26 Burst results for "Marketing Organization"

Examining the Powerful Culture of Charles Schwab through the Stories of its People

Powering Independence Podcast

04:54 min | 2 months ago

Examining the Powerful Culture of Charles Schwab through the Stories of its People

"Hello and welcome to the powering independence. Podcast i'm your host austin philbin and today. We have a very very very special episode. What it means to be swabi examining the powerful culture. Charles schwab who the stories of its people and i will be joined for the first time remotely by three different guests in three different locations. This is gonna be a great one. let's start with Just a little bit about you. So maybe if you could tell me a little bit about yourself your background and why to you charles. Schwab is such a great place to work. Why don't we start with brad. Well first of all things anatomy love having a philosophical conversation like this just around the business and It's been a great partnership we've had with dynasty but to be able to step back and really talk shop like this is a much appreciated break in the day. So i'm brad lawson. I do lead our relationship management teams around the country and i've been working with advisors net capacity for about twenty-three years now and i've seen schwab grow from a very small organization to arguably a very very large organization and one of the things we've released strived for the business is how do we stay small to each and every advisor to never relationship. In spite of our rapid growth and the sheer size of our platform are people in the end. The complexity within the business and the schwab has been able to remain very entrepreneurial with a with a flat organization. It's very easy to navigate They're also very few hierarchical walls within schwab so as large as we become is still under easy to get work done. Every day to collaborate on clint solutions and in the second aspect of the business in schwab is philosophically. Were aligned with advisors We put clients first. We are a market driven organization not a marketing organization which to me means that we understand what clients want in need today into the future and we build that and if we build disciplined in scale and excellence into our model but will figure out a way to be profitable. Make money doing that at the end of the day so that that remaining small incline first pieces. The reason that i keep choosing to wake up and work here every day after twenty three years. Great to have breakfast overlooking the san francisco bay with an executive at your company and he echoed similar comments. And i just wanted to check in with you around what he said. Which was the industry as a whole seems to be migrating particularly in the larger financial institutions to a very specific advisor. One with a smaller book of business with high net worth and ultra high net worth clients. They're going to utilize multiple products. And they're going to generate a lot of revenue for the firm and he said that's that's not really the way that we think about the advisory space schwab. We think every advisor in every practice has a place here and is special. Do you see that on a regular basis with the culture of of schwab. I i do. And what's kind of validating about hearing that from a number of years ago as his. You've had that experience in the past three years and continuing for the next couple of years we are working on evolving our platform so that we can become more specialized for each constituency of advisers. We have an entire platform with a service model with people dedicated leadership and relationship management and service as well as new and scalable value added services like business consulting and other things will come. We'll get into later for advisers that have any fifty million dollars with us and we have almost five thousand advisors without under a hundred million dollars in uh platform our traditional adviser which would call a practice right Maybe budding on professional practice. That may be two three hundred million up to about a billion. That is our our tradition bread and butter and we continue to evolve our platform for those advisers. When you get about a billion dollars and particular into multi billion You know we start to see some really dynamic changes within the structures of advisory businesses and advisors go from practice to professional practice and when you have dedicated leadership centralized back office operations. Sometimes investment management start to see a miniature enterprises in sometimes quite frankly many financial institutions emerged within the ra space

Schwab Austin Philbin Brad Lawson Clint Solutions Charles Schwab Brad Charles San Francisco Bay
"marketing organization" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

04:47 min | 9 months ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on Accelerate!

"Job? They've been doing at finding these just strike customers versus the many many many so so one. Who's not really cheap to acquire but that's the best you can save for them or just happened to be there the end so reichheld a basically an again. I'm stealing his ideas. He still on ideas from from other companies such as Enterprise rent a car and others. I you and many people will remember him as the father of net promoters or got him took a so. So it's really important to recognize that everybody out there recommend a nose. Nps use it in different ways. It's origins go back to this idea that we can find companies that have a much higher proportion of promoters versus detractors. That's a good company. Manali might be doing well today but has tremendous for the future rankles work. That's what it was all about is that I am BS or changes have yes force or indicator of future profitability much aligned with some of these talking about lifetime value So so let's give credit where it's due. I and every time folks are out there doing this than that motor score thing and sometimes go to hate it because it's now Imposed on them well and they're doing it on a transaction by transaction basis with customers as drive the customers nuts but yet go ahead and that's not but pointed it's Kinda gauge the overall a hell of customer base and so basically there's a number of companies out there that either dot this initially and that's why I want to point to the ones that that right cal and now his more recent partners I'm Rob Markey Obeyed So they've been doing tastic job about pointing to companies that have been doing well of talking about how to create the right kind of internal corporate culture to make this happen and his case that as of companies that have gone through that transition. So they're they're in a kind of a broad envious way. I'm doing in a say now or more technical. Clv Way they're very much aligned with each other. And in fact the way we create that corporate culture organization structured so on would be pretty similar regardless of which one of those metrics you're talking about and so it's been really interesting to watch companies go through that transformation or stick their heads in the sand and saying that. I'm good. I'm just GONNA focus on cost minimization so in my first book. I took the task a bunch of retailers or being touted as customer centric. But Not really being that way in the ten years since then it's been wonderful see how some not all of them have actually changed. Their ways was like a really great one starbucks. Where Young for them. It used to be all about coffee founder. Howard Schultz. He was a coffee guy. It was all about. What's the right roast we should using? Or maybe should we have a breakfast sandwich or not but there really was no detail. View of how customers differ from each other's nice to us and to watch the way that they've transform and as many many many US know the things that they do with their with their mobile APP. This a lot of the changes to the overall customer experience. The way that they'll reward inform you allowed by understanding appreciating celebrating the differences across customers and to try to differentiate appealing the ones who have Julian the most valued so some really good examples of companies going through the transformation. I'm others struggling and many many others are just starting to take the baby. Step down a path on. It's really interesting to see where it will go. And how cove it stuff will either accelerate it or inhibit? Yeah I think I think. One of the the big disconnect us when people talk about customer centric been customer centric from the perspective of the buying experience. By almost exclusively. Rather than as as you describe as is how do we take this data and use it to inform how we develop new products? How we implement our services in a way. That is a value to the higher value customers. Such an important point. Yeah so much of the customers interested. You stop ends up being just locked. Within the Marketing Organization at companies either unwilling unable to top to their partners in other parts organization. Such is on such a supply chain and in particular such as an adds to get them on board with being the marketers be critical on.

Howard Schultz US starbucks Rob Markey Marketing Organization founder Julian
Language Modeling and Protein Generation at Salesforce with Richard Socher

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

07:25 min | 9 months ago

Language Modeling and Protein Generation at Salesforce with Richard Socher

"Hey everyone I am on the line with Richard. Social Richard is the chief scientist and MVP at salesforce Richard. Welcome to the PODCAST. Aloha great to be here to chat. Houston you said. Aloha and I was surprised that you're actually in the bay area. I always see these wonderful photos of you all over the place and I only get to ever see you in person at nerves nowadays and The blacken ai events and stuff like that so great to get a chance to connect with you mid year. How is everything? Life is pretty pretty. Good I'm very grateful of our research can continue working on some research during distresses now would that that is specific to Kobe. Nineteen and But Ryan Large sometimes joked at the PhD. Prepared me for several years. I staying at home eating pasta every day. Working on a computer all day and So so I'm I'm in pretty good spirits trying to have a little bit a positive impact and still go about my work and make sure my team is doing well throughout this crisis. And it's it's a tough time But I'm I'm very grateful for line of research we can work remotely. Who quite well awesome awesome. Glad to hear that it is Don't usually you know do this. But is April tenth that were recording. This what is it week. Four for you for lockdown shelter in place thereabouts right. It's it's crazy to time weirdly. It's slow and fast at the same time days morph into each other The Home Office is just the the home and the office and everything so the ad time definitely does not seem linear going through. This is very strange but before we jump into some of the main topics that we wanNA cover in particular language models and some of the recent work you've been doing applying that to the bio space. You share with us a little bit about your background and how you came to work in a chirp boy. It almost starts in high school when I really liked math and languages and when you think about Those two fields one you would hope is true even if you go light years in some other direction and language is district constantly morphing system. Where every you know teenager could just say Yo lo and boom you have a new word and now the the signs of nestor deal with that and so they marry when you try to use computers use math to try to understand language so I studied linguistics computer science Back in two thousand and early. Two thousands and dad's at the time seem kind of like an orchids kind of cute a niche topic to my parents. I thought man if we can get computers to understand language that would be just incredible all the things they could do. You know especially if you're lazy. He wants to agree. Repetitive tasks to be done by a computer would be quite amazing. And so that kind of more Into a couple of other interests in trying to use eventually initially just the typical machine learning essentially sort of machine machine learning by itself and I More broadly applied to computer vision problems. But I really do think in languages the most interesting manifestation of human intelligence There's some quite incredible visual systems and apparatus in the animal kingdom like the Mantis shrimp all kinds of price focal vision. And so on and each I and all of that animals have quite sophisticated visual systems but language connected thought and culture and society. Information are in so got excited about language. Then two thousand ten I saw a handful of people. Apply NEURAL NETWORK TECHNIQUES And extend them to a computer vision and at the time I had also just become a little bit disillusioned myself around how much time naturally crossing folks spend on feature engineering. So I thought couldn't we use some of these ideas from computer vision and neural networks for natural language processing? It was a not easy in the beginning early days had a lot of rejected papers reviewers just ignoring reasonably good experimental results saying why you submitting neural networks stuff to this conference. This is not the nineties anymore. Stuff doesn't work and so on but eventually more and more people have joined a small core initially was read just Joshua Banjo and Jefferson's labs and rings lap At Stanford and and it expanded more and more and and now it's kind of the default way for doing things to US network of course Not Dave developed more and more novel architectures to and it's it's just been super exciting so now I I work Not just on the research side anymore but also on a lot of applied problems you know in the end. I often think about trying to impact and in the end when you do research you hope that people will pick up the research extent Extended next apply it to some real world problems but if you have the opportunity to both the research and applied to real problems to kind of reduce the variance of the impact that you have and so. I work on a lot of problems. Chat bots and service sales and marketing applications trying to for instance automatic reply to emails or two phone conversations or having chat conversations is a really great one also doing a lot of computer vision trying to identify different objects in supermarket shelves. Doing Complex. Ocr for forms and a lot of interesting things recommendation engines Voice Machine Translation. Now the the group is pretty large and so we get to work on a lot of different things. You know it's a it's a research organization but as part of salesforce which we in no as kind of a new still. I still think of itself as a CRM company Owner than their terms here has kind of expanded and now includes everything that you might do with the customer right so we're just ecommerce platform because customers buy stuff online. I worked obviously the largest Sailed Service Marketing Organization but we also have helped companies integrate all the different data. Now Tableau we help people understand our customer data and do a lot of analytics behind it and then we look at you know where are the customers and we help governments senior citizens as their customers and help them especially now also in this crisis of build software really quickly bill chat bots so they can answer questions? You know the knee and if you go to. Da Department of motor vehicles. You have the question chat bots said. Give the answers. They are also You know our customer there of the DMV. We work with healthcare providers where the patients are customer. So the edition of what a customer is is getting broader and broader. We're in all

Richard Houston Department Of Motor Vehicles Ryan Large The Home Office Scientist DMV MVP Nestor Sailed Service Marketing Organ United States Crm Company Owner Stanford Joshua Banjo Dave Jefferson
"marketing organization" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

