20 Episode results for "Mark White"

White Lines on Netflix, Charli XCX, Idles, Scorseses After Hours

Bigmouth

1:06:33 hr | 2 months ago

White Lines on Netflix, Charli XCX, Idles, Scorseses After Hours

"Hello and welcome back to big both. The reliable scribe of Bolton popular culture where we have several visions every day. Nothing what trying to get virgin media signal from Walter. Divine HIS Co. Tonga's ICEFALL Sean. Payton that these has. Sean how are you? I'm like how you and your body's you stay longer or shorter or has time ceased to means really hard to tell. I think marina time. Newt Moebius Strip go man there somewhere laughing. I'm getting the horrible sensations. I've actually wasted my lockdown when you bet on holiday and you think they should have done that she just shut round he said. Oh I could have got a delay. The nominees come actually today's settlement anyway which we have to expect second especially guess who those this week. Darla GETTING FROM PHOENIX ARIZONA IN ACTUAL AMERICA. It's writer at a veteran of both details magazine on details and still hits the American patients smash. It's it's David. Hello David keeps. How Roger Dodger Ratchet up I see your peaceful Sumptuous Hacienda? I with the fireplace the made of brick how things in Phoenix all. You know it's OK. People running around without masks. It's very sort of were. We're not even close to a purple state here in Arizona yet but Yeah all right to people believe that taking the same stance inside of moral weakness. It's a sign of a debt. Debt even deadlier disease known as liberalism. Freethinking do look terrible. Terrible CASES IS I. David Locke because he retreated details magazine in the ninety s where I kept trying to pull affects extra into the magazine. Even though the heat of the blowfish and everybody can why posing this cheaper English garbage into the magazine rates to I was working my way through some days and I was playing. He'll be the ABC's to be zillionaire and on the back is thanks to David keeps. How did that happen what you thanked last? You know they used. I think that was like a follow up to be a millionaire right. It was a remix album. It was the album that that single millionaire. The album billionaire so they used to come to New York and I used to hang out with them basically and I guess I got thanked for because I would take them out. You know an party whatever. It is one does it was mostly Mark White. I do. I do rather like Mark quite a bit And we would go out quite often and then sometimes Martin but I think I think mark white this was when they were in the something like a cross between Joyce Sims and mantra onyx. And the Scooby Doo gang in a mystery machine and so you responsible like hip hop freestyle clubs in New York City. Yeah probably I mean I'll take all the sands of time have long since blown over that horizon not familiar. I haven't so you'll famously. David person that nail tenants handpicked to Road Star? Hits magazine apology on every page as they called it. Tell us about the. How did that happen? What did what'd wanted. Neil go right. Shield keeps out well because I came to the interview with him. He had been brought over to to launch the American version which had been licensed from the English version. Vastly I must say English version and he and Kimberly less than who is the art director at the time came over to get things going as the subject matter experts. So what happened was is I got a call saying I'd like to come in and interview for this and I had just that week written an article for the village voice about men's socks and underwear which of course I mean Neil tennant men's socks and underwear there you go. I believe got the truck. Men's socks and underwear actually ethic. It's that I think truck Florida behavior. Yes so or misbehavior. I went in trotted in with my new wave of gear and my little portfolio and I have that piece in my portfolio as well as a interview with Clare Grogan who had been in New York and I think I did it for the enemy or something like that and he said right. When can you start basically and then then we hung out all the time but I never got thanked album but I do. Thanks on opposite that touch photographs. There's lots of things. They don't do what my grandmother would call. Graceless craigslist says style hits was published by Felix. Dennis was the lodge than life legendary Felix. Danny's who were yellow glasses. Yeah it was big fun. Yeah it was. It was a lot of fun he had. We had sort of crap offices but he always had like a letter you know like Fainting Sofa or analysts college. Whatever you might want to call it and it was. Keynote is all very. You know in lots of exotic girlfriends you know who may or may not have been properly employed Yeah I mean he was quite a character and had a fixation with billy idol. I understand billy was on. He was the bank. Yeah I need billion or Duran with 'cause Duran really ran the show. What's in your What what stand up memories of start greatest contribution to pops rich tapestry. What we what we made moments that stand out. Well you know. I think being slavishly dedicated to the aesthetic that was put forward by Emad Metro in in in smash hit. It was really it was it was shoveling the Lai gay in the faces of teenage girls and boys really. If I'm being honest I mean line. So that's a of toys. That doesn't sound good now that you're repeating it but it was. It was kind of like I mean you'd be hard pressed to find many magazines including smash itself that had like fold out centerfold posters of people but traff people is amenable to taking pictures and he took lovely ones. Was that kind of thing you know. He's been upon him. Paul binds did did so. Did the Americans get the whole? You know what color is Tuesday thing speeco in Crimson per breaks the ARGO? Now a little bit but not at not quite as much no. We couldn't get all the way there are no one knew what you know sticking up in a gun man. They might have been doing it all along but we didn't know well that's just that you have to anglicized by changing black type. Two bolts type. Yes talent yeah well amongst other things. David has been Right about Interiors all and on so I have two questions for you. All we about all we invited to say an explosion of interior design now that nobody can afford to sell house. And secondly what can I do with this place Yes and burn it but let's talk. Let's see I do like mark I have to say. I do rather fancy chandelier because it's rather minimal backdrop. Let's let's meet all guest at mark. Hooper shot shall we shall return to big mouth. The very patient rights riina supervisors. The youngsters face still turned the proverbial waters papery magazine Mark. How're you learn? Could thank you. Israel'S DIAMONDS FOODS SOUNDS BUCOLIC. Papery magazine stirring among thousands credit virus at the moment year. Sort of some some sort of being quite a bit more at your working for American types was low online stuff design writing things that really. I think few magazines still at keeping the to Bernie a lot working for America's because I tell you what they want what properly inside. I mean you'll ever seen the face still you have some some why. I hope with the relaunch. I'm involved since it reload so I can. I help this. But I'm yeah the thing. I think they've they've supposed that prediction while up guns in place. I think September the new one is developing some really good stuff on the website and didn't kind of always hypoc say they're doing covers just looks like a few deficit but like you know video covers with meeting in a multiple great almost like Zoom Shelton and covering people you know. People have their demographic working dams for that. So be good stuff. I think so. Did they got a pretty good pace. The talking to a delivery driver what it's like. Yeah but that's exactly what the face the Blake. The the bus driver in them. Selah covers being people. He workers and things of that. They had pretty announced the other day about the end of the end of the hotel. Buffered should brilliant just like how the face used to do. No one else would think and my mom took now getting into a Catholic but if you just yourself shawn it's just did this Nancy. I'm other news. Do you have your book out. Still in end of the year about trees push tree. Biography sounds amazing. Yeah I think we're going to be early next because of basie. No one's printing but done differences say. Yeah it's kind of like a history book but told through trees trees by something. Famous happen the tree that a modern crashed into Trees by people go handle met under things. Yes Oh yes it was like a social history makes natural in St. Yeah I like. I thought of you of predicting tree futures. And what's in store for the copper? Beech shouldn't think they have to have the frightening nature problems dot com disease coming along or treats of the discovery resentment. But we'll talk about. There's the big data come and try to settle As a massive outcomes come on one thing he can detox. Mingli mess with nature so trees and stuff but yet said he's kind of in the background of your education settle. It's give it license to pop culture. Podcast what are we talking about this? We can do a blood you asked me. Today's big mouth one foot in the rave new NETFLIX's drama white lines. We walk sets up to the Beatha to discover what really happened to her brother a superstar on the Pacific Ireland. It all goes wrong. Obviously we see be illegitimacy messy hedonistic some glory murderer in paradise or Mitsubishi's is any good. We will see close lockdown daughters David mock less in on the albums that have made the lockdown tolerable contrast. Who's chosen pump pump? National treasure check. See X and who's GonNa live at the Buzzer clamp? The answer plus in old film club we have the Moscow says he black comedy and downtown New York with nineteen thousand seats. Touchstone after hours started Griffin Rosanna arquette and Teruhiko made with peanuts. He's got lots of punk hair and it's how does it look now? I Will Transport David. Back to the pre starbucks. Soho of these streams with discuss these topics in-depth after this reminded from Sean if you're watching us now almost watching the cat who I'm trying to get but you'll know that being in support a has its perks. Your support patch helps the mouth to stay big for the price of a pint each month. You can get focused early. Adverts you can watch us live like this pledge just ten pounds a month and you'll get all this plus the gorgeous big mouth monk which Andrew keeps his own tons his in minds full of your valley young Cubans for one meal money disappears just an illusion right areas. There's the Mug it exists such patching big mouth look up our website bigmouth focused code don't UK or follow our social media to find out more was saying Spicer pint okay. Let's start with white lines on the clippers drug Eurotrash and long-suffering Spanish policeman of the Beatha along forgotten island of hedonism from a distant time when it was possible to go outdoors of witness the strange glowing ball of fire in the heavens created by the Spanish producer. Alex Pina of money heist fame and co-produced by the team behind the crown white lines features as a beds out DJ Laura Haddock Audrey Englishwoman. The investigating the probable measure of Dj. Birla who disappeared on the island in the early days of Rave Bonus. Bull also get men's rights. Gop shines Laurence Fox in a new as a preposterous wealth. Spiritual leader of a meditation group attempts to catch the Belichick experience on film. All very white lines pull it off. That's the listen. Just give me. An outlook is drugs. Out of the money talk. Dependencies disappeared off the face of the earth. Twenty years ago there would be notification axles. Best friends they all seem pretty suspicious. When did you see in? His Pie was wild. We approve his twenty years ago. Not Again he's hiding. Something preparing a belief of racial the island needs to look the police everything the boats the drugs and even to get what I came here the truth. I'm doing stop me. You eat shit. Everyone and operations. Hey Axel the truth. That just leaves a cult. David keeps this Eurotrash Ewald house including that was going on before. Edm Cable and then reveal. What do you make a white lines? Utah the love. I W- yeah. I watched it all. Well Look Cra. My point of view Spain his killing it in the Netflix's Game Germany has some some nice dark series like Berlin. We are the wave. Scandinavia has great crime thrillers. And crazy comedies. Like Ragnarok Francis Crap but but in Spain they're making amazing amazing Netflix's and why because they're sexy their twisty melodramatic? They have lots of Violeta NCIA. The parents are completely hypocritical and way worse than the kids And they're always haves and have nots. Two white lines kicks off with episode one an orgy with Coke and ecstasy and it closes with the starbucks version of radio heads. Creep is always very hip to throw in a little bit of Recently or relatively contemporary music. And give it that that mony female starbucks you know religion that sort of slowed down on all trans doubt episode to the main character. Axel who's a DJ says the DJ bigger than life says the bigger picture. I won't try to make Cuny. An accident can't possibly the bigger the bigger picture not conforming transforming people with our music. Yeah it's nine hundred ninety six you know. And then we cut to awake for for him. with forty year olds doing like raving and grieving similtaneously very short traffic screaming. And then they go and hug a cow for some unknown reason and little bit of a spoiler. The Mama Sita who runs the the big richest family wakes off the local priest. And then you hear. I know she has a reasons. It's all about power and then at the river you hear you hear at the river by Groove Armada. What brought me up for episode. That's pretty much it is. I find it highly highly entertaining. This kind of clash of the kind of Telenovela super-rich super bastards with the appalling way with son and the the The the Halsey mother of the father who hates his own family clashed together. With like view of you so the British shameless David which is basically Max. Matte at all and doesn't splashy Lucy things together. I thought wet roommate. Wealth this kind of you know semi Ken loach jump pill social realism up again. Something that should be on Brazilian television and something I really liked about it was A. It's about the world of DANCE MUSIC CULTURE. It's not suffused with crump trance. The Music Actually Precious Little House music in it. This is an awful lot of easy listening. There is as you say only saw books versions of things. So it's quite counselor counselor distinctive. I thought many feel ready. Fresh did you. Can you can about the story that needs to. Yeah I mean simply characters were were Right annoying that the one that got it you mentioned who's in robes and jam all the time He he was just The one who will hug the cow essentially was just the guy with long blond. Here I can't you you mentioned Yeah that's large Fox. That's men's right. Scope shot Lawrence Fox. He tried in the series at least and I don't know who Johnny Maze Is. I guess he's been in a lot of things because you know it's come up hit. His character is quite appalling to supposed to be though isn't it? He's he's an archetype. He's the middle-aged DJ I give him high marks for his accent because he's from ethics today. All I thought it was exceedingly balk as a facing arena graduate. You have to work closely with the free spirits. And shall we say Unorthodox business people businesspeople the be as did I when I was working on. Beck's back did it ring trade. You think captured the experience. Well it's a bit like you said soon as tabloid TV business is not for me. I didn't I don't think that's what clash quite work. Some is seem to work out whether it's meant to be black comedy. It's meant to be real and I kind of like more comic bits in quite a bit x Ray. Eldorado take night on TV. Yeah terrible acting sort of set in Spain so join. Uk in Spanish production. Let's even make carrots? Marcus and some schools in Marcus. Which is this GonNa Catchphrase of the? But now I realized I knew maze and I think he does that kind of you know. Midlife crisis slightly put still trying to make as a DJ love sporting apart his wife's runoff running sex policies. And and I thought he was great and really believable. But this in the first first episodes they have to kind of sign these documents for that body in a in the wild west thing ball and everyone's cheering and seeing it just kind of ridiculous but I thought you either do that where you do the realistic stuff. The jump between the two. I found that quite hard to show his Co. gas together. I mean that's that's that's the enjoy the last night. The one thing that stuck out to me listeners may may or may not be familiar with Mommy mission right the Grand Club of a be in the late nineties and early two thousands at the height of super clip management. The live sex shows on stage managing with a nudity body painting and pythons and all the rest of it this analyst money emissions could reach classicism and lot of you know sort of talking about the old. Roman visual sense that this to me felt very much like they take the money mission story throat murdering slightly very rich. Romano class of a mission I also thought they captured the we had callousness of data really well because when people got live that it does seem to so ten of them. Moral of the moral few seems to cow suddenly dead bodies washed up on the beach just like unlucky mate thing. It is quite aware place. Charlotte's you think we are. Granting is a mix I think it wants to be dynasty ready and BLERTA. The doesn't quite get dot com puff so it's kind of following that football wives thing. I don't know if that went to the states where they really need to ramp up especially lots of sex and drugs it needs to be sillier maybe in a way but some things was just so startling real having been to beat the so many times in the mix is and stuff like that and having to sit near home are soup off three days. Did I make you do but did I know some other people sent me? I got another full times a year at one point. It was just ridiculous but that the so they get lots of things right awful cars. That don't have a roof on them. Everyone drives around with really time. That always there hadn't they don't cry. Scrape tofu voice drive. There is still very odd. It's really really divided. So you do get the rich law. The North who are completely dissociated from San Antonio Lot and everyone taking es all day I mean it's such a peculiar I think maybe it's too peculiar a place to do a story about unless you come up more. It's it's so many different opposites it did bring some of that back. So maybe that's mark of a good program for God right at a pill policy. David did you. Did you enjoy the amazing NAFF? Nosov of Spiritual Obata. They kind of like the knapsacks policies of the NAFF Russian shows then afterwards was everybody thinks so on it. And it's like it's Tacky I've never been to a beef We visit here but Yeah I've never been to. I've never been so I. I had no idea but we have our spots here. In all over the United States they're called energy for taxes and energy taxes like timeless New Mexico in Sedona Arizona and there are places where there's energy in Texas I don't know. And they're they're welts. Trent you get a Lotta Crystal Shops. You know and people have a lot of us and they sit out and they meditate and all of that stuff so. I you know I thought it was look. I went all the way through it and I didn't have to. And then I started actually watching money heist which was. Pena's other thing and that's quite good too. And it's got a lot of the CAST members of elite. And if you really WanNa see something that's Turgid in marvelous you should. You should check out elite. Which is another Spanish Telenovela highschoolers? Who are overly sexualizing. And then of course murderous. Obviously it's not flex quite intelligent about it's definitely aiming at. I mean people who have got kids use Scott rabies the cotton anymore. WanNa see trash. It's bit of lockdown and that demographic I think they dumped to and I think we will see a lot more ravidrums coming out for people who of missing the highlife. It's didn't get Vietnam films until ten years of combat Vietnam calmed down everybody's back from ABC which is basically Vietnam isn't it let's face it be resolved yet. Now we'll we'll see we've managed to not discuss the two K. Characters Atoll wom. Is Zoe the heroine who keeps making terrible terrible decisions to drive the plot on his huge problem drugs? I know I'll put it in the back of my camera. We haven't even discussed by favorite cartoons box of the security guy. He's been down stacked murderer with a heart of gold or house. He he's great. I want to say spinoff where he just goes and commits solves crimes under which I thought. Hey I really liked him a lot. Well in many ways he's the hero of. He's really a hero of the show and he is the one who crazily has the moral center As everybody else's wigan out yeah and he's he appears although I'm GonNa fight your way through a the story. His Jetty. Nobody else is really changing all like he can. He was harpooned by. I would have a problem with that. But he just he makes him full for her even more because he is a man cared about being how woman of unstreamed by. Harpoon leg by a woman. Obviously I see okay poison Arrow at my leg yes sir yes Stanford Hsun from one guests. That editor's recommendation. David keeps track of you bought in via devious package. Taped to the underside of an inflatable bananas. Honey combs yeah. Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah Honeycomb have I the right yen in new track. Is Dave now no. It's a stumper from the summer of nineteen sixty four It's weird 'cause sometimes I go down rabbit holes as one does on Youtube and You know if you're watching Dick Dick Clark Dave Clark five and all of a sudden this comes off and I recognize the tune when I heard it now. Everybody goes on and on about how how great it is. Because it's got the stumping stomping drum drum bass track and mostly just the drums and apparently they recorded it in the studio where they were all stomping on the stairs as they were doing but it does have this Amazing Guitar. Riff in it too. That's really brightened tinny yet about it is. There's a woman the woman named honey land tree and honey land tree. Is the female drummer of the honey. Combs and honey worked in a beauty salon. Showed the record company came up with honey. Combs get it as for the name of the Group. But she's she's absolutely terrific. She's sort of done up like Maude. Secretary with kind of high hair and usually wears a horrible like Thai Blouse. And she's a little bit lurched over the drums and she just bangs it out and it just makes. It's so good and everybody in the ban has their their place. You've got the good-looking square jaw lead singer. You Got Becky Bastard. Who's playing Rhythm Guitar? He got the brother of money. Who's playing lead guitar? And it's just like if you had to take a nutshell of all the be groups and take all of their cliches and thrown into one band. You'd have that Meringue as a banger. I played I played this when I was feeling at Duckie and the place went off. The air was punched. Also Joe make prediction made it being was made on the Holloway Road. Shirley in Joe Meek Studio when my brother used to live in the flat but it's next door to the old job makes you where he met his landlady. So it's all in the nexus of David. You should say you need to rent. Tell Staw the Biography make which features all this. It's got mad. Things like play the jewelry and all kinds of radio. Okay tells them again? Let's listen listen. Honeycomb have either right. It's huge view right. The domestic discos getting louder. The players getting longer we need more staff to listen to. So we've asked our guest mark and David choose to perfect lockdown albums that sort of thing that stops lockdown fever when it starts creeping up on? You well here. Our guests discuss why they chose him after the snippets fastest Charlie access from how I'm fitting now the track is I finally understand. Then I don't live the but calm. This is mother include Gummidge Mindy. Nice gone funny And a funny funny feeling mccaw me from when I hate myself on A. I'm rob long skirt. Talk off. Markle stopped with you. You've chosen youtube. You've chosen blythe we've chosen idols. Live at the bathroom. She got a real CDs actually spent my show Intel for although again. They'll do a screen grab make things much more rarely paying shown town pretty good Hey do things about you. That's mega comprehensive nutria. So you're watching livestock. Nice it's very different. Obviously to beautiful glossy recorded sound that we're used to the really well recorded but disgusted unreformed Get to it's listening policies lawman putting twits. This have an account but I never use it for this. I felt like it just captured. That that Kinda swifty mush bit atmosphere of live Geoghegan. Something particularly crave imagine a time. We'll want now against is almost capture. Meghan the policy really got to save them. The discharge coming up. I didn't get the challenge so I was going to sue Another streamed as live. But we'll come into the comments as well as it was the equipment Things members of Obama coming in until in answering questions. But it's it's like yeah just a real sort of already left but it just felt like this amazing connection sized bass economy The fact that she says she two just as mercy ships mercy and he goes new so does the new song out guys cry but despite the real connection with the crowd needs motion. You guys always breaking down in. And he says it's Great Skiing Evan. The facts that the bicycling united kind of squares a few articles did that Ramos. Chronic last night is it. James Brown thing is somebody talented. He says I will tell you another one. I mean some people get a bit my out time. I think he's you know he's obviously pretty highly. Struggle very emotional performance. I imagined it will bring you to that. Just kind of the nature of the so. It's like depots Leasing child out so it's not really much quite emotional through so I've read something that they released the surprise new singles this week or last week and they dressed it up like a youtube exercise. Because it's cool Mr motivator idea town anyone say this afternoon and all the guys on the bench pretty Pretty Mad. Got Big big Ridiculous Unites Giant phone of outfit and he said always GONNA be doing keep fit in what was just a little sort of pitch take or not and it turned out to be the new video. Yeah and it's amazing lyrics. One of them is like tracey. Emin on her made bed listening to the fall. And that's all very Bamford sort of just pouring the lyrics and trying to decide I'm tracy. Avenues is taken advantage of luck. Finally make that fucking bed and toddy house. I like this choice because as antidote to the glossy stuff and the listening parties are very much. It's getting very Saudi. Everything being very preserved in ASPIC and quite reverend so this was this was refreshing. Although Little Grimy I thought watch it is quite sweaty down there. You've prompt for something entirely opposite. Is Charlie axe? Yes now this is. This is the lockdown album. She has recorded this in lockdown in our house and got it out without all the the the Gulf of the record company that she did not faff about not in the least. And I'm so chuffed that I'm going all English now. I'm very pleased that you that you called her a national treasure because I actually think she she is so To sounded intelligence. Is You actually wrote something? That will not repeat it. As though I'm sean just it's just coming into my head. Enjoyed it for ten. After the Swedish pop group icon of pop recorded her banger. I love it. I don't care twenty one year old Charlotte Emma Atchison who calls her hero. Susie sue and her pop girl. Riana released her debut. Lp True Romance twists filled with knock. Noisy darkens. Swirly dance one song. You ha ha began with this. Yeah we got a situation lockdown and I'm trapped in the basement in twenty fourteen. The artists now known as Charlie XY released sucker proclaimed as best pop album of the year by the horny toads a rolling stone. Who said Charlie XY x is the pop star? Twenty fourteen was waiting for a bad ass. Songwriting savant. Who's the most fun girl in any room? She steps into soccer a middle finger waving teenage riot packed into thirteen punky gems. It's a dance party. A mosh pit and feminist rally swamp so cut to a few days ago when Charlie release. How unfeeling now. Eleven tracks. Thirty seven minutes and it begins with a song called pink diamond which is just as crazy. Noisy US WANNA Joe real Dog So interestingly enough. The scholars at wikipedia inform me. Charlie said she experiences down to color These she states. I see music in colors. I love music. That's black pink purple or red but I hate music. That's yellow or brown or green. So I guess Nobody Irish. You've got these You've got these to really sort of Throwbacks tour I kind of album. Which is pink diamond and the last song which is called vision and they're really noisy scratchy and strange. And then do you have these absolutely beautiful. Pop songs like detonate And then you have. I finally understand a lot of this is deeply emotional. Like I'm stuck here with my boyfriend. I in lockdown. I'm trying to make sense of what love and romance are all about. It's she used to be this girl that she probably still has a lot of swaggers. Very like you know I'm the tough girl domes- with me. I'm you know I can go out clubbing. I can party But we're seeing much softer side of her in a very very interesting so I finally understand it actually starts with a kind of a baseline reminded me of sound of the crowd by the Human League. See if you hear it. And it's all about ambivalence about love and romance and the lyrics is baby. I love you bad. 'cause lately I finally understand that maybe this feeling that I found my kill me. Put me in the ground. So it's like love is wonderful but possibly toxic. This is the kind of thing that I foolishly. Kind of nepotism attention to listen to this unloved. That it's like it's got loads of its electronic noise out the best kind brilliantly inventive kill liquids straight from her. She's an interesting person and it's the kind of thing that you think day God. Why can't expulsion still be going day? Got Waikato hits because she would be obsolete continent. Wouldn't she perfect? All of the government doesn't want to be an old boy. Readers would have to stand on Choline. Yeah and she's she is just so much in charge of what she wants to do. And that sounds like such a trite thing to say but it's really really difficult and to bypass the whole record company. Shit and get out and do it and Righ- attracted in them record it. She does the videos in the living room and you can see her sort of its markup shots as much as it's go see shos. It's just incredible and are just. Salita is also John Lennon idea where she would be pulled by but the record the song on Monday do the cover on Wednesday get out by Friday and which is the best idea is best conceptual provider. You can have her for the you know. I only really knew her for the pop. Hits like a boom bang Beat him my heart. Whatever goes on and on you know all those those really sort of anthem girl pop kinda anthems that she put out and then. I started listening to this. Each listen revealed more. It was really you know peeling the onion in in. I think people are GONNA remember this album. Not just because it was a you. Know a lockdown record. Because it's really fucking good. Yeah Yeah it's a good records that you don't expect ex. I thought to Scott when I chose but I'm glad you didn't like choosing pop. Apollo said loud otherwise they turn into merger. We are going to delve into old film club. What better way to spend internal lockdown since the fine line getting bit irate on twitter and watching a good movie afterwards this week. We've gone for Martin Scorsese's Australis from one thousand nine hundred five. It shows. New York's it used to be a place of low life of Venture Griffin Dunne's pro. People Hackett meets mysterious pinterest. Marcy Franken goes up and it's thrown into a few circles of hell complete with plaster pass Bagel and cream cheese bottles and screaming peppier up Mash as sculpture coming straight after comedy this is in essence a pig risk but is it a love letter to New York or is it something other than that. Let's listen to the trailer. Why don't you just go home? I've been asking myself that one all night long so what happened. Why can't you? I met this girl tonight. Okay and the coffee shop like something. Incredible was really going to happen here. When I got home I gave her a call on the cab on the way down here. All my money flew out the window. I didn't really get along with that well so I left so had enough to get home until I want to lend the money. That's a boy. Oh Wow like what is this? I'm in big trouble big trouble now. This part you're going to say oh you're lying to me. Don't lie to me but it's true. I couldn't believe that. Tell smell my fault. I didn't do it. I gotTa tell who you didn't do what they're trying to kill me. I mean I just wanted to leave my apartment. Maybe meet a nice girl now. I've got to die for you. Know what are you want from me? What am I after hours? Don't Google it without parental settings on kids. The movie takes place in just one evening in Manhattan as it goes from office job uptown to the more earthy. Soho David keeps are start with you know New York. Did you see the phone when it came out? I did see the film when it came out. I was living in New York when it came out I was working at star. Hits came out so I was all in you know. I don't recall loving the movie when it first came out and not certain that I did seeing it. In retrospect as an exercise in. Stodgy but I will say this Martin. He is many things but our director of comedies. He is not catnap. Funny moments like when Joe Pass she is saying what am I cloud you laughing at me spider shoots you get these very dark funny moments where it's all funny. That's based on tension where you're just you're about to shift yourself and you laugh instead because it's so scary but it's always as desperate dark kind of thing like King of comedy which you mentioned and if you haven't seen king of comedy you can just watch the joker because it's basically young. Hello what's the show to give it? A little historical context nine hundred eighty four when the movie was likely shot. Here's what was going on. Jay mcinerney wrote bright lights big city. It was all about loft living. You're the coolest person in the world. If you lived in a loft was the dawn of the era of CDs nintendo MAC computers. And of course Madonna. A you know a very sort of brash somewhat off putting somewhat frightening vision of womanhood so this was the context in which it was set and to me. It's all about terror. Yes it you know. It's the idea that you'd be careful if you go below fourteenth street. 'cause there are weird. People down there there are women in beehives listened to the monkees. Joni Mitchell punk rockers. Who Want to shave your head into a Mohawk? There are leather gays making out in bars in front of you. There are loft living sculptures who are into bondage and there's conceptual artists the horror. Just one. These are all the reasons why you went that. If I could live there I wouldn't be I would've but I couldn't afford it because it was actually kind of expensive to live by it. Can I ask the question? Is there any way that pool? Hackett is relatable the central every man figure. Who has he? He is on the journey. What I found was interesting about him as he explodes a couple of times during the film and it comes out of nowhere. And it's you know A. He's being systematically emasculated throughout the film. So I won't say it's coming out of nowhere. I mean if he hasn't dropped of testosterone. It's finally you know. Sort of maybe explodes isn't the best word thereby if finally Iraq's that's even worse anyway So that it's really really seems really Uncharacteristic but yeah. He's relatable for a lot of people. Relatable I suppose all the people who actually lived in Soho and were part of that scene just thought he was another square and maybe how could they hustle some money out of him Ma Thoughts Agree with David. But that's partly why I love it. It's such a sort of disjointed on having film the it's it's just like a comedy that's not very funny but but I love. This is doesn't feel like he told us it's really feels react killed. Whatever Kim companies really feels like school safety he filled in the wet show? This field yet feels very different and I think the first time I saw it on some Channel Four late at night. Probably coming back from the university It's completely the wrong time to watch Not that and so I remember really been quite struck by how how strange it felt says the the famous actually because when he first meet Feel like victims. It goes on. He's the victim and it's like titles it's twenty the mossy character. Yeah go into this. Yes but that'll by higgins and he's a straight one is she's always trying to play as well. Yeah I I don't like the you know the guy clients about meeting that. Probably the most likeable friendly people in the whole. He's disturbing really cared. If something happens and then out. She seemed to show any so any humanities is fighting pays to deal with your expectations the fact but yeah. I love teaching. Children is rather strange. Nfl these characters like Kathryn Harrison. That he's Shits Creek now. But she's she's mostly Christopher guest films best in show Monty Win Dinu recognized if I'm just trying to work happy with I basically recognized and it's a very different role for her because she in this one she does not play a Ding Bat. Normally and you know another thing that I found so interesting about watching film. Nineteen eighty. Five is I'm just GONNA go there. The teeth in the unit browse. And you know the fact that people look like real people like when we were talking about for like lines to everybody in white wines was incredibly fit in nineteen ninety six and I don't think that's actually you know the real and and being thrown back to nineteen ninety-five and seeing like Rosanna arquette's teeth and and Griffin Dunne's Hyun brow in his opting lack of muscle tone. It was just waiting to see movie actors. That look that way Andrea now. You chose this for several reasons wrong. Woman's David's new. We'd get so Mike Proper in New York insight here the other is I had never actually seen. It had heard a lot about it. And it's the kind of thing I would watch on lockdown and another reason is that accidentally big mouth is tending to Andrew. What's your school? Says he feels. You haven't seen so many reasons. I was really surprised by I. I was surprised at how unfunny it was. Because I've been might my major interaction with embiid reading in the enemy in the eighties. About how this is the funniest thing you'll ever see in you life. Actually it's really quite bleak and obviously this is the enemy of the people make jokes. Those days hadn't been invented yet the Griffin catch deeply deeply unsympathetic individuals. Really horrible things and certain things played for laughs. Which now you'd be picketed full without giving out too many spoil at certain things that care which that would be the subject of multi-page Guardian. Think pieces about what disgrace they are. That said I did like the fact that the freaks and the way those add tend to dominate is essentially A nasty person descends into how and is Is is given a punished tool the hubris and punished for their shallowness. That was real. I mean there was definitely this. Divide of the downtown people versus the uptown. People and Yuppies were very much scorn and the source of ridicule and satire within the art of the underground. You know downtown below Fourteenth Street and the fact is what's Hilarious to me is like it's like I'm just a data processor. Today is like the most crap job you could possibly have and back then. It was a very much a status job for him. Okay Tau also at the basic towards level. I loved seeing these places that th the places that I'm familiar with being this kind of now survey safe shoppers paradise full of apple stores. And you know Brunches Shenandoah and things like that and as kind of wasteland and it definitely felt like this is the last chance to see before things we would change very quickly. And it will become detoxified. My favorite character by mile is Teri Garr. Playing they playing the character of Sean Paddington in the film on head love of beautiful called pulse. Light Kasich. I wasn't gonNA say that. She is in many respects the most balanced character in the film You know Jesus the thing that struck me was like in this this Demi Mon but suppose it hell below fourteenth street that no right might right-thinking person would go to pretty much. Everybody here in Kansas is decent person. The kind of crazy book. They have a bottle center that he hasn't built you don't apart from Popular Shea. Sculpture Lady played by Linda feared Saner with with with the WHO embodies the effect. Looseness that we associate with that kind of downside wwl dot will pretty much everybody else has gonNA marble is even. There's a weird community bolt. Come on there's literally ECON have a mob with burning torches shop without a sense of community. Now that's the end and that's not everyone. I think it's about fear of women. I think it's about being disjointed and I think it's about Griffin done the characters love of things and how when people don't behave like things objects the keys the Bagel Gobi signifies or all over everywhere on these symbols. When they don't behave like things he doesn't know how to deal with it. When they have their own issues around motivations he runs away. He's always running away from that apartment. He's always running away from women. I think it's about that it's about dislocation more than anything. Dislocation latrine posh. New Yorkers will call it in British which and and the Bohemian side. All the Women Bohemians. He's now I it's about that. I don't think it reflects Martin Scorsese's view but that doesn't matter. I felt that it then. It felt disjointed watching it but I don't mind I feels fashion. I didn't mind that. Yeah yeah the we. We don't we don't complain about films at the Nineteen Fifties Fairly goldfish and do we. We absorb and we we enjoy it. Well maybe it's a whole fashion a black and white but also you know we're now accepting that the films with the one thousand nine hundred looked pretty dated and we need to learn to appreciate that to make it. Part of the movies moved to that thing but if you watch a movie from nineteen bothering about the performances although the actors you just had to say what London used to look like all my case what little used to look like if they have to make films you know God look before they not all down could we just say may aren't house by the ADO He's very very infants. My husband the hair and the rabbits in the bar like fairy. It's the soul. And he used fast. Findus I sinclair editor or was it cinematographer. One of the technical crew is from. He knew how to code films really quickly. It was done for a very very small budget inbetween big movies and I think that that part of it is. He wants to get out of anything. That's airing towards Hollywood and I know he was positive that but I think the art house things what he really wants to capture that in the field of it one thing. I noticed because of a credits nerd. It's Red Glare. Who is an old punk figure is in IT David? This rings a bell. Oh yeah I know the name. He was in the sort of performance art world that. That's all I remember. And he's and he's done he. I should know I should know better. But I don't solid rockets if this get in touch from hits because we ask NAVID podcast yes I get. I thought you know Sean. To your point about fear of women it's also about emasculation. I mean there's a brilliant piece of graffiti where he goes in a bar and he goes to take a leak or I guess I don't know how about you say point Percy at the porcelain over there in England and any looks over and he sees the picture of this horrible drawn graffiti of a guy with a heart on a giant shark about to chop it off and I. It's it's kind of interesting because it sort of posits that the underground in some way there was a emergence of female voices female artists Madan. Yeah Yeah and and like all. The women in the film are one way or another. They are artists in their more important than the man. That sort of populate that Demi Moaned as as you might say yeah. She's a great line right down one point towards Andy just says I just want to come downtown. Meet Nosko not but a die for young still sort of this leg on the basic so talking to truck for our guests mark what liberals in this is from childish. Gambino a in fact is that she twenty four nineteen because he's a Named the tracks of the time. They're pair on on the album but I'm sort of in brackets fleabag and it's just mapped collision of worlds but especially love some to sleep activity Character from the show and they don't see met on the set of they're in that star wars film silent and they really hit off. Apparently says it's just crazy that someone is basically my favorite albums fee as it's like United Princeton Tons of lots of very modern Franken stop production on it as well and the fact that somebody like that who the character characters thank. That'd be singular fleabag just let freely in pop pots beautiful song. But it's kind of I love the I got is the one so I really picked up on your paid law suddenly realize the same fleet back. I wonder if that's you know seems quickly states. Be Singing to someone with us. It was actually about character. Oh jets I'm with us. It's closing time Chesser. What will I guess be discussing on a bench slightly someone in that top five list of people that are allowed to see? Now that's Regulations have been relaxed. What will they be sharing a ham? Maidana golic cocktail within the nearest park. David Close Tom Chesa well. Yesterday I read in. Well I would say I read it informs but actually came in my apple news. Be About Joe Rogan podcast. Joe Rogan the Joe Rogan experience. Inky game exclusive deal with spotify Swedish streaming company Hello spotify. They're going to be paying one hundred million dollars. Throw it in love this way for a podcasting company. Yeah for for a single caster so Do you guys know. Joe Rogan is yeah other. Yeah so joe elated. I look Joe Rogan. Is this guy who I knew. Best as being a stand up comic in the Joe Piscopo Andrew dice clay mode loudmouthed. Steroid I don't know if you take steroids or not. But you know like Uber Macho Guy. Any hosted fear factor in the US. So I did a little due diligence. Because I thought what's worth one hundred million dollars I listened. I listened to some of the podcast yesterday. And they're They're like two three hours long. So you have it bad and I I expected him to be a horrible blow blowhard but actually he's he. Lets people actually talk and he has fascinating guests so I don't know what they're gonNa do with that it. Does you know I thought because the PODCAST is of interest to speak about what's happening in the world of podcasting his bit you know. What do you reckon? But it's consistently number one in every in apple charts all over the world and some of these episodes four hours long and I can't do anything for four hours at a time not even sleep so somebody is getting a lot of value out of this somewhere in the world but it is absolutely a cult. Thing isn't that. What can you have a culture of millions? I don't know yes. Yeah in China. So right. Ooh Chum Spruce Oakland spots I so I thought I thought he must make it longer right. Got An hour each. I thought it was. I thought it was interesting. Because this is first time I've ever appeared on a podcast and there's really much more to it than I thought that there might be such as Andrews Kerfuffle with the The technology today show. It's it's interesting to me that it's become you know the the idea of talk conversation That has that kind of value. It's quite nice because really what Rogan is doing. His kind of long form like what used to be called long form journalism where you would sit and have a very long chat with somebody and I listened to a couple of things one was infectious disease expert. Talking about what? We're all talking about the other was josh home from home from. I don't know how he's from Queens of the Stone Age. They were talking about riding motorcycles. And it just sort of goes on you know on and on and on like I'm doing right now. Well it's like a consent profession of the. Ltv The fifties and sixties by people sit objects Chechen talk at length and where solving courage to laugh at. This was like look at what they used to do in the old fashioned days proxies fascinating because people like listening to people people enjoy compensation your need smash after. Smash Kill Interesting Mark Hooper. What's your closing time? Jaffa will similar kind of one of those things. You any kind of discover lockdown but someone just emailed me and said you should check out policies online shopping Very King of the drops O- Flashy in the item descriptions in the in the corner this Some little books. They're just talk writing high coups. Just things talking about that live. One of them said Protect Jacket Grey hundred percent and then it just as I don't know what does sounds good though t h language Threat just finding sniff someone's just ready. Border spent literally spend hours looking through a couple of This fritzy jacket blue. When life gives you lemons make lemonade now having a mid you great resented visual that one and I said I do everything minute even go to the toilet that way so basically this is well. That'd be exactly. There's a little insight into his mind de la so I just want to give a shout through the different types of alcohol to meet your some pissed guy type of your way have the memo valuable time to have a show. What's your closing shelter? Well I'm welcoming big brother the idea and on the TV show BBC have now introduced BBC. Together it's cold and somehow through. I'd play I'm done is you can watch shows in real time with people and someone compose it and then you will chat about it and it's a way of bringing people together but I mean the amount of data. Bbc will get about people's more data about watching things. I felt a little bit kind of surveillance society. Well my mom would like it so I quite like the idea that the technology is still developing new ideas to keep his blue to things but to try and connect people. Because of this interminable thing that is not going to end in a short while so interesting idea whether people will follow. Maybe you could do it with them. Files that hateful But maybe you could. They should pay their artists more. But maybe you could do it. Well you cannot. She listened with someone oppose it and actually have a way to do it via twitter or something else and those things. We'll see what happens in technology when you talk about. This is interesting because when you talk about them collecting data that could drive the decisions of what they're actually the use artificial intelligence to then bake the shows. Yeah and and so. The creativity doesn't come from someone's just sitting there thinking about. Oh I missed the RAVE DAYS. I should write a show about that. It comes of what people are talking about or but also when they pose and what they food wind when they attention goes it will actually be able to look that presumably things that people get what they get to the end of something in far more detail than you can get from just streaming something and I play or something like that. So yes it may shape things other people might use that technology to be able to then put it into different formats something maybe a foot a friend of mine used to work for division of Time Warner Cable. Entertainment in a New York and she worked in the specialist. Delivery got cold out of the offering what you needed depend on to watch the films and was a nice to discover that the case statistic was people watched by people. I mean men only watch the first fifteen minutes of anything. Why is that useful? So why not just making fifteen minutes long debate the rest of the film? I don't know but I thought was interesting useful factoid because as we know adult entertainment produces all the data because he got your check analogy. Well my closest shots is a book. That's out new on Kendall. It's glad to be alive. The gabby and hills anthology the unfurled ejiofor great writer got inhales. You stroke the face and the bits for England. Magazine Polo govern was a genius. And had he died? I think it was twenty three years ago today. Because this on the Wednesday and Shuttled guarantee format through the face and friend of the show. Miranda Sawyer have got his anthropology backout again on kindle. Ads called book alive and it is amazing. Print phrases paid copies of gun performed recruit ago. But you can get it out for about six criticism with into the Ocean. I think but Rhonda and it's very much worth reading because it is everything you want about your pop culture on the stuff that goes around the edges of popcorn. You know the people who make it the places where it happens and to this day. I Miss Cabin because I felt like in the fact that use a lovely bloke. I feel it got robbed of what should have been decayed. Brilliant writing and actually get to grips with Brexit. Gabby gay to grips with you. Know Colbert is a mold. Health Golf all you name it. You could have just five. Innate would been amazing so phil got really robbed. The toys that happen again to go to kindle and by bliss alive and thoughts I believe. Is that the station of big mouth. Funky day the Cape's odile again from Arizona. My pleasure please do. Please do commit game on that. You can Red State correspondent yes. Let's I'm yes Blue hearted in a red state. Blue halted Internet site. That sounds like your forthcoming album. Giants right can get traits the exit. Yeah Yeah David keeps keeps on is and I thought he don again from the red state. It's very literally disgusted of Tunbridge Wells. Thank you everybody. Thank you listening. We'll be back next week from. May Sean Alex Keith. Sell safe of the see you next week.

David Locke Sean Paddington New York City Martin Scorsese United States Andrew Mark Spain NETFLIX Uk Mark Hooper Joe Rogan Laurence Fox ABC Griffin Rosanna arquette Mark White apple Charlie Tonga
H-Hour Snapshots #10 Mark White and Toby Brooks

H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

16:31 min | 2 months ago

H-Hour Snapshots #10 Mark White and Toby Brooks

"Bacchus you on I think we should thank you to Minus two even. Which is mega watching. If you're in Becker noises. Because he got fast cars going past Russillo stone next strike yes home strength strengthening strikes about mach today looking like mock want. Yup Twelve years and eight years. Nps December two thousand eighteen. When did you leave out? Say Two thousand nine Eddie. Fifty thousand nine. What was that like a tough time for me Initially was really good to move to the states. Things pretty good and then it didn't work out came back tried to rejoin Is the high of the recession. I think van was a new thing at the time. So lots of people staying on to the end of the mid career. I was trying to get by kid and the vacancies. Just one that forgot back bucket founding zone an MPG s so thoughts when I talk to rejoin our paper eight months said up trusting sergeant though it wouldn't be a sheet to rejoin but it was founded joining the reserves deploying to Afghan with my own unit trying to come in three to Bob Dole but while sells out onto yesterday saw came out. They were reducing trade down to a third so I knew that there was no chance to rejoin restrict posting career. Prato posted in current Not that much I see is not the most diverse really an unbelievable unbelievable a you WanNa go some effort trade off. Some light isn't focused I'll say engineers. I recommend nothing. You're right and he's quite easy. You're used to be quite easy to transfer between the different trades Sunday the same cup much GM Did you know I've been to Iraq for two thousand three but no Afghan? What was the questions all? What would you like seven and operation when you were regular competitive in an operation resume? Actually what was that like? I was a reserve soil regular when I went to Iraq that was caught in the conflict so it now in January came back in June or July so it wasn't a law infrastructure we'd find when you move forwards you would just set set a base so there was nothing that facilities so it was quite good even as located chime the out towards the front during a little bit more war stuff than would be dating back home. There was zero infrastructure towards the end of Had enough to be honest. That was Iraq Yep Barbie Reserve site was. It was okay. It wasn't a huge difference because when I deployed as a reservist with regular cards lucky. Not How many how? Many resisted hepatic reside. There was can be two of us. That went out the other. One didn't go for whatever reason. So He's just myself Oscar We all the Has Different tools was strap? I think that goes back to the potential recruitment permanence so maybe deployed the Afghan. I I. It's like twenty fully deserves top and then we adults Rich infantry attached I think the unit deployed before us that we took over from. I think that was reserved unit. Oh took over from says. Possibly while many wins. Okay go you go. Yeah right Questions if if you remember the most recent memory and the reason the reason I ask this question when when you veterans talk about stuff to A lot time focuses on that really tough stuff to haunt stuff that some of the most amazing story on the puppy Stories that frightened. Chelsea ending is adding sixty nine the last snapshot he was on about things on people getting mixed also somewhere the pike through yeah. I'm still a proud moment. I try to do a thing. It's the first and only time I've tried to do. It was a sorry Ma'am Run A taxi in Egypt and we had it set. We knew exactly what we're GONNA do. We go onto trump us off the top of the hill. We'RE GONNA run down the side and Invo means a camp and as soon as you went to boom bust out. The call realized that no door on the inside. They didn't are very well so there was no door handle on my side. Semi custom dime. He got out he goes out with his side. He jumped out running around. It was obvious I was panicking exactly what was going on. I was pretty trunks was unaware. And but let me out. He means onto us one man. Yeah we call it the next morning. The Yeah Yeah Craig also. I recommend an Egyptian toxic is not expensive. Probably thinking I'm slipknot suffolk spirits so far while serving not necessarily which means experience probably a little bit of a toss up between coming towards the end of my time in Iraq. Sting want to be there anymore. It was pretty Those guys that had it really tough for years two thousand three Iraq. Yes the loss of six weeks which seemed Long Time I didn't want to be that where we ended up in Attleboro on place on orange. Three with nine Vague but yeah I was. I was very soon very tally. piece. I saw I was yeah. It was percents on in two thousand. Three phytochemicals about it Six flags workshop. Mr Aren't yet is please is in a big cup. This big is it is a school liberal Pro Bowl I think out at Traffic Control Center. It was disused. Short was a note Base lot of people. When I asked that question they they will. They will highlight transition. Leaving the military is experiencing injuries as people like yourself a lot of experience a hideous hideous titans operations they come back to that but actually traveling E. S. So when also just not the case of you know toss up between coming to time in Iraq and when I left in two thousand and nine in fatty thrusting young sergeant doing well though I kids rejoin our eight nine months later and carry on was more or less self I was quite employable and but nobody was rejoining the Ministry of selling a new the recruitment guy in the office officers trying to help me. He's pretty Franken's Consi- it's not gonNA happen at a friend. Who EMPLOYS MY application? I'm ready sorry is not going to happen. He recommended joining the reserves. Jay at the time and during the tool she wanted that unfortunately didn't work either and then trying to gain regular employment. I ended up working in felt factory Where everyone you finish school cutting fat with people that would take drugs in? It's always lunch done. It was really tough to to find something. Hof reasonable second time round a completely different story on her own project manager Stroke Workshop Manager for the Figaro. Show that they sing dickel We still classic costs but mainly newsouth Figaro's view Yeah always been figure us. They will appetizing. So that settles that based and they were recruiting for a manager. Strip portrait manager sold on foot on one of the recruiting websites is old. He was about three months old. I read it seemed to fit me really well assumed it would be gone by plot anyway and then A couple of days later at an email from Taipei Bosman Phone Code Zip. His wife get me said straightaway. Had A quick probably not even ten minutes on the fine invited me in for an interview with the general manager and the Johnson from. Maybe even that week went in an hour off everything seemed to go really well completely different than when I left previously. It was really really smooth. Had A couple of interviews previously for some other jobs which went well and I think that really helps prepare for this one. We'll say someone look more inching. My interests no much skills but setting him on my interests and I was invited back to meet with toby on a general manager again and morals workshop manager Russia Monitor. We come. Did you So we invite you boss. Says he says nice things. Yeah this is interesting. Because you're in the combat is interesting Brooks. Toby toby by so awesome. Years You you look into recruit mole. Exxon that's what was attractive about number nine. You look a whole so I think the Take teams that team more productive adult bass and we always try and recreate for different backgrounds. So we've got people that might have entrepreneurial backgrounds because some people that come from Our industry but people come from all over the place. And what are the ready big scales that you get from? They will have come from the metal trays of growth mindset in the way that I could put them onto things so problems Aside company culture and untamed buildings really important to us and it comes instilled in mark inside is in boom for us to find more people. Go got those skills in those F. if it's opened vape Having a hard time transition into into normal working lives than we neither is Is Good from society as well. So he's not ready works for us as a company. This is positive facility. It's positive Businesses well than ticks. The boxes site True like the cream in Masa Costco today in the HR is in the same thing with the boost background on the right. One of the things I if I come on Lou understand node last with them just you as how. How important is the fact that I can learn as much from civilian as they can to meet in because of Mike Of Him Mr Missile. Bring such different buckles. Experiences can cost training experience that otherwise they would otherwise never asked me on on a mix as much better more productive yet not so eat. So how many people said we got twenty five people when we go bottle Greg? The next year or side said that was why we decided we did. We didn't invent a Formula One A Soul Awareness Diet after which is nice and then we met some people that They recommended this event. We saw the covenant and stuff. I'm we think Yes in our ROUCE TIXX. Mas- many agents weekends died Other agencies that CC fans people want to help us Alba James Comey. Yeah I know James from before I'm GonNa you've done some of this full truck and causes us. What's good about this? Veterans expansion concerned seems to me that companies whether veteran owned companies and on who just employing veterans all support veterans the likes communication between companies. Who might otherwise be competitive. It's very vague. Plus lines yet occasion so when I said I mentioned you about another company. Celebrate today even though they're all of or you they maiden maybe advice. Vice Yeah. She's got positive. We definitely found that tonight as really nice atmosphere is than some of the guys used. Baking got attempts and stuff. Even everyone needs a help they would want WanNa Unite. That would be a transaction Leaks from a script. Where can people find out more about figure so they can just look up the figuring show online on facebook or on Taught vigorous show find a new gas on the. Yeah on anywhere Is Contacted Mayo? Mark The Figaro show we can talk about genie's a page on all the front while website is go job opportunities but there's a lot more than the jobs that are actually own that semi things that interested in classic cars and they WanNa join team on join a coach in unite. They can do productive work and feel good when they go bad even if they haven't got the skills that we love to just talk to them that obviously we've got moth that will help transition Z. Stomach Ginny and we'd love to help people on grow outings. If you look. Thanks very much. Thanks about him.

