag into the trash can Kelly has been arrested in no other suspects are being sought Kelly is being held

Josh Marnie Kelly Mills
Judge Rules Marni Yang’s Wrongful Conviction Petition Can Move Forward

Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Judge Rules Marni Yang’s Wrongful Conviction Petition Can Move Forward

"A judge has a wrongful conviction petition has merit and can move forward in a high profile murder case of Marnie Yang the state's attorney Lake County says there is a low bar for today's decision and he is not surprised by it it has been almost nine years since Yang was sentenced to life without parole for the murder of Ronnie Reuter in

Marnie Yang Lake County Murder Ronnie Reuter Attorney Nine Years
How does hockey reckon with an abusive power structure?

The Big Story

10:59 min | 1 year ago

How does hockey reckon with an abusive power structure?

"By the time you finish listening to this podcast. It's likely there will be more stories out there about abusive hockey coaches right now as we are recording this and as you're listening to it. The sport is facing a reckoning. It began with the toppling of one of the biggest domino's in the game. Mike Babcock out as coach of the Toronto Maple leafs tonight. Every mounting losses position became more and more tenuous and tonight his reign lean over. leafs nation is over. Mike Babcock was fired by the Toronto. Maple leafs for the same reason. Tons of hockey coaches have been fired before him. His team was underachieving. He might have been a bigger name than those other coaches but still not unusual then. The story started during the two thousand sixteen seventeen season. Mitch Moore had a private meeting with Mike Babcock and the coach asked then rookie to list the players on the team from Best Work Catholic to worst martyr complied not realizing that that talk within show his list to some of the players ranked the lowest and not long after that it became clear. The stories weren't just about Mike Babcock. Major allegations made against Calgary flames head coach. Bill Peters a former. NHL Her Chemo Lou. who spend spend some time with the flames in the early part of this decade calling for his alleged use of racial slurs while they were both part of the Chicago Blackhawks Organization now players ears are saying publicly things that used to be kept behind closed doors at all cost and the NHL in almost every league below it is realizing that it has a problem problem or more accurately that it has had a problem for quite some time? Now the question is what happens next. What did they do about it? What changes changes in the leafs? They've been playing a lot better since they fired the guy who humiliated one of their best players who thought I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Jeff Blair is a senior writer at sports net dot CA. He is the CO host of writer's block on Sports Net. Five ninety fan every day. He has covered a lot of dressing rooms ends and locker rooms throughout his career. Hey Jeff how you doing short. I'm doing well you've You've covered a lot of dressing rooms and locker rooms over the years I was. I was thinking about this the other day when the stuff happened with the Chemo. Lou and Bill Peters out of thinking to myself. I ever seen a locker room. I thought something nothing really poisonous and happen. And I think because unbalanced I spent more time around baseball clubhouses than anything else and initially when I started reporting Winnipeg CFL locker rooms is kind of a little different than hockey. I mean baseball. There have been African American players. There've there've been Latino players in baseball has its issues but it's nothing to go on a clubhouse now and see that the white players are in the minority I mean that's just the way it is and the NFL. When I covered it's the same thing and I don't remember any relationship with a manager or coach or a team I thought was particularly toxic? I mean they're examples of tone deafness. But what I think happens more often than not in a lot of these situations is just the manager coach. Whatever you WANNA call it becomes tone-deaf two things? Well why don't you start then by explaining how we got here where it started with Mike. Babcock in the leafs. Yeah there's a couple of things first of all. I'm a little concerned that people are sort word of mixing. Mike Babcock not you but people in general people were kind of going all Mike Babcock and then Bill Peters. Because here's the thing Mike Babcock seems to have tried cried some Caveman Sports Psychology on Mitch. Martyr So tell us about that. Mitch Monitor the first year. The story is now now that everybody's confirmed Mike. Babcock wanted him to work harder. So Mike Babcock called them into his office and said list your teammates in terms of hardest working to least hardworking. And tell me where you'd put Yourself Yourself Mitch. Marna with coach wants to do this so he goes ahead and does that and Somehow and I I don't know when it came out but somehow Mike Babcock doc essentially went to some of the guys that were below martyring. Say Mitch thanks. She works harder than you. You know this guy's dog in it right now and he thinks that works harder than you and the best line out of the Whole Story and God love Mitch. Martin but the best line of the whole story's Mitch Marnie just kind of shrugging and going nobody took it seriously right. You know it's like that's just that's just babs so I mean their stories. You know you can go. God stories about would coaches used to do for motivating players or trying to catch players airs. I Never Scotty Bowman Scotty. Bowman got tired of his team's missing curfew. So Scotty Bowman would go down. And I can't remember which city this went down to the front desk of the hotel and I think curfew was midnight. Went Down to the front desk of the Hotel at eleven thirty gave a stick to the dorm and said do me a favor when the guys come in get them to sign the stick and we'll we're going to auction off to charity so the next day Scott he goes into the locker eight. These are all the guys