10:46 min | 9 months ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"I experience that values of who we are and the proven ability to weather Overtime is really incredibly powerful. And it's interesting when I We had an opportunity at one point to talk to the New York Stock Exchange and it was a couple of years ago but they said all the companies come the New York Stock Exchange. And say we wanna be just like Google or Amazon and and he said he they tell people as well you might WanNa be like Levi's or like wells fargo because what you really want to be as a company that can cans weather all of the different crises. And and eras are they're going to have to go through and can reinvent themselves continuously that being and you know. I'm sure that Google and Amazon others. We'll be able to do that. But his point was that Having been able to demonstrate that you can persevere all different kinds of environments is innovation right. You reinvent yourself to the situation your in and at Wellsfargo. We've done that for a hundred sixty years so it is something that I feel very strongly we've done but to your point. I have this custodianship of making sure that we continue to do it for the future. So part of this is how do we ensure that we bring forward the important part of our history and yet we are not so beholden to that history that we can't continue to evolve to be more relevant and to be hyper relevant right in a world where a lot of competitors are coming into our space and are able to as you said in some ways? Innovate much factor. Because they're starting a very small base. When you think about anything we do. We have to think about. How do seventy million people do it that by the NF itself can be constraining on the flip side? If you're a start up right you don't think about that. You just go right into the market you know. We have technology and capability that Often are older and require more adaptation. But all of that becomes an opportunity. And so I as you said I feel very strongly. It's a great honor to get to do it. It's also a real burden because you really do feel central responsibility for. What is this brand for the next twenty forty sixty years and everything? We're doing right in this moment. Today is actually thinking about that. Which is what's the wells. Fargo that as a marketer that I want people to experience over this next two weeks. Four weeks eight weeks as long as Cova last and the remnants that are that are going to last for afterwards. How do we show up right? And as a marketer I think sometimes we tend to think about a messaging side of what we say but I think more than ever the role of a marketer. Cmo is about how we show up and that includes action than offering then Accommodation WILL. This is another piece that that is really interesting about wells. Fargo that you. You mentioned earlier that it's in You Know One. In three houses like households Like for example Wells Fargo my mortgage through Wells Fargo and there was something that I you know. I don't know how mortgages work but you know it got bought and traded and whatever and a million other things and then so right so wells. Fargo owns it so I became a wells fargo customer rate without even kind of attention that that yeah choosing but was so interesting about that experience. Is that like what an opportunity right? And so many people have an experience with wells fargo or stories or like you know a history with the company in some form or fashion right and like wouldn't advantageous position to you know to continued to deliver on that customer experience. I remember is so many of these type stories. But so my dad used to have vending machines and one of the ones was the wells Fargo and in near on the way to Berkeley and between Oakland and Berkeley on College Avenue. So I I remember going to the Wells. Fargo like every week and like filling their snack. Whatever but so the reason I say that is because along you'll have never is crazy for years and years and years. I counted coins job. But so people have a history with the company like one in three people right like seventy million people have a history with that and probably even more than that and when you have such a massive customer base which is like you know Which is a very rare thing You're kind of in rarified. Air In terms of like how you can continue to create experiences for them. Because there's just not that many people that have that many customers you know what? I mean so I'm just curious like how you like. Organize your your team to think about these customer experiences you know. How do you consider yourself a customer champion like? What does that look like like? How does that shape how you are is a CMO? It's been great question and it and it's not easy right to your point because I think In general you we. We are a hybrid of a Product Company Channel Company in a customer company. Right and so clearly as you use the analog with your mortgage right you came in to wells just through mortgage so your experience with was very much through a product lines Sometimes we get customers who come in who Are going through a major life change in inherited money and want some advice and counsel we ended up doing a lot of business with them but we start much more from a position of. What is it you're trying to do? And what's important to ensure life and and then sometimes it really is more of a channel which is just people literally walk into a branch. They move into a neighborhood and they say hey. I need to open up a checking account and this still happens every day and still even though it's a digital age and people open up all their new accounts mobely people want to know that there's physical place that they can go and especially for times like the ones we're in right now and so it's really interesting because we have to thank both in terms of all the different options that customers have to engage with us whether it's products or channel But then when we engage with them we have to know them as an individual across those channels and products and across time and as a marketer. That's in your head explodes. Usually when it gets to the Rubik's Cube of how do we? How do we best talk to these customers? And so you know a lot of how we are. Structured is both in support of our major businesses but also in support of customers from a segment standpoint and again. It's not always perfect because people don't sit in any one segment per se But clearly there are different types of customers who have different kinds of these at different times. Some great example. Small Business Right. We have a team that is is responsible for helping market to small businesses. And what's great about out like right in? This moment is that we will be an important piece of the government's legislation around supporting small businesses. And we already have a really strong strong small business marketing team. Who is thinking about what to solve is if need from us whether they need to hear. How do we reach them? What's the fastest way to reach them? what's the content that we have that we can deploy quickly do. What channel then do we have other partnerships that we need to draw on and I think a lot of what I see is my job is to help you know. Ideally we would be in a one to one marketing space all the time. How do we take our data And it's a lot of data obviously and partnerships with third parties and tailor our messages as best as possible to that individual for where they are and where they when they are. And sometimes that's GonNa feel more segmented sometimes it's GonNa feel truly one to one and sometimes that may be a mass message but to that individual. It's very relevant. And so I will tell you. That's where we spent. I spent a lot of my time now on the technology side With our obviously things like artificial intelligence and working to ensure that wherever possible across our channel were engaging with our customers with the right content at the right time. And so you have to take those seventy million and balance the scale of that seventy million with every individual customer and thank heavens for technology and data that you can bring those together increasingly to do that. So how do you do that? I mean are you working with? Do you have a data science team? That's on your team. Are you working with like the CIO or the CTO? Like how do you? How do you actually you know? Pull those those insights and then you know. Feed them back to your team. Yeah and it's a partnership that I think As with many companies. I'm sure the as you said. The data management team is integral part of who we work with. They actually house or all of the kind of artificial intelligence modeling. That takes place. Because there's a lot as you would expect of regulatory oversight for Bank With respect to the data that you have and how you use it and I think for us. We know that you know be trusting. Our customers trust us with their data and using that data responsibly. Or most important but the Marketing Organization. We have data scientists and more importantly we have the individuals that can help translate right that that data and that targeting with the right message and the right creative right to the right customer through the right channel and so what we find is that Artificial intelligence and the big data modeling is providing kind of fuel. It's the brain if you will but then if you think about the brain you still need the distribution you still need the contact creation you still need kind of at the beginning of it all the ideas and that really comes for marketing and so you know I always talk to my team sometimes says oh are we going to exist. In a world of artificial intelligence well yes because so much of marketing is about a different level of understanding emotional connection with individuals and a lot of that comes through the ideas and the way that those ideas ultimately get expressed. I think the. Ai Is helping US significantly in reaching the right people with the right message. A great example is where we use it when we know an individual comes into a branch we know the two or three things that would be valued at them to talk to them about because we know what they have with Wells Fargo. We know their experience. We often have triggers That we've identified that someone comes in and we know that they've been Looking online at mortgages as an example So we're able to actually enable our bankers Either in the call centers or online or branches to have the right conversations and it's incredibly powerful but the content of those of those conversations. Still in ball a lot around you. Know what is the offering? How is it positioned? What does that discussion will look like if it's done through email or through digital on us or office wants to creative So the marketing sides still has a huge role to play. But it's to me very exciting to have partners in data and technology and innovation that are creating that brain. That's GONNA help fuel that I mean a great example.

Wells Fargo Fargo Google New York Amazon Levi Product Company Channel Compan Wellsfargo Ai Cova US Berkeley Marketing Organization CIO
Reducing The Perception of Risk  The Art of Pre-handling Objections

All The Responsibility Podcast

09:35 min | 10 months ago

Reducing The Perception of Risk The Art of Pre-handling Objections

"Go to market is really a complex and kind of many-faceted activity and not only are there interesting cross cutting interactions across the organization in the process. But there's a lot of interesting through lines from one. End of the product management process itself from finding invalidating market problems. As I describe in what I call the secret product management framework all the way to go to market now in this episode. I'm going to talk about a tool that I think technologists like us. I E those of us who kind of like technology for its own sake. We're kind of technical so you might say we often don't give enough credence to the topic of risk reduction are really reducing the perception of risk on the part of the prospect. And that's done to a large degree by a technique called pre handling objections. Now we have to bring all of our product knowledge and tools to bear when we're handling objections or even more importantly preparing our sales and marketing teams to do that pre handling of objections. This is really a simplified version of buyer psychology the idea of the subconscious perception of risk. But it's really very useful even just as a mental model and of course it does actually have some basis in psychology. So it's not the only thing you need to do while selling this idea prehensile objections but it's really a big one and it can go a long way to keeping the sales process going forward. Now I'm going to talk about how you do it how the perception of risk arises Wyatt arises even if no one is saying anything about it essentially what happens is we have the subconscious and it's big job one of its big jobs just to keep us from being eaten by a lion? Metaphorically speaking it's looking out for problems and it's trying to ignore stuff that's not a problem we're actually trying to keep the brain from even being impacted by things. That aren't problems. It's really looking for things to worry about. And the problem is that the subconscious is very sensitive. And it's not actually that accurate and it can interpret kind of any little thing as a problem. For example maybe you have a spelling error on a slide. Now the subconscious mind immediately interpret that as danger now spilling aren't really that dangerous but the subconscious kind of crisis is whole story instantaneously along the lines of well. This person doesn't know enough to spell correctly. How can I trust him or her to solve my real problems now? This is a legitimate thing that your subconscious does it. Does this kind of thing now. In some sense your subconscious will grasp at straws to protect you. I mean it looks for the tiniest little indicators of danger you can imagine when we lived out in the Bush. The Mirror snap of a twig. Might say to the subconscious. Oh that's danger. We better run now. We'll go ask questions later. So you can think of an objection to bring this back down into the world of sales as a question. That's voiced or on voiced from the prospect that indicates there some perception of risk. So for example the first thing a prospect is going to be thinking when you first reach out to them. If you're doing sales is who is this person. What does this person want from me? What does this person have for me? And is this person. GonNa be wasting my time and what I mean is the objections. Start from the first contact with the prospect. They really start from the first marketing message. That reaches the prospect because the prospect is going to have those same questions about a marketing message. What are you GonNa do about these? Well one thing you can do is to be well groomed and I mean that in a highly general sense you personally should be well groomed. You need to be well-spoken you need to appear welcoming and open and these are all things that against set the subconscious a little bit at ease so you don't appear dangerous now your presentation you're using one should also be well-groomed so no spelling errors. For example. Little Nets like alignment and capitalization should be consistent. Those those things don't bother everybody but they bother some people a lot including me but this kind of grooming only goes so far a prospect will like you better in this has often again a subconscious reaction if you reduce their fears so remember this is happening below the level of consciousness if the prospect associates of feeling of risk with you here she will not trust you and probably will not like you. If you mitigate that feeling of risk then the prospects subconscious might fully flip to. This person is taking care of me therefore I trust and like them so what you want to do is take care of them now. There's two more important ways to put the subconscious cities one of them is to show that you care and understand about the person by anticipating their needs and concerns and the other is to use stories about other people to pitch your product. I've talked multiple podcasts about using stories and I'll actually talk a little bit more about using stories in this episode because I talked about stories all the time but this will mostly be in the context of item one showing that you care about and understand the person by anticipating their needs and concerns. I'm talking about these objections or the questions. About risk arising in the context of a sales engagement but it really applies to any situation where you're trying to communicate about an idea or sell a concept or product. Even when you're just giving a status report about your project the audiences likely to have some objections. That is they're likely to perceive some risks and those perceptions even if they aren't voiced our objections there away for the person to reject your ideas. Your facts your information. Whatever you're trying to communicate if you don't handle them so let's talk about what pre handling objections really means. It means knowing in advance what is going to cost the prospect to perceive a potential risk. And just show why. That risk either isn't worth worrying about or doesn't really exist. There's different ways to do it and we'll talk about this later. So part of go to market though is enabling the sales organization and did the Marketing Organization to pre handle objections effectively. Without you even being there the reason I mentioned that is because a lot of the objections. There's going to be coming up. A lot of the perceptions of risk are related to things that we know as product managers because we went and did Mark Discovery. And because we've talked to lots of customers and so we need to communicate those to the people that actually go out and talk to prospects which is a sales people and the people that try to get the prospects into our sales funnel which is of course the marketing team. So let's think briefly just to drill down a little bit more on that what happens between somebody out in the market becoming a lead for us and then eventually becoming a customer. I'm GONNA talk about an enterprise software style sales process but roughly the same steps occur in any sales process. They might not include the same people. Some steps might be automated sometimes. A webpage stands in for a salesperson. But in general in enterprise sales it goes something along these lines so a person season ad or some other marketing material it piques his or her interests and they respond in some way. Now we might also be reaching out to those people but it's the same idea right we we're trying to touch them with an ad or with call or something like that they enter our sales funnel become a lead now obviously not everybody who sees our ad becomes the lead. This is a funnel. So there's a certain number of people who come in at the top and they attribute out through the course of the process. So what we have a lead. The salesperson doesn't initial qualifying and discovery call with the lead to determine if they're really a good match for our product to learn some things about them that we can use later on in the sales process and so on now. If that lead is qualified they become a prospect and the salesperson then starts to sales process in earnest and this may actually be multiple steps eventually if that lead is then going to become a customer. There's a some kind of a negotiation that happens. The prospect agrees to buy and then the final step is the prospect becomes a customer now. There's things have happened after that once. They become a customer. But that's really the sales process reduction perceived risk or pre. Hanley objections is really critical. In all of these steps so initial steps were going to be reducing the perception. That the salesperson's just wasting the prospects time for example. How do we do that by showing that we understand the prospects situation? They're big problem and that we've successfully solved this problem for other customers. Who are similar to them now. During the qualifying discovery conversations. The salesperson is going to ask intelligent questions about the prospects situation and the challenges they're facing. The goal is for the prospect of feel like they're in good hands with us. In addition the salespeople is often gonNA use kind of customer success stories to show how we've solved similar problems before for people just like them as a sales process goes along. The perception of risk is going to change especially for talking enterprise software. Like what I work on. The actual monetary cost of the solutions likely to be very high and the cost of failure is even higher both from the standpoint of the money and maybe from the standpoint of the person's job so their perception of risk is going to be very very high. It has additional components. Besides just cost. They're worried of course if the product won't actually work we've been telling them it'll work. We've been giving them customer stories. But of course they're still worried the more stories that we can tell that they can identify with and that are about people like them the lower that perception of risk is GonNa be. They're also worried that the product will be too expensive or that will be very difficult to implement that they won't actually be able to make it work even if it could work. That won't work in their instance. So that's the thing we have to tell stories about as well and then of course there are also thinking well. There's other things that I could spend this money on. Maybe the other things are a better thing for me to buy than solving this particular problem and I'm not talking about competitors in this case I'm talking about solving a completely different problem altogether with that same money. So that's kind of opportunity cost

Marketing Organization Wyatt Mark Discovery Hanley
HOW TO BUILD A GREAT TEAM OF SALES PEOPLE AND CLOSE LARGE DEALS