Iraq general manager Bob Dole Bacchus Toby toby Russillo Nps Becker WanNa Unite van project manager Stroke Worksho James Comey Egypt Attleboro facebook Prato Oscar reservist Exxon Rich infantry
New Relic's Mark Weitzel on creating open developer communities

Inside Intercom Podcast

26:51 min | 1 year ago

New Relic's Mark Weitzel on creating open developer communities

"Hey there I'm jeff and welcome to inside Entercom as we keep building out the intercom platform so the teams can customize intercom for their own needs we loved getting to know the Great Group of Developers and Partners Building apps for our customers and for themselves. I had a platform partnerships here intercom so every day I'm thinking about ways that we can support those developers and make it as easy as possible for them to bill useful and valuable APPs quickly so I invited Mark White Soul G._M.. Of New Relic one to join me on the show today a lot of companies including US at ENTERCOM use new relic to monitor their back end systems and I've long admired the extensive ability Elodie of their platform and the strong developer community that mark and his team have built up in our conversation. We talked about what it takes to start a developer program from the ground up and the strategies that have helped new relic create a true community experience for their partners developers first and customers. Mark's got some great advice for anyone working on partnerships and Deverell strategies. If you enjoy this episode make sure to check out others by subscribing to our show on the podcast player of your choice so without further ado let's head into the studio welcome to the show Mark <hes> you have been working a longtime and platform and so we're really excited to hear all your experience here today thank you. I'm super excited to be here and welcome to my home city of Durham Yeah as awesome that I kind of worked out that I was on these as well and could drive down and meet you in person here so I'm happy to be here so I guess with that kind of experience in mind. I'd love to hear a little bit about how your career grew over time and how you ended up at new relic sure you know I I was thinking about this this podcast in my my journey to to new relic and it really started here in North Carolina. When I started working for IBM a number of years ago I had the opportunity to start and lead an open source project at the eclipse foundation interestingly enough around systems management and it was there that I I really discovered this passion and this joy of working transparently and openly with developers and from there that that led to working also at I._B._M.? Where I was leading the open social foundation we were looking at really interesting web based technologies that were emerging in the consumer space that would really really apply to the enterprise and it was at that time I I met a lot of the team at Jive and found out that they were doing some really interesting work around unlocking the power of collaboration and you're sort of enterprise social graph <hes> that you have and they were they were building an ecosystem of applications and needed to build an ecosystem of developers and they were doing this around <hes> open social and really around open standards based to to pull in that that set of developers that was used to building things in the consumer space and I got excited about that join jive after a brief stint at sugar? Doing you know sort of the same thing of building platforms ecosystem awesome <hes> some mild colleagues at Jive that were at new relic said Hey we're. We're accelerating our platform journey. We want to open up our platform. We're looking for somebody who understands developers and can relate to developers has has built a platform. That's extensible has worked in open source in an oh by the way also built a partner ecosystem so we're looking for that if you're interested and of course I was and being a great journey that's fantastic and I mean new relic has such it's a great company. We've used and looked up to new relic longtime at entercom and so I think it's great to get to kind of pick your brain over the stuff so I guess you know let's let's shift gears into that and talk a little bit about new relic. <hes> you know new relic has always offered ways for developers to plug it solutions turns into their own APPS <hes> principally at least in the beginning <hes> very much for monitoring their applications and understanding what's happening. <hes> you know in your production environment. How has that changed over time and you know how have you guys accelerated that opening of the? Platform Yeah I if you if you look at I guess <hes> you know more than ten years now. The the portfolio has really really grown and adopted and changed as the industry's change right you know we now have mobile and synthetics and things like got in our portfolio sweet but if we step back and look at the the larger trend in the industry right it's absolutely amazing the pace of change in our industry <hes> at this point <hes> I._D._C. Recently said that by twenty twenty two half of the global economy is going to be digital. You know that's that's incredible to think we've reached the point where half the economic activity in the world is going to flow through technology and this this is really transforming fundamentally the every business in the world. We we talk about you know every company being US Opera Company. That's that's true. It's it's incredible. Yeah and these changes are hard. I mean let's think about the lift that it takes for teams to migrate a traditional application which there's hundreds of thousands of them out there still into a micro services architecture in the cloud. It's it's really hard and and teams today. Don't really a half just focus on a few things in production that you need to pay attention to. It's it's thousands and in some of our larger customers millions of things you have to pay attention to so these these environments have exploded in all all of those things all of that complexity that we've introduced those pieces have to work flawlessly together and you. You've got to watch them. You have to know and understand it. I go back to the tweet that as lou is introducing Lucerne A._R.. Our C._E._O.. CEO is introducing new relic one. You know he plays this tweet up that said we replaced our monolith with micro services so that every outage could be more like a murder mystery yeah so true that's true you know. This is the problem. That's this is the complexity that's facing our customers and this is the problem that we're we're trying to solve helping our customers. Make sense at these complex environments and opening up our platform being more open for developers that that's a key first step of that yeah that's amazing rising I mean I think you've hit along a lot of topics. We've covered here on the podcast before you know software eating the world and I think a lot of our listenership and it's easy for us in tech to forget that so much of business is not technology I or digitally native a lot of these businesses are one hundred years old or fifty years old and they're really having to transition these old processes and old pieces of software into cloud products that are very very large scale in comparison to what even some of the large startups have built absolutely. It's an interesting problem for sure so you mentioned they're kind of in passing you know new relic one. I know you guys have just announced a release of new relic one which promises to kind of make new relic completely completely programmable what made you guys decide that and maybe you could give us a little bit of insight into what it means to be completely programmable sure <hes> if we think about this and we we think about the complexity that's happening. Now you know the these environments have changed in the and you have to pay attention to lots and lots of things you know you've got your lambda functions. Your containers your hose all of these things to new relic these are these are entities that that we think about you need to watch and pay attention to them. In production new relic one is really the industry's first entity centric observability platform it helps you make sense of the fragmented things inside of Your Organization Organization it pulls those all together and it helps you better understand <hes> these increasingly complex pan enterprise interdependent system and it's the tool that we believe will you know lay the foundation station for the next decade of growth at new relic and help our customers deliver the outstanding customer experiences that directly impact their their business value goal so I guess it's not <hes> it takes that step of monitoring you know quite a bit further. Sharon says you're not just there to monitor sort of your your system software because software has become every part of your business. You're really monitoring every part of your business and how every part of your business interacts with with each other thus right and and looking at new. Relic from programmable standpoint one of the things we're doing is making it easier to to collect data from multiple sources integrate those things into your workflows and with our programmable U._i.. That's going to be coming later this year one of the things you'll be able to do as visualize that in new and compelling ways that are very tailored to your business. It's it's speaking your language if you will that's fantastic so obviously developers are a really big part of new relic and over the last year. Are you really led the launch of new relic developer program for companies that are looking to start their own developer enablement program or just you know <hes> developer platforms. What types of things should they be considering? How would you recommend a go about thinking about that? That kind of initial startup phase yeah. This is a really interesting question and one that I've done now a few places I think first and foremost you you have to have executive buy in and executive support you have to realize is that you know developer. Program isn't a website and develop. A program isn't a forum where people can ask questions right. It's a it's a long term investment that you're betting your business on and so first and foremost you have to have that <hes> executive support and executive commitment were very fortunate new relic that we we've got that I think the other part of that is then you really need to understand your objectives. <hes> and you know here's a great example at at Jive. We didn't really have a developer ecosystem so a big part of what we were trying to do is attract developers in this case it was from you know consumer space using open social attract them into the platform. Take that expertise and apply it to building applications on an enterprise social collaboration platform at new relic developers are our customers so we're looking at. How do we better enable? How do we you know better provide the tools that they need because <hes> developer acquisition in this particular case is in our our primary goal? We want new developers. Obviously we want people to come to the platform but developers our customers and we need to we need to serve them. Another aspect that we think think of and I was thinking about this as as we were getting ready is the the notion of platform readiness and you you really need to be honest with yourself of where you are and I go back to that. The first met Demirel con in London A._P._I.. Piano Dachshund London and I went back to Christiano bettas session. You know where he did the A._P._i.. Tear down you know everybody writes their developer portal down on a piece of paper and puts it in a hat and he he draws one out tonight. It's terrifying it is terrifying lying right and so there you see in real time somebody going through your your first twenty minute experience. You're you're seeing them interact in front of everybody. You know what it's like to participate in your developer program and that's ads like you said terrifying because you're going to have hundreds or if you're lucky thousands of Cristianos a day so you've got to be ready to put your name in a hat your platforms gotta be ready and and you need to be honest with yourself of where you are in in that process in that journey another aspect that I like to think of is what's the impact to developers. If you are a platform company and you realize that developers don't necessarily get paid hey to build things on your platform. They get paid to do their job and build their software and deliver their software. So the total cost of ownership isn't just they can build something really cool in need on my platform really quickly. It's how does that get get maintained and how does that evolve and how does that grow and your platform can't break go a little bit back to that readiness Zammit like is you have all those things need to be stable endurable in that that cost of ownership has to be very low yeah. It's even more true if you're dealing with the I._S._V. Partners who WanNa make money off your right your ecosystem so it really is you're building a long term relationship when you're getting into building platforms and working with developers and you have to look at it as such from the very beginning absolutely and and as part of that it helps to establish this this notion of some guiding principles and and what are the important things because when when developers come to your your site they work with your developer portal or you're the tools that. You provide and your your platform. They're really interacting with your brand and this is a very public representation of who you are and there's going to be visually lots of ways you engage with conferences like we met up Carell con speaking at domain specific things like devops days open source code that you contribute as a set of examples workshops that you do to enable your instilling in representing your brand in a way that's that's unique to a very distinct audience developers and it new relic. We tried to establish a set of guiding principles for us because so many people so many teams interact with with our customers you know the first one we laid out was this notion of all developers being equal. All developers are created equal and that's the idea that you create a platform whether you're in the new relic <hes> you know whether your new relic employee or a customer Zimmer or a developer at a partner. You're using the same tools. You're using the same A._p._I.'s you're you're using the same things there's this notion of equality across the platform so you guys advocate really for having your internal teams dog fooding reading using those A._p._i.'s to build everything that they build for you know the you know your own internal product absolutely and that's our goal right and this is a guiding principle and let's let's be honest with each other. Sometimes these these are tough to adhere to of course and software making isn't always pretty but if you establish that principle it starts to establish discipline of separating the platform out which gives you the ability to hear to A._p._i.. Contracts which gives you the ability to evolve and move faster so the more that you are that self consuming dog food or drinking your own champagne whichever euphemism we want to use the stronger your platform ends up becoming yet you know another another guiding principle for us is we're striving to be more open. We're striving to become a more open company. That's that's contributing to open source and consuming open source engaging gauging and open standards. We Join C._N._C. off a number of years ago. I guess I guess about a year or so ago. We joined C._N._c. off so we did that so we had to give away to engage the community at a at a at a different level and bring some of our thought leadership and learn from other companies that are there so we're working to be more open in favor working openly where we can that doesn't mean we're going to open source everything obviously <hes> but it does mean we're going to try to engage engage more openly and the last one in this is this is one. That's really I think probably <hes> for me the the most important one which is you know working with new relic must be joyful. You have to have that sense of accomplishment compliment. You know think about that first twenty minutes when you a counter and you like I want to try something in an all of a sudden it works. You're like wow I did that. That was awesome. What's next and you get that I cite man yeah and you feel like you're being productive and driving value to the business in a union new and unique way? That's a joyful experience like that's that's the energy and excitement. I want new relics developer program to instill in every person that touches our A._p._i.. Absolutely yeah we recently had C._C.. A._C. from slack on the podcast and she mentioned something similar in in the sense of <hes> you know you're you're trying to make the process simple and easy and you know <hes> effortless for the consumers of the platform and the users of the platform but you also are are there to sort of instill some of your brand and instill some of that <hes> some of your personality I guess into the relationship as well and it sounds like that's exactly what some of these principles are driving towards is exactly what those principles are driving towards this is I mean you guys obviously have a strong set of principles ables here to start with but <hes> how hard was it to get to those was that you know. was there a ton of internal debate around that. was that an exact level thing. Was it a ground level. You know in the team amongst themselves kind of deciding that or how did that play out internally it. You know it's really interesting. <hes> there was really no debate about that last one right you know everybody understands that that we're here because we all have this love affair with software raw passionate developers right so making that a a joyful exciting experience that was a no brainer and it's almost like stating the obvious you know some of the others like we talked about like building softwares hard. You know deciding for example on the do we open up A._P._I.. That we use proprietary early because it you know favorites <hes> those are those are hard decisions right. All we're yeah billing software isn't isn't always the prettiest thing <hes> if you will and so there's there is a lot of debate about that. What what does it mean to have everybody created equal and and what does it mean to consume our own platform but <hes> we had a lot of discussions about that really at multiple levels of the organization Okay and in the end you guys felt like you kind and I've came to a common understanding of what you know created equal means and what openness looks like and that sort of thing we did and this is this is part of our journey? This is part of our journey is as maturing as a developer platform as as becoming engaged gate you know and engaging our community more these are guiding principles and we strive for those principles were not always perfect but this is what we're striving for excellent so I guess just to get down onto the nuts and bolts of it. I'd love to hear a little bit about how your team is set up and how the developer program runs at new relic so just I guess you know give the listeners a quick overview of what your org looks like and <hes> and how you guys do what you do sure I'll I'll talk specifically about the developer ecosystem part of our organization and really we think about that as you know what's what's required to enable our core platform so these are the tools the A._p._I.'S S._e._k.'s things like that that we that we build to enable developers to extend our platform and then we think about things that are built using that again going back to that all developers are created equal when we start to build or integrations on top of that we want to be using the same tools same process the same methodologies that we expect our customers to do so this notion of of integrations built on top of the platform would be another sort of slice of how we think about that and then obviously there's our advocacy evangelism and enablement aspect of this where we go out and and try to bring some of our thought leadership to our customers and developers showing them the best practices on how to build onto the platform extend the platform in and get more value out of it okay so in in listening to what you were saying there mark it seems like not only are you sort of building your internal organ you're trying to enable developers but you're really focused on building a larger developer community and and that spans not only from the obvious which is people building on the platform and your customers who are using the platform to do their own jobs but also to your internal teams who are effectively forced to be part of the community by that guiding principle of all developers being created it equal so how do you think about community and creating a great community experience and then also why is that community such an important part or such an important factor to the success of a platform yeah you know this is <hes> as I think about this we see as organizations start to adopt devops practices <hes> and start to to really become more agile and and and try to deliver innovation faster you know we're seeing developers having this increasingly important seat of the table in deciding the tools and platforms that they use and more and more these decisions that were seeing are not based on features and capabilities that pop up out of the box. You know you you turn it on the lights lights. Go on <hes> but it's also how well you can integrate with other applications that are important to their business how how you fit into their tool chain and ultimately how you become come you know the seamless part of their business. You know when you're when you're struggling because you've got a fire because your systems are down. The last thing you want to be doing is is trying to figure out and bounce between multiple systems right you want. Intuitive Way to navigate and solve that problem quickly and this is you know a key part of why we're striving so hard to create this joyful developer experience and provide the right sets of tools and A._p._I.'s that make it easy for teams to to work with new relic to get data in and out of our platform so they can integrated into the workflows and their processes <hes> and we we believe this fosters innovation. We believe that it helps modern teams deliver faster with much much more confidence and that's really at the core of why we're building our our developer platform and providing the tools S._e._K.'s that that complement our products and I think we're seeing you know this is this is why customers and our partners have rely on new relic by like inner comments the ability to have that extensive ability to simplify deployment the automation integrate with incident response and really deliver faster with confidence. It's it's exciting. It's an exciting space to be yeah so I mean I guess you know the the sum total of all those pieces means that <hes> you know this community of developers and people using new relic are are you know they're doing it because there's joy in it. They're doing it because it makes their lives easier and then because of that they're kind of helping each other. Get better at using this tool as well or passionate about software right. We're we're in this business because we're passionate about building building innovative solutions and more passionate about software. I mean you know my my first computer. I might be dating myself was an apple two. I'm programming in basic like this is this is awesome stuff so yeah. We've we've come a long way since then but thankfully thankfully but a lot of ways not so far yeah but it's it's exciting and this this change in the industry and what's happening now. In the ability to innovate you know is it. It's just opening up so many opportunities of for everybody and and when you when you build that software you need to understand what's going on with it right absolutely so tell us what's next for new relic in for new Alex Developer Platform Norman developers system sure you know we we started this podcast. You know thinking about this change in the industry in this this complexity that's happening as you know we we make this shift towards everything being digital right. We talked about half the G._D._p.. Moving through software that that's incredible and for companies that are that are going to survive in this world you have to change the way you think you gotta play offense with software and you have to think about the the things that you're developers create as strategic assets that give you a competitive advantage right because who builds that software developers yeah yeah gallopers and engineers and so we're we're going to continue due to open up our platform. We're going to continue to make it easy for developers to to send data from multiple data sources that that aren't just new relic data sources. We're going to continue to expand our A._p._i.. Coverage make our platform richer and deeper are and provide a set of tools and capabilities on top of that that accelerate your ability to to innovate and then we're really going to drive this notion of innovation through our programmable user interface. That's GONNA open up an incredible amount of of thought leadership and innovation on our platform to create new and exciting solutions. You know we we believe and you've heard Lou Cerny talk about this. We believe the world deserves serves more perfect software and program ability is the future of new relic. That's going to help us get there amazing. You know one of the things that I think is great about listening to how you talk about the platform as it so intertwined with the product a new relic and building thing software as sort of what your product helps enable and your developer platform helps also enable that and and so it's it's such an intertwined thing. It's you know it's product. It's platform its ecosystem. It's developers and so I think this has been a really great conversation and a really interesting take on talking about platforms and talking about developer community so thanks so much for joining us today and yeah can't wait to share this with our listeners. It's been great. Thank you very much for having me. Thanks for listening to the inside Intercom.

New Relic developer partner Jive relic Durham Lou Cerny IBM North Carolina US Mark White Entercom executive Deverell A._p._I. murder Elodie US Opera Company
Cleared Hot Episode 67 - Sean Evangelista

