35 Burst results for "Marketing Manager"

Kevin Jones shares how he expanded his sports podcasts network

The Business of Content

05:06 min | 3 d ago

Kevin Jones shares how he expanded his sports podcasts network

"Hey kevin thanks for joining us. Simon man pleasure to be here appreciate you having me so before we talk about your podcast at work. Let's talk about what you were doing. Prior to your podcast network you like you got your start in radio right. What didn't you like about that medium. Yeah i kind of had a long winding journey before and got to blue wire tv in washington. Dc at wsh nine Where i actually like a digital blogger. It was bryce harper's rookie year. Rt threes rookie ear there space on the website to create content kind of l. Put my way into media at a tv station. That i turned that opportunity into the cleveland. Crowds dot com. They were growing their media operation. They had Space on espn eight fifty. They had their own radio show in studio in the building. The i broke into radio there. I was on the team side for the browns. You kind of don't have your own voice in. They were losing quite a bit of game so eventually took an opportunity. Came biard in san francisco. The main am station. It was a wonderful experience for the most part. I saw kaepernick kneeling i the warriors when titles. I got to go on the radio every day. I created digital content. But i didn't see a path forward for someone like myself who was twenty seventeen. I was twenty eight years old. I wasn't going to become a radio host. I wasn't gonna be on tv. And i didn't see enough opportunities and saw a lot of really good free agents on twitter and that's kind of how i stumbled upon blue ir but Yeah my background is really creating content for older digital media platforms. And were you like talking head on the radio. Where you're like a court correspondent like bose kind of your role way more correspondent. I came here in san francisco. Be at the warriors games calling in kevin. Jones live from game six of the western conference vitals. Kevin give us the mood. It would be five ten minute had sometimes team not just the update guy so i got to show up my personality. I wrote digital content. I was tweeting all the time And just treating you making better content. For came we are the most of the radio host For my age group which was articles about the warriors tweets about the forty niners. I was giving kmby. Are that brand name digitally. I wasn't getting rewarded for it and that really pushed me to found blue wire. 'cause i thought i was actually giving more wrong to the radio station online and wasn't getting paid properly short. Did you feel like you had a brand like where people obviously wouldn't recognize you on the street Because they only heard your voice today. Would you be like a bar like. Oh i totally know who you are times. Nothing crazy but you know. That's really what they found. Blue stems from dairy. Is that person in san francisco. He had a warriors podcast. I would getting drinks with him. If people were literally coming up to him and dabbling in sam. I love light years. Love what you do on twitter. It was up one of my a ha moments before i came into company. Is that twitter. Influencers in sports are so undervalued beat reporters for newspaper are kind of going out of style. In my opinion it's a it's a necessary way to get facts and information but Radio hosts are being replaced. In my opinion my twitter influencers youtube post snapchat users who have built communities of people. Yeah i think it's fair to say i have by own brandon. We have one hundred podcasters. I know we're going to get to blue i They have their own brands. And i think that's what makes us different. What's the world's going that way man. It's niche you can be this fantasy football funny guy you can be nerdy a little on the browns. Anyone can pick their lane right now. And then from the radio you went to go work at facebook on like content strategy. What kind of content where you strategizing on. Yeah it was on. The business helped team work out of building. Sixty one in menlo park so anytime. There was a new product launch across functional team facebook. There's a product manager. There's a marketing manager. There's someone who also writes help contact when a user gets the pay what is and that was kind of my role. It was definitely a lower tier. Get your foot in the door at facebook. But i learned a lot about scaling and how the task and project management and just it was a even though. They're not in the news in a good way. The culture they're working there was pretty good. People respectful a challenge each other in a polite way. I was coming from media where people throwing dictionaries at each other in the room. People were getting fired left and right backstabbing each other. Facebook actually gave me a little bit of hope as weird as it is saying this big evil giant stealing all the ad revenue move fast and break things but working inside. That building collaborated with people. Who admired and it kind of gave me the wings that eight. I can take some elements of facebook. Mix it into a sports media company

Warriors Biard Kaepernick San Francisco Bryce Harper Kevin Twitter Browns Simon Espn Cleveland Niners Washington Jones Facebook SAM Brandon Youtube Menlo Park
How Real Estate Sells Cars with Gina McCartney

Talking Automotive

07:21 min | 2 weeks ago

How Real Estate Sells Cars with Gina McCartney

"Gina, welcome to . the It show is great to have you speaking to us today. Maybe just to kick things off can you maybe just tell us a bit about Gina McCartney - who you are and some background. . to thank Yes, I'm yourself sure, you so Gi for na McCartney having me here today. Super excited to see both. So my background if i go back to perhaps my brief - youth and into professional career. I really my whole life was distant creative: sculpting, painting, designing and off the back of that passion went to uni studied creative advertising and was destined. ..my path was to become a art director . My very early career was in advertising agencies and spent ten years ing servic some like pretty big clients ilo, . kohl's meyer group. Cbi off foundation and then some order client bmw and many were because of mine and it was during that time that i realized how much i loved as and surprised no surprise. I joined renault. Stralia and joining renault at the time was at a really pivotal point for the business. And that was all about preaching and finding every possible opportunity we could in the market and myra was to introduce the sierra digital program. Really lift the capability of the dealer network from a lead management perspective. Sur getting out outta rot on building confidence back in the network that we were providing leads to them in generating value from office and then from neymar roll moved into a brand and events role and so the full marketing swayed had an awesome time with the business and great team. And then my time was up. When i was tapped on the shoulder for all at anchor pinellas area group been realized real estate dot com to you joined the business not really knowing much about the role. I was joining. He'd go to market manager role and of bain there now close to seven years and moved my way through various segments. So we're two now. Residential business at develop a business emotional property meteorologisy and clients and also to stint in malaysia. And i leave the win. We acquired a southeast asia and helped with the integration of that business side at an awesome korea here. Rei and now run. I tame called the customer. Excellence team and so my team move. Twenty incredibly talented people help support our two hundred thirty sales teams across australia. And that includes the learning development perching old training ogata market siles support collateral and operations analytic. Kpi's commissions incentive sprints and really big a big team mission and vision is to pave the new way of selling and selling clock when you work for rei. Let's bit about my story. Love love gardening love dancing and eighteen. And that's how i spend most of my time let's it's an impressive story. How you you've migrated from during the karate stuff through to or i will now into real estate now. We can't get a bit of understanding as to real estate dot com o. Rei group and what's the back story of real estate. Dot com abc business was born in the garage. Dome koster and for those familiar with john. It's in the eastern suburbs of melbourne and in nineteen ninety five and they came up with a crazy idea of water. We put the photos of property onto online so people can see them on the internet and so literally scanning photo by photo by photo built this web sought. That looks very different today than what did obviously up. Twenty plus years ago and over the years to really brilliant simple idea to gos- and today with the leading australian property portal and we have hundred million plus is it as a month coming to thought trillions of photos from a perspective and yeah we service most property clients around australia and that includes real estate agents property manages developers homebuilders land developers media clients of less amount of probably. But almost all and anyone that wants to reach property. Sega's we do business. You know you've got a really interesting background. Having spent tom and credit in automotive value in real estate can you. Maybe just discuss some of the similarities. Between automotive and real estate i remember when i joined. Ra and it was probably a month thing. I thought wow. I didn't realize there was so many similarities between the two industries. And if i stop from a business structure perspective the similarities of utah franchise groups independence at relationship between head office and you know the small small businesses that are running in local and regional areas. I think that that pressure that applies with a small business to find the raw talent retain talent when there is no professional requirement This note there's no huddle to get into other industry. And i think that is a challenge that are still share today and another real estate industry in particular institute really trying to introduce their professional courses create more opportunities for the right people to enter the industry. So they've got really quality staff sieving consumers invincibles. And i think our remember. That was a challenge in the automotive industry finding the right talent and apprenticeship styles perspective perhaps a bit of bid process. But that was probably one thing that i saw straightaway is a big lesson. In automotive that i think real estate can learn with the handshake. Between sales and after-sales and if you think of the real estate version of that is the sales and rental market now rent rolls the most profitable part of a real estate agency and if you think about the handover in the importance of one to the other the ongoing retention of the customer. I think that's a really important similarity between the two some. I think some best practice sharing could happen more. And then the probably the other big similarity i would say is the is much smarter and much savia and this is probably not exclusive to automotive in real estate but their expectations have increased tenfold. And no longer. Can you get back to a later inquiry within a couple of days. We're now seeing consumer expectations at a couple of minutes. And i think that's something that dealerships deal with daily and you know the the now now now economy that exists within cosima world.

Gina Mccartney Na Mccartney Meyer Group Cbi Off Foundation Stralia Neymar Roll Ogata Siles Rei Group Dome Koster Kohl Gina UNI Myra Renault Pinellas Bain BMW KPI Australia
Seahawks management not happy with Russell Wilson

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

01:31 min | 3 weeks ago

Seahawks management not happy with Russell Wilson

"Some drama in the streets russell. Wilson's team his personal team of fended his. Nfl team his nfl team is not happy with the russell team or russell. Right now. Allegedly will russell wilson be traded. Is russell wilson. The man that the seattle seahawks won all in on and got rid of everybody else could force his way out of seattle because he doesn't like the way he's being protected his chef came out and said hey. Listen we don't like what's going on on the football field. His promotional manager his marketing manager his agent his strength and conditioning coach his body guru. Everybody that is on the team. Ross what's number three team three. I believe his team three came out and said something. About the way the seattle seahawks have operated entreated the three in team three that was just moments or maybe even an hour or two before. Russell wilson was three was scheduled to go on with dan. Patrick was this a plan by team three to get a little bit of drama contrivances sparked so that maybe they could get russell wilson out of seattle into another city that maybe they feel he'd be able to win a super bowl again at be back in that conversation back in the mvp conversation and all that because that seems a little bit of a combo there. We're going to leak some shit. About how pissed off we are. Then we're gonna have russell wilson by the way chug somebody's celsius me. Die right there.

Russell Wilson Russell Seattle Seahawks NFL Seattle Wilson Ross Football Patrick DAN
"marketing manager" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

Ali on the Run Show

07:53 min | Last month

"marketing manager" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

"For running at ucsd. And i struggled a lot. I struggled to adjust to a new team. I struggled in the sense. That i wasn't running the times i was supposed to. I struggled that there were pressures to be at a certain speed. I wasn't able to hit and ultimately my sophomore year determined. That i was suffering from extremely low fare ten and i was basically a nemec because of it and by the time we figured it out i had already beat myself up for a year and a half about the fact that i couldn't hit my times and so despite having one track season that almost came close to hitting my pr's from high school. I was really just burned out So i decided. I was going to graduate college early. I graduated my junior year. I didn't run that year. And i took two years a little over two now. I guess it was three years. I took three years off running completely like now to step not interested so i definitely had those times where i needed a break. I would say honestly speaking. I'm coming out of another one of those times. I didn't run a lot in twenty twenty and it's always a part of me but i definitely have Those ups and downs looking back at that time when you took several years off. How did you know when you're ready to run again. I feel like. I started noticing it. Because i would start a new job in songo. What do you what you like to do. And i'd say i'd like to run. And i haven't run in a long time but it was always that piece of well. I could go back to that. I'm not quite ready for it. But yeah i'm runner or yeah i i was a collegiate athlete or yeah. This is my friend from when i was running. Yeah this was my teammate. A photo of me running here. And so it's really hard to just ditch completely and move on at least for me and i feel like i finally got to a point when i was actually. I was looking to give back in some way. And my mom encouraged me to find a way to dedicate some time to my community. So i was like well. What am i good at. I'm good at running. How do i dedicate running to others. And that's how. I found coaching and i emailed the assists or the head. Coach of thousand oaks high school and said hey iran here iran. okay times. I'd love if you need extra hands. Let me know and about two weeks later. We sat down and chitchatted. And he's like you're on your now. An assistant coach at thousand oaks ice. Cool and i thought crap. I haven't run in three years. So i had about three weeks until they started training during the summer and i saw the training plan that was coming up for them and i made it my goal to at least be able to do like set of their work cow or to go and run five minutes out five minutes back seven minutes out seven minutes back ten minutes like vividly remember my first three mile loop. I did when i realized i already gone too far. And even if i turned around i in the running further than i already had and i go through that a decent amount where i very much have to tiptoe my way back into running so so when you started coaching and i love that. Intern is what brought back a little bit of that competitive fire and brought you back into running. Did you feel that because you were doing it for a reason other than yourself. It brought different meaning at the time. Definitely it one thousand percent. Because from the beginning i wasn't trying to get in shape for me. I was trying to get in shape so that i could pace someone's workout or so that i could relate to the person i was coaching because i i didn't feel it would be fair and i didn't feel. I was at a point in life where it would be acceptable for me to be out of shape on the sidelines and ordering these young girls around. When in fact if i put in the work to i could relate on a much deeper level there so so. Walk us through the transition. When did you start working in the outdoor industry like you mentioned earlier. You've worked at patagonia you've worked at hokka both of those before coming to track smith. So how did that happen. That was a interesting in kind of surprising. Turn of events. I suppose It sounds kinda silly. When i started running again. I don't know if maybe strava existed in. I didn't know because had been out of the running world for so long. But i wanted some way to keep track of my running so i started instagram. That was just about me running and that was more for me than anything. It was initially some photos of my garmin after run. Sir you know the you put up your self timer and you run by it. And i just wanted something to remind me of my progress and through that was l. Reached out and asked. If i would be interested in coming up for a shoot for upcoming line and i thought this is awesome like why not night flew up to seattle and then few months later. They told me they were doing a shoe with yoga and they said we know. You live. Not too far from santa barbara. That's where we're shooting. If you can come up for that shoot. That'd be great so again. I was like great. Why not. I went up for the shoot with hogan and i realized even though at the time i lived about forty miles from hookah. That hookah wasn't that far away. And i thought i should check their job boards and lo and behold. There was a position. Open that my skills seem to match up nicely for and i applied for and i got that job and i ended up in what i now know as the outdoor industry but i had no idea that there was an outdoor industry. I just thought it would be cool to work for brands that intersected with my interest so here i am. That's so interesting. It's funny to hear you say that you ran your whole life. You ran in college but didn't know that there was an outdoor industry. And i'm sure that many people feel the same way i mean i didn't grow up thinking about it and wondering like who's behind the scenes making these shoes and making these things that i wear. What was your first thought or your first emotions around starting work and starting at hokka immersing yourself.

five minutes two years seven minutes three years ten minutes seattle few months later both instagram thousand oaks high school one thousand percent first thought thousand oaks ice about forty miles about two weeks later twenty twenty first three mile loop a year and a half ten one track season
"marketing manager" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

Ali on the Run Show

02:29 min | Last month

"marketing manager" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

"Welcome to the alley on the run show. I'm your host alan taylor. And every week i talk with people who lead compelling lives on the run and beyond we all share that love for running and that's what brings us together but we all know that there is more to life than what happens on the run and this show is about those the inbetween the water stops. The bathroom breaks the moments and decisions that have shaped who we are today. And why why do we do what we do. And how does getting sweaty factor in today. I am very excited to welcome. Camelias ornate to the alley on the run. Show my introduction to camille. I came last year when she wrote a piece for track. Smith called your black teammate. It's linked in the show notes for this episode. And if you haven't read it yet or it's been a while since you did. I very much encourage you to give her. Words of read. Camilla is a brilliant writer and as an incredibly versatile runners. She's run a four minute. Fifty one second mile and she's also run a thirty six k. So i'm quite certain this woman can do it all today. Camille is marketing manager at track smith. So i get to work with her. She's the best she's innovative. She's passionate she truly sees the good and the potential in people in brands. in this industry. You may know that. Attract smith sponsors the on the job series here on the alley on the run show. I support the brand. Worry the brand and i had the honor of being on the track smith fellowship selection committee last year alongside notable people. Like malcolm glad well so cool and you'll hear more about that trek smith fellowship programs on this episode. But i wanted to have camilla on the on the run show for a long time and today's conversation is especially relevant last week. Outside magazine published a story called track. Smith made a culture. Something you can buy and i didn't love it. Neither did camille up who was interviewed for this piece. It was critical of track. Smith which okay fine. Every running brand in existence has room to improve and things to work on. That's fine but the writers seemed to specific issue with camilla and.