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

09:08 min | 11 months ago

HOW TO BUILD A GREAT TEAM OF SALES PEOPLE AND CLOSE LARGE DEALS

"A great welcome to the show Sweden started. Tell us a little bit about yourself. Thanks thanks for having me. Brian van of the show. Listening to your podcasts. Both through as well as the B. Two B. Revenue podcasts. Quite a bit so appreciate you having me So you know. I'm I'm Greg Anderson. Thirteen years in sales. I think it'd be a rarity at the exact same company so I mentioned the company I started with a out of college company called target started in Boston so now thirteen years. Four offices in three continents Started out as essentially what you'd think of as an inside sales rep calling sue local vars resellers to sell our marketing services and solutions so as a business essentially what we do is we work with Enterprise it organizations and help to connect them with buyers through publishing company and have since evolved in Suwa Tech Company with with intent data so started out work with a lot of those small Vars resellers. Some two to three man shop. Some larger ones Eventually showed that I think I you know I have the chops to work with. Large organizations was asked to move out to San Francisco early twenties to take on some part global accounts like Cisco and Intel and odd Dell and. Hp said work with those really large organizations in complex sales in the next step. I was eventually asked to move out. Sue Our Singapore office to to build up our sales team across Asia Pacific. So I did that in two thousand fourteen in now. I am calling you in from on new from Sydney where I now reside side moved down here to our Australia office. I look after our sales team across all of Asia Pacific with offices in Australia Singapore as well as India. Well I guess you must like to travel. I have to kind of just kind of get used to. Yeah just in the last two weeks. I was up in Singapore per week and then over in our Bangalore Office ROIC so yeah travel quite a bit when I was in the. Us is a rapid with every single. Week I was on a plane who different city on spending time with a lot of customers. But you do have to learn to love to travel. Learn to learn to be able to work on the road. You'RE IN DIFFERENT HOTEL. Rooms in cities and towns waking up. Not Knowing where you are but you've always got your laptop and Internet connections giving stop. Yeah that's it. I always remember because I traveled a lot to that that first moment when you wake up and you look at the phone to see what city your time zones in. Its the greatest things that ever happened with the smartphone automatically change in time zones so it was always right for you. Have to look at the clock in the hotel room anymore to figure out what you need to set your watch to when. I remember one day or several times waking up on the plane not knowing where I was going just just for a minute. Where you're like okay monoplane. Oh you wake up here that little thing. I think the the the biggest week of travel I ever had. I was in our San Francisco office and I had a number of meetings. So this head You know working with HP and Cisco in a Lotta those large organizations but also with their ad agencies so we supported all their sales and marketing campaigns. So there's agencies in Chicago in the York in there was also sales floors in places like Arkansas. So I hit a trip where it was from San Francisco to Boston. Boston to New York New York. Arkansas Arkansas Dallas Dallas to Houston Houston to Boulder Boulder's San Francisco. That was one day in each city. Seven Day whirlwinds around the US in by end of it you know you definitely don't know where you are what time zone it is. Does it have to but you know. That's it's it's fun to be able to do that for a while now. You have an interesting career how to check the same company but you know going up. Every time is that what's kept you there or did you just find a perfect match for your personality your style. I think it's a little bit of both. I really enjoy the work that we do from our leadership team. Who's been around if you actually take a look at some of the some of the folks who are at the top of organization. Those people have been here ten to fifteen plus years. It's IT'S A. It's a great culture. It's a great business But it's always evolving so you know we started out as I mentioned his publishing company where we create content for it buyers to make smarter decisions. So I saw that you were at data power. That was Lybian and so people that were looking at. Api software for example would come to our sites evaluate vendors. Better understands you know ave can secure integrations and whatnot And that's how we started just reading on those folks in that it. Continuously evolved to smarter marketing services now in dense intent data services where we've moved from strictly talking marketing folks and our talk to sales leader is an inside sales organizations so the company itself has changed. I think in changing roles and changing cities. It always feels like a new job. It always feels like a new challenge so for anybody listening and considering relocating I I. I couldn't I could encourage you to do that more. I think it's really refreshing to do that. I'd say the last bit in in being in Marketing Services and software where we don't go in and sell a product and move on to a new customer. We sell a product to a customer. We stick with them for us. referenced. Ibm where you were. You know. They've been a big customer for a long time and we have teams dedicated to going in and talking to the marketing teams in sales teams on daily weekly monthly quarterly basis. So we get to learn the INS and outs of a lot of the you know the largest most profitable interesting organizations from companies like IBM to some of the small startups so Dana. Day Out. We're spending time with some of the smartest exonerated at companies open. The sales and marketing fronts get really interesting exposure to other organizations so it's a real combination of our culture shift in our products but also just exposure to always changing landscape of tech. It's really interesting. And so now you manage a team or you're building a team or both both so a manager containment we're continuing to build a team so We have a team here in Sydney a team in Singapore in a team in India as well so a couple of different layers from From got our inside sales team. We've got our account executives out there. Hunting with enterprise account managers that are managing a smaller territories. It's a twenty accounts so it's been it's been a very interesting shift going from sales rep to leading a team. Not only leading team Us leading team across three different countries in multiple geographies multiple culture. Cultures is well which has been. It's been eye-opening it's been a real you know. I think really valuable journey to be able to come out here to understand how things work immediately outside of the US. Where I know that a lot of folks in North America a very North America centric perspective that you will. Everybody's got a very central. I've worked for people from all over the country and they tend to assume that the whole world is the way is in their their homebase yet. Yeah yeah so I you know. I one of the one of the first meetings that I had here I recall. I came down and I met with With Dell a whole Marketing Organization Cross Australians. I was young. Would I moved out. Here it's twenty eight as real confident. Now that I've not seen business North America in terms of running all these global marketing teams selling all these companies. So I teach these guys a lot of things that went into the meeting and I think my opening was well. You know I worked with your team in North America and I've a lot of learnings to bring there. I was like well. I just got reminded that this is in North America. Commerical spot another that. It's GONNA necessarily matter to us. It was he was right. He was very Markets Sizes Different Cultures Awesome. I'm definitely taken step back saying. Hey I can teach you something because I come from the US in changing around so you know. Teach me what you need and I'll figure out a way to make happen

United States North America San Francisco Boston Singapore IBM Arkansas Sydney Suwa Tech Company Cisco India Greg Anderson Asia Pacific Brian Van Sweden HP New York Bangalore Australia Singapore
Coronavirus Puts A Crimp On The Chinese Tourism Industry

Morning Edition

02:46 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus Puts A Crimp On The Chinese Tourism Industry

"And Chinese tourists account for more than ten percent of the global tourism industry that's more than any other country so airlines cruise ships and high end hotels across the world are in limbo and here's Jackie north and has the story just a couple decades ago Chinese tourists were usually diplomats are athletes since then Beijing has relaxed travel restrictions in a growing economy means more people have disposable income to travel that's made for a lot of crossings a Chinese borders last year we had something like a hundred seventy million border crossings that's Wolfgang Arnold the founder of the China bound tourism research institute which helps international tour companies do business with Chinese customers he says the most popular destinations for Chinese visitors are in Asia thank Thailand Hong Kong and Macau but the sites in the luxury goods found in Paris Sydney in New York City are also popular the greatest number we have for spending is which was of nineteen according to the official records of United Nations for treatment organization it was two hundred seventy seven billion US dollars spent by Chinese on it in this interim so that's quite a number and a lot of those tourists came to the US Chris Hey would with NYC and company New York city's marketing organization says in twenty eighteen the city welcome more than a million Chinese visitors China is a tremendously important market for New York City it represents about three billion dollars in total revenue the fear over the corona viruses brought Chinese tourism to a screeching halt many airlines have suspended flights to and from China so there's concern about the potential financial in impact of the virus he would says his organization is in a wait and see mode we are monitoring the situation very carefully and very closely but it's too soon for us to make an assumption on exactly how this is going to affect business in the long term listing Arnold says he's optimistic that Chinese tourism will resume after the corona viruses contained he points to the sars outbreak in two thousand and three that's across the somewhat similar story that for about three months no Chinese came out of China but after that what we could see and what I think also we can expect this time is once this is over there and the Chinese will travel even more since his institute is forecasting that by twenty thirty one out of every five international tourists will be Chinese but that all depends how long it takes to contain the corona

Beijing Wolfgang Arnold Founder China Asia Thailand Hong Kong Macau Paris Sydney New York City United Nations Sars Jackie North Official United States
How to Leverage AI to Summarize CRM Data and Make It Meaningful

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

08:17 min | 1 year ago

How to Leverage AI to Summarize CRM Data and Make It Meaningful

"Welcome to the show was way getting started. Tell us about yourself. Well first of all thank you for having me. I really appreciate it. My My name is Anna Sheena Walsh. I'm the Director of growth marketing at neuroscience. And what's number two science all about near science is a data storytelling company company. So what we do is we take data. We actually turn that into stories. And we're doing that. We're re imagining the future. Analytics could be by creating eating analytics products that are built for the everyday person that might not have analytical skills. That's most of us isn't it. It is most of us the ask I guess. But it's definitely me definitely a lot of people I work with and definitely a lot of people talk to you because I think today we're kind of buried even data. Aren't we information out of it. Yeah I think so and I think especially so my background is in marketing getting Growth Marketing Really. Lean into the creative side of marketing. I do not lean as much into some of the data driven side of marketing so for those of us with that status natural. That's not where we're trained the amount of information that's available can really be so overwhelming that you don't even WanNa go look at it at all right and it can be Confu not only confusing but misleading. Yeah very true. I think confusing and then for me. Somebody like me if I'm looking at a dashboard is a high likelihood either. Don't understand it or I'm pulling out the wrong things reading it wrong or reading not getting the point of whoever created so now you just moved into demand Gen right. You're more on the product side before. Yeah actually my career. History is mostly in product marketing. Being in a little bit on the agency side is well back in earlier in my career. I've always loved working. In emerging tech in for the past has two years here in air scientists working in product marketing as we started. Some of our new brand projects started launching our new products. That is really heavily invested bringing to life I. I saw an opportunity on the marketing side. Where I thought we could get really creative in Have some fun so I ended up moving over there and I'm really loving it so far cool. So don't give us a sense of how you take analytical data and turn it into a story. Yeah I think I'll talk about our newest product on the best way you can think about. It is a news feed for your business. So what we're doing is we're taking in data about the business in this case. Let's it we're gonNA talk about like a crm data so the salesforce or something like that so we'll take that in we'll run analytics on data and and then we have a lot of tools within the product itself that helps determine what is most relevant. What is driving the change? In what would matter most to the user and we service that up in a news feed type experience you get bite size information about what information you should care about and then you can pop into longer farm stories. If that's something you WanNa learn more about or dig deeper into. I think a lot of sales people certainly they look at their crm and it just looks like you know one hundred thousand tasks that all look the same. Yeah and it's really easy to get distracted and when I talked to wrap your number one superpower's focus. Yeah definitely because ninety nine percent of those contacts and they're not going to buy anything find that one percent. Yeah Yeah I think when I think about why someone would use something like Alexio I when I explain explain to people I expect like this. You could hire somebody that wrote Everyone in your company a three minute explanation of what matters that day. So what's moving in the pipeline. What opportunities are getting bigger or smaller flows dates or moving? All your macro pipeline at your bookings is growing or not would. Would you do that in the the answer is almost always yes and if the answer is yes Lexi it would be something. You'd probably WanNa look right because it's not just the prioritization. It's what they care about or what's going on the status. The the back story. Yeah what's going on is a lot harder than it. Sounds to stay on top of every a single day within sales organizations and then all of the what we call sales plus wants so the Marketing Organization the Customer Success Organization the leadership hip team the product team. All these people are dependent on knowing what's going on within the sales organization whether it's are we selling but also what are these prospects saying when a customer saying insane on top of that is is really hard no matter where you sit in something like this. Ideally would give you that information within a few minutes every day and that's not because I think a lot of leaders look at the dashboard and when they have a question instead of going to the crm that go to the route. Oh that totally Typing it in as much as they can and no one's reading. Yeah Yeah here we call it two things. There's the fire drill or someone goes to the rat in to drop everything in answer or we call it like the dashboard. Dance where they go to the OPS person who has to wrap in the updated salesforce and go back to Oscarsson in it becomes a huge waste of time that is multiple people out of the field when they could be selling more on the market side. There's quite a few products that we'll aggregate the the press releases and the blog posts and the news releases from companies. But that's on the outside. Yes on the inside it over. People need a lens to focus in on what matters then represented in a way that is meaningful. Yes yeah definitely. It's interesting are. We're a ten year old company are if you go way way back. Our original history is actually in an automated journalism fashion. We used to do Some sports story automation and so as the company progressed in we got into reporting within companies in operational reporting. Why would we found is people are so hungry for what the newsfeed style experience in knowing what's going on getting surface to them what about information in a business itself and keeping a tight instead of this long right causes people to call instead of read? Yeah I mean we're all busy. It needs to be something you can look at on the train. When you're making dinner for your kids in those micro two-minute moments that you might have to yourself? That is the only way consume information today. So what's trying to generate demand for this. What do you do Robert? I mean it's crazy raw at because it is such a new concept. It's a new product in a new space in two totally new way to think and evangelizing a new way to work so for us. We've tried to really be a giving brand rather than taking brandon. What what we try to do is share all we've learned about this way to work and storytelling in general and data storytelling in some of our products? In put that out the world and just educate people In the idea would be that we WANNA be able to give people the information they need to make decisions and it's different than what we've done in years past or what you see a lot of companies doing think a lot to be to be companies were from the same playbook and that a playbook it's well documented. It's easy to find in. You can do it in or make you feel good but is it the right thing for you and for us. We decided it wasn't just because there is so much education need in. We have so much knowledge to share that will we're focusing on is continuing to put that out into the world in what we've found is that's a good way for people to trust you. Trust the brand. Interact with the brand more approachable way rather than just. Please try our product right