Cleared Hot

1:54:44 hr | 1 year ago

Cleared Hot Episode 67 - Sean Evangelista

"This. We're gonna go. So most of the time I do like a ad Redon. Like this episode is brought to you by whatever and whoever. But since you're sitting right here, we can just do the ad read and right now. So this episode will you brought to you by thirty seconds out. And what's the killer going to be? Take Lert hot. That's what it is. And it'll be good for. Let's call ten percent off. Let's see twenty twenty percent one time use. Yeah. One time per customer. Okay. One time per customer. Does it matter if it's upper case or lower case? So okay, all lowercase. So thirty seconds out as she you know, what you explain thirty seconds out. Dear God, damn add earn your keep. Yeah. Right. So. Yeah. Thursday. Our basically just military pop art and calm just taken the funny ideas and experiences of being in the military and doing commando shit and putting it on tees and sort of like a sort of a funny way where to the point where a lot of people. They look at it. And they're like, I don't get it. And I'm like, that's fine just move along. But it wasn't that kind of what you're shooting for. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Because if you're if you're if you're making stuff, I think for you know, if you make it for everybody on everybody gets it. You're like, you really don't have you don't have a niche like what are you? What are you saying what do you putting out there? So all right. So where can they find you? Go to thirty seconds out dot com. It's spelled out the correct zero. Yeah, I spell it out RT y thirty seconds out or you can do three zero s UT. But if you just riff, you just type it in thirty seconds out. It'll pop up cleared hatsuko twenty percent off one time use. That's it. All right. And that's the Audrey stun, boom. Brought to you by thirty seconds out. Smoke. North. Schmaltz danger close now. Has for the podcast. I was thinking about this. I don't know where to start. Because we have to honestly, we have more things that we could talk about that. I have room on the sim card. Where should we begin? I'm gonna let you choose. I just come out of the gates and talk about night, you got hit. All right. Well, the last episode with Evan. We came out of the gates hot too because he was talking about Spartans in their leisure time activity with each other clothing. Optional right out of the gate. Thirty seconds Senate. He's just was just hammering away at the Spartan culture. I'm like, and then and then it happened. He goes, can you say this on the podcast, and man, it's it's the internet just fire away. All right. Cool. It's so we'll start with the one of the worst days of my life. That's awesome. I'm gonna let you had a worse day than that. I can see possibly, but why don't believe absolute. So I try to say not use the terms always never. So I'll say that was the second worst night just because leaves room that there could have been a worse like Ed Herzog is the second funniest person. I know because I've never met everybody. So he's right up there. And there might be somebody out there who's funnier than Ed. I don't think so. But I put him at number two. So I'll let you you can fire it off. Yeah. So so like, I was a new guy you have to start the story right though, what? So no shit. There were. No. That was that was my second appointment and in the first appointment was, you know, wasn't as sporty as this one was going and. And I was like the new guy in the team actually like I was actually really stoked that I got to go on on the to be in your guys team. I was too. I wasn't supposed to be because I wasn't. So actually, I never use names guys almost I get their permission express four. So. I names would probably be okay. But I wasn't in Jodie's team. You know? So I was lucky to go as well too. Because they kind of did a little bit of a draft which was good. I ended up there. Because of will. I ended up in Jody's team. I think because I got into a fight, right? When I got to I remember that night. I wasn't out at night. But I remember you telling the story of cutting your way through like a bisque weaned barrier. Like, you small small portions of any with some hand hand combats go. In. Yeah. So I got pulled. I got I got that's how I got picked for the team. I think is no I don't think I know some one guy goes I want to do with the black guy just got in a fight. And I only been in the team for a week and a half. Yeah. Well, that was your trip. I wasn't I wasn't handcuffed. So we can happen. I'm like, that's it. That's that's a good run. Now, there goes we all day. Terrible. So you went through selection. Oh, three what team? Did you come from before that or two? That's right. You were an east coast guy. I was but I started out s if you wanted to why what class were you the one ninety three. I thought. Well, okay. All right. So my brands scrambled. And I thought you were in the mid two hundreds no one ninety three I'm actually gonna make it to like we're gonna probably hit three three ninety three three yelled bureau by Mike. I'll go to Coronado for that Greg class. Graduation your two hundred class. Yeah. Two hundred later. All right. So since we're already completely off track of that night. Anyway. All right. So okay. But that's good. So. I would have thought we. So what you're joint you must have joined ninety three. Okay. Interesting high school. Where'd you grow army brats moved all over in Hawaii a lot for like a long time for eight years when I was a kid when I was like two to when I was tennis. Okay. So STV one was I going back home. Yeah. You had a way I didn't really want to go to away. But. Kind of lived there. And I wanted to go to the east coast, but I never choice. L? Would you put on your dream sheet? Two four eight I did too and I got five so I realize it's not really a dream sheet. It's just put on waste your time. Putting something on a piece of paper. And then they I think they threw darts, and it's like five seven like there was no rhyme or reason to whatsoever. So you were an army brat would your parents think about the navy choice. They were there. They didn't care. They're they're they're just glad ahead some direction didn't wanna talk into like green bean era ranger. Well, I mean in high school like I was you know, I did like I was dead this another scared straight program where they would like get kids that were having problems, and they would take him to a prison, and there's the prisoners like I will rape, you will yell and you leave scared, and then you fix your life. I did that in high school. So as a part of that group. Yep. And so I think my parents are a little concerned about what what the hell I was going to do. But I kind of knew what I was going to always going to go either graduate high school moves Jackson Hole and search start skiing snowboarding or I was going to try for the seal teams. I didn't know what I was. So I was like relatively the same thing. Yeah. Really close. Yeah. Okay. Wow. And so you came in buds STV STV to team two team to to selection. And that's where we like. Yeah. Because I think the first time I ever met you was probably at that trip. It mid self. We rolled out in the morning. Yeah. Full on China. It was pretty awesome. And that was from a cop. Yeah. Yeah. It was it wasn't from anybody hitting me as when I got tackled by the cops and cuffed in night. My the dude hit me like a linebacker running from one of the bouncers around the corner. So hold on just tell the goddamn store since this. One sounds good to we'll get to the other one later tell the whole story. So, you know, your new guy you show up, and this is our first trip and in their, you know, we're all drinking, and Memphis, and or Beale street, whatever it's called. Yeah. Yeah. And some there's some scuffle with some of our guys and some people there, and so definitely wasn't started by our guys though. Yeah. Oh, no. No, no. They they knocked our halos often. We got mad. Yeah. Yeah. You guys are at the bar just reading the bible, right, right? Okay. Just making sure. And so I get grabbed by one of the senior guys. He's like he's like eight you come with me. I'm like, okay. You know, you're a new guy you just you just go along. Right. And so he's he's like he's like we. We gotta go find this guy or whatever. That's you know, he punched one of our dudes or something I'm like ADEMA what happened like, okay? So you down there. So we find the guy in a bar sitting there. And we're kind of waiting in. So. Kind of waiting as adding up an ambush. Well, yeah. A little bit. So so so the news in there. He's he's having drinks. We're having drinks in the corner, and is waiting to see what happens or we're just gonna wait till he goes outside to confront him about what happened earlier in like gets answers or whatever. And so the a wild goes on the were there for like an hour or something and everyone gets tired of waiting like we're over it. We're leaving. So if I stayed so I stayed there. And the dude goes in the bathroom some like, okay, I'm gonna follow this guy in the bathroom. So I go in that go in the bathroom and knowing followed me in there because I don't think they thought it was serious. And so I go in the bathroom and the guy was taking a leak, and I'm like, well, I don't want to punch the skyways taking a leak. I gotta get at least give them like a man on man. See me. I see you. I'm not going to sucker punch. Anybody just because I don't I don't believe in that. So the guy comes out he looks at me. And then I just started. We started fighting. And this point, you know, we're all Superdrug. And so this other dude in the bathroom jumps on me, grabs me a random third party jazz. It's a random dude, grabs me, I'm on the floor in the bathroom. And then and I'm thinking at this point like I gotta get out of here because the cops are coming. I know the governor coming and so I get up break out of that like just grapple my way out of his grips in my drunken stupor, I run out and I see the bouncers like the big bouncers heading this bent me in half running towards me. And that's my saw like the the plastic they had. And so I just of like weasel my way, I don't know what I don't toward or whatever just this is such an asshole story. Get out of the plastic. And I'm and I'm not in good shoes to be running. I'm in. I'm in like, I mean, not mountaineering boots. But I mean these thick winter boots, and I start running and I'm like, oh, no, I am this is gonna cinderblocks under your like clunk clunk clunk. And so I've started running bounces or behind me. There's like two or three ounces. Remind me so run out run run behind the bar. Come back on the street that double back some kind of like circling looking for anyone. I know like I'm looking for the other dues like Where'd you guys? Go. Coming down his right. Isn't coming back on any of the Bill street this cop. He hits me. Like like, Terry Tate office linebacker. Yep. He just cold locks me and just grabs my arms, and I'm just like airborne in my face to smashes into the cobblestones. And that's where the white guy came from nice and dude cuffs me. And then I see the other guy who are who are after who you're fighting. Right. The guy just fought in dumb. So they're like, hey, do you want to press charges or something? No, not like, well, he doesn't want to press charges either. So you guys you go home now. Yeah. Like, don't your evenings over serve. Yeah. You're done here. Yeah. So I took that I got uncuffed, and I was super lucky because if I had gone to jail, if they would have brought me I would have been done that would have been kicked out for sure now they would have given you options like chicken or steak window or aisle, which one he wanted your. He wanted your way out of here choices they would have all terminated near the checked button though, for sure. Yeah. That's I actually remember. Yeah. That shiner we working up to train many trips the mid south. I'm like, all right, cool. Yeah. Okay. Fast forward two thousand five February fifth soya ended up get pulled onto give on the team with you guys. And they're like we're going to go to Iraq. And so I was superstar obviously, like, I'm sure you were too. Yeah. Yeah. We're stoked and it was a good time to go. Because it was what was just slow where we were going to go or slow slower because it's still detail under the time it would have been slow, and it was it was like as an oath three when Iraq. I went down got pretty benign after after the initial invasion of three like guys were you know, hopping and dip in cars and going and get Schwartz in town. Like, no big deal, just carrying pistols. You know, like, we know Afghanistan was the same way. Right. Oh one. Like there was that. I can like I remember my first time in Afghanistan in two thousand into and we went from bog REM to where do we go? We were doing we were augmenting the security detail, and we drove to the yellow house, which is what they call it in a humvee, and then we would cruise around and like thin skin vehicles. Like the exact opposite of what you do. Five years after that. Because I think everybody backpedalled, whoa. Whoa. Whoa. What's going because they were getting crushed mostly because we're about eight centuries ahead, technology wise, and tactic wise, but they backpedaled out of it. And then they slowly started creeping their way back in which is I think what happened in Iraq too. Because it's threw their hands up. Like, hey, we're good here figured out. What was going on? And then the insurgency like drastically different the tactics, we're using oh three for that initial surge or the initial invasion versus even five or substantially different. Oh, totally. And what kind of what happened there too is the? They they basically created a ton of unemployed fighting age males in Iraq. Because if you were on the on the on the side that we didn't like you were fired all of a sudden, no income, and these now now you've got I don't know a couple million fighting age males in the streets with nothing to do and no job, and they've been ostracized from the, you know, the new system. So like, oh, let's form the people what have been going to do. They're going to form groups. They're gonna form tribes gangs and some of them are going to be looking for money. And they're just, you know, you know, the guys we go after they weren't like religious next. They were just thugs the they're there for to get cars, and rob people and you get control and try to try to gain control of a of a region or a Towner. And then there were the the religious fanatic guys. But that left that that vacuum. Those guys had nothing to do. And that's part of like, you know, one of the takeaways that, you know, from the studies Iraq is like, you know, that was a major screw-up. We did we we we didn't give those those people anything. To do when they when they could have been a value. Add in some in some aspect, you know, I think looking back the US military, and I'm sure you'd agree doing what we did. We're very good at going in and breaking things not that that's necessarily our job, but the building and what happens in that vacuum. The US military is not a quick to do that. So I don't know. I mean for myself personally, I think back about Afghanistan Iraq. And I view it from the perspective of like my youngest daughter. Who's tennis? I wonder when you're in college how this is going to be talked about success or failure or victory or I mean, we tactically we would win right? But strategically I don't I don't know. I think the jury is still out on that one. And we'll in the fact that actually I don't think the jury is out the fact that we're still in both of those countries. I mean, where the paper thousand paper cuts, I mean, an occupying force is not gonna it's not sustainable you. We're not going to be able to sit there forever because it's it. It would just drain our resources. We just keep getting drained it when people say how long should we be there? I'm like, well, we still have forces in Korea and Germany and all over the NATO countries in Europe. So it's going to be a piece like pack a lunch if you actually want it to be stabilized in any way, shape or form. So again, February fifth back. This is why it's perfect goes on tangents is is is that what the date February fifth fest. Yeah. I remember it. I'm not surprised that you don't it was it was kinda seared into my head. Nelson. We. Yeah. Like with the you know, we've been doing some good rates at that point. And I I'd never pulled the trigger on anyone until that night. You got hit. But I remember when we started that out that night we were out, and it wasn't very far from where we're at in Baghdad like, it was the exit took the panders. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. We rolled it was gaffed it, you know. Green vehicles basically through the burning ship piles. Yep. Yep. Yep. And we're like we just driving over the medians and everything, and it was it was it was pretty an anarchy. Pander? There are no rules, right? When you have not to machine guns. You can go over the median and people get out of your way and nobody's driving in downtown Iraq or downtown Baghdad in the middle of the night. And having like this was this was probably the most up to up to that point. And I was so put at the top of one of the most confusing layouts of living area that that that I've been to cause remember how confusing it was there was no pattern. There is no about that particular house. No, I'm talking about like that that neighborhood into when we were trying to find those dudes well because we walked past the house really, did, you know? I mean, I remember I was I was up front walking in front of Jody, and we were kind of split in that dude ran across the alley 'cause I remember going past that house and there were no goddamn lights on right? And we went, and I don't remember we chase the guy in we made entry. I remember shotgun going off somewhere, which is gonna wake up everybody. Coming back down. That alley ladder goes up. The widget. Do was doing the widget stuff. And it was a it was a low wall to it was probably what seven foot wall was very high low all in comparison to most of the walls area. Yeah. It was only the second rung of the ladder staring at that window for like the ten minutes. Just looking at it never saw shadow. Never saw anything move nothing. And then would you guy was like, this is it, okay? And then you went over it would that point. We're like you would over the wall. I correct right gives you and then I think I was second. And didn't think scoop is behind us. Yep. Yeah. Because I think there were only three of us in the courtyard when it kicked off. Yeah. Yup. And then I remember you because I remember that light that light was on right now in that room. Yeah. And then you you see the dudes in the room and the TV was on. I never saw that. Oh, you didn't. Because I knew so remember the layout of the house where no there's the door the window, and like kind of like a classic American house where it had that part the jutted out where the garage will be there was that blacked out window there. I'm like, okay. Let's I knew I was gonna hold security for you to police the breach. But I'm not going to turn my back on that. Dr. So I was actually looking in that like in soon as I shifted my head to look at dark that window Chit got a little wild. 'cause we we. So when we first hopped over the rewind like a couple just a couple of moments because when we first got in there, we were lit up. There was like all that junk in the yard. So we were kinda hiding there was some good shadows that low crap. And then I think I think I made eye contact with you, and we're looking and we saw that shadow line, basically where that corner of the carport. And like, dude, let's go to the shadow like this is not a good spot. Because like I remember seeing the guy's head's in. There. I remember multiple dudes. And I'm like, oh, there's a bunch of dues in there. And so is when we got up to move to go to the right when I got to the corner. That's when he opened up and in all I saw was just eight just the flags. Those is looking at the window. Just saw the flashing like in slow motion struck duck doctor, and I thought for sure I was going to get hit how far away would you say it was twenty no more than twenty five feet. Yeah. It was close. Not meters feet. It was really close like you. You could smell his gun. You could smell it. When it went off, and you were to my left and scoop is over to my right? And I remember you disappearing out of the corner of my eye like you were gone. And I was like because I I was I was kind of keeping tabs a little bit. You know, you're kind of we're we're making sure we're, you know, we were other at and then you're gone, and we didn't know at the time, but scoop had been shot through the hand and stopped in this plate. But dude, he was he was he was a beast. He didn't say anything about it until the very end. And he's like, hey. I think I think I gotta talk to somebody and he had shot some count day. I'm like he's like, I'm not really shot. I just got like it's just through my hand like your you were fully shot, dude. Yeah. You gotta go. But yeah, so you disappeared, and then scoop dumped his MAG, and I got to the corner. And then the dude was like looking out the window. Like he was that guy was fully engaged, which he was I'd so I never saw him. I heard so the only time I've ever had that sensation of time truly slowing is. I heard the round the first one in it hit me high up on my leg. Right. Just barely missed my femur. And I remember my first reaction. I remember my hand like swinging down to grab it because I'm sure we'll talk about my love of direct pressure. So I remember my hand swinging down to grab it. But before my hand hit it. So my entire leg felt like a funny bone strike. And then it just I couldn't move it. So before my hand touched the side of my leg. I was like, okay, cool. I'm dead and five minutes because it's just powdered my internal my leg. It's going to bleed out inside of my watch for moral out. Totally. So it hit that. And as I was falling. I just here. And as I got into the car time sped back up, and it was like, boom, boom bump up up on my holy shit. But held direct pressure the entire time. It was excellent. It was excellent work priority and people listen to this and be like, what are you talking about? We'll get to that phase of the story in a minute. And oh, yes, we get. So guess scoop scoops out he's changing the MAG? So I get up to the corner. So I got a spot now. So I had a good corner. Good cover, you know. But that light was the killer man, we were so lit up, and then so I would I would lean out, you know, put pump five or six rounds into there and the guy would duck, and we did this whole like it was like it was like a TV show church. Trading fire. Like, our we go through to in. He would shoot back and it was like rounds were skipping off the corner. And then I would lean out in pop, and then he would shoot back. And then I go, oh, I'm going to juke him. So I I go home. I I lean out like, I'm gonna shoot. And then I roll back, and I don't do anything. And then I'm just I'm looking I could see he was looking wondering, why didn't shoot. And I'm like, I got him. And that's what I just put just filled him up. And then someone else in the room started screaming. I don't know if it was his friend. But it wasn't him. He did. And then there was just some wailing in the room. Like, I think it was maybe it was like as I don't know buddy or something. Well, that point two guys back over the wall that we had climbed over they were engaging to as well. So I don't think you're the only one I mean like who knows who else? Could it got piece? Yeah. Yeah. Totally. Yeah. And then you're like, you're like do you give me out of your Yuliya stuck under bar, dude? I thought like in. Here's the old tactic. Right. You're like we got to win the fight first before we're going to expose ourselves. And I looked at where you were because I saw you under the car in the first thing I thought it was like why is he under the car? Do you crawl under there? No, I put. So when it hit me. I'll send you a picture the belt. So the second round he shot at me burn my belt for about four inches, and the copper jacket is still attached to the belt. So because it hit me in the side and spun me towards him, and I pushed off with my good foot. My right one, which is what sent me flying towards the car. So I hit on my back and slid underneath it like it. Somehow my gun was under me because maybe I thought two hands direct pressure. So I probably just through my gun down. It was grabbing for it. But I'm hung up underneath the undercarriage of the car on my shotgun. Bungee like. Yeah. Underneath me. And I'm like trying to push out to get out from underneath the car. And all I see is from the window. Just do and I couldn't get out. That's I'm like, dude. Give me out of here. Yes. So like, you we wanted to get you out right, obviously, get a medic, but the medic did want. They've made a good call the medic didn't run in because he didn't have good visibility on. What was going on there? It was smart of him not to just blindly charge into a compound. And he didn't even know where you were. So he'd be running in there. Like literally looking for you. Yeah. Right. So it was good. Call him not running in their plus rounds or still going back and forth. And there's other guys in the room, armed and. I looked at where you were in my thought process at the time was like okay Andy's relatively safe because you're under the car like you're out of sight like you're out of just out of the world tower. So just hanging out out of the. And so my first we gotta we gotta we gotta get take care of these guys. Thank you. You'd get me out of there. If I get hurt the priorities shift. It's get any out win the firefight. And then I'm trying to remember sometimes the order thing. Sometimes get mixed up your head, you know. Well, that's why I wanted you to tell from your perspective because mine could be flawed as well. So there once I think we had it we had we had those guys basically subdued before we went in. And that's when I ran over ran over to you in then we had more guys came in the compound at that point. So we had more guns like providing security, it was a good time because we had we had cover at that point in more manpower. So I looked that's when I came over with my scissors to look at your leg after you drug me out. Yeah in. Yeah. I pulled you out a little bit. So I could because I couldn't deal with you under the car like you were like, I couldn't get out. Didn't like the worse. Scariest environment imaginable, your guns underneath you your pin. And you're just staring at muzzle flash. Like in your shot. Yeah. It's like, I really hope. This guy doesn't get lucky and like go up down a little bit. Because as the only thing that was saving me. It was pure luck. Yeah. Well that that filling that room with with with bullets through they weren't happy about that. Yeah. Yeah. I support that. So yeah, I remember. So I remember just trying to like where is it? Where were you hit, and you, and you're you're holding it, and then in it was your left side, right or left, your left leg and in the I just took the scissors and cut it in. And you're like, how's it look? How's it look in? And I remember going, okay. I'm gonna like thinking I'm going to have to tell him one thing. And then the medic the other thing, but I wasn't smart enough at the moment to figure out that you were going to hear what I said to the medic outside 'cause you relive you. Yelling. Yeah. He because he's he's like he's a cow. Is it? How's it look in in and I go and you're like, dude? How is it? How's I'm like, dude, you're fine? It's not that bad. I'm like, and then I go at I remember exactly what I said, I go. He's got a lot of holes in his leg. And you're like what? Because I didn't want to look at it. Because I'm like, I remember you pulling out your trauma. She like, dude move your hand. So I can tell your pants, no even fucking direct pressure. Because I was worried and he said leg I was thinking in my head like on you for moral like that's what I thought for a bleeding. But it was so high up we couldn't put a tournament on it. Anyway. Yeah. How was it? Like bullet like your hip. Solicit your hip socket. Like, you're you're it is undecided. Your hip completely parallel with the socket. Okay. So. Yeah. Really high. There's no way you could have put a tourniquet on it. Yeah. You could've put term like my belly button, which would work out. Right. It was pretty high. Yeah. And then I remembered walking around I remember because we had walked around so much in this neighborhood and just the open the open sewers, and I'm like, I do not want to drag his leg through any of this. Because and then I'm thinking like he's going to get like a major infection die or something. If I drag him for this gusting water that's out here. And then that's when I go to try to put you on my shoulder, and you're like, no just drag me. And that's when and that was like, yeah. That's that's actually smarter, but we'll deal with the infection later. Yeah. And that's when someone else came up, we just did we did the typical like grab grab to handle strap issue strap grabbed that when just drag you back around the corner, and then went back inside and breach the door when inside so I was laying those guys laying outside of the compound listening to all that happen as. The eighteen delta rolled up. He's like all right, cool, and he wraps from curl around it. He's like, you're good. And in my head. I'm like what's going on? Like, this doesn't feel like I'm good. You just put Kurtz on there, which is essentially spongy cloth. And you're telling me, I'm good like, okay, simply have a morphine popsicle like. This is the any any more than this. Well, I had the morphine in my shoulder pocket. You offend. No, right. No law that was pre fennel I wished they would've tape that to my hand. But I had we had auto injectors OK is right. But I had never had any like I thought if I did that as drilling all myself because I had make sure like the eighteen delta, Mike, give me my rifle. I'm like laying in the street, essentially, like at least, let me have my gun. So I feel happy. You're you're still kind of out there. Like, it's it's the target still going on. So all the target happened. And then. It went away that it went the guys were getting medevac helicopters. And when I got put into that, Bradley where the greenest of green medics like he was visibly shaken shaking. Oh, I remember you mentioning that like. His hands were shake. He was shaking. He's like all right. I'm gonna give you an IV. My cool. I give my arm. He whips out at fourteen gauge I'm like, listen, I'm not cool with this. That's the size of a straw for cocaine. I not happy with this, but lake go ahead. He jabs a God. Damn it gets it though. And goes, I don't have a bag prepped and pulls it out, and like you're done for the night, you're done. I just like like there is no one next. I'm like you can ride with us. But don't touch me again. Oh, he was crossing. He was stripped amped out of his mind, cause I mean will scoop, and I probably I can't imagine what we look like we haven't cut her hair and two years. Okay. Well, let's do another side tangent. So scoop so we finished the whole target. Right. We'll get to secure everything's calmed down. And that's when he comes up, and he says something to like us. He's like a I don't think he really knew what described as case. I think something I think I took like a little something or be stung me. Yeah. He didn't really know. And we looked at his hand in the admission shot right through the hand and the. Where it stopped in his plate was I remember afterwards when we had it we kept his kit because you haven't met a back move kit. And we took it back to base, and we looked at it and the the round stopped. It was it was about one inch from the bottom of his plate. It went through a MAG to right or both because then keeps double stacked it might have. Yeah. I think it went through to his four MAGS. And I mean, it was pretty pretty close call. But it was like, you know, one of those things like adrenaline carried him through. He had to have known. He was hit. I think the hand, but he might not because it was it was it was pretty it was pretty rowdy. And if they went everything calmed down his dribbling came down. And he's like, oh, I'm shot through the hand. And I was this was this was a while afterwards. But he didn't want to go. So, you know, I think it'd be good. We can just you know, like because he wanted to stay like who doesn't want to stay right? You don't wanna you don't wanna get med of active. You'll have to hang out and keeping operating. But yeah. So we basically made him get on the, you know, go with you get out of there. At least get looked at by the pros. Bright light in the cleanroom. Yeah. And then we were together for the next was it five or six days all the way through Germany all the way getting back home, which was a bizarre experience in and of itself man, like the medevac process man because it's funny. Like, I got in that pander. I didn't see any of you guys for months like I was just like it was over for me like lift because I'm I'm gonna ask you curious. Did you guys just pack up all of our gear and put it on a rotator flight like 'cause eventually got like I was curious what happened afterwards? No, we pacture guys we pack your stuff because we had to make room because we need a backfill. So we had is that we're gonna fly over from somewhere else. Remember where they came from? But probably yeah. To come over to backfill you guys. So we basically had to clear your bunks out and get ready because it was I think it was only about a week delayed till this guy's got over there. Like, it was the turn. I was pretty quick. So you guys got backfield by two and see how we pack your stuff up, and I don't remember if we if we shift early, but I think we just kept it with us because we're like he's not going to need any of this. I think we may have ship sent like your wallet. And like, maybe some key things all your kit. It just all your major stuff. Yeah. Stayed with us, and we're like, well, let's fly back with it. He's not he's not going to be doing. It doesn't need this. Yeah. I actually don't even remember when when my kid got shed, I think I was still wearing it until we got to the hospital in the green zone, and then it was like the frigging trauma shears came out again like zoo next. What was it like? Yeah. Like, what was that like for you like when you when once you left us like you got in the vehicle, so I got in the painter we got to the green zone about the same time that the Helis the second round of Halley's were meta backing guys out. Okay. So. We all kind of got shuttled into and I've had no morphine at this point. This is a couple of hours because again, I thought if I had a job myself. I'd have been like, I'm like, just useless. I'm sitting there like, this sucks sucks. Actually would hurt me. The most was my ankle because I the neuropathy pain from the doctors don't know if the round clipped my sciatic nerve, or the, you know, the ballistic gel where the shockwaves either way if it was the shockwaves or actually penetrated the nerve it had the same effect short-circuited the nerve all the way down to the terminus point in my ankle. So it felt like my ankle had been just completely hammered on with a sledge hammer. So they we get into the. Waiting room essentially in in the green zone it. I'm in there. Scoops in there. We're in our beds, and you look over and there's a dude handcuffed to his caught like four feet from us. Just looking at us just wide eyed like a rocky dude or like a move. Okay. And somehow they hit just wheeled us into the same room as him. And he's looking at us, and we're looking at him and you see like the doc. He's like we need to get that stretcher out. Yeah. That is wild. Yes. So that guy gets wheeled out. But then there was people guy were talking about last night. He went straight into surgery because it, you know, triage right taken the worst like his portions of his upper upper body were toast. So he went straight into surgery. But as soon as we got in there, and they started working on me. It was like I went from fully kitted out too. But naked in like, twenty seconds. What's going on? Like, everything is cut off. The guy finds like, hey, do you want some more film? Like, yes. Absolutely. He juices me with it. I'm like this is so weak. I wish I would've known I would've taken this hours ago. So it wouldn't have been in agony. And then it was like cat scans. And they started giving me options to like, you know, x Ray cat scan. Do you want us to try to get this metal out of your body? It looks like you have ferrous metal in your body. So we can't give you a MRI because the magnets would uphold on it. Exactly. I said. In my morphine do state. I'm like, so what am I if I leave it in what's going to happen and dockside will it'll just encapsulate itself in calcium. And as long as the stuff doesn't move around and contact a bone. You're gonna be okay, or we could take it out. And I said, well, how would you take it out? It's like, oh awesome. That you asked will knock you out put a tube down your throat in debates, you lay on your stomach, and then we'll hold a two-dimensional x-ray like basically over your ass cheek and starts slicing and peeling and slicing and peeling trying to find the stuff, I'm like, I'll take option a please. And so that was it. They're like, okay. There's there's nothing we can do for you. So they put more collects on it and just kept giving me morphine 'cause I still have never broken a bone. I've had stitches one time in my ear recently. But they never stitched it. They literally said let it scab up with the scab come off and wants to scab comes off you can take a bath again. So I just was that was it today. Let you sleep. Um you'll wake I could not sleep for about the first day and a half just goes in the same time like. The same time. Then it was I didn't notify Jamie. But the time I was in the yeah. My wife the time I was in the emergency room didn't match with the time in VP. It would have been like two in the morning. I'm like, I'm obviously gonna live. Let's not do it does euro to call. So we went into just a room at the hospital. And then the next day. They threw me on a stretcher was skipping. They threw on a Black Hawk and fluids in the middle of the day to buy up. And I waited there for. A day where they were just frigging come over. And just choose me with these amazing amounts of morphine. So I pass out for like four hours a woke up one time. There was like three people standing at the foot of my bed like talking about me point just like right back to sleep. Then they put us on the airplane to Germany, which was a miserable experience. There were people on that airplane in agony the entire flight. And we had one j sock talk between scoop. And I and the guy we were talking about last night. Like, do you need beds? Do you want to ambient like we had our own little pod? And it was the entire length of the aircraft four rose the wall to in the middle and one on the other wall of people that were hurt so casualties did the guy in the rack next to me with standing up in a turt- of a Humby wanna do clocked himself in from everything from his belt line up was completely Swiss cheese. And there was burned victims there were multiple amputee, and they were like inaccuracy screaming like in the getting mad. So that was the. Entire I looked over at the dock. I'm like, hey, can you put me out, please? I don't want to experience this land in Germany. And it's like a twenty minute bus ride to the hospital. So I'm on a stretcher I almost get dropped in a stretcher because now it's like a e for air force poor little twenty two year old girl trying to carry me on a stretcher. So I almost go ask over tea kettle on the stretcher, I put into a fucking white school bus on the autobahn, and we're just sitting there just just bouncing and people who have like erector sets holding their bones together, just like. So they get us to Ramstein. They all get sent off to their wing. I look like I'm a Hobo because I hadn't cut my hair and years like, and they're like, so they put us into different wing, and I ate jello and watched shitty DVD's for like a day scooping. I checked ourselves out of the hospital went to the airport. Got a delta ticket flew back to the New York where teeny weeny Mattis and landed the command like whoa backup. Why did you guys go the civilian route? What what because it was a week until the next rotator. Oh, so you guys you you were stuck there in Germany, correct? Oh, no shit. Yeah. So scoop was in the same room as us, but he spent most of the time at the bar because he was totally mobile. I'm like right on dude. I'm sitting there. He just had a big band is mitt and he would just go put it on the bar and building cocktails. So his experience in Germany was different than mine. I'm just sitting there like I took. I was able to take my first shower. Like, I was able to talk to Jamie, talked my parents like, yeah, it's not the best day of my life. But I'm going to be okay. And then they started like hail rotate will be here in a week. I'm like, that's not acceptable. How how how does how does your wife? Find out. Did I called her man notifier or so you were the first phone call? She got. Yes. Okay. So go. Oh. I was so high on morphine ahead to have somebody dial the phone for me because it was when they moved us to buy up literally like the syringe was this big the docs like you then I'm like, yes. Absolutely. And then he hands me up is a cell phone. I'm like, can you need you to dial this number because I can't I can't do it. And she answer isn't as like, hey, Jamie. How you doing? You know, how it's supposed to be home in two months. I'm going to I'm going to be home. Probably in the next few days. You know, I got shot last night. And I kid you not she goes like in the face. Like, no, I didn't didn't get shot in the face. That was what she said to me. And I did a podcast episode with her and she made it. She was like, yeah. I don't I don't know like, so she notified my parents. But I was able to I talk with her. So which was good. And we I mean, I don't remember a lot of the conversation. We talked about five minutes, and that was like hail seen a few days. Okay. So then you get home, and you and you see her like she met me at as the ramp was coming down or not ramp. Little stairs were coming down on one of the teeny weeny birds. She was sitting there pregnant with her middle son who's thirteen now with Riley, our oldest son in a stroller. And it's like the most surreal, you know, forty eight to seventy two hours before that all this was happening. And like I'm hobbling off a plan like in the. Winters was standing there. She hates him to this day because like. And I'm I'm sure messing this up because this is her story not mine, but he had a purple heart in a box. He's like here you go by that's what he said to her like a total douche can move no respect whatsoever. And she was just like essentially go fuck yourself like she hates him to this day. And that was it. I mean that and then you guys came home months later. I mean, it was it was bizarre. And I was totally left on my own rehab. When I got back. Because we didn't have the system that developed over. There was nothing at the in the in the command like, yeah. It was bizarre. So then like you. So you start rehabbing and the word of the docs, telling you as far as like, you know, went hey, were you like when am I going to start feeling my foot? They said probably two to three years if ever I have never had more medical professionals. Tell me that I don't know because I would say because it was neuropathic, right? And they honestly don't know that it grows back about a millimeter day or an inch a month. So it would have to grow back all the way down to that terminus point decided nerve in ankle. So for about the first four months, I had foot drop. I couldn't articulate my foot at all. I could always or flex. I could always push my to- down, but I couldn't Dorset flex. I couldn't left my lift my toes up, and so they fit me with like the plastic sleeve that goes underneath and a cups your foot and all that stuff. And I had some experimental like nerve tap stuff. Don't on my spine to try to stop the pain. But the commands I I would go in and I would see hutch and he would put eastern pads on for an hour and go. Cool. We'll see tomorrow that was it. That was my rehab from the navy and the rest of it was on. I was on my own which is how I ended up finding a meeting tweet because a buddy of mine recommended. Hey, check this out. And it was like I found tweet who is still associated with cross fit. At that time started doing cross fit is my own rehab flew twice out to the command to do that seminar. And then took over my own rehab by basically exercising is all I did. That was the first seminar. I did with with Mark white. Now is the first time ever done one of those seminars at the command, which I think looking back. I think it did change a lot of the culture when it came to exercise the dudes soldiers in their chest and tries back and buys, and like triple asinine are like pushing fricken, you know, quads around and doing rope climbs and drags and like what are you doing? What are you doing or there on that incline? Bench. Yeah. Yeah. It was good. Because during that course, I think that was the first time that I had ever. Kind of almost hit the wall on a exercise machines say vomited while working out. I was like it was the rower. And it was like, oh, we're going to row five hundred meters. As fast as you can. I'm like five hundred meters seem very far to me like, I'm like, okay. And now, it's like everyone knows like, you know, was the five hundred meter row now. But at the time, I'd never even heard of this you row as hard as you. Can it doesn't feel that bad in twenty seconds later, you go? Oh, no. What's happening? My lungs. Yeah. What catches up and the intense pain, and you face basically fall out of the Rover while you're still strapped in for about two minutes through their. Yes, sidebar. So when Mark came the command one when I heard that Mark was coming to the command, I was super stoked because like he was kind of like one of my heroes on high school. Yeah. Just from the climbing world, I'm assuming. Yeah. Yeah. Like, either pictures from Rockin is climbing magazine like him free, soloing ice, walls and Chamonix, and for me the way I was in the way I thought, and I I'm still to this way to a certain degree. But not so elitist mindset, I would say, but I was I was into that. Because I'm like, look what this guy's doing. He's three hundred feet off the ground with no ropes, climbing ice walls. And then I would go and I would like see like the football players at school. Like the lacrosse players. I'm like, I'm like this is boring. Like, there's no no one's gonna die doing this like so like, I was definitely drawn mindset wise. I was drawn into whatever was what what could you die doing? And a challenge a surrounding that like. An activity with a lot of danger is what kind of drew me in. And so I'd say found it. Yeah. Yeah. And so like having Mark the toilet. We walked got more toys here. And I remember I do I knew that guy is. Yeah, you know. And I don't think it will whole lot of people knew because I was a niche little sort of like a little climbing kid high school. Yeah. I did. I think the longest episode of my podcast have ever done was with him really down in Salt Lake. We we could have filled up three x more time because the guys so he's so deep into the things that he's interested in like like people ask me about them all the time. Like, what's Mark like, my he defines intensity in all of the best ways? And if you don't define intensity in yourself, and some of those ways you and him might not get along very well because you know, what? I mean, he he he knows what he likes. And he goes down that path. There's a reason he was like, you know, like, the greatest American helpless that's ever lived for sure guys intense. And he's he's you know, like other people like you read any success books or like people that are like how do you do amazing things? Like, you kinda gotta be obsessed and people use that term in negatively like, oh, he's obsessed like it's a negative thing. Now, he's trying to do great things or he's he's doing something really dangerous, and you need to be obsessed in order to have the drive to understand the details on how to stay alive while you do it. Then you need to have. The practice to do it. And then you can't be you can't be half asked about. Oh, you know. You're you're you know, jumping wing sues its wing suiting. I would say isn't a great, you know, every other year type of activity not over if you want to survive over a long-term. No, yeah. Yeah. You wanna be immersed in it? You you went to become like part of you in so doing it all the time, you know, kind of thing so like being obsessed and you see people that have that. And you recognize it pretty quickly like all he's obsessed about this. Which means probably good at it. Which means if you wanna learn about it, he might be the gotta go to correct. So in hindsight looking at looking at the story arc of your career. I would say because people ask me all the time. But military, I'm like, it depends on your optic of the things that we did I had a very fortunate career or a very unfortunate career. Like if you were looking to do the things that the seal community is designed around doing. We had an amazingly fortunate career if you wanted to just have the job, but not into those things, and it was unfortunate. So it all depends on what you're looking at. But you I would say the time that you serve their hit it definitely in the sweet spot. So in two thousand and five I would say, I can't say it for you. But would you say it was still just ramping up or? Yeah. Totally the intensity level and the the Optima was increasing in both theaters. How would you describe? And I'll talk about it in whatever terms you're comfortable with. But everything that happened because I was the last time other than yesterday. The last time we were on a Halley together was in Iraq. So so for all the listeners, we weren't hill skiing. Yes. Boarding for some of us who helped me you Trevor Thomson from Thomson sports than I. Nelson up in Montana. I don't know if you've got to be on camera because you kind of a secret, dude, it's not even his real name will good. Yeah. Just. Totally. Yeah. Well, what would you? How would you describe or talk about the rest of your career because you got out what twenty we got twenty twenty thirteen? You said you're actually ended twenty four ta but I left to command until two thousand thirteen because he got you build up some leave. Yeah. Terminal leave and the whole thing, and you you squish together nearly early. How are those seven years after that night on target? I would say I got to do every like when you go into the military you like I would really like to do this. You have this idea of what's going to be like if you make it into the commando community, and when I say commando community, I don't mean just the navy. I mean, the army rains, especially operations so backups this command. I just call it commandos stuff. But you have idea of what you want to want to see and do as a commando and pretty much. I got to do everything and see everything that I ever wanted to and the only thing had left to do at the end of my twenty years was was get shot because I never actually got shot close lots of times or die. And I'm like, I'm pretty much done. All this other stuff. I'm like, I don't really need to do. I need to keep pushing it and hang out. No. But you know, looking back on it. I am. I would what I do it all over again. It's not even question. I would sign up immediately. Did I had to rewind time and they'd go do my same exact paiva-weed? Do the exactly what I did. Because the nineties were tough nineties were mentally the hardest time in the military because there's nothing happening. We're alcohol consumption. It will. Yeah. You know, just going on all time high. Just like the whole the training ears in the nineties. We're we're we're just for me. We're we're really kind of a low point of where you know, what though it gives you good perspective. Like when I went in when I so I left the command I went and became a buds instructor is like my rehab, and I saw guys who were coming in to a community that was fully engaged in war, which to me, the people who volunteer for that. Like, you get a tip of the hat more than a guy who just raises his hand and not not not that it's necessarily different. But at least that individual in wartime is like I'm pretty sure I know what I'm signing up for. I know the consequences. I'm coming anyway. I joined in ninety six it was like I like the concept of this job. Right. But nothing so it no none as a not like to make a value judgment on either one of them. But see those young kids coming in. I'm like friggin right on you. And they're like, you know, what you're getting into. But without having the pre nine eleven understanding of what the teams were like as the op tempo slowed. They had no context and perspective because if you serve pre nine eleven and you go through peak period. Right. And you roll over the other side of the bell curve. Totally. You're like, okay. I know what this is. I know what to expect. If you think you're coming into play call of duty twenty four hours a day. And you don't get to do it. You're like I'm out of here. And you're gonna leave with a chip on your shoulder, which I've seen from a lot of the young guys because they get into like, all right? I'm ready American sniper. What do you mean? I'm going to the PI. What are you talking about? Totally like, no, I'm out of here. Fuck you. And fuck the teams, but it's also going to be the first bullet point on my resume. You know what I mean? And it creates problems because they have a chip on their shoulder, and it only takes one bad experience for companies, and they're like, oh, no more seals. Well, when it will it will. And I when I showed up on a show up the squadron in with you guys, you guys have just came off the invasion and yet three and like, I just missed it because I was going through training. I'll never be able to do those guys. Like, it's never going to like you missed it. It was the whole just a mantra. Was you missed it. Well, and I was just I was dude always reeling. I was like I can't believe I missed it. I was like this is well in the in the in in the goal team room before that it was all these like models of Bosnia targets like pre-nine eleven where they were doing like these. What were they were? They after like war-crimes people, right? The war crimes do's and then shortly after the invasion. They're like just we can take that off the wall like this. You know what I mean? Because those guys thought that they had everybody else was like oh do be missed doing that. And then Iraq kicked off in. But it was like put these new trophies on the wall. And then people like, oh and then gotten saying, they're like take those trophies off the wall. You know, what I mean like it's this cycle. Right. Right. Never ending. What was the highlight of your career? Anything stand out or not innocent of the one thing, but any particular time line or event that stands out. I don't know if there's a there's an event there's a bunch of operations that that stand out that we got to do some of them. We can't, you know, talk about on the podcast. We did it. We got to do some operations that are, you know, you can't really talk about them. But those are sort of like vice called high profile highlight items were highlight items where you get to talk to the president in. That's that was pretty good. We've got to get to have a conversation with Obama in in a room. He called in one time and talk to us. And I'm like, I don't care what your political leanings are if you're talking to the United States president. It's a big deal for me. I don't care what political side you land on your talking. You get to meet the president or talk to the president's big deal. Yeah. But I think getting to I just looking overall just umbrella wise like being able to. Just lifting about just it was just year after year after year of deploying and getting to do all the things that you wanted to do when you were like I want to try to go be a commando. It was happening and it was live. And then the consequences were happening. Low point low point for sure was August sixty thousand eleven league source and got shot down. Yeah. Definitely. So we were in you know, that was that was our our team. And so some of those guys I had known for over a decade. It was to troop. Right. I mean, so you started off in a team. Now, if you'd of the time long enough, right, and we stayed on that like because people ask me about that too. And I knew same thing. I knew a lot of the guys you worked with them a lot longer. But it's not an impossibility that if you had stayed and not moved on he'd been in that helicopter as well. You know what I mean? Yeah. It's all I mean, so were you over in? Oh f. No. Yeah. We were in we were over in j bad, and they were we're know in different basis and two hours before those guys got hit. I was you know, on on on on, you know, tax computer, chat military, computer chat with two of the guys. You know, just talking about the next training cycle coming up. Like, hey, what trips coming up, you know? How can we support you guys because we all come together we train a lot together. So were you a team leader at that point, though was yeah, it was where in the deployment cycle was extortion towards the tail end middle middle comeback. We rolled out and like. Wanna say end of June being July. So there was like, you know in August. So it was just in the middle block. I would say and. Yeah, just chatting to two of the guys. And they're like, hey, we gotta roll out sums popping up. And I was like, okay. I'll talk to you dick heads later. And then it was I don't know two or three hours later on one of the one of the boys opens the otas the hut overseas. We have these these huts we live in our like built out of plywood and pretty much the same everywhere huts. Yeah. They're just plywood walls. There's an AC unit in there. Why are they called b huts 'cause I think the CB's build them? So they just take the be like CB HUD, short for. There's probably a CV listening to this. That knows this. I think it's because of the seabees built them. Okay. Because the CB's of the damn saviors of the whole thing. Yes. I mean, if you should roll up somewhere, and there's no CB's. No infrastructure, your sleep on gravel. Yeah. We're like this is terrible. Yeah. But. I forgot we were going with this you talking about extortion. Somebody'll Elvis be outdoor yells down. Like, hey, those guys just got shot down. Like what guys they're like? They're like the boys over to. I'm like probably didn't. I was like they didn't. It was just like they don't we don't get shot down. And so I go over to the the computer screen room right with all the computer screens in. We're getting there in the first thing I saw where I was like this is not good was just a black circle because we're looking at thermal, and you just see the black circle. And there's and you hear the com-, you know, they're trying to reach out, you know, get him on coms, and like any any station, you know, please respond, and there was nothing. And then like, yeah, they're probably we weren't sure. At that point. If they had been dropped off how or like, we're like, they're they're probably already on the ground somewhere over there helping out with the Rangers. You know, how the story went out there anyway. And then the moment the moment, I realized that this was real and that those guys were gone, and is when you know, they put over the ticker. It comes out of the main base over and over and. World of wherever they put it on wherever they put it out from. But the text is extortion. One seven down it was like thirty seven or thirty eight souls onboard whenever they say souls on Dillard, that's were that's basically a soft confirmation that they're lost. And the we saw that come across from from from the base from from bottom. And I was like oh fuck because that means they they've confirmed something or another they've gotten to a point to where they're going to call this basically a soft. You know, you know, announcement speak, and then it was just. But you know, what I was definitely a low point there for sure what happened on the rest of that deployment was it like an all hall because that's they stood us down. Fisher fifty percent of the force. Right. Yeah. I was half of us that we're overseas were dead. Yeah. In then days, they stood us down. Because we and this is where like. I really like the Rangers before, but after after this night now for this operation, and including what those what the Rangers guys what they did on like with Red Wings up in our is they they went out to the crash site like these young dudes and Rangers generally tend to be younger than we are on on average. They went out to the crash site, and they cleaned that place up. And you're they're talking like looking at, you know, American soldiers, they didn't want us to go because we started putting our stuff on. We were getting radio checks for like we're going to the site. Right. Fucking now spin the birds like we're not. But the it was looking back on it. It was probably a good call not to have a SCO in clean up our own for sure best friends. Didn't it burn for over a day? Oh, yeah. Yeah. A long time. Yeah. Because it's like, you know, the metals on fire like everything was Marco that aircraft aluminum yet. Once that starts you can't put that out. And and then so the the Rangers went out there. They clean the whole side up. And then these guys these boys they carried a. Section of a rotor blade. It was at least I think it was. I we measured. I think an arm. I thought that was a seven foot section a rotor blade. They carried through bad guy through Indian territory so to speak for Colomiers in Columbus in Columbus. They carried this thing a long fucking ways. So that they can hand it to us and say this is what we got off the target from your from your teammates. And like the things do when they when they they brought that over to us. I was just like. Yeah. You guys are amazing fucking humbling for sure. Oh, totally. Yeah. You think you're at the absolute tip of the spear. And then you see some people do some shit like that. And you're like, I'm not fucking worthy. Yeah. No, totally. Yeah. Yeah. And so like today end up just Bip in that thing afterwards after they got everything out. They could you know, I'm not sure I'm not sure what they did. When once we once, we got all the we recovered everything that needed to be recovered firstly, obviously are Garcia, then, you know, whatever equipment sensitive items that whole thing. I'm not sure what they did with the site on there. It was it was next to village. So I don't think they dropped anything big. But. Yeah. Those, you know, the the other thing, I guess, the, you know, that leads me to this point like the other thing that I liked about when you're busy is the competition between units like we're we wanna get emission, right? And everybody was like clam early nineties like getting a mission. It was like a juicy giant steak with the wolves in the nineties the golden Connex box would have opened. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It's all things you need to make your commando dreams. Come. God didn't like took me ten years to realize I got deem at there is no golden comment box. Right. Well, actually, the golden Khanna's box is the command because it's just the budget. Yeah. But yeah, but it was like the competition became between units and getting missions and all that really started to level out. And there was less like, oh, the Rangers. You guys just you know, you guys do you? You just basically support us like you're here to serve us because we're at this higher level of tier or whatever. And it got to the point to where we were just happy to have those guys on target. We would give them targets. They would give us targets, and we would work together it became more. Like, we became closer like more meshed even between navy army force like I like it got tighter across the board. And that was like it was really enjoyable because once once that started to happen your team gets stronger because now you have assets and other units, and you're not you're not like, you're not hoarding information. And you're not hoarding equipment. I don't like if you know unison aren't as well funded like don't have things you're like, oh, do you see Some Marines? You're like, bro. Like, what are you wearing like because they were like look at us. Like so jealous of what we had been. And I remember like reaching in my bag and just hand them like here. I don't even know if you're allowed to wear this kit. But here you go you get to a point you can wear that. Here's some extra MAGS. Here's you know, what I mean. So there was a lot of sharing going on because everyone had enough pie on their plate to where they were like getting full. What's crazy? Is there enough time had to expire for that to happen because that's certainly wasn't happening. Oh, two three. Oh four. You know, what I mean because everybody had to get their plate because we lived in a theoretical world. And then everybody was like, oh, this steak is awesome veggie goes to the buffet line. Yes. Stock one time get full we need you to go through again. You're like I'm getting kind of full. Yeah. Yeah. Took it took time for sure. Yeah. I experienced that same thing. How's the impact on your amazing career on your family? Well family fell apart. You know, like a lot of them. Did I was married twenty one years two kids? And I think I think what happens, and is is it's like, I I would say it's it's it's also not exclusive to just military because we're on the news lot going on. It's like law enforcement first responders like if you're going to work, and you're seeing heavy stuff every day, and your job isn't just spreadsheets. And something like that it starts to take a toll also a lack of control of your schedule to so high consequence high demand low control time predictable lifestyle. Yep. Yeah. The unpredictability of it. And so what happens is the the wives, you know, and they start to or the husbands and some cases they start to raise the family on their own without you. And and and when you show up you don't show up, you're not you're not really like in a in a in in the position that you think you're in because their their sched-. Set. They have they have a program that kids are going to certain practices. They earned now they're in band, and they're going to fricking football or soccer, ice hockey. And and so coming home and trying to find your place inside the family unit again was without disrupting with right without disrupting and it became harder after every deployment because the stress level in the family would increase in the stress level on you and increase. And then what happened? I think what with us in all of us like in that are that have similar sort of jobs as you start to change. But you don't see yourself changing. They see you're changing. And then they'll mention once every once in a while, I k-, you know, you're you're you're just different. Now, you're changing like, and it's not a positive like it's like, you're more intense. You're you're it's all the things everyone. They're not giving you a Pat on the back on that comment. They're giving you a cautionary warning. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. It's it's it's a it's a foreshadowing like, hey, something needs to change because you're changing, and we don't necessarily like how you're how you are. But to us we. You'd be you just you'd become different. And you're like, what do you mean? I'm Jay, I'm the same person. Look same house. Same guy. I shaved the same same haircut. But your your your approach to life, and your views or behavior patterns, definitely change. And we don't see it. And they see it. And that's why I think our divorce rate at the team. It was over eighty five percent something like that. It was astronomical by we time two thousand ten rolled around. We had enough years of this pattern in like everyone was getting divorced. And and so like, yeah. My my family fell apart, shall we tried to hold it together at the end, and it just didn't work for me. It didn't work out, you know. But what was impact on your kids? So mine were super super young to be honest. I don't think any of my kids have. Any interest understanding or idea what I used to do for a living. But your kids were older. What what did you notice the impact on your kids with a career? So my so so like like like, so my son of my daughter, my son's twenty five his name's Jason my daughter Claire is just turned twenty. And they're they're like in my daughter is is like not the she's the polar opposite, but with the same intensity like she has like arse type of community sort of intensity. But she's like a vegan hippie business entrepreneur girl that likes to walk around barefoot with ankle bells and she lives in. Now. You're joking about the bells, right? No fuck. No ankle bells. You ever been to a dead show? Come on. No. No, what are you talking about? I'm not a huge country fan. So right. So so my daughter, basically, like she I don't know how much of this had had an effect on her like her going up in this environment. I definitely think it definitely impacted. But she was she's Khan became an old soul for how she in two thousand and five. I should be able to. She was what five. Yeah. Okay. I'm really young. Okay. We got hit. Okay. Let's she was at his rolling into an age where she could remember by the time you got out. Oh, yeah. Okay. That was always trying to she was you know, when when extortion got hit, I think she was twelve years old. So like, you know, twelve years old. You're your understanding that you and your son was even older. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. My son's five years older than she was. So my son was seventeen when when extortion got hit. So my son's early early years, you know, he played ice hockey, competitively and. He poured himself into in end is hockey, you know, and isn't like intense dad's always like would help my son like with training, and like it. But I think I was definitely I I was overbearing I would say I would say I was I was too intense with like, you know, you gotta have drive and motivation, never quit. And like, I I really pushed it harder than I think I should have looking back on it. Like looking back at you can push them away as opposed to drawing him closer. It's a balanced, man. Yeah. I struggle with the same thing with my kids like. They'll say something that I just wanna be like you were not allowed to be weak. But what do you why would you quit and then into the hemlock? Okay. Dad approach is not gonna work. You're going to do what I tell you to do because I'm physically standing here. But what I wanna do is develop a young man that's going to do what I need you to do or what you should do whether or not I'm telling you to do or not on the path that I have found that his least successful is getting in their shit with overbearing. Right. But which of course, I continuously make that mistake because we're we're assholes, but it's been ingrained into us. And it was largely I think why we were successful in our careers. Put it's gotten negative consequences that have to be controlled. But I think what. So like, let's say, you know, like looking at the way we're looking at it right now is like let's say we're like a family on an island with no with no network. The one thing that we had that did help was my kids grandparents and my wife at the times, parents they lived they moved to Virginia Beach to be near the grandkids. And they were like a huge support structure for them. Like like, they provided so much stability when I was gone. I think we were gone average something around like seven or eight months out of the year twenty years. I mean, that's like the average you're gone. It's ridiculous. But you know, having a support structure out there like family nearby. They can help support is is a game changer. It's huge. But my son went on, you know, he he left home after sophomore year in high school to go play ice hockey up in northern Michigan onto go play. You eighteen AAA because he wanted to you know, he's like I'm gonna go for it. I want to try to go play college hockey, and and he ended up playing college hockey liberty university. He got his business. He's got a business degree the summer. And it's kind of funny like the way things are going nowadays. He got his business degree. He's gotta be us in marketing and business, and he's in the trades. Now, he's going he's trying to decide if he's going to go electrical or plumbing because he's like he saw he saw what those guys are getting paid and the demand in the market the way it's going win wins. And he's he's now he's in high rise construction in Memphis, Tennessee, he's up there. Sending me pictures. He's up in a building where in orange vests like just like a skeleton of a building up their solder and pipes together. Yeah. I'm proud of my guts, awesome, man. Good on them. So the kids are the kids the kids have done, well and the family didn't didn't stay together. There's always life afterwards. You know, like I've met this girl. Off-camera tamra. And so there's always life after something like that falls apart. It's not the end. In there were dark times for sure like when I first got out, you know, like go through. I'm sure you've gone through valley some dark periods me now. It's everything for me is it's shiny lights on positive. Yeah. Do you have a course second sign up for at all? I do. It's nine hundred ninety nine a week. That's fine. Yeah. Just nineteen dollars ninety nine cents twenty bucks. Okay. I'm gonna. No, it sucks. Yeah. Yeah. I'm my own worst enemy if you give me enough time with me by myself thinking about me, it doesn't go. Good places. Like, it's the 'isolation where you're talking about the network of people the isolation for me, I found is the worst and the times of just an self-reflection or just I mean, it was tough for me. Get out of the military. I struggle for year and a half. Yeah. Along those lines. Do you think looking back at your career? And where you spent the majority of your time. Do you think they should limit the number of combat deployments or the amount of time? People can spend in combat. I would say like ideally that probably wouldn't be a terrible idea or or or create more of a buffer between deployments. But then like there's there's that phrase where you you can't you can't generate an unlimited amount of special operations overnight. So the the demand is out there, and we're gonna fill the demand because ultimately were working for the DOD like in. We're we're machines that they deploy as tools to accomplish tasks, and if the machine gets a little wear and tear as part of the game. And so I think the demands are always going to outweigh the concerns of the individual because when you sign up your your little bit, you're signing over your life. Like in your your you, really? That's what we all do like rear. You're part of a year apart of a greater thing right now in your cog in there in your in your cognitive time. You need to be turning when they say we need these cogs turning. Yeah. I was just curious your thoughts because haven't been out for a while. I mean, I think this country has been sustained combat law. Longer than it ever has been in its history. And nobody knows the actual. Consequences of that the divorce rate at eighty five percent guys deciding that the solution to how they're feeling is put a fucking gun in their mouth. I'm just and I have no no data to support anything. I'm just I I spent enough time thinking like how much connection is there between the amount of time gone stress on the family things that you see overseas. You'll think about this thing about this. Let's take on February fourth two thousand five you're not shot yet. And we get an Email from the command saying, hey, we're going to try to limit the trauma that you're experiencing and you won't deploy again for eighteen months after this deployment. What would you have said? A spam filter would have picked that up. It would have been tough because I was in my early twenty s where I wanted to be doing what I wanted to do. But that's what I'm saying. Here's the thing. People at our age. Have the perspective looking back and the guy who would have received that Email at twenty five. How old was I want to get shot two thousand five I was. Seventy seven carry the was twenty eight when I got shot. My forty one year old self now like. I would want to go back and talk to that that twenty eight year old kid who got that E mail because. Me and my family life certainly is perfect. I didn't go nearly as deep into the career field. Is you didn't do the things that you did? But it was a bit. But the thing is I was around enough where it had the impact on my family. But I never saw it because it was a one percent slide at a time. And like when my wife, and I argue sometimes do we argue about shit from Virginia Beach, which is a lifetime ago. And we argue about it because I never had the time to close the loop on it because it was like, hey, I gotta go. I gotta go for this rut, I gotta go on this trip. And so it doesn't go away. It's just a staph infection. That's gonna come back later on. And I never would have been able to because I had the same head space. You if I've got to be able to like, screw you man like auto send is spam. Folder. Yeah. But now knowing what I know I would at least I feel responsible for protecting my younger self, and so I would feel responsible for protecting the younger guys. So you're probably you sound like you sound less selfish than I am. Because right now, I'm thinking that's always been the. Case. Yes. But like, I if the time and even now even now looking back on it. I'm like, this isn't gonna last forever. This is what you've wanted your whole life. Like, I was reading books about lurks in Vietnam navy seals and be down when I was in middle school. You know, what I mean, I am like in in. I kind of like you ask for this. It's time to get it on. And I know that there's a window there where it wasn't gonna last in the operations were so fucking good. I didn't want to miss a second of it. So like if they were to say that I would have been immediately like, oh, I'm gonna go. I'm going to go to like try to go to marine recon. I'm gonna go to shut, you know, try to go to the bat or like, I would have tried to find another avenue. So I could keep doing it in because we're morons. Yeah. No, we're selfish. Well, here's it any. Remember, the enlistment contracts that we sign there's no space for have your kids sign here. Have your wife sign here when I was young and reading those books like, and I hear you say that because I read the same books. I was thinking only of myself, and it wasn't until halfway through my military career that there are other people to think about, but I was you know, what I mean? I was like because I was the same way like us committed like, dude, two months after I got shot, I'm doing fucking tandems, you know, down in Moya because like I couldn't mentally accept the fact that I was done, right. Like it was so it was like doing. Eight hundred miles an hour in the Indy. Five hundred and I was like hoops miss fifth year that just went reversed there goes the tranny. I couldn't process it mentally that was the hardest part for me because I didn't want to be done. And I can only imagine the asshole that I was like being around Jamie like 'cause I was pissed I just wanted to deploy again, I don't want my God. If I could just go back and have a little chat with myself, and it's like the same mantra that everyone at this point like there's so many books written about it. And so many stories about it where you once you're in winter in combat with guys. Everything else sorta just is a second place to that in and not always. But it's definitely it's it is a high competitor for first place at all times. And you get you get addicted to it and you don't want to stop. I think I did I think heroin addicts talk the same way. I mean, literally never sure because we're addicted to what endorphins right and you're into like the endorphins that come along with the excitement of the job in the training. You do your winnings. Your dictate to winning. There's a buddy of mine asked. He was asking me about just war in general. He's like, you know, any asked me like what's the worst part about war? And I thought about it for second. I said that it ends. What are you talking about your psychopath? I'm like, dude, I've never felt such clarity of focus clarity of purpose. Clarity of just like all of my systems were functioning at a peak level. I knew what I was going to do my job. I knew what the people next to me were doing, and it was awesome. Because we were and at the same time you are participating and I was gonna say playing, but it's not your participating in the highest risk highest consequence environment, and you're winning. So yeah, I loved it. I loved the winning. You know what? I mean. It's it's and you get addicted to it for sure I'm just I mean, I don't know a now where I'm at in my life. I think back I'm like, I just wondered what the long term consequences are for guys who. Okay, I'm only twenty second deployment like that might be too much. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I yeah. I agree. I agree. There's there's a point like like kind of what I was saying earlier like I did get to a point where I sort of thinking about everything that I got to do personally as a commando guy. And I was like. Pretty much of checked every block and the remaining blocks are not looking good, you know, getting shot dying. And so I'm like, I'm okay to leave. Now. That's why I left it. That's one of the one of the reasons I left at twenty. How was your transition out? So let's talk about post military. Yeah. So when when I when I when I joined the military, I I was either like have mentioned before I was either going to move to Jackson Hole and starts game because the in the magazines that I was reading that's where all like, the extreme RAD shit was going down. I'm like, oh my God Jackson holes where it's happening. I need to go there and learn how to snowboard or ski down really steep shit. And or I'm going go become a team guy. So it became a team guy. But the entire time was the navy. Not a day went by two. I didn't think about moving to the mountains. I said one day I'm going to the mountains. I'm gonna I'm gonna I'm gonna do what I my other option that I didn't take when I was eighteen years old yoga I'm going to go that route. And so I. I knew I was gonna move out west. And I wanted to be my rule was I wanted to be with a fifteen minute drive of a skier because I wanted to ski because I knew I had something physical at something. I had to have some physical activity involved my life. I couldn't go. There's no way I could go get a job in like an office or something like that. I would fire me in two days. I actually wanted to do that. But I want to produce it as a reality TV show. Oh, we take like a team due to me put them into IBM. Imagine amazing to be one kid, you know, one of us in charges sheets. But no like to watch us like take over that organization. It'd be like A Bola infection because they put us in a of thing. Accuse right. And the first thing we would do is obviously recruit the people in the neighboring cubicles, and they would love us. So we would we would corrupt them and their work productivity would go down. And then the way that we talk to each other at work. We'd have some suicides from other people that work there because they cannot tolerate the way and then like the ratings are through the roof. So he gets season two. And the next thing, you know, it's like you. And I. And the CEO suite with like Ascot's smoking, you know, like I ever handled pipes talking about the trajectory of the company, and it's like how did this happen to be the best TV show ever? Now, we can't go into that environment. I would blow my brains out. Yeah. No, not fucking working. Yeah. But so I basically loaded loaded up in RV, I had divorce was in in in progress. We're still like making those last ditch attempts to hold the family together. And you you wanna make attempts obviously like real attempts to hold it together. If you've been together for twenty years or twenty liters, right? You you want to at least know at the end of it, you gave it all you had. And I do absolutely harm percent believe I I gave it all I had at the end. I didn't give it all I had while I was deploying, and I was gone all the time. That's not giving it all you have to your family being gone seven or eight months of the year. You're just not giving all you have to your family. Here is not because either one of us at any point. We could have said you could have gone to buds in you know, when the war was getting hot, you could have said, no, I'm gonna go to shortage. And I'm gonna go chill, but we chose not to do that. Which in my mind that was selfish selfish decision because I wanted to go and do what I came here to fucking do. We lived through the dam and nineties mother fuckers. So yeah, he like. I felt like, you know, do we gotta make it. So I loaded up an RV bought a forty four foot RV had a a Chevy thirty five hundred duly toy. Hauler had a bunch of dirt bikes, and you know, action sports stuff yet. Right. Just your I call. You're you're getting RAD broke down stuff, right? Because you and I drove out into Sun Valley and moved out here and new one person I moved to town pulled up to the RV park plugged in the shitter to like several, and I was like, well, there's the ski hill drove into town. Charter check out the mountain started through some running shoes on jogging around the mountain. You know, checking it out. And and I'm like, yes. Okay. Now, I guess start training for just for ski patrol having never skied, right? Yeah. Snowboarded how much time. Did you give yourself? What was a realistic window having two years? Two years of one hundred two years of one hundred ten day years before I'll be ready for tryouts. But they don't hold tryouts every year for ski patrol at suits when they need to man. Yeah. How many people do you know that have become ski patrol in under two years. I don't know. I'm not sure I think the answer is zero moved to a place and say I'm gonna be ski patrol. However, how do I put these skis on? However, where's the front? Yeah. Is this right? Do I walk across the street with these like, Jerry. But like knows like talking to Trevor I was talking like Trevor he mentioned that the he mentioned it last night while we were well, we were hanging out. He said you've spent like a career learning how to learn. And so we were really good at learning. And so how do we learn we look them in the eyes? And when the guy we just go Roger, and when you when you have like a world class, canopy pilot teaching you this is how you fly fucking parachute. And they say do ABC you go. You're like, Yep. Yeah. And you never deviate from ABC. Just so you're so you're you're gaining ground with every input of information. So I had a guy here in town. Waylon barrett. Took me under his wing. He said, bro and teach ski, and he's a level for psi ski instructor. He his lesson. Nothing. You just said make sense. Yeah. He's like a high level like skin structure like to hire him for the day. I think is is six or eight hundred bucks for the day. Joe ski, but he was like, hey, you're a vet. I wanna help you out. We get. Good. And so he taught me on a ski. I started out in you know, in the fricken pizza just in the in the the attack pizza positions. Just. Agro pizza? Here. You are. You're like a former commando bad ass, dude. And then these little kids are just ripping next to you. And then you know, like doing that was like, oh, I'm at the beginning. Again, the literal beginning like you were everyone here is better than me. Did you find that refreshing? Yes. Yes. So did I yeah. Anytime slightly refreshing hip, because I think in a way like I think I felt like hide in it like because I I don't need to be commando guy. I'm just a person learn I'm just a gold Moore out here. Learn how to ski I'm fucking nobody. You know, I'm not don't ask me any questions about prior military like you're just trying to be a little bit anonymous. I think. It you know in that. And it feels good to just be starting out in in being in that environment again 'cause it brings you back to when you were going through selection. We're going through some tryouts or you're in some school, and it was hard. And so it's just like, okay nothing like, and so when I was well shared my first two years. I'm like, I got to focus on something. Because if I sit in my house where I'm gonna do is probably just drink a shit ton get into drugs in my life is going to spiral into a whole because I'm gonna live in house in a dark room by myself. And that's I think we're guys when they hole up and the ice late. So I, but I'm like, I'm not those guys. I'm not that. When I got here. I started like remembering what how they talked about how PTS or PTSD. Call terms changed a little bit. But how it affects people like don't isolate them like my isolating. Well, I live in the mountains by myself in a house. Yeah. I'm probably isolating. I need to get out. And so having a mission was was key. So I'm like guys would be like, hey, you know, I knew one one of my buddies here. Mike tourism? Works for Smith optics, awesome guy or so like best friends. You know, he's, you know, he's like, you know, what are you up to you on the call? I'm training. Today's like, oh, cool. You go. You're the y you're going to the gym. I'm like, no, no skiing's training training Seattle training for ski patrol, dude. He's like he's like we trading risky patrol. You shitting me? Yeah. Let's go skiing. Let's go. And so we just every day. My goal is to go. Uphill click into boots in just get better. Be able to go down the hill and just start in learning from people, and then everyone so I find myself on a chairlift with with Mike and in another guy and afterwards of Mike could be like, oh that guy was in X games. Like he'd be a guy listened to on how to ski and I'll make hey, hey, can we do a run together? And the guy's a cashier. Let's go, and I said, okay. Let me tell you right away. I suck fucking balls at skiing. And and if you tell me, I just want one good fucking takeaway, just watch me ski also how do you do backflip? That was the next day. And and just listening to people that have zero combat experience zero military, but I don't give a shit. Like, I I I absolutely respect guys for their expertise in their field as much as I do. I do this walking around with the fuck and medal of honor on this. I mean, I'm like, you're a bad ass. I know it's the same thing. It's just a different field. Yeah. Totally and they just decided to differ route like they those guys are the same people. That are the obsessed mindset people that would probably make it through buds this in a lot of cases, not every case. But I would say average wise they would have a higher than average passing rate getting through sealed training for sure a lot of these obsessed climber guys in jujitsu guys. I may dues anybody who's willing to go down a path for enough where it starts getting into sacrificing quality of life for a goal pain tie. And they're starting to push through stuff. Now, you're starting to go up the Bill curve, but people are going to be successful in like going decade with zero glory just grinding it. Yeah. Fucking decade. But. Doing shit that people if they were to swing the spotlight on you. You would have all the glory, right? But you're just a dude living in a van down by the river climate shit. Yep. Yeah. Yeah. So we're thirty seconds outcome from let's get to the company you got go. Now. I know you I know you know, what it's about. But it was kind of like it was heard the term a couple times. Hey, you have thirty. Now. But I mean, just in general, it's I'm fascinated by what people do when they get out of the military because I actually don't know what I do for a living, and I'm still trying to figure it out. So. My least favorite question people. Like, what are you doing? I I don't know. And they're like, okay. You don't have to be an asshole. You could just tell me. I'm like, no, I don't know. I'm still trying to figure it out in my forties of good. But yeah. So how would you describe it apparel company? People say what did you do? I say sell t shirts on the internet and up. Basically, I kind of what what I what I look what in my mindset when I started thinking about just doing it was I'd watch like you a hockey fan. So I watched like these hockey players and in all these guys like red bull, dude, Stu and Brad red bull shit jump off buildings and doing crazy shit. And I'm like, my man, these guys should get a lot of attention and credit and respect from the world for doing these red things. And I think about things that like I did with you in a bunch of other guys. And I'm like, we this is this is a different type of RAD shit that we did like risking your life. Every night every night, you going out like how many times did you look at your bunk going? Okay. Well, I don't my friends to have to come in here and deal with my dirty gross ass, piss bottles under the bed. So before like, a heavy hit you, you know, maybe you're pissed bottles away the other way, I would just label it as eight acting them. Like lemonade or like, so so for listening to piss bottle thing is you don't know what it is a lot of people might not. It's kind of a thing. I it's. So like when you're overseas the bathroom like where we live in like these plywood huts, we talked about earlier at least twenty feet away, which is ridiculous track. It's an expedition to get to the piss via. Yeah. And we're not doing that. We got we got we got sleeping to do and stuff. Yeah. He's water bottles everywhere, and we have water bottles because that's how we get water. So we just the water bottles become our urinals, and we all just start peeing out of the sides of our beds, and you start stacking these bottles onto your bed, and it would get so impressive sometimes where people were running out of room under their pissed bottles. Get a year enshrine. I'm like it's getting it's getting to a point here like. Beer, enshrine was awesome, dude. And then every once in a while somebody would spill one and actually saw somebody on a, you know, a night while we drank it. Yeah. I heard somebody drank their own pets. Once I didn't see I saw it just the. It. No, it wasn't just pissed. It was pissed mixed with Copenhagen dip dip spit Solly out with the urine in the bottle. Yeah. And just took a full chug. And then just immediately the trampoline. Just here's an I saw him do it because we're all like we're sitting in the room we had a big screen up. We're like probably watching tombstone which we've seen ten times. Right. And then do brothers. Yeah. Grabs off the top shelf. He still watching the movie unscrews the cap because we had other good Gatorade laying around. Yeah. And takes a swing and we all look over. You know? And he's like he's like. Ios ruse. Like do. Don't spit it in here. Run out the door. Hold a door to spend it on the door. Do you think it was his own piss? Oh, no. It definitely was not as his because he didn't live. He didn't live in that. He didn't live in that behind that was another man's piss right down the fucking, dude. Is this right away? Oh. Yeah. No documentary, truly is ever captured that aspect depravity and savagery of some of the people that we used to work with. Did there was I remember there was like one of the base guys at one of the bases and price talking about this. But I don't really give a fuck. He was like because he knows like is you guys with, you know, sneak little bottles or something he'll lick overseas. And if you don't know that you're fucking God. Moron. But he's like out there at the base, and he's like one of the base guys. And he's like all official and he's like he's like I'm looking like, hey, how's it going? You know, whatever his name was like, what are you? What's going on? He's like I'm looking for liquor and women, and then I go so are we where are they? Because I don't a bus us for you know, whatever. But I don't know. It was bizarre. I woke up one morning, I can't use his person's name. But just talking about the savagery I woke up one morning, and I rolled over and my cot same thing. And it'd be hut in like this dude had just like thrown everything off that he was wearing. And so his kit was over here is top over here in his pants. We're like halfway between my bed. His and there were covered in shit. And I'm like from no, no from the pant leg up or like, or he originated the from the pant inside down. Okay. I'm like, hey, dude. What the fuck is. Like, oh, yeah. Did I shit my pants on Dr? I'm gonna take care of that in the morning. I'm like are. You fucking kidding me in the morning. Yeah. Mike, you just gonna take off shit filled pants and throw them in between your bed in mind. These are the people that we worked with doing very high level. And then they would you know Pena bottle? So. Yeah. Back to thirty seconds out. We took a wild, right? Turn their. Yeah. That's right. You know? So I started looking at school shit. And I said, you know, I don't I want to do something. But I don't wanna like I'm not gonna write a book and talk about exact tactics and how he did things and break it all down into the nitty gritty, and I don't know something I want to do. But I think there's a cool element to our culture like as we had a culture like, you know, what I mean, we all like war movies. And and you know, we all like kind of like sick humor a little bit gallows humor. Yeah. Yeah. And so so I started like just coming up in like combining a little bit of like, kind of the motivational mindset. Like, no one is coming. It's up to us. And where I felt that like we're like that that no one is coming like this fucking shit here. Yep. Was was when we started. When when the when the war started really really going, and then every night, we would go out, and yeah, we would have accused f- which was like the biggest basically a backup for so. But like, let's say we're going on a hostage rescue or something like that like your it. And I think that this applies to like firefighters law enforcement guys guys doing undercover work. Yeah. Anybody who's far enough out on the front leading edge? Yes, you do have backup by the time. It gets there. It's going to be a cleanup force there. They show with brooms and a mob, and you know, yes, they're going to come. Yeah. But it's not going to matter to you. And so that feeling of. You really feel that I think going into like the the the the lion units where you're in your your direct combat unit. You're like, oh, you guys are going to see combat for sure. So by the time the bullets flying. There's nobody coming like it's up to you. And whoever you there with and over you trained, your like, we're going to you know, we're gonna what do they say you're going to perform to the level of your training. If you're gonna fall level, you're training. You're gonna fall to love you don't rise the occasion, you fall to the level of your Trump, which a lot of people confuse the to like I'm going to be good. Now that's called luck bitch. If you extend the time line out long enough, you're going to get to the actual level, you're training. And so yeah, that's kind of like well that sort of an so I was like, hey, there's a lot of cool like military takeaways coming from like combat background that I think could that could cross over and apply to like other things. And so one of the one of the first cool things I had was I had like an investment banking group in Manhattan. They bought a bunch of my no one is coming. It's up to us shirts. And they and they and they put it on Twitter, and like an I saw there, and I was like holy shit. Bunch of bankers are wearing my T shirt is like their team shirt. I'm like in. So I felt like a little bit. Like, oh, what a what I'm doing is validated. What I was doing puts up. I wasn't sure if anyone was really getting what I was trying to what was your first item. You created sticker sticker strong, opening a low overhead. No, right, because it's a good experiment. Yeah. You don't kinda invest you'll hundreds of hundreds of dollars in t shirts anyone's gonna buy know by seventy dollars for the stickers and see if anybody wants them. Sticker in a website. And you're in business. But the stickers and then just doing t shirts and like making the like patches and stuff like so what are you about three years for just just just over four? And what have you learned along the way business wise? Oh, yeah. I'm I'm still learning all the time. Like, I'm constantly listening to like, I think right now if you look behind there, I think there's. Close to twenty business books right there that I'm working my way through right now in the also huge audio books and learning the whole business thing like it's funny. I hear I've heard guys several occasions from from our background go when I get out. You know, I'm going to I'm going to become the CEO of a company, and I'm like, no not. I'm like what what company like your? Yeah. In ten years, if you create the company, you learn how to do this this then. Yeah, you'll be the CEO you're not stepping out of special operations become the CEO of a corporation. Will you're not qualified so fucking idea going on zero idea. And I think that's a that's a that's something that I've learned is like, yeah. I know a lot about doing commando stuff. But I don't know anything about business in in in the thing about it is is the bottom line doesn't lie in. So like your sales numbers. They're going to tell you how much you know, about business or how much you care about your business. And so the numbers will tell you, right. There is just a good line. No bullshit, are you succeeding or not? Well, the numbers are right there. They're telling you. It's not a. Soft thing. Yeah. You made some mistakes along the way. Oh, yeah. Maybe I'll buy a bunch of these because these are awesome. And they're like oh shit. Or like like, I love this one thing. Like, do people are gonna love this. And then it's just crickets tumbleweeds, and you're like, but I loved it would come on guys. Yeah. Can get it. Why don't you guys understand if I think it's cool? It's going to sell. Yeah. I get. So what once like I got out on like, okay, how am I gonna do business? And so you start reading a couple books, and then you try you try to start figuring out by yourself. And you like you. We I think we feel really self confident you like I can fucking do this. I've done offense other like hard shit. But you start doing it in the start feeling like you're spinning your wheels. You know, like, well, maybe I'll let me just share with this guy has the same. And then all of a sudden your minds like formula. I know nothing, and then he recommends somebody, and then I think I started what started me the very first like like down the entire road of learning about business and entrepreneurship and in creating a life that is not governed by somebody else was the Tim Ferriss podcasts. I started listening to that in my mind was like what in that? I started reading the books, and then once you're into that if if you're passionate, and you and you want to build something, then you you just take your obsession. He becomes you. Just be obsessed on fucking that learn how to do a business because your other option is go to job collecting, a little retirement get a job, and there's nothing. Absolutely nothing wrong with getting a job, but you know, giving in the military we have a little bit of an advantage. When we get out if you retire, and you get either a medical, you know, you know, it's stipend at the Andrew you get some, you know, your retirement years, it it covers like, you know, your mortgage or your rent. So it gives you a little bit of a cushion. So that you can focus on something else. If you choose to take that opportunity and time to learn and just be a new person and shut your fucking mouth. And just listen to what people have to say because these people know a lot about business, and like I'm gonna coaching group now called the Arctic celebrator right now. Ed, my Latin Andy Priscilla, and we're in this group, and you pay every month to be in it, and these are guys that are combined worth close to a billion. They do a billion a year in revenue closely combined. They're getting up there. And I'm like, oh, yeah. I'm am. I going to listen to what these guys have say about business. You fucking damn right. I am what are some changes. You've made from when you started and you dove into the business books and the coaching group. Like, what are some changes? You've made less products, fewer skews. Yup. Okay. Get focused on making your your. Your core product better and just improve that because the first you start out. You're like I'm gonna make this insert you sort of like making all these products. Just because you're basically just you're just throwing lines in the water and seeing what fish bite like what what are they biting? I don't know. I don't know about business. I don't know how you know. I don't have another. You know, I don't have a bunch of experience in business school. That tells me things I probably should know at this point. So you start experimenting and then you start chiseling it down. And then you, but then you start going down the road. Right. Did of oh if I keep adding new products that are just will sell then I'll just keep doing that. And I'll make good money. But then pretty soon you start getting spread so fucking thin that you can't keep up with the vodka company. You're trying to start and your t shirt company. And you're, you know, oh now I wanted to start, you know, like like a podcast or now you're so thin like you're not good at anything. And so it's it's like learning how to let go of like your little pet favor. Ritz because it just doesn't fit your business model is a tough thing to do. And you should have to. It's a it's a lot of people call it a kill list. So you're like, okay. Let's get everything that I sell or that I'm doing in business. What what are the core? Top. Two or one or two things on that make my business that is what it need to focus on just who. I am all these other things are in Cillari. And so if you guys have heard of the predispo- principal, right? The eighty three toes the parade owes principal eighty twenty rule. Okay. So eighty percent eighty percent of the results come from twenty percent of the effort. Yeah. So it was like last year. I'm like, okay. I'm gonna I'm gonna do. I'm gonna check the eighty twenty roll my business. I started looking at the numbers and sure shit. It was seventy nine to twenty one. Was it really seventy nine percent of my income was coming from twenty one percent of my skews of. And I was like I was like mother fucker damn it's true. And so turning to trim down and and. And what we're I've got now is like you start winter business starts growing you start. Getting stretched thin thin thin thin thin because you're inside the business, and you're doing everything and you're trying I can do that. I can save money and do that why don't have to pay anyone twenty bucks an hour to do that. But pretty soon you can't do it all and so stepping away in that's another process of letting go like letting go of product lines letting go of responsibilities and handing them off to the capable people and not just that. But training those people 'cause you're not gonna find the perfect employer going to have to like on boredom and teach them a little bit too for your for what you have going on. And then removing yourself from the business at working on your business, not inside of it. And creating like what I'm doing now is building systems in the business. So that because it's it's like an example, what do you mean by system? Okay system is how do we make t-shirt? I you get a design. How'd you get Zayn from? Well, let's get it designed from an artist that we like on Instagram that we've chatted with on DM hit him up. Hey, we want you to do a design. Check our style out and something you like, let's work. Together. And and we've had you know, good success. We're gonna do it more and more. We have guests artists because I do a lot of the art. But I also like to see other people's because I get tired of Mon stugotz. I get sick a looking at my own designs. I really do. I like to reach out and get new fresh perspectives on like new new look something. So you're like, oh, here's how you do. It. You get an AI file you get the design. I sent it down to Ryan and industry thread works. Hey, wanna make these t shirts colors you want? And I go if I don't really know kind of what do you think what does this match with? And like Ryan he's so good down. There industries like this looks good on like a red and black. But the way the contrast works is not going to work like another color. So. And he can tell you what color patterns, sell the most. And which ones don't. Yeah. Totally like don't make a tan tee shirt. Seven people will buy it right over six years. But it's not a the end. So don't they make the shirts? They come up you create a product product page agent. Shop affi- take good product photos backed up with lifestyle for Dogerthy, get your Instagram thing ready. And then so there's there's patterns to this and the repeatable, and if you're reinventing the wheel every time, you're spending your wheels. So like things that are repeatable in your business. I I've learned to write them down and create systems. So that you so that you know, you can hand them to someone you hire. Like, hey, here's the way this one system works, and let them work on that until they get really nailed like, oh, I I totally understand how we launched t-shirts shirts. Now, I can make a product page to the product photography hire. Someone we are. We actually have on retainer Matt lingo down DC, it takes a lot of her lifestyle stuff in and Trevor, you know, he's he's doing a ton of like the lifestyle workout, they're you know, doing all that. So where do you see it in five years? I would say we are definitely not in this building. Where I if I if I get scaled. I'd say we're probably ten x where we are right now and satanic scene were ten times, the the yearly revenue that we're at right now, and the there's very solid systems in place and scale ability and our market just isn't military commando people. It's it's kind of like that market. I was talking about earlier where it's people that kinda like they like that sort of obsessed sort of like like hardcore. Look with a sort of a military twist with sort of with some humor. Yes. Humor to it. But and we're patriotic. But we're not, you know, like, of course, I'm a patriot. You know, I love America. There's no question doesn't mean you have to get crazy with it. Yeah. But, but my style isn't like the, you know, China American flag on the back. This is all you know, I'm gonna crush your face. If you don't love America like this. I don't think they goes over. Well, I just not my approach not my personality. And so like your business also has to be a little bit of a reflection ear personality to appoint. But then another point to where you start to you start to create what sells in every business. Does that at a point? And I'm not at that point quite yet. I still like are still love to have like the keep the heart of what what what I wanted to become isolate to keep that within a certain Krahl little bit. Yeah. But you know, so we gotta go backwards. So you got one year skiing onto your belt tryouts, come up. Two years. I two years you had skied for two years to. Okay. So I probably we're talking two hundred twenty days the just killing it, and I don't know anything about ski patrol other than they're probably way better on the mountain than I am. And so you try out or you put your application. Let's talk about the application in and of itself. How did you separate yourself? Okay. So just because I'm anti office. Anything I was like everyone's gonna turn an eight and a half by eleven resume with some, you know, some black letters on it about things they've done and all this. And that's that's great. And I know it definitely works and has a place, but I'm like, dude, I'm gonna stand out. So I went to this website. It was called. I think it's called pick pick though chart or pictographs dot com. And it's basically, it's a it's a visual appeal visually appealing timeline of of what you have. So there's like there's colors there's bubbles graphs EROs. Right. And so it's like it's an info graphic like info chart, if people know what that is. So I was like I'm going to infiltrate resume, and they didn't have one of the time. It was they didn't have one called resume. So I picked one that was like the closest to what I would think it would be cool. And so I'm like, okay. So I'm going to do a bunch of cutting and pasting dragging and make this and make it longer to right? So I'm like, oh, if you wanna stand out from the pile. Well, number one start with a size that doesn't fit the pile who X. Yes. Or like it was so so I make like this. I don't know. It was like it was like seventeen by nine like a scroll on card stock. Yeah. Right. And so like, I made made those and so that that right there just going to get you like, we got at least have a conversation with this person who somebody would turn something like this. But yeah, it it it kinda worked, you know, as far as getting a foot in the door is like standing out be different. Don't be like the crowd because if you're just plugging into what the rest of the crowd is doing your your fucking does your near invisible, man. What? So when you showed up for tryouts, how many people were there. No, man. I think it was like he was like sixty something. Yep. Yeah. And they had like six six spots or something like that. And it was like literally a guy with a clipboard. There would be like. Okay, moguls, and they would like were like next, and you would ski the moguls the best you could. And they were like, right. Your score down. And like, it was a full tryout thing. I was I was like this Weightman this is like this legal legit like for real like tryout deal and. I I was there is no way. I was even close to being in the top eighty percent of the best skiers on the entire thing. Right. But they're not like they're not looking for, you know, on the patrols. They're not really necessarily looking. They're looking for a strong capable skiers dip that they can work with and probably be taught teachable. Yup. And work ethic. And so they do little tests like they one of the tests they did. And I could see in from our background like you learn how to learn like, I'm like, oh, we've been through selection processes, I know what's happening right now. So they had us all standing up on top of this avalanche problem. Whether like, okay, here's a scenario. We got two people buried down here, and we all had packs on with you know, shovel and probe in our packs. Like, everyone had the same gear didn't have anything and they're like so go ahead and start and I'm like, well what they're looking for right now initiative. So then I I I know the basics of like, you know, how to do I'd been through an a level one in. Gary level one have lunch rescue. I that that course knocked out, and which most a lot of people that are ahead higher than that than I did. But they didn't have the initiative to lean forward and like make something happen. Everyone was like waiting to be told like waiting for someone else or waiting for someone else to come and do it. So me, and like a couple of other people just poured right into the avalanche problem we coordinated as as a team like, okay, you're you're get your mom. You're shoveling pro Brady I got a signal ski down to the SOS. You've got a signal skied right down to it. And then went through our probing procedures headed started digging. And there were still people standing there wondering what happened? So the next day because those people were hopefully, gone. Yeah. I don't think any of them made it. Yeah. So they're they're like patrols looking for who's gonna who's gonna realize what the situation who's gonna react who's going to go at least try. You don't have to be perfect. But at least like lean forward take initiative and don't be afraid to stick your neck out there in front of a bunch of people at a tryout in and give it your best shot and do the best. You can. And create create an immediate small team with people you've never met before that know, the basic same level of avalanche knowledge and create a team and make teamwork happen and kind of make it happen. And. You'll see I saw I've seen that everywhere that I've ever met. Whether it's people that they're always waiting on the walls or kind of like the wallflowers or waiting for someone else to do it. Because they don't wanna make the mistake. They don't want to be exposed and they're a little bit afraid to to feel to leave their comfort zone in their comfortable being on the wall. They're not comfortable stepping forward going. I've got the basics of the knowledge to to to go after this who else who will TASR it may maybe someone else will step forward that knows more than I am. And you're the fucking team leader. But I'm a great deg. And I'm great I'm great at at probe in like, I'm in shape, and I can do this all day long. And so you immediately find your spot put yourself out there and go for that was your first year own ski patrol the big learning curve. Yeah. Like, yeah. Like like going on racks. And and just seeing people hurt with broke legs and stuff like that. What was the first call you ever went up to my buddy who was on ski patrol. My buddy. My Buddy's, dad. Oh, he was on my buddies on ski patrol his dad got hurt and. I can remember it a hip or femur, but he'd got hurt and I was driving the toboggan and went down there. And it was my first bog and ride like toboggans like this giant slat people. Don't know what's. Because these big handles that come out fronts, you ski in front of it and toboggans long enough to put you know, like a person can lay down flat in it's a big sled. So I pull it next to my Buddy's, dad. He's like dad, this is, Sean. And then he's of course, he he he he's heat to ease his daddy. He's like he was a former navy seal, and I'm like man come on. What is it? Always go back to that Faulk. You can't get rid of it. You know what I mean? In a hold him down. But we didn't tell him. It was the first time till the bottom. Like, I was like, hey, how's awesome? He's like dad that was the first time he's ever taken down the non-aligned toboggan his dad's like what will he did? Great. Thanks. You know, was all it was all good. But it it's but it felt really good to get back on the team. Again, you know, and you have a mission where you get to help people because it does it feels good like some, you know, you're up on the hill and someone you know, they fractured femur, and they're an sane amount of pain. And it it for a lot of people up there. It's like you see a lot of people every day while you're at work on what could be the worst day of their life, and you show up right there where stay of their life, and you help them, and it feels good. It does ski patrol painting thing it doesn't pay fucking shit. It costs money to fuck and do that job. And so like anyone's like how much they pay like, they don't pay any anything. We've I mean. I'm I pay with my time. Because if I were to take this any time, I do that. And I put it into this business the business would celebrate. Yep. But I don't want to miss. It's like the balance. Right. You find. You have time. And then you've you're gonna get money. And if you can align a shitload of money, and you get a shitload of time. That's great you, and you can get there after a lot of years hard work, but you're going to give away a lot of time to get money. And I feel like after doing what we've done and we talked about this on the your Heli skiing yesterday. I figure a little bit not all of these grinded out, hustle hustle. Guys. You see on the internet have they've never seen any real shit in life, man. Like, they've never slave never seen people get killed. They've never killed people or seen their friends die in like had experienced a tremendous amount of fucking loss to realize that your tie. You're not getting your fucking time back dude, you can hustle until you're seventy good luck. I'm not going to do that. Yeah. I'm gonna hustle to a degree. But I'm going to balance it out and spending time with people. I love, you know, well, recalibrate your perspective. Totally and and part of the battle. There's you're like, well, I could hustle more. I could just give up. For my time. So I can get more money later. But then when I have more money than I'm just probably gonna go do what I'm doing now. Anyway, like if I literally had ten million dollars in the Bank. I'll be on ski patrol. I I would do it. Because it doesn't pay me money. I'm doing that want to do it. Yeah. Which is the best job. You could ever have. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I love it in every everybody's everybody's goal is different. And and and no one's no one's path. I will never ever sit down and go what you should do is get out and go mountains and start skiing go on ski patrol because very few people. That's what they wanna do. What you definitely finding something that you want to do really bad. It could be business, and that's great. But I don't know you you got your time's important don't grind your life to dust. Perfect ending ever. Cheers, homey. Me.

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NPR News: 02-28-2020 8AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 5 months ago

NPR News: 02-28-2020 8AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman Markets Tumbling in Europe again today about the corona virus and its effect on the global economy. Npr's Frank Langfitt reports London's key footsie. One hundred index plunged more than three percent at the opening bell the footsie-100 which tracks the UK's largest companies has lost more than ten percent of its value. This week that's the sharpest fall since the euro currency crisis of two thousand eleven and the financial crisis of two thousand and eight this morning markets were also sharply down in Germany and France stocks fell across sectors particularly airlines including the budget carrier Easyjet and the UK flagship British Airways which are both cutting flights to Italy. A huge tourist draw where cases surged past six hundred yesterday. Governments are also considering canceling large events for instance Swiss authorities are banning events drawing more than a thousand people until at least mid-march Frank Langfitt. Npr News London tomorrow with South Carolina State Primary election. President trump is holding a rally tonight in North Charleston. Next week it's Super Tuesday with fifteen presidential contests. One of those states is Massachusetts. A new poll finds Vermont. Senator Bernie Sanders has up a substantial lead their over Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren. The poll is from member station. W. Far as Anthony Brooks reports after disappointing results in Iowa New Hampshire in Nevada. Our poll suggests that Warren has a big challenge in her home state. It found that sanders leads by eight points. Twenty five percent to seventeen percent among Democratic voters in Massachusetts fueled by younger voters. He's the choice of close to half of voters under the age of forty five. Anthony Brooks reporting. Nearly four hundred people gathered at a suburban Milwaukee Church last night for a vigil. This was held for the victims of the mass shooting. This week at the city's Molson Coors Brewery Wisconsin. Public Radio's Alana Watson. Reports Ridge Community Church Pastor Mark. White organized the vigil. He says everyone needed the opportunity to grieve. We just felt like there needed to be space for people to come to. And I think there's just something very important times like this where we're together. Milwaukee Resident Wanda. Welsh says. Her heart is still heavy. I really feel that. We need to continuously petition our legislators and work with politicians and the community to help better this world. The shooter killed five people in himself on Wednesday police are still investigating and have not released a motive for NPR news. I'm Alana Watson in Milwaukee. Turkey has asked for consultations with NATO over the fighting in northern Syria. Turkey is blaming Syria for the airstrike. Deaths of thirty three of its soldiers in Midland province. Russia is backing the Syrian military but Russia denies any role in the deaths of the Turkish soldiers. You're listening to NPR news from Washington in Oregon State Democratic lawmakers say they'll try subpoenas to force republican state lawmakers to come back to the capital the Republicans have skipped the legislative session to block climate. Change bills they oppose some of the Oregon. Gop lawmakers may be out of state by fleeing the capital Republicans are preventing Democrats from getting the required quorum needed to conduct any state business. A proposed bill in Georgia would punish doctors if they help transgender youth during their transition from member station W. B. Susannah Kepler reports on the legislation in Georgia state legislature. The Georgia bill is similar to others introduced in several states this year. It targets medical providers who assist transgender youth with hormones or surgery. They could face one to ten years in prison and lose their medical license. Jeff Graham with the LGBTQ advocacy group. Georgia equality says it's political pandering by conservatives in an election year these sorts of medical decisions need to be made with parents medical providers and the children and politicians and the state has no business getting involved in this medical decisions. Conservative lawmakers called the treatments child abuse advocates however say they are reversible for NPR news. I'm Susanna Caputo. In Atlanta of federal judge in Washington State has ruled against the trump administration. Saying it cannot use money for military construction to help build a southern border wall. The lawsuit was brought by Washington. State's attorney general. The military funding in question is supposed to be used to build a pier at a US military base west of Seattle home to some US nuclear. Submarines I'm KORVA COLEMAN NPR news.