Camille last week last year Camilla alan taylor camilla Smith camille track smith Fifty one second mile thirty six k. Camelias four minute track smith fellowship today Attract smith trek smith malcolm
New hand-held device promises relief from anxiety, insominia, depression

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

New hand-held device promises relief from anxiety, insominia, depression

"I hand held device promises relief from anxiety depression insomnia and pain for many dealing with chronic issues like anxiety or insomnia the solution is often hills but now you can use pulses Dr Josh Brierley says alpha stim targets the body's internal system to bring relief it's designed to just kind of balance out the nervous system increases alpha waves in the brain we are FDA cleared to treat anxiety insomnia depression and pain the prices of the two devices is a thousand dollars but marketing manager Daniel Boyd says alpha stim is still a bargain you look at the cost of the device right out over several years and years then you're really looking at a much better value than if you were to take prescription medications for that long there are two models one designed to treat pain one doesn't I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Depression Insomnia Dr Josh Brierley Insomnia Depression Daniel Boyd Insomnia Anxiety Pain FDA Oscar Wells Gabriel
Ex-Cisco Employee Convicted for Deleting 16K Webex Accounts

Smashing Security

11:17 min | 2 months ago

Ex-Cisco Employee Convicted for Deleting 16K Webex Accounts

"I'm gonna tell you about a chap called sudesh qasaba ramesh and he was working at cisco which of course the giant technology firm working there from Midway through twenty sixteen up until april twenty eighteen where he departed the company. Okay so he spent. How many years say he was there for almost two years to fully months. After he left the company's employment he decided to log into their systems specifically some cisco systems which were hosted on an amazon. Aws server when those cloud buckets those blobs of computer mitchell. Don't kinds of clever things up there in the cloud. Do we know where he is in america. Always in the state somewhere else can start. Yes yes But he is no longer under their employees so he's no longer working with them but this is only months after he left. Let me just let me just repeat that. This was fi months after he some heat when he was able to do it. Not just he thought about it he actually did he did. He logged in Has it never happened to you. That a client has left the gates open after you no longer working for them anymore. I'm sure they have. I'm sure correct answer because you've never checked because that would be a bad thing. It would be yes. I i exactly. I'm sure there have been Companies i've worked for who haven't changed the credentials and you're working for technology and security firms Well in some cases. Yes so. I'm just saying i'm just saying i'm not surprised that just when i was working down kentucky fried chicken to him some extra bob. It wasn't yeah we'll okay but this was cisco you're right so cisco's is a big dog. Okay so five months. After this guy's finished employed he manages to log in. yeah he looks in someone. Forgot to do something. I wanted just having a nose you think or know. He's not just news around. They'll just have a curious to see if the company still doing well in his absence. He's not doing that. I wonder how cisco doing without me. No no i miss. I have yeah. Yeh we've all done it. That's why. I wonder how bad doing no i've left up shit. Grew up to something else. You're saying yes. So sudesh ramesh. He looks in to this. Aws server and deletes. Oh four hundred fifty six virtual machines. Oh boy which were being used by cisco to power. Its webex video conferencing service. Oh for god's he's trying to bring go to it's knees through its web x.'s. As though webex doesn't bring the entire world to its knees on a regular basis whenever you into it. Music video chat yet. The video conferences. You must have used it. Have you guys used webex video Yes pre pandemic. Oh yes it's been usurped by things. Like zoom zoom really has sort of caught everyone's imagination now hasn't but webex was. It's still worsley going strong in its eased by some organizations. What's the mark corporate one. So as a consequence of ramesh deleting all these virtual machines as a result of this over sixteen thousand webex teams accounts. Were shut down for up to two weeks. Imagine the impact on productivity. That's right productivity. Must have gone through the roof. Yes well we can't have a meeting. Oh darn we'll have to do some work instead over the sending email You're on mute and having all those kind of kenya hemi austria on my last call cheese every over there so they can hear you over the line. This is the way so. I'm just doing next to somebody who did exactly that on the national conference call five. Am called into the office showers loud as that two countries anyway and so sixteen thousand accounts were shut down up to two weeks cisco spent roughly one point four million dollars restoring the damage paying people to restore the autism restore them. Don't you have to just press. Go back to you control z. Issue dragged out of the track. They would have backups. Shirley we would think so. Wouldn't you and they also had to pay over one million dollars to customers in refunds. 'cause they're hosting all. These webex is for other companies. People would have had contracts and they would have had to say. oh terribly. sorry you haven't been to use it two weeks. We can haul webinars that people were not able to host yet. Not just internal inside your company but one would have been given to customers. Mike god the product marketing manager is going insane thinking like from the marketing team. Like oh there goes yeah calendar. We've got a problem. We've got to change the landing pages real to reel who's who's at full the guy did it. Yeah ultimately him. Yeah yeah. I mean like leaving your car unlocked right so if i left my car unlocked and then someone stole something from inside my car which has happened to me. Whose fault is it right. Ultimately prison stole a thing for my car because it is parked in my drive. But they're opportunist and you'd say well lock your doors dumb ass. Yes so so cisco should have looked dolls. Demolish had the kind of. I'm guessing pretty high level privileges to do that. Much damage that easily. I mean nobody locked. Is the countdown nine. A little bit. I mean jeez. Five months later. I mean i can understand if it was the day after he left but five months later. My guess is that win. Some sunlight ramesh left employment at the company. They may well have revoked his access to active directory and his ability to log into his email or something like that. But i wonder whether access to the aws server or something which was available to many people in the it poem. Maybe they were sharing credentials shared crafts. Yep and. I think that's probably what was happening. And it's hard to workout if you do share credentials inside an it team who might know those looking credentials in. It's a pain to change them. Because that's gonna affect lots of other people and lots of other services. Well not if you use a really good password manager. Well simplifies a lot right because you can change at the admin level for everybody. Yeah i suppose so if you also have services which might be logging into these systems and it may be. It's grabbing the password for everything. The real mistake here is sharing. Paul sweats right. There are teams of people where the password we'll be known to a variety of people and they'll log in they'll doing administration and all kinds of different maintenance and our work on a particular system and the thing is that they don't have individual password see can't just revoke a person's password scrape advice. We share passwords possibly shared. Yes we share passwords to run this. Podcast jimmy yes. You're not cisco though. I know we're not cisco but i'm saying we know better and we do it because the work around to do it. Any other way is too complicated like just ridiculously complicated. Can i show you cro- the if one of us were to leave smashing security to set up a podcast about. I didn't know piccoli predicament. Something in fact took off and weren't interested in smashing security any more than i would change the past or whoever remained would change the parts of those accounts. And so that you or whoever had left would no longer be a system really. Does this mean you're joining our podcast now. Is that what i'm understanding. It sounds like to me. So there's clearly some in the of cisco they should have changed the log in credentials right just like you would expect when people leave a company to hand in their badge or giving any keys which they have to look doors but shed credentials bad bad bad ideas so for something that business kercheval legs the kingdom. I mean it's one thing to say you know. Here's the marketing log in for. I don't know something really unimportant. But your admin credentials for your entire webex product. So cisco call sedition when they figured out what happened and say look. We obviously dismissed bad way and offer him a nice severance package and a hug will in a donut to get to the bottom. Exactly what his beef was with sysco. What made him do this with some months. Later is not really an act of passion is it. he was still doing. Shushing takes five months to stir it be angry with the company. But you're not angry necessarily move its customers and you're not probably angry with most of your former colleagues so remain professional. Don't take it out on them. Because what if you are though. What if you do eight all. Your fork is a justified in this case. Reminded me a little of the case of terry challenge. Do you remember terry. Childs was a former network administrator the city of san francisco back ten or fifteen years ago. I remember his name right. Well yes he infamously looked up. The city's entire network for days in two thousand and eight resets nor the admin passwords. So that only he knew them and he refused to reveal them to anybody and the excuse he gave and you know. He was arrested in things in a week and a half. Nothing was happening. Because no i'm gonna tell you the password you can't and he claimed it wasn't going to tell the bosses or the managers the passwords because he was concerned that they would indiscriminately share those credentials with third party contractors and so. He didn't like that. People were being careless with passwords. He was like l. So you so you the vaults you cannot break it and ultimately oh my go to me. The mayor of san francisco had to personally go and chat with him. He was the only trustworthy person. That doesn't sound just like a typical quote rogue employees. I think there's some mental stuff going on there because that's a baby or something. That's that's that goes beyond anyway sedation. Ramesh he pleaded guilty on. The ship has now been sentenced to twenty four months in the clink and to pay a fifteen thousand dollar fine as well and because he was here on a visa as well. I suspect he may find it difficult to stay case

Cisco Webex Sudesh Qasaba Ramesh Sudesh Ramesh YEH Mitchell Amazon Kentucky Piccoli BOB Austria Kenya Shirley Ramesh America Autism Mike Jimmy Sysco
Boston area shoppers safely spread holiday spirit while supporting small businesses

WBZ Overnight News

01:03 min | 2 months ago

Boston area shoppers safely spread holiday spirit while supporting small businesses

"Hasn't been easy for local shops across Massachusetts Derby Street shops and hang him hosted their annual holiday stroll on Sunday to get people shopping while also socially distancing. WBC's Brooke McCarthy stopped by the stroll to bring us this story. I'll get to work on that right away. Santa took some time off for making presents to stop by Derby streets. Holiday stroll were spreading the holiday cheer around, You know, it's been a tough year, and this is the year to spread Love. A big hit was poker Dog Bakery, offering free pictures with Santa and your furry friend, which will continue throughout the month. Marketing manager for Derby Street, Caroline Hesburgh says they got creative this year with ice sculptures, really? It's an interactive photo booth really focused on making happy moments and photo moments all across our property, so that every time you come here, there's something new and different. She also encourages people to come check out Derby streets, 12 small businesses this

Brooke Mccarthy WBC Santa Massachusetts Caroline Hesburgh
Fitbit will replace some Sense smartwatches due to ECG problem

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:40 min | 3 months ago

Fitbit will replace some Sense smartwatches due to ECG problem

"Of course one of the companies that basically started the fitness wearables trend. Years ago well. Our video team and audio team managed to catch up with marketing director anna day this year. We are introducing a tune new smartwatches. And one you fitness tracker plus a new premium service and the smartwatch the name fitbit sense and fitbit census our most advanced health smartwatch. So it comes with advanced health features for example It has an idiot sensor which measures the electrical activities with your skin and then we also have a stress management tool We have temperatures for skin temperature sole the skin. Temperatures matt measured at night and it can be an indicator for Illnesses so could be used as an early detection. So yes sir really diving into this direction with our smartwatches and with the new technologies. I think it will be more common for people to wear them. Because it really gives you a deeper into what's going on in your body with your health. It gives you a holistic view and you can see how all fits together. Here are activity here or nutrition stress. Sleep like all these Critical topics and they are all being put together in our fitbit app. So you can really you get the complete view of you. So that's on. Buday marketing manager for central europe for fitbit

Anna Day Fitbit Matt Buday Central Europe
Due to COVID-19, Philadelphia's Colonial Theatre launches fundraiser

KYW 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

Due to COVID-19, Philadelphia's Colonial Theatre launches fundraiser

"Few friends to respond to their online fundraising campaign. We get more from KY double use. Marc Abrahams, Bob, trade marketing manager for the nonprofit historic Colonial Theater, says it's a matter of timing. We really thought that this was time to do a go fund the campaign. We had never done it before, and we realize that we have some really cool things that we can offer people as incentives. Among those special premiums the chance to program a month of classic movies at the theater. And to be the grand marshal of the annual Blob Fest event at the Colonial. We have ah, broader platform than just the Philadelphia area now because Blob Fest has allowed us to reach to the lengths of California and Washington and Arkansas, where block best screen virtually and because of that reach trade, says he's confident the theater will reach its goal. Marc Abrahams K Y. W News

Marc Abrahams Colonial Theater BOB Philadelphia Arkansas California Washington W News
The Importance of the Print

This Week in Photo

06:28 min | 5 months ago

The Importance of the Print

"Able to little something different for you today here with an old friend of mine as in I've known him for a long time not that he's. Data's. Data start is here. He's from Epson a little company that that makes printers that you may have heard about printers and a bunch of other things but we're GONNA WANNA. Have Dental on to talk about printing. From the standpoint of the importance of it in how people that that may be afraid of printing today or somehow said, you know I don't print stuff on facebook and instagram whatever what's a print? I WanNa talk about that and get to the crux of why people should be printing especially if you're an advanced amateur beginner or or or professional photographer. So denno Steinar welcome to the program and how you doing great veer. It's great to see you and you're a game of thrones. Very symmetrical background their employees. Against Green. Screen. Good Yeah. Thank you. This is this is a brand new setup. People have been watching this show no, that normally that's not my background. Normally, my desk is actually slipped in the room is the background. So some different you guys got mix it up every now and So let's let's talk about this. So you're at you're at Epson let's talk about like the your role at Epson what what does Danone do at the company? Well, title is marketing manager my primary responsibilities are. Working with the creative professional markets in the marketing things that go along with that primarily photography certainly work with anybody that's creative professional. A fine artist and illustrator in other markets. I also do video production and amd because of some of the crazy background ahead in the early days of printing I've been I sometimes a pulled into some color science things related to projection because of all the pain we went through early in printing. I consider these long boring international color science meetings and understand what's going on. The. Yeah Yeah Yeah I definitely want to talk about that because. You know we were. We were talking before I clicked the record button about. Just sort of back in the day you know we won't have to go back. You have to put a time stamp on it, but back in the day. The printing experience was, hey, I got this brand new printer gamma. I got my box of paper and you run your first print through it and he came out. Magenta. Okay let me what did I do wrong. Okay and now gotta understand all this stuff. You run another printer it comes out yellow. This was you know. So let's talk about that a little bit. or excellence. Let's let's do that a little bit deeper I want to talk about the history. Of Printing itself you. Touched on that a little bit. Back in the day was enlargers. Remember those you know we had enlargers. Black and white, and then we went to color enlargers, which was a little more involved than a little less tolerance of temperature and all that, and then today you know it's it's file print. So talk to talk about sort of the evolution of where things were in the digital printing world and where they are today. How much time do we have? We have have about three days. So make a quick. To say you know. If you were to take the entire history of photography from nips if I'm pronouncing that correctly, when took that eight hour exposure the French street scene. and to kind of the the beginning of the digital age, you know that is like ninety five percent of photography and digital that term is just this. Let little. Little Flash. Little. Wink of the eye and just in perspective how quickly and things evolved. But as I've been with Epson and a little over twenty years, I was recruited from the Eastman Kodak Company. And this was when Kodak was Kodak. Amazing Kodak Moment. But it was so. Before, that I was a commercial photographer, I used to use a biton view cameras. Shooting. Food for magazines. Cargo, but if you look just a quick thing in the past. The. Printing was always about black and white printing. And it was not an uncommon thing that post World War Two for hobbyists to have dark rooms and advanced amateurs do dark rooms, and if you define yourself as a professional photographer, you always had a black white darker. Color Printing as we know it, we call now the analog world then it was called color print. That slowly came in the kind of mainstream. Sixties seventies, but that was purely big labs big photofinishing houses. It was difficult. You need a big processors he needed temperature control you needed. People Staff and. The Lap And? And it'd be fair to say that traditional see printing. I've never met anyone that said, Gosh I just love the way my seat prints used to. There were revered print processes back there like dye transfer some people remember CPA chrome off of things. But they're just kind of there in the past. It's kind of interesting history lesson in I. I lived at and that's where all this hair went in those darker. Darker. But the first kind of digital printing. started. Really A in the early nineties and I was then a Kodak technical sales representative which was a revered job back in the analog days in my territory to zip codes in Manhattan. New. York City district.