Anna Sheena Walsh Marketing Organization Director Of Growth Oscarsson Brandon Customer Success Organization Robert
"marketing organization" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

Conversations with Dez

10:55 min | 1 year ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

"So I would say the biggest trend we're starting to see when we talk to customers and the biggest trend that everyone needs to sort of used their crystal ball and in the next eighteen to thirty six months get themselves on the right path to who is this whole concept of how you managing this new strategic asset called data if you think about this as if you had any other asset of physical asset or your financial assets and they were managed in the same in many cases chaotic way that data is being managed today would never be acceptable for for basic enterprise hi and welcome to another conversations with dense. I'm dense blanchfield. You'll host now today. I have the honor and privilege of having Chris Powell on with us today in the studio. Now Chris Powell is the cheek mocking of for convoked Chris Welcome to the show. Thanks thanks for having me. We're going amazing conversation ahead of us some amazing highlights around to your personal life exciting journey that you beat me to the Chase Smith Smith you went to the South Pole which we're gonNA cover for the minute and why you went there you then had the opportunity to do a tedtalk which I'd love to get into the detail and then we got some exciting points around acquisition acquisition of an organization recently by Your Company and then the upcoming two thousand nine hundred volt go event which undying to talk about more detail and I had the privilege and honor of coming to before we get into that though I wonder if maybe can just get a little insight. Do you personally bit background away from way grew up any anecdotal moments. It's in your academic career path. You'd be able to create so I was born. In the states outside of Philadelphia or in Philadelphia where I was born. I grew up mostly outside of Philadelphia. Am One of one of four kids and the the story. I often tell the person who has the least guided of my siblings. I I have a sister who's a nurse at another sisters and accountant and my brothers a Catholic priest so everyone sort of knew what they were going to do in life except for me and I I managed to just sort of skirt along and and follow things as they came at me so I tend to have had a lot of success reacting to things I'm always impressed with people who sort motive have planned their life out and I have tended to to manage to be somewhat okay just stumbling from one thing to the next so that's been good experience for me my family and I have I have three daughters my wife Nancy and I lived down. Argentina just got back about five years ago. We spent about two and a half years in Argentina when I was with. SAP running the Latin American Marketing Organization so it's been it's been a whirlwind you know I've been from from the start up world where I was sort of a jack-of-all-trades with seven people in the start up all the way through to a major organization like sap in the tens of thousands of employees to now here Combo which is sort of the best of both worlds in terms of size and ability to really get close to the business and and make an impact packed while I loved reading your bio you described as an adventure seeker marketing expert and potentially seeking exciting opportunities which were about to talk about one of the most exciting but it sounds to me like you always an adventure at heart but an interesting diverse background across the some of your siblings from religion through technology. That's that's a bit of a challenge for your parents. Imagine Juggling all yeah yeah it sure was up and say that I was a I say that I'm sure even amateur churn adventurous and my wife says I'm a professionally. I'm so you can choose which way you want to look at it. I think I'll go the same punchline I'd I'd love to dive into the role of chief marketing officer and come Volt Motor Day in the life of Chris Bounds like but before we do that I've been in mind. I'd love to talk initially about your exciting Jenny. You just had recently to the South Pole now folk who who have probably done a bit of homework on you're ready and have been following them sessions social media. You had this amazing journey down to the South Pole you went for a really fantastic reason just to bring awareness around what's happening with the world in general but you did it based with a solar solar power and regenerative energy and particularly I think it was bio fuel and wood chips so maybe give us a little bit of background kind of how that came about first and then we can sort of talk about the whole reason rational for some of the key challenges you faced so I had the great honor and pleasure to meet Robert Swan which which is coming on I guess about two years ago now when we were doing some work with them with our company was speaking at one of our events and as I was discussing thinks some things with him in ways that we could potentially sponsor some of the work he was doing he brought up this expedition that he was doing to the South Pole so the first expedition to realized solely on renewable energy and as you point out it's biofuel and solar power they were going to rely on and the premise was a pretty straightforward one which is if we're able in the harshest environment on the planet to rely on nothing but renewable energy imagine what you'd be able to do back here in our day to day lives and that's the premise has to sort of raise awareness of it so come up involved as the official data sponsor as we were partnering with Robert on the Expedition and and and there was just so many interesting things that are happening around this expedition that Robert and his teams involved in testing some equipment with NASA in terms of the conditions and its ability to perform and various things that we're able to sort of bring on this journey so when he asked me if I would be one of the folks that would join them for the last ten percent of the expedition addition I leapt at the opportunity it was sort of a once in a lifetime chance to get personally involved and I probably didn't realize the time how much it was going going to change me but it definitely I thought it would be a great story for sure but I didn't quite realize I think at the time how much would sort of impact me you did a lot of training for listeners who are thinking. Maybe there's a little bit insane trying this. I mean you didn't just walk into it and essentially just get helicopter into last mile. You'd Oh you you did the Hans log on the genius. He did a heck of a lot of training from one end. Stand what went into the training for this whole adventure so ultimately ultimately in the end. I think not enough but I managed to make it through the what Robert told all of us is that you need to be able to run ten miles a day so if you can run ten miles alson it's sustained basis day after day then you should be able to make it through. I did a lot of running a lot of I would run through the neighborhood with this crazy crazy sled. There's this this metal sled a fifty pound sled that I would drag behind me through the woods and all these places none of my family would ever walk with Mir or WanNa want to be seen as I was dragging this lead through the through the forest but it was a great opportunity in terms of being able to pull all of the you pull pull things together that I needed in order to be able to do the journey between the prep fiscal preparation than also Justa tab all of the things you need to do for equipment and it's all about the gear and being ready well. I guess it's one of those things where someone wants. Wrote Guide to the South Pole all was paramount to go into space that you get to a point where you realize you're so far away from everything that no one can really get you to help you and I think there was a moment I read in one of the articles we could long the lines saying by day to you wondered if you're going to be able to make it but based on a red background I think you describe yourself as a terrible athlete quote unquote due plenty of biking and running in tackling triathlon so I imagine your regular fit anyway but this particular fitness particularly mentally fitness. You've got to get ready for this. What was that little epiphany moment like two days in just realize that you are you a committed? This was this is really happening. It definitely is one of those situations where you realize. The only way out is through through a emergency plane coming in and evacuating you so you definitely don't want to be involved in that and it was you know that that question came about actually actually through we were answering questions from school children from all around the world from Australia to China to India to the United States and they had submitted questions where number of the folks that were on the expedition were sending the answers back and one of the questions that I'm not sure exactly why founded so humorous but one one of the questions was How do you keep on going each day and when you look if you find yourself in this ice desert where there's nothing there's nothing that's all around you? There really isn't any option except to keep going so you just keep moving forward and I think mentally it's it's an incredible opportunity and space. Physically you eventually start to realize. I just don't know how I'm going to feel the next day and if my body's going to keep moving forward yeah I mean I I'm crazy enough but every now and then something breaks so luckily I I made it through and you mentioned we were talking off air that I think it was you mentioned Scott's sex position back in nineteen twelve or fatally everyone perished those a massive gap between that and essentially this particular expedition well and it was so when when Robert Swan I walked to the South Pole it was in nineteen eighty six between one thousand nine hundred thousand nine hundred eighty six no one had attempted to do what what Scott's expedition ended up all perishing on the on the walk back actually after reaching the South Pole Robert did this then in nineteen nineteen eighty six with two others and then as he's been raising awareness for Antarctica and the plate to save Antarctica He Robert has a foundation called the twenty forty one foundation which is the year in the year twenty forty one is when the treaty the international treaty that protects Antarctica Expires so he's he's become a a warrior fighting for against climate change trying to protect Antarctica and this joining him was all part of that continued journey. It's it's frightening to think just how close that actually uses in two thousand nineteen thousand feet two thousand twenty next year matter months literally counting down to the days of some some of the two thousand and forty one or really talking a couple of decades before that pristine part of the world potentially is up for grabs the various things and we've seen what humans have done to the rest of the planet so that Pristine will that we're talking about is potentially at risk in a number of areas. I mean innovative exam. We're talking about climate change. I was watching a perma-cold uncalled land-line here on the weekend it's sort of like a a farming community TV station and they were talking about how farmers moving from various parts of central Australia in ministry down at Tasmania nine hundred down south because the climate becoming so temperate that they need to go and find cooler places gross.

South Pole Robert Swan Chris Powell Argentina Philadelphia Antarctica SAP Chase Smith Smith Scott accountant chief marketing officer Chris Bounds Australia Jenny Latin American Marketing Organ
Aligning Sales & Marketing

Daily Sales Tips

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Aligning Sales & Marketing

"Ian Altman from same side selling as back today. You may remember Ian from such tips, as number one sixteen where he suggested you stop calling to check in. He's back today with the story about sales and marketing alignment in the real world. ANC inolvement aligning sales marketing, what does that even me? Well, I worked with a company this week. There about a twenty billion dollar organization and something fascinating happen in the lead up to working with their sales organization. The head of marketing reach out to me and said, hey, would like to be there to if that's okay because we want to understand what the sales organization needs to be most effective. Meaning what can we do in the marketing organization to help them the most, and they were actively involved throughout all the discussions? We were talking about same side selling and how. Apply it to their business with their customers in the coolest part is towards the end of the meeting. The head of marketing said, hey, would you guys be opened us setting up a task force, so that we get a combination of sales people marketing people working together, so we can find out, what are the biggest problems that customers are trying to solve so we can find out, what's the language that you're hearing out in the street so that the marketing organization can create collateral can create content can create video to support your efforts and every time you come up with a great message instead of each person having to learn it. Weeden create that in the marketing content that you can share with your customers. So if you're wondering what sales and marketing alignment, looks like that's what it looks like. And if your organization isn't doing that. Well, you got something to work on,

Head Of Marketing Ian Altman ANC Weeden Twenty Billion Dollar
"marketing organization" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"These days that that's required or that's needed has evolved. Over the years as you alluded to earlier, I think the biggest changes in marketing organizations is is the need for technical skills. So I met with my team the other day, and we were talking about our tech stack, and we were reviewing all of the and I get pretty detailed because I can geek out, and we were reviewing all the different applications that we have we were understanding where could we shave costs what we really using which ones we get the most value of what was everything providing us, and I had we've thirty seven applications will use a marketing, and I was like what like thirty seven. I was like oh my God. That's that's a lot of money. It's been on demand gen. My my head is group said well, actually serious decisions for our size company. We should have at least forty five. I was like what forty five. So I think, you know, the the modern marketer relies on technology. You know people. I think the research shows that there's at least seven touch points digitally before you're willing to talk to somebody. And I mean, the thing about the last big thing, you know, that you bought a car a house. I mean, you go research online you get emails. You might watch a webinar. You'll download a white paper you'd whatever it is like it's extremely technically driven. And so I think tech skills and tech teams and having the right people. You can't just have the right systems you have to have right people. In fact, there's a CMO who I very much respect and she was switching from one job to another. And I asked her I said, hey, you know, how that go you s over the negotiations like, and I expected her to talk to me about oh, ask for this much more stock or this much more cash. I'm sure she ashes things that she said, well, my big sticking point is I wanted ten more people from my. Team. And she said it wasn't going to take the jobless I got ten heads that were technically focused, and this is the way modern marketing teams are and she knew to be successful should not only needed the Techsystems. She needed the people to run them..

United States Fed Funds Rate | 2019

Medical Frontiers

02:48 min | 2 years ago

United States Fed Funds Rate | 2019

"You, and I have talked where our interest rates at this point. Well, interest rates are actually very good. Very attractive. The thirty year fixed rate is at four and a quarter percent. The fifteen year fixed rate is at three point six two five the five year adjustable rate is at three point six. I'm sorry. Three point five percent three and a half percent. So interest rates are are low compared to where we were October November December of last year December they started to go down, but we were close to five percent in October. And I think at the time, especially what the Federal Reserve was saying they were saying interest rates. They were going to raise them in December most likely, and they were looking at three more rate hikes in two thousand and nineteen. So they did raise rates in December. Which caused some market-organization that entire time from October to December. We saw it in the stock market. We saw some selling in bonds. But then it started to turn around wants economic figures started to come out, and then the fed took a different position recently, which there is a slight hint of even a rate cut, which is highly unlikely. But even Janet Yellen said, it is not out of the question that if there is any kind of economic slowdown, and they're talking globally as well that if there is that type of slow down would we need economic stimulus? Can I ask you a question? Yes. Do you think they know what they're doing? I that's a great. Why I'm asking is. Because how do you go from three rate increases potentially for two thousand nineteen and within thirty to sixty days. Now, there's talk about the possibility of a rate cut. Yeah. Well, yeah. And and that's probably very slim. But but it is fascinating. Why that would change so quickly? It doesn't make a lot of sense to me. And I only want to bring it up. But I think there was definitely some politics involved in that entire process, but. I it looks like they're back to looking at hard economic data. The inflation factor is not really there. But you have a strong economy have a low unemployment would usually would be a fuel for inflation. But they're not is still not in the market. The market is the stock market has come back some not fully to where it was at this time last year. But it's pretty it's getting very close and interest rates are actually down. So it will be helpful. The bottom line is going to be helpful to homeowners who are looking to purchase a home or refinance coming into the spring market. And actually we've seen a fair amount of in the month of January relative to what we normally see in the winter months right after the holidays. Okay. Tends to be a little quiet. Louis. Interest rates have really plummeted for some reason. Well, what happened to all the concern about the inversion of a yield curve? I mean, that's still that's starting to widen. A little bit of snow. It's still there still relatively flat.