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Oprah Honors American Heroes: The Freedom Riders Reunite 50 Years Later

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

28:18 min | 4 months ago

Oprah Honors American Heroes: The Freedom Riders Reunite 50 Years Later

"I'm Oprah Winfrey and I'm delighted to bring you the Oprah Winfrey show the podcast starting march third. You can listen to some of the most powerful life lessons a really. Never thought of it. That way brilliant breakthroughs and Aha moments from the show that I believe is one of the greatest classrooms in the world. Never allow them take you somewhere else. The podcast features handpicked moments from the four thousand five hundred sixty one episodes. We taped over twenty five years. I hope that these classic Oprah shows will help to continue to eliminate your path to all that you were meant to be subscribed to the Oprah. Show the podcast on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you find your podcast and begin the journey to your best self. Every single person ever will meet shares that common desire. They WANNA know. Do you see me. Do you hear me. That's what I say mean anything to you. Twenty Five seasons four thousand five hundred sixty one episodes. I believe the Oprah Winfrey show was one of the greatest classrooms in the world. A rolling never thought of it that way. The AHA moments the breakthroughs. The connections the occasional ugly cry so terribly missing every single minute the L. O. Ell's the moments that mattered eye-opening light lessons. Never allow them to take you somewhere. I'm bringing them back. It's time to open the ball. I personally chosen these classic episodes to share with you again. Every single person you ever will meet shares that common desire. They want to know. Do you see me. Do you hear me. That's what I say mean anything to you. You're listening to the Oprah Winfrey. Show the podcast for many of you watching. I know that this may be the first time you're even hearing about the freedom rides but let me tell you if it were not for these American heroes. This country would be a very different place right now and the lies of millions of you would be dramatically different. I know my life would be were it not for them. We begin with a look back at what life was like back in nineteen sixty one when the freedom writers movement was born in Nineteen Sixty one. John F. Kennedy was sworn in as America's thirty fifth president at just forty three. He was the youngest president elected to office. The camelot era was for many. A time of hope and optimism. Gas was just thirty one cents a gallon at many family saw the USA in their Chevrolet that same year the United States put our first man into space popular. Tv shows like leave it to beaver. And the Andy Griffith show depicted an idyllic all American life but those images were far from the reality for many African Americans especially the deep South. Jim Crow laws forced black people to use separate. Water fountains separate public restrooms and waiting rooms even on buses and trains. We had to sit in the back in Nineteen forty-six and again in nineteen sixty the. Us Supreme Court outlawed these racist practices but many white southerners continue to follow their own. Set of rules during those hate-filled terrifying times in the south and other parts of the country a fearless and determined group of Americans men and women black and white many of them still in college at the time. Join together to fight against racial injustice in our country it was dangerous and daring some even considered it a suicide mission. Thirteen courageous freedom. Riders would risk their lives to board buses in Washington. Dc and head south into the belly of the segregation beast. The plan was to buy tickets on interstate buses for a two week journey. That would end in New Orleans along the way the writers with Test Federal Laws that prohibited segregation by riding in the front of buses and sitting in waiting rooms designated whites only and colored. The movement was organized by core the Congress of racial equality core trained all the freedom riders to be nonviolent how to protest without ever striking back. The freedom writers hope this nonviolent movement would force the federal government to step up and protect civil rights. It was that optimism that would lead to one of the most significant moments in American history. On the fiftieth anniversary of the freedom rides. We honor the four hundred and thirty six brave and determined people who risked their lives to change our nation as an African American woman born in Mississippi Nineteen fifty four and raised in the south deep debt of gratitude to the freedom writers. As do we all ladies and gentlemen I stand among heroes. Join me in welcoming one hundred and seventy eight survivors of the nineteen sixty one freedom rides. It was fifty years ago that the freedom rides officially began after several days of intense training. A small group of activists fighting to integregation believed in the deepest part of themselves that they were ready for anything. Even the possibility of death. Thirteen brave freedom. Writers boarded buses with no security. Only their hope an undying determination to change an inhumane way of life. They knew they could be viciously attacked even killed but there need to fight for racial equality was greater stronger more significant than the fear of losing their own lives but they had no idea what lay ahead on the eleventh day of the ride may fourteenth nineteen sixty one two buses left. Atlanta one hour apart freedom. Riders were on both buses along with regular passengers. The first bus crossed the Alabama state line and was soon surrounded by an angry mob organized by the Ku Klux Klan the KKK the crowd carrying metal pipes clubs. Chains smashed windows and dented. The sides of the bus. The terrifying siege lasted about fifteen minutes. Eventually the driver was able to pull away but did not realize someone had slashed. The tires panicked. The driver went for help abandoning the bus. Then something crashed through a window with their lungs filled with smoke the passengers spilled out onto the grass and into the hands of the angry mob. Genevieve Hughes Houghton and Hank Thomas are two of the surviving freedom writers who were on the bus that was set ablaze so welcome. Thank you very much. At what point were you when you were on that bus? Did you think this is serious? And we may die when the mob had pretty much broken up most of the windows they were trying to get into the door but fortunately for us. When the bus driver got off the bus he locked the door so they couldn't get inside so for a moment. I thought we were safe. Do you remember how you were able to escape. Well after awhile. While I couldn't breath any longer so I thought it would be good idea to go to the front of the bus. Maybe there'd be some oxygen there. Did you all think you were going to die on that bus? I certainly did. I knew if I got off the bus. I knew the mob would kill. How old were you at the time to nineteen and we're going to we're going to kill these NATO's and so I had that particular choice. If I stayed on the bus and frankly I decided to at that point to commit suicide. It was just a question of how it was going to die. I was going to die so I thought that if I breathe in the smoke took a big deep breath of the smoke. It would put me to sleep. And that's the way I would die. I decided to do that. And when I did. Of course involuntary actions of your body takes over you and you try to fight for air so ran up to the front of the bus and the people outside were holding the bust door when they saw that we were trying to get all and I could hear them saying. Let's burn them alive. They're trying to get off the bus and at that moment that fuel tank in the back of the bus exploded and exploded. Everybody ran the ones outside. And that's the only way we waited to get off that bus. How were usually at the time? Twenty eight twenty eight throughout the movement. There were southerners both black and white who risked their lives to help. The freedom writers one of them was a brave seventh grader. At the time imagine Janey foresight was just twelve years when the freedom writers bus was firebombed. Right in front of her family's grocery store fourteen people were trapped inside and Jamie is here with us. Come on out Jamie wonderful. You're an amazing woman. That is so courageous. Twelve years old and I understand that after that was your family ostracized because of what you did yes and no it was mostly me what happened to you after this well. I was waiting for a shoe to drop because I knew it was not a safe thing to defy. The Ku Klux Klan heard that they'd had one of their meetings wherever and whenever they were and that they had discussed what to do about. Richard foresights. Little Girl Jim and I found out that in that meeting some of them had decided to give me a pass. Because I was young and obviously didn't know what I was doing and I was weak minded. But if you had been older if you had been the age genevieve was at that time. If you were twenty eight and you had done that children trashed. Yeah she would have been. It would not have been safe for an adult man or woman to do what I did. Some of the freedom writers explain why they got on those buses fifty years ago. I got on the bus because I knew that deride must continue. I got on the bus because I heard this compelling voice. I got on the bus because as a Jew. I was against prejudice racism and hatred. I would rather be dead than not free and that is the reason that I got on that bus. What do you believe in so strongly that you'd be willing to die for hearing these stories of the freedom? Riders makes you think about that. I know in my heart. I don't believe I would have had the courage to do what these brave souls did. I don't believe I would have had the courage to get on those buses. United States congressman. John Lewis is a prominent figure in the civil rights movement. He's a name. We all should know who wants work side by side with Dr Martin Luther King. He joined the Freedom Rides as a twenty one year old seminary students of your own life at twenty one on. May Ninth Nineteen Sixty one when he stepped off the bus and into a South Carolina bus terminal. He was beaten bloody by an angry white. Man Take us back to that day. Welcome welcome thank you very much. Omay Ninety nine hundred and sixty one. My sleep mate was a young white gentleman by the name of Abbott Bigalow. And the moment we stepped off the bus. We attempted in a so-called white waiting was Mark White Lady and a group of young men came toward US beating us and I was beaten love bloody when you were trained to be non-violent and then you're put in the situation where people are actually beating on you. What spaced did you have to go into to not to fight back. Because you're you're natural. Instinct is to protect yourself during the time. I was in beaten and other times when I was being beaten. I have what I call and executive session with myself. Wow said WANNA take unprepared on a freedom ride prepared to die. You were prepared to die. I wanted to answer gay. Gatien a racial discrimination. I growing up seeing no signs. I didn't like it so I wanted to do something about it. So elwin Wilson says he knows exactly what happened to John Lewis that day because he is the man who beat him after years of regret. Elwin apologized to the congressman in two thousand nine and today. Elwin speaks out against bigotry and intolerance. So thank you for being here today. I know this takes a lot of courage on your part to show your face to the world into say I am the man who beat you win? Can you tell us? Did you have the epiphany or the revelation or did it occur to you that black people were just as human as you? When did that occur to you will back? I prayed So many times that I can meet a man. It abated station. Well were you a member of the Ku Klux Klan? You were blown to plan short okay. Was he the only person you beat up that day? After he would be in blood in the home he policemen came in asked him suited. Do Warn the press charges motors. He said no she would not here to call. So we're here for people to love each other. Heard him say no? I'm not here to causing trouble. I'm here for love. Did that strike you as being what kind of what is that Oprah. Tate played a park coming so many times. Would he say he wouldn't out to harm? Nobody Mr Wilson came to my office. He said I TAC. You and I'm sorry I want to apologize. We accept my apology and I said yes. And he game Ya. Was that the first time you knew who had actually and he store cry a hook back to us also and use the first and only person apologized to me. Wow thank you thank you. Before I got on the bus I wrote out a wheel. I was afraid that I might not get back home to my family when I decided to go on the freedom ride. My parents were quite upset. My mother was GONNA get killed and my father thought that I had ruined my life. I got on the bus eighteen years old. My mother was terribly worried about me but I felt it was worth the risks segregation. Being such an evil system did not plan to survive the trip. Dangerous now willing to sacrifice my life but freedom of my people. After several days of bloodshed. The freedom writers were stranded in Alabama. No bus drivers were willing to take them any further and they were surrounded by hostile racist mob. Freedom Rides were over southern White supremacists thought they had one but they did not know about an utterly fearless. Young woman named Diane Nash. A softspoken force to be reckoned with. She was Diane. Nash was a leader of the Nashville student movement. In nineteen sixty one. She turned twenty three on the very day. The freedom rides were cancelled but Diane was not willing to give up. And so that same day. She agreed to coordinate. A second wave of freedom ride keeping the movement alive in the middle of final exams. Twenty-one students from various Nashville colleges left school to join the fight for equality when US attorney. General Robert Kennedy heard that more students were continuing the freedom rides. He called his assistant John. Seigenthaler welcome Diane. Nash and John Seigenthaler Bravo Bravo. George just had enough. Yes you had had enough. Segregation was so humiliating. If you went downtown in Nashville. During the lunch hour blacks would be sitting on the curb eating their lunch that they had brought from home or dropped from a restaurant on a takeout basis. And it was. It was humiliating and I hated it. The students that Diane Organiz Miss Nash organized eventually made it to Montgomery Alabama. Were clansman had been waiting for them all night. A full scale riot then broke out. John Seigenthaler was there. John You were there representing the attorney. General Robert Journal in the United States. Didn't want this to happen. Not Want it. I mean the last thing administration needed wasn't explosion conflagration of violence. And so you end up in the middle of the riot. I wound up in the middle of Violent Ryan. I was hitting Ed. I'd never been knocked unconscious before. And then they not me down and kicked me on to the car and I woke up thirty minutes later. Policemen finding pick me up. It's almost impossible to imagine that we were that sort of southern society at the time that that fifty years ago. Oh and and when you when you think about that you wonder where it came from. Where the courage of these children came from. Yes every time. I complied with the Segregation Stein. When used a back door or something I felt like I'm agree that I am inferior to inferior to use The ordinary facility that the general public used and it was a real problem for me. I'm glad it was a problem. I'm glad it was a problem. You did something about it. Thank you MS nationalist. Battle on Day twenty one. The National Guard escorted the freedom riders out of Alabama. But there were no feelings of relief as they crossed the border into Mississippi Mississippi was the state they feared the most when the freedom riders walked into the white only waiting room in the Jackson Mississippi bus terminal they were immediately arrested and eventually sent to Parchman penitentiary. Those arrests inspired hundreds more to become freedom. Riders they came by bus plane train from every corner of the United States to Mississippi men and women of every age every race and religion determined to fill parchman prison an overthrow segregation ernest. Rip Patent Junior Carol. Ruth Silver and congressman. John Lewis were among the three hundred freedom. Riders who spent the summer of nineteen sixty one in parchment prison congressman. Lewis when you arrived in Mississippi and knowing as I said earlier I grew up knowing. It's one of the most racist states. Did you know you're in trouble? I grew up in Alabama thought Alabama was beheaded but I had never been in Mississippi before when I saw that sign that said welcome to Mississippi. The might know your state heart start beating a little faster seem the air warmer. I hear that they tried to make your prison sitting especially miserable rip. Yes it did We we did a lot of singing and they didn't like to sing and every time that they would threaten to do something. We would seem for example. We're GONNA take your mattress you can take. How Mattress Oh yes. You can take our mattress or yes. You can take out mattress. You can take mattress. You can take out mattress. Oh yes now that man sleeping on steel but we were willing to give up those mattresses. So were you. Also you were also in parchment prison right. There were twenty three girls say girls. 'cause we were pretty young in one side were you. At the time I was twenty one. Twenty One and those twenty three girls were in a cell in Heinz County. That was built for four. So there were four bunks and the rest of US slept on the floor and we were told they're going to take you to parchment and we were really afraid at that point because the the reputation of Parchman is that it's a place that a lot of people get sent and don't come back. I'm back from some back. Wow on September twenty second nineteen sixty one. The Interstate Commerce Commission issued an order taking down all of the Jim Crow signs from all of the bus and rail stations. In the south the freedom writers had one fifty years after the original movement. Forty college students are now retracing the route of the freedom rides from Washington DC to New Orleans they are riding alongside some of the original freedom. Writers I'm getting on the best because I believe that knowledge is power on the bus because the movement is not finish. I'm really interested in. Is what inspires ordinary people to stand up for justice and how young people can get involved in sustaining a movement around the world. That's what's Great. Congratulations to William to to Michael Tanya and Caitlyn who was selected out of one thousand students to join the rides. Thank you for being here. I wanted to do this show today. I think it's so important for all Americans to know who we are where we came from how we came to be you. You have to know who you are and what your history is Ray. Arsenault is the first professional historian to write a comprehensive book on just this movement it's called Freedom Writers and beautifully written historical account. You're gifted storyteller. Because this is all about every story each individual's story here. Why did you want to tell this and these stories? Well as we've seen today this is a story that had to be told When I began work on the book about thirteen years ago I wasn't sure that anybody could do full justice to the to the freedom writers story but I had to try and the just the dramatic power of what they accomplished back in. Nineteen sixty one. Everybody who dared to get on those buses is a hero and a heroine. That's really the story of the Freedom Rides to me. They had the courage inside themselves. It was. They found something larger than themselves and they signed on for life. I mean they weren't. They weren't going to pass their responsibility off to to anyone else. It's always the young people thank you. I would like to give special acknowledgment to five of the visionaries who helped inspire and plan the freedom rides. George Houser Gordon. Carry Tom. Gaither and Reverend James Lawson and C T Vivian. Also reverend thread shuttles were critical role in protecting the freedom riders. It has really been an honor for me and I know for those of you who were part of this audience and those of you at home to celebrate all of you on behalf of all of America. May I say you make us proud to call ourselves? Americans they may also say we stand in reverence for what you have done and we can ask ourselves these questions as we look at the courage that you will showed at such a young age. What's wrong with the world? And what can we do to change it? Thank you thank you for that. I'm Oprah Winfrey and you've been listening to the Oprah Winfrey. Show the PODCAST. If you haven't yet go to apple podcast subscribe rate and review this. Podcast join me next week. For another Oprah show the podcast. I thank you for listening.

United States Oprah Winfrey Oprah Alabama congressman Mississippi John Lewis Jim Crow Ku Klux Klan elwin Wilson Apple Genevieve Hughes Houghton John Seigenthaler Washington America New Orleans Diane Nash George Houser Gordon John
John Lewis

Oprah’s Master Class: The Podcast

32:47 min | 1 year ago

John Lewis

"Today's episode is supported by Ernest Ernest has helped thousands of people save money with personalized rates and payments for their student loans. Visit Ernest dot com slash masterclass to check your rate and claim your special two hundred and fifty dollar bonus. If you sign alone, this bonus offer expires March two thousand nineteen but you can apply to anytime. Loans made by Ernest operations LLC analyst number one two zero four nine one seven California. Cfl license number six oh five four seven eight eight Ernest low interest loans designed for you support. For this facade comes from squarespace squarespace makes it easier than ever to launch your passion project from showcasing your work to selling products of any kind with beautiful templates and the ability to customize just about anything you can easily make a gorgeous website all on your own. And if you do get stuck square spaces twenty four seven award-winning customer support is there to help head to squarespace dot com slash masterclass for a free trial. And when you're ready to launch. Much use the offer code masterclass to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website, or domain. I don't use the word hero lightly. Congressman John Robert Louis is a hero in the turbulent nineteen sixties young John Lewis stood side by side with Martin Luther King junior and other civil rights crusaders displaying unwavering courage through years of continual, non violent protests. John Lewis battled segregation head on and China spotlight on the cruelty of racism in America. Whether he was participating in sit ins and Nashville marching for equality in Washington DC, taking a stand on the Edmund Pettus bridge in Selma or proudly serving his district in Atlanta. John Lewis has always embodied, persistence, fearlessness and hope. The son of Alabama sharecroppers. John Lewis grew up witnessing the injustices of the Jim crow south. It was here that he began. His life's work to fight for equality and Justice for everybody. Everybody has a story. And there's something to be learned from every experience. Use your life as a class. This is masterclass with congressman John Lewis. I grew up in rural Alabama about ten miles from a little town called Troy in one thousand nine hundred eighty four when I was four years old. And I do remember when it was full. My father has say three hundred dollars and with two three hundred dollars. A man sold him a hundred and ten acres of land on the form. I fell in love raising chickens been my mother, a father wanted to have chicken for lunch of dinner at en-, lack it, and I will boycott demille, but the chickens became my friends, and as a little boy I wanted to be a minister. So what happened my brothers and sisters and cousins, we all of our chickens together in a chicken yard. They will make up the audience that congregation, and I was so I appreciate to these chickens. I wanted to stay the souls of some of these chickens, and I would tell them not to be good be kind not to fight and somebody chicken about a as some of the chicken Shaked aheads. They never quite said a man, but they tended to listen to me much better than some of my colleagues. Listen to me today in the congress. I grew up with the I guess a restless spirit when we go off to school. We had the broken down school buses and all of the little black children and to go down Matan, the Pula staff schools and all the little white children went to another school. I saw the signs that said white men colored men white women colored women I den like what I still in a Ethel thanks to be better. And when I was fifteen years old, I heard Martin Luther King junior already. Oh, listen to Dr king inspired me. He gave me hope and kept up with the drama that was taking place around the country. What was happening Montgomery in about the supreme court decision. A nine thousand nine hundred four I dream of went to a better school Ryan about a bus. I didn't like the fact that my mother and my father, my grandparents, my uncles and arms in had any rights. My mother was Sylvan over again. Boy, that's the way it is. She was saying cool. It be quiet. Don't get in trouble. Well, I was inspired to get in trouble. To get in. Good trouble. Good traveler is simple. When you see something. That is not right. Not fair. Not Jess you have a moral obligation. You have a mission. You have a mandate to speak up to speak out. You may get arrested and taken to jail you may be beaten enough bloody. And you could be murdered. You could die. But his party depressed at you have to pay not just Liberato south, but have free and liberate others. I've been stuff to college in Nashville, Tennessee that this time I'm eighteen is uncle a mind gave me a hundred dollar deal more money than ever hand. Gave me a footlocker put everything that I own a septa chickens in mauka and took a greyhound bus to Nashville, Tennessee. I remember so well meeting Jim Lawson young Methodist minister, he represented an organization called the fellowship of reconciliation. He has studied the philosophy and a discipline a nonviolence. In the fall of nineteen fifty nine he stored conducting these unbelievable training sessions, a small group of students the come listen to him go through role play playing. We will have what we call social drama because black people and white people couldn't be seated together and the like people had to go upstairs. Why people went downstairs you couldn't be seated together in a restaurant at a lunch. Connor. We wanted to change that we store sit in on a regular basis. You'll be sitting there an orderly, peaceful, nonviolent fashion. Someone will come up and spit on us put a light cigarette, and I had pool. Hot water hot coffee in pull us of the stews. We had but because the do's and don'ts of the sit in movement is someone push. You don't push back is someone Kirscher, and I curse you wanted to project that it was something that the community could rally Ron in support. Why people cursing making a lot of noise. These young men and women just sit in Dan, orderly, peaceful fashion. Nonviolence it is not the absence of islands is the presence of Justice. It is a present a bringing the dirt and filled from under the road out of the corner into the open light. So we can deal with to help convince people who may be standing on the sideline may be watching. This is the right thing to do. In the city and spread around the south like wildfire. And we were told over over again if we continue to sit in we will be arrested. And I wanted to be prepared in February get arrested and go to jail. I wanted to look with some young people. Call shop a fresh clean. I wanna a new suit the where the jail I had very little money. So I went downtown Maciel till us men store. And bought a suit a paid five dollars for the suit on that day, eighty nine students arrested became the first mass arrests in and sit in movement. We feel the city jail. And we conducted nonviolent workshops while we was in jail. We sang songs a created a sense of solidarity that we became one big family. Jim Lawson told us to whole concept of the beloved community that this idea that in the bosom every human being they is despotic. Divinity? At his despotic or something that is sacred and holy especia-. And we don't have a right to destroy. You know, no, one wanna go to g nobody wants to be beaten no-one wanna feel pain. But you come to that point. And you have what I call an executive session show. Steph say if just apprise it must pay for people to be free. To be liberated to behold dinner. We must be prepared to pay that price. And I was arrested. I feel liberated I feel free. I feel like I crossover in look clean. I did look Shah. I did fresh. And I have not looked back since one of John Lewis is boldest decisions was to become one of the original thirteen freedom writers, the US supreme court had already ruled that segregation in interstate travel was unconstitutional, but in many places those laws simply weren't being enforced. And so in nineteen sixty one John Lewis and other civil rights activists decided to get on a bus to challenge segregation in the racially divided south. They nearly got themselves killed in the process. John Lewis knew full well, the danger and the difficulty of what he was getting into. But to hear him tell it the freedom rides were something that simply had to be done. He was twenty one years old. The freedom. Ryan came into being on the port of an organization called cool. The congress eraser equality. It was to test a decision of the United States Supreme court ban racial discrimination during interstate travel because Lanc people in white people couldn't be seated together to travel Suva genu- the North Carolina cycle, Anna Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi to New Orleans. We made a decision with core. Another groups that we will is the freedom rides store and in may nineteen sixty one I was twenty one years old came to Washington. A group of us went to Chinese restaurant in Washington DC now grown up in rural Alabama going to school in Nastro tendency, I never had Chinese food before. We had this wonderful unbelievable meal. But someone said that evening, you should eat whale. Because this may be like the last supper Omay fourth. We left that morning or greyhound bus to go from Washington DC all the way to New Orleans. When we arrive in a little town called rock he'll socket liner. We got off the bus when into this waiting room. Mark white waiting. A group of young man memo the clan. Attacked us beat us enough us line and a pool of blood. The bus was burned in Anniston, Alabama. Now, the bus was burned and people were beaten in Birmingham and Montgomery Alabama in anger mob medicine degree, degrom bus station. They I jump members of the press. So if you had a camera a pan you I want to be attacked and then the turn on us. My sleep mate on that day at a ride. Was young white student. We both beaten enough line mistreat, bloody. I'd had got a patch on my head. My seat mate was in hospital. Eventually, Dr Martin Luther King junior revenue wrath Abernathy came to Montgomery for the heard about the freedom rides. Her put it happened. We had a meeting with him said we're going to have a mass media and supported a freedom rides at the fresh Baptist church in downtown Montgomery. That was an attempt to burn a church the more than fifteen hundred people in a church just in Montgomery was putting on the martial law. And then we made a decision to leave dumber and traveled to Mississippi. And go into Mississippi end of a been there before, but I grew up he ended Mississippi was worst in a state of Alabama. This is the state for immaterial was Lynch does is the state of people came up missing. So the national guard took us to the Mississippi State line, and you get to Mississippi and Mississippi State troopers put us in jail black and white freedom riders nen they've made a decision to take us all to parchment statement. Attention a guy standing there with us Reifer. And you said we have Nicosia they eat you. They would beat. You is a saying you Dan freedom songs now is set to each one of us, take all your clothing. It was an attempt to humanize us. They segregate us put all of the white men in one sale block all the black men in another. They did the same thing. For the white and black women and most of us stayed in jail for forty four days, but the freedom ride lead to segregation of public transportation. All across the south president Kennedy, Trenton, the Robert Kennedy was able to get the Interstate Commerce Commission to issue on order. Take a nano signs that said white waiting colored waiting in a deep south more than any lesson left. Learn you have to be consistent emperor. Learn to be not just persistent, but also insistent, and if you see something that need to be done. Do it. Maybe hard and may be difficult. But keep the faith. I. The March on Washington was the idea of a Philip Randolph this Dina blank leadership a man who had been wanted to see a March on Washington since today's Roosevelt. President-candidate less to the White House to meet with him Kennedy. They liked the idea you said if you bring all these people to Washington won't there be violence and chaos and disorder Mr. Randolph responded in his bare tone voice, instead, Mr President orderly, peaceful nonviolent protests, and we start organizing. We were able to bring more than two hundred fifty thousand people to March on Washington, and we all had to prepare a speech was very young. Twenty three years ago. It all of my hair and a few pounds lighter. When phila- Randolph said a Phnom present to you young John Lewis, the national chairman of the student nonviolent coordinating committee looked to my right? Are so hundreds and hundred young people. Who have been involved during the early days look straight ahead of so to see if he managed then I look to the enough. I so young black men. Young white man up in the trees Jonah get a bed of you an innocent myself with this is it in straight ahead again. And something said to me go forward, and I opened my mouth and asteroid speaking and some people sought that might speech was a little Strom that was too radical. But I thought it was rather a good statement. And then Mondo cane junior came up as deterrent speaker. Effort, Dr king speak in preached so many times but on that day he was on fire. He spoke out of the death of his soul. He preached a sermon he turned the steps of the Lincoln Memorial into more than they pull a pip. He knew he was doing it. We all lifted up. When the March was all over president Kennedy invited us down to the White House. He was beaming like a prod father, and he kept saying to each one of us. You did a good job. You did a good job. And when he got to Dr king, you said you did a good job. You had a dream. That was my last time seeing president Kennedy. Dr king used to set a time is always a right to protest. What is right? He also says anything more powerful than the margin of determined people. I felt the end, and I feel today that the vote is precious is almost sacred. It is the most powerful nonviolent instrument of to that we have in a democratic society. But for many years people a color could I registered to vote especially in Lebanon states that old confederacy people stood in movable lines. People were beaten people were murdered for tempted to register to encourage other and one look comedy called Lowndes county. The kinda was more than eighty percent African America just outside of Montgomery, Alabama. There was not a single register African American voter in the commie acid present Johnson, sinus direct site in July nineteen sixty four. We said to him and affect Mr President. We need a vote ranked side. He's saying I just signed us little right site. We don't have the votes in the congress to get a vote ranks night. If you won't make me do it. That was the protests impera comment. Alabama young man was shot and murder. Because of what happened to him? We made a decision to attempt more from Selma to Montgomery and someone from Dr canes organization said John we want you to watch with us. We want you to lead is more with Jose Williams from Dr king's organization, we left church we conducted a non Valla workshop in a courtyard, and then we lined up into. To walk from Selma to Montgomery. I was went a backpack before became fashionable to wear backpacks. I thought up we're going to get arrested and go to jail so in this backpack. I wanted to have something to eat. I had one apple and went on. I had two books at toothpaste and a toothbrush. But we understood what we will walk into the streets to Salma. That shares Selma and Dallas Connie had requested at all white men. Over the age of twenty one to come down to the courthouse that Saturday night to be deputized. The become Puerto has posse. We just kept walking become to the highest point on imitators bridge. Down below. We see a sea of blue Alabama state troopers. We saw all of this water down below in Alabama river was Williams said to me, John. Can you swam? I said, no Jose. What about you? He said a little as well as too much water in this river flows to jump. We must go straight ahead. A man by the name, John cloud and inefficient himself and said, I Major John cloud. The Alabama state troopers. This was an unlawful March will not be allowed to continue. This I returned to go homes to your church as a major may. I have a word is there will be no word you. So these men putting on gas mass. He said troopers advance they came toward us beating us with nightsticks tramps horses. Releasing tickets? I was the first person to be hit was hidden ahead about state trooper with a night stick at thought. I saw death. I thought it was going to down that bridge thought it was my last non violent protests in all these many years later. A don't recall I made it back across the bridge to the church ado recall been in the church. They asked me to assess something to do audience, and I stood up and said something like, I don't understand. It have president Johnson consent troops to Vietnam. And cannot send troops to Selma Alabama to protect people wanna desires to register to vote. And then next thing new. Been taken to the good Samaritan hospital. Selma. With seventeen of us have been hospitalized and early the next day. The Monday morning warns Cain junior came to see me, and Dr king's don't wear John. We will make it from Selma. Gummer Imus hopeful I was optimistic. I never lost a sense of hope even being in pain Obinna jail. You have to have hope when you lose since a hope that sense of optimism is like giving up. President Johnson spoke to joint session of the congress spoke to the nation, and may one of the most meaningful speeches any American president. I made more than time. I was sitting in a room with mourners Cain junior and others. And I looked at him tears came down his face. And I think we all crowded a little could we knew it was just a matter of time the congress passed voting rank side and president Johnson was cited enter law. So I was there. On august. Sixth nineteen sixty five. When you signed that. I gave me one at appearance to be used as in. My mother, and my father were able to register vote for the first time. My father in particular when he became very very proud. And I think it places it was dangerous for him to sit Domi. But you said it was yes. That's my boy. For me, Dr king. Was my hero. Also, he was he was my friend. Who was like a big, brother? You know, he gave me a way out. Maybe a way in. Would you made lives better? It was just a woman's mices guy to ever wanted to meet. He would tease me from town matai. He was things like John do you steer preach? And I said Dr king from taking a shower, and he thought it was so funny. He would just laugh and on occasion, we will be traveling in Alabama someplace in Mississippi. You see a little hole in the wall. Cafe restaurant. He was said things like we should stop and get something to eat. We get arrested and go to jail, you're gonna fool a stomach, and he thought it was so finding anything it was so funny. He had a heart of go the day that Dr king was assassinated April fourth nineteen sixty. It was working Robert Kennedy campaign for the democratic nomination for president. Emperor. Robert Kennedy got up to speak. You said he has some sad news like mini people waiting to Bobby Kennedy. We own. Cried. It was a sand dog out at a know what was happening to discount. You really feel like something had died in America. And I think something died in all of us. One of the reasons forgetting involve in American politics to run for office. Felt maybe just maybe that could help continued the efforts Dr king as we will send a movement. You must continue to pick them up and put them down. You must believe some high and some way we're going to overcome. We're going to survive. May get not down. But you've got to get up. Dry, your tears. And keep moving Dern the freedom rides during the sit in during why efforts in Mississippi Rhonda vote, a working cell. I never ever thought about giving up and saying this is too much. I never thought about dropping out. You come to that point will use their I got to go on and see what the angle into be you have to. You you you have to get out there and push and pool. To try to make things better the generation yet unborn each one of us has the ability to resist not to be quite we have to be brave. We have to be bold we have to use a constitutional rights if it means a much asylum. Walk a sit in a sit down a maybe signing a petition ride on the ladder of voting. We have to be engaged all of us as members of the human family as citizen of this country. Net forces at one take us back to another place. And we're saying we're not going back but come to a flaw. We made too much progress to stop not with the turn around. That's our feel. It is put him out obligation. My mission a mandate to reach as many young people as possible. The fight is not over. We have to continue to fight. And sometimes you have to fight some of the old battles over and over again for the next generation for generation, yet, unborn you too can make a contribution. And you must. Congressman John Lewis has devoted his life to get into good trouble. But putting himself in harm's way. And staying true to his nonviolent principles. No matter how viciously he was personally. Abused? Congressman Lewis helped to change the hearts and minds of this country, his selfless deeds contributed directly to the eventual passage of the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four and the Voting Rights Act of nineteen sixty five and he has not slowed down in recent years. He's let us sit in for gun safety on the house of representatives floor and then arrested while protesting for immigration reform. In addition to fighting for the dignity of people from every walk of life. His accomplishments are historic and his life will remain an example for generations to come. It is. An honor for me to say congressman John Lewis. You are a hero and master. Dern the freedom rides during the sit in during why efforts in Mississippi Rhonda vote, a working cell. I never ever thought about giving up and saying this is too much. I never thought about dropping out. You come to the point where you say I got to go on and see what the angle into be. You have to you have to get out there and push an pool to try to make things better for generations, yet unborn each one of us has the ability to resist not to be quite we have to be brave. We have to be bold we have to use a constitutional rights. If it means a much asylum. Walk a sit in a sit down a maybe signing a petition ride on the ladder of voting. We have to be engaged all of us as members of the human family as citizen of this country net forces that want to take us back to another place. And we're saying we're not going back but come to a flaw. We made too much progress to stop not to turn around. That's our feel. It is put him out obligation. My mission a mandate to reach as many young people as possible. The fight is not over. We have to continue to fight. And sometimes you have to fight some of the old battles over and over again for the next generation for generations yet unborn. You too can make a contribution. And you must. I'm Oprah Winfrey. And you've been listening to masterclass the podcast. You can follow masterclass on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, if you haven't already go to apple podcasts and subscribe rate and review this podcast. Join me next week for another masterclass podcast.

Dr king Alabama Mississippi president congressman John Lewis Selma Alabama Congressman John Lewis Robert Kennedy Montgomery John cloud congress Washington President Johnson Nashville Jim Lawson America Ernest Ernest Ryan Congressman John Robert Louis
Dec. 1: Steve Torrence joins the show

Raceline Radio

43:22 min | 8 months ago

Dec. 1: Steve Torrence joins the show

"Host Canada across America and around the globe on the World Wide Web. This is race line on the race. Line Radio Network presented by Subaru race. Line is driven by twenty twenty Subaru wrx and wrx. Sti The a typical sports car by the Subaru. Vr's Ed the attainable sports car. That's fun to drive and by continental tire for what you do at other shoe candidate presentation here we go again with your national radio. Motorsport Authority the race. Line Radio Network. I'm Eric Thomas host anchor. Reign hosts Mahar Supreme Commander in race. Line Master Control Josh. Santos still steering the network. Boris this week San with Raleigh. Tall Pines winner. Phrasing Leo early and co-driver girlfriend tops. Yano Nicoletta an excellent story to Gel. We welcome back now to time. Nhra top drag. Reggie Champ Steve. Torrens was more entries for the Subaru race on email bag trivia contests race rap news. Lots going on. Hamilton finishes the season with an easy win of the F one Grand Prix of Abu Dhabi. Latifi makes it a pair of collection F. One More Day bounced it coin. But that's where hinch may wind up and Rangers are happy puppy at the NASCAR awards so for race fans everywhere powerful sport. Powerful radio twenty-seventh here on the air across Canada. Soon to be twenty eight. This is the race line radio network. And you're listening. Couldn't help and drew twin which disappoints me jump down as he jumped out of the business. So this guy amused rally the wind rushing past his body muffled a yawn as he reached for his parachute cord of course. Mark Matthews recently purchased a Subaru. Wrx Sti and it's hard to compete with that kind of excitement. The Twenty Nineteen Subaru wrx. Sti The atypical. Sports Car Subaru confidence in motion. It starts with vulcanized. Rubber forced into long circular rods than cut into one inch thick piece. Compressed into a freezing cold and danced with a diamond cross hatch texture around the edges. It is the humble hockey lock. Gb goodhew company celebrates the game and the workmanship behind it debuted. Goodhew work boots bench crafted to be rugged and durable J. B. goodhew built for work. We're two men and a truck so you're moving to a new home and all that's left to do is to call a mover. You know you can trust. Naturally you think two men and a truck since you know they have lots of men and lots of trucks. They'll wrap tack and move everything you will with a ninety six percent referral rating and professionalism. You can trust the choices. Simple for a free in-home estimate call today. We're two men and a truck two men and a truck they'll move who care for. Nearly one hundred and fifty years continental has been making tires for the most demanding drivers tires. You can count on regardless of what the road throws at you inspiring total confidence in any driving condition. Everything continental is learned on the racetrack. They've engineered into your tires. So you know you can trust continental no matter what you drive continental tire. For what you do Eric Thomas Race Line to the waistline radiometric. Latest News opinion. And here we go all the way. Slight Rice Rat Formula One season closer at one Grand Prix Abu Dhabi House Marina United Arab Emirates. Get to that on a second because we have bigger Canadian F. One News off the top Montreal's Nicholas Latifi now officially joining up with George Russell Williams. Nf One next year replacing Robert Cabeza. Nick has been the team's number one tester so this was really just a matter of time teepee announcing his graduation to the big cars on social media. Very big news from you today. Very excited to finally be stepping up to a fulltime race DR AT F one next year Catholic. Everyone enough for all. The words of support encouragement really means a lot of obviously have a big S to race. Weekend Ahead So I won't have time to reply all messages just yet but I will read them all. Want to get the chance and yeah very much for to keep you updated on my jury well race line. Radio was left a message for Nicholas and he will eventually. We can only pray though. The Williams comes up with a much better car for nick next year. This past season just basically a horror. Shell from top to bottom but Latifi is in f one and that is the main thing and for the first time. We'll have to full-time Canadian drivers in Formula. One with fellow Montreal or land strolls still trying to get better over at racing point in two thousand twenty so yeah what about those two final two races per Latifi at Abu Dhabi. He finished seventh and second in the twin bill to wind up. Second in the final points. Tally and his dams race team won the constructors title. Good for them now. Onto Formula One lad so the final f one race of the season as we said Abu Dhabi Yas Marina United Arab Emirates. Never had an f one season stretch into the first weekend of December. Before have we know but didn't matter to Lewis? Hamilton accrues to a milk. Run victory going lights to flag for his eleventh win of the season pulling away initially gaining almost a second landfall slowdown as. Nobody's going to catch this guy on this day that's f. One Wind career number eighty four for Lewis rest of the top five W Dobbie for stopping Leclair boathouse. Fennel Montreal's lent stroll dead last D. and F. Final Two thousand nineteen points Leclair finishing ahead of veteran Federal Land Stroll Fifteenth With Twenty. One points on the season. He only scored points in four. Gp's Ferrari started the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix the way Charlotte Clair's car under investigation for a few wall discrepancy. The amount of fuel in the car not jiving with what Ferrari reported was in the tank is no word if a penalty is pending or if it will have any effect on the finish or the points. The offseason indycar cauldron bubbling veteran driver. Infrequent Waistline Radio Guests Hash Day cut loose by Dale Coyne racing when a sponsorship deal fell through the would've paid for Saab's ride not out of work long but not in INDYCAR board is set for a full campaign of in sports cars next year would make that. J. D. C. Miller rumors abound free agent. Canadian James Hinchcliffe might take days location at coin as he is still connected with. Honda money though still an issue here too and Ed Carpenter Racing Has Pink Slip Spencer Piggott because of gas. What Yup more money or no money to pay for the ride Ed let it slide. As long as he could NASCAR stuff on Quebec's Andrew Ranger all smiles in his finest bib and Tuck the Nascar Awards Plate Rattler at the Charlotte Convention Center. Here's Twenty Nineteen Nascar Canada Championship. Got Him in. I bring my my girlfriend here. We are here with a little bit with some friends and the sponsor it's fun. I feel so great to win the championship like that. It's an awesome one. I've been working really hard and the it's just amazing to to live that I've never even seen or spoken to Andrew. Ever when he's in a bad mood just seems to be a happy guy all the time even back to his indycar and yet dirt modified days to the continental tire. Sports car report brought to you by continental tire for what you do. Two thousand nine F one champion Radio Guest Jenson. Button will leave Japan's Super Gt Championship. Now that their season is all done remains to be seen whether button who became a father earlier. This year will continue racing thirty nine year olds last F. One show was at the two thousand. Seventeen Monaco Grand Prix. Standing in for the indy. Five hundred bound Fernando Alonzo after stepping away from the sport on a full-time basis. At the end of two thousand sixteen button had one world title in fifteen wins three hundred and six F one starts been a regular guest on Sky Sports. Tv coverage during the two thousand nine hundred F one season. The rally news is a presentation of the Subaru. Wrx and WRX STI creating those monster sales. Well we still have the big white winter rally in Cologne. Abi See for sports net six fifty two but we already know the Quebec as Carol Kari and Samuel Joy out of already locked up twenty nineteen Canadian rally championship presented by Subaru. They of course one team of many but US Subaru equipment helping sube clinched their fifteenth Canadian Rally Manufacturers Championship. Nice Work People's coming up on our first guest segment rally. The Tall Pines winner crazy Leo early in his rookie. Co-driver Tatyana Nikola together for some real fun filled post rally comments. You're GONNA enjoy it. Nhra drag racing. They find twenty top fuel champ steep torrents twenty-five Gir- in order to anger management sessions after a dust up at the Nhra finals Pomona torrens confronting and striking rival Cameron. Furry ticked as cameron deep. Staged him in the first round trying to throw him off at the lights. It's an old and totally legal. Tactic wasn't really required. Really as torrence won the round anyway. Stevenson's apologize. I think he clearly just overreacted. Torrance's up later in our second guest segment bikes rain. Dampening the final day of a two thousand nineteen Mo- GP test at Jerez Spain on Tuesday Marc Marquez and Alex Renzo beating their first eight times before the clouds opened up. Meanwhile burqas right shoulder need further exams. Perhaps you've been surgery after his day. One Tumble off Yamaha's maverick Banal held a commanding advantage over the field on day. One remain quickest overall at the end of the test faces in the pits. While I goofed as I often do last week in the story about the Specialty Equipment Market Association or Sima Suing The US government's Department of Transportation to come up with rules and regs. Now regarding the construction of replica. Classic cars hot rods muscle cars. You see Seema wants the legislation to become official now because a lot of companies bags of money and took order for cars. But it's all being held up by the shirts and ties. I said last week in Ottawa instead of Washington even though I had Washington down on the script if I'd only learned to read what I write. What's there wouldn't screw up all the time so there. I think I'm done punishing myself Rob Macron out of Las Vegas finished first and score trophy truck. Some first overall in this year's one thousand off road classic in Mexico Part Time Nascar driver Brendan Gone. Returning his roots winning class. One INDYCARS ALEX. Rossi rolled his truck while leading the Baha at the ninety five mile. Mark with the help of some locals He and his co-driver were pulled out of the vehicle. Were able to limp along for another one hundred miles or so before. Their banged up truck had to be retired from the race for good and that surfaced this week on the race. Wrap your questions your opinions comments on headlines in the news always welcomed here. Let's hear from. Y'All share your thoughts and theories with your fellow gear heads across Canada could win you the Grand Prize and the Subaru. Raisani MAILBAG Trivia contest. Edgy qualify. We play contest in a couple of minutes or so. Okay Lorraine a pitstop please coming up. Crc rally the Tall Pines Winner Crazy Leo earlier than two thousand nineteen injury top. You'll champ the torrence. This race line presented by Subaru. A range of dryness. Recotor mogul Subaru dealer anywhere along the race. Line Radio Network. Hey she's the Bashan. You're listening to raise radio every morning. Drives an hour and a half to work and every evening he drives our home but never once does Frank Feldman complain. That's because Frank Lips only fifteen minutes from his office but he drives a Subaru. Wrx So he never regrets taking the scenic route. The Twenty Nineteen Subaru. Wrx The atypical. Sports car seward confidence in motion. It starts with vulcanized. Rubber forced into long circular Rod than cut into one inch thick pieces. Compressed into a freezing cold and etched with a diamond cross hatch texture around the edges. It is humble. Hockey Puck J. B. Goodhew food companies celebrates the game and the workmanship behind it. Db goodhew work boots bench crafted to be rugged and durable JP goodhew built for work. We're two men and a truck and we've got lots of men and lots of trucks whether you're planning a move to a new home or to a new office down the hall bigger small. We moved them on. We even sell packing and moving supplies but no matter what we'll do it with a smile with a ninety six percent referral rating in the professionalism. You can trust the choice simple so when you're planning your next move. Call two men and a truck two men and a truck they'll move is who care for. Nearly one hundred fifty years continental has been making tires for the most demanding drivers tires. You can count on regardless of what the road throws at you. Inspiring total confidence in any driving condition. General tire a brand of continental is the official racing tire of the NASCAR and K N N pro stock car racing series. And everything we learn on the racetrack. We engineer into your tires. So you know you can trust continental no matter what you drive continental tire for what you do and the snacks nobody'll motorsport. Authorities Race Lime Radio Network. Great to have you along for the ride. Had A great time covering the Canadian Rally Championship Rally of. It's all pines last weekend and bankrupt a few hours north of Toronto. Subaru loaning me a lovely twenty twenty percent for the trip having already clinched the twenty nineteen championship their second row. Carol Kerry and Samuel Joy. Al Did not enter the Pines and that opened the door top runner russian-born Crazy Leo early Toronto. To step up again. It is late model Subaru. Wrx Sti Story. Got Very Cool. Indeed when we learned later that Leo brought along Russian girlfriend Tatyana Nicoletta on a rally date seriously as his co driver navigator her very first time in a rally car but they lead the pine start to finish so in the chill of late night of view. Very animated minutes with Crazy Leo. Early Jason Tetiana Nikola on race. Line radio no no no no come on in you know no Leo. What a day. What a story is great to see you not only back in the car but retired Yanni here. She hasn't been on rally car like five days ago. Just what a perfect story I know. Yes actually doesn't get better for selling a co-driver course. Does it training course but I mean honestly this was as like we'll go have fun. It's a date we'll just sending especially date. Yes no literally rally date. That's the Hashtag and you're here. Tell us what you thought I mean you. Did you feel sick to your stomach at any stage because you know now not at all no see. I have taken her in the car when I was fourteen in Moscow. So okay so no fourteen sixty so. Yeah but yeah but I mean once you got out there in the competition. You're saying her notes. Delivered delivery was was amazing. How did you manage that? Let's say like this crazy. You needs a crazy girl. Explains a lot. Is that explain? It does but it was like we we beyond what we expect pushing pushing because she kept delivering. The perfect like okay. I know the car go a little more a little more later. When she started getting a bit ahead or behind that night. Back right off. We never had a real moment when you're on the limit but on purpose under limit How was it different at night than it was during the day? Well I well I of all I've never seen a rally car rally lights at all. Yeah yeah so that was like I didn't know what to expect The lights again in the car is different so you read them differently And I cannot understand where the lights in the car pace notebook needs to be. That's what she means and of course. I cannot like understand where I am because I'm not used to. Yeah so it was a bit challenging. That's why I was ahead or like you know as a beginner was it scary at any point No surprising surprising that it's not scary. Yeah because sometimes even when you make perfect corner with in that case Murphy delivery like it's like okay. Well two feet two inches more. You know. So it's like it's a good way for me. Maybe she's crazier. Where does it go from here? Though for the two of you will ask you. I can do another one. I known. Now that's surprising all of this and you're not going to do another one. Well I like to do everything perfectly so I do understand that it will take me long long time to learn everything like how to supposed to be so co-driver says she's not going to do another one. What is the driver thing? Well it's We're we're we're always realize that you know I want to rally proper professionally. I needed co drivers from experience. Only somebody with three hundred plus rallies can actually deliver at the level. I need and I also need to be able to learn from my co drivers right so to have it for fun like I give it a comparison like this Sebastian Lopes and dies sometimes national rallies with his wife but WRC. He goes with co-driver. Gotcha so that's I I would love to do. I'm sure she should be out for it. Of course they will be up for a fantastic fantastic story. Congratulations thank you sir. Congratulations to you. Thank you so much. Well they are crazy Leo early cheech and his girlfriend co-driver navigator Tatyana Nikola. I was asking her about feeling nauseous in the because if you remember back in the days when Tom and Trish mcgeer where the top of the championship she being the Co driver. And you've done it in your passenger car when your head is down trying to read something. It can really upset your stomach. Especially the way you're flying down these roads and the and the car up in the air half time and banging down going around corners your stomach sometimes flips over an trish. The poor thing often got nauseous inside the carbon. Tatyana didn't at what a job they did especially her considering she had never been in a rally car before. So what a what? A great great story in the rally. The Tall Pines the winners of the twenty nineteen rally. All pints portion of the Canadian rally championship presented by Subaru. Crazy Leo early cheech. And there's a horrible co-driver Tatyana Nikola. She doesn't mind me referring to like that I Went lovely story. It was just a just an excellent excellent story. Alright Lorraine let's work in. Another pitstop is still to come the Subaru Race Lonnie Mailbag Trivia contest than twenty nineteen. Nhra top fuel drag racing champion. Steve Torrence this is the race line. Radio Network still in her junior. And you're listening to race line Radio Canada's National Radio Motorsport Authority the race. Line Radio Network. I'm Eric Thomas Have Jonah's tales columns an inside track motorsports news magazine and on the Web at sports net dot CA. So here we go once again with our highly regarded Subaru who email trivia contests other grand prize. Pack to win if you qualify by answering the Subaru Trivia questions correctly your email comments and if you do that the entry goes straight into the brake drum with a winner drawn at random at the end of the contract racing season which is here final week to enter the contest. We're going to draw the winner next week. The current qualifying questions here one the optional performance package for the Twenty Twenty Subaru. Wrx includes a braking system upgrade. What is that upgrade? You needed to describe it. Okay in Pretty. Fair detail really. Here's the question again. The Optional Performance Package for the Twenty Twenty Subaru. Wrx includes a braking system upgrade. Describe that upgrade. Okay US eric at race. Line radio DOT CA connecting under the Trivia contest. For your chance to win the prize. Pack Eric at Race Line Radio Dot. Ca Capital E. R. I K. The symbol at race line radio don't gap between race on the Radio. Because it'll bounce dot ca eric at Race Line Radio. Dot Ca. Let us now go to The mail bag over here. It is never too far away. let's Let's see here. We've got All we are our good buddy. Out of Dearborn Heights Michigan Paul Anton who listens faithfully Sunday nights at eight o'clock on. Am eight hundred CK L. W. in Windsor one of our Very long running and strong affiliates certainly He says always look forward to your to your show and see. Klw eight o'clock Sunday night. C. T. just received in the mail which you referred to as the stapled monster the December issue of inside track motorsports news. There isn't electric editions. You heard James Neilson. Talk about recently but Certainly the stapled monsters away refer to Their magazine Inside Track. Motorsports news always enjoy reading. It look forward also reading your column. Just WanNa let you know that your recent column about John and the current edition of the magazine And how he promoted. The sport was terrific. Thank you very much for running it will. You're very welcome. While here's another entry to the new Trivia Quiz question. The Twenty Twenty Subaru wrx the optional. Performance package what brake system upgrade is included. He answers enemies. Got It right again. He's got it right again and get another injury in there For his chance to win another price because he's a former Grand Prize winner and we do appreciate him listening faithfully as he does. Yeah the John Force thing. Was You know win? Number one fifty you know and him getting emotional and the fact that after Sixteen Championships in the funny car division of the HRA. He's still to me the best in terms of a sports entertainer and the number one interview in sports. And we've had John on the show an awful lot and certainly very emotional after win one fifty and of course his daughter Brittany still involved on the on the top fuel side but Nice photograph that the inside track guys found as well and that was terrific into always nice to To be able to to write about John. Because he's very easy to write about because he's always so animated. Paul has another subsequent entry and he has another question as well any status updates e t For the listeners relative to Canadian Motor speedway that is supposed to be built near Fort? Erie haven't heard a thing for a while. You haven't heard anything for a while because I haven't heard anything for a while. I'm still affiliated with the project as the media relations Guy They still have the property there. The own the property but there hasn't been any any progress in terms of at least visible progress. They're working on things behind the scenes and let's put it this way everybody until they tell me to stop in that it's done I'm GonNa keep telling you that it's that it's open and viable and they're still planning to build Canadian Motor speedway but it's been in a really ten years now since they re redirected Millers Creek but if anything happens you'll hear it here first on the on race line radio so we do appreciate Paul Anton question on that. Wendy Hollis Maryville. Maniac listens on six Tennessee. Ktbs Saint Catharines Sunday nights. Eight o'clock and Saturday afternoons at four. She goes on to say as per your trivia question. I'm really compressing her. Note here I YELL UNCLE. Too Tired to go mining for a more answers arrest up and try again next year. Wendy Hollis. She says even the winner's circle marital maniac. Wendy Hollis. She's got a lot of entries in here and we do appreciate writing in there. But that's fine lots of entries and we'll make that that draw next week senator contest entries are comments as the Final Week. Eric at Baseline Radio DOT CA the current question the optional performance package on the Subaru. Wrx As a braking system upgrade you need to describe the upgrade another pitstop here Lorraine then some media center sound twenty nine hundred ninety three drag racing top fuel Champs de torrence. This is race line presented by Subaru for the ultimate performance handling test. Drive of Ers Ed. Sports Coupe this week. Anyone along the race line radio network this Jenson Button and you're listening to race line. Radio Mark Matthews couldn't help but feel a twinge of disappointment as he jumped out the airplane. So this is skydiving. He muses the earth rapidly grew closer the wind rushing past his body muffled a yawn as he reached for his parachute cord of course. Mark Matthews recently purchased a Subaru. Wrx Sti and it's hard to compete with that kind of excitement. The Twenty Nineteen Subaru. Wrx Sti the atypical. Sports Car Subaru confidence in motion. It starts with vulcanized. Rubber forced into long circular Rod than cut into one inch thick pieces. Compressed into a freezing cold and that's with a diamond cross hatch texture around the edges. It is humble hockey puck. J. goodhew food companies celebrates the game and the workmanship behind it. Dreamy goodhew work. Boots bench crafted to be rugged and durable. Jp goodhew built for work. We're two men and a truck so you're moving to a new home and all that's left to do is to call a move or you know you can trust. Naturally you think two men and a truck since you know they have lots of men and lots of trucks. They'll wrap pack and move everything you won't with a ninety six percent referral rating and the professionalism. You can trust choices. Simple for a free in-home estimate call today. We're two men and a truck to men and a truck though. Don't move as who care for. Nearly one hundred and fifty years continental has been making tires for the most demanding drivers tires. You can count on regardless of what the road throws at you inspiring total confidence in any driving condition. Everything that'll as learned on the racetrack. They've engineer into your tires. So you know you can trust continental no matter what you drive continental tire for what you do. Canada's National Radio Morris Born Authority yes indeed are twenty seven consecutive season on the air across Canada. Getting close to twenty eight. We are the race line Radio Network. The twenty nine thousand nine. Nhra drag racing season is all done for another year. It all came down to the finals at pomona California chrome the winners of their countdown. The championship in the three main pro categories top fuel nitro funny car and pro stock. This week we sneak you into yet another media center. We've done a lot of that this year and it's been great to join the scrum around twenty nine thousand nine hundred now to time back to back. Top fuel champion Steve Torrents sometime competing with some gorgeous window rattling track pomona music on race. Line radio you have been so dominate over this year and last year. How history of injury you know. It's been Really special to be able to be part of a team that that goes out and has the success that we've had amenable to me. It's not it's not the driver. That does anything I mean. You just got to do your job and and and the guys that work on this car. They're really the ones that get the credit and Richard Hogan and Bobby Louisiana. 'cause they make the calls and you know. Go up there in the semis against Richie and go up there. I guess instead of racing to win racing not to lose and new the new situation of what we had to do but just just kinda messed up but It's not typical. Go one eighty on the tree. But did you know you go up there and play it so so Really really really special to be able to go to to win one championship much less to do it back to back. So Steve. How tough was it going? Into the final day season and you got four drivers that can mathematically beach and how that spreads the time for. You only had one driver that can do it right. Yeah I mean you just the first time that we came in here I came in here and and Had that in my mind the whole time and choked against Anton was ninety three and got beat and you know just came here like racing defensively instead of offensively and so I knew what we had to do. The latter played out to where it worked the best force and I mean we were gonNA decide. Who's the champ second round? I'm I prefer the situation that we were in last year. Much much more than what we were here today. But the gas prevail prevailed in just gave me the race car and I. I did the job that I needed to do when I needed to do it. And so we're the champs but that that's only for today because after tomorrow or after the banquet everybody's gone in for you and you're the former champ constantly talk about your team. Utahns constantly. Talk About Bobby Richard. What is you mean? Are they the reason that you are where you are there? The sole reason I mean you know you could take anybody and put him in that car and probably get the results as long as they did their job and so I mean the team that that really Bobby Agana has been able to assemble. You Got Richard Hogan's leading it. But Bobby's there at the shop day in day out and hand picks those guys and we've got that group of guys has been together for years so that continuity is what has has been the key recipe to our success this field classes so competitive and you've had the target on your back and what's it like racing in this division I think it's the most competitive that it's ever been. I mean we're we're you're seeing fields that are set that are similar to pro stock. You know within got four guys. That ran seventy six and just decides on what you know. What with the end of it. So we've been very blessed to be able to have the success and have the brakes because a lot of these cars out here can throw down especially grubby. I mean that Guy Chops jobs as down most of the time. Not a not a sixty three sixty four car sixty two car and and he is and this really played. Dr Benefit this weekend. Being hot. It's it's more in our wheelhouse where Vegas was definitely his wheelhouse. Oh just luck of the draw you look at. We look at sats. All the time people like force that were so dominant for Tony Schumacher. Dominant for years. You've been dominant for years. Yeah but I mean I'll let you guys look at that. I don't WanNa look at that because you you just kinda get clouded and think about things. That doesn't really matter right now. I mean it's not something you look at the end of your career. Hopefully I can raise another year too. But what does it mean to you to at least be in contention for four five championships as a team that race. What would you say store ball parks? None of us are smart enough to our own parts and from or maybe we're smart enough to not build our own parts. How Johnson and everybody that supplies they give us. I mean you know you call and get what you need and get the best parts and and it's always the same so you just bought them on and go out here and let the crew chief. Do his job started here. On the runner up the skits revolving in the summer your unbeatable number one seed get beaten the first round reading how you deal with those ups and downs. I I don't really know what the answer is. I think just being in the situation a couple of times before you you just learn to deal with it and not let it affect you in the way that you go up there and and and like I said race defensively. Instead of just going on your race in the wind you you start racing not to lose and it changes your mindset and it changes the way that everybody around you feel so just got to keep morale high and really approach every round like you just need to win this round. We don't need to know what happens after that round or what the points are going to be after this round. Because you'll get preoccupied with thinking about. Oh I gotTA DO. This gotta do that. We need to win and when you can do that it it takes that burden off. You Mentally Stephen. How did you come back to what you do to get your head right to raise Brittany? There's I've seen it on the TV and everybody. You know the whole place here hates me on the most hated champion ever. Probably nobody knows what was said. Little heated conversation down there and and it went too far. But I mean unless you know the whole story and what was said other than just watching it on television you don't you don't get it so I went and talked to camera just a minute ago and apologized and I think we have a mutual understanding. And and it's just released back. Which would you do in mentally to in the trailer? Talk yourself to non I mean I. It's you know that's one of those things where you you that happens and you say it happened and be done with it and go to the next round. I mean I needed to raise Brittany and we needed to win. We didn't win that round with a win the championship. We're not here. She's here so It just was what I had a new. There wasn't can I will I? It's I mean there was. There was no option. I had to get that out of my mind and get in. That car and be focused. Was it fun? No no I mean. This season has been fun You know I think at the first of the season rose talking about. We had a slow. They went five races without a win. I mean I. I've been years without a win. It took me a long time from from six to twelve to even get in get in the position to win a race so I mean I'm having a wonderful time. My Dad has come out and raced more with us and been very successful. So that's that's been fun. I mean it's you. We do this as a family. We do this for fun. It's me that mom and dad. I mean we and every one of those boys so what. We did get a chance to research that today. Yeah that would have been cool You know I don't know where he's going to end up in the points and things probably fifth now. Leah's went you know when is she has but It would it would have been really cool to have an opportunity to be one to be one of the few father's genes that are out here and there's very few families that are racing. Do you and your dad kind of share a lot of the technology because technology keeps changing. Every day we share everything Those are two teams worked together. Hand in hand Last night we went sixty eight and I had. I didn't expect billy to go slower. If I thought his car down the track it would have been quicker than us because they knew what we did. They were trying some stuff and even though we're rice and right now we need to know how to go sixty three and sixty four with Robbie and so we needed to try that and and I really thought that they would go quicker than us and they didn't but we share everything says cattle May. Personally I I don't focus on anything other than just coming here and drive in but I mean that. That definitely is what made the difference. I mean I think I think at the end of the day if Doug Wins. It's just a couple points different so Those those are imperative. I mean you gotta go out there and and go forward every round and build them up as much as possible so yeah. I think that that's something we'll continue to focus on what I mean by Surround sound at the race track. There aren't a drag strip. It gets noisy. I think it just adds to the authenticity. Don't you twenty two time? Consecutive top fuel drag racing champion there. He is steep torrents very determined and fiery competitor as the guys who pilot he's eleven thousand horsepower. Three hundred and thirty eight miles per hour. Projectiles often are on race line Radio Funny Car Champ Robert Height and pro stock master. Erica enders in coming weeks. Just before we roll into our Christmas best of New Year's specials all right Lorraine let's fire up that final stop and then we'll be back for the last lap next week show lineup and more. This is race line presented by Subaru Howard with a heart pounding. Wrx Roxas Guy. Now fifteen time. Canadian rally manufacturer champion on the race. Line Radio Network. This is cow. Patty graceland radio returns a moment. Every morning Frank Feldman drives an hour and a half to work and every evening he drives an hour home but never once does Frank Feldman complain. That's because Frank Lips only fifteen minutes from his office but he drives a Subaru. Wrx So he never regrets taking the scenic route. 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We'll have part one of the official media conference with on Rick Hendrick where he makes it all official plus more of your entries and comments final week for the Subaru race. Lonnie mailbag Trivia contest. But when checkers fly we say Goodbye. Unanimous RACE LINE. Thanks GOING OUT TO CRAZY. Lille early Tatyana Nikola. Crc Tall Pines Rally Media Steve Sorenson Nhra Media Andrew Ranger and NASCAR media big banks as well the supreme commander Wayne Postmark and Josh Santos for operational excellence so from all of us. Race Line Radio. I'm Eric Thomas. So long everyone race line coast to coast with race. One radio network presented by Subaru has been driven by the Subaru. Wrx WRX STI. And Be Ours Ed. You can learn more at Subaru DOT CA and buy pot metal tire. Where what you do talk again. Next week I will do it right here on race line radio.