that showed up after midnight. Their names are on the stick so I mean stuff like that is you know. That's all part of an old school. Coaching you mentality. Whatever you think of it? Yeah it's and I mean at the heart of the the coach player relationship and this and this is why we'll talk specifically about. Bill Peterson Chemo. Lucas IT'S A. It's a point I think people are missing. I mean at the heart of a coach player relationship. It's a power relationship. I'm the coach. I control the most important part of your career. I control your time I control. How many starts you're gonNA make I control? Will how many at bats you're going to get I control if you're going to be coming in the ninth inning. I control if you're going to start back to back games like Then I control. You're earning power. This is sort of at the route. That's the traditional relations traditional relationship. Is that changing it is in the NHL. I find this fascinating because the four major sports in North America all right now if you look at sort of the players relationship to to power in the game the NBA players leak. It just is players are getting lots of money They make a a lot of money from shoe deals so they're comfortable financially outside of what they're earning contract like Shaquille O'Neal didn't spend any money he made playing basketball. He invested all all he lived off. His shoe deals coaches have no power over anybody in the NBA the NFL's you know you're disposable piece of meat. There's no such thing as guaranteed contract. Baseball's always had a very very strong players association. It's Kinda splintered now and I think we're kind of in an every man for himself air but what's happened in hockey is there has been an an influx of really talented really young players and because of the way the NHL 's collective bargaining agreement is setup. You Essentially Ashley. Now have a bunch of guys who were twenty two twenty three or twenty four making eight million dollars a year under contract for five six or seven years and that's the biggest difference to me. Is that players always used to make more than the coach and this is specifically the NHL players always used to make more than the coach. But they've got more term So if you're Mike Babcock and you've got three years left on your contract you've got Mitch Monitor. He's got six years left. He's making ten and a half million dollars a year. How do you? How do you motivate that? How do you manage them? It would take us. Ice Type. Doesn't matter to him take two minutes ice time away from me. I'm getting ten million dollars a year and by the way I got a job here for years down the road and you say that so hockey ocoee more than any other sport I think is is going through. This and hockey is going to half the data and and and the coaches are going to have to. The players aren't going to have to adapt. The coaches are going to have to debt. And this this gets the Bill Peter Situation and and why I think this is particularly vile you know first of all. I mean there's no statute of limitations and racism so I've heard people will make the case. Well he said this ten years ago three organizations ago he wasn't even with the flames. You have somebody claiming that he. He used the N.. Word that he used a racial epithet. You have that player's teammates backing you up. You have subsequent you have players coming out. Who played for Bill? Peterson Peterson Carolina. Saying hey he physically abused me. You have players coming out and saying yeah not only did he. Physically abused Rod brindamour. Not only did he did. He physically abused guys. But you've got player saying oh by the way we spoke. The Ron Francis who was general manager the team at the time and he didn't do anything wrong. There was something but the Akeem loose. The situation is really. I find it really bothersome. Because what was he supposed to do. You know these guys are playing in the American Hockey League They're not making a lot of money. Bill Peters when he was coaching that team the Rockford ice hawks. He held the future in his hands. so if you're a guy like a chemo Lou and you're trying to establish yourself or you're trying to get your career going going to your general manager and writing out your head. Coaches racist is probably not not a good career. Move and I think more than anything else. What this says is that at that time? Ten years ago that organization Chicago Blackhawks. There wasn't a structure in place. I mean I'm not gonNA say that guys don't yell things at each other in the locker room or on the ice and we we know they do. We know that racial epithets unfortunately are still a part of the sort of the on Ice Onfield Dialogue and sports. I don't think this happens now though like if we were rewinding this Chemo Lou had been Ah. I don't think that happens. 'cause he reports to somebody or he goes on social media then and it's taken care of but it bothers me that people are saying that some people are saying well you know ten years ago and nobody else stood up. It's people have to understand Dan that again. This gets to that that power relationship between the player and the coach. There's no way the player could you know what are you GonNa do. You're going to sacrifice your long term financial future because of this. I mean I'm not. I'm not saying that means. Bill Peters is right but hockey I think more than any other more than any other sport just by the the nature of how players are developed. Kids leave home. Kids go to town cities. They're billeted with people dependent on the structure. They are dependent on on the power structure there absolutely dependent on the power structure. And I think maybe that's what has created this culture around hockey the the NHL is really really trying. I think to find a way and I mean the NHL in general teams coaches are trying to find a way to deal with this the new age the players the the ultimate lesson the lesson from hopefully for this whole thing with Bill Peters is that there has to be every organization has to look at itself often say do we have the structures in