Epson Eastman Kodak Company Facebook Instagram Marketing Manager People Staff AMD Danone York City Sales Representative Manhattan
The Parents Are Not Alright

Latino USA

07:11 min | 5 months ago

The Parents Are Not Alright

"I'm in the virtual studio today with producer Ginny Moon Hey Jeannie I'm waving to you all the way from Harlem, Hey Maria, I'm in Queens. So Jeannie were talking about our favorite topic today parenting, right? Yeah and parenting in twenty twenty is a whole new level parenting. You know what I have adult children now. So honestly, I am so thankful that I do not have to be raising little kids during this time I just can't imagine. So what have you been doing because how old is your little boy now Medina's turning three it's been an adventure I don't know how else to put it. But in this adventure, you're not really going anywhere, right? No, it's an adventure within the four walls of our apartment. So what's it been like like? How do you even manage it I don't some days and some days I do. I had to cut back to part time. So when everything shut down I, just tried to manage the best I could. But it became too much I. was burnt out I was trying to work at night I was trying to work in his nap times and also like switching gears from mom to try and. Write an email or work I can't multitask again if I have a toddler running around in the background running my life like he's the boss, I can hear my in the background saying Mommy's. But yeah, you just Kinda deal with it. Yeah. I have to say in the beginning the only way I made it through, was my coffee in the morning and passing the torch to the wine that I would have to the day. I know you're tired genie as a parent but the thing is, is that when people are tired, they're like, oh, my God the last thing I want to do is go to work but for you, you're like I'm tired I really WanNa go to work yeah. Because I just WANNA. Work without distractions like how many times a day do I have seen running in here and being like me and like L. And he wants to play and like. Hangman. And it's nice. I had review. On some level, but I really just want to focus for an eight. Hour Day Without a distraction and it's because it's really hard to switch gears feel like women are good at multitasking. But this is not one of those scenarios I wanNA parent when I need to parent and I wanna work when I need to work I can't do both at the same time. So. This whole thing about the schools being closed down like New York City like they try to never close the schools down, right? Yeah. So the fact that they did shut down and they shut down all around the country poses a really big challenge because. Not, everybody can set up for remote learning I mean not everybody has Internet. Some kids only get their meals if they're going to school so. It really has been a challenge on a lot of different levels. So you decided that you like all parents you're like, okay I need to talk to other parents and commiserate and think and see how other people are doing it. So you didn't gather a group of parents I guess virtually right? Yeah I did because there's been a slew of articles about the mental load that everybody is dealing with as parents because you're not meant to do both things at once like you can't parent and work full-time that's why childcare exists and none of this was meant to be a long term solution. But I do want to say before we start that even though we have all been affected by the pandemic, all of us participating in today's roundtable have been fortunate enough to still be working in some format. So we're all healthy and we're all grateful for that but we're barely hanging on by threat. So here we go. I want to welcome from Dallas Texas we have. dinty Cabanas. Hi. How are you? Thank you for having me. So glad you're here I have Joe Marvin Tura from Richmond California. For having me and I have to Haida Alencastro from Orlando Florida. Hey thank you. Teeny. Thanks for having me and just the disclaimer everyone knows to hide it and I have actually known each other for like twenty years. So no surprises there little bit. All right. So I just want to quickly go around the virtual room. And tell me about your kids what you do. This is our Sia I am in Dallas. As you said, I have two little girls wind will be ten in three weeks. The other one will be four in two weeks. And I for fulltime digital marketing manager for. Mary. Kay Corporate here in Dallas Great Jomar. Hi I'm Joanna and I'm in Richmond. That's you know the bay area and my little one is turning three months and I teach elementary school. So juggling the new definition of a teacher and first time parent has been very, very interesting adventure. Into Haida. I have two kids. My son is ten years old and my daughter is about to be eight and a few weeks and I am a systems engineer for Lockheed. Martin but I work from home. So I've been A. Since two thousand and five. Okay. So we're going to start from the beginning. I think I mean I don't know about the rest of you but I think we all were kind of like Oh. This is going to be a few weeks we can do this. No big deal, but walk me through personally what? Each of you guys had to go through and like what kind of plan you came up with to get by for the end of the school year. Well for us like all of you we've had to adjust we did not work from home originally We were released for spring break and never came back. We were told we were going to stay. And do you learning and so it was a shock I'm not gonNA live my husband and I freaked out a little bit. But then we had to pivot really quickly. Right what are we going to do? Do we have the right equipment to we have the right setup at the House Both of our kids are in the same school. So that was one good thing because it was need to everybody. So the school they know what they were doing. We know what we're doing the girls were like what's going on? So the ambiguity of it all was really challenging for all of us. But we just started getting a routine down our dining room became our command center. So I would say the first two weeks were horrible I'm not GonNa lie but I think we've all pivoted. Can and so I was pivoting at home I was pivoting at work. And even with myself like how am I going to take time for myself and you know lose it But I'm not allowed I'm sure I'm not a lot. Of. This

Dallas Jeannie Medina Ginny Moon New York City Producer Haida Alencastro Harlem Queens Maria Joe Marvin Tura Dinty Cabanas Dallas Great Jomar Richmond Texas Marketing Manager Kay Corporate Joanna Richmond California
JetBrains with Natalie Kudanova

Ruby on Rails Podcast

03:25 min | 8 months ago

JetBrains with Natalie Kudanova

"Chedda Brennan Susan International Company of at Crates, professional software development tools to help developers work smarter and faster. We do strive to create the strongest most effective developer tools and of ambitious attitudes. By mating common tasks, we enabled programmers to focused on co design and the big picture instead of boilerplate. Code. That's awesome so I'm curious I have spent some time as a product marketing manager, and it's always kind of a difficult rule to explain the people people are not clear whether or not it's technical or not, so what is a day in the life of a product marketing manager? And do you really see a hybrid between product and marketing? Well in a sense it is, and actually there is no typical day at least for me I'm basically the person helps the team. There will be maintained. Hear the voices so for Ruby developers and I'm the one who tells Ruby developers would good Ruben mind has to offer. That said I communicate with customers, online and offline I'm in charge of advertising mortgage, research, content, creation, codeine, sometimes and so I. Don't do it all myself of course, but I am the dot to where all these lines connect. I love that where some of the best places either online or offline to reach Ruby developers. Oh. I'd say it's a it. Of course and twitter has a huge community. And we have our own channels like our newsletters. We also forget a lot of feedback a the our. Issue Tracker. So. There are lots of places. Social Media and online. That's great, so I'M GONNA. Put you on the spot and ask you for an elevator pitch for our listeners who haven't had a chance to ever use ruby mind before I've been a user for about five years and I absolutely love it. So why should ruby developers consider using ruby mine? Ruben. Mine is an ID that said it has all essential tools that help you go. More efficiently. It offers powerful Golden, said features such as gold. Completion Golden Education language, specific inspections will quick success refectory in editor, Weekday Communication Remind provides a test runner debater visa supporter I could go for hours. It's basically everything you need to develop and Ruby only monoplace. Now I agree I really and I should say this as well that jeopardizes not a sponsor of the podcast I was excited to have Natalie on. Just because I've been a user of the tool for so long and really there isn't many tools out there like ruby mine, and what's fascinating about jet brains is Ruby mine yeses further ruby on rails community, but they have a solution for pretty much every market out there. My partner writes PHP foles full time and he uses PHP storm. Yeah actually it's pretty easy to transfer from one idea to another for example. If you want to learn a new language or try something you, you can just switch to a different Gebran tie, and you'll be like at home.

Ruby Product Marketing Manager Ruben Brennan Susan International Co Codeine Developer Twitter Natalie Partner Editor
"marketing manager" Discussed on It's Wood - A show about all things woodworking

It's Wood - A show about all things woodworking

08:44 min | 8 months ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on It's Wood - A show about all things woodworking

"From the tools we use the companies who make them to the artisans who used them and really anything in between remembered as we always say if it's, would we're? Also the opinions and actions, comments of our guests are strictly their own, and do not necessarily reflect those of anyone working with wood, so pull up a chair and join us in the shock. And thank you for coming along on this journey with me. Hey everyone several weeks ago, before being in quarantine, I made a trip up to Bainbridge island Washington to record several shows, and I had the immense pleasure visiting a place called Barn which stands for the Bainbridge artisan resource network. It is a place of learning creation and networking for artisans of many disciplines in this multi part discussion. I will be talking with three people involved in this great institute, Their Marketing Manager, the Woodshop studio lead and And one of the Woodshop Students I. I'm going to be sitting down with Caroline Goodwin the marketing. Manager for Barn and she's GonNa tell us all about this program. And how it came to fruition from I, did to a full blown place creative community, caroline, thank you for spending time with me this morning and welcome to its would well. Thank you. Thanks for coming. It's great to have a year so in a nutshell. What Is Barn? Well Barn is a is a community. It's basically it's an artisan community formed of artisans from all different disciplines who have come together and initially worked to create this space and now work to. Invite people into it to learn and make things now. You have a number of primary studios. Here I. Believe Ten. What are those. Well, we have everything from electronic and technical arts where we have three D. printers and laser cutters and laser editors and a lot of people who know what to do with them. and we also have fiber arts where we do weaving and knitting and sewing. Glass Arts where they do Stained glass and mosaics and Fused glass we've jewelry and fine metals where we do all different aspects of jewelry, making from the Lapidary or stone cutting work to the working with to gold and silver and other metals We have a kitchen arts. We have a commercial kitchen here, so we have a group of people who put on classes on on kick cooking, all different kinds of cooking from all over the world we have print and book arts where we have a professional quality, prince, making equipment, and also teach bookbinding and book arts. And we have a writers group where we can teach people both the craft, and the business of writing and then finally last, but not least we have. The the woodworking studio which is has been incredibly popular and and is just always full of people making things whether woodworking studio is what brought me here, initially It's kind of my thing, but I've been so impressed with the you guys offer is is just amazing now. How did this place come about? Well it. Ta started in about two thousand twelve where. Initially. It was a woodworker who had an idea to that he'd seen a community woodshop shop in Arizona think and thought wow, that would be a great thing to have on Bainbridge island. And you know he worked on it. And then was looking around for a existing space on the island to do that in and in the process, other people kind of started thinking well. What if we did that, but we also added a print studio, and maybe we did that and had a jewelry studio, and the more the more people that. kind of joined in the more traction that idea got and eventually. It morphed from looking for a space that existed that we could put this into to. You know if we're GONNA do this right. We just need to build the space from scratch and so. So that's where it went and it actually all kind of came in the idea gelled in a famous. Band tour there were a group of about. eight or ten people that were in a van on a trip to go look at another artists space in the area and on that trip the whole thing came together. It was kind of like well, you know. Let's just build it and they came up with the name you know. Let's call it barn and they came up with You know really the whole this I. Guess I. Unfortunately I wasn't on that trip, but apparently it was just incredibly exciting time for where where everything just kind of gelled and from there. We we went into the. The Next phase which is building the building. Yeah and I mean it's it. There's a big step between this would be really cool to actually breaking ground, and and it's just everybody I've talked to this whole. I don't know if I. DO SHOULD I call it an institute or just a this Space Barn? was seems to be such a Labor of love. You know everybody's passionate about what they're doing. It met a lot of the other instructors or the studios yet, and but it's all. It looks like you're doing it right well, it. It's It's brought together just an incredible group of people from the very beginning, it was the initial group. We started in a little, tiny, twenty, five hundred square foot, building up on the other end of the island and. Everybody was piled on top of each other, and there was a crammed into every little nook and corner in the space, and and it was just a crazy small space, but it. It was a place where. The you know, the people started coming and the ideas started flowing, and we figured out how the whole thing was going to work and started practicing, I guess, and because from there we grew to this twenty five thousand square foot building, so you know a tenfold increase and just. A huge explosion in the number of people and classes, and so it was great to have that tiny little space to to figure it all out. How many members do you think there are currently? We have close to We have close to a thousand individual members now. There's a lot of those family groups, so the memberships is a lower number. but you know there's there are close to probably a thousand members, and then we have a lot of people. The thing about barn is that you can participate as either a member or nonmember. It doesn't matter. We want everybody to come. You know there are reasons to be a member. If you're GONNA, you get discounts on classes, and you get free access to the studios as a member so. If you're a woodworker and you WANNA. Come in and use the studio. Once or twice a week Sense because it's usually a twenty dollar drop in. So it just kinda depends on what what you WANNA do with it, and but we're open to both, so you know there between the members and the non members. There are a lot of people. coming to US barn from. Farther and farther away all the time now. Do you take advantage of any of the studios? Yourself I do I do I I I originally joined because of the kitchen. I'm a pretty. Avid fanatic cook, and so I'd been looking for a place. Actually I've been working. Another group called sound food. That's all about sustainable food on the island and looking for a place..

Barn Caroline Goodwin Bainbridge island Washington Bainbridge Glass Arts Marketing Manager Bainbridge island US Ta Arizona
Carolyn Goodwin - Marketing Manager at Barn

It's Wood - A show about all things woodworking

05:53 min | 8 months ago

Carolyn Goodwin - Marketing Manager at Barn

"In a nutshell. What Is Barn? Well Barn is a is a community. It's basically it's an artisan community formed of artisans from all different disciplines who have come together and initially worked to create this space and now work to. Invite people into it to learn and make things now. You have a number of primary studios. Here I. Believe Ten. What are those. Well, we have everything from electronic and technical arts where we have three D. printers and laser cutters and laser editors and a lot of people who know what to do with them. and we also have fiber arts where we do weaving and knitting and sewing. Glass Arts where they do Stained glass and mosaics and Fused glass we've jewelry and fine metals where we do all different aspects of jewelry, making from the Lapidary or stone cutting work to the working with to gold and silver and other metals We have a kitchen arts. We have a commercial kitchen here, so we have a group of people who put on classes on on kick cooking, all different kinds of cooking from all over the world we have print and book arts where we have a professional quality, prince, making equipment, and also teach bookbinding and book arts. And we have a writers group where we can teach people both the craft, and the business of writing and then finally last, but not least we have. The the woodworking studio which is has been incredibly popular and and is just always full of people making things whether woodworking studio is what brought me here, initially It's kind of my thing, but I've been so impressed with the you guys offer is is just amazing now. How did this place come about? Well it. Ta started in about two thousand twelve where. Initially. It was a woodworker who had an idea to that he'd seen a community woodshop shop in Arizona think and thought wow, that would be a great thing to have on Bainbridge island. And you know he worked on it. And then was looking around for a existing space on the island to do that in and in the process, other people kind of started thinking well. What if we did that, but we also added a print studio, and maybe we did that and had a jewelry studio, and the more the more people that. kind of joined in the more traction that idea got and eventually. It morphed from looking for a space that existed that we could put this into to. You know if we're GONNA do this right. We just need to build the space from scratch and so. So that's where it went and it actually all kind of came in the idea gelled in a famous. Band tour there were a group of about. eight or ten people that were in a van on a trip to go look at another artists space in the area and on that trip the whole thing came together. It was kind of like well, you know. Let's just build it and they came up with the name you know. Let's call it barn and they came up with You know really the whole this I. Guess I. Unfortunately I wasn't on that trip, but apparently it was just incredibly exciting time for where where everything just kind of gelled and from there. We we went into the. The Next phase which is building the building. Yeah and I mean it's it. There's a big step between this would be really cool to actually breaking ground, and and it's just everybody I've talked to this whole. I don't know if I. DO SHOULD I call it an institute or just a this Space Barn? was seems to be such a Labor of love. You know everybody's passionate about what they're doing. It met a lot of the other instructors or the studios yet, and but it's all. It looks like you're doing it right well, it. It's It's brought together just an incredible group of people from the very beginning, it was the initial group. We started in a little, tiny, twenty, five hundred square foot, building up on the other end of the island and. Everybody was piled on top of each other, and there was a crammed into every little nook and corner in the space, and and it was just a crazy small space, but it. It was a place where. The you know, the people started coming and the ideas started flowing, and we figured out how the whole thing was going to work and started practicing, I guess, and because from there we grew to this twenty five thousand square foot building, so you know a tenfold increase and just. A huge explosion in the number of people and classes, and so it was great to have that tiny little space to to figure it all

Bainbridge Island Glass Arts TA Arizona
"marketing manager" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:04 min | 10 months ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"To the marketing manager for rex Boston about real estate enter before we talk about the state of affairs in terms of real estate tell me more about the advantage for the seller when using racks to be advantages really that we list at a much lower fees so we're listing at a two percent all in the state of the traditional five or six percent okay now let's talk about the local market and what changes we might expect here are still people out there buying and selling I don't think the stigma that's typically attached with a longer days on market is going to be quite the same during this time period I think people are expecting things might take a little bit longer just because the mechanics of trying to get into the house and and making sure that all these protocols are met how does the metro Boston area expect to fare later in the year where the third most densely populated metro in the country and you know that the rent prices are still very high interest rates are still very low and we've got low inventory so even with a spike in unemployment you're still more buyers out there and sellers the whole normal seasonal flow of buying and selling has been upset by what's going on what does it mean for the calendar going forward and what we typically see in Boston is in August thanks low down substantially and I think that this year we're going to see a more robust market coming into July and August and finally what about the physical process of buying and selling that's also changing dramatically would you care to comment we were actually already implementing things like virtual towards in taking people through homes and vetting people before we were bringing them into houses for not doing any in person open houses in the traditional way but we've got protocols in place where we can either do an open house where someone is beer in in Zuma's become obviously a big thing in a number of different industries and and we can conference people and into shelling out way into open houses that way were a lot of our business is just gone virtual my thanks to a Andrew Ferrante the marketing manager for rex Boston hi this is Steve address with the sump pump geeks the sump pump is the most neglected items in the home and yet we need it so badly.

marketing manager rex Boston Zuma Andrew Ferrante Boston Steve
Streaming Storage Reimagined