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(corrected) Interview: Elisabeth Williams (production designer)

Mayday: The Handmaid's Tale Podcast

35:22 min | 11 months ago

(corrected) Interview: Elisabeth Williams (production designer)

"Hey maybe listeners. It's Justin. Let's talk about anchor. You've been out there listening to us. Do this podcast and you're thinking I can do that. I have a great idea. I WanNa do a podcast guest. I agree with you. You should do a podcast. Anchor is the quickest and best way to do it. It's free they have all the creation tools on their website or on the mobile APP and it will help you get distribution sure bution to all the great places spotify apple podcast as well as that thing we all dream of making money off of our idea they will help you get sponsorships with no oh minimalist internships that means if you and three your buddies are the only ones listened to the podcast that's fine. They'll give you a sponsor. There's no minimums it's fantastic. You're not gonNA find that with a lot of places uses so go to the APP store. Google play store download anchor APP or go to anchor dot. FM and get anchor. Today is the easiest freeway to start. We podcast. Hello there mayday listener. Let's talk about spotify spotify. You normally think of as the place you go. Oh for your listening of music on your mobile device if you will did you know that you can get all your favorite podcasts on spotify as well. You didn't now now you do. I'm telling you so head over to your APP store. Download the spotify search up your favorite podcast or midday hemmings dope. I guess maybe the same look it up on spotify or you can browse favorite podcasts under your library tab or you can just go and search for whatever topic you want you will never miss an episode you can and follow your podcast so you don't miss anything you can be a premium user which will allow you to download and listen to it. offline wherever you are and you can easily share what you're listening to with your friends friends on instagram so go to the APP store and check out spotify. You can listen to our podcast. You can listen to any podcast as well as music. All in one place spotify check is it. Is it take a yes welcome. May Day listeners is Justin. Thank you for joining us. We have a very special guest with us today for an interview. Welcome thank you for joining us so that we have with us. Today was uh-huh uh-huh I really am going on designer. Elizabeth Williams from the handmaid's tale joining us today Elizabeth how how you doing this is your fourth emmy nomination. You were nominated previously for your work on this your emmy nominee one handmade first and last year the first emmy win so tell us how it feels being nominated again this year well honorary talking in on maybe some experience for up some of her previous part and what's been working on the handmaid's tale opposed to working quite crews worked being just being nominated is is already. I find a great honor. Um and then of course you are. Always you know kind of what you hope for for. I think everyone hopes to win. And what would you exposure to the handmaid's tale prior to working on becoming of course but it's also great for for the team for the art department everyone else who's involved. You've seen this show at the win for the also a win for everyone really truly because you know if we win. It means that the lighting was great. It means that the acting was great. It means that you know the story. Story was great. It means it means all of that right so because without great acting the sets you know aren't as as interesting to look at I mean that's that's the truth so so yeah you know it's an honor for for for me and for the show I find and and this year I mean this is really great because for their. I guess there were some rules that changed in the in the Academy Outta me I guess last year and we were able to submit the last three episodes of season two and so we chose we chose the episode called Holly and You know and I thought that you know since it. We had one for season two last year. I kind of Kinda I saw that you know the voters would would pass us by but we were nominated so I'm I'm really thrilled. I mean it was a surprise to me and so I'm happy. I'm very happy so Hemmitt. Still everyone we've talked to has been a kind of a different experience for people coming from previous productions and what's it been like working on. The handmaid's tale opposed to working on the shows that you previously worked on well. I feel like I have been lucky or or they're all this way but I I've heard you know not horror stories but I've heard that shows that that don't go very well. I've been particularly lucky I guess on Fargo and on you know channels era that I've worked on with NBC and and now in the handmaid's tale you know some considerable shows that are big and require a lot of management and a lot of people sitting around the table it runs well. I mean people are very collaborative very respectful of everyone else's position and everyone else's input and it it's it's it really is a good experience you know in a creative and collaborative of experience so you are from on candidate correct I'm from Montreal yeah and what was your exposure to the handmaid's tale prior to working on the show and how did you become involved in the show. If you could talk about that well my exposure was simply. that I'd read the book when I was in my late teens and then and then that was it I mean I hadn't really thought about it. and I was working on Fargo. IN CALGARY YOU and Warren Littlefield is executive producer on the handmaid's tale was also the executive producer on Fargo and so I did the second since he's in Fargo as art director and then the third season of Fargo as production designer and Warren invited me to you come to the handmaid's tale truth be told he actually invited me to to work on the second and season from get go and I wasn't able to I wasn't able to do that. I had to come home. I have two children at home that I you know I leave behind when I work work on these projects so I really did have to come home and take care of my family and you know it was it was needed and I think well deserved and so I I declined and the production hired Mark White who did an excellent job in prep and and then Marquette to leave the show. Oh during the first week of shooting I think and so Warren gave me a call and he said if you spend enough time with your family yet and there's no would you would you be willing. You know if I asked you to come you know. How quickly could you get here and so he called me on a Sunday. I think it was a Sunday Sunday night and I was at work on Wednesday yeah. That's how I that's how I got to the handmaid's tale but you seem the show at that point before you got the call from Warren yes because because when he originally invited me to do the show it was in May of the previous year and so the show was actually on the air so I watched a couple of episodes on the air and then I watched them I watched them before I arrived to handmaid's tale. I watched them in. You know the the first few days or just wash. I've binged them basically so that I could come to work and be you know sort of be knowing what I was doing. Sort of now my next question was going to be about what you thought warrant saw and your work that he thought would work for the handmaid's tale but during my research. I was looking at your bio from your website contain this line which I think explains everything. Elizabeth has thrived on translating emotions. Fears obsessions. Anguish mania is into something visible and tangible sounds like a no brainer to me. You Know Honestly Warren in his position. very you know quiet and observant servent and originally. I kind of was had no idea what he what he saw in me. You know what I mean. When you're you know when you're you're younger and I was kind of at the beginning beginning of the the the important more visible part of my career and I I it was such an like seriously an honor for him to to juice offer this to me but yeah I think I do bring I don't know I mean I don't know. I don't know what I bring honestly I. I think I do bring a certain sensitivity to to to the sets I guess I I'm I'm and fascinating with psychology and people's basically people's socio economic backgrounds and how that's translated in in to how they live and so that you can apply that to any any circumstance and you're able to basically quickly build or create a show a set that is multilayered you know and so that's what interests me and I think Warren another thing that Warren said though is that there's the creative part but he said you know Elizabeth. He said there are a lot of production designers out there who are very very very creative and then there are a lot of other production designers who are maybe less creative but very very good at you know managing team and he said you're the perfect perfect mix of both you. Have you have your your left. Brain is just as strong as you're right brain and and that's what we need. It was wonderful. I was like Oh my goodness so before we get too far into the handmaid's tale specific stuff I just wanted to talk about kind of the role of the production designer and what that is and what you're responsible for that we see when we're we're watching the show. Okay well a production designer. I mean basically takes the script and makes it it visible which means that depending on the action and depending on the description that scripted of a certain space east the production designers role is to basically create an environment the best reflects you know the the the story and the character and the action. That's going to take place and to basically it's like it's like creating creating a a nest in which the story unfold let's take Dr Laurence's for example and and how I mean I think it reflects his multilayered personality and is kind of you know Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. There's there's a lot of There's a lot of confusion in in exactly who commander. Lawrence is and bye bye making his environment so like dense with information you're. I you think you're able to to give the viewer in addition to the action. That's going on a sense of kind of Do maybe your or your confusion as to what exactly he represents and so that's my job my job is to you know with the colors there's and the materials and style the architecture the aesthetics of of everything my job is to is to make that tangible so you're responsible for a lot of what we see the props the art and set. It really covers a lot of ground. Get exactly a- all of those things the art work all the props all the set decoration so you know all the set dressing the plants and then when we go outside the picture cars all that falls under the production design how you you work and collaborate with other departments when you're working to create the production design elements of the show the work a lot together you know there's obviously the the the directors and the DP's are involved in in creating the look of the show you know with the lighting fighting we we have a dialogue about what's best and then like. I don't know for example the types of windows or window addressing that we need whether they need you know we. We basically have this dialogue to make a with directors as well. You know what what lay out best fits the action you know if they'll give you an example in the kitchen of commander. Lawrence at one point you know there's a fireplace on the right of the kitchen and the original design we had created this kitchen that had the fireplace in the middle of the room and it was it was gorgeous and everyone agreed on the director agreed the DP thought it was wonderful and then as we got closer to to to shooting the director started did working on his on his shots and how he was going to make the actors come in and out and we realized he realized is that the fireplace was actually in the way and it was in the islands and you know we we stood in the room and we looked you know we from every the corner and it was kind of always in the way so we moved it over to one side so in that sense there's a dialogue you know so the the idea of the fireplaces places mine but then if it doesn't work. I you know I work with them to to to you know to move it or if I have to get rid of it or whatever now having started in season to the show with some of the elements already in place. What kind of research did you do on your own. And what did you take inspiration wise from in order to create the things we see on the handmaid's tale that we see Gilead well we did. We do a lot of research and I have a team. You know that helps as well we pull out as many images as we can for which ever set that we are we start. We're thinking about so for Gilead when I first arrived the first sets or the first world that I was responsible for was the colonies in season two and the barn which the women live and so that was is my main focus when I first arrived and for that we did a lot of research on Gulags in on World War Two and concentration attrition camps and labour farms and and so we put all these images together and put them up on the board and we you know we we basically take inspiration. Kinda like Margaret Atwood has said for her book. There's nothing in my book. That doesn't come from reality. That hasn't already happened so we. We do the same same. I mean we were inspired by by things that by reality and basically we we you know we create create our world based on a world that that already exists we take bits and pieces of different you know different environments and we create our own world now you mentioned the colonies and that was a very different look from the rest of Gilead so what we're some of those design elements that you use to create the look for the colonies hey there maybe listener wanted to tell you about a brand new sponsor that we have the show. They are a another podcast which is awesome so we're always looking and for great wants to recommend to you. They're called beach to sandy water to wet now. This is a podcast by brother and sister do Alex and Christine as they recap dramatic readings of one star reviews written by real people in not so real problems whether it's a bar known throw policy Barista who's just to friendly or a school psychologist fashion since they will cover everyone who has real complaints but not real problems so each week they are going to cover everything ranging from strip clubs lives in Vegas ghost tours. DMV's in Phoenix and they nobly will delve into all the polls that have reviews yelp trip advisor and maybe apple podcasts because you know we liked that phone with our reviews sometimes so how'd you listen to them. You can listen to the beach to sandy water to wet on spotify anchor Apple podcasts or any of your other favorite podcast cast APPs. You can also find them all social media platforms at at Beach to Sandy beach t o o Sandy check them out sounds like a great concept super excited to welcome the podcast two guys well if we if we talk about the field or the call in either the work the exterior work field you know for example we painted trees with biodegradable what degraded pain so so we didn't ruin the trees but we actually painted the trees. Brown so that they look. They look like they were burnt. we actually we also torched some some some saplings and had them you know. L. Placed in the in the field so that it would look like you know they had been contaminated. we we worked very with with the special effects to create rivulets and had smoke coming out of the ground but else did we do my goodness. Yes we that field that we found this location. It was this old quarry that had been abandoned and so it was all overgrown with you know with weeds and trees and and whatnot so so we had a section of it mode basically we had all the trees taken out and and all of the of all of the weeds the saplings taken out and then we work the soil to make it look like a Labor farm. It was a huge endeavor. When we started the process? There was snow. We had to build a road to get us down onto the pitch. It was it was it was a huge endeavor yeah and then when they're in the barn that was a working barn and so the farmer who was who who was there. I mean there were pigs in the in the in the basement of the Barn you know the barn was full of Hay and so he had we had the barn emptied. We had it you know clean and made it worker friendly and we basically rebuilt the barn on the inside to make sure that there wouldn't be any you know any accidents since and whatnot yeah and created these you know basically concentration camp like settings for the women now. What are some of the design elements that maybe you can think of that. maybe hidden away or the audiences may not have noticed on their first viewing or maybe kind of things that you can think of that. Maybe we didn't see I think that you know especially in the in the world of Gilead other than commander Lawrence's house which which we've just talked about most of the sets are very pure and there isn't much that isn't essential and isn't really supposed to be there and that the audience doesn't see there aren't really that many hidden hidden hidden treasures the only thing that could be a bit of an Easter egg would be that in commander Lawrence's kitchen and there is a painting by me which was the inspiration color wise for the the colonies field and that is just a bit of a client you know to to season two because we we build Lawrence's kitchen and season three and and in season two we use the me and you know the costume designer used Famille. Our Department did Colin Watkinson did we each had our own little painting that we were basing our creation Asian on and mine was that one and so it's it then it's I put it in the kitchen so a couple of things that were pointed out from season three Easter egg type things the people wanted out. Were the statue that at Jesuit bells that June uses ultimately to deliver that final blow that kills commander winslow that appears appears to be a statue of a woman and also there is a wooden screen that is kind of between the bedroom and living area that appears to have a swastika design in it. Can you tell us about at those and whether those are accurate depictions are not and if those were intentional choices you all made for the show those are accurate descriptions The statue is a department creation. we actually worked on ten different prototypes of statuettes and that was the one that was that was chosen and in the end by the director are we the are are sculptor had made ten. I chose three and the director preferred that one so that is the one that we ended up using it is it is the statue of a woman it is to represent you know fertility but in that very brutal list dictatorial world so it's a combination of fertility and you know harsh dictatorship leadership so the screen in all honesty was a a happy mistake in the sense that we had designed in season two we designed to screen for jazz above and when we when we did the first design it was just something geometric and then when we put all of basically when we repeated the image we noticed that it basically created a swastika uh and then we thought okay. Are we going to keep it or are we going to change it and it was a conscious creative decision to keep it because because it was subtle enough that you know only certain viewers we're going to recognize it and and you know we didn't want to. Y- you may get a thing but we didn't want to get rid of it either and so this year when we did when we built the room we built that room in the studio and so so you know we built the screen that was around the bed and and all the doors and and we kept the same design intentionally and so it's one of those things that I always love to see when I read you know commentary from people on the Internet who who are fans of the show. Who Will you know catch things things. I think it's fantastic so there are times where you get to go beyond the walls of Gilead to places like Canada and the colonies talk about the different approaches you have to take when you're going to different locations like that and the inspiration that you put in for those places it is it is a challenge to to keep our world separate or it right. We have Gilead we have Canada. We have Boston and this year we had Washington and so and so yeah Canada is I find the contemporary. sets are always a bit of a challenge because to make them You know aesthetically pleasing yet. Make them realistic. There's a fine line you know so if we take you know sounds like little America which we wanted wanted very messy and loose apartment is full of full of objects and you know plants and it's just kind of chaotic but yet it has to remain. You know something that people want to watch. you know has to remain aesthetic right. There's always that delicate look it balanced that we have to keep we also it's important for us to keep a contrast between Gilead and Canada so that when the story switches from one to the other that the difference is obvious on the screen I mean other than that important to us is that since we shoot in and around Toronto onto we're very careful with the choices of our locations and now. I've worked on twenty six episodes so after twenty six episodes when you're at the twenty six we kind of feel like we're kind of running out of of of choices or that. We've made a mistake because we've chosen a location that was you know that would have better served as Gilead than than than Canada for example so it's always a bit of a struggle. I have to say to keep all those things separate and make the right choices at the right time. It's also interesting to see. The differences in choices made for different characters when it comes to things like different types of homes that are used for reach family. Talk a little bit about how those choices are made what the differentiation is between those for characters obviously the the locations that we look for and that we choose represent the hierarchy between the commanders and the and the power that they that they have love. There's that and so you know and then we also partially work with the locations that we find you know there. There is a compromise sometimes that is made uh-huh to reach our goal so if you take for example you know a commander Lawrence and Commander Waterford or commander Lawrence and commander winslow so those choices are about power and they're about personality you know Lawrence was the professor he's lived in this House with his wife even before Gilead so it is you know it's filled with not not only the art that he's stolen or taken for museums but also things that he's collected over the years. There's a certain warmth professorial real like feel to the House commander winslow on the other hand. You know he's at the top of the food chain and he's got this gigantic. You can take opulent home that is filled with you know again art and pool table and you know it it breathes wealth off and so those are the kinds of things that we look for when we look for locations all the commander. Lawrence I have to say it was built in the studio but it was it was based on on original house. Now another awesome thing everybody loves this season was we finally got to go outside of the Boston area of Gilead and get into Washington. DC which which was amazing and got sure offered you a lot of freedom to do some different things really had this overpowering sense of dread and you know how much worse things could be outside of what we've seen in. Gilead already talk about that and what went into creating well that here's a perfect example of of how all all the departments bring their art to the table to create an ambiance that tells the story. The creation of Washington is basically basically derived from the script the Lincoln Memorial is scripted. There was no other way for us to do it. It is a story point the way that the art department and the rest of production added to that element is by choosing locations like the train station and stripping them of everything that wasn't essential and replacing with Gilead flags with guards and and military vehicles and this regimented way the actors stories moved in rows and columns and all those things put together gave that sense of dread that Washington had has ever been a specific request from actors when it comes to the production design because you always hear about the actors having deep back stories for their characters plotted out out Soviet any of them come to you with special request anything specific that they thought would lend to the production of their character actually the that what happened once other than that the actors are very receptive of what we what we build for them It's never never happened that. They've been you know unhappy or or confused or have said this is not who I am. I don't understand the set on the contrary. They've always said Oh. My goodness helps me. Be You know my character this. You know so so that's been really great. I did have one really great exchange with Bradley Whitford about about his character when we a built his his office because when we started the show we didn't have a script and so as as the episodes went on we added to the House and the office came a little bit later. I think it was in episode four. I think and and we were discovering commander Lawrence at the same time as Bradley was and there was you know we kept having thing to adjust to who we thought he was and so in in creating his office. I had a talk with him about you know who he thought he was and what what is it that he was going. He would've been doing in this office because the script doesn't tell us this you know it'll give us one scene but it doesn't really tell us what the background is or so so it was interesting because at that particular picula moment he was he was not struggling but he was he was thinking about his character and I was thinking about what what his office should look like and together we we we just talked about it and and and it was great. It was really great right so we got to talk to your editor. Wendy Martin. She's also nominated for creative arts emmy this weekend and we were talking a little bit about the return to more practical article effects and using CGI only in places where it's deemed necessary or not as cost effective as doing things practically so talk to us about that and if you're seeing that in production design elements as well because it's so much what we're seeing on the screen is dead yeah. I've noticed that as well in the last few years you know a few a few years back. Maybe I don't know ten. Maybe there was this big. You know pushed to do things. CGI It was you know it was news extraordinary and I guess we thought thought that we could do things with CGI that we couldn't do without but there's definitely a trend to go back to mechanical effect rather than visual effects and you know. That's the same with snow or water or smoke. Yes definitely smoke smoke because it doesn't it doesn't look right and the thing is people are now demanding and rightly so you know now that most of our entertainment is on television Jim. I think the audience is very critical of of what they watch and you know. Fake smoke looks like fake smoke and it takes you out of the action and and you know makes you focus on the smoke rather than what's going on and and we don't want that I mean. CGI still is important you you know they sometimes actually not there. It's essential especially for example on the show like the handmaid's tale. Let's say where where dressing a street for Gilliat seen the art department will take care of all of this that is to about ten feet. Maybe maybe twelve in the air but anything that is above that be it street signs or posters and windows or things that we don't want to see. CGI comes in behind wind and and the race is it for us because we can't it would be impossible and sometimes it's we're not even allowed to physically remove it so they have to remove it and post host same thing with snow. You know sometimes our special effects will blanket a location with snow but then the crew is walking on on it and it's just it's and CGI will come in in post and just clean it up for us you know and make it look just make it look perfect so again. It's elaborate all right well. Do you have any upcoming projects. Did you like to talk about anything on the horizon for you beyond handmaid's tale well well. I actually I'm going to do season four of the handmaid's tale so that's what's coming up for me. I chose to to again to stay home and take care of my children this summer so I will go from season three directly into season four and then we'll see maybe maybe it'll be the testaments Margaret Atwood's new book or I don't know I can't wait to read it. We look forward to any news forthcoming about that. Obviously and we thank you for joining us on the podcast asked today. We really really appreciate it. Have a good one and best of luck at the Emmy. Thank you so much.

commander Gilead spotify Lawrence director Warren Littlefield Emmy Canada Elizabeth Williams Justin Margaret Atwood commander winslow Washington Google Boston Fargo Montreal
(Audio Fixed 9/15) Interview: Elisabeth Williams (production designer)

Mayday: The Handmaid's Tale Podcast

35:15 min | 11 months ago

(Audio Fixed 9/15) Interview: Elisabeth Williams (production designer)

"Hey maybe listeners. It's Justin. Let's talk about anchor. You've been out there listening to us. Do this podcast and you're thinking I can do that. I have a great idea. I WanNa do a podcast guest. I agree with you. You should do a podcast. Anchor is the quickest and best way to do it. It's free they have all the creation tools on their website or on the mobile APP and it will help you get distribution sure bution to all the great places spotify apple podcast as well as that thing we all dream of making money off of our idea they will help you get sponsorships with no oh minimalist internships that means if you and three your buddies are the only ones listened to the podcast that's fine. They'll give you a sponsor. There's no minimums it's fantastic. You're not gonNA find that with a lot of places uses so go to the APP store. Google play store download anchor APP or go to anchor dot. FM and get anchor. Today is the easiest freeway to start podcast. Hello there mayday listener. Let's talk about spotify spotify. You normally think of as the place you go. Oh for your listening of music on your mobile device if you will did you know that you can get all your favorite podcasts on spotify as well. You didn't now now you do. I'm telling you so head over to your APP store. Download the spotify search up your favorite podcast or midday hemmings dope. I guess maybe the same look it up on spotify or you can browse favorite podcasts under your library tab or you can just go and search for whatever topic you want you will never miss an episode you can and follow your podcast so you don't miss anything you can be a premium user which will allow you to download and listen to it. offline wherever you are and you can easily share what you're listening to with your friends friends on instagram so go to the APP store and check out spotify. You can listen to our podcast. You can listen to any podcast as well as music. All in one place spotify check is it. Is it take a yes welcome. Mayday listeners is Justin. Thank you for joining us. We have a very special guest with us today for an interview a first time talking to her so we really appreciate are coming on and we have the production designer. Elizabeth Williams from the handmaid's handmaid's tale joining us today Elizabeth how you doing. I'm very well. Thank you for having me so. This is your fourth emmy nomination. You were nominated previously for your work on the show Fargo and you one last year for your work on the handmaid's tale first emmy win so tell us how it feels being nominated again this year well well. It's you know it's it's a great honor to be nominated. There are so many shows that that are up for for this award and and you know the selection processes I think quite arduous so to being just being nominated is is already. I find a great honor and then of course a win is is as always you know kind of what you hope for. I think everyone hopes to win. so so it's great and it's great for for for me of course but it's also great for for the team for the art department everyone else who's involved because you know a win for the art. Department is also a win for everyone really truly because you know if we win. It means that the lighting was great. It means that the acting was great. It means that you know the story was great. It means it means all of that right so because without great acting the sets you know aren't as as interesting to look at it. I mean that's that's the truth so so yeah you know it's an honor for for for me and for the show I find and this year I mean this is really great because for their I guess there were some rules that changed in the in the academy I guess last year and we were able to submit the last three episodes of season two and so we chose we chose the episode called hall eat and you know and I thought that you know since it. We had one for season season two last year. I kind of kind of thought that you know the voters would would pass us by but we were nominated so I'm really thrilled. I I mean it was a surprise to me and so I'm happy. I'm very happy so the handmaid's tale everyone we've talked to has been a kind of a different experience agreeance for people coming from previous productions. what's it been like working on the handmaid's tale supposed to working on the shows that you previously worked on well. I I. I feel like I've either I've been lucky or they're all this way but I I've. I've heard of you know not horror stories but I've heard that you know shows that that don't go very yeah well I've been particularly lucky I guess on you know Fargo and on Channel Zero that I've worked on with NBC and and now on the the handmaid's tale some considerable shows that are big and bit require a lot of management and a lot of people sitting around the table it runs well. I mean people are very collaborative very respectful of everyone else's position and everyone everyone else's input and it's it's it really is a good experience you know and creative and collaborative collaborative of experience so you are from Canada correct I'm from Montreal and what was your exposure to the handmaid's tale prior to working on the show and how did you become involved in the show. She could talk about that well. My exposure was simply. that I'd read the book when I was in my late teens and then and then that was it I mean I hadn't really thought about it. and I was working on Fargo. in Calgary and Warren Littlefield is the executive producer on the handmaid's tale was also the executive producer on Fargo and so I did the second season of Fargo as art director and then the third season of Fargo as production designer and Warren invited me to come to the handmaid's tale truth be told he actually invited me to to. I work on the second season from get go and I wasn't able to I wasn't able to do that. I had to come home. I have two children during the home that I you know I'd leave behind when I work on these projects so I really did have to come home and take care of my family and you know it was it was needed needed and I think well deserved and so I- declined and the production hired Mark White who did an excellent job in prep and and and then Marquette to leave the show during the first week of shooting I think and so Warren gave me a call and he said if you spend enough time with with your family yet would you would you be willing. You know if I asked you to come you know. How quickly could you get here and so so he called me on a Sunday? I think it was a Sunday night and I was at work on Wednesday. Yes that's how I get. That's how I got to damage to the show at that point right before you got the call from Warren yes because when he originally invited me to do the show it was in May the previous year and so the show show was actually on the air so I watched a couple of episodes on the air and then I watched them I watched them before I arrived to you the handmaid's tale. I watched them in you know the first few days or just wash. I've binged them basically so that I could come to work and be you know sort of be. You know what I was doing sort of now. My next question was going to be about what you thought. Warren saw on your work that he thought would work for the handmaid's tale but during my research I was looking at your bio from website and contain this line which I think explains everything. Elizabeth has thrived on translating emotions fears obsessions anguish and mania into something visible and tangible sounds like a no brainer to me you know honestly Warren in his position very very quiet and observant and originally I kind of idea what he what he saw in me you know what I mean. When you're when and you're you're younger and I was kind of at the beginning of the the the important you know more visible part of my career and I I you know and it was such an like seriously an honor for him to to offer this to me but yeah. I think I do bring I. I don't know I mean I don't know. I don't know what I bring. Honestly I think I do bring a certain sensitivity to to to the sets I guess I'm I'm fascinated with psychology and people's basically people's socio economic backgrounds and how that's translated in into how they live and so that you apply that to any any circumstance and you're able to basically build or create a show a set that is multilayered you know and so that's what interests me and I think Warren another thing that Warren said though is that there's the creative part but he said you know Elizabeth. He said there are a lot of production designers out there who are very very creative and then there are a lot of other production designers who are maybe less creative but very very good at you know managing adage you can team and he said you're the perfect mix of both you have. You have your left. Brain is just as strong as you're right brain and and that's what we need. It was wonderful. I was like Oh my goodness before we get too far into the handmaid's tale specific stuff I just wanted to talk about kind of the role of the production designer and what that is and what you're responsible for that we see when we're watching the show okay well a production designer. I mean basically takes the script gripped and makes it visible which means that depending on the action and depending on the description friction that scripted of a certain space the production designers role is to basically create an environment the the best reflects you know the the the story and the character and the action that's going to take place and and so basically it's like it's like creating a a nest in which the story unfold let's take Dr Lawrence's House for example full and and how I mean I think it reflects his multi-layered personality and his kind of you know Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. There's there's a lot of There's a lot of confusion in in exactly who commander. Lawrence is and by by making his environment so like dense with information nation you're. I think you're able to to give the viewer in addition to the action. That's going on a sense of kind of do maybe you're you're confusion as to what exactly he represents and so that's my job my job job is to you know with the colors and the materials and the style the architecture the aesthetics of of everything my job is to is to make that tangible so you're responsible for a lot of what we see the props the art and set it really covers. There's a Lotta growth exactly all of those things the art work all the props all the set decoration so you know all the set dressing the plants and then when we go outside the picture cars all that falls under the production design. How do you work and collaborate with the other departments when you're working to create the production design elements of the show the work a lot together you you know there's obviously the the the directors and the DP's are involved in in you know creating the look. Look at the show. you know with the lighting we we have a dialogue about what's best and then like. I don't know for for example the types of windows or window dressing that we need whether they need you know. We basically have this dialogue to make with the directors as as well. You know what what lay out best fits the action you know if they'll give you an example in the kitchen of commander amended Lawrence at one point. You know there's a fireplace on the right of the kitchen and the original design we had created this kitchen that had the fireplace in the middle of the the room and it was it was gorgeous and everyone agreed founded the director agreed the DP thought it was wonderful and then as we got closer search to to to shooting the director started working on his on his shots and how he was going to make the actors come come in and out and we realized he realized that the fireplace was actually in the way and it was in the islands and you know we we we he stood in the room and we looked you know from every corner and it was kind of always in the way so we moved it over to one side so in that sense there's a dialogue you know now so the the idea of the fireplaces mine but then if it doesn't work. I you know I work with them to to you know to move it or if I I have to get rid of it or whatever now having started in season to the show with some of the elements already in place. What kind of research did you do in your own. And what did you take inspiration wise from in order to create things we see on the handmaid's tale that we see in Gilead. Hey there matey listener wanted to tell you about a brand. Iran new sponsor that we have the show. They are a another podcast which is awesome. We're always looking for great wants to recommend to you. They're called beach to sandy water to wet now. Now with this is is a podcast by brother and sister do Alex and Christine as they recap dramatic readings of one-star reviews written by real people in not so real problems whether it's a bar no throw policy a Barista who's just too friendly or school psychologist fashion sense they will cover everyone want who has real complaints but not real problems so each week they're. GonNa Cover everything ranging from strip clubs in Vegas ghost tours. DMV's in Phoenix and they nobly will delve into all the cesspool that have reviews yelp trip advisor and maybe apple podcasts because you know we liked that phone with our review sometimes so how do you listen to him. You can listen to the beach to sandy water to it on spotify anchor Apple podcast or any of your other favorite podcast apps you can also find them on all social media platforms at at Beach to Sandy beach t o o Sandy check them out sounds like a great concept super excited to welcome the podcast to guess well we did. We do a lot of research. and I have a team. You know that helps as well we pull out as many images as we can for which ever set that we are we start. We're thinking about so for Gilead when I first arrived the first steps or the first world that I was responsible for was the colonies and season two and the barn in which the women live and so that was my main focus when I first arrived and for that we did a lot of research on you know gulags in on World War Two in concentration camps and labor firms and and so we put all these images together and put them up on the board and we you know we we basically take inspiration. kind of like. Margaret Atwood has set for her book. There's nothing in my book. That doesn't come from reality. That hasn't already happened so we we do the same. I mean we were inspired by by by things that by reality and and basically we we you know we create our world based on a world that that already already exists we take bits and pieces of different you know different environments and we create our own world now you mentioned the colonies and that was a very different look from the rest of Gilead so what were some of those design elements that you use to create the look for the colonies well if we if we talk about the field fielder the colony the the work the exterior work field you know for example we the painted trees with biodegradable pain so so we didn't ruin the trees but we actually ended the trees. Brown so that they look they would look like they burnt we actually we also torched some some some mm saplings and had them you know placed in the in the field so that it would look like you know they had been contaminated we we worked very with with the special effects to create rivulets and had you know smoke coming out of the ground and what else did we do. My goodness we that field that we found this location it was this old quarry that had been abandoned and then so it was all overgrown with you know with with weeds and trees and and whatnot so we had a section of it mode basically we had all the trees taken out and and all of the Y- yeah of all of the weeds and the sampling's taken out and then we work the soil to make it look like a Labor farm it was a huge endeavor and when we started the process there was snow so we had to build a road to get us down to the pitch it was it was it was a huge endeavor yeah and then when they're in the barn that was a working barn earn and so the farmer who was who who was there. I mean there were pigs in the in the in the basement of the Barn you know the barn was full of Hay and so he we had we had the barn emptied we had it cleaned and made it worker friendly and we basically rebuilt the barn on the inside to make sure that there wouldn't be any you know any accidents and whatnot yeah and created these you know basically concentration camp lake aac settings for the women now. What are some of the design elements that maybe you can think of that or maybe hidden away or the audiences may net have noticed on their first viewing or maybe kind of things that you can think of that. Maybe we didn't see I think that you know especially in the in the world of Gilead Gilead other than commander Lawrence's house which which we've just talked about most of the sets are very pure and there isn't much that isn't essential and isn't really supposed to be there and that the audience doesn't see there aren't really really that many hidden hidden treasures the only thing that could be a bit of an Easter egg would be see that in commander Lawrence's kitchen. There's a painting by the me which was the inspiration color color wise for the colonies field and that is just a bit of a plan to you know to to to season two because we we built Lawrence's kitchen and season three and and in season two we use the me of you so you know the costume designer used Vami our department did Collin Watkinson. Did we each had our own little painting that we were tasing our our creed creation on and mine was that one and so it's then it's I put it in the kitchen so a couple of things things that were pointed out from season three couple. Easter egg type things that people were the statue that Jess Belle's June uses ultimately to deliver that final blow that kills commander winslow that appears to be a statue of a woman and also there is a wooden screen that is kind of between the bedroom and living area that appears to have a swastika lost eco-design in it. Can you tell us about those and whether those are accurate depictions are not and if those were intentional choices you all made for the show. Those are are accurate descriptions. The statue is a art department creation. we actually worked DOC on ten different prototypes of statuettes and that was the one that was that was chosen. I was in in the end by the director. We are sculptor had made ten. I chose three and the director preferred that one so that is the one that we ended up using it is it is the statue of a woman it is to represent you know fertility ability but in that very brutally honest dictatorial world so it's a combination of fertility and harsh dictatorship so the screen in all honesty was a a happy mistake aac in the sense that we had designed in season two we designed to screen for bills and when we when when we did the first design it would just something geometric and then when we put all of the basically when we repeated the image we noticed that it basically created a swastika and then we thought okay. Are we going to keep it or are we going to change it and it was a conscious creative have decision to keep it because it was subtle enough that you know only certain viewers. We're going to recognize it and and you know we didn't want to make it a thing but we didn't want to get rid of it either and so this year when we did when we built the room and we built that room in the studio and so you know we built the screen that was around the bed and and all the doors and we kept the same design intentionally and so it's one of those things that I always love to see when i read you know commentary from people on the Internet who who are real fans of the show Who Will you know catch things. I think it's fantastic so there are times where you get to go beyond the walls of Gilead to places like Canada and the colonies talk about the different approaches you have to take when you're going to different locations like that and the inspiration that you put in for those places it is it is a challenge to to keep our world separate right. We have Gilead we have Canada. We have Boston and this year we had Washington and so and so yeah Canada is I find that contemporary. sets are always a bit of a challenge because to make them you know aesthetically pleasing yet. Make them realistic. There's a fine line you know so if we take you know sets like little America which we wanted very messy and loose apartment is full of full of objects and you know plants and and it's just kind of chaotic but yet it has to remain you know something that people want to watch you know has to remain aesthetic aesthetic right. There's always that delicate balance that we have to keep we also it's important for us to keep a contrast between Gilead and in Canada so that when the story switches from one to the other that the differences obvious on the screen I mean other than that important Horton to us is that since we shoot in and around Toronto we're very careful with the choices of our locations and Now I've worked on twenty six episode so so after twenty six episodes or when you're at the twenty six we kinda feel like we're kind of running out of of of choices or that. We've made a mistake because we've chosen a location that was you know that would have better served as Gilead than than than Canada for example so it's always a bit of a struggle ago. I have to say to keep all those things separate and make the right choices at the right time obviously the the locations that we look for and that we choose represent the hierarchy between the commanders and the power that they that they have there's that and so you know and then we also partially work with the locations that we find you know there. There is a compromise sometimes that is made to reach our goal so if you take for example you know a commander Lawrence and Commander Waterford Bird or commander Lawrence and commander winslow so those choices are about power and they're about personality -ality you know Lawrence was a professor. He's lived in this House with his wife even before Gilead so it is you know it's filled with not only the art that he's stolen or taken from museums but also things that he's collected over the years. There's a certain warmth warmth purpose oriel like feel to the House commander winslow on the other hand you know he's at the top of the food chain and he's got this gigantic opulent home that is filled with you know again art and pool table and you know it it reeves wealth and so those are the kinds of things that we look for when we look for locations commander. Lawrence I have to say it was built in the studio but it was it was based on on an original house. No another awesome thing everybody loves this season. Was We finally got to go outside of the Boston area of Juliet. Lee added get into Washington. DC which was amazing and got sure offered you a lot of freedom to do some different things it really had this overpowering sense of dread and you know how much worse things could be outside of what we've seen in. Gilead already talked about that and what went into creating well that here's here's a perfect example of of how all the departments bring their art the table to create an ambiance that you know tells the story. The creation of Washington is basically derived from the script the Lincoln Memorial is scripted. There was no other way for us to do it is a story point the way that the art department and the rest of production and added to that element is by choosing locations like the train station and stripping them of everything that wasn't essential and replacing with Gilead flags with you know guards and and military vehicles and this regimented kid way the actors moved you know in rows and columns and all of those things put together gave that sense and dread that Washington had has there ever been any specific requests from actors when it comes to the production design because you always hear about the actors having these debate back stories for their characters plotted out Soviet any of them come to you with special request anything specific that they thought would lend to the production of their character actually the that happened once other than that. The actors are very receptive of what we what we build for them It's never happened that they've been you know unhappy or or confused or have said this is not who I am. I don't understand the asset on the contrary they've always said. Oh my goodness. This helps me. Be You know my character this. You know so so that's been really great. I did have one really great exchange with Bradley Whitford About about his character when we built his his office because when we started the show we didn't have scripts and so so as as the episodes went on we added to the House and the office came a little bit later. I think it was an episode four four I think and and we were discovering commander Lawrence at the same time as Bradley was and there was you know we kept having to adjust to to who we thought he was and so in in creating his office. I I had a talk with him about you know who he thought he was and what what is it that he was going. He would have been doing in this office because the script. It doesn't tell us this you know. It'll give us one scene but it doesn't really tell us what the background is or so so it was interesting because at that particular moment he was he was not struggling but he was he was thinking about his character sure and I was thinking about what his office should look like and together we we just talked about it and and and it was great. It was really great so we got to talk to your editor. Wendy Hallam Martyn she's also nominated for creative arts emmy this weekend and we were talking talk about the return to more practical effects and using CGI only in places where it's deemed necessary or not as cost effective as doing things practically so talk to us about that if you're seeing that in production design elements as well because that's what we're seeing on the screen is yeah. I've noticed that as well in the last few years you know a few years back. Maybe I don't know ten. Maybe there was this big. You know push to do things. CGI It was you no it was news extraordinary and I guess we thought that we could do things with CGI that we couldn't do without but there's definitely a trend to go back to to mechanical effects rather than visual effects and you know that's the same with snow or water or or smoke. Yes definitely smoke 'cause it doesn't it doesn't look right and the thing is people are now demanding and rightly so you know now. Most of our entertainment is on television. I think the audience is very critical of of what they watch and you know. Fake smoke looks like fake smoke folk and it takes you out of the action and and you know makes you focus on the smoke rather than what's going on and and we don't want that I mean. CGI TGI still is important. You know they sometimes actually not all there. It's essential especially for example on the show like the the handmaid's tale. Let's say where where Dressing Street for Gilead seen in the art department will take care of all of this Linage that that is to about ten feet maybe twelve in the air but anything that is above that street signs or posters and windows or things that we I don't want to see. CGI comes in behind and races at for us because we can't see it would be impossible and sometimes it's not even allowed to physically physically remove it so they have to remove it in post same thing with snow you know sometimes our special effects will blanket a location with snow but then the crew was walking on it and it's just it's and CGI will come in in post and just clean it up for us you know and make it look just make it look perfect so again. It's elaboration all right well. Do you have any upcoming projects. Did you like to talk about anything on the horizon for are you beyond handmaid's tale well. I actually I'm going to do season four of the handmaid's tale so that's what's coming up for me. I chose to to again to stay the home and take care of my children this summer so I will go from season three directly into season four and then we'll see maybe maybe it'll be the testaments Margaret Atwood's new book or I don't know I don't know I can't wait to read it. We definitely look forward to any news forthcoming about that. Obviously XLII and we thank you for joining us on the podcast today. We really really appreciate it. Have a good one and best of luck at the EMMYS. Thank you so much burn.

Gilead commander Dr Lawrence spotify director Warren Littlefield Elizabeth Williams emmy Canada Justin Margaret Atwood commander winslow Google Fargo NBC Fargo dot
Full Episode: Friday, March 06, 2020