Mike Babcock Bill Peters Hockey NHL Leafs Chemo Lou. Baseball Chemo Bill Peterson Chemo Mitch Moore Calgary Toronto Scotty Bowman Mitch Scotty Bowman Scotty NFL Bill Peter Situation Mitch Marnie American Hockey League Bill
Marne Levine From D.C. to Silicon Valley

The Strategerist

12:53 min | 1 year ago

Marne Levine From D.C. to Silicon Valley

"Of our favorite things to do on this podcast pick the brain of people whose careers have really taken some unique turns and who tackled big jobs which brings us is to mark. Levin who is currently the vice president of Global Partnerships Business and corporate development at facebook previously serving as chief operating officer at Instagram and before that was in the Obama administration straight as chief of staff of the National Economic Council and Special Assistant to the president for economic policy. We can keep going back but we only have so much time Marnie. Thank you so much for doing this. Well thank you for having me. Those titles are mouthfuls. I started. I took some notes on paper. I've got just lines that that make sure I get those right but took an entire sheet. Almost it's great to be here in the Great State of Texas or we're glad you're here visiting from the Great Silicon Valley which will cover here a little bit but your career began in the great city the city of Washington DC at the Treasury Department. So how did you get started in policy in government actually think my career began in Cleveland Ohio. Which is where I was raised raised growing up I was always really interested in politics and policy and then my senior year of high school I got a job working for it was an internship working for the county commissioner. This woman named Mary Boyle who is a real fireball and that's it's really where I learned about. The role that government could play in people's lives and I was hooked immediately and my job there was to new research different proposals and to help work on casework and provide access to different kinds of get that people access to different kinds of social services that they needed which was great they also had me working on a solid Waste Management Plan. I got really into that as does so much so that I was nicknamed. Trash Queen Levin those a fortunate said of rhyming right exactly so that was the that was I think the kickoff to the career that sort of where I got the so-called bug for politics and policy and so oh then after college I moved to Washington. DC AND I ended up getting a job at the Treasury Department. This was before the Internet so so I didn't really fully understand or appreciate what the Treasury Department did but I knew that I wanted to have an impact on people's lives lives and I thought that you know government was the best road to be able to do that and that policy was kind of the best vehicle Kohl for doing that and so working at the Treasury Department where we could work on low cost basic banking accounts financial privacy things like that. I thought we could help help improve people's lives and was a great start in Holly. You spent a long career. Government is well I did I did yes thank you for pointing uh-huh and so did Hollywood you kind of have a similar experience to that in your desires yeah and you know I had a little bit of a similar experience. It was slightly later later for me where I really had not been exposed to politics. Policy is a kid that significantly other than what you just read in the news and and and learn in school and then when I was in college I interned in Congress and that kind of bug is what really turned me on to and got me into policy work as well yeah and you were you legislative affairs right I did I did policy work and then I ended up doing legislative affairs at the end because I had worked in Congress so once she working Congress they figure you know how to how to deal with members of Congress. At the Treasury Department. I started in the chief of staff office but then I would see people running up and down the hallway all day running back and forth back and forth back and forth and I would hear the click clack of heels on the on the marble floor and I thought what are they all doing and then I realized that it was negotiations with Congress and so I thought that's where I wanna be like that's where the action is working on working from the Treasury Department with people in Congress on different kinds of legislation and so that's eventually where I moved to yeah yeah it was fun because I had worked on Congress and worked on legislation that I then had to go into the administration and implement seeing both sides of in writing it and then implementing it was really interesting and not a lot of people I think have that experience of actually writing it and then having to go put it in action and figuring out what we did well and what you didn't do so well when you wrote a piece of legislation different skills knowledge and a different level of detail yeah yeah so then in two thousand eight after you're spending some time in the Treasury Department he joined the Obama Transition Team from the Bush administration Bamut Ministration and wrote about the the kind of exciting being difficult decision to take a position that really was going to suck away a lot of your time. How did you balance that in your life. Well I had worked in the Clinton administration in and I was in my twenties then and I knew how all consuming it was so I was in a very different place in my life. When Obama was elected I was married worried. I had a three year old child and then I had I had just had a baby and so I was really interested in serving and and I was very grateful to even be given being given the opportunity to serve and I wanted to play some small role in helping to address the great recession and the financial crisis that was going on so I had a conversation with my husband. He said we'll make it work work and I thought I was but what happened was pretty interesting for me. One morning I had to go into the White House late because I had to take my then three year old son to the doctors and we were driving home from the doctor's appointment and he and he said where are you taking me and and I said well. I'm going to drop you at school. You're okay and then I'm going to go to work and he said. Did you know that Matthew's mother drops him at school every morning and I said well. I don't know that Matthew's mother does that every morning but I try to take you when I can now there was at the White House. There's the seven thirty. AM senior senior staff meeting and then there's the eight fifteen am meeting which is the extended senior staff and that was the meeting. I was supposed to go to but that conflicted with taking my son to school unless I took them really early in the morning and so Monday morning rolls around after we'd had this conversation and he marches into our bathroom threw him and he says he says to me and my husband so who's taking me to school today looking straight at me no pressure and I said well. Daddy's GonNa take you to school school and he said do you remember our conference on Friday when I told you that. Matthew's mother takes him to school every morning and I I said I do remember. That husband looked at me and he said well what are you gonNA do. I said you know I think I'm going to need to take him to school in the morning. So it's interesting who your teachers are in life and in this case it was and what he was saying is. I need you in the morning and not in the evenings. which is what? I thought I he needed me dinner any we needed me for bedtime but he really wanted me first thing in the morning and so I march into work that day and I told one of my colleagues that he would would be attending the meeting he was thrilled and I started taking my son to school and when I think what I learned through all of that is I could make it work but but this was much more about quality over quantity of time together and that I really needed to listen to the feedback that my kids and my husband we're giving me about what they needed. Specifically and once I was dialed into that I was able to kind of make it all work I got into the White House. I would get there every morning at about nine fifteen in the morning which is late for ready late but the world's still turned into L. worked out Yup so Marnie after your timing government then went out to Silicon Valley and I'm curious how you found that transition. There are two very different worlds. They're different and and then there are also similarities so let's start with some of the differences. The obvious ones were the dress code I went from suits to hoodies and that was a real transient wearing jeans to work in that was that was definitely but I've now adjusted and I would say there was a difference in language to in in the government we would always say I'm going to write a memo advice. Good memo oh right away and it facebook. There would be something that would look like a memo but we would call it. A plan and there was in Washington. There was a lot of talk about fail failure legislation that had failed or didn't pass and in Silicon Valley. There was lots of discussion about pivoting okay right so there we're differences there were there are lots of differences in that regard and I would say the glaring difference was that in Washington there is a love of paper and big binders full of paper and in Silicon Valley. There's not a lot of paper around I personally brought my love of paper with me to use Silicon Valley and get teased mercilessly for it but I I would say that the similarities are as follows there are I feel like in government is a collection of best and brightest and it is a collection of people who are very mission focused and focused on doing good in the world and bringing about change and I think that in Silicon Valley there's a lot of that as well a collection of really smart people who are mission driven ribbon and trying to do good in the world affect people's lives and positive ways. I think the things that I brought with me from Washington war for you know being able to peer around corners and identify risks. That's a skill that one develops in Washington and also when you're trying to get something being done in a vast government is that you need to have process and you need to bring all stakeholders to the table and have conversations and be able to synthesize emphasized that to come up with the best policy recommendations in Silicon Valley things move pretty quickly and in scaling organizations what you WanNa do is apply just enough process so that you can get the best of thought from everybody but not so much process that you really slow everything down and I think I brought some of those skills from Washington continue to facebook when I started there in two thousand ten you obviously very senior woman in silicon in valley and you and your friend and colleague Sheryl Sandberg have really been a promoter of women in the C. Suite Talk to me about that issue and why you're you're passionate about it and what you encourage other women to do and how how to how to think about their roles well I think for me. It's all about connection community among women from the earliest days. I've always really enjoyed getting together with women and I just I've I draw strength from that and I've seen what happens with other women when they are connected. When I was in business school early on there there was a woman in my section we all didn't really know each other very well and she had just gotten engaged in so I suggested hey why don't we all get together and come over to my apartment and will toast Christine but at the same time you know we'll get together and talk about things and get to know each other and what was so interesting we made up at that the point I think less than twenty percent of the of the class of our group and when we when we came into the classroom the next morning there were a a lot more women who were speaking up a lot more women who were building off of each other's comments and they felt more confident as though I think that was one of the Times where I really saw or how that connection and feeling of community could be empowering for other people and then things like my book club where we actually would read the book and discuss it would also became kind of my leaning circle that Cheryl started the lean in circles and that's really about relying on one another connecting acting sharing and helping each other make important decisions in in one's

Treasury Department Washington Silicon Valley Congress Facebook Barack Obama White House Queen Levin Matthew Marnie Chief Of Staff Great Silicon Valley Mary Boyle Vice President Of Global Partn Senior Staff Cleveland Chief Operating Officer Texas Ohio
Who pays for the tech to survive climate change?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:49 min | 1 year ago