Big Data Beard

06:44 min | 11 months ago

Streaming Storage Reimagined

"This Corey Menton and we are back with another season of the big. Dig Up Your podcast and we're GONNA kick it off in style this time with a little conversation around streaming storage reimagined and have that conversation today. I'm joined by two folks from Dell Technologies. Amy Nannies is the product. Marketing Manager Adult Technologies and Flavio. Jakarta is the senior distinguished engineer. Adele Technologies Aiming Flavio. Welcome to the show. Amy How are you surviving in this crazy corona virus work from home migration and doing surprisingly well? I think I was made for this kind of living. What's funny I had a conversation yesterday and I somebody said its worst nightmare for an extrovert. Because we don't get to get out and socialize but it's also works nightmare for an introvert because you really don't get a lot of downtime because there's so many people in the house potentially for those of those kids and wives and families and all this stuff so it's everybody's struggling a little bit flabbier. How are you doing in this time? I'm pretty good pretty good. It has been on. It has been nice intelligent at the same time. Nice from the perspective that We spend a lot of time with family together like I. I believe we have never done before. So that's nice but telling him. Part is not being which you step outside me here stain. We have full lockdown. Now can we go tight for groceries and all that stuff from that perspective is challenging but You know we. We were coping very well. So we'll good well. I hope everybody else's stand out there. Hope our audience sustained safe and hopefully this conversation with episode. We'll give you something to enjoy in the lockdown. That's happening so many places around the world. Now business hasn't stopped. People are still out there. Working trying to derive value from data and one of the conversations kind of macro themes that has been really popular over the last two years. If you will is this concept of analytics on streams so I want to set the table Amy would you favor and help us understand? What exactly do people mean when they talk about streams sure yes so extreme as just a continuous data feed? That's in constant motion. So there's no beginning there's no end. Typically we have a time stamp on our data feed so this is different because it's always flowing Today a lot of our data naturally comes in this form you know everyone has a organizations are beginning to utilize drones and security cameras. So we're seeing this information produced all the time interesting now. This constant stream of data a guessing is kind of important you just mentioned a few Kenna interest in areas security and surveillance and those kind of things why streaming getting so much press. These days is becoming really critical for modern analytics. Yeah so you know. It's important for us to be able to consume it store it and analyze it in real time as it's coming in because we get the most value from this data as it's coming in A good example is when we're shopping online so we get to the cart and we have suggested purchases if the computer behind that was to look at that data. Historically we'd be getting it a week from now and that wouldn't be as valuable Or something like traffic lights. We can look at how busy they are and change the timing in between them if we can get that information as it's coming in so the ability to analyze information as it's coming in is hugely valuable in almost every industry. Yeah so get into that real time. Capability is so challenging. I imagine you know there's a lot organizations and a lot of technology is being built and developed to handle executive that problem so far beyond cures from your perspective. What are the challenges that this stream type data bring to maybe those traditional analytics platforms that organizations have spent the last five ten years deploying right so following up on a on what amy said if you're continuously generating data in you can imagine applications where you have a large number of these data sources? So she she used an online shopping example right. But you can also think of food servers Sensors edge applications in general. You can have many of those and all of those producing this flows of data continuously so this year diggity unnecessary to ingest this data and make available downstream. So if you're talking about applications that we want you tell that street rates went to processing data as soon as possible so ingesting that making available news is challenged by itself. Now if you think about the characteristics of of the Stream flows they need their unbounded right so as you mentioned the arm-banded so they have They have a beginning. They begin at some point by there is no no no. There's there isn't necessarily an end end. Not even that alone. You can have fluctuations in the in the workload so that the flow. You're getting my change in my few censors at some point or more sensors oranmore service fiercer results although this cannot can fluctuate and and the the your plan which accommodate those changes and in addition to that you don't want you don't want to have duplicates miss events or or or have problems with the with the streaming away that doesn't reflect what application expects a consistencies and other is another important property. All that's with the with the application wanting to deliver results with low latency so he's taking that data processing yet and delivering results as possible. And finally the the the aspect of reacting facet changes. So if you are in this in the situation that you are taking the state alive processing live and delivering results as fast as possible. System must also be able to accommodate changes to too many thanks to the work as I mentioned on. That could be faults in the system needs to watch to react to those. Maybe replicate In my need to increase the the D'Amato resources dedicated to a critical application. So all those make a beauty a platform like this very challenging.

Amy Nannies Flavio Corey Menton Dell Technologies Marketing Manager Adult Techno Jakarta Adele Technologies Distinguished Engineer Kenna D'amato Executive
A helping paw: Central Florida pet food pantry need skyrockets, seeks donations to feed growing demand

Sean Hannity

00:35 sec | 11 months ago

A helping paw: Central Florida pet food pantry need skyrockets, seeks donations to feed growing demand

"You are in need of food for your pet are you looking for a worthy cause to donate you need to know about the pet alliance food pantry at alliance already does great work with all of its pet adoptions but they also want to help someone who has money issues affecting getting food for their pets we just really want to be there for any pet parent who possibly need food for their characters and want to make the decision of should I buy make pet food or should I buy a Karen Morris the digital marketing manager for pet alliance says they've seen an increased need in the last few weeks this time last year we only served about a total of twenty one pet store can't be

Karen Morris Marketing Manager
"marketing manager" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

"Know whatever it is. I guess frozen to isn't even out yet. Anyway the you might like Snow Day. Go outside for an hour. Run everyone around. Get all the energy out then comeback in. Have your hot chocolate and say okay. Now it's movie time and then you can probably get at least half a workday in if the kids are into the movies if they are not old enough to be reliably entertained by television in movies. That's a lot harder. You'RE GONNA have to really make use of nap time. Hopefully that also means that. Your kids are young enough to nap so definitely running around the post in the morning. Get the good nap in the afternoon. Make yourself a triage list of what has to happen during that time. Because you don't WanNa be deciding during that time what you need to do. We need to have like a two hour These the first hour is the staff. I most likely will get to you because the natural probably lasts up on the second hour is the need to. But would you know the end of the world? If I didn't the third hours the bonus stuff go with that. You know if your kids are really sick and sometimes if if it's required you're active monitoring you may just need to take a sick day yourself or whatever that is if that is not an option again. You probably aren't GonNa be on the phone but maybe there's something else you could do. You could answer emails You could do. Maybe fifteen minutes here and their child is napping or is is able to watch a show. But that's sort of lower your expectations for the day. Figure out what would need to happen in like a three hour if you will. We're going to have three hours over the course of the day. And then maybe you can make up some time at night. If you have a partner who can then cover that that time. Yeah and also say You mentioned flew. Flew is pretty contagious. Nobody wants to get it but strapping bronchitis. I mean those are situations where sometimes with a little bit of ibuprofen. The Kid may be okay so it may not be the kind of thing where you WanNa leave the kid but maybe there would be a babysitter willing to come over so you could also be at home. Get a little bit. More focused worked on while the kids feeling okay. They could color what the kid or watch shows with a kid or get the kids snacks. And you'd still be able to monitor the child because you know this person writes back. Childcare isn't feasible it depends how important is you? And if this is like very very dire if you throw enough money at this problem you can probably solve it now if you have the PTO or your partner has the PTO than this may not be an issue and you can just use your own time in spend that time being apparent. Fear that needs you but if it's one of those intermediate situations where the kids like to sick to go to school but not dire dire. You can still potentially get some help while even watching the kid to some extent get a little bit. More work done is one thing I was thinking about. I also remember to. This is not all of your responsibility. Of course you know. This is your partners responsibility to. It may not be a crazy thing to track. How often this actually happens. Because I also think this is one of those things where sometimes it seems more frequent than it actually is now. Maybe I'm wrong and it's been thirty days at us but it may be that it feels big and memorable because it's traumatic. It's tough while it's happening but even let's say if it's like eight work days out of the year if you and your partner each completely owned four of them and let's say you didn't work at all. Well that's four days of Pto out of however many you get it might not be some crazy percentage and if you've ever let yourself not take all of them one year you can build up a little bit of a buffer. Which is I have done that kind of inadvertently actually so I don't feel terrible on the off chance that I have to be home for a day or two. It's like whether it's something fun or something like this you build it in. So maybe get some objective. Data might help you feel a little bit better And then of course. Don't feel like a bad mom. You're not a bad mom. You're just a mom with a job and kids and stuff happens so keep working on yourself and alleviating those feelings of guilt because they really don't belong anywhere in yes. It will be summer eventually. Don't worry probably too soon. All right well. This has been best of both worlds. We've been interviewing Liebeck now and we will be back next week with more on making work in life fit together. Thanks for listening. You can find me Sarah at the shoebox dot com or at the underscores shoebox on instagram. And.

Snow Day partner Liebeck ibuprofen bronchitis Sarah
"marketing manager" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

08:59 min | 1 year ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

"At finding finding other people has really been the most helpful thing Enron just knowing that your kid is still your kid even if they do have a diagnosis. And it's actually you know people in the US it it's helpful for insurance. I mean they will cover way way more with when he just had like developmental delay before he had autism diagnosis. We couldn't get him any sort of therapy with insurance coverage. But now you know we can. So it's kind of a weird thing but it is helpful and budget to know that it doesn't change them that they're still the same kid just you know it sort of is what it is and others a grieving period. I mean I still get upset about it and like I said before you know. I wish this that he didn't have this. You know I wish. She had had a typical childhood that he will grow up to be. You know typical adult. I just don't know but I think it's okay to grieve about it. You know it helps absolutely and I can tell you still have some wonderful times with him and he looks very happy. All the normans program and the happy exceptions. Not but that's all kids it Lee so our listeners always love to hear about a day in the life and think certainly we got a bit about your childcare set up afterwards but maybe you can talk through what it looks like from. You know getting up until going to bed okay so actually training for a marathon right now witch. I don't know why I decided to do that. At this point in my life but I did love it. I've been following your long runs. It's very Wasser on talk miles tomorrow. Not really excited about that but in three weeks so I've been getting up extremely early because if I don't run in the morning I won't like I'm not an after work runner. I just want to catch so anyway I have been I get up anywhere between four thirty and five thirty go to bed early so that helps and you know. I get my Rondon. Or if they don't have to run I'll get up at six thirty A I work in a really casual office so when I'm going into the office I don't really have to. You know look very presentable. You know jeans jeans and a t-shirt is fine so it kind of cuts down on the time getting ready. So that's that's nice so I get Alex up at seven and try to be out the door about seven. Fifteen seven twenty. It's very rush. She does eat breakfast at school usually somewhat late too but I drive into school which is across the street. Basically we could walk but there's no point walk in their drive into school. Drop them off and go to work which is about half an hour away so I try to get there by eight and then I have a lunch break or sometimes I'll do errands. You don't go to trader Joe's target that sort of thing I get off. Work is a drive. Pick Alex up because my husband can't get there in time have to be there by five thirty which is hard for me but I can manage it most the time and then come home. One of US will make dinner. You know we'll hang out watch. Tv WITH ALEX. You know then my husband will generally give him a bath and get him ready for bed and he goes to bed. I mean it's yeah it's not very nothing really out of the ordinary no but it sounds nice and logistically tight and doable. And you have a routine that works and you're running a marathon so there you go and you're training for a marathon so normal life except for the twenty mile runs stuck in. No that's awesome. Well before we end this we always share a love of the week and mine is actually running themes those there you go and I think I actually made this my my love of the week like two years ago but I feel like it deserves a new level because I dug so I went. I went okay. This is too long the love of the weeks I was like. I really want an Apple Watch. Josh was like you do not need an apple. Watch in your life. You don't another thing. Remember you have watched Watch because I needed something. I was doing some interval training and my usually. Just use the Strada but it was not very accurate when I was trying to do specific intervals so I like dusted off the old garment. Thirty five from twenty sixteen and it works great and even pairs with my phone and it basically does everything. I would want an apple watch to do except I already owned it works perfectly. That's frugal and giving it was Bruegel win. I'm giving it a shout out because that's pretty decent longevity for like a electronic device. That's good well. Mine is is sort of also APP related but Sam. My ten year old announced when we're having our homework set down time yesterday that he needed a pro tractor which we don't randomly have around the House and it turns out you can get a pro tractor APP on the phone which turns your camera into you. See the object and then measures the angle So there are free protector. Apps and that was pretty exciting. He mentioned that one of his classmates parents had gone on Amazon. To get a protracted wouldn't apparently 'cause they started doing their homework earlier so they could get the overnight shipping or the two day shipping. And still get it in time. But they ordered seventy two pro tractors. Apparently they come in units like seventy two which makes sense right you order for your classroom. But I'm sure they did not need seventy two per attractors so I could see myself having done being like. Oh where is it? Where's where's the protracted AMAZON RECOMMENDS CHARLOTTE? Just click on that and then getting seventy. I'm annoyed at the school. Not just passing out pro tractors or I don't know giving enough lead time to order it on Amazon. Approach actor in there. I don't know maybe if you kept it since geometry when you took it I don't know it's possible so definitely don't have mine all right. Lee. What is your level of the week so mine exclude related and it is. These bars called perfect bars. I don't know if you guys had those okay not only have I had it but they were attentive sponsor for the show and I actually wrote our person back I was like I love this bar and we haven't heard back from them but maybe now that if out there perfect bar where we're on it at nine away had their these bars that they're in the refrigerated section and they're just really good. I've had a couple of flavors. They like peanut butter chocolate chip. They just have a different consistency than you know. They're not like me like other. Wardley agree with you in seriously. I was like Yes yes I I went out and bought them like they didn't ship. It's me I bought my own perfect bar. I was like this is really good and I haven't heard back so that's zipping doesn't have to be shelf stable for like a year. That probably changes what you can put in it on the package that you can keep it unrefrigerated for up to five days. Young Penn stick it like in your bag or now. They're like super peanut butter which is huge plus in my book. That's awesome. Well thank you so much for being on the show. Lee-ing at me. Yeah we can't believe this may be the first time we had an actual conversation knowing you guys at the dawn of the Internet deciding like let's meet on this online fitness board like people what it was was designing the first first online Wang Pre face rock and it would have been facebook page group today but it wasn't didn't excel. We were just before our time xactly hundred. Thank you so much all right. Thank you well. That was great and now we have our listener question. This was sent into Sarah on instagram. Sarah read it for us with maybe censoring. Some of the language I will censor away. This person says I am in the thick of it between snow and sick days doing a lot of work from home with the kids. These are situations where backup Isn't feasible truly horrible weather or sick days. Like flu strep bronchitis. What are your best tax for doing this? I'm so over it but I also recognize this is the downside of the workplace flexibility. I often enjoy. Is there any way to end the day without feeling like a bad mom in a bad boss slash employee slash co worker? Also do you guys think summer will come in twenty twenty now? It's funny knock on Wood. We haven't had any snow days here. so I guess that's she's in a different part of the country but the northeast has been pretty not. I mean it's not been warm but.