Perspective

37:34 min | 5 months ago

Full Episode: Friday, March 06, 2020

"From ABC News this is perspective a closer look at the week's top stories and the stories. You may have missed. I'm Sherry Preston coming up staying calm during covert nineteen when you spread fear to your friends. It's almost like spreading germs. Super Tuesday lived up to its name. The Field of Democrats running for president is narrowed to just too much. So you want to be an astronaut. Now's the time to apply. The former space travel tells us what NASA is looking for. Don't ever want to tell yourself. No let them tell you. Know All ahead on perspective if you were to ask five or ten or a hundred of your closest friends this week. What's most on their mind? Chances are good. Many of them would say corona virus as the number of people infected with Kobe. Nineteen fluctuates fewer in China. More around the world people have. It's safe to say been very concerned. There's no hand. Sanitizer be found anywhere those surgical masks that do no good or sold out. Flights business trips and events with a lot of people are being canceled and the markets have gone absolutely nuts. It's also sparked a mini industry of Corona virus songs around the world. Here's one from Vietnam about washing your hands. Here's one from the Dominican Republic about staying away from large crowds. Here's one from China. Wuhan boots when it comes to the latest information on covert nineteen one of the best places to find out what's going on is the Centers for Disease Control. Cdc Dot Gov is their website or the World Health Organization who dot I N T is their website. You can also turn to question and answer sessions that have been set up places like here at ABC news featuring our friend Dr Jennifer Ashton hundreds and hundreds of questions coming into our corona virus Command Center. Now we're going to start with Shea on facebook who's asking how are people infected with Corona Virus Being treated and what are the protocols right now other than stay home. We really don't know at this point. This is right. And that's the key the unknown not knowing what's freaking all of us out David Rope e studies risk. He's written a book called. How RISKY IS IT? Really? Why are fears? Don't always match the facts. He's spoken a lot this week. About Corona virus including to us. David if you could give me your take if you would on. What exactly is going on with all this. When risk is new it has uncertainty. We don't know yet what we need to know to protect ourselves and that uncertainty makes us feel powerless like we don't have control over it kind of like driving the car down the street. Only your eyes are closed. You don't have control over your own safety and that makes it feel scary so what we do is anything that gives us a sense of control like we buy all the bottled water and toilet paper. Costco right or masks or say we're going to wash your hands and not shake hands and all this sort of stuff which is generally good practice but in part it's because we're freaking out rather than it's actually just good practice. I think terrorism is another one that you could think of you know after nine eleven and over the subsequent years. It's a natural human reaction so after nine one one and then the anthrax letters. We were all buying a lot of people. Were buying gas masks. That's the same thing as these face masks now. Ninety million Americans bought the plastic and duct tape recommended in case there was a biological or chemical attack to seal off a room and many people said coming out of the store. I this look stupid but at least it's something I can do to make myself feel safe. It's taking control now. Here's the danger of that. When we think we've taken control we relax and in this case we need to be cautious. We need to wash our hands. We need to be aware of symptoms. There's a real risk out there. It's not like this is not a risk at all. We just need to keep our reactions perspective but those reactions need to include do precaution. Is that something that you can pass onto people this the sense of control? Let's say okay. I've got what's going on right now and I and I'm scared about that but it's just as important for me to pass on information that is true to you as it is for me to wash my hands. A tweet and a cough can be just as dangerous a cough CONSP- the germ and a tweet can spread the fear. If we only sound the alarm everybody thinks the sky is falling and we overreact. Now here's why that matters. And here's a tweet and a cough can be the same. Constant worry is bad for our immune system it literally weakens our immune system. We're in a fight or flight response to fight off the lion and we don't have to worry about germs when the lion is attacking. So we're in this fear state but the fierce day turns down the immune system when you spread fear to your friends. It's almost like spreading germs to them. You wouldn't want people to do that to you. We shouldn't do that to other people. David ropy thank you very much really interesting stuff. Milk hope it was helpful. Take Care Remember last week when we were talking about? What a big deal. Super Tuesday would be chock that went up in the. You are correct column on Monday. There were four still left in the race five with Tulsi Gabbard and by the end of the week there were just two three with Tulsi Gabbard. Michael Bloomberg proved. You still can't buy an election even when you spend half a billion dollars on your campaign when he dropped out. He said he didn't have any regrets. I've been doing this for a long time and every day gets better and I can tell you today. Sorry we didn't win but it's still the best day of my life and tomorrow is going to be better and I watch another. Warren was a bit of a different story when she came in third in her own. State of Massachusetts on Tuesday. She knew there really wasn't a path to the nomination and so on Thursday in front of a lot of clicking cameras she also left the race one of the hardest parts of this is all those people all those little girls. We're GONNA have to wait for more. That's going to be hard. It was a little hard to understand there at the beginning but what she said was all those promises and all those little girls who are going to have to wait four more years. It's going to be hard. What a week it's been. Abc News Political Director. Rick Klein is here to help us. Sort it all out rick. We're going to start off with what you wrote in the note the political note that you guys put out every day your first line. This week changed everything in politics somehow for a great number of Americans though it also changed nothing Elizabeth Warren out of the race. What does that mean? It means that is going to be battle of two older white men this fall after we get through the two older white men who are off the Democratic nomination. What a remarkable statement and we have this year with this historic diversity. Gender ethnic and racial as well as age diversity. And now you're stuck with two guys in their late seventies battling it out to face another seventy something year old president who's also white male and I think it is a powerful statement about where we are as a country and you could hear it in Elizabeth Warren's voice as she dropped out of the race talking about those Pinky promise to made two girls and how sad she was that it would be at least another four years before. There's a female president. Okay so let's talk about who is now left in this race. We've got three older white men who are running and they're what they stand for is very different. That is true but still when it comes to diversity. We're looking at the same thing. We've looked at for two hundred years notable to me that some of the candidates who are diverse dropped out cory Booker Combo Harris. They haven't endorsed. I wonder if that's something that weighs heavily on their minds. Aside from the very basic question of whether who the best president is going to be the Democrats have to feel better in one sense that they have narrowed their choices as quickly as they have. The talk of the contested convention is basically going away. But there's other parts of the city can't feel good about including what the makeup of this race truly will be okay so now when we're talking about going forward let's keep Donald trump out of the picture. Let's talk about Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden. What are we going to see right now? Joe Biden is the front runner which is incredible statement because Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden was on life support. That's all turned around. I think the next debate that first debate where is going to be probably a head to head Between the two of them is going to be telling the Michigan primary. Coming up on Tuesday is going to be absolutely critical as well as Jerry. Because that's a state that has huge symbolic value and practical electoral value for Democrats. A lot of people are going to have. That date circled on their calendars as a key. One to see if Bernie bounces back. Finally what's up with Tulsi? Gabbard hard to say I mean. She's got two delegates both out of American Samoa. She has no mathematical path nomination. And that's not a statement on the merits of for candidacy is a simple statement of reality. Can She stand sure? There's elements of her campaign. That have been suggesting that the party establishment's been unfair to her. I'm sure they're going to continue to complain about that. But I'm pretty safe. Predicting she's not going to be the nominee ABC's political director reclined. Thank you as always. This was a big week both inside and outside the US Supreme Court inside. The justices took up one of the issues that deeply. Divide this country abortion. They heard arguments over whether doctors who perform abortions in the state of Louisiana should be required to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. It's sometimes difficult to get those privileges and those fighting against abortion. No that sort of those fighting to keep abortion legal. Abc's Gloria Riviera has more rallying cries of a cultural. Divide a woman's access to an abortion. Now before a leaning Supreme Court for the first time since president trump took office a clash of convictions on the steps of the Supreme Court. Kathleen Pittman has just stood before the highest court in the land. She's here to fight as the plaintiff. In a case that could set the precedent for the entire nation a ruling that many fear to weaken roe versus Wade. I cannot tell you how moving it is to see all of you here. All of these faces rallying behind us behind a small independent clinic northwest Louisiana here. Twelve hundred miles away from our nation's capital in Shreveport Louisiana the real battle unfolds Pittman small clinic now at risk of closing of its forced to comply with the new State Law restricting the doctors who perform abortions. There aren't sure outside. Seen the clinic staff is all too familiar with protesters lined up many. Who will leave? Abortions are a sin. Good morning thank you recall and through to help you inside. The clinic is inundated with calls. I think I need to write my obits simply so I can say what I want. Said Pittman says are small staff of Twenty one provides birth control abortion and consultations to three thousand women in Louisiana alone. The women we see here I would say between seventy to eighty percent live at or below the federal poverty level so these are women without mains and then there are the out of state patients. I would say about twenty seven percent from Texas. We also see women from Arkansas Mississippi Oklahoma occasionally Nebraska as one of the only clinics in the region. Pittman and all. The staffers feel like they are the last line of defense for countless women. It is highly possible that all but one if not all clinics will close in Louisiana. It's not just this case while this case directly affects all the clinics in Louisiana it. It's going to affect other states as well think everybody. That works here has a commitment and reason for being here Everybody has their own story. The weight of that responsibility not lost on anyone. Abc's Dwyer has been covering the Supreme Court and joins US now before we get into what happened in court. Explain to us what this means when a doctor who provides abortions has to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. What's that mean? That's a requirement Sherry that doctors Go to a hospital and apply for privileges to be able to send their patients to the nearby hospital. Even if they don't practice their full-time themselves. It means that the doctor would have to provide their credentials. It would have to In some cases they prove that they see a certain number of patients on a given year that they have certain specialties The bottom line is they getting admitting. Privileges is highly subjective. It's really up to the hospitals to decide who they will grant admitting privileges to and that sort of the heart of the dilemma. In this case how hard is it for doctors to get admitting privileges for their patients These several doctors in Louisiana said. It's very hard in fact. They were denied admitting privileges thereby forcing them under this law to shut down their abortion practices but conservatives the state said it's actually not that hard and they didn't try hard enough and so that's what the justices heard At court on Wednesday the side from the government that saying That it's not that tough to get these. Admitting privileges go into that argument a little bit for us. Yes so the state of Louisiana says this is about protecting women's health they say These these privileges are important to allow a doctor to send a patient to get admitted at a nearby hospital. If something goes wrong during the course of an abortion. They say it's common sense. They say they have mirrored this requirement for abortion doctors on a similar measure for other surgeons in the like and that's necessary for safe practice in good health in their state. The other side Sherry is that They said this is simply a hurdle. In fact the district court in this case found that it's not necessary for women's health that in fact most women who get abortions these days get them Through through medicine and that they are if they have a complication unlikely to experience that complication once they get home so they don't need to be referred by their abortion provider clinic within thirty miles of that procedure. It's tough line. And and the justices on Wednesday were were really grappling with whether or not the serves valid purpose or whether or not this is really meant to be a barrier to women getting abortions. And that's what the one side has said. I mean you have the liberal justices including Elena Kagan. Who said. Isn't it right that the clinic has served three thousand women a year and only transferred four of to the hospital so sang with that such a low level of complication? This shouldn't be an issue and this is just an attempt to halt abortion. That's what one side says. Yeah I mean Elena. Kagan pointed on three thousand a year. Seventy thousand women over twenty three years at this Louisiana Clinic and only four referred over that time so she was pointing out. What a lot of the liberal justices And the plaintiffs. In this case Have been arguing in that is. There's something else going on here with. Bater Ginsburg said this. Thirty Mile Requirement really makes no sense And she she kept repeating that over and over again she said why would you put in a thirty mile requirement if really women need to get into hospital anywhere But we did see Justice Samuel Alito the conservative justice nominated by George W Bush. He was the most supportive of this measure Sherry. He came out and said that basically these doctors didn't do enough to get these many privileges and they are. They are important for women's health and even if just one woman needed to be admitted Over the course of say seventy thousand women getting abortions that that is enough and sufficient reason for the state to require it. There's no more issue that he is. You know really strikes at the heart of arguments between conservative and liberal than the abortion issue. And you heard that outside the court before the arguments began you had protesters on both sides. The women who were there Speaking out against this law they heard from Chuck Schumer the the the Senate Minority Leader and he had some some words that were you know striking to a lot of people and afterwards the chief justice came out and gave a rare rebuke. I mean you know written rebuke calling him out by name. It was an extraordinary statement. Here from the chief justice but A lot of people saying it was equally extraordinarily here. The top Democrat in the United States Senate not deliver the words he did in front of the court as it was here hearing arguments Sherry. Obviously this is an issue. That stirs up Enormous political fervor. And that is what Chuck Schumer was driving eight but you do have a number of Republicans you also had a number of of left leaning Law Critics In the light. Come out against Schumer And so there's there's there's certainly a firestorm over just what he said. Well Devon Dwyer thank you so much for covering this so thoroughly for us. We appreciate it thank sure. So here's what Chuck Schumer said outside the Supreme Court about those two new conservative justices. I want to tell you. Gore's such I wanNA tell you cavenaugh. You have released the Laura Wind and you will pay the price that you most. News anchors including myself edited those comments stopping there for the sake of time but here is Chuck Schumer Full Statement. You know large at you if you go forward with these awful decisions. The bottom line is very simple. We will stand with the American people we will stand with American women we will tell President Trump and Senate republicans who have stacked with right wing. Ideologues that you're going to be gone in November and you will never be able to do what you're trying to do now ever ever again the next day Chuck. Schumer did apologize after he was called out by Republican leader. Mitch McConnell saying I should not have used the words I used yesterday. They didn't come out the way I intended to and he followed it up with to the women of America. What we're talking about here. What I am fighting for here is your right to choose. It's been nearly fifty years since Roe. V Wade legalized abortion across the country. The fight continues coming up. Nasa wants to take you to space but do you have what it takes. We'll talk to an astronaut. Who Tried fifteen times before he finally walked through the doors of Johnson Space Center as an employee on perspective? After this when it comes to hiring you don't have time to waste. You need help getting to your short list of qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot Com post. A job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates using an intuitive online dashboard. And when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsor jobs new users can try it for free at indeed dot com slash perspective. That's indeed dot com slash perspective terms conditions and quality standards apply offer valid through March. Thirty first twenty twenty from ABC News. This is perspective a closer look at the week's top stories and the stories. You may have missed. I'm Sherry Preston coming up. We're GONNA remember a business leader and entertainment legend. But first NASA has announced that for the first time in four years starting to accept applications for astronauts. The agency has plans to send men and for the first time a woman to the moon again and it's preparing mankind for its next giant leap to Mars. So what is the process of applying to be an astronaut? Like can lead a background in one of the stem fields pilot. Training is a plus and it probably goes saying that the application does say extensive travel is required but so's persistence. It took astronaut Clayton Anderson. Who goes by the name Astro Klay Online a lot of time to get to NASA and eventually to space? But he did it. We have to sit down and ask him about the process this week. So let's go ahead and talk about what NASA is doing. They are for the first time in four years opening up Candidates to be able to try out to be an astronaut and They're doing this. This is something that you did. I would assume years ago when you said. Hey I want to be an astronaut How hard is it to become an actual astronaut? I did try to do this. I tried fifteen times and was denied acceptance until the fifteenth time. So perseverance is a big deal. I think for anybody that wants to do this. You know I tell people all the time that applying to be an astronaut is easy getting selected to be an astronaut is hard to all those out there who do want to apply. I also say that you don't ever want to tell yourself. No you WanNa let them tell you know. What are the things that they're talking about is like the basic requirements? You have to have a master's degree in a stem field. They say things like engineering science physical science computer science or math but it really is a whole lot more than that. I mean you could be a pilot could be any number of things. Why is the range so big in the number of ways that you can become an astronaut? They need that many things in space. That many experts That's a great question. Sometimes I think we pick folks that are way over qualified to do the job I mean I know what the job entails at least to this point in our space travel experience. But you know you need people. That are adaptable. That are flexible. That are team players that are willing to think on the fly and be successful in a team environment. It'll be really interesting to see In my time as an astronaut and if I think today and say wow is there anybody I'd like to go too deep space with a ton of him but there's also some that I wouldn't WanNa go to space with right? Nasa looks diversity. Nasa looks for a lot of different skill sets You know no one is Mark Watney from the Martian. No-one I've I know a lot of really good astronauts but they ain't no mark white me's among them so you have to find people that you can put their skills together and make that solid team based on. This guy knows that the scowl knows this. He's really good at this. She's really good at that. And that's Kinda how NASA looks to approach him with it. That's a really good take on it. What are some of the qualities that you would want in someone? You're going to spend time with in deep space in some of the qualities. You would not want somebody. You're going to spend a lot of time with an outer space. Well my case really good looks. I think that it's really important and I wrote a piece recently for a NASA book that supposed to be published in the near term. But they asked me to write about the human factors ideas about. What's in here when you're GONNA go to deep space? We find a lot of astronauts that are really smart capable technical people you know that can right computer software or can fly of Super Fast jet. You know but now as you go deep into space I think that we have to start changing our paradigm a little bit and that maybe Jett Jockeys and helicopter pilots and military folk while. They're incredibly good at what they do. What's the real skill set you need to achieve a Mars mission? That's GONNA take six to nine months just to get there and six to nine months on the surface in six to nine months to get back. That's a long time and so I don't want somebody that gets in my space all the time or there will be those people and we see this all the time in the astronaut corps when we do things like patch design how. I don't care what it looks like that. I don't care if everyone and then when they see it they go. I don't want that that's right. So those kind of issues I think will begin to crop up or creep out in how you deal with. That stuff is going to be interesting to see like your office environment. It's like your your recreational basketball team. It's like all those environments except now put yourself in a vehicle that you can't get out of you know the psychological aspect of this is going to be way more important in my opinion than we've given credence to in the past two Nasr's credit. They're looking at that but I don't think they're looking at it enough yet. That is absolutely fascinating. Because I cannot imagine being in space where you can't get out with somebody who who really just little things bug me so talk us through the process of what it's like going through this especially when it comes to those psychological questions that you're raising you did it fifteen times. So what's the process like? I did it. I had this device. It was called a typewriter. What and I have a lot of white Back in those days but today. These tech savvy folks are just going to hop on a computer and they're gonna go the appropriate Lincoln. It's GONNA lead them through. It's going to tell them to upload this document and upload that document and all that great stuff so I think. The process is pretty streamlined. And the fact that you do the Internet is why they've changed the requirements. A little bit. You have to have a master's degree now. That's the minimum education hormone. It used to be a bachelor's degree. You have to have two years of equivalent experience with that master's degree you have to do the physical. Which is it's a new different physical in that. They're looking at things that could cause problems. With a long duration mission versus show missions that lasted a week. Or we can have. It's interesting to me though. At least when I was selected. Nobody had to be able to swim. Nasa would teach you swim because you're going eventually end up in the six point. Two million gallons of water pool so to me. I'd put a Red Cross swim certificate. Requirement and Aaron that would eliminate a lot of people probably say tax money. Can I ask what it sounds like a astro? The African Grey Parrot. I'm sorry that's the best I can do. You think you would like to be in outer space with Astro. No no no. He likes to throw his food and in zero gravity. That would not be fun and he also wakes up every morning to do his duty and that would also not be fun to clean up. Yeah that does present an issue like that. I mean when we watch these astronauts we see them and everybody seems so calm cool collected on the International Space Station wants to go on missions like that that aspect is is something that you have to keep that calmness but still have a good personality. That's tough to do. You know my philosophy. I lived with all coach off and FYODOR chicken for about five months and they were tremendously. Wonderful people cosmonauts from Russia very talented. My philosophy is an astronaut. Was If anything happened on the Russian side of that vehicle I was GONNA grab onto olives belt buckle and I was not going to let go and I would do whatever he told me no matter how smart I think I am or how talented or capable. I think I am. There's no way I was going to know. As much about their vehicle in the Russian languages they were and so my goal was to not be a hindrance to them as they executed whatever they needed to execute on the American side It was a little different. I was supposedly the expert and I was hoping that they would follow me in the same fashion. So that's part of that teamwork aspect when you get international people together. The game changes a little bit. But we've proven over the years in the space station that we can do it successfully. We'll play your website is called Astro Clay and if you are interested I mean. I don't think you're gonNA reapply again. But you can't go to NASA dot Gov slash astronauts and apply for a sixteenth time. You Might WanNa try it again. Yeah maybe that should but I probably get a big red x stomped on my application. So play Anderson. Thank you so much and take care and good luck to astro the parrot as well. Thank you so much one more thing about being an astronaut the pay. Nasa's website says the annual salary for someone who literally flies above the planet is between one hundred and four thousand one hundred sixty one thousand dollars a year our brains are divided into two hemispheres. The left side handles things like science math and computer. Coding and the right side handles things like emotions. Creativity art and music. This week. We lost a couple of men who personified each side of the brain. Jack Welch was the left side. James Lipton was the right Jack. Welsh was the longtime CEO of General Electric. He's significantly increased. Jeez earnings but also earned the nickname neutron jack for shedding huge numbers of employees at the company. Fortune magazine called him manager of the century. One thousand nine hundred nine but ABC's Daria Albinger says his legacy a little more complicated. When you think of General Electric a couple names probably come to mind one. Thomas Edison inventor of the Electric Light Bulb who's Edison Electric Light? Company was precursor to g. e. The other. Jack Welsh a man who went a long way toward making the conglomerate the household name. We know today John Francis Welch Junior was born to working class parents in Massachusetts. Who demanded excellence in two thousand one interview with? Cbs is sixty minutes. Welsh says mom still that drive in him early on. I'd come home with four Asian Abi and should give me health and not having five as an inch. It Hug me well join. Ge In nineteen sixty as a junior chemical engineer with a salary of ten thousand five hundred dollars and he might have remained an engineer. Had He not met Reuben got off a GE executive? Who saw potential manager? Who focused on people if I could have ever personally every person that company I mean it's It's what counts by nineteen sixty eight. Welsh was the vice president running G E plastics and by nineteen eighty one. He Re engineer the corporation itself being named the company's youngest chairman and CEO at just forty four years of age welches philosophy was radically simple for a corporate executive e one at all of Ge's divisions to be market leaders. And if they weren't there were three choices fix them. Close them or sell them over the next two decades Welsh would oversee an empire that went from twelve billion dollars in value to more than four hundred billion and one way he kept increasing. That revenue was by cutting payrolls especially early on eliminating more than one hundred thousand workers in his first few years on the job. The best thing you can do to employees is early on as early as you know. They're the bottom ten. Let them know so they can go on and adjust their life and get in the right game in the right level of company. That's in my view. A KINDER GENTLER COMPANY. Then the company that winks at the truth that kinder gentler kind of policy earned him the nickname neutron. Jack when Welsh retired from GE he received a severance payment a four hundred seventeen million dollars it was the largest payment of its kind in business history years later. He looked back on that success. In his management institute series with Strayer University Luck plays a big pot. And all this is the right bounce around bouncing you. Don't make out but I think I think it's all about confidence. Welsh died of kidney failure at the age of eighty four. So that was left brain. Jack Welsh let's move over to the right side of the brain with James Lipton. He was an acting teacher who loved talking to actors. Wanted to know what made them tick how they went about their craft. Here's ABC's Chris. Connelly Jennifer Aniston too. Will Smith you have no idea how long been waiting to build this show from Hugh Jackman to Jim Carey. As host of inside the Actors Studio for Twenty Three Seasons beginning in Nineteen ninety-four James Lipton welcomed. Big Names in showbusiness. What brought you here for thoughtful unhurried conversations and he took viewers inside the creative process. I promised myself that it would be about craft and not about gossip. Bolstered by index. Cards and encyclopedic preparation did appear in any of the Plays at the Resurrection Baptist. Church real homework over there. His QNA's would also provide a permanent record of some who've since passed on such as. Paul Newman and rightist Robin Williams. Whose time in. The chair was an Arctic Delight. What took you from Chicago to Detroit a plane. The show success on cable made Lipton himself a celebrity. His lofty tone affectionately parodied by. Will Ferrell in this classic. Snl sketch is delightful taught acting in the nineteen fifties by the Great Stella Adler Lipton would go on to serve as the dean of the Actors Studio Drama School. His longtime dream was that one of his students would join him onstage someday. Then in nineteen ninety nine one of those acting students had a question for Sean. Penn was a young Bradley Cooper who subsequent appearance on the show. Twelve years later in two thousand eleven sparked an outpouring of grateful emotion. Who is your basic technique teacher pointing to his teacher in the crowd. Elizabeth Kemp I was never able to relax in my life. James Lipton died Monday at the age of ninety three remembered as a teacher who's curiosity about creativity could entertain and inspire at the end of every inside the actors studio which aired on Bravo. Lipton would ask his guests the same question here he is with James Gandolfini heaven exists. What would you like to hear? God Save you arrive at the pearly gates. Take over for a while. I'll be right back. James Lipton was an atheist and was asked that same question in a twenty twelve interview with CNN. He said he wanted to hear the words when he got to the pearly gates. You See Jim. You were wrong. I exist but you may come in any way march. Second Monday was the birthday of Dr Seuss as a part of his legacy schools and libraries nationwide celebrate the act of reading to children. So let's do that and say Hurrah for read across America Day. Fourth Grade is an age where kids like to read but they also like listening. It's something they need. Carol brewers a teacher of children this age and she has a message she turns the page. You're never too old to Aki too wild to pick up a book and read with the Child read across America. Day Is March to honor of Dr Seuss. That is who it today to remind us that for all our strife. There's more we can do to get fun out of life. We can read to a child or they can to us. It's better than stressing about corona virus or politics trump. Pelosi or shift. It does get tiring. We've been there as if so as you lament the state of our times. Why not read stories or poems rhymes two young ones like this? Who have sage advice on how to stay sane even tempered and Nice? You have brain to new head feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose if you got lose just read from ABC News. This has been perspective. If you want to listen to any of our past shows you can subscribe to the perspective. Podcast give us a review. Tell us what you think. It really does help. You can find it on apple podcasts. Spotify stitcher wherever you listen to your podcast can also find this and other. Abc News shows at ABC News. Podcasts DOT COM perspective is produced by Eric. Malo thanks for listening for ABC News. I'm Sherry Preston. Okay so in the New York. Times calls you one of the eighth news. Podcasts worth listening to well you to say thank you so go on start smart we start here the ABC News daily podcast. Take us with you. Listen to us now. Free on apple podcasts.

Sherry Preston ABC News NASA Stella Adler Lipton Abc US Supreme Court Jack Welch NASA Louisiana Chuck Schumer General Electric president Elizabeth Warren Elena Kagan Kathleen Pittman David ropy America cough China US
Episode 156 - Martin Fry

Sodajerker On Songwriting

42:08 min | 7 months ago

Episode 156 - Martin Fry

"Hello and welcome to so so the jacker on songwriting. One hundred and fifty six joining us. Today is an English singer Songwriter. Whose career spans almost four decades as the enviable debonair from Man of ABC? He's got ten K and five top forty singles between nine hundred. Eighty one one thousand nine hundred ninety while their seminal album the lexicon of love was UK number one and the since taking its rightful place. In the Pantheon of all time greats pop records with delighted to welcome the fantastic Martin fry to the show we met with Martin backstage at Birmingham Symphony Vinnie hole where he was getting ready to perform the whole of the lexicon of love album with a full orchestra conducted by and yes she arranged the strings on the original record. Of course us he did and our former guest trevor horn produced the album. And I think we mentioned in the Intro to that episode. How much we love it? Yeah well it's a firm favourite isn't it so the towers I think it sets a new benchmark really pop record making oh absolutely great tunes. Intelligent lyrics pristine production. It's got everything. Yeah Grades Arrangements Agents musicianship and of course popularized. The gold law may suit. I'm actually wearing mind right now. Looks good on you. Thank you. Martin was born in Stretford Manchester in nineteen fifty eight and grew up in nearby stockport's he was a fine of prog rock and Bowie as a kid then go into punk as a teenager and sites being present at the sex pistols infamous Manchester lesser free trait whole geic. In the summer of seventy six has a life changing experience. He originally wants to be a writer and went to Sheffield to study English literature. It was in the steel city in nineteen seventy seventy eight. that he met Mark White and Stephen Singleton while interviewing them for his fanzine modern drugs. Martin was Julius to play keyboards in there and vice versa. which was part of the Beijing Sheffield sinned obscene? Eventually Martin graduated to lead singer and chief songwriter. In one thousand nine hundred the band changed its name to ABC and developed into a slick funkier Honky at altogether more soulful outfit. They recorded six studio albums between one thousand nine hundred eighty two and one thousand nine hundred eighty one beginning with the aforementioned lexicon of love and they released. It's very different. Follow all the much rockier rohrer sounding beauty stab the following year. They scored a US top ten. Hit in one thousand nine hundred five with be near me from how to be zillionaire for which the boundary invented themselves as cartoon characters. I think they were really ahead of their time with that way. A few years ahead of guerrillas at least definitely then followed a two year hiatus while mountain bald a serious illness. They made their triumph from the ten in one thousand nine hundred seven alphabet city which yielded the classic. When smokey sings attribute to motown legend smokey Robinson and gave them another? UK Top ten album. Nine hundred thousand nine op saw them experiment with more of a house. Music influenced sound. ABC disbanded in Nineteen ninety-one but August resurrected the name in one thousand nine hundred seven for the album skyscraper thing. The band focused mainly on live. Where for the next decade or so but returned in two thousand and eight with the album traffic Sousse by old friend Gary Langan their ninth studio album the lexicon of love to drop in two thousand sixteen to rave reviews and reach the top ten of the UK album chart we actually saw ABC AC sound checking for the one show in June of that year? Didn't we we did. Yeah we've been broadcasting. How suddenly for amazing because we're so important on as we let them on the bomber upside going through Yves Agricole? Yeah I think we took a pic. We'll put up on the socials at some points and Martin came up in our atom slesinger episode fears back as well all didn't they. Yeah we will discuss in the movie music and lyrics which Adam wrote the songs for and they're in mentioned that at one stage. The filmmakers brought Martin on board to show the film star Hugh grant ransom of his signature. Stage Moves I wonder if he tells them the points in surely did. I'd love to have been a fly on the wall for that too. You can hear trucks from across the ABC discography if you check out this episode spotify playlist which will link to our Martin's page at so dejected dot com slash podcast. Keep up to date with all the latest news. ABC See Martin Fry Dot Com facebook dot com slash ABC LEXICON AT ABC FRY on twitter and at ABC Martin Fry on Instagram. Get in touch with us at Soda. Jack Dot COM com facebook dot com slash so dejected and at so Jessica on twitter and instagram. If you need to the show be sure to check out vast archive of songwriter interviews and subscribe to the a show on apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your parts to get you episodes as soon as they're released we also appreciate it if you'd leave us a five star rating and favourable reviews to help with us to find this. This this is a properly independent podcast to help. Keep it that way. Please donate whatever you can spare at so dejected dot com slash donate okay. Let's get on with it here. We are backstage stage Birmingham Symphony Hall the suffocation of Suave that's his. ABC's don't try don this just one thing left on my mind. ooh thank wise more mice. The catchy while you're on the wrote wrote lovely to be here nicer finally hook up with you guys. Thanks for inviting me along to the party. Great to see the Classic Sanction Lexicon of love getting the loss treatments. While you're so yes today at the Birmingham symphony hole with the cast of thousands. Yeah I've got the south banks in phonier fantastic orchestra to work with really young and full of energy. I worked with him over the years. I've noticed the personnel keeps changing. It's like maneuver the old Mexican man within the Orchestra I recognize about third of the faces from last time around. So it's kind of a great opportunity for people to get the first orchestral GEICO GEICO. They're a fantastic orchestra. I'm here with Dudley. Who arranged so many of the Huhne's back in the day and more recently so Yeah we're we're play about twenty twenty twenty two songs tonight. Yeah I bet you didn't since back in the eighties at those songs. Would go onto. Become such cultural touchstones. Well Cultural Tusk. Ominous shaken daycare but What did Andy Warhol's You know you could be famous for fifteen minutes so you know nineteen eighty. Two's a long time ago. But it is a great honor to get up on stage and be able to roll out. You know when smokey sings on the night you murdered love or the Look of love all of my heart. poison-arrow was is that kind of very sophisticated so the cosmopolitan pop sound party of vision kind of air the on Leong from the very early stages. Yeah I mean the lexicon. Love came out in eighty she to sell first album. We had a hit with tears. Not Enough I got into the top twenty and then we met Trevor Horn and recorded the rest of the album. And that's what I'm Gary Langan. Jj Yeah I mean. I grew up watching the clash and the pistols. You now is to see all those bands. When I was growing I looked Bowie and roxy music but the the bands that are can I used to go and see live first of all Susan? The man she's the prefects subway sect pistols clash both Cox. They're all punk bands for my generation so when it came to forming a band the whole kind of punk thing that wavered gone that was crushed on the shore. You know amongst my generation there was like Duran Duran and Spandau ballet and deppish mode and all his indexes human league. Everybody seems to have a vision of pop music being more sophisticated. I'm with us. We'd always envisage though songs to be like a film noir really. There's a lot of influences in say x can love from Sinatra through to Jerry Lewis through you too Brian Ferry you know no coward likewise in the Audio Palette of it here we wanted to kind of make a record that sounded very old fashioned and very remodel at the same time I was in a bank vice versa with Steve Singleton Mart. Why and that was kind of electrtonics? It was synthesizes grown up in Sheffield that was inevitable vegetable. So our background was from electron ex spouse but we wanted to give the music hall. And that's why we're interested in working with a real drama David Palm. Ah We met in Chesterfield. He's brilliant drummer and he's no castration. It was a kind of radical idea for a group from Sheffield. We wanted to take his as as we possibly. Could I read somewhere that you said whenever you write song feels like an adventurer a poetic adventure. I think it was the phrase. Do you still feel like that these days. Yeah yes very much so. I mean the two ways of doing songwriter. Ye can go brill. Building me other guys collaborate with them and finish song by four o'clock that afternoon noon which is a great way of working. But at the same time you know always inspired obviously no Tuesday afternoon. You might not be inspired. You might be in spied on Thursday afternoon. You know but In writing songs now I realize that the best songs the I've co-written no written a voice been very personal and you got to stumble across the stuff. That's you're unique voice your unique view of the world and it's worth waiting for those moments and then the adventure begins whether they say ninety eight percent perspiration a two percent inspiration only supposed to sit in with an instrument now no sitting on a plane or something or walking down the street you know. That's the beautiful thing about the the iphone isn't in these days. I'm listening to think it was a Taylor swift out my. She put a couple of her voice notes on the album. That was crate. You know it's kind of an indication those does all you demos these days so for the last thirty five years people ask you know musical lyrics or vice versa. I mean I love that full song how I wrote elastic amount. But I don't want to become the guy in the song around explaining everything you're GonNa make me be that stupid. Did you feel new data uncut. The the technology is kind of always been part of the process. I mean Trevor Horn on the show he talked about getting you guys to perform over more reached biking and how that kind of helps you focus in on lots of sense of groups that you want to achieve on that album. Well we took trevor the down to a club in Sheffield and said you know on the one hand we want to be like Sinatra and but we also WANNA be like joy division and our influences were wide but also there's a joy Oy to Disco Music or piece of music with a pocket to it so he can spend thirty five years chasing pocket and you hear a piece of music and it just swings ECON. You can't even analyze. It just feels great. You know that's the pot of gold. That's Xanadu so I think part of it was when we got to work with him. Obviously we hand held in black and white earn. Love the scale of the Ramat with the dollar record yet you have to go back in a time machine and imagine hearing that on the radio but it had such economy wide light screen a big panoramic field. So that's how we hoped with trevor. Yeah leaps at who is this guy who's made this incredible record And then he played his Give me about my hall and videotheque. I think he was working on at the time. which was an incredible sequence of these three songs? Yeah I asked him about video tech radio like that one. I think that's a as you say it's got that sort of wide screen vision to and it's interesting. Are those kinds of cinematic metaphors become part of describing the record making process success isn't it because it is unofficial innocence. Oh yeah totally. Yeah I think so. I think that's why you may music because you don't paint not less sounds pretentious. The marriage of machines earned real musicians with vice versa. It was all machines. We did a couple of records is of Christ and still Yagi okay. The band existed and I joined them later but it was always electric's in Sheffield. You've got cabaret voltaire the Human League clock. DVD most of the bands were heavily influenced by craft work or I Dunno it was very electronic but we were a band you know. We had a base player. A drummer guitarist interest a singer and sax player so the legs can love was definitely about marrying those two areas now. People just do it on a laptop back then trying to get stuff to sink into swing. We've trying to marry the willed avert dance music and pop music lives alone. That's what poison-arrow. Well that's what the Look of love is definitely about. Yeah yes sound of it. Yeah that was about to mention poison-arrow is very much of that kind of ilk. Isn't it as an almost chic like based on it must be kind of freak. Yeah but it edges. We worked with on when smokey sings lakes. It and it meant we could use every chic ISM with no guilt because he was in. Yeah I mean I'm not gonNA with Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards. You'll hear that. So of motor groove. You know this. They're they're almost like machine with machines chasing ah when he doesn't have blondie or chic or Roxy Music or countless other bans and craftwork obviously and you remember poison-arrow started in the in the writing process in the some right and it was about making something that was like a mini opera because a West Street in Sheffield in the other rehearsal rooms. There was cabaret voltaire. And like I say the Human Ligo Ugo you'd sometimes see Jolyon DEF leppard countless of the bands. You know like everybody you want to be totally different totally original so with poison-arrow I guess part of its admiration for like Quincy Jones and don't stop till you get enough and all those great productions from Michael Jackson that Jackson's appeared earth wind and fire. It was vaunting ambition But also to make a record that was very emotional and Histrionic hysterical. There was hysteria in the guy singing. The song me about shooting that poise is narrow. It was like we wanted to go in a different direction to a low of our contemporary. So we're like Gary Numan singing about electronic pylons and stuff we want to be like a mini opera like a very romantic like a pound pressburg movie which is like in soup annual a color. You know the red shoes. Yeah that's very much what poison-arrow was about the look of defiance Swanson parts of the situation. It's on your skin. You couple of the sounds. We didn't put on the armor from evolved. Some called surrender but when we played yeah it was to push as much as that make emotional. Yeah I think Trevor mentioned actually. Didn't he. He said the research strong emotional contents especially on Mexican above. I wondered where that came from in terms of musical influences. Other things from the past the how to kind of an emotional ocean resonance for you that you drew. I mean you know anything from Bowie. Young Americans to see him. Make that transition Marvin Gaye James Brown around. I mean on the side of his enough. There's a song called alphabet soup and it's kind of just a pure James Brown pastiche. I used to love those James Round. Sounds like king in heroin. That's an incredibly poetic Song Eastern some incredible music judgment. You know who else I thought was fantastic. Thing wasn't influence on us. The pop group marks the pop group when they came through with beyond good and evil. It was just a whole different post punk kind of will you know music. That was definitely in there so the idea was to make something. That wasn't a robotic. Yeah I in fact it was a reaction against vice versa. How that came over it was much schmo physical much more emotional definitely what went into those songs? I think of Edgy. Say That lyrically speaking. You're inspired by kind of Rogers and Hammerstein and full poets. What was about the approach of those people appeal to you? Why did snarl records grown up as a kid and as the Israel by you kinda realise how sophisticated those songs or even now as a sort of sixty year old man? Listen to some of those songs that seemed so simple originally but they're just incredible the way they set them up the way they set the chorus up they set versa. That sort of noble songwriting tradition. You know I was also interested in what you can squeeze into a song. We were trying to sort of put something more complicated into the back. And I think that's definitely what came to the fore and I suppose it was quite as to get onboard. Lee String arrangements on top of that production. And then have your Kinda falsetto on top of that. I mean this kind of emotional drive to that sound. Isn't the first thing she arranged. Yeah she's going to be around later. Ask Her but it wasn't like we hooked attack with a and she was a string range. She took on the challenge. She loved like Philly and stuff like that. You know all those tunes gambling Huckster Ryan motown on multiple is a very big influence and stuff like the temptations Those productions are incredible. You know on cloud nine and but was rolling stone. It was released on the space inside those wounds. Another thing we were obsessed with was love. American music sounded like space at the back of it. British stuff at the time time was kind of really full so it was kind of about how you arrange the sounds but anyway I do believe this. Though the host the mistakes you make and the kind of blind alleys or the kind of complete Eh stupidity that leads to great ideas and so the idea that these five guys from Sheffield. We're going to kind of become height. Well originally we were trying to get Alex side Ken to produce the record because I loved Grace Jones records and we say to him had tears enough out there and we're like how do we make swing. We want it to sound sound. Great in pennies disco on Wednesday night but of course Lion Robbie with a rhythm section in the fast lane. It's like he didn't have the heart to tell us. I thought we were crazy but we got there in the end. Yeah if you listen to something like all of my heart which you mentioned the moments ago I mean that is kind of an accomplished dramatic picks isn't it and especially that pause. I mean not really add to La Drama to that song. Think David Palmer was from Chesterfield. He was working in the working. Men's clubs he was like kissel child prodigy on drums joined. The band played on that track. These days he plays Rod Stewart all these years on east kind of a world class drummer. We were very very lucky to kind of run into a world world class drummer in Chesterfield. Tuesday afternoon piece of the puzzle to find. Isn't it really got it so on all of my heart you here's hi hat patterns and stuff. Yeah phenomenal with those who's pauses effective in place before. Is that something that's came up in the in the recording of it originally Tape in for the third one is longer than the other all of my heart. Ah The dead and so when you get to the third one on the record is time is not even in time. It's a piece of tape to go. All of my heart says no ambience just a piece of dead tape on stage. Of course tonight. There'll be three or four thousand people at that to do that with the orchestra tricks of the trade. I give the drummer a wink. And a cue from all of my key player now thank take a lunatic explaining the cute but yeah that's the first him. Squeezing the drama maximizing the drama. And that's very much alive. Yeah in all of my heart you look of Lavas obviously temple try in terms of all of these things isn't it. It's got `electronic drama. It's got the interest interest in words. We're always fans of your lyrical. Approach is even the first line phrase like strange arrangements. It's beguiling isn't it. It's unusual mysterious. What don't you think it's the hardest line of a song to right the first line you've got to draw people in how you can cop out and of course but you know? Come on in welcome to the willed of ABC. You know whoever look Lovisa is probably our most popular song over the years. I don't know I'm one of them but it's a curiosity. Yeah I love it when Drill guys all kind of hip hop guys go. Yeah yes. It's a hip hop two thousand five years on but it's great when people say that the funniest thing somebody said to me about about the song was once I was in John. Henry's rehearsal room and a guy comes up to me goes if akin for real I said what are you for. Real man. UPI EPA. Yeah so I had to front Emma. I said Yeah. We're going to ask about those moments because of just low vowed they work in the hip hip. Hooray with those I'd lived in the song Yeah Yeah I came out of planet life. We used to play live. I wanted to ramp up at the end like poison-arrow so that it was like a mini opera so repeats right at the final beat. That was definitely part of the thinking. So the EPA just ecstasy. You know the the singers demented wanted by the wind song. It's almost like you. Climb the top of the mountain and they were you know shrieking into the distance but it probably would have come from a couple of run throughs of I just out lips yet Bruce Travis things be lucky in a he. He did his beach boys. Sisters and brothers yes Utopian speaking. I think he came at the same time. It's kind of a take eight writer. That's why they fit together. I felt good about that. Hyun you know. I felt good singing in the studio. Well you should yeah. There's a whole kind of collage of voices in that song is in the the woman saying goodbye. And all the bits and pieces Greek chorus moments as well as in I I really like Slide family stone dance to the music and alike prince late Sir. Nine thousand nine hundred nine the tradition in our in. BF kind of the Bass player. Goes to the Mike and then they get harassed. And there's a whole kind of dialogue. Colin response is always there and James Brown. So I think that going on in the Look of love you know the different all. I'm saying it takes a lot all I'm doing it's Kinda schizophrenic. But in rock music was always one guy you know singing the whole I think through with this even though I had to sing it all it was pretty much me being the different characters. That's how I wanted to do the vocal. Yeah it we've been impressed by your sort of your rhyming ability as well like just on that album kind of throughout you know I was listening to so hip. It hurts your. I'm courtesy with hits me. Yeah wants to be a millionaire. That was the album I just wanted to do. If something came naturally to you or something you really kind of work that I it came naturally but I'll tell you what it is nice to Dacia with rhymes for years. I was trying to get the word umbrella into a song was kind of mortified when Riana came came here last night on stage singing when the Postman Dome Cologne Valentine's Day. That umbrella don't work on a rainy day so it already already done it in in a so. Yeah I mean you start off with your core what you're saying but it is nice sometimes just to push the limits to see how can push the audience. Yeah I mean I love the the rhyming schemes and you know this stuff. In the original Rojas Nam Stain in and Rosanna. The whole tradition of sitting down writing a song that is kind of the Orion but as is heartfelt at the same time sincere sincere but also quite theatrical. He's kind of getting the balance but rhymes I'm always looking for a rhyme see. I've got a bag of rhymes here. Could you write a song about a Unicorn. Exposure there's always new words in the public consciousness but you can push it too far. It's like a house of cards as an Olympic. You always walk. Walk that fine line though with the ABC stuff like how to be a millionaire for example sounds like quite a bold statement that title but then the first line is. I've seen the future. I can't afford it yes zero. We saw treading that fine line of this. Ironic is this plane with those ideas of being glamorous and being sophisticated or I remember him bruce springsteen said he wrote born in the USA. So you not assumed it was like a gung-ho yeah national pride kind of the King USA tune and he explains it is but it isn't and you know it's kind of about the anger the guys felt when they came back from Vietnam but simplicity and sophistication in that song so without to be a millionaire. Now it's hard to be a millionaire question. Mark I was living in Sheffield at the time. Eighty four the miners strike. You know Kinda come round again full circle. Oh failing I guess people assume that we were always in wymen bows drinking cocktails. They used to say you know partly down to the way we look through the Golden Army suits and the whole thing but yes kind of social conscious song in a funny kind of the millionaire but with a great beet. Yeah kind of like They have seventeen seventeen did as well as it relates house from pavements crush by the wheels Industry Willia- fascist groups chin. Yeah and here when you talk about Sheffield minded minded strikes and stuff and then the photo you website where you're in that sort of opulent dining room. It's an interesting contrast that you've always put across. Think slight I think you know. Life's it's never one thing. Why shouldn't you live in a chateau in you know what I mean? I don't know I'm not really thought about it. I don't live in the shadow. You you to come. Don't disappoint those. Are the things you can play within song. I mean the best songs of a lot of ideas in them. Anything from you know Dylan through to to the nineteen seventy five. You know. He's kind of like. That's the beauty of songwriter. It they tell me. Don't Eh in one song that that always seemed very straightforwardly heartfelt was when smokey sings yeah Which I think that one came out quite difficult to period for your health was well I did? Yeah yeah I mean how skins disease. So we put out to be a zillion and it was like flying in the United States. But then I realized I was. I was diagnosed with cancer. So had Hodgkin's skins disease and I'd have a radiotherapy and chemotherapy. So everything stopped you know It was tough. Yeah it was really tough but sitting around at home are kind of would play music and I realized how much valued music in a period when I was just straight of sitting around win treatment and stuff so when smokey sings is about that feeling yoga of music and take you to a place away from any kind of concerns. You have any pain any worries. And that's where the song came out and I love Motown Stevie Wonder Marvin Gaye the temptations for tops and smokey Robinson when my cousin knows how to clinical local smokey's as well I had nothing to do with. I'm was always reminds. It gives that kind of Benny Benjamin back. Yes absolutely yeah. I was very a fortunate. I've got my health back or recovered enough to make a record when smokey sings. Now let's say and the first Week we go out and promotes it. We go to a Dutch Dutch TV show and they say yeah yeah. Come on down the corridor here. The dressing room next door smokey Robinson was in not doing say hello Mr Robinson. He is the seven inch final for the record. Me Mark. Why Went in that. We wrote the song here so about five weeks later we were in Los Angeles during a TV show and the record. Have I've been a hit. And his record and wins mugs. Things were both in the top ten in this day so he said are thank you very much came over and he gave Mark Myself a handwritten written letter our just saying you know he was touched and moved and and write the bottom. It just says William S Robinson managing director of Tamla motown. Aw that song. I don't blame you a toll. 'cause you play the fool who is a clown and So many great songs I got the chance to interview him once it was like an isdn thing and asked him what it felt like to have written my girl. I mean most people would retire. I think the first big hit. So yeah smokey Robinson sweet you know you the same night search the the dome. It's always good to get someone's name into a song. It's always good to be associated with someone. Yeah Yeah Yeah. That's the thing glamour boy sociation. You've got some great tales of near the nightmare. Did Loaf hats a hell of a title. Isn't we'll vow those kinds of sheikh ask bells kind of follow follow the democracy in that one as well and that was with either with banana was that we did two songs. We've been when smokey sings and the not committed love when we did not admit it love. We asked him to play bass on it. They had this big red but each at night in one wouldn't play bass think Brad Lang played bass on that so he had to sit there and playing various with Bernard next day collect terrifying so it was a brief moment in somebody who's great. He's on the back of all that stuff he did with Robert Palmer stations stations and I think he NYLA NYLA split up but then I got it together. I think people forget. Actually I like the hit record that he produced Bernard because Nile disease more on the sensors. Niba what Sony Thompson. Listen was incredible resilience chic either on. I think he played unless Dan Stadium Days. Yes that's him. Yeah he had to play with led Zeppelin at one point in here so these days with lexicon of law of being a kind of a by word for technical assistance achievement. I mean that's how we see. We see it that way and it's just one of those mark benchmark things. How did you come to approach the sequel? Because that was well. I've made a record. Traffic ethic just made it with Dave Palmer and chuck this in Los Angeles. I just got back into songwriting again. A couple of years earlier so it was great just to get back into the process of writing and recording voting and there was no particular ambition involved or it was just great to make the music just off. It went playing. The show's playing. The orchestral shows was real inspiration for me. We played that the Royal Albert Hall in fact it was ten years ago but I work with and lay an orchestra and we played the lexicon of love and a bunch of stuff. I kind kind of thought. Well here's the audience. They kind of interested in the whole idea about where we are now I just took some of the songs that had there was a couple of songs from way back the data really put out on. Am I of evil of which they subsequently put out later. When I did the new record and just re recorded everything from scratch at a single flames of desire which is the opening song that was written with Charlie mole who is a really big string arranger now as well been an arranged the strings on the record so for an ABC record it has to be something big and bold? You know. There's no point me showing with a twelve string and saying you know suffers from is your sir. I mean Bowie did that on a couple of his records in the nineties and millennium. You've gotta show up with something that represents what you truly about I. I think he's Nice. When when Lou Reed Did New York he seemed to find his whole kind of velvet underground spirit again and stuff so mature artists can sometimes stumble across us? Good stuff so I wanted to work I want a vanity project out but Ted Chocolate Virgin. Emi some Moran that listen to some stuff was doing and they they said you know this is great. Go ahead and make a record so but just fell right. I just thought make something very big bold and orchestral like pop on steroids. You know UDDER ECOMOG a very good relationship with Anne Dudley from Lang live show so we got together and wrote some stuff. There's got called rob for sorry. Who worked with WHO originally worked with many people beyond all say Lady Gaga I? He's in New York but we kind of writing stuff and he was sending me stuff and sending him stuff so we had a good working relationship. I always liked to collaborate all the time. It's the only way to finish anything and then the guy said you know what the she's the lexicon love to you know. But then I went home and watched can dead on net flicks and figured you know these days. There are many different versions of the same idea so I felt it was time to do I do. He came onto the this insist when you collaborate with. Would you passer a demo of an idea that you've caused especially now with eleven side. The love we just trying to piano. That's how that song handout. Viva Love was pretty good shape but then we started from scratch but at that point I think am I put out as a download you know that was great it it was originally demo but basically a road bunch of songs. pull out the best bits. And there's a lot of other sons didn't use. Yes so it was like that neither to to make a record called the LEX. Can I love your hat show with the songs definitely. You don't destroy the legacy but you want to enhance it. And that's what the next thing I love to is all about. Yeah we saw. Oh you sound check and level of him outside the one show few years ago okay past and how the record came out. Yeah Yeah I've been playing the law shows and stuff but Yeah it was a good experience for me. It was fun but I have to say it was like climbing a mountain. I mean I'm no fool. I didn't want to kind of make record of people. Hated people have very strong memories. But I kind of thought left here. ziggy stardust to Datu or familiar for me. There's a riot going on to sly stone. But you know you never will so the idea of kind of going back with the characters and seeing how they were thirty five years later. Yeah Yeah it was very much a filmmaker idea to make really stands up as well because along. Okay 'cause you guys I I would think so. Yeah it's great companion to. I'd say it would be great trevor the Horn again but originally thousand the path. We're going to go on that one. Though that never happen I listened to Trevor's orchestral record as well. That was interesting here in his his interpretations of eighty six but with the lexicon enough to it worked. It went well People seem to like it. It's really hard to gauge They did they you like to. Have you got any songs leftover from that experience that you thinking of doing something else with. There's a whole bunch of stuff. Yeah at about Mexican three but the lex GonNa something else. Elsa trilogy all of the Matrix as godfather but I didn't know I tell you what it is with. ABC We went down so many different avenues with with how to be a millionaire with alphabet city with up beauty stab lexicon originally wanted to flip it. I wanted to make a brand new piece of music. That people had a sense of familiarity familiarity about. That's what happened with those songs. Yeah leaving the direction and everything about it really. Yeah like how you're supposed to lick and in the shadows generations here. Yeah yeah that's right. I was lurking though alert lurk. Geely Well Martin. It's been great talking to you. Thank you so much for doing. We've loved you music forever. Pretty much have to talk to you about the jazz brilliant thanks. Thanks very much That that was Martin Fry speaking tours of Birmingham Symphony Hall. I mean that guy's been in our world musically for such a long time. It was just amazing to sit down with them wasn't it. Oh Yeah Yeah Unin you know. The lexicon of love is easily one of our desert island albums. I would say so to get to go in depth on that record with them was such a trait and he. It was quite revealing about his process. I thought he said he writes of walking down the street yet. A kind of reminded me of what am says zone. Oh told us a while back about how you know. He's he's always sorts of kind of antenna up you know when he's walking down the street when he's out in the bowels he's always gathering fodder for songs. Yeah as Martin said Your Voice not you them. Oh so he's capturing things on the move. It was good to revisit. Say the work of Trevor Horn. Of course he was so essential sit lexicon of love. And all of that description version of Sinatra meets joy division yes very evocative those people getting together we trevor just brought out by incredible sense into groove. That pockets as he said which is what thereafter. What to be cited? Chiusano do that. You're part of gold. Yeah but it's such a wide side screen. Canada sound isn't it. It's a beautiful sound and record. It's real lay experienced to listen to us. Martin said he's always trying to get something more complicated into a pop music frame. Yeah Yeah and I felt like the kind of Glam it and so it's a swath of his stage persona even though it's kind of a core element to how the music directions understood. It doesn't seem that calculated. It seems like it's really just a pause of him. He because I kind of pushed him on that a little bit and he seemed to say well. I haven't really thought about it. That much and I was surprised that that would I was actually really kind of pleased as well. But that's kind of a really natural part of what he does and the songs are kind of audacious when you think about the rhymes uh-huh are the production is and yet. He finds the bounds between the kind of half Felton. The theatrical yeah I think he said it was kind of a house of cards. Didn't they just trying trying to get that sense of humanity into something. That's so kind of bolden. Glamorous yeah and I think the song all of my heart is a great example of where they've succeeded in the undeniable emotion but also that real drama too. Yeah definitely. I'd love to hear him saying to us as well. So thanks to the mountain for such an exciting and interesting chat. Checkout is amazing back catalogue and we'll be back soon with more quality guests. Take Care Bye bye doc.

trevor horn Sheffield ABC smokey Robinson Martin Bowie ABC ABC Sinatra Martin Fry Gary Langan Birmingham US Birmingham Symphony Hall twitter UK Chesterfield writer Anne Dudley
The Odds Report CFB Week 15 & NFL Week 14 December 6, 2019

Sports Gambling Radio - By BangTheBook

28:41 min | 8 months ago

The Odds Report CFB Week 15 & NFL Week 14 December 6, 2019

"Did you know you can get more value from your Medicare coverage choose optima Medicare HMO and get medical and prescription drug coverage coverage plus and has benefits dental vision and allowance for over the counter products with plans starting at just steer dollars per month the Medicare annual enrollment period ends on December seventh. So visit US online today. Learn more at OPTIMA health dot com slash Medicare. We got one more guest. One more segment left here for this Friday edition available. Radio that is with Brent. The head risk manager down at the SL sportsbook for this week's version of of the odd support Out there in both the college football and the NFL Betting Markets Conference Championship Games. You'd figure the lines we tight but short money finding value value out there doing the same for week fourteen in the NFL. So without further ado here is districts version of the report with grant from Ds is joined by Brent. The head risk manager down at sports work for this week's version of the odds report Brett. How's it going today? Man Do very well got to not bull season yet. But we're getting Kinda down the stretch where I mean for me. It's a better time a year instead of having you know like Seventy College Football Games on Saturday ten narrow down because generally speaking people are going to bet the same amount of money now. They're just going to better on fewer game. which from a risk manager point of view it just much much easier for do for us to do and of course? NFL's is a great time of year because also you got sort of that jockeying for play off position in the contenders and pretenders are Kinda showing their heads now. So I don't doing well and excited. I don't get often excited about football but this is the one time of year. I kinda do. Yeah we got the ten Conference Championship Games. Aaron of course college basketball slowing down a little bit now with exam weeks the holidays. So you're not a bad time of year for you down there and we have plenty of stuff to talk about here. Obviously with this week's Conference Championship Games Noteworthy these sharp action at least nothing that you've mentioned here so far With this Oregon Utah Stand alone game on Friday night. But what can you tell us about this game since you know it is a standalone on and I'm sure people are going to be invested in it. Yeah I mean honestly there is kind of what I'M GONNA call respectable action on the dog. There is not calming in College. Football that people people worry about key numbers but in this particular case to get a decent bet from a guy who's kind of like almost a list worthy on the dog on Oregon plus the seven so other than that I've got a waiter accountable to favoring Utah. The favorite. My totals completely balanced I'm good on that one thing you look at it with a lot of these. These is games as we can just not a lot of movement and a lot of these numbers have have really you know held pretty tight. I mean there are some that have moved a couple of points and stuff like that but like I mean central Michigan Ohio take for example. It's pretty much hasn't moved and often six and fifty four APP State Lafayette. Same thing hanging total open lake fifty five and a half or fifty six now in the side who like five and a half to six or whatever so he's numbers of really. It's a lot easier. Obviously when you've got fewer games take a little more time to put this stuff up so it was kinda showing another. There's been a lot less movement. Which of course is better for us to look at the Games that do have extremely notable sharp action here and that begins on Saturday and it begins ends with the first game on the Board Game One? Five one zero six in Detroit Mac. Championship Game Central Michigan. Miami of Ohio. What do you got going on for this one front Brent? I got a good a good spot for us in that I've got a sharp and a public split which is something that we Kinda is always good for us. You can kind of hang your number and maybe a little bit higher than you might sharps in public on the same way so you can kind of balance. You're charging Kinda you know work to a you. Know a a tar position that you're that you're looking for without a whole lot of movement sometimes sometimes when that comes in your favor dig it sharp money on the dog. Miami of Ohio. And I've got to say I mean I. It's a really really big wager. Count when you're talking six to one on favoring central Michigan that's like for college football and especially for the you know the lower-profile game that this is such a big way to count one ways is is is quite know worthy so six to one favoring central Michigan Bay count there I'm talking to teams at eight and four hundred seventy five and you're going to have some common opponents and stuff like that. I I think Miami while they lost a ball state where losses in central Michigan. I think Bertie Squeak by ball seat but you don't really you know from a sharp perspective guys only look uncommon opponents and stuff like that central Michigan to like last week. I guess it was their game. I think in the first half. They'd scored like on a touchdown like seven straight possessions. The lead like thirty five seven at the half or whatever before cruising Toledo so you get a high scoring team like central Michigan and a result like that kind of carries over a bit so just just a really really strong inside account that way are at so the next game here. Is The Sun Belt Championship game. This one on Appalachian State's campus in Boone. North Carolina Game One. Oh seven Louisiana. An APP state. It's been pretty one-sided money at least in terms of the line move for this game on the APP stateside nightside. Yeah there was initial tick up from the six to six and a half. You know again i. I had a bye on Lafayette plus seven minutes. One one twenty so there was a half-point by on the dog there by the sharp so they are on Lafayette on other cases. Well my my count is is pretty much even on this one. I do have a slight count. Count fearing APP state but nothing like is news on a major count that way But sharp money like I said on Lafayette plus seven minus one. Twenty Again same situation you've got common opponents and stuff like that and this is one of those games well where you can look at they. They did actually play each other head to head during the season. But you kinda again every every game is different. You throw that one out yeah. It's something it's kind of interesting about this game. Is that some places kind of got caught a little bit on this number. I'm looking at the screen here and I see in some places even open this thing as low as minus three. Let me just take a look. I mean I obviously didn't open not loy. You did OPACIC. So Oh yeah we open at six three. I don't know I don't know who what where when that happened. The lowest I saw was five and a half and we opened at six. All right Mojo move on and we don't have any noticeable sharp action on this game but I do want to ask you about it. Since we're looking on that portion of the board here game one nine one ten as Baylor and Oklahoma the home of big twelve game rematch from the game a few weeks ago when Oklahoma was actually at ten and a half point favorite in Waco's now under ten at a neutral site are you getting your the makings of a sharp versus public. Split here or what I mean. It's funny we talked about this one. You know when they did play previously inches it just I. I didn't get the line. The sharp plate was on Oklahoma. Didn't make sense to me. Based based on where the records were in the home team all that kind of stuff on this number as well as basically basically the open net at at nine and a half I think it was on nine and a half and it's bounced between the got as low as eight or eight and a half and come back up to nine where we are right now so even the market is pretty much ministerial number. You look right now. You can find numbers as high as nine and a half and as low as eight and a half. It seemed Kinda like that numbers count wise right now I have got more count heavier on Baylor so if anything might take down to the eight and a half at nine nine right now but there was a nine and a half out just kind of hanging at nine with the rest of the market but nothing you know nothing sharp of note but it is kind of interesting. I just kind of had the feeling myself of this number would open a little bit lower but it hasn't worked out are going to give them one seventy one eighteen here the SEC championship game. This is the one that everyone's most interested posted in here this week. Even though you've got Utah and Oklahoma vying for what could be that Funnel College Football playoff spot Georgia would get it if they win this game mm-hmm but they are a seven point. dog-eared LSU yeah. I mean Georgia. They've only got the you know the one loss on the what was that was South Carolina when their their field goal. Kicker I I mean can blankenship or whatever his name. He's usually pretty solid and he he missed their. You know both these teams won easily last week and I got sharp money on this one I again. I mean college football. You don't really look at key numbers too much now. Three and seven are kind of key still on the sharp money they come in on Georgia plus the seven house. Were down seven seven right now. Pretty much across the board. I think I've seen some lake seven fifteen as well so it seems market wise mark white kind of training that way elsewhere must have got hit by short money's well on Georgia so seven dogs fifteen is out there. I'm sitting flat right now. My account again is three to one fearing LSU. So that's why. I'm sitting at seven minus one ten each way if I had to. You know even even count on my probably be kind of tilted towards Georgia's well at at seven minus one fifteen base chart money was plus seven ten and again you talk about both these teams. They've beaten quality opponents. Like Georgia did beat Notre Dame Florida Auburn Auburn teams. Like this. They've always got good schedules and play good gains good team. So when you're talking about eleven one team that twelve and thirteen obviously these kind of proven the worst so far. So so I either. Aside more than a touchdown for your ethnic would be a bit much. Unlike some you know some of the other Games you felt like Ohio state for example like we're GonNa talk about you Boise state's almost two touchdowns failed as well but you know in a game like this conference in such they play in. You know they've kind of had that you know the litmus test if you will in terms of both these teams being tested One loss between the two of them so not much. Choose from like I said Georgia plus seven and a half. I count wise this eight three one. LSU So it was kind of just sitting at the seven where around right now just because the money keeps coming on Lsu. I mean there's just no way move off the number seven right now. We have seen a lot of totals movement in several of these Games. But this this one really hasn't moved too much. Yeah no not much at all. I mean my count. Even news is pretty much deb. Get even on this one. So yeah it's it's kind of between nine. Fifty four and fifty five is pretty much. The number's been pretty solid at sitting at fifty four and a half right now. There's I think there's a fifty five out there right now but everyone elsie fifty four and a half for fifty five. When I was at fifty five I had a little bit more money on the under when I was at fifty four? I had a little bit more money on the over. So low and behold fifty four and half working for us on here is again that seems pretty significant. Totals the big ten championship game game. One Nineteen Twenty Wisconsin and Ohio state state. Ohio state big favourite here. This line has come down a little bit. The total movement is very interesting here with a pretty substantial move up in a pretty big adjustment from the first time these two teams played. Yeah this number has moved quite a bit did open I opened. I think it was fifty three and I got a eastern. It's not often in in college football. That will get you talk about a a sharp and public split on a total but these are you know what you might WanNa Call Marquis Games with fewer games and these are the kind of like the best of the best playing here on this number number dig it but up from the fifty three all the way up to fifty seven. I got sharp money at fifty seven when it came right back down fifty six and a half and fifty six. That's kind of where we're hanging all right now. I even when I went to fifty six though I was still getting over money. Public money on the over. My count even fifty six three two one. Favoring the oversaw backed doc to fifty six and a half kind of splitting the you know the difference there between where the sharp money came in were they. Just keep on betting me so I kind of want to avoid taking back up to fifty seven because I could will get better again and wants to sharp. Show your hand you Kinda you try to avoid showing that number again but right now looking at the way things are going and even like I said when I dropped at fifty-six I still have public money on on your so. I get the feeling that publishers gonNA keep betting this one over no matter what we put up. So you know salons. My position doesn't get out of hand apologised hang the fifty six and a half if the market stays that way. There is a fifty six out there as well so I think that's kind of like seems to be the right number but just a strong leader count on the over from the public. 401 account is the the sharp money was under fifty seven about the side for this one. I guess winds come down a little bit anything notable about that. Yeah I think that that kind of respect a little money out there perhaps grabbing something on the dog of whether it was just the numbers you know grab at the sixteen and a half or I don't know my count in houses about three to one favoring Ohio Ohio state so I I think fifteen and a half is probably going to take up to sixteen. We'll see where it goes from there. All right the other game here the ACC championship game. One twenty one. Twenty two new notable sharp action and shop for this one. Does anybody even have interest in this game with the big number of twenty eight yen not much nine. Honestly the only thing in kind of respectable that I've seen in terms of you know a bet that I you know some guy who I'd say he's he's he's borderline. Sharp was on the favorite. There are Clemson minus twenty eight now. There are some twenty eight and a half. So they're on board so I'm there with them but my county. No at twenty eight was was in his twenty S. A key number or anything by count was about three two one favoring Clemson at that number since twenty eight and a half I'm balancing action both ways so I'll probably just hang there as long as the market stays the same one other thing. I want to ask you about college. Shapur here before he transitioned over to the NFL side a ballgame lines are going to come out on Sunday night so sort of walk us through what that process is like for you in terms of you know getting the numbers in terms of balancing some of the early moves because we will see a lot of people jump on these things early trying to grab some prices. But you've got you'll and and in some cases up to three weeks before the Games actually played. Yeah I mean there are our biggest defense really up. I just lowering our limits. And you talk about these these bowls and there's just there's a lot of unknown because you've got guy you can have situations where guys GonNa you know you're going to declare for the Dow so he's not GonNa play the ball game that can happen. I've heard rumors that every now and then College players kind of get rowdy and get out of hand get suspended for these games so you have that stuff that comes into play You know we've had cases cases. Were like five guys on the defense get suspended stuff like that. So it's really you have to be on the defensive and as you mentioned there's these games you know the lines Komo just so early so really just having early lower limits is the best thing you can do you try and balance you know. Put your initial numbers out there. Thinking like one. What is the number that's GonNa Balance Action and to which way of our customers gonNA go without giving too much away to the sharp side of things if you're looking at a sharp exploded and trying to kind of anticipate that you you also have the factor in terms of just kind of profiling games inter how much action you expect? The habit on certain games obviously certain team certain team brand names obser- ball games have a higher higher-profile another. So you're looking at you. Know what kind of exposure looking at certain games and stuff like that but really the biggest defense we have is is kind of an anticipation of where numbers are GonNa go and also having the lower limits a kinda control getting hit when people are out there looking and make numbers grabbed and you do see that a lot. You'll see a you know. Initial number grabs on a certain number or people setting up a number. They think he's just wait to loyalty at pickup. And one of these relieved to look out for in terms of when you're looking at someone who's setting up a number you really a slow gradual tick up in one way in one direction is not going to be a numbers. Grab when you see a number. Go up say dramatically in in say an hour or thirty minutes and then plummet back down in the next hour board or thirty minutes. That's kind of situation. We have a number being set up and kind of you know look for. That's the okay. That was the number. If you didn't get that price. He missed out all right so move over over to the NFL side of things here and we start with the first game on the board for Sunday. Game One thirty one thirty two Baltimore and Buffalo. What are the toughest handicaps of the week in my opinion because this is a very bad spot for buffalo off that physical win over the forty Niner for Baltimore? Excuse me off at physical win against the forty niners and the other hand Dan. Buffalo's played a very weak schedule here. So you've got questions about them. And the validity of their record seems like some people do have a position on this game though. Yeah Yeah you're I mean you you you hit the nail on the head there automated. It is a very tough spot. Both I think both kind of from a handicap and just kind of a perception of from our side of the counters like okay. Baltimore is all the rage course. Buffalo is kind of like the consistently disrespected by you know by the betting public. So you know what's what's the right number. What's a number number? That's that's high nafis like okay. If these teams played on a neutral site where would you go. Okay factor in how people are GONNA bet. What do you think the right number is going to be so You know buffalo can maybe. Fortunately I guess they had the big win. I guess you call it over Dallas Thanksgiving but Baltimore's has been. I mean he's just been so good for this whole season I've got a you know a wage accountant pretty close out. It's not even two two on favoring Baltimore which I you know I. I'm really happy about because they said they'd been just just like the public darting for even since the pre preseason game out although all the Rachel Jackson and stuff like that and what he was going to do in the weeks week week after week just like okay. MVP gets out of hand so We did have a you know a decent number on this one off. Put a Baltimore five and a half to get bet by sharp money at at that It's number did carry on from six to six and a half and got back. Bet Back Down which. I'm kind of happy both who didn't have to go too far. But five and a half is where I got. Sharply there You you talk about the buffalo and their opposition stuff daddy. It is kind of like if you look at who you know. Prior to the Dallas win had beaten Washington. MIAMI DENVER ENVER LOST AT. Cleveland is Kinda like you know I think us as well as public are still trying to figure these guys out. Yeah I think so too and it's crazy to think about that. You you know with thirteen weeks worth of games already in the books you know. It's tough especially when you factor some of these situations spots into the equation some of these teams and we'll talk about commit. I guess we'll go ahead and go to. That game. Came One thirty seven. Thirty eight San Francisco New Orleans. San Francisco is a team. That had its bye week four. They've been playing a lot of games here in a row so although it hasn't deterred sharp money from taking the dog here yeah I mean right. We'll get to that right away with the sharp money is on Champ Cisco Plus Three even money so this one's move annua take a lot. I think it was even like three. And a half minus one fifteen at one point so they kind of a big number if you will in New Orleans looking where it is now all the way down to Pretty much across the board New Orleans now minus two. I think there's a two and a half there as well but you know kind of a you know a steady result there in the market that the money's coming in on San Francisco consistently plus three. Even money's got sharp money on my also took money on the under this game under forty five and a half where that came. We're down to forty four and a half as well and yeah I mean San Fran. They did the tough loss last week but it was. It was a good game. It's not like you Kinda you don't downgrade them at all off that loss and and Orleans I mean you look at who. They've beaten in recent weeks. I mean they'd beaten Tampa Bay Carolina Atlanta the past three weeks. He's is still kind of trying to be them what I think like how. How good are they Breezes been back you know. It's kind of A. I don't know like you said a after all this time. The jury's still out on the on on on some of these teams I'm waiting account wise. My count is about to one on San Francisco so I got the the public and the sharps in the same way. Decide on the total. I've got a count of about two one five minutes over so I got a publican sharp split there in terms of the public going over and the sharks going under the forty five and a half what. What's kind of amazing to me is? Is your the early week. Move through three is is very telling minutes very eye opening in and of itself but this lines continued to kind of tick down a little. But I'm seeing some twos you too flat too with reduced juice out there. Do you feel like there's some sharp segment of the market coming back in New Orleans at some point. I don't and I only say that because I just Kinda I think you know because my mum money came in at three I think once it dropped to two and a half and two do I think it should have come in. You know even if it didn't come in in house right here. I think somewhere in the market. It should have come in now. You're talking like some some books out there that get a lot of heavy sharpish and they're still sitting at two so you know he's not like there's any big injury information that's waiting to be. You know people are waiting for something like that Just the the minus two is hanging out there and it's you know it's a solitude pretty much across the board so I think if someone waiting for a number to grab on ones they would have done it at that point. What what did I do want to ask you about real quickly here? Carolina Atlanta one forty one forty two not a whole lot of moving on this game but Carolina Firing Ron Rivera. I mean do you find that people people try to use that as a betting angle or do they kind of stay away from that game just because of the uncertainty and not really knowing how team response not honestly I think most people just kind of look at the teams on the field and not so much at the coaches. When there's these changes I mean you could make the same case for Atlanta with quantum? The you know there was talk. Kabua his job being on the line before they were off a couple of wins as well. So I I would say Carolina already took action with their coach was Atlanta's coaches still kind of on the fence events. Whether he'll be back next season or not so no. I don't think that factors in much into a game like this but you know it is one of the you know the lower bed games of the week all right so he jumped one forty five one forty six zero we do have some sharp involvement and you know. Look sometimes we get to talk about sexy games. And sometimes we don't and this one falls into the not sexy category of Miami and the jets. Yeah we kind of no surprise. I mean if you go back you know the recent weeks that we've talked about on on this show. It seems like every week Miami seems to come up or the jets come up and this week probably no surprise and other playing each other. We're we're talking about these teams. Miami's Miami's where I got a sharp money on this one seven so this number obvious he was. Just you know just kind of often. Shouldn't have open as high as it did. I think it opened as high as seven and a half old in the market there which Office just to hire a number. It's weird because Miami was was so bad from the get-go and they were getting these astronomical numbers like seventeen and a half I think you'll plus twenty one and stuff like that and the public. Just love betting Miami. Now they've actually shown a little bit of life with Matt Fitzpatrick at the helm and they're still getting a whole lot of support. I gotTA wage accountable to one fearing Miami. So I've sharp money and public money on the dolphins here and it's just like I'm down a five and a half our finances. You know a real substantial move from the seven all the way down a five and a half so it's as telling move. I think we talked previously about the jets. How their their their strength kind of sets up people defensively to attack the weaknesses? They've got a very strong front seven. So you really can't run against them with much success. You talking about a Miami team who no matter who they're playing couldn't run the ball you know versus anyone. I think ballots had like one of the worst yards per carry numbers like in the history of the NFL. And and now he's out so you've got to. I don't know if you WANNA call it. Third String Four. String running backs coming into the fold for Miami. And you've got a quarterback who just loves force in the ball downfield and and he basically a tax defense leaves it up there and you've got the jets who've got a real weekend injured You Know Defensive Backfield so the tendency I've seen for over these. These jet schemes recently has been towards the over and this number as you can tell has gone from forty four away to forty four forty five and a half so this one's getting bet heavily over and you got money on the dog Miami and the thing with Miami. It's like I said I. I think what happens with the jets as you. You kind of your strength force people to attack your weakness. And that's that's the kind of thing that you know Fitzpatrick laws and Lo and behold the dolphins get behind and they just have to sling it like they did last week in the and he'll do that and the one last week outright and they'll probably get inside the seven this this time around to all right. So we need a pallet cleanser. Here we don't have any sharp action to discuss but game one fifty one fifty two huge game here Kansas City and new the England going to get a lot of public involvement. Obviously you've had some recent playoff meetings to look back at as well. What's the story here with game? One fifty one one fifty two. Yeah I mean it's in an afternoon game is not the the evening game on Sunday because it actually Another great game in the evening but this is going to be a massively bet game in the afternoon Right now my waited counters absolutely dead on not a whole lot of movement from the opener of New England minus three and a half to minus three minus. One twenty five where they are right now. the totals. Well not a whole lot of women opened fifty ob- sitting forty nine as well so it's not you know nothing real you know really know where the in terms of of movement movement on my way to count like his almost dead even this number dig it as low as minus three and got support soon as they hit threes and adding juice on the number three so I I could see the number going back up to three and a half but I just you know I I doubt it will probably refrain from it other than the initial move down. You don't have a whole lot of risk once you've gotten a three. He said we when it got down to three minutes. One fifteen support for New England came in right away so we're back up to three miles a quarter well. Is this football game. It's GONNA makeup for an ugly Monday night football game giants and Philadelphia Monday but Seattle and the rams on Sunday night very good game here in the NFC west and a lot of intriguing intriguing line movement here to this game. WE'RE GONNA flip favorite scenario. Yeah it I think the flip favorite tells you everything you really need to know about this game in terms of where the sharps are going on. The Dick grabbed around at home. And it's you know it's really one of those games were the rams have just looked so ugly so often this season and Seattle's Seattle's look fantastic. They look fantastic last week but for weeks and weeks and weeks they've been overpriced. It's Kinda one of those situations where you get the you know the analytics and the and You know the quant guys in numbers guys who looked game and it's just like they're constantly looking for value and finding value going against Seattle. You found that for years against the Patriots the kept on losing and here the you know again being on the rams plus two and a half I got bet by one sharp on my dad took another sharp bet the other way on the money. Line the rams as well plus one fifteen so have too sharp on the rams here a home Moi initially Home Dog I was GonNa say and numbers now either the rams at a pick or maybe like pick one MM fifteen minute ones out there as well. I'm out. She hit going both ways. Using the rams moneyline minus one fifteen using the spread of minus one dog fifteen as well kind of hanging there so The move down from two and a half not you know not a huge risk because it was an out for your hand that but I've got a non surprisingly at all. I've got a sharp public split here with the public on Seattle Count three to one right now and again. They just they just seem to be overvalued is interesting because two weeks ago I guess it was where the Rams Played Baltimore and they just absolutely got crushed by Baltimore. And there's a Lotta narratives coming out. How Arizona was just going to do the same not quite do the same thing to the rounds but how you know kind of it was going to have a great day against the rams defense and stuff like that because of what Lamar Jackson did and of course they did absolutely nothing? Yeah absolutely absolutely nothing is a good way of putting it. They gained almost four hundred yards. I think in that one so other rams look very good last week. We'll see how they wind up looking here this week against Seattle breadth breadth head risk manager down at sportsbook. Always a pleasure to chat with you man. Thank you so much for joining me. And we'll talk to you next week. All right we can. Adam combining home and auto state farm gets you a whole lot covered less but this state farm radio ad gets you this jam covered for free. AW AW premiums. Two by combining policies. Oh Tom and from our coverage is it stays farm dot com live from state farm. We have Sharon lavishly. It manager attempting to forty seven hundred acts of good. Today's Today's good deed. She will attempt to scored a little old lady across the row had tailed elbows into locked steadier. How across the Sharon Pravo allstate found employees challenging themselves to get on the board with one hundred acts of good see? That story is a neighborhood of good dot com.