Who pays for the tech to survive climate change?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by ultimate software dedicated to putting people first with innovative solutions for HR payroll and talent management. Learn more at ultimate software dot com. Ultimate software people first and by click share with click share, and you're meeting, you can share your screen instantly from any device, click share instantly projects any speakers laptop, tablet or phone onto a presentation screen. So everyone can work together. Share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com and learn more and sign up for your free trial. We're going to survive Lima change private money and entrepreneurs have to get game from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. We're continuing our new series on marketplace tech called how we survive about. How technology can help us adapt to climate change. And here's the thing about that. It's expensive the UN puts the total cost to society at fifty four trillion dollars at a minimum by the end of the century. So arguably what we need now is money to create innovative technologies to help survive. The worst effects of warming Jayco is managing director of the private equity firm light Smith group, a firm that's hoping to find an invest in some of those technologies, and he says there aren't many others like it. I think it's one of the earliest attempts to try to look at of teaching resilience as an investable opportunity. Most money so far has gone toward mitigation trying to reduce emissions and improve energy efficiency or toward recovering from disaster. And the bulk of that spending is driven by governments or nonprofits if you look at the global tracking of climate finance lists and five. Two six percent of all finance in the climate universe can be tributed what's called agitation or climate resilience. And so far the private sector has almost no skin in the game. But co says the need for funding is staggering three hundred billion dollars a year by twenty thirty in developing countries, alone and only growing so on the one hand private money is going to have to step in without being able to harness the flow of private capital from the private sector. We're going to face a much much more challenging experience with the effects of climate change flowing through over the next several decades and potentially the next several generations. And on the other hand, there is money to be made from companies that can come up with great solutions and scale them. Our rule is to find companies like that with great management teams already growing that can then be excel rated in their growth that will generate better returns for investors and also a better outcome for society. Okay. So but next question, what do you find co says he's looking at two possible catego-? Oris for investments, which he calls. Macgyver. Maclay? Macgyver used what he had to get out of jams. Looks like it might be Thurmond, Bob. So that's climate intelligence. Like, we talked about earlier this week or things like artificial intelligence for modeling risk to buildings and real estate. Then there's taking technology. We already have transferring it to different parts of the world, and scaling it. Up like, drip, irrigation or drought resistant seeds or cheap. Internet connected sensors for water metering but more available and cheaper. Now. Marnie MC fly from back to the future. Could use tools from you know, the future to change things. And so that means investing in entrepreneurs with crazy, moonshot ideas or materials, we haven't invented yet or just innovative ideas. I say distilling clean water from the air at any house or school or building anywhere on tomorrow show will look at a little macgyver and a little MC fly. And now for some related links. If you are not already you should totally subscribe to make me smart. The other marketplace podcast that I'm on with KAI Ryssdal. We did a crossover episode this week about climate adaptation with Solomon Hsiang, a professor of public policy at firstly who studies the economics of climate change adaptation, and in my opinion. It is a great episode. Jane brought up this really interesting idea of opportunity cost related to add up tation and resilience. He said that basically because of climate change the cost of just survival is getting higher, whether that's hardening infrastructure or disaster recovery or building new seawalls or AI sewer systems, and that leaves less money for other things in our society, like schools or firetrucks or the tech innovations that will need to make life easier or even possible over time other interesting reading on money and climate change last month to central. Bankers wrote an open letter about climate related financial risks. And how in fact climate change is a severe threat to the global economy. And I just learned there's a Sirius XM radio show called knowledge at Wharton, which probably also makes you pretty smart and on the most recent episode two professors from the university of economics and business talked about that letter and the potential economic impacts long term, and I really want this series to be focused on solutions in kind of a hopeful way. But in slightly bummer news earlier this week. It was confirmed that global carbon dioxide levels have hit their highest number in human history at four hundred fifteen parts per million. Scientists say that was probably last the case around three million years ago when sea levels were at least fifty or sixty feet higher and the Greenland and west Antarctic ice sheets. Probably did not exist so solutions, then I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN Patrick in Santa Cruz. California wrote to us to say marketplace is an essential element in his life. And that we're helping make him smarter through high quality thought provoking and informative journalism to join Patrick and supporting what we do. Please donate online today at marketplace dot org. Thanks to Patrick and all the marketplace. Investors who make our work possible. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by click share, an award-winning wireless presentation system with click share and your meeting, you can share your screen instantly from any device. No more awkward small talk or wasted time as you wait. For tech problems to be fixed. Click share instantly projects any speakers laptop, tablet or phone onto a presentation screen. So everyone can work together. Share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com to learn more and sign up for your free trial.

Apn Patrick Lima UN Jayco Kai Ryssdal Marnie Mc Molly Sirius Xm Radio California Maclay Greenland Solomon Hsiang Managing Director Santa Cruz Light Smith Group Wharton Thurmond
"marnie" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"marnie" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Financial planner, Marnie Schneider, the retirement professor reading Francia. Welcome to this edition of the word on wealth. Marnie schneider. Glad to be with you. There is a great freeze that I've come to embrace the last several months, it's called financial sanity. And it's really important to define this. I I think financial sanity is attained when there are two really important things that happen at the same time. The first thing is you have to live within your financial means now for a lot of us that makes intuitive common sense. But it is shocking from my side of the table. How often people are not living that way that is they're spending more than the bringing in running a deficit every month and digging the hole deeper and deeper and often times that leads to credit credit card issues and getting overwhelmed with debt. That's the problem. The second thing is when you are. Are living. According to within your means, then you should have a well conceived and tested plan of action, and that plan has to consider the impact of all the possibilities that might impact the successful outcome of your financial planning. And this is very very critical in the reason, I say that is you have to have a really clear understanding I of your financial life situation, and you have to have goals that are in sync with your values. This is another important conversation where when you defined goals financial goals. Life goals. It is really important just to make sure that whatever goes you have in mind, they are going to be consistent with he or what you value your ethics your, faith and other important personal issues. You have to examine all this specific threats that would threaten the success of your plan, and perhaps last paternally not least there has to be a game plan in place a blue. Print a chart if you will now certainly when it comes to finances. There's an awful lot of unknowns. We don't know what the stock market's going to do this year. We don't know at interest rates are going to be. We can't tell you what income tax brackets are gonna look like in five or ten years. Those are unknown. We can only deal with what we know. And what we have. But a blueprint ought to be flexible enough to be able to respond to a variety of changing market conditions. The plan. It self is going to be based on outcomes based goals orientation, where we define where we're trying to get the time that we have to get there, and it's really really important to gain financial clarity here and to have a deep understanding of where your current dollars going. And whether they're being appropriately applied in the direction that leads you towards your goals. So this requires a grasp on your numbers. And I I find is a lot of people just kind of get lost in the shuffle. Because they don't have clearly defined goals. And therefore can't really predict outcomes if you can help with that come see me, we'll put together your financial plan. We'll set your goals will target some dates will make sure that what you're doing. Now in terms of your retirement plans and IRAs and 4._0._1._K's and personal spending is consistent with the outcomes that we're trying to achieve..