Federal Reserve Janet Yellen Louis Five Percent Fifteen Year Thirty Year Sixty Days Five Year
"marketing organization" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on Accelerate!

"Before they're at the buyer readiness stage. Let's combination of in our marketing organization through outreach in nurturing. But also, you know, the salesperson is still is is, you know, oftentimes, you're having a meeting with the meetings with customers for maybe a web conference with the customer or meeting them at a at a trade show or something like that. So the the in terms of. You know, how many of those we found that it wasn't reliable to look earlier stage opportunities from a management perspective until until they said, you know, formerly were we're gonna make doing valuation in. Oh, and so obviously, it depends on what types of products. You're you're selling more transactional businesses where the decisions made much quicker. It's it's going to be slightly different. But even those customers are customers of media fly that are outselling on a daily basis in transactional type businesses. One of the first steps that they have to take is to assess what the what the customer's current perceptions are of the products and services in what you know, the impact of of those products and services to be on their business. So we we weren't gonna really wide variety than. You know from B two B tack which actually similar to what media fly does financial services customers, like Goldman Sachs and TransAmerica we have a lot of customers in the consumer packaged goods space. And you know, that's very transactional. Type actually distribution side or in the retail side so selling through to retail. So so so the PepsiCo example, so there North American beverage business thirteen thousand users on on media fly and they use our solution to go out and gauge with people in the store and even the home office of of those retailers, and in one of the first things they have to do is break down the perceptions that the that those customers might have, you know, the the another one of our leading customers Miller cores. They use data data insights to help break down those perceptions. So everything they do whether it's in their on premise business in the bars and restaurants to the retail classes of trade in grocery liquor stores..

PepsiCo Goldman Sachs TransAmerica
"marketing organization" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

14:49 min | 2 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Is the place. It is time though for a off alert. This is Clark Howard rip off. Alerts. I want you to be really careful when you get a pitch for getting involved in a multilevel marketing organization. They are semi never seems to go away. And all that changes is what people are pushing at the time. The report from the Federal Trade Commission finds that it is a fraction of one percent of participants in multi level organizations ever make a penny or profit. Now, I want you to think about that. Of every hundred people who get involved in a multilevel marketing organization. Less than one will ever make a penny. That's not good is let me compare it to people who start their own small business where the success rate is generally just a little less than half. So in a multi level. People recruit people recruit people recruit people, and you have your down line your up line and all those lines. And the idea is that as you recruit people you get commissions on their sales. They recruit somebody they get commissions on the person, they recruit, and you get some commissions from both of them and on like that. Well, by the time, you figure out the Matt either you have to price things at a point that people don't want to buy them is end users. Most of the time. Or? You're selling them at a price where the people in the down line up line sideline and all that can't ever make any money. Now, the one that is the most polarizing of all in the last five years probably is will rue we will row. I can't even say, right? And we will row has been so controversial over the years. And now, the attorney general the state of Washington his filed a lawsuit against Louis Leroux saying that the business is a pyramid scheme and illegal pyramid scheme. And it's based on the fact that people overwhelmingly lose money in it. And in fact, this is not my word. There's a quote from the attorney general moolah row trick consumers into buying into its paramedics scheme with deceptive claims of high profits and refunds for unsold merchandise, instead many Washingtonians lost money, and we're left with piles of unsold merchandise and broken promises from Lula row time to hold Leroux accountable for its deception end quote. The courts will decide on this. But what I do want to direct you to look on EBay. There are three hundred thousand listings for moon Leroux wraps trying to unload merchandise. Three hundred thousand. Because with Lynn Leroux you buy lot of inventory. And then if it's not working for you. They promise that it'll be bought back. But again, the allegations are they don't buy it back and looking on EBay, maybe that's true. You'll decide. There's a story in the Washington Post. That I found fascinating. It's that women's friendships with each other. Are being harmed or destroyed by women because most people involved in multiple marketing or women not men women who really get into one woman who really gets into one. It's all she's talking about thinking about and all that. And she burns off her friendships trying to recruit people into multilevel marketing organizations, and so be aware that be careful. In fact, the percent of people in multilevel that are women. It's three quarters of people involved or women, and we've got eighteen million people. Who in some way, or another somehow connected to a multilevel? That's a lot. As a percent of the American people. That's a little more than five percent of the American people. And then includes kids when I say that five percent or involved in some multilevel. But almost none of them are making any money just be aware. And wary of the pitch you hear from somebody who's ultra enthusiastic the tests. You should always think about. Is the way you make money recruiting other people? Or is the way you make money selling to strangers who want the products at the prices or services at the prices that you're making them available. If all the push all the fuss is about recruiting other people, then ultimately it will collapse into itself, and that would qualify almost certainly isn't illegal pyramid game of chance on the other hand. If you really believe in the product, you really believe in the service, whatever it is. And you believe that is so good and price. So well that absolute strangers will be happy to buy it from you. Then that would be the way one of these organizations should function and should work. Geis's with us on the Clark Howard show. Hello gus. Going there. Clark. Great. Thank you guys. You're looking at getting involved in investing in stocks. Tell me about that. Yeah. I just now recently started looking into it something I would like to do myself. I didn't know if you if there's any get platforms out there that you recommend tell me what kind of trading are you thinking of doing are you thinking of buying small amounts of individual company stock are you looking to buy just a few stocks and put a lot of money into those few. Where are you? Where are you in your head about this? No, you're exactly right. I would like to just there's like a select few companies I'd like to invest in and probably do, you know, anywhere from five hundred bucks to, you know, a few thousand bucks, but only into a select few like you're saying, so if you're not going to be putting big money into just a few stocks. I like you to look at the trading platform, Robin Hood. Is that a mind? Oh, you're familiar with Robin Hood. Yeah. That was one of my options out that what's nice about that one. Is there is like, you know, zero commission and all that for actually for doing a trade. What there was a couple other ones out there always looking at where there is a commission, and they did have, you know, like more options, and it looked like they had like some online training for stocks, which I'm sort of interested in. But I just hate the commission for every time you do a trade well with the with the number with the number of stocks. You're gonna experiment owning. And the amount of money you're going to put at risk in the market. I think you start with Robin Hood. And if you really find that you were going to be at least part time. High energy high involvement into investing. You may find that you outgrow, Robin Hood. And then you want to start trading on a more normal platform, which today usually means you'll have stock trades at about five dollars trade. Correct. Yeah. That's about what I was seeing those five to six bucks. But the thing is I'm a huge believer in concept that there actually is a guy named Charles Schwab, Charles Schwab developed years ago, which is core and explore that your first money that you invest should be put into. Index fund type choices where you own thousands of companies little bits of thousands of companies as your base, and then the exploring is when you get involved in buying individual stocks because you want to be invested in the quote, unquote market first and then narrow win to individual stocks that you'd like to own. That kind of makes it a two part question for me because I worked for a public utility where they offer a four fifty seven plan that I am contributing to. I'm only doing ten percent. Would you recommend that? I try to max that out before I start playing with money four fifty seven in that four fifty seven what kind of investment choices, are you putting your money into well right now, it's it's in a retirement based type of retirement. So it is like say, you know, the s&p five hundred and on. I mean, it's it's totally. So you're doing you're doing exactly what what we're talking about. Because you are by being in the s&p five hundred you own the five hundred largest publicly traded stocks in the United States which account for in terms of overall stock market value. I think somewhere about eighty percent of the total value of stocks in the United States. So that is the diversification you want and so doing that first and then on your own using something like, Robin Hood, or one of the discount trading platforms owning a small number of individuals. Socks that works fine. Okay. So the base you always start with protecting your base, which in-investing is widely spreading out your money, and then from there, that's the whole idea of explore is that you buy specific things that really appeal to you. Andy's with us on the Clark Howard show. Hello, andy. Great. Thank you, Andy. How can I serve you? Question. Really year up some extra credit card debt, we have a two year old. So of course, things came up. We wanted to go on a couple of vacations. I should've said no a few times when I did it. Old are probably I don't know twelve thousand dollars in credit card debt. I was starting to trickle down. Now is that about thirty four. Whoa. Things one. I hear a lot of guilt in your voice. Yes. But I also hear of taking responsibility for choices made. So as much as you can let go with the guilt and just own the responsibility to improve things from here. Right. Right. So thirty four thousand that's a pretty serious number. What's your family income? We're right around rhetoric to twenty. Okay. So we're not hurting by any means. So I don't want to belittle the debt, but I do want to say that on the income. You have you can easily turn this around and white that debt out. Right, right. I think so too. How much per month out of that? So you're earning net of taxes. What about fourteen thousand a month? It ends up being. Be right around ten eleven. Okay. So right. So let's say ten how much of that ten. Can you reasonably put towards the credit card debt each month? Not what I wanna hear what's reasonable for you. I think we could do around fifteen hundred. We can maybe stressing the to fifteen fifteen. Okay. I want you to put in an amount that you can succeed with on the net. Income you have you should be able to do the fifteen hundred the effect of that is that you will wipe out that credit card debt, if you stick to it and don't charge more of the cards, you wipe it out in two years. Okay. And that's her anytime, you can pay off credit card debt in thirty months or less. It's just something that becomes a hassle. Not a real threat to you financially. Right. Right. Okay. That makes sense. And one thing, and I had a couple of neighbors friends mentioned it to and I thought about it was not knowing anything like a debt consolidation company because I know those are nine times out of ten or maybe more rip off. Looking at either either a personal loan if it's in the five to eight percent range or a home equity loan just to get cards from twenty twenty two percent interest down to a sentence. Seven. Do you know what your credit scores are approximately? Somewhere. There's probably middle. Oh seven hundred. All right. So what I would recommend is that you go to the platforms of lending club and prosper. Okay. And see if you can put your dad out for bid on both of those platforms, and you should be able if your credit score is where it is. And what your income is hopefully, your overall debt ratios are. Okay. You'll be able to refi into lower rates, and then you're on a path that where I'm telling you to pay it off in two years. You know, they may say, okay, we'll lend you money for twenty four months is what you're going to have to pay per month. And that creates the automatic discipline, right? Right, right. That's that's part of what's in my head. So that would that would get you. The lower rate thing you and your wife have to resolve is that you're gonna put the credit cards and the deep freeze. Because if you ran this up from twelve to thirty four thousand in a blink. The way you turn that around is not using those cards, and literally I mean, putting them in deep freeze, you get one of those freezer bags put your credit cards in it put water in seal it and throw it in the freezer compartment, which has the the mental and psychological thing that your cards are out of your life, and you will not be tempted hopefully to try to defrost them. You're listening to the Clark Howard show..

Clark Howard Robin Hood Andy Federal Trade Commission EBay United States Louis Leroux attorney Washington Post Lynn Leroux Leroux Matt Washington Charles Schwab gus Geis five percent
"marketing organization" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Keep more of what you make coming up in just a few minutes to let you know? An update on something. I told you about an absolute Clark rage involving horizon, ripping off teachers and students. No other cell phone carrier's doing any foolishness like that. And I'll fill you in on what Verizon has decided to do after a wave of negative, publicity and coming up later. Multilevel marketing organizations. I gotta tell you I making the most money I've ever made my life selling this out of the other. I've got some update for you some information you need to know before you get sucked in to any multilevel marketing organization. I wanna talk to you right now about why this is one of the great bargain times of the year. A lot of stuff is a real deal right now because well people are shopped out from the whole Christmas shopping season. And there are a number of things become a deal this time of year. There's a lot of fuss about the cruise industry and what used to be called wave week and it's now called wave season. And when it's as cold as it's going to be in so much of the midwest and eastern part of the country over the next about forty or so hours. A lot of people are gonna think. Wow. Going to the Caribbean on a cruise that sounds absolutely great. So normally this would be a wonderful time to book, but you may find the according to historical numbers from cruise critic you're going to actually get better deals on cruises in March. Then you're going to find now that's just based on historical numbers and particularly with the extreme cold wave. A lot of people are going to be more motivated to book in may end up paying more than you'll have to later. But there are a lot of really good deals right now. It's just actually going to continue to have a lot of offers over about the next five weeks. Six weeks on cruises one to tell.