Alex US apple Amazon Lee Enron Sarah Wasser Rondon facebook AMAZON Joe Josh Sam Wardley CHARLOTTE
"marketing manager" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

12:30 min | 1 year ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

"This is episode one hundred thirty five which is first airing in early. March of twenty twenty. We are going to be interviewing Liebeck now today. She is working as a marketing. Manager is also raising a special needs child's going to hear about all the details involved in that at first Sarah. Let's talk about medical dental appointments as we all know that one of the challenges of working full-time and having children in general is getting to medical appointments and things like that and when they multiply when there are therapy visits and things like that can get to be a little crazy but yeah so what. What do doctor visits? Look like in your area. Yeah I was just thinking about how this might apply to those who have to go more than rarely in how hard that would be because I just came from. I am not pregnant but I went to my ob for some other routine stuff and my appointment. Time was it three thirty and actually interesting because I was like could I come later? And they're like no three thirty at the latest. We can be seen it for twenty like that's when it was brought back with the nurse. I don't even know when the doctor came and she's great and you know it's okay. I brought a book actually was fairly productive time for me. You know if I had a child that needed to do that twice a week or something. It would probably drive me up a wall. Is it like where you are because I sadly feel like? That's fairly standard for south Florida. Our pediatrician is just as bad. Really I I don't know I think we`ve. I've either lucked into her. We sort of sought out. That are the people I see frequently are pretty good. So our our pediatrician. When I'VE BEEN BRINGING HENRY. Because of course with newborns More appointments more frequent. We get seen pretty much immediately and then with Might be one of the things I liked about this practices. They were almost always quick like it was never a long time waiting there which is really nice especially at through a pregnancy. When you're going fairly for you're not just went back for my six week. Visit and the appointment was eleven thirty and I was back in my car at twelve. Oh five so. That is amazing. That's pretty I know. I think it's interesting because I have a feeling if in your location the culture is that things run on time then every practice is gonNA pressure to do that. But I don't think the culture here is to run onto because it seems like most places. It's like sit there for an hour. genevieve's last pediatrician visit like she was going insane. Because we got there at nine twenty five or nine thirty appointment again. We're seeing that like ten forty five and I am a physician so it's not even like it's it's not. I assume people aren't sitting in the break room being like I love to have people sitting my waiting room for an hour like it makes me seem more desirable. It's like a club assume that is not old groves. What's going on. Maybe you can unpack this for us. I run pretty on time. I was saying you don't do this like you're there are days though when someone just takes longer than I would expect them to take in. It's not terribly uncommon for me to run thirty minutes behind in the afternoon but never like the hour and like I can't even honestly I would be mortified walking into a patient's so I guess it is very clinician dependent. Maybe I need to find some more Taipei provides. I know I was saying I might. I might switch if if somebody's making a two year old wakened waiting hour and a half. That's just that's just cruel. I also think it is harder and harder to survive as a private practice these days. I don't work. I work for Community Hospital. I'm looking employees kind of a big machine so it's a little bit different versus being profitable when you're a small practice which is kind of what I see for. Our pediatrician will be. Maybe I think they probably do have to overbook to some extent because if they do get no shows I don't know I mean I must be some math to it and people have sort of gotten to accept it if the doctor has a good reputation But Yeah my ob in particular like the appointments themselves. Were like three minutes long. Like I should have. I never did but I should have set a timer for how long the guy was in the room most of the time because it really felt like under five minutes and yet I would often wait. Naiad. It's yeah I mean. I have sat through bad visit so when when Ruth was getting diagnosed. We're originally figuring out what to do about her eye condition you know. We went to different specialists. And boy we went to the Wilmer Eye Institute in Philadelphia and I was literally here right. We'll maybe it's I don't know they're different. We didn't wind up using them. But I was there all morning with her. And yes I- points are gonNA take one because they have to die light weight but still it was like every time the getting back in. Was this huge ordeal and then the special specialists then went with who is affiliated with Chop the children's Hospital of Philadelphia. It was slightly more on time although there are still some some weights and then now we're at Johns Hopkins. Which you know we have to go. We have to travel two hours to get there anyway. So it's like we've already made a day of IT I. I don't even know if it's a long wait or not. 'cause it's it's an entire day long ordeal as it is so this is this is the problem but the normal ones are pretty quick. I think yeah just came up with an where you could say. Oh if you wait longer than sixty minutes your visit is free true while there for for like I mean I mean I my the incentives aren't quite there then right because if you're yeah happy insurance how does that. Yeah if it's free for your insurance company like that's not only they waive any copay or deductible now it's interesting but no I. My heart goes out to people who have to actually do this all the time and I guess a have to ask her like if I did it through this all the time. Probably one of the things on my list would be like. Can I get in and out efficiently like it's only so much if someone is an excellent provider? But that's GONNA matter if you're going to be multiplying it doesn't matter so much me because he's a rare occasions but it would matter if it was more frequent. Do you have any tips like will you? It sounds like it's not an issue in your area. I guess the only thing I've found that sometimes works is to try to get the first appointment of the day although sometimes that has backfired. Ob they can end up having to do like a delivery and then the first appointment. They don't actually start until an hour later or more in their like. Sorry they had to go for an emergency session or like okay. I can't argue with that or just bring work and be like this. Is My office space. I mean if you yeah I mean so I. One of the reasons again is using a larger practice or one that's affiliated with an institution is that there's a little bit more backup so if one of the providers got duct doing a emergencies thing. There'd be somebody else like you could see the NPA or whatever That there would be another provider there so that person might be doubling up. So there'd be some way but it wouldn't be as bad as waiting for somebody who is In Surgery Yeah first appointment of the day at and I would say it's also one of the things. We like about our pediatrician. She has part of a larger practice. But I've had some of the others who are waiting longer but she does not so I think it is provider specific so I said the day the purse. I post lunch right. You say that that helps sometimes. Yeah sometimes that can help. Definitely I even tried. I've tried to call fifteen minutes before that only works if you're like really really close in location to where it is which is the case but can be tricky all right. Well I think we should get into our interview with sounds good all right. We're so excited to welcome Li Beck now onto the show. She is a senior digital marketing manager at a medium size company and also the mother to a wonderful son that she's going to tell us about a welcome to the show me. You're welcome so one of the reasons we brought you on because we've gotten several requests from listeners to feature some parents who have special needs children because it comes with a often a special set of challenges and of course rewards as well and you came to mind and I think I remember now if you had volunteered yourself on instagram or not but I was like. Oh yeah because I have followed your journey. And how old is your son now. He thinks he's six years old. So you're not exactly new to this anymore. You're you're seasoned but I thought you'd be a great person since you're also working at work that whole time to my knowledge In could share a little bit about what that's like and maybe provide some guidance for others who may be at the start of their journey or who just can use some tips along the way and sounds good. So why don't you tell us a little bit just about the beginning of your story in even I even remember? There is some if you're willing to talk about it some things about your pregnancy. Where you were a little chair I can talk about. It might get really long but I'll try to work for ten so yeah basically started when I was pregnant. I guess like whenever they do the genetic testing for Down Syndrome and that sort of thing. The results came back like way off and they were concerned that the baby might have down's syndrome so I hadn't Amnio Dine and didn't have down syndrome so they were like we don't know exactly. It's probably an issue with the Placenta. you know should be fine and then as my pregnancy progressed. He started not growing as fast and somewhere. He never know. If it's here is someone was diagnosed with. Img are injured during growth restriction. I guess that's me diagnose. Not Him I don't know but So he was not growing so I have a lot of growth scans and other tests and stuff and basically he decided he should come out a little early so he was born at thirty seven weeks ahead a C. Section. But that was because he was reached more than anything. They would have induced me if he was head down an when he was born a thought he was gonna be like three pounds something and he was actually four counted fifteen ounces so he was like hiding in there somewhere so when he was born they were basically like maybe it was the placenta. You know we just don't know and You know nothing really out of the ordinary in the first couple of months happened I mean he was led all but you know he was doing baby stuff. You know sort of what they do. You Know Sleeping Ryan who've been that type of thing but Somewhere around like four months. Maybe our pediatrician mentioned genetic testing and at the time. I basically freaked out now. Is like this pediatrician doesn't know what he's talking about. And so but we did some testing and everything came back normal and so this was all like in his first year of life and when he was about one we kind of started to notice the delays becoming more apparent. So we know we went to the doctor again. Did OTHER GENETIC CASTING ENDED UP? Going to a developmental pediatrician when he was about to who diagnosed him as being on the autism spectrum. So that was kind of our working diagnosis for a couple of years but it always kind of seemed like there was something else going on. He's always been very small and some other like little things that people wouldn't necessarily notice by looking at him but like his Pinky fingers or like curved a little bit and his toes or smaller than they should be like little little tiny things in it. Just you know. He has some traits that go along with autism but some that. Really don't so we're always like okay. Well you know. He has autism diagnosis..

twenty twenty Liebeck genevieve Wilmer Eye Institute Taipei south Florida Down Syndrome NPA private practice Philadelphia Hospital of Philadelphia Community Hospital Johns Hopkins Ruth Ryan Li Beck marketing manager Amnio Dine
Raising a Special Need Child with Marketing Manager Lee Becknell

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Raising a Special Need Child with Marketing Manager Lee Becknell

"Welcome to the show me. You're welcome so one of the reasons we brought you on because we've gotten several requests from listeners to feature some parents who have special needs children because it comes with a often a special set of challenges and of course rewards as well and you came to mind and I think I remember now if you had volunteered yourself on instagram or not but I was like. Oh yeah because I have followed your journey. And how old is your son now. He thinks he's six years old. So you're not exactly new to this anymore. You're you're seasoned but I thought you'd be a great person since you're also working at work that whole time to my knowledge In could share a little bit about what that's like and maybe provide some guidance for others who may be at the start of their journey or who just can use some tips along the way and sounds good. So why don't you tell us a little bit just about the beginning of your story in even I even remember? There is some if you're willing to talk about it some things about your pregnancy. Where you were a little chair I can talk about. It might get really long but I'll try to work for ten so yeah basically started when I was pregnant. I guess like whenever they do the genetic testing for Down Syndrome and that sort of thing. The results came back like way off and they were concerned that the baby might have down's syndrome so I hadn't Amnio Dine and didn't have down syndrome so they were like we don't know exactly. It's probably an issue with the Placenta. you know should be fine and then as my pregnancy progressed. He started not growing as fast and somewhere. He never know. If it's here is someone was diagnosed with. Img are injured during growth restriction. I guess that's me diagnose. Not Him I don't know but So he was not growing so I have a lot of growth scans and other tests and stuff and basically he decided he should come out a little early so he was born at thirty seven weeks ahead a C. Section. But that was because he was reached more than anything. They would have induced me if he was head down an when he was born a thought he was gonna be like three pounds something and he was actually four counted fifteen ounces so he was like hiding in there somewhere so when he was born they were basically like maybe it was the placenta. You know we just don't know and You know nothing really out of the ordinary in the first couple of months happened I mean he was led all but you know he was doing baby stuff. You know sort of what they do. You Know Sleeping Ryan who've been that type of thing but Somewhere around like four months. Maybe our pediatrician mentioned genetic testing and at the time. I basically freaked out now. Is like this pediatrician doesn't know what he's talking about. And so but we did some testing and everything came back normal and so this was all like in his first year of life and when he was about one we kind of started to notice the delays becoming more apparent. So we know we went to the doctor again. Did OTHER GENETIC CASTING ENDED UP? Going to a developmental pediatrician when he was about to who diagnosed him as being on the autism spectrum. So that was kind of our working diagnosis for a couple of years but it always kind of seemed like there was something else going on. He's always been very small and some other like little things that people wouldn't necessarily notice by looking at him but like his Pinky fingers or like curved a little bit and his toes or smaller than they should be like little little tiny things in it. Just you know. He has some traits that go along with autism but some that. Really don't

Down Syndrome Amnio Dine Ryan
What it Means to Be Creative with Vanessa Dewey

Design Speaks

10:26 min | 1 year ago

What it Means to Be Creative with Vanessa Dewey

"Vanessa is as a community builder marketing professional and currently works at Adobe as the senior project marketing manager. That's a mouthful yes it is. Hopefully this is not actually. I just left on Friday. So it's all new. Okay so my guess my first question it was gonNA be anyways sort of if you WANNA talk to us a little bit about what you're doing. Now what your journey has been up to this point and what you're going to be doing. I guess now in the future shirt. We'll definitely I apologize about that brand new. Everything's happened so quick. No not necessarily I looked at today just to make sure everything was updated. But we don't don't always update linked in with our life right. Yeah especially when things just happened. I'm a little slow to that right now. Yeah no worries I guest. I'll just say overall my career path is definitely not linear. I'm definitely not tick the box type of creative My background is in graphic design for about eight years years. I was in house designed for Mattel branding and packaging orca across multiple verticals of the play patterns of toys And then I serve at a certain time of my career halfway through at during that venture at Mattel I decided to served take something else because I realized there is no outside. Craig is coming inspire a creative community of four hundred to six hundred plus creatives in Los is Angeles so I took on while having a full production schedule realize I need to take on and create the speaker series grassroots and over the course of five years built up from from quarterly to buy weekly bringing design. Thought leaders like Brian Collins. To wwl moment I Leela Nash. Meyer wow what a great idea it was it. It was in theory but that's was in essence in two thousand thirteen. When I started doing that it start planted the seeds because at the same time to I had a thought? What would you next my career so for me? I want is see and found other opportunities to infuse leadership and other types types of opportunities to help elevate and evolve myself as a creative and as a leader so the speaker series is also you know as you mentioned. Aig I got involved. volved in the Los Angeles chapter quite a bit and over the years that served helped me in an in a way to supplement where I was looking for that I was in say per se getting as IC Mattel not to say that. The community wasn't amazing but still like that extra in two thousand sixteen. I think this is just a year or so before I bet you my life I hit my. What's next month in my career? I was no longer inspired and just I could do packing branding. But it just wasn't singing to me in my God and then at the same time I decided to leave. My husband divorced him so so there's so much and what I ended up doing was professionally. I was able to take a role and evolve it and creates a so. I guess that's experiential educational and inspirational called the hub ultimately that's supported by four hundred six hundred plus Craybas at the headquarters of Matale. So I continue my speaker series and added onto that by Craig. An Internal Speaker series support at highlight creatives leaders in our community. At mattel a podcasts. Help my L. A. D. My led with crave career path and as a side note this role actually dead. The COO transitioned into H.. Ourselves and learning development so I go home ready packaging to hr so that lasted for almost two years. And I quit when I went into that role I went to a w maximum San Diego and one of my friends is one of the community managers for the creative jams community on team and I went up to see if there was any inside of eighteen was coming enterprise side so as it as it turned out they were working towards that end in summer of two thousand seventeen. I was part of the pilot for Adobe Craig Gems Enterprise Foul. KABC's what okay. So crazy is who don't know okay crave GM's as core. It's part is a to park. They have experienced part inspiration apart hands on Their community and there's also enterprise now but basically basically the format is you have teams of craters two to four depending varies but having teams creatives have asserted brief learn a certain tool from adobe. CBS Adobe Dobie Stockton W rush and then have an our tasks over three hours to address the brief while leverage these these tools rules you then also bring in thought leaders such as local design leaders or even just creative leaders anybody to EXPARC inspiration depending on what you want the talk about and the theme and also the end you bring in all craters and having do presentations of their final deliverables also Two percent of the teams and there's usually prizes and also it's A. It's a nice experience. Yeah it's a hack actually creates a little more elmo fun and not just a hack no. It's just a lot of fun. I actually participated in a creative jam here in Albuquerque. Oh Yeah my team member and I actually won the the choice choice award or whatever the thing is but yeah. I just wanted to kind of explain what that is for the people that don't understand we haven't had one around here in a while so just options is to explain a little bit but so when it happened was coming into twenty twenty eighteen. This program was then adopted onto the Create a quote enterprise side the marketing so I was brought over to join the team. And that's where I ended up so what from branding. Packaging Design Zayn into more of a creative HR learning development role and then that translates very well into this Role within the enterprise side and had it was a great opportunity. What I did was each of basically what I was doing it Mattel's then able to translate across in essence to different customers? Key customer customer so over the course of the first year has A. I was lucky enough to be able to help. Establish that in Europe so I was working with customers curate atheist. BESPOKE EVENTS FOR BBC Vice Media Sky TV to to pet lebrons. I did some in North America to and then I came back to North America Because to focus more on this last year in particular last feels those focusing on North America helping out the team here see. We're kind of split living indeed. Yes correct for the first. While months to fourteen months I was splitting time. Actually between Los Angeles and London which was mental? And then and then then I started phased out of the Arab side but then I still at once. I moved to New York I was for workwise those in New York but still continued when I could because I could work remotely at times. I was in London when I over the course of over the course they are right built a really lovely and inspiring design network and tried of add. Some really dear friends over there so I just could've. That's where everything's to me so I would always go back there when I can. So that's amazing. So are you at liberty to kind of speak to. Oh what your next step is what you're up to right now before we go onto our topic for today sure. No I definitely can't so basically I had a moment of clarity clarity literally Thanksgiving Week. I was elected and I had all these different mope conversations with people and just something clicked and I'm just actually. She probably take a pause to the last three years. I've taken a pause between METALLICA Dobie. I took two days off a Saturday Sunday. which is not a weekend? So I'm just figuring house and delving into what I really WANNA do some side projects and then having conversations I haven't been able to have And a few other things too okay. So what sort of side projects if I can pry. I love people side project so for several years. People keep saying you need to write. You need a ride. So I'M GONNA be pitching some articles goals designed based on creative base but also to one of my passions besides building communities connecting people and is coffee as you probably And you post lovely lovely pictures of coffee a thank you so basically what I'm GonNa try to do is also create a dialogue Building community meaning but more or less talking about coffee also brought it broader crates. So I'm trying to figure out a way to pitch a formatted adage series. So if I'm in London I'll pick three craters or three people within even the food industry and go to their three favorite coffee or wine wine shops and talk about it and go from there some. I'm playing around with different types of not just doing creative or design industry focus writings but other also infusing so my other passions. Yeah that is really exciting. Thank you and then all of this. I'll be taking my pause in in London so I bought a one way so London and the man so We had a long layover. I I was in Europe In at the beginning of October and we had a really long layover in London So so we we had like a four hour chance to just kind of explore as quick as we could. It was the day of that crazy brexit thing on a Saturday. So loggers augurs and like subway places. Where like blocked off and stuff but I definitely want to visit again when it's probably less chaotic and when we have more time to the hang out there but it was it was really beautiful? It is there something unique about the design community and just the creative community as a whole and then also so to a city. It's Io's feels like little hamlets piece together so you have a high straight with just bustling but then you can go off a couple of blocks and you're quite canals and so it's a nice. It's a nice