Marnie Schneider professor ten years
"marnie" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

09:47 min | 2 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Marnie to you Jason afternoon there. I have no idea. What time is it? Morning guys a little bit earlier than it is in Atlanta. But we're good to go. So how was it down? I was good. It's good. It's not too long of the flights quite as long as it is out to the west coast about four hours. I guess the weather is amazing down here. Kickoff tonight should be about seventy degrees. Little breezy, beautiful weather. So what was the first thing you notice as you jumped off the plane down there Costa Rica, Jason longshore. Well, after we got the customs, which took a minute. The first thing I noticed as we're walking out of the airport to get on the buses to head to the team hotel is the amount of media who were there to greet the team amount of local media who were there. This is a big deal. This is a huge deal in Costa Rica for this club air Diano, who's a powerful club. They're they're probably the third biggest club in the country, but they've won twenty seven domestic league titles. So there are also a club that has prided itself on upset in AFC Champions League. They've they've really given Mexican clubs battles over the years. And they're gonna throw everything after this is for a team right now in league play. It struggling a little bit. This is the biggest match of the season. So this is going to be a tough one for Atlanta tonight. Talking about Jason longshore is he joins us live from Costa Rica tonight. Our coverage begins at nine thirty with the pre game show. And then of course, ten pm kickoff with my cunnie Jason longshore in the opening game for Atlanta United now allowed to talk about here. I want to ask you a question about our team in a moment. But you get a sense of excitement down their in Costa Rica about the fact that Lenny United is is down there. Is there any sense of Atlanta United as a team in Costa Rica has this brand kind of made its way south? Absolutely hats. And and this is something that I think is going to surprise a lot of people around the country is that what Atlanta United done in the first two years and bringing in players who are known in Latin America like Miguel Helmer Joseph Martinez and now fifty Martinez. There were probably forty to fifty River Plate fans. River played is a club from Argentina where PT Martinez comes from. But it's also a club where they worldwide following. And it looked like the the River Plate local supporters group here in Costa Rica came out to chance for him and sing for him during the press conference during the Atlanta United training, they stayed around to try to get pictures and autograph. This is a club. That is not your typical American soccer clubs. They are known in Latin America, and whether it's a player who drives it or it's just the appeal of Atlanta United strong seventy thousand people they're winning. Championships there two years old. They're a big club. What's going on here? I wanna see this for myself. This is a club that will draw in this tournament. Jason I have to ask because we were talking about this morning. Everybody's excited about you know, soccer play about to begin. Again. What does this mean with everybody talking about how big of a deal? This is what does this mean for Lenny United? If by by some chance, they don't get this this first game out of this first match. Well, just in this competition. It's a to like series. So it's like the playoffs last year where you're gonna play a game here in a game back in Atlanta Kennesaw next Thursday, so it's one hundred eighty minute game. It's an okay way to think about it. This is the first half. And it's not a must win. I've always felt like in these types of competitions over two legs. You can't win the leg in the first one is it's really hard to if you put up a number like Santos flipping it did last night over marathon from Honduras, six one, okay? Pretty much done. But you can lose it in the first leg if you fall behind so Atlanta, in my opinion, you come down here and get a result a draw is fine a win. It's great. If it's a narrow loss, and it's gonna put more pressure on the game next week at Kennesaw. We're talking to Jason longshore as we get ready for the opener for lending United tonight live on sports radio ninety nine the game. So we get this Team New coach Frank de Boer. What do you expect Jason? I'm expecting to see a team that that focuses a little bit more on possession. And that's not a huge departure from what we saw in twenty eighteen. It's it's a pretty simple tactic. Honestly when you break it down. You are limiting the other team's chances to score a goal. If you keep the ball. They don't have the ball. They're not going to be able to create as many chances. It's it's pretty simple. And I think that's something that taught that Martinez was working towards with this team from twenty seventeen to twenty eighteen now Frank divorce just gonna take that to another level. I think it's also going to be a team that could be a little more dynamic in the way that they change positions on the field. It's not going to be quite as structured. That's one reason why you've heard Michael Parkhurst talk. Specifically a lot about the defensive organization because in the attack you wanna be free. You wanna be able to rotate you wanna be able to make runs off the ball and created many opportunities to score is possible win the ball turns over that's where you get organized. That's where you can. Fend. And that's where Michael Parker says mentioned Deboer really working hard on those moments of transition, making sure you recover your shape to protect your goal Jason longshore. So get ready for Lenny United in a in that new coaches offense, Martinez Martinez. How's this going to play out in your opinion? What are we gonna here tonight, or what do you expect to see in terms of those two being able to connect on passes, and and be kind of effective as we saw him. And just be in the last couple of years. I think honestly, it could look a little bit more like an attacking trio than the duo that we've seen in the last couple of years with Miguel and Joseph I think Joseph fifty Martinez, and it's Akio Barco are all going to be heavily involved in creating chances. We haven't seen PT Martinez in an official match for Atlanta United so far Mike, and I had the chance to call the game against Tijuana, Mexico and PD played forty minutes. He played half of it. He already look. Like, he was building a pretty strong connection with Joseph Barco also looked excellent in that match. That's I think where Atlantic can be dangerous this year is you have that attacking trio upfront. But then you also have a Julian Grasso making runs down the right, George bellow or a brek shea and making runs down the last you're going to be able to really drive the attack with the superstars, but you're going to have other players jumping into it as well. And it's going to be very hard for defense is to contain all of that firepower. About the rest, especially about a place. Mileti United going into this match. How much do you think the rest will factor into this mess tonight? In this one. I don't think it'll be too bad the referees from Mexico. He's also a World Cup referees. He's a big name. He's on the level of his Maruf who we were really happy with last season in the postseason for Atlanta United the thing though about playing and conquer calf. And when you're playing opponents like air Diano won this game is is everything to them tonight. This is their season really wrapped up into one match. They've struggled this year. They're in ninth place out of twelve in the league. This is the chance to kind of rescue the season. That means everything goes, you're gonna see cheap shops. You're gonna see trying to con the referee to get a call. You're gonna see some dives you're gonna see some trash-talking. That's what happens in these types of games because the stakes are elevated a little bit. I mean for a club like era Diano, they're not just representing their fans there town there representing their country in a lot of ways and Atlanta United is as well. This is a big. I think important priority for Major League Soccer going forward is to win the Concha Champions League. John said nobody's done that before in league history. You win this. You're going to do a fief club World Cup and representing MLS league. That's a little over twenty years old. And you could be playing against Liverpool around Madrid a true heavyweight in a competitive match that opportunity is so big that sometimes it's maybe not even just the referee making a bad call. It's the referee having difficult decisions to deal with because of the players in the stakes and the match. All right. Jason. We look forward to it tonight a short off season. But here we go loaded up. I mean, you're gonna have a lot of games real fast between the the cop and or the Champions League, I should say and and MLS and defending that Cup. I we have to get used to this because you're going to be right back here next week at Kennesaw as you mentioned a week from tonight playing the second leg against area, Dino and then right into that into Major League Soccer play. And if you beat Arizona right back into the Champions League. I mean, it's going to be a lot going on going to be fun. Lots of trophies out there for Atlanta United to try to reach this year. Hey, don't have to tell you to enjoy it. Now. One other quick thing. Here you guys did Mike is Mike gonna eat that spotted rooster thing this morning because we were talking to him yesterday. He said, no, I'm pretty sure I might not strike me. As a guy. That's an adventurous person, especially when. And he said he don't like being. Beans. What makes you think? Game day ready for business. Right. Exactly. We're trying to give my country today. Go do that. I appreciate adjacent mobile tonight..