Verizon Clark Caribbean five weeks Six weeks
"marketing organization" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

14:41 min | 2 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Is the place. It is time though, four rip off alert. This is Clark. Howard rip-off alerts. I want you to be really careful when you get a pitch for getting involved in a multilevel marketing organization, they are some never seems to go away. And all that changes is what people are pushing at the time. A report from the Federal Trade Commission finds that it is a fraction of one percent of participants in multi level organizations ever make a penny your profit. Now what you think about that? Out of every hundred people who get involved in a multilevel marketing organization less than one will ever make a penny. That's not good odds. Let me compare it to people who start their own small business where the success rate is generally just a little less than half. So in a multilevel people recruit people who recruit people recruit people, and you have your down line your up line and all those lines and the idea is that as you recruit people you get commissions on their sales. They recruit somebody they get commissions on the person, they recruit, and you get some commissions from both of them and on like that. Well, by the time, you figure out the math either you have to price things at a point that people don't want to buy them is in users. Most of the time. Or? You're selling them at a price where the people in the down line up line inside line and all that can't ever make any money. Now, the one that is the most polarizing of all in the last five years. Probably is we will rue when Lareau came say, right? And we will row. Has been so controversial over the years. And now the attorney general the state of Washington his filed a lawsuit against Louis Leroux saying that the business is a paramedics game and illegal pyramid scheme. And it's based on the fact that people overwhelmingly lose money in it. And in fact, this is not my word this a quote from the attorney general Luna Leroux trick consumers into buying into its paramount scheme with deceptive claims of high profits and refunds for unsold merchandise, instead many Washingtonians lost money, and we're left with piles of unsold merchandise and broken promises from Luna Leroux time to hold Leroux accountable for its deception in quote, the courts will decide on this. But what I do want to direct you to look on EBay. There are three hundred thousand listings for moon Leroux wraps trying to unload merchandise. Three hundred thousand. Because with Lula row you buy of inventory. And then if it's not working for you. They promise that it'll be bought back. But again, the allegations are they don't buy it back and looking on EBay. Maybe that's true. But you'll decide there's a story in the Washington Post. That I found fascinating. It's that women's friendships with each other. Are being harmed or destroyed by women because most people involved in multilevel marketing are women not men women who really get into one a woman who really into one. It's all she's talking about thinking about and all that. And she burns off her friendships trying to recruit people into multilevel marketing organizations, and so be aware of that be careful. In fact, the percent of people in multilevel that are women. It's three quarters of people involved or women, and we've got eighteen million people who in some way or another somehow connected to a multilevel. That's a lot. A percent of the American people. That's a little more than five percent of the American. People includes kids when I say that five percent or involved in some multilevel. But almost none of them are making any money just be aware. And wary of the pitch you hear from somebody who's ultra enthusiastic the tests. You should always think about is the way you make money recruiting other people. Or is the way you make money selling to strangers who want the products at the prices or services at the prices that you're making them available. If all the push all the fuss is about recruiting other people, then ultimately it will collapse into itself. And that would qualify almost certainly is an illegal pyramid. A game of chance on the other hand, if you really believe in the product, you really believe in the service, whatever it is. And you believe that is so good and price. So well that absolute strangers will be happy to buy it from you. Then that would be the way one of these organizations should function and should work. Geis's with us on the Clark Howard show. Hello gus. Yeah. I was going there. Clark. Great. Thank you guys. You're looking at getting involved in investing in stocks. Tell me about that. Yeah. I just now recently started looking into it. It's something I would like to do myself. So I didn't know if you if there's any good platforms out there that you recommend tell me what kind of trading are you thinking of doing you thinking of buying small amounts of individual company. Stock are you looking to buy just a few stocks and put a lot of money into those few. Where are you? Where are you in your head about this? No, you're exactly right. I would like to just there's like a select few companies I'd like to invest in and probably do, you know, anywhere from five hundred bucks to, you know, a few thousand bucks, but only into a select few like you're saying, so if you're not going to be putting big money into just a few stocks. I like for you to look at the trading platform, Robin Hood. Is that is that China had in mind? Oh, you're familiar with Robin Hood. Yeah. That was one of my options out that what's nice about that one. Is there is like zero commission and all that for actually for doing a trade where there was a couple of other ones out there. I was looking at where there is a commission, and they did have, you know, like more options, and it looked like they had some online training for stocks, which I'm sort of interested in. But I just hate the commission for every time you do a trade with with the number the number of stocks. You're going to experiment owning. And the amount of money you're going to put at risk in the market. I think you start with Robin Hood. And if you really find that you were going to be at least part time. High energy high involvement into investing. You may find that you outgrow, Robin Hood. And then you want to start trading on a more normal platform, which today usually means you'll have stock trades at about five dollars trade. Correct. Yeah. That's about what I was seeing those five or six bucks. But the thing is I'm a huge believer in concept that there actually is a guy named Charles Schwab, Charles Schwab developed years ago, which is core and explore that your first money that you invest should be put into. Index fund type choices where you own thousands of companies little bits of thousands of companies as your base, and then the exploring is when you get involved in buying individual stocks because okay, you want to be invested in the quote, unquote market first, and then narrow win to individual stocks that you'd like to own because. Okay. That kind of makes it a two part question for me because I worked for a public utility where they offer a four fifty seven plan that I am contributing to. I'm only doing ten percent. Would you recommend that? I try to max that out before I start playing with money four fifty seven in that four fifty seven what kind of investment choices, are you putting your money into? Well, right now, it's it's in a retirement based type of retirement. So it is like say, you know, the S and P five hundred it's totally. So you're doing you're doing exactly what. What we're talking about? Because you are by being in the S and P five hundred you own the five hundred largest publicly traded stocks in the United States which account for in terms of overall stock market value. I think somewhere about eighty percent of the total value of stocks in the United States. So that is the diversification you want and so doing that first and then on your own using something like, Robin Hood, or one of the discount trading platforms owning a small number of individual stocks that works fine. Okay. So. Start with protecting your base, which an investing is widely spreading out your money, and then from there, that's the whole idea of explore is that you buy specific things that really appeal to you. Andy's with us on the car Howard show. Hello, andy. Hey, how are you? Great. Thank you, Andy. How can I serve you? Well question. My wife over the last really year rats up some extra credit card debt, we have a two year old. So of course, things came up. We wanted to go on a couple of vacations. I should've said no a few times when I did for his old are probably I know twelve thousand dollars in credit card debt that was starting to trickle down. Now is at about thirty four so two things one. I hear a lot of guilt in your voice. Yes. But I also hear a lot of taking responsibility for choices made. So as much as you can let go with the kill and just own the responsibility to improve things from here. Right. Right. So thirty four thousand that's a pretty serious number. What's your family income? We're right around rhetoric. Okay. So we're not hurting by any means. So I don't want to belittle the debt, but I do want to say that on the income. You have you can easily turn this around and white that debt out. Right, right. I think so too. How much per month out of that? So you're earning net of taxes. What about fourteen thousand a month? Ended up being. Right around ten eleven. Okay. So right. So let's say ten how much of that ten can you reasonably put towards the credit card debt each month. Not what I want to hear what's reasonable for you. I think we could do around fifteen hundred. I can maybe stretching to fifteen Joe with the fifteen okay. I want you to put in an amount that you can succeed with on the net. Income you have you should be able to do the fifteen hundred the effect of that is that you will wipe out that credit card debt if you stick to it and don't charge more of the cards. You're wipe it out in two years. Okay. And that's her anytime, you can pay off credit card debt in thirty months or less. It's just something that becomes a hassle. Not a real threat to you financially. Right. Right. Okay. That makes sense and one thing, and I had a couple of neighbors friends mentioned into and I thought about it was not knowing anything like a debt consolidation company. 'cause I know those are nine times out of ten maybe more rebuff looking at either either a personal loan if it's in the five to eight percent range or a home equity loan just to get cards from twenty twenty two percent interest down to seven do. You know, what your credit scores are approximately somewhere? There's probably the middle. Oh, hundreds. All right. So what I would recommend is that you go to the platforms of lending club and prosper. Okay. And see if you can put your dad out for bid on both of those platforms, and you should be able if your credit score is where it is. And what your income is hopefully, your overall debt ratios are. Okay. You'll be able to refi into lower rates. And then you're on a path that where I'm telling you to pay it off in two years. You know, they may say, okay, we'll lend you money for twenty four months is what you're going to have to pay per month. And that creates the automatic discipline. Right. Right. That's that's part of what's in my head. That will get you. The lower rate thing you and your wife have to resolve is that you're gonna put the credit cards and the deep freeze. Because if you ran this up from twelve to thirty four thousand in a blink the way, you turn that around is not using those cards, and literally I mean, putting them in deep freeze, you get one of those freezer bags put your credit cards in it put water in seal it and throw it in the freezer compartment, which has the the mental and psychological thing that your cards are out of your life, and you will.

Robin Hood Clark Howard Federal Trade Commission Luna Leroux United States EBay Andy Leroux Washington Post attorney Louis Leroux Washington Lareau Charles Schwab Lula gus Geis China
"marketing organization" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Keep more of what you make coming up in just a few minutes. One to let you know an update on something I told you about an absolute park rage involving horizon, ripping off teachers and students. No other cell phone carrier's doing any foolishness like that. And I'll fill you in on what Verizon has decided to do after a wave of negative, publicity and coming up later. Multilevel marketing organizations. I gotta tell you. I'm making the most money I've ever made my life selling this out of the other. I've got some update for you some information you need to know before you get sucked in to any multilevel marketing organization. I wanna talk to you right now about why this is one of the great bargain times of the year. A lot of stuff is a real deal right now because well people are shopped out from the whole Christmas shopping season. And there are a number of things become a deal. This time of year. There's a lot of fuss about the cruise industry and what used to be called wave week and it's now called wave season and win. It's as cold as it's going to be in so much of the midwest and eastern part of the country over the next about forty or so hours. A lot of people are gonna think. Wow. Going to the Caribbean on a cruise that sounds absolutely great. So normally this would be a wonderful time to book, but you may find that according to historical numbers from cruise critic you're going to actually get better deals on cruises in March. Then you're going to find now that's just based on historical numbers and particularly with the extreme cold wave. A lot of people are going to be more motivated to book in may end up paying more than you'll have to later. But there are a lot of really good deals right now. It's just actually going to continue to have a lot of offers over about the next five weeks. Six weeks on cruises wanted to tell you..

Verizon Caribbean five weeks Six weeks
"marketing organization" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

13:57 min | 2 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"This is Clark. Howard rip-off alerts. I want you to be really careful when you get a pitch for getting involved in a multilevel marketing organization. They are semi never seems to go away. And all that changes is what people are pushing at the time. The report from the Federal Trade Commission. Find said it is a fraction of one percent of participants in multi level organizations. They ever make a penny or profit. Now, I want you to think about that. Out of every hundred people who get involved in a multilevel marketing or your sation. Less than one will ever make a penny. That's not good odds. Let me compare it to people who start their own small business where the success rate is generally just a little less than half. So in a multilevel people recruit people recruit people recruit people, and you have your down line your up line and all those lines and the idea is that as you recruit people you get commissions on their sales. They recruit somebody they get commissions on the person, they recruit, and you get some commissions from both of them and on like that. Well, by the time, you figure out the math either you have to praise things at a point that people don't want to buy them is in users. Most of the time. Or? You're selling them at a price where the people in the down line up line inside line and all that can't ever make any money. Now, the one that is the most polarizing of all in the last five years probably is we will rue when Lareau say, right? And we Leroux has been so controversial over the years. And now, the attorney general the state of Washington his filed a lawsuit against Lareau saying that the business is a paramount scheme and illegal pyramid scheme. And it's based on the fact that people overwhelmingly lose money in it. And in fact, this is not my word this a quote from the attorney general moolah road trick consumers into buying into its pyramid scheme with deceptive claims of high profits and refunds for unsold merchandise, instead many Washingtonians lost money, and we're left with piles of unsold merchandise and broken promises from Lula row. It's time to hold Leroux accountable for its deception in quote, the courts will decide on this. But what I do want to direct you to look on EBay. There are three hundred thousand listings for moon Leroux wraps trying to unload merchandise. Three hundred thousand. With Lulu row you buy inventory. And then if it's not working for you. They promised that it'll be bought back. But again, the allegations are they don't buy it back and looking on EBay. Maybe that's true. But you'll decide. There's a story in the Washington Post. That I found fascinating. It's that women's friendships with each other. Are being harmed or destroyed by women because most people involved in multilevel marketing are women not men women who really get into one a woman who really gets into one. It's all she's talking about thinking about all that. And she burns off her friendships trying to recruit people into multilevel marketing organizations, and so be aware that be careful. In fact, the percent of people in multilevel that are women. It's three quarters of people involved or women, and we've got eighteen million people who in some way or another somehow connected to a multilevel. That's a lot. As a percent of the American people. That's a little more than five percent of the American people. And that includes kids when I say that five percent or involved in some multilevel. But almost none of them are making any money just be aware. And wary of the pitch you hear from somebody who's ultra enthusiastic the tests. You should always think about. Is the way you make money recruiting other people? Or is the way you make money selling to strangers who want the products at the prices or services at the prices. The you're making them available. If all the push all the fuss is about recruiting other people, then ultimately it will collapse into itself. And that would qualify almost certainly is an illegal pyramid. A game of chance on the other hand, if you really believe in the product, you really believe in the service, whatever it is. And you believe that is so good and price. So well that absolute strangers will be happy to buy it from you. Then that would be the way one of these organizations should function and should work. Geis's with us on the Clark Howard show. Hello gus. Going there. Clark. Great. Thank you. Gus. You're looking at getting involved in investing in stocks. Tell me about that. Yeah. I just now recently started looking into it something I would like to do myself. So I didn't know if you if there's any good platforms out there that you recommend tell me what kind of trading are you thinking of doing are you thinking of buying small amounts of individual company stock are you looking to buy just a few stocks and put a lot of money into those few. Where are you? Where are you in your head about this? No, you're exactly right. I would like to just there's like a select few companies I'd like to invest in. They'll probably do, you know, anywhere from five hundred bucks to, you know, a few thousand bucks, but only into a select few like you're saying, so if you're not going to be putting big money into just a few stocks. I like view to look at the trading platform, Robin Hood is that mine. Oh, you're familiar with Robin Hood. Yeah. That was one of my options out about that one is there's like, you know, zero commission and all that for actually for doing a trade. Are there was a couple other ones out there? I was looking at where there is a commission, and they did have, you know, like more options, and it looked like they had like online training for stocks, which I'm sort of interested in. But I just hate the commission for every time you do a trade with the with the number with the number stocks. You're going to experiment owning. And the amount of money you're going to put at risk in the market. I think you start with Robin Hood. And if you find that you were going to be at least part time. High energy high involvement into investing. You may find that you outgrow, Robin Hood. And then you want to start trading on a more normal platform, which today usually means you'll have stock trades at about five dollars trade. Correct. Yeah. That's about what I was seeing those five to six bucks. But the thing is I'm a huge believer in concept that there actually is a guy named Charles Schwab, Charles Schwab developed years ago, which is core and explore that your first money that you invest should be put into index fund tight choices where you own thousands of companies little bits of thousands of companies as your base, and then the exploring is when you get involved in buying individual stocks because you want to be invested in the quote, unquote market first and then narrow win to individ-. Stocks that you'd like to own because that kind of makes a two part question for me because I work for a public utility where they offer four fifty seven plan that I am contributing to. I'm only in ten percent. Would you recommend that? I tried to max out before I start playing with money. Four fifty seven in that four fifty seven what kind of investment choices, are you putting your money into well right now, it's it's an a retirement based type of retirement. So it is like say, you know, the S and P five hundred thought I mean, it's it's totally. So you're doing it. You're doing exactly what. What we're talking about? Because you are by being in the s&p five hundred you own the five hundred largest publicly traded stocks in the United States which account for in terms of overall stock market value. I think somewhere about eighty percent of the total value of stocks in the United States. So that is the diversification you want and so doing that first and then on your own using something like, Robin Hood, or one of the discount trading platforms owning a small number of individual stocks that works fine. Okay. So the base you always start with protecting your base, which an investing is widely spreading out your money, and then from there, that's the whole idea of explore is that you buy specific things that really appeal to you and he's with us on the Clark Howard show. Hello, andy. Hey, Gordon, great. Thank you, Andy. How can I serve you? Question. My wife really year racked up some extra credit card debt. We have a two year old. So of course, things came up. We want to be on a couple of vacations. I should've said no they didn't. Old are probably twelve thousand dollars in credit card debt that was starting to trickle down about thirty four. So two things one. I hear a lot of guilt in your voice. Yeah. So they also hear a lot of taking responsibility for choices made. So as much as you can let go with the guilt and just own the responsibility to improve things from here. Right. Right. So thirty four thousand that's a pretty serious number. What's your family income? We're right around right around twenty. Okay. So we're not hurting by any. So I don't want to belittle the debt, but I do want to say that on the income. You have you can easily turn this around and white that debt out. Right, right. I think so too. How much per month out of that? So you're earning net of taxes. What about fourteen thousand a month? Ended up being. Right around ten eleven. Okay. So right. So let's say ten how much of that ten. Can you reasonably put towards the credit card debt each month? Not what I wanna hear what's reasonable for you. I think we could do around fifteen hundred I can maybe stress to fifteen fifteen okay. I want you to put in an amount that you can succeed with on the net. Income you have you should be able to do the fifteen hundred the effect of that is that you will wipe out that credit card debt, if you stick to it and don't charge more to the cards, you wipe it out in two years. And that's anytime you can pay off credit card debt in thirty months or less. It's just something that becomes a hassle. Not a real threat to you financially. Right. Right. Okay. That makes sense and one thing, and I had a couple of neighbors friends mentioned it to and I thought about it was not knowing anything like a debt consolidation company. 'cause I know those are nine times out of ten or maybe more rip-off looking at either either a personal loan if it's in the five to eight percent range or a home equity loan just to get cards from twenty twenty two percent interest down to seven do. You know, what your credit scores are approximately somewhere? There's probably mid the low seven hundreds. All right. So what I would recommend is that you go to the platforms of lending club and prosper. Okay. And see if you can put your dad out for bid on both of those platforms, and you should be able if your credit score is where it is. And what your income is hopefully, your overall debt ratios are. Okay. You'll be able to refi into lower rates. And then you're on a path that where I'm telling you to pay it off in two years. You know, they may say, okay, we'll lend you money for twenty four months what you're going to have to pay per month. And that creates the automatic discipline. Right. Right. That's that's part of my head. So that would that would get you. The lower rate thing you and your wife have to resolve is that you're gonna put the credit cards and the deep freeze. Because if you ran this up from twelve to thirty four thousand in a blink. The way you turn that around is not using those cards, and literally I mean, putting them in deep freeze, you get one of those freezer bags put your credit cards in it put water in seal it and throw it in the freezer compartment, which has the the mental and psychological thing that your cards are out of your life, and you will not be tempted hopefully to try to defrost them. You're listening to the Clark Howard show..