Mattel London Adobe Craig Los Angeles Europe North America Adobe Craig Gems Vanessa CBS Marketing Manager Leela Nash Matale Adobe Dobie Brian Collins Meyer COO New York Kabc Craybas
YouTube Considered Screening All YouTube Kids Videos, But Dropped Decision

Techmeme Ride Home

02:37 min | 1 year ago

YouTube Considered Screening All YouTube Kids Videos, But Dropped Decision

"According to Bloomberg earlier this year Youtube considered solving it's horrible algorithm problems by screening all the videos posted for kids under eight years old in their youtube. Kids Channel seems reasonable. Right seems logical seems responsible but of course I you tube ended up not going this route for the typical reasons why content platforms usually get gun. Shy Youtube was afraid of overtly exercising using editor Oriel control less. They look more like a media company than a platform and thus invite additional scrutiny and regulation remember that landmark. FTC settlement that Youtube agree to earlier in the year quoting Bloomberg Youtube privately. Consider taking more control earlier this year at assembled a team of more than forty employees to brace for or the FTC decision. The team was code named crosswalk as an away to guide kids across Youtube. Chaotic streets among its proposals was a radical one at least by the standards of Silicon Valley. Youtube would screen every video aimed at kids under the age of eight in its youtube kids APP ensuring that no untoward content crept into the feet of millions millions of thoughts around the world. A press release was even drafted in which youtube. CEO Susan was shaky said. Professional moderators would check each clip according to people familiar with the plans yet at the last minute the CEO and her top deputies ditched. The plan said the people who asked not to be identified discussing private deliberations. The rationale was clear to summit youtube. One person involved in the project recalled handpicking videos. Even for kids made Youtube look too much like a media company. Not a neutral platform. A Youtube spokeswoman denied the idea was turned down because of put the company in charge of programming but she declined to comment further on the decision in a recent interview Jiechi made it clear hear that her content moderation push only goes so far telling. CBS News that even being liable for video recommendations would destroy the essence of the service quote. If we were held liable for every single piece of content that we recommend we would have to review it. She said that would mean there would be a much smaller set of information that people would be finding much much smaller an quote Youtube Bouncing Act between media publisher or hands off. Internet bulletin board has sparked intense debate internally for some business partners and employees. This year's decisions visions leaves them with the impression that the company is unable to take a series stand quote. What is the mission of this company? People don't even know said Claire Stapleton a former the marketing manager. Who left this year after clashing with Google over employee protests quote? Youtube is so ill equipped to manage these massive challenges and quote

Youtube Bloomberg Youtube FTC CEO Bloomberg Silicon Valley Claire Stapleton Oriel Control Google Cbs News Editor Marketing Manager Jiechi Susan Publisher
4 Small Business Marketing Insights for 2020

Duct Tape Marketing

09:04 min | 1 year ago

4 Small Business Marketing Insights for 2020

"Number one insight audio content. I think that this is going to be something that people need to really embrace for twenty twenty so audio content is this it is a podcast. It's all the things that have been around for a while. It's actually part of a video. There is audio typically the video but a couple of things. I think are really important. If you're not podcasting I'll say it again. I'm sitting at many times. I think you should be. PODCASTING is a great way to produce content content. It is a great way. If you do interviews like me to reach out and have some great conversations with people you wanted to speak with and and you know that can be it doesn't have to be authors are influencers that can be your target market. It could be your customers. It's a great way to get content to build relationships but from a format standpoint. One of the things that I think audio has going for it is that people have less and less time and less and less attention may be to sit in front of a monitor and read content onto read blog post and and a lot of ways. I think that that's due to the fact that I know how I am if I'm in the office and I'm in front of a computer I don't know I'm going on client stuff stuff writing my own content. I'm probably not gonNA read content same with video. I have a lot of trouble sitting in front of a monitor and watching video. I get distracted. I want to do other things because I'm on my computer but audio content has the portability that really no other format hats so in other words judge I can download the podcast Stick my phone in my pocket and go for a walk. I can turn it on in the car because I can listen to it without having to watch it I can walk. The dog dog can go for a run. I I just think there's so many things that that make the format the portability at least of the format Something that I think you have to be adding if you're not today because I do think that there are people that are tuning out And every other form of content I know a lot of books That that you know or some of the biggest name books that you can look at in in the world of business or non fiction books by. I'd like my friend Ryan holidays. Still misses a key his recent bestseller the Audio Book Format that is selling as many copies if not more some days than the printed format format and I think that that trend is going continue in fact. I think I saw a statistic the other day that audiobooks sales outstripped the sale of kindle e books I think it was just a study Eddie in the UK but still and it gets indicative of of really the behavior of consumption. That is out there so if you are not producing adducing on your content. I'm going to encourage you to do so. There are a couple of things you can think about. I mean if you've produced a whole bunch of videos and you're all on video videos fine videos. Great video is necessary but you can sometimes strip out the audio from those videos and run it in another format. You don't have to have a traditional podcast cast you can just occasionally Do a rant like this in an audio format you can use audio to actually just talk all about your business for hours and hours and hours and let somebody else. Turn that into web pages by transcribing it so there are a lot of things that I think you can start thinking about adding A lot of reasons to add audio content to the mix. I do think that this is Kinda my one. Futuristic idea here I do you think that the smart speakers will at some point become a way that people consume more of their daily content so in other words Alexa. Play my flash briefing. You might deliver say daily kind of recap of audio content again. I think we're a long way from there. It's too hard to figure out how to get an Alexa skill. Walk on your daily briefing. It's kind of like the old days of podcasting but but but it's coming I think So audio content get into it all right the second insight. This is me speaking more as a marketing consultant and a person who trains marketing consultants. I think more and more small businesses should should and our bring things in house and there's two areas that I think you should stop outsourcing as much or or that you will stop outsourcing I think and that's marketing tactics. I'm going to expand on that and then technology in fact I if somebody came to me and said Okay my businesses at XYZ point. What should my next higher be? This is a ninety percent chance that I would say it'd be a marketing person or it would be a technology. Ag Person The problem with kind of both of those is is that you don't just say either or I think you hire a marketing person because there are so many things that can be done routinely writing content doing social posts getting reviews taking photos of things making instagram post. Those are all things that I think. You should have an internal resource to do but marry that with a strategic marketing partner. A Life Times were the challenges is that small businesses will will hire a marketing person. Usually a young person who knows that social media stuff but there's no direction there's no way for them to kind of tap into the strategic marketing plan because a lot of cases there isn't one so what my suggestion is is you should be looking for a trusted resource mentor to revise her coach consultant. Who can help you with the strategic component? The plan the maybe even the operations of the plan the analysis of the plan the analysis of the data that the plant produces but get somebody internally directed by that person you'll get the best of both worlds and I think that that's a that's scenario that's going to grow so much so that in twenty twenty We are actually going to create a certified marketing manager program just With the with the primary goal of leading business owners letting US train their marketing staff leading them show them how to hire internal marketing staff. And have that person Directed acted by an outside resource such as the duck tape marketing consultant. So that's a another insight that Be As as many of these tools have gotten in some always easier to operate but but it also in some ways more foundational to marketing. I think that's a great hybrid combination insight insight number three. This was kind of fun because so many things. I've seen over the years that I've been doing that there's this giant pendulum swings back and forth worth. It seems like so used to be every deal was done with the handshake. You know with a trusted partner that you could look in the eye and then technology came along along the Internet came along and all of a sudden you could do an entire business without ever actually talking to another human being and it was too far that way and I think that we're swinging being back somewhere to the middle to the point where this insight sort of seems counterintuitive. I'm saying you need to both humanize automate. And I think the reason for that. Is that so much behavioral summit so many ways in which people want to do business with customers are or with Customers do business with us. They want things that should be convenient to be. Convenient should be efficient to be efficient. Should be automated to be automated but then they want that human touch. There's tremendous amount of research done around. You know what makes you love company and Dan in many cases. It's it's things like convenience knowledge communication efficiency friendliness all human traits but a lot of the reason the company is is convenient and efficient is now aided by technology in the proper set so I think that we needed we need to get it to the point where we are automating everything that can and should be automated and we are humanizing or re humanizing everything that can and should be my insight for twenty twenty in terms of a recommendation in this case is get back on the phone let your phone ring answer your phone and call people that that is one of the easiest ways I think to re humanize businesses. I'm GONNA do it and I've certainly been guilty of the opposite insight insight number four I think retention customer experience is the Golden Opportunity for anybody. That's been in business for any amount of time already. Alluded to this but press pricewaterhouse. Cooper didn't extensive research on why somebody stayed loyal. What they thought was a great experience experience and it not wealth? Very few of the responses had anything to do with the product or the service it was convenience knowledgeable communication efficiency friendly

Consultant Alexa Marketing Partner Marketing Manager UK Ryan Eddie DAN Cooper United States Partner
"marketing manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

15:11 min | 1 year ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"For joining us this morning in Latin America. It's great to have you I've interacted with you through. Do I mean I've listened to your podcast too so I'm excited to have you as part of Latin America and the fact that you are an engineer or your your your intact make a big difference in terms of also the content that you're able to produce so why don't we start by learning about you. You're used to be in on the other other ended interview people so let's talk about your journey into tech arena first of all thank you for inviting me really appreciate his paternity and thank you for building in this Latin America community. 'cause I also listen to your podcast and I just love your styling how you focus on the personal journey so thank you for reminding me so a mom. I'm actually a musician turn. Electrical Engineer Turn Product Marketing Manager. I actually went to the school I for sound engineering back. Homing aim Florida I was warning got acas witness whaler about move with my family to Florida when I was a a kid when I was only twelve years old and I love that intersection of music and technology and how you can use technology to make music music and make sound better so I gotta actually come my degree back in twenty thousand eight and are working a recording studio in Orlando and one of my mentors at the time the professor already so that I was really really passionate are electron ix how things were how the how are all these amplifiers and sound effect machines put together and so he he meant threw me he saw that. I had a knack for it so so he told me Google. Maybe you should consider electrical engineering and at the time I was like why not so I started taking classes at UCF unreasonable. Oh Central Florida and eventually got my degree back in twenty eleven and my thing was all analogue electronics. I Wa Really Geeky about Allah Eletronic so transistor amplifiers. Although that sort of thing I remember that actually bought at the main strictly analogue dot com my email in college was or go at strictly analogue dot Com so fast forward twenty twelve. Intel calls me a yoga. Were looking for analog engineers. Would you be interested in like what am I going to do it until I just want to build sounds amplifiers fires and I lend a co-op in Sacramento California back in twenty twelve so I back my Nissan Sentra we'd all my things couple bags my bass guitar my a music election and made a road trip out here to California and fell in love with a cultural Intel and I've gone through different roles at Intel so actually I B I became an analog designing near and I fell in love with the culture my team but I realize that being accused designing circuits all day wasn't really something that was it was attractive but he's but my thing is that people my thing is that okay who are the people using this product because I used used to work in the memory product vision and in the staff meetings. I was always asking questions like wait. We're going to use these S. as the dry were building whether they look like. What did they back to listen to? How do they use it and my boss at the time said Google. That's thus lot marketing question like. We're here to just build this and we don't care after we build that. Iran's you worked. We don't care about that but you know he was. this man or one one of my mentors of Matthew daily a he he actually saw in me that I was really passionate about percent in my ideas and talking with people you're listening to people building those relations ships and he recommended me for a sales marketing rotation program here at Intel where are we take electrical engineers computer scientists and we teach them how to be field application engineers so we are in the intersection of the customers and the technology and right now. I work as a technical product marketing manager at Intel and what are the ways that I give marketing and sales people the tools they need to tell the stories about our products is of CPU's abuse specifically. So why should you buy this. What's the benefit of getting this so have an engineering background so that really helped because I really really understand the products at a deep that go level and I'm I'm able to convey in a simple storytelling manner. Why should you buy this though I found my niche. I'm in love with it. I've been in the bay area for three years now and I love it. I am going to be here for a while without ticket thing in your great communicators so it's you're able to combine your technical skills with year with your marketing skills because those are marketing skills. You're using a product development skills but you're also podcast or so your fulltime tech person and in your spare time at I'm not sure how much time you have but you are in your podcasters to tell us about what what you're doing and why you also follow that passion of actually building your own podcast for asking. It's a s you know you know. Put Gassing takes a lot of time. the editing booking guests making that calendar for your your recordings and all those things so it he thus take time. I actually did the math on how much time I invest for episode then. It's comes around nine hours burr episode. That's why that's why I only do mine biweekly. Let's call us and the way that I got into podcasting is that I I love listening to podcasts. I love audio. If you ask my view ask my friends I'm the friend that's always walking around the house with headphones on. I'm always listening to an audiobook awkward podcast and here in the bay area so I'm part of these national organization Kohl's ship the Society Hispanic Professional Engineers. We're a nonprofit that aims to connect the Hispanic community with a tech companies to solve that problem of the leaky pipeline of talent talent so I one year and I host workshops around public speaking communications networking had tell under story how to find out what you're really good at all those kinds of soft skills workshops so I looked at podcasting as a way of the wing commander ship at scale because if I do a workshop or have a one on one conversation and information interview where professional from Apple Google facebook that's amazing. That's great. I get a lot of value out of it but what happens if I record that information on interview I can. I ask a product manager from Apple. Hey so what does a product manager really do every day but does your week look like when the you no you're done you know. Can you tell your challenges that you face when working with teams can you tell me the product the proudest off and I I find that true connection as my podcast. I find that people are able to get that example of hate that person listen Hasa Latino last name on each side apple at Google weight so that means that I can be there to most of my audience are a young a young professionals and the college students and amazingly a Lotta my audience I I ran a Serbian my audience and our own sixty five percent of with them are are women are seen us that are interested in working in stem or are within stem so no us a very pleasant surprise the fact that I'm reaching that audience so my aim is to show the young professionals and listen to it that it's possible you can work in tech as well and there are. There's some really really interesting people that are here in the bay area so I see myself as a collector of stories if you will and and my aim is always to connect that a young professional that Latino Latina young professional to stem we are podcasting. Thank you to you mention that. You want to do something about the leaky pipeline. What do you think we as a community can do more to increase increase in diversity intact just based on your your personal journey and also that of those that you that you had a chance to interview that are working in those companies Obviously those companies are doing the things for because they're retaining them right. Yes I find that so so so there's two things here so the first thing is that we need to get to the students as early as possible. that's why we shop with aside. Hispanic minded professionally engineers. We have outreach programs for K twelve students and I find that that's one pillar that we need to take care off now. What happens is that when I focus mostly in college students because I I've been doing workshops for shack for the last I've been a member for the last ten years and I've been a lifetime member since twenty eleven so I've been doing workshops pretty much quarterly at least one or two a quarter to college students and they need to know that it's possible. They need to know that the first thing to get something done is visualizing that what been done looks like so I think I think to to solve that pipeline. You know what the things things that we can do as a community is actually seek out the people that have succeeded and reach out to them because I tell you one thing that we we have the social media is this double edged sword of you know you can waste an hour scrolling through memes teams and stuff like that or you can actually and I do this all the time and I'm sure you do it. As well. I go to lengthen and I look at Who Do I know that works at Apple. Oh Okay I have ten people that are in my network and have ten other people that are second level connections okay. Oh Wow the person snus up Maria Garcia. I wonder what she's from. Lemme ask her. LemMe adder a am Augusta Janos Great Ju. I just service here in the South Bay so seek out those mentors and build relationships with them. I think I think that I I wouldn't be here without the network of mentors that I built built throughout the years so I think that the very actionable thing that we can do as a community seek out those mentors use Lincoln USA facebook use whatever social media you're at because there's a community of Latino since them and we're out here in we're more than happy to help the the next generation and full disclosure. My husband works at Lincoln in I I loved Lincoln has been there for a while. I I have I have wonderful connections and I think the thing about our community and those at our allies is dead. Eh If you pay them. The likelihood that they'll respond is really high on this like super duper busy even those that are really busy tend to reply without let me connected with someone else or or how this is how. I can help so I I am not a full product endorsement in like I said my husband full disclosure Lincoln and but I I love I just loved the connections that were able to to make because they're also meaningful in there with people that are either the roles that you that you aspire to e. N. or the rules in in our case of people whether we want to interview or that are on their way so and I always welcome sending me notes. I just had had similar from. DC sent me a note by linked Dan and said Oh you know I I really liked your podcast and and this is what I wanna do and she wants to get into data data science and I said well I just near you. You know he'd have to see who is a data scientists. Can I connect you both and she was like yeah absolutely that would be it would wonderful so in a way where you know we're making our were making a difference so thank you. Lincoln and let's move on to it. You said something earlier. which is you know? I want other people to know what people in in different roles at different companies so Bob. Tell me a little bit about how one becomes a product manager. We heard your journey but what's the traditional route or maybe even the non traditional route that someone you can get to become a product manager so I'm really gonNa tell you they ask me that. I'm away full disclosure. I Love Lincoln paid paid the fifty nine ninety nine a month.