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Foot Nationalism: Hiking and Nation-Building in Israel

The Tel Aviv Review

28:36 min | 1 year ago

Foot Nationalism: Hiking and Nation-Building in Israel

"This is is to be one. Vitelle Aviv review. Hello and welcome to the Tel Aviv review. Brought to you by Van Leer Jerusalem institute, which promotes humanistic democratic liberal values in the central discourse. In israel. I'm hosts get helping and before we start have a small request. If you're like us, please show it we need your support. Please give show by going to our homepage. That's he'll be one dot Tel Aviv review, scroll down to the bottom and you'll see a big red button. That says patriots click on it and support us. We count on you. My guess today's assistant professor of Israel studies at Binghamton university in York, he is the author of the forthcoming book, entitled marking and mapping the nation. History of Israel's hiking trail network talk to share no Hello Markham to Tel Aviv review. Thank you. So just like anything in Israel, even hiking is not ideologically neutral, right? What role did hiking play in the nation building of these radiation? Well, okay. That is a big. It's kind of the central question of my dissertation project that I wrote when I was a doctoral candidate at Brandeis university. And it's the question that I'm continuing to work on now. So the way I I began to approach that question. Right. What's the role of hiking? I had to I learn why that question even was relevant. I had to get to that question. Right. So the way it happened for me was in two thousand six I began hiking's feeless rail the Israel trail along with my brother, and my best friend from the United States. So for fun. Yeah. For so it was kind of for fun. It was I was a scout growing up in the United States. It was something that I was interested in doing it been studying Israel as an undergrad. And then I kinda went on to keep studying Hebrew afterward traveled to Israel a few times in the framework of like, I was actually working for a Christian tour operator based in Oklahoma City. So I was really I was engaged connected with Israel, but it was very much an American very much outside or two Israeli culture. And I had gone on several tours help. The company tours, and we were always going to the same places on the map. Right. We're going to Jerusalem. We're going up to the Galilee. We're seeing all the dots on the Christian map of the holy land. And I remember kind of sitting there one that was actually on the see of Galilee with some friends, and we were kind of thinking, wouldn't it be cool if you could walk across this country. Okay. We were totally blind to the fact that hiking was even a sting in Israel. Okay. We didn't know it was possible. So I ended up going home emailing Rayleigh friends, I had who said no, you actually can hike across Israel, and we even have a national trail that goes across the country. So this is kind of how the idea came about. You know, I got permission from my wife to go hike the trail. She said you can't go alone. So you have to get someone to go with you. So I talked to my brother and a friend of mine from boy scouts growing up. And we kind of cautiously explored this topic, right? But. Finding out about it was hard. I mean, we're in the middle of the US almost noth- as that time. There was almost nothing written in English about hiking or trails in Israel. So I could read Hebrew. Okay. So actually got on the website of the MAPA guides company. And I ordered the handbook to release the guidebook, and I had it shipped to my address and Oklahoma City, and I did it all the of the website paid with credit card. I get an Email the next day from some editor at MAPA guides. Who says I think you may have accidentally ordered something, you know, this is being sent to an accountant, Oklahoma. And there's no that's correct. And the person that you need to pay way, more shipping because we never ship these outside of Israel. And he said, no one side Israel is interested in hiking our little country, right? And this blew my mind. I mean, three million tourists visiting Israel. I think four million now is the more recent figure and many of them are Christian tourists or their tourists. They're Americans or just non his Railly's who have some spiritual connection to the land and wanna walk in the footsteps of somebody Abraham. Hamm Jesus or whoever. So I was I was really should surprised by this question. Well, get the guidebook, and we plan our hike, and we big in a lot. And we we start to north and has we're walking across the country were running into people and people are finding out that were neither Jewish nor Israeli and they kept asking this question. Why are you here? Why are you doing this to them? Why though know exactly it was like such a strange question to me if I had run into them on the Appalachian trail in the US, I wouldn't have blinked an eye right because people visit to hike, and so I gave the center, you know, it's a beautiful place. They're interesting ruin their lots of things to see spiritual mean a million answers for why would wanna walk across his real clear that for them. It was very much a Jewish Israeli thing to do that was very surprising to me. And so that along with other questions people were asking what I thought about the guidebook. What I thought about the guidebook writer what his political orientation was wanted. I think about the route of the trail it doesn't cross the green line at doesn't go to jerus-. Limb doesn't go to Masada and to all those questions again. I was kind of like, I mean, I don't have much of an opinion. I'm not here to judge. Why the trail goes where it goes? I'm just here to hike. But why is it? Why has it become such Jewish Israeli thing? I mean, it it it is counter intuitive as put it. Yeah. Well, so that was the question that I began to explore. So when I ended up doing graduate studies at Brandeis university. I didn't think that I could study hiking for my doctoral studies, I was going to study some other aspect of modern Israel. But I kept coming back to these questions. It seemed to me that the encounters. I had had while hiking were really about people and their sense of connectedness to the land. Okay. And it became obvious to me that hiking in Israel was about forming personal connections with the land about forming national connections with the land as kind of a people group reengaging with this territory and trails themselves were almost like lines there. Inscriptions of national identity written on the map and on the ground. Right. So the land becomes like a document the land becomes like something you're writing on, and you draw this line that somehow encapsulates what Israel is few Israel the Israel trail. This line is somehow supposed to represent the nation. Of course, people are going to fight about it. But how did it become a Jewish Israeli thing? I mean, this became the question that I wanted to explore why do people hiking Israel? I mean, look Israel, the only country in the Middle East has a major marked and map taking trail network. Okay. Marie cently. You had the Lebanon mountain trail. You had the Jordan trail you had the Sinai trail. These are all countries right around Israel. These are all countries who have seen what Israel has done with hiking trails, and I think if seen some potential in their own countries, but Israel, the only one to build a ten thousand kilometer network of trails on the level. That's on par with European trail networks, in fact, if you look at the density of Isreaeli trails per square kilometer of. Land it ranks up there with Switzerland. Germany, the places where modern hiking way marking putting marks on the ground that began in the nineteenth century. I think more interesting comparison to develop networks of hiking trails in Europe. But they're they're almost entirely recreational and here, it is a highly ideological endeavor. How did it become how was it co opted into the realm of ideology? Okay. I would say it wasn't co-opted. I would say the European networks started as ideological trail networks, Israel, sort of inherited its ideas about trail marking and hiking from Europe kind of inter-war Europe. And then Israel built its trail networks along those lines German trail networks polish. I mean, they were all born modern hiking was really born in the heyday of late nineteenth century early. Twentieth. Century nationalism, Israel, built its trail network along those lines. The difference is Israel still has. A national kind of nationalist trail network in these other countries have transitioned out to make their trails for tourists. So Israel hasn't made that transition yet. And I would say that the reason for that has to do with the fact that this is still contested territory there still questions about who will control the land in the long term. So that's how it started in Europe. It was like Suming someone sovereignty someone's, you know, the existence of the nation over the land. That's like the verb as a group of the. Yeah, I think so I mean, you can trace European hiking back to you know, when walking becomes hiking is kind of a blurry area. But a lot of people trace it back to. I mean, you can go back as far as the Protestant reformation with people doing these journeys across Europe. But then it's really the romantic period, you have people like Russo and Wordsworth these kind of romantic thinkers who have these kind of democratizing ideals and for them walking across the country as a way for people to connect with land to to connect with Nate. Later, and those ideals hang on into Neo romanticism in you know, in in late nineteenth century or early twentieth century, and so in places like Germany Czechoslovakia people begin marking trails so that youth can go in no their homeland. Okay. You have this idea in Germany of high Kunda this knowledge of the homeland and the towelettes exactly exactly. So basically in the teens and twenties you have this efflorescence of hiking trails growing across Europe. Sometimes they're marked in national colors. Right. So Bohai means in Czechoslovakia painting trails in red and white blazes because these sort of the national colors of Bohemia in the Dayton land where it's German speaking. It's again, contested territory. You have check hikers going in marking a trail one day German hikers coming and you racing their markings the next and putting their own markings down. So there's kind of a battle of way marking that's kind of this grass roots part of larger contests over the importation of it too. Design is tragedy and pre state Israel. We're talking about the first half of twentieth century was it conscious. Did they know that the well like, you know, importing in the central European endeavor into? Yes. So really, you know, hiking becomes a big thing in British mandate. Palestine it's really around nineteen twenty you have European youth movements Zionist youth movements coming from Europe. So hush America ear is kind of the major one that does hikes all kinds of hikes in central Europe, eastern Europe. And when their guides start making Aaliyah they start showing up in Palestine emigrating they start leading hikes here. So as they journey across the land, they bring these European ideals the first person to think about doing European way marking in Palestine shows up in the late nineteen thirties. He was an engineer named Hilo beer Geir. He was from Poland came from loge, and he shows up in the midst of the hour. Revolt in Palestine, and meanwhile, he gets a job with Alleata Navarre USA Leah which is bringing young, you know, German boys and girls who are fleeing. And they're coming here without their parents. So burger starts to do these courses on mapping and navigation with these kids because they're coming from Germany where they're used to this culture of hiking where you know, you put on your later hose. And then you go up over the hills. And, you know, you're hiking in the Alps, and it's this pleasant peaceful thing, and he's trying to teach these kids you can't do that here. I mean, some Jewish kid in Palestine you're not going to be able to just March from one to the next instead he thought of Jewish territory in the land as these islands, it's like an archipelago of safe spaces within a sea of Arab inhabited territory under the control of the British who have checkpoints who have all kinds of restrictions on where you can and can't go, and what curfews you have. So he's trying to teach these kids how to navigate the land safely while also saying you need to be able to walk the land you need to connect with this place. So here's how to do it. He's the one who starts arguing for trail marking. And he's the architect of the first systematic effort to start marking a trail in Palestine. And he does it in nineteen forty. So whether the trail stalled him, what is that he argues for this for years. Okay. At the time Jewish hikers are walking from from all over the country, but the big prime hiking destination is Masada down in the Judean desert. This is the magnet for the youth movements school trips hiking clubs scouting clubs. They all want to go to Masada. This is the hard core location. Right. So because it's a beautiful place. And they'll only because it's the place. I mean because of its it's fused with stories of ancient heroism. Exactly. Right. So Zionist leaders are thinking in terms of educators are thinking in terms of how do we create this new Jewish identity here in the land? How do we get away from sort of how we've stereotyped ourselves in Europe right is behaving in. How do we start to live out in the sun and become ten and strong, and they'll be kind of Sabra ideals that we think of now hiking was a big part of that. And what we're. Where do we hike the destination matters so Masada? Yeah. This kind of legendary place of Jewish heroism rebellion in the face of the Romans. This is where we want our used to learn their lessons. So, but it's also it is beautiful, and it's this visceral experience right because the other component of of knowing the land and hiking it's deeply excess dental for these people, right? I mean, the pioneers who come in the second Leah. They're showing up nineteen Ford in nineteen fourteen thereabouts. David Ben owned, the whole kind of founding generation of the Jewish state. All those labour Zionist leaders show up in Palestine and see their relationship to the land is X essential for them to walk the land. It's this kind of yada. Alright. I mean, the very term knowledge of the land it has its burdened with this kind of sexual connotation eroticism because the dot is to know, it's to no information. And if you know a person that way, it's knowing that person like Adam knew eve, right? So there want to know the land that way, they want to it's almost. This mystical connection with the land that -sposed to give birth to a new identity. A new kind of way of Jewish living here in the land things about the Zionist Rene sons was about taking ancient Jewish concepts and secularize ING them is hiking away secular rising, the pilgrimage. Absolutely. I mean, so that's what the pilgrimage to Masada ends up kind of being all about it's the civil civil religious pilgrimage destination. So instead of going up to Jerusalem, you're going to go up to this mountain. It's out in the desert that has kind of this a whole other lesson than doing Elliot regular for the festivals the holidays. So by the mid nineteen forties. These youth movements were going out to Masada and they're marching out there. And they're doing these tricks, and it is this deeply existential endeavor. They're going out there, and they're putting themselves through all kinds of hardship to do it. Right. It's it's a Masai. It's a he's muscle haute aren't just like regular hikes. Their tests of endurance and strength. And if you can arrive at Masada alive and be there to watch the sun break over the mountains to the east across the Dead Sea. Then you've kind of you've walked in the footsteps of the ancient zealots who fought against the Romans. And so, you know, this was kind of what it was all about well that journey to Masada takes a certain shape over time. Okay. As the first people start to do it really in the nineteen twenties and thirties, you have a small groups of of Jewish hikers going out to to Masada and finding safe routes. They're connecting with bedouins who will guide them out there, and let them know the safeway's through the Judean desert. The desert east Jerusalem is kind of like a maze of little canyons and wadis and mountains and cliffs, and it's very difficult to get through. They're very little water. So once they learned to get to Masada safely Masada becomes the prime destination. And they they kind of create this well beaten track. So you have Jewish infrastructure on the northern shore of the Dead Sea. You have kalaiana you have the this. Potash factory right where they're processing materials from the Dead Sea. But there were no roads. I mean, if you look at a map of British mandate roads in nineteen forty six forty seven. There isn't a single paved road south of the Jerusalem to Jericho road. There's nothing so the British police this area. So if you're a Mark fighter right Jewish paramilitary. You know person who's preparing for possible war with the Arabs. And you want to train with weapons or or train with your brigade. Or whatever do you wanna go out to the Judean desert because you can you can challenge yourself, and you can invade the British. So these treks to Masada are there following this route along the Dead Sea shore, and they they're about kind of forming. I know a cadre of elite youth who not only know the land, but are able to fight for it. So so high can was deeply tied to militarism from the very early start. Is it like, you know, some stage of preparation? On the way to having you know, self-sufficient Zionist youth. Yeah. I mean, it's sort of hard to pigeonhole it that way. But it definitely does go in that direction. Right. So I was at the hugging archive in Tel Aviv several years ago, and it was trying to find whatever materials I could find on these hikes of the Palme. And you know, on the one hand, I was seeing this kind of reading, you know, Hebrew language media from the thirties. I'm guessing these letters to the editor from hiking group leaders, and parents who are saying hiking's out of control like kids are walking everywhere. They're wandering into Arab villages. Their misbehaving there getting arrested crossing the border into Syria and getting arrested in nineteen thirty four group of kids walks around the Dead Sea. Okay. Nineteen year olds pack a bunch of guns illegally in defiance of their hugging commanders, and they walk around the Dead Sea through Transjordan in the process. The Robin beduins of their water gun point. They lose each. Young man loses. Ten kilogram. Rams of weight in the course of the track. I mean, this is what the culture of hiking looks like. So we can say, okay. Yeah. It's militarized. These guys are packing guns and going, but they're also disobeying they're hugging commanders and doing so so I think it becomes a sort of anarchy grassroots. It's it's almost like this yeti ATar. It's thing the founding generation was really into it as a way to teach youth, but the the ones who were born here, and we're steeped in it go in their own directions with it. So yes, it does become militarized when that generation grows up and realize that they are going to fight for control of the land who becomes the elite commandos right who fills the ranks of the Palme hikers. I mean, do you lead hiking guides of the of the Jewish hiking clubs in Tel Aviv? Jerusalem Haifa they're the ones who become the scouts of the poem the elite of the elite and then those scouts go onto become the commanders of the idea. I mean read the biography of almost every ill Isreaeli military leader in the early years of the state. They'll talk about hiking being a formative experience for them. And these treks to Masada were big for them. Does it Pacific into the state years after forty eight? Yeah, it does. So maybe I can get back to your nineteen forty seven trail question because it leads into this. Okay. So the first trail marked in this systematic way is on November twenty second nineteen forty seven which is one week exactly before the UN decision vote on the partition of Palestine. So here you are one week before there's going to be internationally recognized decision to what degree to Jewish state and our upstate. Nobody knows how it's going to go. And this guy Hilo burger the guy who has telling you about he finally gets permission from the hugging general staff to market trail. They give him a hundred Palestine pounds and they the bucket of pan. He ever he buys a bucket of paint. And he brings some ladders out to keyboards bet our VAR in the northern shore of the Dead Sea. And he and a group of volunteers from the kibbutz and Paul scouts carry this out to the most difficult. In dangerous part of the trail to Masada. So it's this place called Ross fish. It's called Roche takim. Now, there's a park at the bottom two came if you if you ever go down by the Dead Sea, and they market to kilometer trail that goes up this rocky headland that overlooks the Dead Sea. The plan was to Mark the whole trail to Masada using these same blazes. And so they made a three striped blaze, which is basically identical to the blazes. You see on the ground for trails in Israel. Now. It's Mark white red white three stripes, and they paint these markings high up on the rocks. So that the bedouin who live around there won't erase them. Okay. So on the one hand, they're marking hiking trail on the other who's doing it. Paul knock scouts. Okay. The elite paramilitary troops of the issue who will fight for the Shiva weekly. Right, right. They're doing it. They're putting the marks way up high. So they can't be a raced. They know that the people who live there will probably want to erase them. And on the map the partition maps at the UN has just produce. Use for how the land will be divided. This is our territory. This is not going to be within the territory, the Jewish state. So they're going down there and painting markings on the ground. I think it's a claim on territory. I think it's a almost a statement to say we want to maintain the right to be able to walk this route to this place to Masada that's important to us. So after nine thousand four hundred the state is established. I mean, in a way it would undercut these efforts because Israel to too few months, but the state of Israel issue MD its borders Sumed, its territories. There was really no need of that permanent. Revolution territorial revolution of making your presence felt. You would think but nonetheless, that's right. So after the states established right that I trail, of course, is taken over by the Jordanian Arab legion Jordan takes control of the West Bank. Israel's first trail is unusable for the next nineteen years. And nobody marks trails in the nineteen fifties. This engineer burger he'd become the Palme marks kind of navigational topa graphic guru. And in the early idea his the book, he wrote on topography navigation becomes still the guidebook for soldiers and remains that way for decades. So he's still out there. Banging the drum for trails. He's talking to his military contacts. Even after he goes back to being an engineer and Tel-Aviv, but the culture of hiking has to figure out what it's going to be with the establishment of the state. I mean, you know, you had these young men and women who had been steeped in Diatta, our it's right and they had to figure out now in these new boundaries. How do we explore this land? So they still want to put on their cash. Close and go marching along the borders. Okay. They're still following kind of in this way, the the wake of that poll, Mark image. And that was still kind of the sexy thing to do you have the nuthouse settlement, you know, unit and things like this in the military, and so people are going out, and they're they're wanting to walk along these far-flung borders. So in the fifties. That's what people are doing. But they're dying. Okay. And some of them are walking the borders of the land in areas, where the borders aren't clear, I mean, think of Israel and its early days. I mean, it's easy to think of it now is having so much control over the territory then habits, but back then nobody had the money. Nobody had the equipment to even Mark the boundary between Israel and Jordan through the through the river, the border between Sinai and Israel is largely unmarked. It's completely porous. I mean, people can go back and forth through these desert areas. And if you're a hiker down there if you're hiker and Getty, for example and Getty on the shore of the Dead Sea. You're right under the shadow of the Jordanian border. And there are hikers who hike up there and get shot from across the border. So it's dangerous to hike out there, so marking trails after statehood becomes about gaining control over those territories where Israel Jewish Israeli society hasn't really been able to penetrate because of rough terrain desert. You know, you can't build settlements in roads through their very easily yet the government doesn't have money to do it. So hikers start to go out there and trails get marked to keep them safe and Monday to become such a central aspect of Israel education that every school kids goes on the hiking tool once a year throughout the school years. Yeah, it's something a lot of outside. I don't think realize about Israel, the depth of hiking in Israeli culture. It's just so deep. I mean, so you can go back to nineteen o two when the first Zionist educational curriculum is written. Okay. And even at that early stage. Teachers are saying we young men and women should go out walking because this is the way they can encounter the land. And learn about history geography, so. Goes back that far hiking. Does it takes on this ideological component? You know, the way through all these processes we've described. But yeah. After statehood, the the annual trip is remains a part of the school curriculum, and that's kind of trails get marked in the framework of education. Okay. So it begins out at out in Getty in nineteen. Sixty the Getty fueled school is established. Okay. It's kind of done informally a hiker who's in love within Getty and wants to Mark trails gets this idea to repurpose the old military huts outside the end, he becomes a keyboards and the old military huts become a field school for education. And he gets his name is see Feldman. He's still kind of a famous name in Israel and Feldman starts this and Getty field school, and he talks to some of his connections and tries to figure out how he can fund it. What are what the potential will? He get support from aria alone. One of the founders of the society for protection of nature in Israel alone was a poll knock scout. He was there when they marked the first trail in nineteen forty seven alone goes onto become the one of the big leaders of Israel's environmental movement. Okay. So again, the trails are kind of a nexus for these big forces in Israel society. So Israeli environmental movement kind of goes back to all this too and alone likes this idea of this little school out looking over the Dead Sea where maybe the ministry of education can outsource field trips to the society for protection of nature, and they can have this facility out there in the desert where they do it. So that becomes the Genesis of Israel's fueled school system, which is still in place today. There's I don't remember it's in the teens the number of field schools around the country, these are still used so the ministry of education sort of farms out these trips to these field schools and the society for protection of nature in Israel, kind of does the educational legwork. So do you see hiking as like one aspect of Israeli folklore was dressed in ideological colors. Like say, I dunno folk dances. Or I mean, Israeli music like folk music. Did you see like is it part of the same the same trend or does it stand out? It's a good question. I don't know if you can totally decouple if hiking was ever tradition separate from nationalism within Zionism because going all the way back to the beginning of that Zionist school curriculum. There's I mean designers movement is kind of predicated on this idea that this land is going to eventually be under Jewish control right in some whatever stream of Zionism, you're looking at there's kind that's kind of the underlying idea. And so high king was kind of always part of that you learn about it. So that you can make this land your own. So I don't know that it ever got kind of pulled into nationalism. I think it's it was always part of it. Right. All right. Dr Shay revenue assistant, professor of Israel studies at Binghamton university, and the author of the coming book, mall, king and mapping. The nation a history of Israel's hiking train that work. Thank you very much. We'll coming in today. Thank you for having this big thanks to give them all the mirrow sound engineer until tasha producer as well. As the Van Leer institute for the generous support. And of course, my co host ending who will be back with us next week. And now another request please consider writing a review on Huhne's and support us by going to a website. That's Tailby one him stress Tel Aviv review and subscribing on to- patron campaign. Check out our archive will almost five hundred interviews if you like us, you can also like us on Facebook page is called the Tel Aviv review, podcast ideas from Israel and follow me on Twitter. Join us again next week for another edition of the town of review, and until then goodbye.

israel Masada Dead Sea Israel trail Palestine United States Brandeis university engineer Jerusalem Europe Oklahoma City Israel Jewish Israeli society Tel Aviv Galilee Germany Binghamton university Getty UN Van Leer Jerusalem institute Tel Aviv
Cloud Damage Assessment, Centene CEO, AEP CEO

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

46:19 min | 10 months ago

Cloud Damage Assessment, Centene CEO, AEP CEO

"Things better that's why so many people work with IBM on everything from city traffic to ocean plastic new schools to new energy flight problems it's human nature to hate problems but why is that after all problems inspire us to mend things Ben things make the my mission is simple to make you money I'm here to level the playing field all investors there's always work at summer think this company touches turns to gold whatever you're you're talking about linked xbox windows or the incredible azure platform for cloud infrastructure title who's struggling to hold their own in the worst economy in two years who's in trouble who's a much better safe than you'd expect thanks to savvy management fees are the real questions every company beats already Lord estimates doesn't tell us anything no no to find out what matters we need to go company by company and you can't answer them by just like saying forty seven percent you've got to do homework so let me give you the score court date we'll start with joyfully obvious I was worried the pro Hong Kong statements by players and coaches in the NBA might lead to a complete blackout of NBA Games Bessemer Donohoe said he simply hasn't seen any slowdown same goes for last night's winner Microsoft here's a company that is clearly fiery it is all working when you read most comfortable you think the whole world must be bullying really it's booming thanks to real strengthen I promised to help you find may have money starts now crater GONNA make money tech assistance human capital management the sheer magnitude these contracts could ing business just closed him Europe Europe is downright shocking is a welcome reminder that missile intelligence and top notch web services now that business that's not seeing any kind of slow down then there's the company that Donohoe's leaving service network Nike thanks told me earlier days of digitisation these guys closed a staggering forty six deals that are worth more than a million dollars in net annual contract that is extraordinary the stock got the Alcoa Sea of service now w came on this show and told us it was companies riding a wave of digitisation they're signing up huge deals to automate employees on board we keep track of their reasoning. How do we make sense of things why no one way you shouldn't all right I we don't look at some aggregate tally here in America that tells you ooh forty two percent of the country's beat estimates or twenty four percent of have the guy who don't know these surveys are useless because who cares there were series of headlines last night to create the impression that business was slowing higher but those headlines must be by some sort of body because every he does even doesn't even know that we're in a tough environment because the businesses in such good shape let's call that WanNa one who's able to thrive at the station of business as to numbers I know it has to be tough especially since one of their upper markets major markets Texas has been bruised by oil oil prices didn't matter telly put China's been a positive for my heat everything's good who else missed the memo that this is supposed to be a tough environment how much put their business actually accelerated thanks very good results in spite of the environment or how about the rails did you hear our interview yesterday I mean I thought it was amazement Jim foot he's from hammered yesterday on the news at Donna who's leaving takeover at Nike but those that but there's numbers then came out and well I mean the stock shirts right back up eight percent today Aspen digitisation better through tremendous advertising and popular new menu at the Carnegie Asada it's so good I hope to make permanent to pull it just posted eleven China happening for a little bit here the Chinese went third basketball and they they the Ministry of Sports Wants Nike Abbott Deal with Nike far from negative the innovation personalization Nike's been avoided any economic sensitivity for it's expensive for word power even in China were sales remained very strong my only fear when the biggest day for Ernie supports so far they were the Dow Twenty eight points it'd be inched up put one Nasdaq point eight one percent how slowdown in equipment but flash memories coming on strong who knows what will how people react to the microprocessor strength in Intel this very evening but that's how the same store sales growth that is very impressive especially when you know it's driven by seven percent traffic that's one new people in the stores yet the marvel at the performance of two big industrials honey these guys at lamb could report such quarter and if Lampkin hit the mid point of its guidance for next year this could be the second best calendar you're on record in terms of earnings in a slowdown live coverage that went to the bleakest all the slings heirs of the economy worldwide? I don't even know that this is difficult environment last night John donahoe welcome Kramer I do make friends money my job is such entertainment educate teacher putting contracts who call me at one eight hundred seventy three CNBC or tweet me too corneal squawk on the street wow but this man and his team have been dealt a really bad hand by Boeing's seven thirty seven Matt's woes get South West all he brought back a monster amount of stock at the right prices lamb has unseeded with today I'm serious lambs unseeded supposedly as the the most of it here I'm thinking about Costco and Walmart they're using the pressure from the trade wars to crash through competitors these big box stores have always shine with treasure we now feel more confident that Dow chemical stock can hang in there even more difficult global connery finally who seems sadly at the mercy of the Mall I no longer think that tie can keep holding down this bountiful stock battlefield fit five seven percent yielding stock if you're looking for income best performer in the S. and p. five hundred what else hey let's not forget about JP Morgan how the heck can they make so much money in environment is supposed to be talking to the banks who's doing so well they don't notice the Environment Who's thriving inspired the environment who's treading water and who's getting steamrolled would you divvy the corporate world up into those categories there's a lot to like but a lot to avoid why don't we go to Fabio in New Jersey for them to be a tailwind for ages the bottom line when you look at stocks earning season these are the buckets you need to be sorting out into take dollars but they do have a lot of airspace which could get a little bit if you bones problems drag on finally how can you not be impressed by Pepsico and Coca Cola both of which are at the top of the suppliers rather than eating the cost of the themselves passing them onto you seem target by the way I think all three can be bought here I don't know if you caught southwest airs Gary Kelly Games on the cops called each about innovation not the Fed not the trade not this loader how about the companies that are seeing a downturn though but have managed parts of the world even worse even worse than four you've got three so many of its end marks markets seem to soft and I think China's become a real headwind huntly out or in everyday low prices even though they have to source immersion guys from China at least some of it they have the scale and the scale that would be able to demand better prices from the I couldn't believe how well this railroad all is doing even though most of his corridors are headed straight downhill and that's spite the fact that more than half of the book of business has been hurt by an immense declined yet. CEO Tim March believe just predecessor. Kramer Uber Fave Rick Hill Houston this remember what puts what is secret to success was just run a better railroad quarters and estimates and wondered whether I should sell it out take my lawsuit and reinvest or hand look I'm in my I say Ford motorist really truly struggling like the Little Dutch boy with the fingers dyke they're in bad shape in don't miss a second of mad money follow ask Jim Cramer on twitter I have a question tweet Gramer Hashtag Jim about a year ago the market seemed little bald so I thought I'd had my investments by pretty on I don't know how many cylinders just awesome thing mazing CEO such as expanded into all sorts of new businesses Mexico's now taking chill left and right I think the franchise is so strong right now no bank in touch him when it comes to profitability for certain right now Jason where he might be the cheapest doc in the Dow relatives growth rate the coverage remarkable it's all an execution work then there's lamb research L. R. C. Axe after capital quibbling land knows times are tough the and to a producer of gold and copper okay McMoran bright and I just want but it's been losing money ever since and they didn't meet their last the problems but why is that after all problems inspire us to mend things ben things make things better that's why so many people yes you're way behind the eight ball trying to do a lot of five g. they remind me very much frank frankly you have a blackberry I'm going to say no loves problems. Ibm Let's put smart to work visit IBM DOT com slash smart learn more we've not nice people the earning season you're required in divvy up the corporate world into the categories telling you to do there's the light it really was quite discouraging scourging and just shows you how much headway is how about an Nile please Ed yeah mad tweets send Jim Email to mad money at CNBC DOT com or give us a call at one eight hundred seven four three Ziegler BC there's something Ed Tha mad money DOT CNBC DOT com problems it's human nature to we need to talk about the companies that are winning in China work with IBM on everything from city traffic to ocean plastic new schools to new energy flight delays to food safety smart right okay I know it sounds crazy. Our government's relations with China rapidly deteriorating prison trump seems to want it that way I think the big unstated goal of our negotiations with the Chinese discovering some real winners in China some American companies that have worked away into the heart of Chinese commerce in spite of the trade war which companies this is to force them to make an agreement to can't live up to that nevertheless gives American companies we're time to get out of the People's Republic as China once again makes a bunch of and even when you try to get other back bankers to knock CEO Jamie diamond they simply won't do what about the companies that are merely treading water I think Dow Chemical Mr President I told you so that's why I think the trade wars only gonNA get worse before it gets better yet the strangest things happen right now gate a tier two months ago as a long term investment twenty twenty and beyond do you still see potential in the stock and should I buy more old or South is very disappointed I mean these guys Fabio Hey jim written viewer hooked onto your show trying to learn a thing or two that's what my question is a Nokia I bought him at forty if your goat and your report go pay has licenses for online and mobile transactions in China as well as industrial ecommerce I want you to listen working closely with existing Chinese financial institutions. Now Dan had to do it this way he had to because China's the world's largest commerce market with half a billion online shoppers generating will conquer the world's largest emphasis going payments market by acquiring seventy percent of Gopro back in September I'm sorry go play not go pro for heaven's sake gopro switch wearing able all this to happen end quote ha a roadmap a blueprint even basically pay pal told us how American companies can craft theoretical commitments and embrace nothing I spent the president very soon accelerate the tariffs in order to make it look like he's taking advantage of once again remember we've been through this before it's how things Jim throwing one this morning for squawk on the street blogs in this category they're just starting to tread water some of the cycles they've lever lever to are starting to turn it's not perfect but is profit tests revealed gigafactory in China over the course of ten months clearly with the support of the government source their bill dare higher there disrupt it for the innovated but within the existing structure in five offer differentiated value proposition to Chinese merchants and consumers yeah I hope she never reported the equation you have to hope for trade deal so you can bail from the stock I don't want you in the stock the balance sheet to Pastiche I'm tired of management frankly if you want to do business in China even in this time of strife need to hire a lot of people in China work with the government play by the rules and the indispensable it comes to make process domestic or payments in China and quoth then he continues we have been working on this diligently for years when I say diligent I mean literally almost every president of the United States stay with Roemer lots boy tonight he's winters in China I am eying American companies still operating in the country who success to shock you no I've spent years pushing cloud based software as a service names but in the last few months the group has been put through the meat grinder now though these former market darlings become mean dogs they've gone from love to load as Wall Street losses taste for high flying growth stock well Dave and have been working on this and we work quite closely with the PBOC with other authorities inside China we worked with the administration here too the China one work closely with the regulators to invest quite heavily and compliance and risk management. Three be strong collaborator with system rather than proprietary technology. Maybe that's not what the government wants but it's the way to do it I wish there were ways though I wish it was about China buying planes bolinger soybeans from her down by the shortsellers and the long doors at least till today today the whole group rebounded rebounded hard hey so does how long term you still got some is an enormous cancer in fact most of them are still up for the year in the cloud case have dramatically outperformed the rest of their co word uh-huh but these companies are working at least for the moment that they could change at any time with a simple tweet from the mirth copies can still break in gigantic Chinese market even in this environment but they gotta play rules we saw something last night to move from Tesla Window Company Importers Cer- mid-september we conducted a damage assessed review where I warned you that cloud court had further to fall recommended dumping most of them and then certainly to what Schuman had to say quote so first of all obviously it's incredibly meaningful venture the first nine Chinese company obtained payments license too folded after the talks in Argentina the free traders make their gain Steve Mnuchin Treasury's circular color president chief acknowledged visor then the Chinese government disappoints and hardliners the White House gets uh-huh expansion in the pure see their machines are a must buy in China if local semiconductor companies went to fill out the five G. capacity again the key here is surprising civil shaped circle back to the beaten and bruised cloud stocks the one that told you to dump Dave lost more than six percent but let's zoom out and take the whole offers a service complex by let's say do group your service place coupons offer hub spot Kramer Families Save OCTA new relic Atlassian they're like the cloud kings but earlier in their life cycle ended the cloudplayer's have it last bottomed or is it merely dead cat bounce sellers take a moment to reload I think we've got a lot more recently constructed than we did a month ago to train online sales that's more than half the online retail market worldwide yes he had the play ball playboy he did in short start with a real faith stolen papal people reporters toward the fourth quarter last night dance Schulman the he's shocked in community revealing the pay policy popat in their performance has not been very regal of late frankly on average the keizer down twenty one percent from their highs earlier this year well some of them have been do we're going to start with the best of breed cloud kings that salesforce dot com adobe spunk service now Twi- Leo VM ware and worked it used to be red hat remember things are wagons around the highest quality offers a service companies the ones with the most reasonable valuations and I know they're expensive since then there's been yet another daljit although it hits some of these teams of course some concern for astor's but could the company's most recent quarter single time the recent buying I'm sitting down with the CEO so stay with Roemer it can come together who else is winning in China Lam research the giants look you make talked about the show it's a nice com ringcentral Alkan help you smart sheet Viva Systems Zen desk and Heather Games Z scaler then plummeted more than thirty percent so off that they are still up some stanchly for the year we're talking forty one percent on average not bad top McCain I like Ben I'm searching through the rubble of the software stocks and telling you could finally be the time to buy and I know many of you are beleaguered and then had talked ten Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren candidacy even more brutal when you look at the other clouds toxin our universe and here's that list out Turks and a plan hearted another to get this on the average eleven clouds Stocksi blessed this month I perform damn less than a percent while the twenty-one clouds toxin are covers you it's only up eight percent for the year so you give lagmay twenty percent game for the S. and P. Five hundred over the same period how about the cloud princess the best run of the smaller APN Domo Domo Domo at like In Florence Domo five nine Mongo DB seeing some delays in the closing deals at an investor event last week the stock points from one eight hundred sixty two day four days now and bigotry Tori for the your this is the cloud coworker got obliterated during the mark white so late last year but that turned out to be a terrific buying opportunity this same thing happened in early twenty sixteen inch a couple of extremely high profile slammed by the rotation for good reason project but workday CEO and he'll butchery whom I think he's terrific he wanted to see the day the company's going to quote this definitely delays to food safety smart loves problems. Ibm Let's put smart to work visit IBM DOT com slash smart to learn more unusual by the way even the cloud kings with iron clad fundamentals have been poor performance salesforce which you know isn't Kramer Favorites Chapel Trust it's down eleven percent from its highs what can they tell us about the current situation okay. I'm not been archie but listen to this. During last year's meltdown the stock the cloud software cohort fell thirty two percent from peak Detroit the cloud tableau Israeli is still an on premise software provider. I mean Lincoln's business oriented social media network but there was a real negative catalyst I remember how much salesforce went down this Abbas beautiful headquarters building just a second deal with me all right here we go now outside of the cloud aristocracy the declines been pinnock brutal sell off underneath all the just pl- acidity of the averages so these names come down enough to be enticing GONNA put in some contexts you do that we've seen these before Mrs from Tableau Software subsequently bought by salesforce and linked in subsequent what by Microsoft not mentioning offers a service. Ps But if you can buy these stocks were volunteering to go over the top of World War one I mean you're begging to be mowed when you look at the cloud stocks that were publicly traded back then they racked up an average of forty six percent declared b twelve even the best of them adobe lost twenty six percent of its value was off over a period of seventy six days compare that to right now this group was now down thirty three percent as of yesterday having hit for one hundred and three days in other words basis requests for profits the prince they blew down average more than twenty five percent for the respective us out coupe is held up better than the rest ring the register in the winner's cloud crash in two thousand sixteen on the other hand was in response to pair shortfalls like I mentioned tableau and linked in you could argue they weren't can the last big breakdown you could argue cloud stocks ready to bottom coming into today's session but before you get your hopes up we need to consider the two thousand sixteen scenario forty five percent from its highs which has sent the stock deeply into the red for twenty some of these really frustrating people Atlassian it's business collaboration so for play that much just reporters as we bad it's only fifteen percent which means the stock still more than double says the beginning here new relic Lucerne which new relative and again I it's the worst of them hi with a big chunk of their pain come in the last but that is painful saying same goes for the cloud socks from the IPO class at twenty thousand seeking forty percent from there is this breakdown look Berlin two thousand sixteen in two thousand eighteen hard question well okay last year's meltdown had nothing to do with the fundamentals it was all about a change of sentiment debate the investors Louis Panic while you still get an amazing by team when you got to be patient wait for the Cornish unfold many people started too early the question is does occur strong quarterly this week got hit hard on news ain't GonNa Taste pats shed nine point Salinas better-than-expected numbers that said most of the cloud princes had run so much going breath until last week I would've told you the latest softwares of service sell off is a sentiments story like what we saw in two thousand eighteen however after what workday said about the glade is last week we need to be a little more alert for signs of actual we said we also cut movies and be optimistic aftertaste protect rally think about this I think this run was safety smart loves problems I._B._M. Let's put smart to work visit I._B._M. dot com slash smart to learn more two questions one do I do I run the register and I I'm a the bulk of my retirement accounts are ready they go to Patrick and Pennsylvania Patrick First and foremost thank you for taking the magic out of how you doing true I couldn't be better how you doing well got a question for you today you talked about this stock a decent amount I got some news a couple of weeks the stock market and making regular people feel like they know what the hell they're doing thank you I just want to inspire enough confidence because everybody else's so busy once again and we've got a twenty six teen scenario on our hands and not a twenty eighteen one through in Texas drew services business I think he can start gradually not once don't be a hero buying the high quality names right here just keep some powder dry in case they get hit and go back to sleep or do I keep buying in because they've got a pretty good trajectory about twenty six months they dropped off of their high tonight giving you my blessing to pick at some of these downtrodden McLeod names the one of the best fundamentals of the most reasonable valuations the ones I've been go I eight feet core there now finally planning on spinning off match group wanted to get your thoughts I think it's an incredibly inexpensive stock I've always been on today the cloud stocks prove they can bounce after months of magny even after this evening's Amazon shortfall may spend Spook some these of its giant service space we also have record Microsoft which has a major cloud infrastructure business that's on fire here so I want you to put it all together and I am now tonight and then both Donald McDermott came on our show gave us a very bullish outlook said there was no sensitivity confirmed that we all suspect there's no question there's no reason to question the drivers in this offer auto even though he's moved ninety three people out but you know we've got an able replacement term it terrific track records former CEOS water vanguard index funds nine hundred laughable air kid and US pond I read the register and rolled-over in there jor fan I think that IC- whenever the stock comes down I don't know if you've noticed we always cheer suggested you buy some and boy am I ever not giving them you try and tell people don't say our that's never how I've taught and I like to be constructive how help well of it and then put that in index funds into keeps going back to its all time is up another quarter then you just let it run and relations about them as Dobie salesforce spunk Twi- Leo Hub spot five nine disease rain central and Diana trees he pay Donohoe's well-respected so the fact that he's leaving the softwares of service industry did make investors nervous of course fortunately to close last night service now reported a fantastic quarter I bought into Mongo DB my average buying price has got me about forty nine ninety nine close today about one twenty two and change pointing now I I know that people were down they kind of did the match spinoff this thing sells it incredibly cheap mobile giving all the different acid has a bar call me a bar I would to start buying quality names but were mad money at seventeen is soaring after earnings with the company building momentum to a series of acquisitions is consider the healthcare plan I'm talking to the CEO then as worries about the global economy not make headlines isn't time to circle back to the utilities I'm talking this this was a very good quarter the buyback we have the optionality now that with the proceeds from the sale today we called when the Fifth District Federal Court was going to rule the way they did right now we think there's a chance that the appeals court could since this week I've been telling you that the managed care stocks just aren't getting enough credit for the incredible fundamentals especially best offers like united health group seventeen we're they're allowed to flourish they're flourishing in caution going down people like him and we'll retaining the individuals longer than we historically have though we're down he's reading a lot you've got a lot I like to take out the houses money so on this Saddam predicting I want you to take out a about one point nine million we were staying longer all the time and we have eighty percent of the people each year renewing from the previous year so it's a product are executive now that he's finally recovered from the Saint Louis Cardinals stinging defeat at the hands of the shocking Washington nationals but you're not going to make money of US knows which way it's going to come out but there are situations which could be very advantageous for seventeen that people nate misjudge but which is by stock when I we called WHO's our investors you just get better and better when this next he'll closes right doing because you've really got a momentum enough and you also announced the by that which I think was great turtle we we know that if they don't it's going to the Supreme Court and we think Supreme Court were overturned not five four you'll be sixty or seventy two so like it's where people want to walk in with an insurance card not for free care don't you think that there's been a miscalculation in the big broad presidential debate and lately just in and thank you for the incredibly climb all right the cloud stocks they can bounce you have my lesson right now starting tomorrow on a little downdraft from Amazon the socks the copies were divesting and we now have the option retired that or by backstop if we cannot like to buy back stock as a way to for the investors contain costs in a single payer is withhold services I've had people in England Germany France as us to open up medical tourism spots in the former Eastern European bloc so they can go get the knee replacement of what things they can't normally get one more fast sure have to confirm this the driver manager okay let's you so much for coming on this quarter was really what odd I think that there's a very big federal appeals court decision coming very shortly could happen to this evening for I know we're going to be a lot of misunderstanding at I'm not sure there I believe there are about ten times as many M is in Canada as I'm too would be in favor of the four healthcare which absolutely it is the exchanges are shocking people right they're actually doing during sign there's a couple of I this was the ninth clean quarter we've had and the other eight we went down for Novi in my mind volatility with her she's a big administrative government sponsored health pets sure enough two days ago seventeen reported what I call a Nabokov quarter meaning not is fear while the company delivered a nice top and bottom line and crushed by Elizabeth Warren worries and number was all they knew sock exploded higher than the new surging six point five percents single session teens now rallied nearly fifteen point from its lows find the Mayo clinic in Rochester Minnesota thing about this what that means if this four if there's seventy four in Rochester some of that nature there's only the polls from CNN the other day it looks like the American people are waking up idea that maybe it will cost too much and maybe the care would be subpar on this single payer you do want to do well here's what I'm thinking there was a piece in the New York Times Tober eighteenth twenty nine thousand nine how pending decisional bomb care could up in twenty twenty campaign no you've had the postal system the private system they'll this this system is working people care they want a couple of employees in Italy and one of my employees it's hard to see who's the states can decide how many players they want anytime and what the rates are okay what question do you think that people are beginning of when it was warn really raises less corn and more hell are people actually starting to get frightened about the the dollars that will cost you think it's starting to sing I hope so for every time a politician I've said it to you before it's too much politics not policy right I tell them why don't you go practice on the postal system cofre Mer the all American electric power see how that grows stop is buried and of course all your calls rapid fire tonight's the night in rows is stay with the Broncos went out and then the lightning round is over are you ready scared politics not policy and you know it's very easy to have a soundbite medicare for all right it takes a lot of paragraphs explain bad all right that's great because you've been a source of etiquette Charles Jen about Vodafone real risky it's had a very big move and at this point the CEO of seventeen CNC I think the time has crested one single payer which makes sense team a great by their money's packing do it for instance I was okay so where are we now it's Illinois in New Jersey I mean every state do you have to make a presentation every state in why can these two states hold you up they also missing some key line I'm so we can over that medical cost ratio found that little niggling frankly the percent of the premiums they collect it goes to paying for healthcare but because the managed care stocks have yeah couple of months ago and been on a bit of a thousand and lately and almost points and I'm I'm seeing that the also I in a portfolio I think it's one hey how are we going to Chris in Ohio Chris Kramer Yeah how are you because the numbers I've seen that that single payer program Medicare for we'll have somewhere between twenty five and thirty eight trillion dollars over ten years uh-huh I'm just okay on right now I mean it's been a little too up for down hit or miss in the food group on the Pepsico Guy I think gets rotation and just wondering whether I should hold onto it or governor Sam imagined Sam Open Day fifty percents to basically getting month although it's still twenty seven points away from its highest stock is picking up some members so let's check in with Michael Mayer is the chairman president CEO of seventeen and my favorite healthy. We're hoping that the Federal Appeals Court Fifth District does reverse it they do it will just take an over here out right but you I'm presuming you're saying the punches shares and some analysts have rowers its price target and I'm chomping on the face position this happened I'm good how are you very good thank you thanks for taking my call my question is about the edge confusing out platforms here's the budget for ten years is fifty six trillion dollars they get about what that means there's the whole country would be it's it's it's I've said it many times it's it's virtually going to be resolved any time now I it's it's a clean it's very clean acquisition okay now the we're working with justice I any trust any trust is NBC come down a lot I guess it ran a little too much like ten diabetes GASCON did I like to I think it really belongs so I'm GonNa have to do more homework because fast lease just something I'm slowly on let's go to fill New Jersey fill it community by sundown by some little bit Laura let's go to please and Connecticut fully and the first time how much further can utilities run wisdom and also whatever win what we're going to fail you told us to succeed now people want them and my family members included all right that's buckle night on Sherman President this is a group to thrive when investors are worried about the global economy the youths are domestic consistent and they pay `bout two full dividends although given how much they've rallied some of the yields now you see balancing I I wish I dunno weaned fastly we'll fastly and we'll disley from the tight end or I think he's I think he's I R uh-huh Actually Incorporated Bawden for around twenty seven dollars and then it's taken a nosedive than the other about the things we're trying to do as a company there's no question that that when when it really is a music sort of music thing because six people probably saying utility company Doobie brothers why they bump in with that the floor is yours yeah so obviously we were happy with the outcome of the quarter and even forty two whole country I mean is there so's dynamics that's great numbers on post road now I go through this gigantic acquisition welfare I don't know how well they're not they're not going to New Jersey they seem to be last that's okay they they're going to the review right now there are some some things in Illinois we have a a tune that we're playing and we went to continue being prosperous and and it reflects and the music so I I know you also from your other world which is the rock and Roll Hall of fame in terms of what the electric industry is providing we have further left vacation of the industry that's occurring and certainly with the infrastructure development I think people are starting to recognize the importance of the product that we did I was just looking at every other country you go to England they've had single payer forever and there's a private system equal in size