Jason longshore Atlanta United Atlanta Miguel Helmer Joseph Martinez Costa Rica Lenny United soccer Kennesaw Major League Soccer Champions League AFC Champions League Frank de Boer Mike Mexico Joseph fifty Martinez River Plate Marnie
"marnie" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Marnie Schneider, the retirement professor. Greetings, friends. Welcome to this additional word on wealth. Marnie schneider. Glad to be with you. There is a great freeze that I've come to embrace the last several months, it's called financial sanity. And it's really important to define this. I I think financial sanity is attained when there are two really important things that happened at the same time. The first thing is you have to live within your financial means now for a lot of us that makes intuitive common sense. But it is shocking from my side of the table. How often people are not leaving that way that is they're spending more than the bringing in running a deficit every month in digging the hole deeper and deeper and often times that leads to credit and credit card issues and getting overwhelmed with debt, that's problem. The second thing is when you are. Or living. According to within your means, then you should have a well conceived and tested plan of action, and that plan has to consider the impact of all the possibilities that might impact the successful outcome of your financial planning. And this is very very critical in the reason, I say that is you have to have a really clear understanding I of your financial life situation, and you have to have goals that are in sync with your values. This is another important conversation where when you defined goals financial goals. Life goals. It is really important just to make sure that whatever goals you have in mind. They are going to be consistent with he you are what you value your ethics your, faith and other important personal issues. You have to examine all this specific threats that would threaten the success of your plan. And perhaps a last, but certainly not least there has to be a game plan in place blueprint a chart if you will now certainly when it comes to finances, there's an awful lot of unknowns. We don't know what the stock market's going to do this year. We don't know what interest rates are going to be. We can't tell you what income tax brackets are gonna look like in five or ten years. Those are unknowns. We can only deal with what we know. And what we have. But a blueprint ought to be flexible enough to be able to respond to a variety of changing market conditions. The plan self is going to be based on outcomes based goals orientation, where we define where we're trying to get the time that we have to get there, and it's really really important to gain financial clarity here and to have a deep understanding of where your current dollars going. And whether they're being appropriately applied in the direction that lead you towards your goals. So this requires a grasp? On your numbers. And I would I find is a lot of people just kind of get lost in shuffle. Because they don't have clearly defined goals, and therefore can't really predict outcomes if you help with that come see me, we'll put together your financial plan. We'll set your goals will target some dates we'll make sure that what you're doing. Now in terms of your retirement plans and IRAs 4._0._1._K's and personal spending is consistent with the outcomes that we're trying to achieve..

Marnie Schneider professor ten years
"marnie" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"Marnie is going to be introduced in months long roll out over the first half of this year. And Orkan pest control has revealed their annual bed bug city rankings Baltimore tops the list third year in a row. Most most bedbugs charm sitting on top again coming in second DC. Oh. Probably in the entire country. Work was bad and DC the top two for bedbugs third place, Chicago. Wow. Yeah. Right. Right. Wow. Get it together downtown really mostly sunny. Highs around thirty eight right now right now bone chilling eighteen degrees at five thirty two. Thanks for waking up with Toby and chilly in the morning on this. Another kind of delayed posts day Tuesday morning. Ninety seven point one wash FM off to Hollywood. And a few minutes what you're working on our show, biz buzz, Selena, Gomez comes out of hibernation on social media. That's what's next. It's right to stay with us ninety seven point one wash FM Toby in Chile in the morning. Go ahead. Have this instinct moment never little JT back when he had the curly hair thing going. You..

Gomez Toby Marnie Chile Baltimore Selena Chicago Hollywood eighteen degrees
Meek Mill's Legal Troubles

Ellen on the Go

03:55 min | 2 years ago

Meek Mill's Legal Troubles

"Let's talk for a second about meek mill. Okay. So I'm going to be honest. I didn't know who make mill was until this view, and I I was was really reliable. about the booking because I'm from Philly, and he's a huge story in Philly. So meek mill is a hip hop artists from Philly right and meek mill when he was really young by the Philadelphia police, and he did a little time. And he encountered a he encountered a judge in Philly who is a really tough judge. And so when he was released from prison, you know, years later he was on a very strict parole and while he was on while he was on parole. He was in New York City, and he rode motorcycle on only his back wheel. He wrote a Whealy as I used to call it right in New York City, and he got a ticket for it. He then posted that video on Instagram. Yes. And how'd that go of his judge? The judge saw it was a parole violation. He was called in for it. And he was put back in jail so began an odyssey in which everyone in the country, including the DA of the city of. Adelphia who would normally be charged with prosecuting crimes? Everybody in cute, including him wanted meek mill freed, and this judge would not do it. And so free meek mill became like, a national trending topic a national campaign by some of the biggest, you know, celebrities in the country, and he was finally released from prison. I think last may and he and he flew by helicopter. He didn't know he was being released. They they kept it a secret from him. They didn't want a big crowd there. Too late joined crowd showed up he went via helicopter from prison to a Sixers game. It was just an unbelievable story. And he's like a really incredible guy. Who's now he's still an artist. He's still a musician. He's got a new album out, but he's dedicating his life to prison reform. And so we booked them to talk to him. He didn't perform we booked him to talk to them. Ellen was fascinated by him. I thought it was I thought it was fascinating. Yeah. So you're in for for stupid reasons, you shouldn't have been in there. And you had no idea that so many people were fight. Adding to get you out. You had no idea. I did have an idea after like the fourth day the first week. I was I was being a public figure. They put me like a loan. Twenty three hours a day when I got out I actually start watching the news on TV. And I was saying like CNN like big TV stations talk about my situation must be. Yeah. Good. These situations. People go to Jovan these things all the time. Marnie things not even committing crime. Which people don't understand a lot of people will see somebody violated. Violated could've been loitering star. But it could have been anything. Yeah. Police contact violation. So a lot of people would say he belongs in jail. I didn't commit a crime and good since I've been. Yeah. No, you did not belong in jail at all you didn't. So so how do you? So the day you find out you're getting out. What did you know, you're getting out or did? They just came to you and said you go. I was in my so I just cooked have race in macro. They go they sell like a macro fish, and I was eating and I was watching the news actually three or four o'clock time you show come on east coast, four o'clock. Watching the news and mill is. Jumped up in the air. And you know, I was leaving ten minutes later. So you get out and you saw all the people outside waiting for you. I came out side. I was kind of like dizzy. Yeah. That's amazing to see that many people supporting you and celebrating you getting out how long were you in five and a half months. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Well, you're out now until you're the face of criminal Justice reform, and and did you ever get to this point just having grown up in an Enviro. environ?