Intel Google product manager Apple Lincoln Electrical Engineer Turn Produ Florida Latin America product marketing manager Orlando engineer dot Com product development Augusta Janos Great Ju Kohl Iran Society Hispanic Professional UCF
"marketing manager" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

15:31 min | 1 year ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"How's it going going really good exciting stuff going on. How `bout you yep things are great and I'm super excited today to talk about seagate and what you're working on. seagate technology is a company. That's been around for a long time and we're GONNA talk about marketing coating hard drives in what kind of goes into that and get into a little bit of your background but I had you get into marketing the first choice well. I've always been interested in graphical art writing narrative storytelling technology and business and when you mash that all together ultimately. It's really good fit for marketing. I think I enjoy really digging into how position and message products and ideas resonate with customers. Did you have inklings in college that you wanted to to do it or Or what were you thinking yeah. Actually when I went straight into college I knew it was marketing or finance and as I dive deeper into it I just really liked the storytelling it because really at the end of the day that's what marketing is storytelling through either ran word or are with visuals or combination thereof and so once I started really digging into that I was kind of addicted and new marketing was for me a little bit about your car roll and while you're working on a seagate yes oh in my current role. I'm the global surveillance portfolio product marketing manager manager at but what that ultimately means is the I'm the one that's responsible in creating content assets and putting on activities that will create awareness and educate customers about our portfolio in surveillance with is and ultimately when ever putting together content town or talking to customers. We really have to adjust the fact that drives not just simply a drive. There's a right drive for the right application edge to clouds specifically when you're you're talking about surveillance and so that ranges from our Skyhawk drives all the way to our enterprise drives and as a with excess nitro. What's the scope like. How many customers are we talking about? Obviously with being at the cutting edge of you know deep learning. Iot Big data smart cities all that stuff is really exciting exciting space man. There's a lot of hardware and software that go into that we talked to a lot of CMO's about kind of marketing their products specifically specifically you know when we talk be SAS and things like that about marketing directly to the customer. It's a little different for hardware in certain cases chases. I'm curious like you know how how that marketing is. A little different so seagate is specifically has a wide portfolio of products ranging from uh-huh consumer all the way to enterprise and with my role in surveillance. It's really interesting. It's a little bit more complex than just marketing to the customer because at the end of the day the two personas that ultimately make a decision to purchase a drive and what's going to be put in the box for that customer are going to be the system integrator. Ah Solution Architects at the end of the day the end customer just wants the box to work their solution to work and the same thing is true for the solution architect attacked and the system integrator but they also have an added incentive because they wanna be profitable. If it's not going to be reliable then they're gonNA have have higher service calls and that gets pretty costly over time so they're ultimately making the decision and the thing that's interesting about. This space is that there's so much technology right now. You're talking about everything from cameras to. Ai Software that's simplifying and expanding the whole scope of what surveillance means it's beyond on just security and catching the bad guy these days it's optimizing your business based on the learnings that you can have your surveillance footage on how to place products within your store or to optimize manufacturing processes and things like that so we've really nailed it down to those specific personas and they're quite different the system integrator we call the man in the van because he's going to be on the road quite frequently and selling large volumes of products. He doesn't really like to customize He just wants to sell as much as he can. Then keep it very simple. The solution architect on the other hand is going to take on larger projects that are going to need more customization Zeeshan so you're talking like stadiums and smart cities where they really have to design and you unique solutions that are going to meet the unique needs of that customer so but at the same time they want something that's going to be plug and play compatibility is huge for all these guys and and we make sure that we're compatible with all the large players in the industry so the end of the day it comes down to really understanding who your customer. Meraz but not only understanding who your customer is who's making that purchase decision and the buyer's journey with smart cities being such an important the thing going forward is like the smart cities with regards like dumb cities. It's really it's Sir so so many of our cities opera dump. It is true right. It is really true we had we did a podcast called future cities and and we interviewed you know a ton of a ton of leaders in there are some city leaders like the former. CEO Paolo Alto who is talking about this idea that like essentially all of these really critical critical places that you could get data from don't actually harvest any data street lights and telephone poles and a street corners and all this stuff is like the future our future might not look totally different physically than it does right now but digitally it will look look completely different in the future. I'm curious like what are you working on with smart cities and what types of stuff or are you creating two to evangelize this future yes so in my experience in talking multiple types of customers ranging from businesses that will be able to leverage the data flow affirm these smart cities all the away to the people that are trying to design them themselves. It's been flu point together. An actual smart city and we actually haven't seen anybody successfully. He pull off one yet. Foundationally smart cities start off as safe city as you mentioned they have you know they can have sensors and cameras stir up the the city to alert you know citizens and also just law enforcement of potential issues they also are great for traffic management. It's but in the future we see that changing and it from a digital perspective is GonNa be quite significant and why it's changing versus now why hasn't Senate changed yet is because the technology is rapidly changing and enabling this type of adoption. we're talking about sensors video so being at the edge and being able to incorporate a technology like never before you're also looking at communication networks increasing increasing their capabilities with five G. which will be incredibly important to getting real time data and analysis done and then you're also talking about having the compute and data flow ready and available not only in the cloud which the cloud has some land sea and that's some of the challenges that we face in the past but now you're going to be able to a place at the edge where all the activity is and the edge is really what when I talk about the edge we're talking about sensors and cameras where are you can really be able to capture that data analyze it very quickly and then make real time decisions the way in which the world is changing for smart cities cities is that the capabilities are increasing but at the same time the cost is significantly decreasing and the way in which we're trying to get ahead of that is recognizing a hey. This is a great opportunity. We know what's going to happen and we WANNA start educating. these solution architects they're going to be spearheading these these projects to make sure that they understand how to store collect and retain that data and then ultimately also do some deep learning in the cloud to enable the systems to become smarter so. I think it's really like what I said before giving the knowledge to those people that are going to be designing it what drives to use in applications in a smart city everything from edge to cloud. What are some of the maybe there's there's. There's no smartest city yet but like what does that actually look like. Are there some examples of people that are pushing the pace innovation. If you look at a WHO's really pushing edge on what the technology holds today. You're going to see a lot of it is China. One of the big cities in China are really pushing the opportunities that surveillance a offers and obviously there's some challenges and privacy issues that that come in hand with that but as other countries like the US look to leverage surveillance a technology. It's beyond just the typical security issues tracking down who burglarize this business but also being able to optimize traffic management and traffic flow throughout the city also recognizing pollution issues. I'm adjusting them more quickly. All all goes even deeper into like health healthcare being able to do deeper analytics and behavioral analytics to define. Hey there's a larger issue at hand. was our citizens. Listen are facing. Let's address it now with a certain programs healthcare programs so I. I think what you're seeing right now. Is People are really pushing the opportunities of surveillance. Ai With smart cities is going to be in China but we're seeing it gradually become an opportunity cities in the US that are taking it on and so are you creating copy marketing for governments around around this as a stakeholder or as a purchaser like I'm curious you know like I for example in the for the CEO's and the technology leaders or innovation planners for cities that I've talked to in the past a lot of that. Is it something that they're buying is at something. It's other organizations or companies are private enterprises around them. Buying what does the city need to have versus. You know companies like Komo coupon. FACEBOOK and folks have a lot of data and obviously the mapping companies like you know ways in which part of Google yet so I'm curious like how do you think about marketing to those things is it. Is it more evangelizing the future or is it more you know the product marketing stuff. There's a lot of thought leadership that goes into it obviously because smart city hasn't alternate only come into fruition. It's been very futuristic a pie and sky type of concept but the way we went to approaching we recognize we're just the storage piece of it. That's a huge piece obviously because data flow storage is ultimately going to be Kinda like the luxury of what makes smart cities smart smart cities but we also recognize that there's other components to the story that needs to be told everything from the networking with five G. go to the actual video cameras themselves and the NPR and DVR boxes that go along with them and so what we've done is we recognize you know yeah we can have our view of the world from seagate with storage but we also need to Poland and rain in some of the story and point of view of our our partners who are in telecommunications who are creating you know manufacturing the cameras of tomorrow to really tell that story line line and explain what the solutions will be for smart cities. Do you think that there's an Roi problem around around some thought leadership marketing and not one of the things that a lot of marketing leaders that we talked to know that they need to be doing some type of quote unquote leadership whether it's content marketing or otherwise but it might not necessarily play into their dimension strategy or might not play into performance marketing adding and they struggled to just kind of justify spend at times especially when talking to you know to sales and say hey what is this. What does this actually getting for me other tables. How do you look at that sort of thing we like to look at it from a long-term perspective and you know obviously some short term opportunities as well but from a long term perspective especially in technology everybody is looking at technology and making sure that you're staying ahead of the game name because they want to play with those type of companies and so I think that's a huge opportunity for us not from an only an innovation standpoint but from also Louis sales perspective because as an added differentiator to our brand one thing that recently we just launched the Skyhawk. Ai Sixteen terabyte and there's not a huge demand for such high capacities and surveillance but we like to be able to show that we're pushing the cutting edge of technology technology and rainforest. You know technology. That's going to be the future and showing that we're going to be around for those opportunities so I think it's just another other talking points. Our sales team really leverages at the end of the day and then you know when we're thinking about thought leadership pieces a lot of these are vertical specific and outlining how the technology is being used today and tomorrow and that gives a kinda grounds it and allows customers fasteners to be able to put themselves in the shoes of the people that have ran that use case to understand where where the product fits for them in their environment. You know we we talked before this about marketing more than just hard drives. I think it's a it's a pretty common. I think challenge for just a lot of companies on on a lot of marketers to market the future market the impact market their customer in the Post Products State our they've you you know drink the magic elixir and have the superpowers with something like hard drives which is such a critical part of you know digital transformation formation and and you know your technology stack and all that stuff how do you can differentiate. How do you Kinda talk about more than more than hard drives but also also you know clearly articulate that your product is has has features and benefits that are better than the other ones. I like to think that we go beyond ends away. just the typical hard-drive. Company would and understanding who the customer really is at the end of the day we like to really flesh out who these people are when we're talking about the personas of the.

seagate Ah Solution Architects China US product marketing manager Senate CEO Paolo Alto FACEBOOK Zeeshan Google Komo Louis NPR CEO
"marketing manager" Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

14:41 min | 1 year ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on Marketing Trends

"Eight plus. Plus and plus content. It actually gives you a nice story behind what the brand believes stands for so because we know I think now it's like eighty percent of the searches star on Amazon so so it was really important for us to be you know very much education focus but then also have the right content and messages in every single consumer journey touch point white whether it's schoolwork whether it's Amazon whether it's other Brecon creek channel's I think the first thing like you said exactly it's educating them on what our products really do with a brand really stands for and I think the second thing is believed being you know now. millennials are also also very much digitally focused so my consumer arranges and you are between the ages of twenty to fifty four so how are you going to talk to all of these women at different touch points with different in communication strategy and that's what I that's what we've been trying to do and actually test and digital and the biggest thing that we've done is just test and learn and and we have different strategies for Menopausal women whose experiencing hot flashes and who's having extremely painful sacks and she actually needs it's Mubarak at worst as someone who is having sex for the first time and they don't know what it actually feels like an this pain really normal or should she not feel pain gene. How do we educate her. How do we talk to her from a digital perspective and calms perspective and which product would be right for her. You know I worked on this project on entirely revamping vamping both of our key wise site and site to actually get the consumer journey through different life stages and that's been kind of our I I would say like our a pillar in every single decision that we've made even when it comes to our innovation strategy so I think it's one pillar is education. Second pillar is really touching Her a different life by state is different life points and the third is really continuing that conversation ongoing because lot of times what happens is one year to year you how you find this purpose and you do a lot behind it and then you kind of lose traction and then people forget about it at in this digitally native consumer where they're thrown own ads like. I think I forgot stop but it was like twenty ads of the day or I think it's more me know. How are they going to really remember your Ranan. Remember your purpose purpose. We need to start start to think about continuing that conversation and making sure that we are really standing behind the purpose for long term and and you know I had to present this out to our business in management teams really figure out. What is that look like digitally but then. What does that actually look like off line because yes we are very digital? Yes we are very much focused on ECOMMERCE. That's where we really want to drive. Our gross but offline is actually a lot of opportunity as well because you know ninety eighty percent of stole my businesses off line. So how do we work with our retailers. How do we work with our buyers and and really make them understand our purpose and make them fall in love with us and what we're trying to do and it's really exciting to see how you know. When we talk to a female buyer or retailers like Oh my God had this category has had no refreshes and so many years and it's kind of eye opening that we haven't done it and I'm glad that we are here that we were talking about this so it's also also they love the fact that we're innovating in that space but also we're keeping that digitally mindset so I think it's all of those things in combination. We talked a little bit before this about silos. What do you think leaders can do to break down silos because specifically around performance and brand a a lot of times like well. Brenda's brand stuff performances performance stuff and will will meet whatever on our weekly calls and that's about it yeah it's it's so true and actually how it works and sometimes when I talked to my peers and other organizations and other. CPG companies actually how they're structured and I absolutely think it's just it's hurting the business more than helping because as a marketer as a twenty first century marketer you can't just think about your brand equity in your PR campaigns. You have to be able to measure. It and we should be doing that anyway. Right performance marketing is all about making sure your campaigns are working for you and they're working harder for you. And how can you quickly optimize and learn from it right so I think they they really need to go hand in hand and near the way our teams are really structured. Turn is that e commerce is kind of like a sales unit and then the brand is kind of the outside and they just support sales but it shouldn't be that it should be super integrated because when we think about Amazon media and we have ems an EMC campaigns in there there are so many synergies between what works on Google versus works on 'em Muss and how do we optimize our Amazon campaigns through our media campaign so there's so many synergies in there that even from a business point of view I think which they need to work together and they need to really figure out a structure that helps grow ecommerce but also focuses on the brand shot as you what they're trying you to do so I think it's that balance between sales and also Brian because lot of the things that I was kind of speaking about earlier. DOCU series now. That's a lot of investments by the result doesn't come in a month or two while you know when we think about e commerce performance you invest in ems and you invest in Amazon on you tend to see your sales results in a weekly basis so it's also setting some expectations for our management and leadership team to say look the objective of both of these things are are different but they work well together and you know one of the things that I can share with you. What I did is to just create a quick final and educate the leadership team to say when consumers start searching for something Amazon that actual sought in his or her mind comes from something else so for example when you have Valentine's Day you see a huge spike in just ky.. As Bran because we're heavily advertising from an awareness point of view and that search coach goes into Amazon and hence they lead to purchase but it's really hard to track that right so from a performance marketing all these that Oh yeah the search happen. Ems Campaign was live and we ended up in result in in sales but actually that started much much higher from a funnel perspective so I think what leadership can also do is really understand that there's a role for boasts boast can really drive our businesses and really training marketers and I think our be last sure I was essentially the only lead on ECOMMERCE and digital for a lot of the personal care Brian's on on our B and I've learned tremendous Mendes amount and I think that's what the leadership really needs to recognize that once we give that platform to someone and let it actually give them the autonomy to test test and learn to work cross functionally to bring the teams together it actually drives a lot more and once they see that they start to recognize it and you know Arby's very much focused on e commerce and digital and we're actually training our marketers and in June to really think of it that way so I have a firm believer that it needs to be it can't be silence. We need to really work together on this funny question. It's not that funny but how much sir traffic so you think gets siphoned by the fact that people now search for Kylie Jenner which is like six million people a month and it starts with K Y because I was thinking about that when we were doing crap because I'm like man so many people search for Kyi a month and then I typed Kyi into my search browser. Now's like first thing that comes up is Kelly Kelly gender and I was looking at that searched her. I was like man. It's that's an it's actually expensive. That's the crazy thing. Kylie Jenner's name is inexpensive search term Maybe that could be testing. Larry do yeah right yeah buying against that a Kylie Jenner. If you're listening thing we have a sponsorship opportunity for you. Just let us know love that final question here. What are you excited about for the future like what are what are the things that you you know you wanna do that are bigger cooler just stuff that that really fires you about the future marketing and where where some of these really cool brands her going yeah you know. I get super excited about so as I said like my background is in finance so I love data and I love Pinellas and I love to be able to drive a business and I think I get super excited about how I can really digitize my brands in the future future and really understand why consumer very authentic way and and something that I can do myself and I think that's what gets me really excited and you know seeing seat eight some of these cool brands. I was actually reading about freshly the other day. How they've found this unmet need in a market where you know you're single person in in New York City in your don't WanNa go grocery shopping or you don't have time to where you want to have healthier meals? We don't want to actually cook all right. There is an answer for you and they have this completely completely digital model around Regina consumers and and having that product that really resonates with them I think for me what I get really excited about is this brand building and brand strategy but also how can be making more digital so that as a brand and as a brand marketer. I'm much closer into my consumer and I really understand what their thinking is. So I can innovate better. I can market better and that's what really gets me excited. Let's get into the lightning round fast easy questions just like marketing automation product you can go to dot com slash podcast to learn more about B. Two B. Marketing with the world's number one. CRM We love you will to check it out. Fast easy questions for the lightning rounds. What after using your phone that is the most fun I use like a lot. I Love Bento. be be doing a lot of work lunches. I don't know if that's really fun but I love like reading comments afterwards when people go for like happy hour and they make these co Margarita emojis. Thank someone actually like Puke Gang. I find it really funny but this grid favorite vacation spot Alaska. I have to say Ah Alaska's absolutely beautiful if you haven't been there it is you know we live in like New York City so for me to just get away and be around. I think seaward if you've ever been there but like anchorage and all of these places are absolutely beautiful surrounded by mountains and ocean and it's such a nice getaway. Yeah I love Alaska. I've not been I would love to go but we next next to my list would ad campaign of you seen recently that you're most jealous of okay so it's interesting because I work on twitter from Brands Dirksen Ky.. I constantly struggle with this because directs always go city. Zinni spun parties so you're doing actually already because we're targeting to gen Z. and millennials get Zuber Jealous because I'm like why can't I do that on Kyi and I wanna go to these cool fund full parties. We're actually going to be part of Bonnaroo festival and yeah so I always constantly think about jerks and Q I in that sense but I think the other brand that I was really inspired by was also Gillette campaign. I don't know if you've got a chance to look at it but I think that was also one of the things things that I also think about as a brand that I'm working on which is very women's focused but then how are we raising our men and I was kind of a jealous about how Gillette really came about it but I thought it was brilliant. What is your favorite book or podcast that you've read or listened to recently. Obviously marketing trends other than marketing trends. Thank you though I have so many podcast. I listen to you but I love. Hbo and I actually just got my book on how Finance Works from me here was the professor at HP are at he's talking about how we're continuously investing in thinking about these small insurgent brands like what happened in Uber recently but how are we actually evaluating these companies so actually just started reading not. What is the question that I have not asked you the the you wish you were asked more often. I think I always get asked which I also don't know the answer to but you know from a career wise. Where would I see myself going because I love performance marketing. I love ECOMMERCE I really and but I also love brand marketing and right now. There's really if you look in the market place from a career perspective there so silent and they're so different and there's not one role that combined all unless you go to an insurgent brand or startups. I think I love to see I always ponder on this. Like what does that look look like in the future. What is talent quake for for an organization in the future then do don't we all need to be well burst in e commerce if that's where we're all headed so oh yeah wish you had asked me that. I always talk to my mentors about what does that look like for a marketer like me who loves Brian Building Building and who understands brand management and really working cross functionally with supply and rnd and all these things but then also I see see my passion is in digital and my passion is going online. So how does that fit into an organization and you know I. I don't think there's I've yet to find an answer on that but it's something that always excites me and makes me. WanNa think about it. Nancy has been awesome. You've been generous with your time. I think this is just been really informative conversation. I think it's something that a lot of people struggled to talk about in their homes and it's cool to hear you're what you're doing specifically with with kym directs to hide in the conversation and to get people information that they really need when they I needed so.