Clark Howard Robin Hood Federal Trade Commission Leroux EBay United States Washington Post Lareau attorney Andy Washington Lula row gus Charles Schwab Geis Gordon five percent
"marketing organization" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

12:07 min | 2 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"WDBO? Glad you're here on the Clark Howard show, where it's about you learning ways to keep more of what you make. Dear to be rich in this multi level marketing organization, you can have your up line your down line your sideline your everything line the pitch forever. Something I've been asked about forever. Multi multi-levels come and go in waves, and in popularity and the idea is always the same. It's a belief that this one's different that this product line or service is the greatest, and that is the fastest growing level sense. Blah, blah, blah. So if it is a legitimate multilevel, what are the chances you're going to make money? Well in a survey done by the website, magnified, money dot com. They talked with they just survey over a thousand multi-level marketing participants and when they computed the math, the average participant was earning less than a dollar an hour working in a multi level, not thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars and no free cars and all that. And half of people. Earned less than five hundred dollars in the last five years in the multi level. There are so many women who got into the leisurewear thing is level and our start now with massive inventories sitting in their garages, or if they have a basement their basement spare room. Gathering dust going on. So. There are always animal team level. That's why a lot of people confuse them with the different kind of activity and illegal pyramid. But they are not lots of multi-levels. They're perfectly legal, but they work like a pyramid. And that there's a very small number of people who hit it big. And everybody else earns basically nothing. So when somebody gives you the pitch, please. Be wary be aware be careful because even though that person talking to you. Is so excited. So enthusiastic. Know that the odds are very very much against you. And the number one thing. That I want to go back to something that happened last year. Do you know one of the reasons credit card defaults spiked last year? Was people got into the whole mania of the crypto currencies and the initial coin offerings. And they were doing it with borrowed money. Don't borrow money to buy inventory for any multi level marketing organization, the ones that push you to lay out your money up front to hold inventory. That's contrary to the whole original idea multi-levels, which is your hard work and time and effort will pay off. Not you having to be a merchant holding inventory. The whole inventory side should be all about something that when an order is placed the inventory goes straight from a warehouse of the multi to the individual buying and by the way, remember this. The way you get to that fuzzy area where it goes from being a multi level to an illegal paramedics. Is if the big push the big pitch is about you recruiting people into the organization instead of you selling a product or service to strangers. You know, not to walk away. Run run away. Sue is with us on the Clark Howard show. Hello, sue Clark. You're going to Costa Rica? Are you a surfer or what's taking you to Costa Rica? Just to go to stay in the sun. And just relax. Join the scenery there. Well, you know, the the cost of getting to Costa Rica and elsewhere in Central America has been going steadily down for the flights. But in Costa Rica in particular, a lot of the costs of the trip went to your there is actually higher than it used to be because of the? The amount of demand. There is for going to Costa Rica to the coast and also to San Jose, the rain forest, and all that have you ever been to Costa Rica? Not magnificent place. Really great. Well, good what we wanted to do about maybe going into flying into Liberia. We'd kind of be wearing at the coast. Yeah. And then like like round trip. Tell me do you live in a city served by jet blue Greenville airport. Atlanta about writing between both south. So I would go to jet blues website because many of the cheapest fares to Costa Rica other Central American spots and spots in the Caribbean. Now along the eastern seaboard a lot of those cheap fares. Are they are because of two airlines jet. Blue and spirit chapel is a great airline spirit is an airline. Yeah. Like share with your fellow listener. Any us to death? Everything you wanna do. There's just. Well, they didn't charge to breathe though online debatable. There were a lot of extra charges. Once you get through chief short. Yeah. I understand. I was looking at. Wow. Air a European airline that flies from the US to Europe it some amazingly low fares. And what's funny is when you get past the ticket like I was looking at tickets that were ninety nine dollars each way to Europe, the add on fees ended up being at least one way more than the fair was. So you got gotta look the all land thing now. But if you wanna go to Liberia, go to go in there out of San Jose, whatever whatever we work out to be how much flexibility do you have about your travel dates? He's open. That's great. That'll get you very that'll get your very cheap fare. What I'd like you to do is set up. A with a fair alert from several different departure point since you sound like you're willing to travel a little bit could be the best fares out of Charlotte. North Carolina is an example or the best fair might be out of Charleston, South Carolina. You don't know, you know, in in your general vicinity and then track fares also on kayak dot com Kyi AK go and do one of their fair searches where you do plus or minus three days. Try different departure airports in to both Liberia and San Jose. And when you see a fair, that's really just eye-popping. Great. That's when you buy eye-popping great to either would be a fair that starts in the threes round trip. In other words, less than four hundred round. Trip. Jim joins us on the Clark Howard show. Hi, jim. How are you today? Oh, I'm doing. Well. How about yourself? Good. Good. So how can I be of service? Steve today. I recently hold. You speaking on the radio. After work is I'm driving home. And you had mentioned that people that are under the age of twenty one. So that eighteen to twenty they wouldn't be allowed to get a credit card. Do you to federal law, and I worked at a credit union since graduating from college so going on three years now, and I just new right? All right. Knew that because I've recently issued cards and helped college kids college students, I should say get their first credit card under the age of twenty one. So after doing some research to find exactly what I was talking about. Realized that it was the credit card act of two thousand nine that. You're referring to. If people are able to pay down debt, then they could get credit Heidi younger than twenty one. So. How's your part time job there? A okay to submit an application. You have to submit it via fax mail, which isn't hard to do for most financial institutions. And I mean, this is only one way to start building credit, and I just submitted a question online or a blur. To just kind of. Well, I appreciate that. You know, most of the time when I'm being asked the question, it's about students who are not working, you know, they're just in college as full-time students and the idea the card act was it was such a high delinquency rate on credit cards. When college students were given them the first week of school at age eighteen or nineteen. That's why the card act provisions are there. But especially if a kid is I used the word kid, even though you just corrected yourself. If somebody is working and they're going to school. They're considered to be someone who is some degree of financially independent, and they are eligible to have a credit card. If a financial institution will issue one to them. So you are completely correct. Well, the other thing is I know plenty of high school students that graduate. Maybe they don't go on to a technical school or four year degree program. But you know, they go right into the workforce and for them to have to wait until they're twenty one could be quite a burden, but but they don't have to. If they if they show that they are under the card act is is I understand the provision, right? As long as they are financially independent. They're eligible to apply for a credit card at eighteen. Yes. So it's only college students that are completely dependent on their parents who are the ones that are supposed to wait 'til they're twenty one. And I appreciate you going in and digging in and reading the rules and regulations. Nobody ever does that. Yeah. That's really neat. Judy's with us on the Clark Howard show. Hello, judy. Hi there. How are you? Great. Thank you, Judy. You have a question for me about saving money. There's a particular investment app. And when you go into it and ask you for your Bank account information, your credit card information, and everything. And I'm just trying to make sure that this is a legit apt to invest my money on what's it called acorn, actually acorns? Yeah. That's legit. I've talked about that before. And what happens is that? Let's say you go into a store, and you buy a sandwich..

Costa Rica Clark Howard Liberia San Jose sue Clark Judy Europe Caribbean Jim Charlotte US North Carolina Greenville Atlanta South Carolina Charleston Heidi younger Central America Steve
"marketing organization" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