Philly New York City Philadelphia Sixers Adelphia CNN Jovan Marnie Ellen Mill Twenty Three Hours Ten Minutes
"marnie" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Marnie Schneider the retirement professor Brings, friends and welcome to this edition of the word on wealth Marnie, Schneider here live and local social security always a hot topic of conversation when it comes to retirement planning and I'm always surprised that the amount of information that folks are not aware of when it, comes to making. Appropriate social security filing decisions at the top of the list for me is a very. Very important fact, he know many people understand that the longer they wait to initiate their social security income in most cases they're going to be receiving a larger check and you. Can defer that all the way up to h seventy. And after that your, account will not grow anymore so it doesn't make sense to wait after that age but for many people their so-called full retirement age when they would receive a hundred percent of their benefit is, somewhere between age sixty six and h sixty seven and it depends on the calendar year of your birth but here's, the catch that a, lot, of people are not aware of, if you decide. To initiate, your social security Benefits prior to reaching your full retirement age which is again between sixty six and sixty seven You have an earnings cap and what I mean by that is that if you are continuing to earn income from job and at the, same time you have started your social security benefits and you're. Not yet had full, retirement age then you're limited as to. How much income you can make now for this. Year that number is just about seventeen thousand I believe it seventeen thousand forty to be exact so, if you have a job and you're making thirty five or forty thousand dollars a year year exceeding the cap. Of seventeen thousand by a significant amount of money somewhere, around seventeen eighteen thousand above the cap and for every. Two dollars that you're, above that cap you're going to give back one dollar of social security so for many people if they, are continuing to work. And file for their social security benefits prior, to their full retirement age this becomes an issue many. Times folks are not aware. Of this and they're surprised to, learn that there's an earnings limit let me just add, this once you hit for retirement age the earn Earnings cap goes away there is. No longer a cap once you hit f. r. a. for retirement age you could make a million dollars a year and your job and it would not reduce your social security check so one of the, many factors to consider as you're making appropriate social security filing. Choices is the earnings, gap issue certainly there spousal issue spousal. Survivorship issues that you have to consider if you. Are a married person and the proper time to initiate each spouse's benefit becomes a topic of ongoing, conversation lots of moving parts there and my strongest recommendation is to make sure friends at you sit down with. Somebody that understands all the ins and outs of the, social security planning before you make a final decision because. In most cases when, you make that decision it's pretty final and you're not gonna be able to change it in most cases, so make sure you. Get with somebody that can help you make, good choices if you need some help with that come. On in and see me. It's part of the retirement planning, process and I'm happy to have you come on in for..

Marnie Schneider professor forty thousand dollars hundred percent million dollars Two dollars one dollar
"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Tung yet me nobody's then there was marnie but they well courroye um but with other things they had students come up to me afterwards whom we bridge something that has to do with rape and say you know i i was rage um and i mean who worse experience i had was teaching a poem about rape and it was right after nine one warne in on that very good good night right before nine one one this student had been raped and it was like oh my god the issues like actress ho and rare even though i bring up nine weren't one except that for her was every bit as traumatic as it was for any individual in nine one warned you know or or for those of us just watching a um trouble so far that way way uh which are yeah vague your recent that minding her associations you know what cheese associating with trump uh uh you know i think that we come there's there's a sense in which its in yeah it it validates that that trauma if you can bring the students to see that it you know it can be very helpful but but that's what i'm tired you know that's hard it it is is hard and if you know it's it's it begins to be beyond our job you know to to work with students traumatized to um and yet it for teaching material that you know that that triggers their trauma um there's in you know and we are implicated ange at least we have to allow them to the right place for somehow or i or you know if you this is off the topic birdie if you allow them to substitute something else you know i really want to make if my job as much as possible to go into a critical note that can in that sense desensitize people um from you know.

Tung marnie rape ange
"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Yeah you know about what is interesting about the filming that's what you do and the teacher yeah um and and try to have the students see that but it's they they don't have to like the thing yet early gone wrong and it's it's very authoritarian so like or taste upon them i mean but way you want them to do is to understand this to see what's going on to understand the complexity and then if they never want to watch the film again because there was an unpleasant experience and you know fine at a little time but they have it's spend the contract took to the class that they need it that they need to at least be open to understanding the mechanics of of the film uh if nothing else on the other hand and i don't know if this is appropriate to bring up that there are students who were traumatized i urged by a film like marnie it triggers me some parts of the zone does but i'm i'm triggered by law hotter films i really love it any for example an had the abusive that um you know the abusive father and so on but i think it's it's very hard uh or you know will lead a you know having students freedland lead to um very hard to rationalize you know making student experience something that that really does traumatized and i i you know i am sure you come up with this cut this problem is well tom yet.

marnie tom
"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"It would be very easy to i just i just made a a kind of packed with myself that this is a this is a job i'm a lot stronger than that what was the reception like to the still how did you experience uh i was pleased to the way it turned out you know as a difficult movie the do because the hitchcock made it difficult i was delighted with the way it came out i was very pleased with hit somebody told me that i was going to be considered for our any canopy award and hick staff at no more nice guy oh well did critics except the film when it first came out i don't think so some of them did um you know uh uh minority was difficult because people didn't really understand what happened i i think you know it it's just been recently than fit that uh in psychologists and psychiatrists really get into fact of what what happens to you and you're a child and and you have difficulty with with relationships and and things that aren't thrown at you as a child and how it affects your leader life i think that was what was the big problem with marnie is if people didn't understand when people start to kinda come around to the song actually not too long ago let me even when you consider time took a long time was a senior cells being portrayed in a hbo.

marnie
"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Yes it's a weird insured shot you know just like an what's this program picture jagger unday given that we came to whom i seem to deal more sympathetic to marnie earlier i guess you know i i i would kind of like to go back and to say that hitchcock really do want to make curry into aim more compromised figure than he winds up being a new roof soared said that but i just kind of went to emphasize that and you know partly because she's james bond that it you know that he could quite pull it off but you know i think he pulled it off a lot better than he seemed to think he himself pulled it off i i find i find him annoying um and well i find him to be a very problematic figure from very early on and however again the um we ever and his liking catcher i've caught something wiles in by god our keep you and you know wang two km her and all of that and i know that this is a also some once the stuff of women's will be into the you know the idea of a man shaming a woman in there that women often swoon into that kind of thing um and if he jets with the screenwriter talk she was doing to um but um i i feel that there's as gril the who worked for me as answer and as a romance aimed at a laugh lying in the film we've already quoted on yeah i don't want here's the ill my brother stay with you it's in the know romance you know she's still new round yeah i'd rather stay you wish you.