Amazon Kylie Jenner Kyi New York City Brian pain Alaska Ranan Kelly Kelly Brian Building Building Ems Campaign Brecon creek Mubarak Brenda Google kym Bran Nancy Wan
"marketing manager" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on Security Now

"Dedicated hardware devices or magic links sent via Email, I'm sure there are others. But for the purposes of this post any pattern that doesn't involve entering a username and password into a couple of input fields is in scope to their credit. Some of these solutions are genuinely very good technically, very good. But what proponents of them? Seem to regularly miss is that technically isn't enough despite their respective merits. Every one of these solutions has a massive shortcoming that severely limits their viability, and it's something they simply can't compete with despite its many flaws. The one thing that the humble password has going for it over technically superior alternatives. Is that everyone understands how to use it period? Everyone period. Yeah. Not how to use it securely or well, but the Houston. Yes, it's the it is literally the definition of the lowest common air, and he says this is where we need to recognize that decisions around things like off scheme. Teams go well beyond technology, merits alone. Arguably the same could be said about any security control. And I've made the point many times he writes before that these things need to be looked at from very balanced, viewpoint. There are merits and there are deficiencies and unless you can recognize both regardless of how much you agree with them. It's going to be hard to arrive at the best outcome. He says let me put this in perspective assume you're tasked with building a new system, which has a requirement for registration and subsequently authentication. You go to the marketing manager and say, hey, there's this great product called and has, you know, Barack brackets insert thing here that replaces passwords, and all you have to do is signed to side in is dot dot dot. And you've already lost the argument because the foremost thing on the marketing managers mind is reducing friction their number one priority is to get people signing up to the service in using it. Because ultimately, that's what generates revenue or increases brand awareness or customer loyalty or a cheese, whatever the objective was for creating the service in the first place as soon as you ask people to start doing some. Something. They're not familiar with the risk of them. Simply not going through with it amplifies. And defeats the whole point of having the service in the first place. And he goes on and I and it's long, but and I don't want to skip anything. But I everyone should have the point of what he's talking about. I just saw him saying right here. What I often find. When I had the discussions is a myopic focus on technical merits. I'll give you an example from from earlier last year where someone reached out and a spouse the virtues of the solution vade built they and by should mentioned. I've never spoken to Troy wasn't me. Because I'm you know, squirrels not out yet. He says they were emphatic that passwords were no longer required due to the merits of bracket insert thing here, and we're frustrated that the companies they were approaching weren't entertaining. The idea of using their product, I replied and explained pretty much what's outlined above the conversation is going to get shut down as soon as soon as you start asking companies to impose friction on their users. But try as I might they simply couldn't. Get the message. What barrier? There's no barrier. They went on to say that companies not willing to embrace products like this and educate their users about alternative off. The schemes are the real problem and that they should adjust their behavior accordingly says I countered with what remains appoint. That's very hard to argue against. If your product is so awesome. Have you stopped to consider? Why no one is using it. Now in fairness, it may not be precisely no one, but in this case, and so many other of the insert things here. I'd never seen them in use before. And I do tend to get around the internet a bit. Maybe they're used in very niche corners of the web the point is that none of these products are exactly taking the industry by storm. And there's a very simple reason for that. There's a fundamental usability problem. This particular discussion ended when they replied with this..

Troy marketing manager Houston Barack
"marketing manager" Discussed on The Site Shed

The Site Shed

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on The Site Shed

"I've ever been met think they're the boss of the tax. Oy. X did the boss of the dispatchers and they're both wrong when you guys get the org. Chart by my book be worked chart you will see that neither one of them were bosses their job. If they have a dispatcher has a problem with the tax their job is to bring it to the service managers attention. And And if the if the text. having problem that abusive dispatcher their job is to bring it and then service magic it's everybody in the room and gets this resile we to work as a team, so marketing marketing manager meetings. So in charge of the marketing manager, there's a marketing manual, and there are things that you need to be doing which is for me is right amount of calls from the right customer at the right time in a nutshell that is what a marketing manager is all about what they have to be doing. And I believe as those Allen that an owner meta how big your company has you never really get the lead the marketing manager. It's too important. Yeah. I remember it actually I think a lot of that in the book is well, you're talking about that. Specifically, I think it was when you're talking about how your your hide your your dad's colleague today the marketing when you re branded stuff. Yep. The first rule is good question meals. Rolon don't question. Number two. You think the question? Leo don't. It was great. He taught me so much about marketing it really to me. So the guy's sales and marketing are two sides of the same coin. And it's kind of like, you know, always had this question about chicken and the egg Matt so Ellen years ago, we just like we love talking about business. And Ellen just said, what comes first marketing your sales, and I said sales she goes while at the phone doesn't ring I go if I don't know what makes Matt my ideal customer tick, and how I can reach that person when I'm face to face my chances of finding one hundred thousand million Matt's is minimalized. So the better you are at sales in my believe, the better, you are understanding what your marketing messages and had a target market. And of course, today's technology just makes that so great rut because you can do so many great things sorry for going off of my like market, and as you can tell. Yeah. Yeah. So the installer. Get it done meeting. That is just we're clear about install is somebody else sold it. Now, I'm coming to do it. So you sold what heater? I'm coming to install it. You sold the boiler the furnace. I'm coming to do it you sold the air conditioning. I'm coming to do it. My job is to bring the job in on time and on budget for materials. And then if I do that typically in our case, we give them some reward. But while again is a scorecard for this. Otherwise, what's the consequences for not hitting the target in the parameters? So we talk about you know, typically what went right this week. Celebrate what went wrong, let's fix it. And then what do we have to look ahead? So here's my scrape looking at we never looked ahead. Never look ahead and magically Monday would be crazy busy not enough guys or who's dead. Now. What do we do with ourselves? You know? So the other thing was rooftop units. Where they have to have a crane to lift them up on the top. If it's nobody's job. Then either nobody does it or two people or the crane. So we would have no cranes cranes on a job both of bad scenarios. So this installer. Get it done meeting was a great opportunity for us to find out where is the rigid three hundred. Whereas the pro press, we are the things that we need to get staged out for that job. That's what this really takes install to such a better level because I looked very funny, which I had a conversation again, one of these crazy nights from the two of us left standing, and I just said Richie. I don't need anymore practice. It install. I'm really good at it. I can sell really good. You know, what I like to make money install? And this is where that became, you know, we've just started to talk about. So we project material labor versus actual material label did we win. And that's really so big. And you would think everybody has a with this map. They don't..

marketing manager Matt Leo Ellen Allen Richie
"marketing manager" Discussed on Plz Advise

Plz Advise

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on Plz Advise

"And all of you i just saw you're in about eating calls and figured i'd ask richmond race basically i'm sure you one married know kids iron in baltimore and has been some employees from six years are you graphic in revenues online and technical blogging and do these social media recently and my biggest clan higher learning background marketing manager she said she wanted to get out of designer and more about marketing but she started back in august she's just in dining room and more and recently hired a design intern who will be graduating in that this claim that are fifty percent of income and he's been reuniting with them for ten years and until recently truly felt like a part of their team pretty close to the vpns marketing or watch your cat and soften she was down the blocks from me wondering if i should initiate attended conversation with either the ep or marketing manager about how they see my role in the future with the company um honestly i'm a bit upset that he he hasn't come forward and suddenly thing to me about the drastic cut and workload florida i also understand that business is business so just wondering why should initiate conversation and if so what exactly should i say uh if not entered eating that the playing for jobs but it's been six years and i can't imagine having to go into an office every day i wouldn't mind or work whom up opportunity but i feel like they are few and far between um all my other clinging to really small an honest we spent owing to work with i have to go drive to to flash drives of images which is they don't know how to email so.

baltimore marketing manager intern richmond six years fifty percent ten years
"marketing manager" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"It's time for us to talk about c e s twenty eighteen as you know i'm a you she has guy i'm innovation judge i foresee s been one for the past four years and i really enjoy looking at newer innovation out there it's you know it's going to impact my life and your life as well and one company that i have come in contact with through my coverage of ces audio check you know i've talked about them a lot on the show of also so had one of their representive joining me when i first started out the czech zone you remember that i do i have lunch but i decided to have the back on and talk about some of the great innovation that they have available right now and i'm see if i can try to get out of them were they're going to do as the as 2018 see leg to some armtwisting get them to talk and joining me right now is the consumer marketing manager for audio technica crystal griffith and also consumer product marketing manager bob pete was going on how are you guys doing nato we're doing great and complain great to have you guys on and a chris so i had you on the last year in the things that we talked about were so amazing got a lotta great feedback from it and i'm so glad that i have you in bob on december talk about not only was coming up in see yes but which has been doing this year and some of the products that's been released so what's been like the hottest product the audio technica has put out the sheer when it comes to the consumer market also had the who i'm going to pass was kind of often bob because we've been doing pretty amazing thing the buddy via the high end of the spectrum among just to kind of showcase life what we do best so i'll have him talk about those products a little bit were relaunching ago fly shooting phones uh we actually had an iraqi mom not cobra but will be eating.

marketing manager bob pete chris product marketing manager four years
"marketing manager" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"Uh the bumpers or or leedle some elements of his keeping them within the frame 'cause i think at the end of the day when it comes to empowering you know it's not about the idea of giving people more power it's actually in in my mind is about having people make better decisions than i would right so like as an example here as a marketing manager empowering his people i think the ideas that when there when they're doing some of the things that they're doing that they're closer may be to the customer or more aware of the things that are happening from a marketing standpoint that are relevant to society today and they take in what the vision is for the company and then they make a better decision for the materials that they're are creating is kind of the idea but but yet you've got to have some type of framework around um you know giving them some ideas of where they can be in and when they may be go too far away talking about a very quickly cut to kinda bring them back in not in a hate it is a bad idea why did you do that this doesn't work for us but more of a helped me understand what you were thinking here in why do you feel this was you know uh that this would be a good material and kind of what guy you to this point in spending time with the team talking through would get them there to than helpfully be able to help bring the back and help them understand uh you know the idea that they're still responsibility to the brand still responsibility to you know to the profitability of the start of he i think also i mean what we can in in the context of of marketing because this is where the the question came from i think there is a misconception debt did marketing is a group of creative people sitting around a table and coming up with the next great slogan in that's that's how you do it and i think a lot of people were not in the business don't understand how much time and money and effort goes into that data collection and the verification of that day.

marketing manager
"marketing manager" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Yes beach hi my taylor with geagea ecstasy yellow interchange your ryan leslie in cory rosemont and according to actually talked before the event is to go over some of the questions that we were going to consider a during the intersection of of technology in and chaining yacht give you shot out to my girl out there who mined is one of my cool is besties when he comes two journalism and also in the business samara link samora was one it said seventy moderating so you shut out the girl but corey is impressed me with his knowledge and cory is the global marketing manager for plan toronto now i didn't stutter the global marketing manager of land chunks are at play intranets excuse my english and koys responsible for lodge very busy person and he and i tried to get together many times as ccs before so that i can interview him in and talk to him about some things that he's involved enquiries worker microsoft he's worker hp work rebel very bright my when it comes gaming technology and some of you may be familiar with planchon accept my i i guess experience will clinch onyx when i had my electricity store back in the year two thousand and ice to carry paint shawn kemp sets and i shall allow those lautem our customers really will you love the way that they feared newly the sound and just the durability of it will then venture off into the gaming jamie world now you have heard of the term 3d video correct what left three audio we'll cory in his company planned sean ix would they did was merge are and a partnership with dole digital yes the talk about at much now what does that most would is me was mean for gaming we'll have nabetani to catch up with corey at each three twenty seven team and he explain some of things that planchon ix is doing and why these headsets early going to change the way that we gain sean you ready for it isn't that you'd have cory rolls when i do a gory arrive at how's it going paul great to see you my friend here three has gone so far man has been a great show for us really excited to announce and talk about our partnership with dovy and.

cory rosemont cory global marketing manager microsoft dole digital corey ryan leslie toronto shawn kemp
"marketing manager" Discussed on The Venture

The Venture

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"marketing manager" Discussed on The Venture

"Expanding quickly to meet the needs of our customers versus staying focused and doing this small said things really well i don't show whether it's a when when we had record companies may go over one hundred people in a building i would call in they deputy managing director the gia the deputy marketing manager and say you are now the managing director the marketing manager the cells under the new company and we ended up setting up twenty five different record companies around the country who became the largest independent record company in the world so maybe you could you try to set up small small units around the country to manage it and try to do it'll from one bigger and bigger and bigger central company where everybody loses touch with each other and and you can't really people can't really take credit for their success easel ownership of their fate is now thank you my second question is about values i've worked at big companies and also small companies in the thing that i find distinctive distinct visits small companies like most to them at least have the sense of mission and the values of the founder of completed resonate because the company so small most companies that as they grow bigger attends to hollow out intends to become more solis as we think about growing our company like what can you do to prevent that hollowing out of of the mission and values to put energy into it.

deputy marketing manager managing director founder deputy managing director