09:02 min | 2 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"We're back and we're having a great conversation with Kevin Dunn Worth C._E._O.. Of Selling biosciences sciences really cool company doing fascinating meaningful work for everyday people or people who are are struggling out there particularly orthopedic Lee and needs out ways to manage their pain and be able to go on living their lives and so Kevin and I are talking about the role marketing and growth in <hes> what it means when you really are bringing a brand new innovative science to the market and you're trying to get medical professionals who have particularly their own ideas about how things need to get done trying to market to them and your marketing to patients and giving them you know something a story. That's an alternative potentially to traditional Orthopedic Surgery Orthopedics. We Dabble babble in heart. We we have a position in cosmetics. Yes anywhere there's inflammation causes an effect. It's unwanted cells. Play a role in absolutely so. What do you think that she most important things things? The Marketing Organization needs to do to help a company like yours grow organically when you have this sort of new story new market you know it's really not just about pumping out more ads or for more content. It's really a different immoral about a strategy sure I guess one of the things that we struggle with as we get to do business with at one point exclusively thought leaders these people that lend themselves to the next day so they were easy to get a meetings with even though they're the busiest practitioners they're easy to talk to this about it because they want. They WANNA understand the next thing but they somewhat get insulated into their group and we it didn't if as effectively work that they would proselytize our message to to other health providers you'll helping new going to be evangelist for sure say in a way that was sort of your strategy early on. Let's haven't evangelist strategy to but it didn't crack play out the way you'd hope key opinion leaders have always been great about that. That's that main thing that they do but I do think that sells in themselves are either this full-time practice of evangelizing to your patients versus constituents other surgeons so we have struggled to take this great message <hes> in these these key opinion leaders to that next a group of Dr so wait wait we see people that never view cells and then we see see people that have stopped mostly doing traditional surgery and just you cells and those are the book ends in and everything in between we need to become we're trying to figure out how to become more effective to market to that greater people and that's where there's a lot of people you if you if you look at the technology adoption right you've got those those Donald Bushy hourly innovators maybe only two or three percent right on those very very early innovators and you you reached out to those guys they get their on board and so it really is <unk> crossing the chasm speak right and getting into those early majority Kinda even some of the early adopters but really getting too early majority that sort of the next hurdle interesting they've actually become a guess what we struggle with as day become not only in early adapter but they then become a contributor and that's what eats up a lot of their time. I mean they literally. We have doctors at our run. They run labs doctors at now work directly with US evangelist portion of that whole idea. Idea we definitely need support their <hes> they need support there and we need to be person to support him but that was not her plan from the get-go so I sense of according to be some new exciting things happening in two thousand nineteen assist your year <hes> which is why I'm having this conversation but you've been in in this space along time. He's been in sales. You've been a marketing. You've been in operations if you could take a moment just even stepping outside of just selling biosciences and thinking about what we know about industry about as an entrepreneur and as a businessman. What do you think are the two things that every marketing organization could do better to drive organic growth for a company? Oh I think it's the passion in creativity which often go hand in hand but in a passion spends energy being creative is kind of something you're more born with but to drive that throughout an organization I think marketings use the marketing from the inside out and sometimes they need to also the market inside you know one of the things we done early as I create an uncommon common here like everybody else's place they could eat and sit away. PUT IT SMACK DAB in the middle of our office so when you were in an ear shots of engineering <hes> the biology and <hes> the the cell group or marketing we wanted to have this great a collaboration in exchange at one point a guy that ran our warehouse had renamed more products than any other person for the marketing barmaid nate nine nine of them in a really big it came from this trying to market to ourselves inside because you can imagine it's not like we were hurrying people that came from stem cell company. When I got started we were one of the if not the first one of the at this row artnews only a few minutes left so anything about marketing and you think about the folks that you had in marketing what does it you want them to measure to show that shows to you that they are moving the needle for the company? You know I'm always looking where we go next and as we've gone from one disciplined the next in in medicine marketing has an effectively told me the size of that opportunity in different silos and once we get outside our comfort zone mostly in around orthopedic Spine we were cosmetics. We did a really report job getting into it because we didn't understand the demographics of that group. It was a cash business. We've learned from that. We've made a lot of br actions but the demographics of each opportunity was cells because they're the same cast of characters biologically we tended tended to treat all medical industries the same and they're very diverse said well really talk about this is a conversation that several of the folks that have been so generous with their time on this show is the notion of the upstream really being able to understand your customer base your market than your value value proposition your differentiation all those things before you try to go out there and beat the bushes and and do all the tactical work whether that's email campaigns or go to events or whatever it might be and so <hes> it's easy to get down in the demand Gen Space Little d demand Gen and away from the big picture story that you need to tell when I think you're you're saying as we'd probably to do a better job segmentation. We probably needed to do a better job of really really understanding. What's unique about those segments? Have how tell are stored in those segments as that what I'm hearing you say you bet willing I think at some point we were they were kind of in the trenches with the people we should be marketing to and they were more marketing to us and and so we we've made some corrections we get some big changes coming a first of the year but that was a learning curve Y- you tend to convince yourself you're in such a young <unk> such a a new exciting business that the old try tried and true methods don't always apply but really at the end of the day they you know you've you apply trenches right and so so what I'm hearing you say is really really understanding your mark and being able to segment even the you might think it's all very much the same because you think it's the same there are nuances that are really important to pay attention to so that whole notion about segmentation or we're getting ready to wrap up our time together. You've been great guests. Thank you Catholic before we do. <hes> is there any you know things you would like to share in terms of your own journey to being a C._E._o.. Or your insights are lessons learned in business that you think might be helpful to those folks out there listening sure tell you that I think it headed a little bit. Easier wasn't educated thrall of this stuff. Love Sports certainly gave me competence which you need the most when you have adt the least get started go do it. Don't think that you're unprepared. You just need to do more to make sure that you're prepared the next time we get a chance because this isn't the last I win or the I lost kind of back to your boxing days. Every every matches is another match all the time to learn at the time and in boxing you have all those rounds to go through just because you're got to adjust box right and a a little bit but just point being that you know you're learning your about your opponent. Obviously that's not quite the same metaphor here 'cause you're learning about what you need to do and you're actually adjusting in real time but right in the ring which is a little bit different. Kind of contest is not the same food so they got it. Does the best is a guy that can make adjustments the flock atkin necessarily good message to leave folks with important available to adjust on the fly. Thank you very much. Seven call back over to you..

Marketing Organization Kevin Dunn boxing Orthopedic Surgery Orthopedics US Lee orthopedic Spine Donald Bushy nate three percent
Optymyze, Three-Time Leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for SPM

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

09:36 min | 2 years ago

Optymyze, Three-Time Leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for SPM

"Six hundred and fifty episodes. Unlike to think I've captured information on every industry and shared stories of out technology is transforming them, but don't think that we covered the world of sales performance management or SPAM to the cool kids in. Industry. So when I discovered a company called optimize which is a sales performance management platform, which combines data science process, all amazing enterprise planning, an advanced analytic combined with the fact of course that gotten recently listed as the leader in sales performance management. I had to get them on the show to find out more so book hold on tight. As I beam your ears all the way to the east coast of the US just outside Philadelphia, believe where John from optimizes waiting into speak to us about the digital transformation will challenges that he sees working first time with large enterprise clients, but also how sales office can overcome. A massive, warm, welcome to the show John. Can you tell the listeners a little about who you are and what you do? Sure. Certainly. So my name is John studio. I work for optimize as the SBP of operational planning. I've been in the sales performance management and sales operation space for about twenty years, and I've been with optimize since it's formed a few years ago. I spent most of my time in that period in the professional services side of our business doing things like consulting with our customers about their different SPN problems, sales performance management use that acronym allot consulting with them about their problems, doing business process, design system design earlier in my career, helping them implement the solutions that they need, and then helping them manage the ongoing operations for customers that need that. And then as I've gotten a as I've progressed through my career, I've spent much more and more time on the overall engagement manage. Managing our internal operations, managing our engagements with clients. I've also spent time in the sales and marketing organization within optimizing in my career. So I know how it feels to be on the other side of sales performance management, not just providing solutions, but getting the outputs of what what sales operations does. Right now I'm responsible for operational planning, which really means that I'm in contact on a daily basis with both our professional services teams that are responsible for delivery as well as the clients. As it esscalation point, helping them handle day-to-day issues as as an escalation at helping them think ahead beyond just what they're doing today, what their short-term priorities are, which is a key part of our engagement model. Something that I'll probably talk about a lot as as we continue the conversation. I'm not gonna faint and we all gonna hit the acronym SPAM a luxury. So most most likely? Yes, not when we what else should have been shown? You quickly found that you combine data signs process automation and to price planning an advanced analytics. An essentially you seem to be leveraging technology to enable your clients to execute new sales strategies and effectively drive sales performance and Salesforce productivity. But anyone listening to the show that's hearing about optimized for that very first time. Can you just offer an overview of what you do and what makes you unique from other SPM's out there? Sure. Certainly. So optimize is really, I think if I were to summarize it one sentence, which I'll obviously elaborate on, I would say that really what makes us unique is that our solution is an integrated solution. The technology includes as you already pointed out, multiple integrated platforms on the same software. And in addition to that, it also has services integrated as well. So it's an overall engagement model not just software, it's the technology and the engagement model together. That's all integrated. So from the technology side and you already kind of mentioned, this is that optimize is comprised of five overall platforms. They're all no code platforms. So everything that I'm talking about in these platforms can be done without someone going in and writing sequel code or scripting or anything. It's all configuration, which is a unique item as well in our space, the the, the base, the first thing. The thing that we started with really where the sales performance management platforms platform itself, and that includes SPAM apps for managing incentive in sales compensation for managing quotas for sales people for managing territory, alignments and so forth for salespeople, how you define whatever when's area responsibility is what customers they call on and then

John Studio Professional Services Salesforce United States Philadelphia Twenty Years
"marketing organization" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Well forests starred on defining industries that are actually formally in the creative sector tests so the xe have are defined by the fact that they sitting in an industry defined by create of outputs or creative services and each country would bet that that very slightly in south africa and in the uk and even in the us it's kind of everything from artists to agency such people who in the making space in the in the in the business of of atoms of theater of music end of commercial creativity like advertising agencies marketing organizations designed businesses architects everyone who sits within a space of of sort of formalized creativity how however if you ask me whether i don't think that creativity ohni lives they i'll tell you absolutely not i think creativity is a currency that led lives everywhere within everyone and i find it fascinating how companies who are more traditional and our engineer hang trying so hard to be create jobs and companies who have creativity at the hawks are always trying to over professionalised so i found myself locates had some way between the two lewis talk about this concept you for that this this concept of creativity what is it about this that you love so much visit beat you know and i don't want to say it's because it's a bandwagon because it's definitely is the it topic a lot of times they're marketing organizations is this sense of how can we be more creative more innovative and so that the first question what about at the second question i have is is innovation creativity linked to in your minor can they be two separate things.

uk engineer hawks lewis south africa
"marketing organization" Discussed on IoT inc

IoT inc

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on IoT inc

"The datadriven marketing organisation is an organization that has a higher probability of getting the product right hand to effectively communicate their message to their prospects and their customers this is less than two in module aid of the ici peace strategy and digital transformation course designed sell build from the getting started module design sell bill this is a methodology that i've used my entire career her validating the product before it's built by selling it first plan one dino is the first iot business plan hand requirements stock it is developed at the end of the concept in ita shen phase of pre production while sitting around the conference room table it may seem light the greatest plan internally but it must be validated externally with potential customers this product validation methodology sometimes referred to as market validation can be best summed up as design sell built design your product sell it and then build your product the designs sell build methodology is especially important in iowa t since in its infancy product ideas need to be validated early and at every step in the development process it's been my experience with my clients that all iot products pivot all one hundred percent and they don't just give it a little bit it prove it around a hundred eighty degrees or more why because both the vendor in the customer are not that familiar with the internet of things in the early stages especially terminology may not mean the same thing to both parties functionality that sounds good initially may not be what's expected once coded everything is new.

ici iowa hundred eighty degrees one hundred percent
"marketing organization" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Sans he was the original product manager at netscape communications tell us what does that mean what is a product manager do in a text startup so product manager is really the person who connects the market to technology so holtom it lay that person decides what you're going to built and then works with the engineering team to make sure that uh what's your delivering basically meets the requirements that you've mapped out so it's a combination of making it work making sure the features are as promised while you involved in the branding or marketing or is that a different team it's done differently it at different times but mainly mainly not mainly the there's a separate marketing organisation and they're the product management often does product marketing so articulating the features and benefits and capabilities of that product but not of the company's whole so you put together the first business plan effectively for netscape how what was the thought process like behind it it was clear that if this worked it was going to be revolutionary but how was the company ever gonna make any money it was fascinating exercise so we did in fact have the company and innovated on all on a whole variety of things including public beta including affiliate programs and alike but it really was a very early version of our free and business model where in the product was free for personal use and use and educational institutions but we charge businesses and so that's basically what we came up with and i will point out that working with jim clark and you in a with his guidance we came out and we had a plan and said the first year of revenue we're going to do a little over fifty million dollars and then they hired three vps who are all much more experienced than i was a kid a puppy dog fra and they came in and said you know what are you do and we actually are going to be responsible for delivering this this is ridiculous they lowered the plan to thirty five and then we went out and did eighty so jim clark is a fascinating character i love michael lewis's vanunu thing tell us a little bit about working with jim clark well jim has an amazing capability of spotting megatrends and assembling incredible people to do it before the.

product manager netscape jim clark michael lewis fifty million dollars
"marketing organization" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

"And category designers use a provocative engaging porter viewed a frame a problem or a van july's a problem if you will and almost as a result of a vandalizing the problem when of course therefore there solution in a very compelling way they create these coal around not just the company but the whole thing that they're doing to quote mike they create a movement so to get back to your question john around mobilization what legendary entrepreneurs do and this is the distinction between category design and marketing of course marketing is generally something is done by the marketing organisation category design is a is a company initiative because we mobilise the entire culture needs to educate the market about a problem when a solution and condition the world to think the way we want them to think and when the whole company gets behind prosecuting the magic triangle that is to say getting product company category right now all of a sudden we're doing something that most companies number attempt to do which is to move the world from the way it is now to the way we want it to be and as as we shift the world to our own view a boom in entire new market category takes off and we are best position to take seventy six percent of the economics and become the category king in so mobilization is really about how do i as the chief executive mobilise the entire company to go play a category design game understanding that if we don't design a dominate this category at best we're going to be fighting for 24 percent of economics.

porter mike john chief executive seventy six percent 24 percent
"marketing organization" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"marketing organization" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

"And category designers use a provocative engaging porter viewed a frame a problem or a van july's a problem if you will and almost as a result of a vandalizing the problem when of course therefore there solution in a very compelling way they create these coal around not just the company but the whole thing that they're doing to quote mike they create a movement so to get back to your question john around mobilization what legendary entrepreneurs do and this is the distinction between category design and marketing of course marketing is generally something is done by the marketing organisation category design is a is a company initiative because we mobilise the entire culture needs to educate the market about a problem when a solution and condition the world to think the way we want them to think and when the whole company gets behind prosecuting the magic triangle that is to say getting product company category right now all of a sudden we're doing something that most companies number attempt to do which is to move the world from the way it is now to the way we want it to be and as as we shift the world to our own view a boom in entire new market category takes off and we are best position to take seventy six percent of the economics and become the category king in so mobilization is really about how do i as the chief executive mobilise the entire company to go play a category design game understanding that if we don't design a dominate this category at best we're going to be fighting for 24 percent of economics.

porter mike john chief executive seventy six percent 24 percent