james bond marnie wang two km
"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Right and the real triangle i think is in a way between the one that shows the most emotion between jesse this is edgar and marty you know an acting cure what you're saying about being set up as insurance is really fantastic and um this sort of like marnie comes home and finds out her mistress is seen as someone else great hall being unfaithful in that that shatters her more than anything else except filling in for you in the film better mother wants to move the cotton's into the house just like oh ho ho leads ian shepherdson of your air or this also that strange sec had me of the north versus the south and they make such a point to make sure that we know that mirny is a southerner that her mother as a southerner that the neighbors names are cotton that they're big the p con pi i mean there's just like so many cigna fires for the south versus the north it's absolutely bizarre and should but aren't they we're ridge whereas mark from is in virginia hours in maryland arches marcus from philadelphia and uh okay army is from below the mason dixon line because she's in ball from baltimore but you know i don't being from george i don't really think in baltimore as the south technically it's flow the mason dixon line i o'hare uh you know again in morals book that sean connery listen to tapes of someone a man with a very distinguished philadelphia accent for the role but she reveals herself by saying insurance instead of writer insurance that and you know the course the novel takes place in england and she had learnt head elocution lessons and learn to have a posh accident in that's sort of the equivalent of her posh accent failing her at them you know one moment and become a key moments or yeah that is interesting but much written about i'm trying to remember who wrote to be a five book but they definitely bring that up a little bit in there too still seems like there's more to be discussed about that topic that just hasn't been necessarily discussed in i i mean i don't know like to me horseracing seems like more of a southern thing i guess because the kentucky derby.

jesse edgar marty marnie the house ian shepherdson maryland arches philadelphia mason dixon line baltimore george england kentucky derby virginia sean connery writer
"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Uh home which i find her investigation is is such as lidl's investigation is such a profound fascination with marnie um as well as an investigation that i i find that to be a compelling reading a n intensity who get better birds uh push a character and intensity uh that going on between between two women that advice a possible lesbian reading i don't i don't pick could you know the only way to read the film by that i can certainly see why was being critics would would feel that i also you on my own work i've waited dutch a her her relationship with her mother when she brings her mother first dole from the beginning and sh basically talks hers if she her up like like a mr sch you know i think there's some sort of the state of mass for kissed it relationship it begins they are um gosh uh uh literally says i set you up she literally yeah do you think not how i get the money to set you up by being by being a mistress to two mike off and it is always struck me it's everett nobody else's seems to ever mention it or care about it but th the those words win when the woman is set up by somebody even a house in given for code tent set up you know you're referring to man in the new stress so that relationship that starts there you know suggests that barings here that mommy's sexualities very complex now if not resolved doll you know it's not exclaimed as lesbianism and would want anybody to think i would be saying oh martin these alleged a lil as a lesbian by um to certainly crew year queer over like we were undertones and then everything out.

lidl marnie um mike martin everett
"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"He so who pow line he said it's such a compelling he's such a key is such a compelling role i do identify with him and you know when he's cleaning up the bathroom so meticulously and that sort of thing of course remember first we think it should mother who's done though the killing i mean booby screwball seen enough so many billions of time we got it anymore but when he explaining the bathroom he does think you know we do think it was mother who did that uh yeah absolutely but it does throw sympathy our way for much of the film thinking that he's just trying to cover his mother crimes we're happy to see the bathroom cleaned up and garg less you know like get rid of the evidence clean it up in a pristine again here you're wrong weeks into eu anal any nationality so that there's no female blood left at all i what do you got sick of the lil mainwaring character the diam baker character because it's like we already have one investigation going on in the movie which is mark invest getting mirny but now we have a second investigator whose put on the case as a war of lil wanting to figure out what's going on with marnie as well or may be figure out what's going on with mark i suppose motive isn't an an inside but in the novel it a love triangle between two men and woman and they changed at two women and a man in in the film and a lot you know they've been some interesting f as written about the lesbian under towns uh.

eu investigator marnie garg
"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Now you describe it extremely well that is exactly what happened in the us that's one thing yeah and you're kind of thing you once the camera right on her face i think that's interesting because it was but they moved away to show his menacing you know especially if he could end his menacing stare at her as he comes towards her to ray per travolta the cameras equally on him and the menace it he represents for the first part of the movie were supposed to do empathize with mark but after that scene it's almost impossible for me to be with the guy for him to be this euro for me it's just you'll marnie kind of his on that line because she's a thief in a liar for the first part of the movie and then after that happens by heart goes to her so it's i don't know if that was all to a way way you are gonna go to her and kill ran i don't mean to sound beret junior but i mean when she's in the car with marken just you can tell everything that she saying as a lie but i mean yeah i guess it's when he catches her i know that i i have been pulling for her is specially during the robbery seen because you wanna see somebody get away with it mean who i know you love me mom are wing treatment group for mother or i guess i just have too many issues wrapped up on that end enemy and how you like crappier lego while ma'am all in you know her taking advantage of her fear when that the branch crashes through the the window room ride in heard you know we privy to her dream marnie fill obviously traumatized and so obviously i think you know cart wanted us to be sympathetic with her compulsion that this was i don't know not like bruno in change some to train is a fascinating character but i don't think that were.

robbery bruno ray marnie
"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"marnie" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"I don't wanna go to jail i'd rather loosely calling so many people wanting to either jail marnie or fix marmi and just it gets a little much sometimes i mean the whole idea of mark the tamer of wild animals and seeing mirny as this wild animal who needs to be tamed it just seems like there's but there's so many movies where men need to fix women and this is definitely one of those ambiguous in the sense that on the one hand ukraine and feel bad remove years going in that direction and that he is curing her but on the other hand is so much that pulling away from that you know banning satisfaction that were would normally feel in a typical hollywood bogey or something like that to happen so you have to have a tremendous amount me i'm ready i think in relation to the characters in their relationship and i think that's a source of of the vaccination at that don't mix held for so many hitchcock scholars at least the only way that you know there's any belief in this heterosexual couple at the end frankly is because it's sean connery and that he was such a a you know sex symbol and hitchcock was looking for someone who is the powerful sexsymbol so i think that glosses over some of the really horrible things that actually happened in film like of course our aid yeah that rape scene i mean that's pretty much what i think drove five at hunter off of the fill was not want me to get into that nearly as much as had struck wanted to identify them.

marnie ukraine sean connery sex symbol hitchcock hollywood rape one hand