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Lots of Y during the Pandemic

Talking Tesla

1:00:57 hr | 4 months ago

Lots of Y during the Pandemic

"Talking Tesla Hockey has. I'm not sure if the breaker the sellers each put on you on. It must be some sort of geometrical algorithm during their. I'm sure this matt so he space. Excuse the deal landing ruckus on a ship is charged with Expected to drive a car without our saying Charter Chinatown. I know I'm not a good pug a tough. Yeah I think that this is a complete with is run by superbeets. Holy cousin used to because this kept us were that you've got a model eggs. Seen the future ended his life whole charge. I wouldn't call it a screw up. Do you like your monologue. Hayley's boys goes a little bit here. it's time to do a little contest. We haven't done one of these in well because Robert Robert's real doctor seeing real patients in the middle of the pandemic and Tom is medical educator in the middle of the tent. Tam And I don't know what I'm doing but we thought we should do just to show. Mostly I'm calling miss the Hepi version because I'm having a drink talk a little bit of Tesla just for old time's sake just to you. Know take the anxiety down a little bit. We're all talking cove. Nineteen old Tom but not now now. Let's Talk Tesla K. Let's took Tesla have either one of you. Since the last time we spoke. And I don't remember when the last time we spoke was have either one of you received a new Tesla. I've got this damn close. He's got one. I've got the New Testament at it. I still don't have it. It's like all the paperwork is there. And they're like it's minutes away. But then the pandemic occurred and they send everybody home. So I'm pretty sure. Mind sitting on a truck and nobody's there to unload it so in the last week. I've seen four car care car carriers filled with Tesla's coming down to one. Oh one this hope is hope I know of people who are getting their wise right. Now Tesla delivered my three to me. Touch Lewis almost about. That is no fun. If you like touching yeah. Tell us about your touch delivery. I don't think we really understand the whole point of that really touch. Who were you hoping to touch? That's all I wanted to. I think about you I touch myself. He said I never change pandemic or not. Dammit try not to cough because then you're going to expel me from the studio in the studio. You're at hub. Dear are you getting delirium? Oh we're not in the same room together. Mostly because Robert Actually sees patients regularly and the last time we recorded was sort of at the beginning of this and he walks in from shift wearing his scrubs and IT N. Ninety five mask hanging around his waist and I was like this probably a bad idea. I probably shouldn't be around him and now he is half naked doing this recording from his own house so well he could be all naked. We can't see below the waist please enough. Yeah well because I went for a run. I WANNA contain my pulmonary health. I wanted to that I can read the really well and be as strong as possible for when these little corona viruses tried to get in me but touches delivery. It was actually quite impressive. One thing that I didn't realize was that actually gave you mel key. I didn't know that you send me Fox but when I got there so it's Monday I'm working I get off of work around ten thirty. I think it was an drive halfway home. Stop at the at the talking Tesla Studios. Because that's where I had taken delivery of a drill. I was driving Truro for a couple of weeks model three Couldn't bring myself to drive a gas car. I just could. I love that. Love renting model three from tiny on Truro and it was great I think Burbank is car was black excellence. It was beautiful black car. I described how I know that I definitely don't want blackhawks. Got Counting worm sitting in the Sun. Even though it was like a sunny day here in California fifty degrees out so I get to the studio and eleven thirty at night after my shift and there it is white all white you model three with like thirty miles on it and I called the Tesla unlocked it for me and then I drove home and it was delicious. I I unfortunately didn't have the keys. I was unaware that existed legroom to service the next day and get some keys. Nate he you know the Keycard because you need to be able to link your phone to car. Now everything's great. Where were the keys? I guess they were with now and I didn't catch one box that he had sent me. That said keys or Miss Judy. More even though I went into studio to take a leak and contaminate doorknob. Thank you Lord. It's great today happening but the best part of this story Robert was. You didn't us that. A modal free was getting delivered so so. This studio is one part of the property and the other part of the property is residential and the lovely lady that works their lives. Calls me and says Million Model your your Tesla's here. They're dropping off their tests on like what talking about like the dropping off your Tesla and they're delivered it and I'm like what are you about. And the guy's going away and he says you can't take it back because I'm like well I didn't and I drove off and she's like it's beautiful white Tesla. I'm like I wanted to blue one. There was complete confusion because she didn't tell her car to the wrong address. Very heavily about US two minutes into this conversation. I'm like that's Roberts three. He's delivered to the studio so we finally worked out. We OPEN UP THE CAR. And Yeah there is these cases but the case in the studio and then vox you and you didn't get the volks and then she again because magically disappears and then there's a black Tesla Tesla he. What is? I mean? You can't be that surprised. There's always a new tesla parked in front of that place and that was obviously the. Who is it to route? Timing tirees a car then a bike just ignore any tesla's this just get delivered to the studio it'll work itself and it's like a Tesla portal. You know it's funny because people talk about this place as the Tesla place because there are so. Many tests is where we recruit. We just known as the Tesla Place. Yeah we should have some kind of a light from your backyard that just shines up into the clouds. With Tesla T T so Batman. Hell you liking your brand new twenty twenty absolutely old bills and whistles except for performance model. Free Love it love. It is so amazing white cheerier to describe it. Well when I first picked it up. It was nighttime so I didn't really notice it so much the next day when I drove it in a on a sunny day of reflection of all of the weight services none of them are glossy seeds the dash but the white it just brightens up the car. So much if you suffer anyone. They're talking destination from any type of depression than this is the car for you. It is so bright and so light. You should just you know. Go onto the Tesla website with Robert. Three one seven seven and ordering yourself a white Interior Tesla somewhere. The extra few bucks. That's funny because I find that the White Dash I love the white interior would not get a cow a test with but the dash right in front of you on a sunny day in that white. I find it reflects too much. And Dash eight dash the that strip of the event year dead Strip there on the driver's side. I feel the need to put something over at third party groups that do that. I just find that on a sunny day. That's a little bit glory. As a matter of fact there isn't third party group that can do something on that in that market. Rpm Tesla he puts like a would overlay. He can put on it. And there's a what is it carbon fibre. So I don't know I don't get any of that your car. He hasn't done that he does. He offered it to me and I am actually probably GonNa take him up on the sunny days. Oh I've got a story. Can I tell you a story? Is it tassels story? It's a Tesla Story. So you know I s and I got a red three and I loved it because the you know the payment was like third and I like the three more than the S. and told the whole story and it's very exciting and I did and I was a bit out of phase because I really wanted to get a why. But why wasn't around in the why wasn't going to occur for another year and a half and I'm like well wait. I'll get a three now. And then but then of course they accelerated win wise coming from like the end of the year to some to now. Yeah and so now. I'm getting the coal. Do you want you why. And against everything I've said. Of course I'm not going to white. Even though the right thing to do is wait and let them work at manufacturing issues so now what am I going to do? I'm going to have this cow sitting around. That's complete waste so I emailed them and I said can I return this model three? It's only about three months old. And how much do you think it is to return a model three in a lease after three months? Obviously GonNa have to pay some sort of fine but I don't need it so I want to send it back. What do you think thousand dollars? That's my guess. Okay Robert Your turn. Well let's see how. How long did you use it for three years? I'VE HAD IT FOR THREE MONTHS. Six hundred dollar a month payment Yeah round that five. Six hundred bucks so thirty two eighteen fifteen thousand dollars so I get the email and and the email says yeah. You can return it. It'll be a little expensive. The return cost is fifty eight thousand dollars. They want all the money. And I'm like I guess I'M NOT GETTING A Y. And then I get an email the knicks day. Oh sorry we forgot to subtract the residual value of your trade in. Which is the car that I have right now. And then the number was three and a half thousand oils and a half thousand is listed fifty. The residual value was fifty five thousand on a car. That new so that's there's so much to this. That's very interesting to unpack the residual value of a car. Aghast when you drive it off the lot is usually twenty percent the residual value of this cabinet already three months old. He's a way less than that. It's like five percent. It's stunning right. These cars hold their value so well so I can actually return this Jimmy five percent. I mean ninety five percent I can return this car and pay three three and a half thousand which is a lot of money right but it's still way less than two and a half years of paying payments on it if I kept it so why so I'm giving it back and I'm getting away baby. Okay I was going to say so. Weird is the why so the Wi th I've got all the they've sent me all the stuff and that's like it's delivery is imminent but I haven't got that last thing. Come and get it at this time. So this happened right at the beginning of the pandemic and they closed everything down on. I just figured okay so this is not going to happen for six months. I'll just keep my model three but you keep telling me you see truckloads of wise coming in the one on one. I'm like maybe one of those. Did you see a blue one with the name a melon? Did you see that? No did you say what is the deal done with them to return the three. No so I said look do this deal. That's a little cash out of pocket. But I really want the why but I'm not going to do it until I get it. So they said Yeah. You can just put on pause and we'll do this deal once you get your way so now. You're not paying the monthly on the three either. No I'm still paying a monthly on the three. Come on let's be reduced that residual as it goes like it'll be it'll change over time. And if Teluk Tesla collapses and things that terrible that I won't be able to do this but Yeah it'll change a little bit but I was just standard. How much how little it was to get out of a lease on a three months old because that residual value and it's going to be able to get rid of this. We're GonNa seems crazy to me. Actually that seems like not good business on their part unless it got a lot of people who are interested in your combination of a. Why but no three you mean. I'm sorry a three either way but now it's used. I would think that they would sell the wind. Were easily well. They're having issues with the Y. In terms of Well these these reports anyway that they're already moving to the rear wheel drive only cheap aversions because obviously when there's a pandemic and and you have this collapse of the economy. People are not going out and buying cows doctors who are guaranteed job security. This some of us that can do that. So it's interesting to me that the three is maintaining so I wouldn't be surprised if when my wha rise if it arrives saying the next few weeks and I go redo the deal they like? Oh now we're not giving you that deal it's insane. I Dunno wonder I mean I. Is there some way for you to lock this up? I didn't ask them. I would kind of look it up because honestly I'm going to go back to work now I'm going to. I'm coming out of retirement. I'm going in with Robert. I'm going to the front lines and the this obviously you're worried about getting sick and the worst of things. But this is a tesla. Show my biggest concern for the Tesla shirts. My actual biggest concern but my biggest concern is like. I didn't want to get this disease before I can drive the why because Oh my God. You sound like somebody. I know who was dying of cancer some years back and they were like I just WanNa know. If President Obama gets elected president. You know it's like I just living with long enough feel like I just bought the why because this is the cow that I've always wanted to have loved the S. X. Great but it's the why it's I just wanNA open the hatch. And did I could go to the shift in L. Intimate. You don't get the disease it just one time give me my car now you want to fondle it. This is you get a close show. Got Terribly sad right there for moment wider void. But you know what I mean. This is the car this is the one this is accelerated. Come on yeah. Have you been looking at? The videos has been a radio. A Lotta great videos of of the why people that are sort of just walking you through it. How BIG IT IS? And how far off roading have you been looking at these things? What are your impressions can give you mine. But I don't WANNA take show. What is a very big? It's very big. I love the size of it. I watched I can't remember which youtube it was. But a gentleman wasn't his it was given to him to do a walk through by some friends of his and he put it in the middle of a parking lot and he opened all the doors and he went through everything and he showed a lot of details. And it's surprisingly large which I was kinda shocked at how surprisingly large it was and I've only I have seen them in the person But only on a truck going seventy miles an hour in the other direction off the five so it doesn't really count. I saw a whole crapload of about a week ago. So they are coming and my first impression is it's great. I wish my car had the same residual value as yours but it does not right upsetting. I look at these videos and I you know I was when they did the reveal. I think I've talked about this a million times bill. The Wind Ilan today in a long time I was under impressed. But since they've changed the form factor. They've made it so it's much more ex than it is three. I'm super excited about this thing. And then when I look at the look at the videos that people are putting out it. Looks like to me almost the perfect car for me. The hatchback size the the ride height reluctant. Suv Ride Height. The Big Franck the under the storage in the back but the fact that it rides like an ex but as efficient as three and as short as a three narrows of three this is why. I don't WanNa die before I drove. You'RE NOT GONNA die. Be Safe. It's interesting to me the way that it has basically the same height as the three to the floor but then they put like six or eight inch platform inside which is what the seat sits on. And that was the first time in that walk through video. I watched on Youtube that I had seen that. And it makes sense but you just sit up a little higher on it. They just kind of raised the height of the seat. Which I think is is very cool. I would really. I would like you to get one just so I can sit in it and drive it because I'm really curious how much it actually has changed since the why launch. Well it looks like it's changed a lot in a way higher much more when I see the pictures of the X. Y. And the three. It looks way more like the X. Than it does the three here but we'll have to see them together like that'll be good one for you is once you get it. You can put it next to the accent. We can really do a nice comparison. Because I don't know I haven't seen that video yet. I'm sure it's out there but I haven't seen that video. Yeah there's been a couple of them but we can do better and I think we've Lost Robert. No No. He's he's just no talking. I'm just being quiet and listening to you wax on about the why I would love to get in. In fact Wednesday I will get it. Wednesday will may be driving what told Pluto. It's kind of a shame that we're recording today. Monday the thirtieth before I drive down to San Diego Words County area to socially distance with Mark White Down My car and allow him to help me by putting on a front clear. Bra and protect my beautiful white seeds before I missed them. A lot and do Any number of other things. I might do this. So what does that mean for you in a? Why does he have a why? He took delivery savage Sunday of his Wi- and I think I sent you guys a picture. He already has customized. It like unbelievably it's He's got a clear coated. He's got his. I think it already came. Chrome delete right. They all come chrome delete. He's got like a custom steering wheel in there now with white leather on it. He's recovered the center council in White as well as the armrest want and the car looks like so cool and he's going to let you in it. I wouldn't let you in my car right now. I haven't been to the emergency room actually in a few days. I'm in I'm taking my temperature and I am But you Kinda know me. Boys is being a bit of a compulsive note Go through the show notes and make sure all the words the right size for all the different sections that's me and so- wearing a mask and being protected is mission number one. I'm at work. The chances of me getting this nasty bug is exceedingly low and I think what I would do if I let you have my wife. I just leave it in the sun for two or three days and that'll almost certainly destroy the vars. Then I'd get back in steam it with like clorox. It's sunny in southern California and that institutional temperature. It's going to be baking in. That'll kill that little thing with its lipid by last week. Corona League is taunting the corona virus. That's there's people listening to this show. This is bad. No good plug for podcasts. That I discovered earlier today. That was really good. I really enjoy listening to it. In fact the podcast Dave Mason. Thank you dave. Gave me my third laugh of the day. And that's your other podcast now about it's called won't hurt a bit. And it's all about the corona virus and I think everybody who listens to talk tesla she check it out six really really good. Thank you rub it. It's this one had a bit. We'll put a link in the show nook. I thought I was outstanding now. I didn't think you were a standing. Shocker just mason was good but Dave Mason was. He took he took he took it home. He was awesome. He was fantastic but I think I was fantastic. Sorry I could have warned you. You are wise wise beyond your years. Young Tom. I just know mel very well. So we're excited about the. Why did you hear that one? With the that is the competitor. To spacex to Starlink. One web went broke today. And they're down one way. Was this company. They're putting up. Low Earth orbit satellites to do fast Internet connections and it was sort of exciting that you had space x doing this and one web doing this and that we would have fast Internet connection across the world and they'd be a little competition there today because of covered nineteen. They felt for bankruptcy. Did you hear this gentleman? Didn't I'm reading it right now? Ars Technica article. Do we know how many satellites they have? A they have seventy four satellites up. They have like forty four ground stations and they said that's not enough for them to even do any Internet access at all and they'd gotten three billion dollars in funding and this was one of those things where it was exciting because there was competition where this is going to have different groups and it's not just going to be one company monopolies a bed so it's really really sad actually probably elands very accelerators like they goes the competition. I wonder if Ilan we'll buy them at a vastly reduced price. Now it's probably different technologies and stuff and so might not be worth anything to them but the spectrum that they had might be worth something they were doing something like four hundred megabyte downloads with thirty two millisecond ping so maybe they'll buy the spectrum but it's kind of amazing how quickly that happened that they just ran out of funding interesting so they will have So they've laid off eighty five percent of their five hundred and thirty one employees which is terrible there They have two point. One billion and liabilities. One point seven billion in senior secured financing plus money owed to between one thousand and five thousand creditors. They're based in the UK they have. Us Headquarters in McLean Virginia. And they operate a satellite production factory in Florida with Airbus interesting after Softbank. Who was one of their top shareholders their next owned by Qualcomm Airbus and Wyler's eleven ten adventures? So they will be able to restructure and get back into it. I mean they're not gone gone because bankruptcy doesn't necessarily mean you're GonNa know it just means that you know maybe they can get it together. The hard part I think is going to be. You know coming up with more money to keep launching right. That's GonNa be the hard part. Sounds like Softbank took a big hit after they're After the announcement of this bankruptcy and it says here from Bloomberg that they've dropped their shares ten percent after the satellite operator in filed for bankruptcy. Which is a pretty amazing ripple and we're seeing ripple effects everywhere in so many ways around the corona wires. This is just another indicator of how interconnected we all are and this ars. Technica article says that potential buyers could include Amazon or facebook. Both of which are planning constellations of low earth orbit broadband satellites except nobody says the inhouse mechanism to launch. This stuff reliably. I mean Amazon's working on it but You know SPACEX has it been. I guess I say this with a little bit of trepidation. If there's anybody I trusted a monopoly I think it would be you on. I think it's hard to the right place. And the fact that he bought like over twelve hundred ventilators in China and had the ship to La. And that doesn't help anybody in Washington or New Orleans or New York but that's amazing that's pretty damn good but they are refurbishing. The Buffalo gigafactory the the the solar factory in Buffalo to make more ventilators right. Now they're they have a partnership with medtronic's I believe in trying to start ramping. That up there which will be very very helpful if they can get any kind of numbers going. That'd be impressive. You know it's Kinda crazy that Looking back at the past fifteen or twenty years that it came after a number of disasters that we experienced were ventilators were short supply not merely as big a situation as we currently have there been moved by like health and Human Services and various national high. She said Governmental Organizations to fund the creation of inexpensive easy produce and easy to stockpile ventilators and in each of those cases it companies in the startups that were created for that effect were bought out by massive large plot equipment manufacturers and then quashed it was a great article light. I'd have to find a hero mediocrity to the notes for later but it's just you know again Money is not the the end goal for everything and the cheapest is not the end goal for everything. You've got to look at a bigger picture. Yeah I saw those in its. That is the whole big government. Small government Capitalism is the best thing and it's not release kitsch. The free market market forces means the. You don't prepare well for a pandemic because you can't really factor in the cost of that until it's too late and so they`ll. I think they'll be some interesting discussions that come out of this about exactly that there are some things like global warming and pandemics. The free market does not have the skills to deal with it. Because it's a probability its future thing and I saw that in like water disaster because despite what you've heard from the top of government nobody ever saw this coming. Nobody could have predicted people. Being predicting this and talking about this for years this is an absolute inevitability and it will occur again and this idea that nobody knew people have known this have been telling government and telling them to prepare for this and part of the reason that some of the Asian countries have been so much better at dealing with. This is because they got slammed by and murders and we didn't here in the United States so we pretended it's not a problem. But now we're talking about the pedantic and we said we would so let's move on. I WANNA I WANNA go back to the modal. Why have you been looking? At some of the videos of the model y on the race track and the motorway off roading and be sending any of those boys. No I haven't I saw the model I on the race track. It's not as fast as the model three but I think there were. There were performance versus performance. And what I do WanNa know because you alerted this. You alerted me to this now. Is that on the Tesla APP. When I look at my model three I have a opportunity to up the performance of my model. Three very excited about. Are you going to do that? For Two grand you can go from like zero to sixty zero to one hundred kilometers an air in four point four but if you pay the two grand to three point nine. I think it is yeah. I am definitely going to do that. I WANNA take I wanNA take. There's a there's a really nice very wide open road near one of my hospitals. That at night is completely. There's nobody on it and I'm going to do a really. I'm going to do like three or four. Maybe five zero to sixty time splits and see how fast my model three is at baseline. And then I'm going to buy this thing and then I'm going to do it again. Oh please can you video that? That sounds delicious. I need to figure out how video in the car you know. I've seen a number of people and how they do it. Like the Tesla van life. Aw Damn his name is just for a second thought. He's got like three cameras set up and it's pretty cool. We're you know you've got camera. Your shoulder stuck on class looking at you or the dashboard. You've got camera looking at you as sure that makes him really funny faces when this happens. Yeah I would like to see anything. Give me something. 'cause I really WANNA to know. Does that work? I mean it's over. The air firmware upgrade that allows the motives to suck in more energy across the couple of wiring. And I I want to know I'm not GonNa do it because I think the acceleration is plenty fine right now but an era. You like to go fast. We looked at years ago when we first went for driven. What was it the model x? When I thought I was going to do yes when you first got your expert I just wanted to see. How does it handle nobody around in that area? So there's a number of videos out there by some of the Youtube. Is that early access by people who had model wise and I gotTa tell you. It's pretty impressive. Impressive the speed as their drag racing as thing and the offroad abilities and model y sits up a little higher actually like I think it's five to seven inches higher than the model three and they have an off road mode. And so this is not like you're GONNA go rally driving this thing. But if you're like a tom go camping and you need a little extra you know. Full wheel drive is stuff going on. There were very impressed with how the off road mode sort of made the traction go between wheels and for them to be able to go over significant hills and bumps and lumps and their impressive so chicken up. I'm just saying think y might be as close as I've ever seen the Kerr for a huge percent of the population. You can put a lot of kids in the globe. People in there you can go off roading. It's incredibly efficient for a big heavy. This thing is impressive. They're saying that the zero to sixty is three point. Four two or three four three seconds with this one foot rollout which is typically. How zero to sixty is time. And that's pretty damn good three point four seconds that's better than many. Bmw's without the performance features that people throw on top of them so for a like a soccer mom not super expensive car. What sixty thousand dollars? Sixty eight thousand dollars if you get the performance. That's pretty darn good. I would say more than pretty damn good. This is a Suco like this is this will blow the doors of everything from zero to sixty and I don't actually use that. I'm not drag racing people but just to know when you're in La Freeways and stuff that you can just punch through a problem. Somebody's cutting you off. There's a bed it's a nice thing to have even if you're not the kind of person that likes to blow people away at the zones it's nice to know I probably would use it to out of five times when I get off of work. Typically it's late somewhere between eleven in the morning and I'm getting on the one. Oh One freeway. There's a very large like you get on the freeway and you don't see what's coming up behind you because it's there's just been an overpass. Visibility is not great and you start getting near to merge into the most The slow lane so to speak and there are semis. That I'll just come up upon out of the blue. It just not looking around. It's not you know it's late at night. Maybe I'm a little tired but bottom line is is if I need to get in front of them. The car does amaze at doing that in with this added. Performance insurer for two grand. It'll be even better and I find that when I'm actually I'm in the slow lane and this is a very thing. People are coming onto the freeway. And there's like seven cows coming onto the freeway and there is no space to merge into them. I'm like what am I going to do that? Ability to just punch the car you already doing sixty miles. An errand to punch to eighty to get in front of another car changed lanes. It's kind of a nice thing to have just saying acceleration talk at low speed and highest paid. Even if you're not a redhead is a nice nice thing dip into when you need to know what I just noticed. I'm looking at my phone APP. And that little choice to add that feature of the performance acceleration has disappeared. Maybe already bought it. And you don't remember that I don't think I did. Did you have a few too many drinks and forgot you bought? It's no no maybe like full self driving. You can have it but you don't have to pay for it so it's the opposite of the full self driving where you pay for it but you don't get it probably makes your world boys. Do you have anything else to took it. We don't need to feel the need to waffle on forever away. You know. There's so much happening because you know. The FREMONT CLOSED DOWN. Well not close down but both Fremont and sparks Nevada of like. They're working on skeleton. Crews this is going to. This is going to be sort of the situation for at least week's here. The question for me. It brings up the question of are they still building superchargers or is that work also on hold. Well we heard Buffalo. New York is going to be making respirators but does that mean they're not making they're not using the same line like so the way that they're they're actually using a whole new space in the Buffalo Factory to build respirators they were like plotting out. I saw a photo can't remember where it was but there were. There was an open area and they were plotting out where a new assembly line was to go because this is a vastly different item. You know the the respirators aren't very big So they weren't using taking that over but I don't know if they're just not building any of the superchargers stuff at the moment. Either I know that Nevada's mostly closed as well so any work. That was being done there but does that also mean like they're not doing any power walls did get an email about my referral power wall. What please discuss well? They sent me an email. Actually I've gotten to now that I've sort of ignored because I have no no way to deal with it at the moment. But they're like we're not installing them. We don't have the capacity to install them so if you want it we'll ship it to you but we're not installing it which I don't believe was part of the deal so the kitchen. I didn't need to content. I don't know I mean it's so big. What am I going to do with the thing? I was just GonNa do what you're doing with the with the WII and hold out a little while as long as I possibly can but Here I'll read you the email if I can get it to open on my computer. Thank you for being a tesla ambassador and helping accelerate the world's transition to sustainable energy. You've earned founder Series Power Wall through our referral program. Currently Tesla does not have the installation capacity in your area. Therefore we'd like to offer you the option of Shipping Your Power Wall and gateway to you know cost except for the five thousand dollars. It'll cost you to install it. They didn't say that were extrapolated. What they were thinking So I don't know I'm going to contact them and kind of see if I can if I wait. Are they going to install it or are they just not installing them period? I I have no idea. That's could you ask them to bolted to your so that you get another. That'd be I seven. What's your kilowatt? Tom's through like another fifty malls ranch near Cap. But I don't know because it's probably pretty heavy so probably takes fifty takes a little bit range away. Plus it's not car battery cells is different chemistry. I don't think you really thought this through Well look I'm the first to admit to think that Powell Walter. Model three is the best idea just signed but anyways I just think everybody that's ever bought and their vehicle using our referral codes very appreciative. Very excited to eventually have this. Power Wall installed. So we'll go from there. We go ahead go ahead finish. I was just GonNa say just in terms of general. I was wondering if you if you've been stalled long enough for you to get super charger. Update that'd be great. We love each other and know each other so let me do. Let me give you the super charger. Update the I think the indicators are that yes things as far as power as far as superchargers go are starting to slow down because the number of permits is very low compared to construction and open superchargers which is typically not this. They don't have this ratio boy since we last gathered on the eighth of May may March since the eighth of March. How many new open superchargers do you think we have to three on? You can add those together and then at twenty on top of it. Five Eighty five busy mel. I mean not mel but Tom could do map quickly. And then when it comes to construction How many do you think we got all park to seventeen well if you had together? You're still short twenty five under construction. Wow Twenty five and twenty five. Yeah and permit is only seven. Which is you know not to be unexpected. I imagine that even a Tesla worked out the sort of like online permitting process. I don't think the people who are paying attention to all its stuff are GONNA be You know pushes paperwork through or making approvals that much. Although I don't know a lot of construction I think is continuing at least around. The buildings are still building. Roads are still being resurfaced. People just keeping their distance but they're continuing to do the work and Got classified as An essential what is it cool. I didn't remember the word. Essential Service so construction is continuing whether you think that's appropriate or not it's continuing. I think it's appropriate. Somebody asked me about that today and I do think it's appropriate because we're a lot of places have such a housing shortage to begin with. I think as long as the construction workers are being careful. Yeah I agree and I round me. There's probably I think something on the Order of twelve hundred units being constructed right now. All within like six block radius alert live. So you know that's not your city where they're putting up tall tall buildings but that's pretty impressive amount of construction. We definitely need it bad for so many people who are out on on the roads right now. They're restaurant is closed. They don't have work or their businesses on hold because they don't have a not able to be open but we're definitely going to need to stack from this may take a while but we can't just stop everything with have to do it with logic and consideration for what the real risks are when it comes to spreading corona virus. We should end it here again. I don't want it to be a bit current events. But how can it not be a bit so we could talk about a Hawaii battery storage? That's in in the offing. You could talk about. How big that puppy is that thing dropped it in their bidding so basically Tesla. This is an electric article from Fred. Lambert of course and Tesla's bidding to build one of the largest batteries in the world. Two hundred and forty four mega packs. Mega Pack is three megawatt hours of storage so that makes it eight hundred plus eight hundred and ten megawatt hours in Hawaii on Oahu in a valley which. I'm not going to try to pronounce because they don't want to do it for Coca Cola. I knew we would have to be do something inappropriate. Yes KOCI VALLEY ON OAHU. And it's GonNa have a what two hundred forty four so let's just hope they can continue to make these battery packs somewhere. I don't know they're not. I don't believe that Nevada's open either. So everything's Kinda slowing down now. I think Nevada is opened or they just had one person test positive. I thought Nevada was only twenty five percent or something of capacity. I don't know how open I know it's open what's interesting in this article is if you look at the signs of the power plant. That's already there the size of the power pack setup that they're planning it's just a fraction of the Science. I they last like maybe a ten footprint so it takes up so much less days and you know the power that the source of the power whatever that may be solar panels or it's going to be these. Big Giants smokestacks can apply. It looks like it may be part of a natural gas. Plant is what it looks like. This is going to be six times bigger than the South Australian battery backup thing but when they call the biggest battery in the world. What does that mean? What's the largest battery in the world in South Australia right now? Then California is about to take over Iran Monterey Bay. This one is going to be about the same so as I'm not exactly sure heddle pan in Monterey Bay might be actually bigger than this but they competing for the biggest story. I think functionally right now. Today is still the biggest and this is going to be six. Bigger two hundred to three hundred million dollars. That is impressive. I agree they need to put some the need to put some renewable energy around it. There's nothing like right now. The photo that's on the electric article is is of another power plant with this power. Plant this these batteries. These mega batteries on the sides tournament is really important. So these batteries are really good to stabilize the grid. The instant on instant off but we also need to now pal them with wind and solar and other stuff and I don't know in that article I remember reading that in. Say you know as Maui. Putting lots of solar panels collided this Kawhi put a big soul. Afam and then a big battery pack but Maui. It's not clear that this is linked to renewable energy. It's more just for stabilizing the grid. So so here's what it says actually about that. So the goal is to provide both load shifting services and create backup power to its electric so load shifting means it stores energy during periods of low customer demand for use during the high demand and then this type of B. E. S. S. They call it enables the grid to accommodate more renewable sources so this will allow them to eventually add more wind add more solar wallet displaces. Thermal generation so. This is a lot like everything we talk about. When it as it pertains to Tesla's rate as the grid gets cleaner the batteries are cleaner so this this is about the one of the few sort of energy plants you can build that over time gets cleaner based on. What's feeding into it? So that's how I like that description thome. You did a very good description. Thank you very much. We also talk about autopilot to it's about to go through a A transformation we're bit to get some updates yet please discuss. Yeah so soon. I don't know when but soon probably by the time we record the next show the people who have autopilot while latest version which is coming out of the. It's going to be twenty. Twenty eight is going to see our traffic lights and stop signs and the car is going to slow before a traffic light. It doesn't matter what color the light is green orange or red and it's going to slow visiting. You're not a pilot. It's going to slow before a stop sign and see your confirmation as to whether to go through it or to stop so either touch the accelerator on the break. And this is sort of like a pre learning before rollout of this intermediate range of autopilot already have the slow speed autopilot. Which is summoned? That would be in a parking lot or your driveway. And we have high speed autopilot. Which is well proven on freeways to you know quite a stress. Seder might use it all the time and this is the middle ground. What what happens between the highway and the parking lot? An doniger excited to see this come. So can you explain when you said something about the Stop Signs? Yes that when you get to a stop sign. It's going to ask you whether or not it wants you to run it or it's going to stop and then ask you win. It should go so my understanding is when it's placed when your car is in auto pilot and you have full. Self-driving not you tom but Tom Melania Hubby I know you don't get to be a Guinea pig Dan so while my car is in full. Self-driving autopilot alternative. On as I leave it on driving on city streets as it comes to a stop sign or it comes to a traffic signal the car will hesitate as I approached the intersection and either will stop. Even if even if the the traffic lights are green it will stop. I confirm that it should go through it so no. I'm not going to run traffic lights or stop signs to really F- with the Tesla programmers. Does that would definitely do you. Guys feel like that makes any sense to put something like that into action. Well evidently they need this to kind of further the learning of the auto pilot program. I feel like they should at least pay me like an hour hourly wage to teach their kind of gig like I should get like. Ucla costs or something. The bottom line is a state they don't have to. How many of US constantly provide Tesla with bug reports when the autopilot does silly and stupid things You know it's all free and we pay to be doing right seven grand that's you do. I don't that's the bonus of not having it I don't have to pay for it. Haven't like forty percent of Tesla owner paid for full self driving like even multiple times sixty six percent of the people in this phone. Call currently have excellent press two times. It's easy when the math is like very basic. I can look very impressive but if you start to throw some algorithms in front of me we'd have some problems and I mean very quickly. We would have some problems. I'm curious now. Are you going to engage this? Drive your car. Be Engaged in autopilot on traffic on non highway streets and help train it yet. I have two types of driving one is got stuff to do driving and then there's one I hope it will test the route so yeah I will engage it at times and help teach the that will eventually take over and become all sorts and Egger and come to my house and kill me and there are other times. I just need to go to the store. Although those times of going to the store much less than they used to be yes media picks all right. So I'll do. I started the fourth season of Westworld. I could not wait to see. I didn't watch the whole like whatever I just watched big. Give you all of the previous issues that you need to be up with when you start watching your good. I'm two shows in. That's all there is right now and let it let it could Tiger king check it out. Ozark I'm about to start tonight and I re watched the favourite which was a very interesting intrigue a mind bending kind of like Who's out to get whom he was a really good movie. I really liked it. I think it was done so well. And there's just so much good stuff out there definitely saving grace for quarantine for my part. I have been Jumanji just for total silliness was good. Not Great Nine hundred seventy nine. It was excellent and I'm rewatching the second season westworld before I watch the final season of worst will because I want to get myself rainer into and Oh and I'm listening to Foundation Trilogy Isaac Asimov. It's actually in the trilogy goes. It was so successful. He went on and did more. But the trilogy is key. So I'm listening to that on audio books and it's going to become an apple TV event thing. It's it's outstanding. Let me just say mix media? Pigs media picks media picks. How did we ever forget? Media picks all I do is watch media So movie Netflix. Hell OR HIGH WATER WAS JEFF. Bridges an excellent bank robbery flick and haven't seen it yet but the new season ozarks dropped. And you know that is going to be good so otherwise you know. Read a book stand on your patio drive one hundred miles out of the city and standout breathe by yourself. You can go outside just dude alone. So do you WANNA ended here boys. I think feel feel the need to move on. Thanks for doing this. I think we did. This is a public service thing. I think we did this because we needed to get together. I think we did this because one day. I've always felt that we look back in time. We think about the second war the first World War. The pandemics like nothing. Big like that happened to us. But we're in the middle of this thing. We're in the middle of something that when we're old if we're lucky enough to get old we can look back and say that defined our generation and we want to sort of be part of that but what does that mean like in some ways because its defining every one of these generations that are currently alive right but I get my head around it. I can't get my head around this into later. I mean I lived through wielded through but I remember being a dock at the beginning of the HIV epidemic. Going to work and seeing all these people with HIV. And not knowing if I was going to get it and I didn't really understand how impactful it wasn't until years later and like I live through that sometimes it's too much to process and I think right now. It's a bit too much purse years from now. We're GONNA look like Damn. We lived through a global pandemic. Yeah I don't know what to say if you're having a hard time sort of getting your head around this. I think that's normal. It's it's a little hub to get your head around now for sure. I was looking at some of the literature that came out. After the nineteen eighties loom MIS identified Spanish flu pandemic and how society adjusted and changed. And that that's fascinating. That's could look that up with Google just to see how society changed people's attitudes changed and you know we're in for some changes definitely even beyond what we're feeling right now. I think being resilient taking care of yourself. Don't forget to get some exercise. Don't forget to eat well. Don't drink too much alcohol as I finish my good. I'd say that she didn't tonic and And and don't forget to laugh enjoying herself can't all be they can't all be. It's GonNa be a while it's going to be. This is the public service announcement. It's going to be months months and months. And then it's not going to be over even then we're GonNa have to flatten the curve a couple of times but we can get through this and so. He's a trivial pursuit question. Where did the Spanish flu originate in Virginia? Kansas Kansas okay. I knew it was a military recruit camp. That's a kind of a crazy thing as we think about the Spanish flu it actually originated in Kansas in military institution world. These guys were training to go to war to fool wall. And these pathologist Dec- this bizarre pneumonia that they couldn't really work out then. The troopship dumped a Europe. They spread it to the other troops that were in Europe and then it probably underwent a little mutation. It came back to the states in the rest of the world and it's called Spanish fluid because Spain wasn't actually involved in the war and every other country the US and Germany and Great Britain all these countries that are in the war didn't WanNa talk about this flu because that made them look week at a time of war but Spain and Public Health Service said like my God. We've got flu everywhere and people are doing so it became known as the Spanish flu because they reported on it so interesting. History history is fascinating visit. History is interesting and we are going through a pandemic and there hasn't really been a pandemic like this in over one hundred years we've had some terrible bowler outbreaks. H One n one APP breaks SARS. Moore's but this one is bed ladies and gentlemen boys girls feel good. Oh feel bad about it. This is the worst pandemic one hundred years. But we're going to get through it all right. Excellent thank you. Thank you for everything you're doing now. Thank you for being on frontline. Thank you for looking after the patients. I'm going to go to take up the retired coat and put off put on a white coat. I'll be back there with my brother real soon. If poopie hits the fan here in California which we think is a better we too away. I look forward to be safe out there. Listen Gentlemen Boys and Girls Destler? It's over. It's the pandemic edition on on a coal. We're going to call it something else. We're GONNA have to call it. The why stress I episode. We've ever done completely remotely. Is it true I believe never done? We've never done one. Where all the remote Zuma edition you? You've forced me into the side room. Which was sort of like a remote show but this is the most remote show we've done. What about the show where I was sleep deprived and had too much to drink and we could use? That was a terrible. That was their welcome. We didn't affect the recording like in various hotels like in Denver I recorded show in Sacramento. Recruited shove neither courses in Chicago. But I don't think all three of us have ever been removed because even Mel's not technically in his studio. I'm not in the studio. We shuttle Studio Dan. I'm in home. It's crazy but isn't gentlemen boys and girls. It's talking test the we're not there that often right now but we'll be back soon out care yourselves.

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Season 3 - Episode 36

They Walk Among Us

55:20 min | 1 year ago

Season 3 - Episode 36

"Now, everyone g too overwhelming demand. We have added another date to our listener meter ups in July with the generation Y podcast. The event will be held at loves company in London on the evening of Monday, July eighth entries free, but limited and tickets will be available on Saturday. March sixteenth at six PM Greenwich. Meantime, from below to- dot Kodo UK that's beyond. I double L E. Double T, O dot co dot UK. The tickets were gone within twenty minutes when the first two days were released. So make sure you set a reminder, we will be posting direct links for tickets thraw social media accounts on Saturday March sixteenth. So make sure you a following us. If you want to come along. Thanks. We look forward to seeing you there. Three episode fetchy six they will come on us a podcast dedicated to UK true crime. Torelli ad free access to episodes. Visit patriotic dot com for would slash. They will come on us. Listen to question is advised. This episode contains adult themes and descriptions that some listeners my find distressing. fifties. Short twenty mile two lane motorway connects the five just north of Cheltenham and Gloucester westbound toward Simmons e Atta the Welsh border. The small rule stretch sits across three Midland counties. Worcestershire Gloucestershire and Harith achier just before sunset on Saturday. June nineteenth nineteen Eighty-eight a local patrol costs slowed as it traveled expound along the m fifty motorway walking along the hard shoulder was a young girl carrying a baby. The officer pulled in August. If the girl was alright eleven year old Georgina explained that she was looking for all the system are- that call had burnt down a little web the road and Maria left us the emergency phone some time ago, but she had not come back the officer land that thirteen month old baby was the young girls nephew Mark that Georgina sister twenty two year old Marie was seven months pregnant the officer put the children safely in his vehicle. Untold them. To wait while he went to look for her walking on foot back to marines Morris. Marina Coupet, the officer found no sign of Marie where the card been pulled over onto the hard shoulder. Those no sign of her along the Virgil further along the emergency phone, but the latch on the cool books was open, and the receiver was dangling from its core is if it had just been in use the officer, then issued a radio message relaying to headquarters that a woman was possibly missing. that morning Saturday June nineteenth nineteen Ninety-Eight Marie sets out from the family home in Worcester with a thirteen month old baby Mark for family day that we're going to visit her husband Adrian twenty seven. It was a carpenter an army volunteer. He was on a territory Alami weekend instructing group of army cadets in the forest of dean is Simmons yet just a few miles shy. The Welsh boulder on the way, Marie picked up a little sister. Georgina from parents. So she could join the the three of them drive to see drian. I'm they left before sunset Maria former nurse only recently, gotta license was still a nervous driver on the way to Worcester. She wanted to take the country roads, avoid the m fifty miles away. But she got lost aronie option was to get back to the fifty where she would at least know the route as dusk fell on the m fifty near lead burry, the oil warning Lloyd on the marina began flashing and the car broke down on the hard shoulder realizing that the emergency phone was seven hundred yards behind them Murray told Georgina to stay in the car with Mark. White for her to come back at seven thirty seven. PM Marie made a coal to emergency services explained that she had broken down was heavily pregnant Maria the parade to phone her parents said they could come. And collect the children Murray was put on hold marines mother on the parade is call an explained that her husband Marie father was out fishing and had the family car. The operator tried to get Marie back on the line. But oh, she could hear was the sound of traffic. The operator began cooling out MRs Wilkes, MRs Wilkes. She tried again. But Murray was gone five minutes after this last call the police officer found Georgina walking the heart show though with Mark. Dod marine may be missing the cooler Perata huddle ready dispatched roadside assistance, do gene. Explain the two couplets stope to few minutes earlier to check on her a Marineland way to a service station up the road tool so cool for help with marine missing full further. Police cars were dispatched to the scene to begin a ground. Such a cool was then placed back to Marie mother. He was given the news Todd daughter possibly disappeared while on the phone to the emergency services marines mother than gave a description of her daughter on the pink white maternity dress that she had been wearing that day. Just after eight pm around twenty minutes after the cool the search to find Marie began mohel was cool to the scene and soon over fifty officers, including tracking Dokes began a larger scale such a helicopter arrived overhead. Using thermal imaging, but was unable to find any sign of Marie police on foot explored the steep embankment while the scout the ground on their hands and knees. Eight twenty PM marines mother was telephoned again. But by this time already desperate police had still not heard from her seven months pregnant with a second child. Marie Wilkes had completely disappeared from the roadside. After the rush of the initial information was gathered, and it became known that the emergency phone operator retired the sound of traffic, a male voice, and then the sound of a car driving away with no sign of Marie in the vicinity assert track to be postponed late that night to be resumed. First light. The following morning and nationwide. Search from are- had begun with the disappearance heating headlines across the whole of Britain the hunt for Marie was led by west mercy. As detective chief superintendent David Cole on the ground when the sun rose more offices dogs and search and rescue once again dispatched combing the area in search of any sign of Marie. The first thing crime scene officer detective Sergeant David Periton found was that the emergency cool books had spatters of blood across it. This was the moment of the search for a missing woman a possible abduction even shifted up. Again. The now had every reason to believe that Marie was severely hurt. A worse. the day ended. No closer to finding Marie. Body after noon police were following up. Seventy five possible sightings one was called in by the editor of the news. You've been on the fifty motorway the previous evening and it seen a heavily pregnant woman standing with a man near a light colored old looking car the location of marines disappearance. Maurice family distraught. Parents Terry and Sylvia with trying to stay positive for Georgina as well as Maria three other sisters. Adrian was insured and along with the family and police made an appeal to the public for help. He said can only appeal to whoever my have her for the sake of humanity to let go I just want to home. She has a baby he needs to the reason why she would have gone off in left our baby a Canadian magin someone has taken her away. I know of no reason why she should disappear. There has been no trouble at time. We will looking forward to a third anniversary on Wednesday, and we counting the days to the birth of our new baby who in their right mind would want to take away pregnant woman. After being almost if he feared Marie may not be found alive detective chief superintendent, David Cole responded. I think that is a possibility we might have to consider she could be anywhere in the country. Boy now. This is Wilkes was travelling along the m fifty on Saturday evening when her com broke down between Tewkesbury and Gloucestershire. She went to phone the police from an emergency call box, but halfway through the phone call something happened. And by the time police arrived, they found no sign of the heavily pregnant woman on the phone receiver was dangling from the set. Police are following up. Seventy five reported sightings, including one from a man who says he saw a pregnant woman making a phone call while a car was parked nearby with a man inside after Marie walked to the phone books. Too cool for help she left her son, Mark and younger sister Georgina in the car when she didn't return Georgina grew concerned so picked up her nephew and went to look for her role. The sister way too. The phone turning done. I looked in the box to see to it. Her to win it. So I won't back down. Heartily spotting Georgina and Mark on the roadside a man with ginger hair and his family pulled over and Austria, gene. Or if she needed help. Got car. I'm t- asked me. Let the boss, and I said pudgy note because my sister went to teddy paintbox too. Then he asked me to respond. I said, no, I looked in the boot. And he looked beat. Beat the police know that the family stopped at the next service station under rain for a breakdown truck to go back to the Wilkes broken down car, and they're appealing to the family to come forward. Mrs Wilkes has now been missing for two days and police believe it's increasingly likely that she's been -ducted at a press conference this afternoon. Her husband Adrian was too upset to talk. But her father, Terry golf made this emotional appeal to appeal to ginger. Three. Com. We'd any nation there about soon Georgia Mark anything to help. The course, please. Fun. And if you'll do is watching now, what would you say come on? Come on. There's no problem. That's too too. So. Adrian Wilkes would like to regret to an interview. He spoke about how he was coping an appealed for witnesses to come forward to the moment is really. Got to me yet. Family Remy supporting people with me. And then the notes home home own. It's all. And then I'll find big old mission. More lewis. Do you think you will be able to rely on some neutral you nations both so's family Marie? So young family. Very, very helpful. Very good support to me. I'm most. How is he's fine. He's fallen. It's been looked after very well. And he's just falling. In fact, he's been he's better than it has been for the last couple of weeks. Do you think that having after him his health, you do the nasty James? Gotta be author country bids restraint reloaded. I mean, he's only got me. So. Not just gotta carry on the best most yourself. I've been coping we got a few rumors saying on under sedation of not I've not seen a doctor. I am perfectly. Okay. Just slowly come into terms. With the positional all our can say if there is some just please think about it. And just think just how can just come forward and let somebody know that we have traced to person responsible. This crowing. The media hustling Rangers interview, not only that gives everybody a chance, and it may just help to some there. We remember something just any little thing. Then they will come forward. Funky to hundreds of people found in little bits of information all the support from neighbors friends and the colleagues from the air force and the army they've been a great support. And thank you very much. Thank you, very. Police worked on the numerous sightings of Murray, a man and a silver gray car building a picture of what they believed had happened. That main focus, however was on three sightings in particular at the time of marine emergency cool. Mr Hughes was traveling the same direction as Maria. Neom. Fifty the and is guilt. Friend miss Bailey. So what they thought was a silver Reynaud twenty five on the hard shoulder and the pregnant woman nearby the stood out to Mr Hughes because soon after the couple were overtaken at high speed by the same silver gray car before it disappeared after site he recalled, but the registration number began with C seven. It was then the tune off duty police officer inspect a p Clark was also traveling the same route with his wife the couple past Murray's parked car and sore. Georgina. Mark as they drove by a silver, gray. Kost suddenly appeared on the road in front of them which not been there before Peter Clark assumed that this car just done a u-turn in front of him crossing over the central reservation from the other side of the motorway will vote today. We have barriers which stop drivers making u-turns back then on the fifty. This was possible. Inspect to Clark recall that the car had four doors and see registry Shen cronk than overtook the silver car looked over to see a man with yellow blond hair, driving alone. It was wearing a blue and white shirt and had clothing hang behind him in the car Clark and his wife, then passed pregnant woman standing by the emergency telephone when he looks back into his review mirror. He could see the silver gray car. Pull up beside the woman this inspect to Clark kept driving. Less than fifteen minutes later, another witness, Mr. Farrell, sewer, stationary, silver, grey, Reynaud, three miles further up. The fifty it had reversed up behind the crash barrier. A number of other witnesses reported the car at this location. Some saying the bony took the car was up, and he's hazards were on. The following morning. Two days after Marie disappeared last witness, Mr. Farrell met with two constables and together, they drove to the place. He had seen the car the spot one of the detective constables notice the skit Mark on the haunt shoulder around twenty feet loan behind the barrier that was a gross verge leading to a steep embankment tattoo view of the road around fifteen feet down the embankment in a flattened part of the undergrowth they spotted the lifeless body of a pregnant woman. No one had any doubt who it was. When the crime scene officers arrived, they discovered Marie along with a run born by Marie was covered in blood from a stab wound on a neck. She had suffered a broken jaw either from an assault or struggle. And there was a question raised as to whether it could have occurred on her descent down the Bank -ment. The body lie against a granite Roque and under harassment hand with three coins. No blood was found on the motorway all the hard shoulder but down the grossing Bank meant for bloodstains were found in diagnosed line indicating she may have been rolled or thrown down after being stabbed. Crime scene officer detective Sergeant David Periton the same officer who located the blood on the cool books believe that the blood have been pouring from Maria the time of going down the embankment is opposed to spurting splashing and where marines body lay allowed you mount of blood pulled. It was his belief. She had been at least injured at the cool books and possibly beaten and stabbed in the car before the killer dumpster, the bloodstains name Bank leading to believe her fatal wound which hit her jugular vein was not inflicted where her body lay upon the road the skid marks matched the witness sightings of the car parked behind the crash barrier. But they found no time marks which would have helped them identify the vehicle. This indicated that the car either had bright trouble will both tires. With the lean formation at timed police. Believe Marie was killed and dumped within fifteen minutes of making the cool to emergency services. But that was one lingering question. Why would anyone wants a mad or a heavily pregnant woman? Marie didn't know prior that she would be making an emergency. Stop it appeared to be purely opportunistic killing. News broke of the death on the Adrien Marie would have celebrated the third wedding anniversary. In support the Worcester. Evening news on the Hera foot in Worcester on me could it full set up the Marie Wilkes family appeal fund. Sees police Gutu cool from an apparition with high company a man had returned to silver grey Austin moisture over the weekend. When the call was returned to the dealership, the owner found blood on the inside of the vehicle the man who leased the car was pulled in a mmediately for questioning by detectives. After several hours of interrogation. He was let go after it was established that his friend who was a passenger in the higher suffered a perforated drum which bled onto the interior by the driver. And the passenger cleared the press continuously reported on the mud women fit driving alone. And they were very few details being provided by police on Friday, June twenty full for Newcastle journal reported the tonight's him of Murray's do I repaired to be missing which raises the question of whether it wasn't just a murderer on the loose, but a sex attacker as well west Missy police assured the public that will be puzzling. That was no indication that Marie had been sexually assaulted by the Friday announced his impression of the Blundell yellow head man seen both in his car. Ran walking alone. The haunt showed. With Marie was released to the public. It was described as white within shock features a pronounce chin an a long thin knows. He was likely in his twenties. And of a young ish appearance is head was cut in the molten style blunt short and spiky with possible yellow or orange highlights use of a smart casual appearance zero on his way to a night out. And finally, the man was believed to have been wearing a blue and white striped t shirt with dark or Royal blue trousers or jeans detective chief superintendent, David Cole made a public statement that this man was not just a person who may help police with their enquiries. This man was a suspect. Ever wondered what it's like to be lost? In the African jungle forest is amazed down to explore untouched. Caves and understand how intensely nature impacts our human experience. Something has changed in the BBC podcast. A brand new podcast telling stories of human experience. Incredible blue water with the wonders of the natural. On a cast apple podcasts school wherever you get your podcasts. A week to the day after the murder. Police cordoned off part of the m fifty and questioned around four thousand motorists in the hope of finding someone who would take in the same route the week before then policewoman tearing green help stage reconstruction dressed in a similar pin can whites maternity dress. The officer walked the route Maria taken stood at the cool books for two hours hoping to joke. Someone's memory unprecedented. Felice operation on the quietest motorway in the country involved a hundred and fifty officers from three four this in the space of two hours around four thousand votes Ruth was salts and quizzed about their whereabouts the week ago police road checks with setup at every junction. Police also say the chilling reconstruction of Laurie's lost moments before her death base. Marina was parked on the hard shoulder. Warning lights flashing in the exact spot where broke down seven hundred yards further along the motorway at the emergency telephone where the killer struck twenty seven year old policewoman tearing green played the part of Marie W P C green was chosen because of striking resemblance to Marie clearly visible for several hundred yards in each direction with a constant stream of traffic. Speeding by presence. Made it all the more incredible. No one's soul. The moment. Marie was attacked. But superintendent Jones says last night exercise could prove crucial could be extremely important. If new information comes to light it's affected only yesterday, a new witness came forward as a result of the crash someone who's being on the crucial evidence to give Nicole that was six days after the event, they a witness to comply with an e we all now seven days, the end of issues awardee thing, perhaps there are other. Witnesses that we will trace come forward. Chief and spanks Ken craned already been busy tracing every silver or gray Reynaud twenty five with a registration beginning with c or c seven four hundred seventy nine calls matching the description had been cleared because being accounted for else when the full hundred nineteenth was registered to woman living not far over the Welsh border in tree. Okay. Mid Gle Morgan the whereabouts of that particular vehicle that evening was unconfirmed. When tracing the car investigators found that the owners husband was last seen in mid Glamorgan at six forty pm that evening an hour before Marie made the cool. This man was then matched to a tip off the come in amounted cooled police stating that his work colleague match the composite drawing of the suspect. He had a history of. Violence and access to a Reynaud twenty five. at the time. The reconstruction was taking place police were ready on the title of Welshman, Ed Wood oh in Browning. The thirty six year-old ex-soldier nightclub bounce of regularly drive is wives. Come father of a young daughter. He had sure cropped yellow blunt and resemble the composite drawing too closely to ignore. According to Browning, the often noon of June nineteenth he had been drinking and off the full points. He had a row with his wife. He then telephoned his friend Carrie Evans in Aberdeen Scotland to say he was going to drive up and see Evans would like to say he suggested Browning take the fifty. Browning them visited his father in porritt. Who'll so told him to take the fifty six thirty PM at would Browning hung up clean shirts behind the driver's seat and go to into his wife silver of Renna twenty five, but he shooed police the did not take the fifty. Instead, he decided to take a longer less direct route over the seven bridge onto the five the six and then on to Scotland he claimed the after spending the night visiting Carey Evans, he returned to Wales the same way under no circumstances was he anywhere near the m fifty and he did not kill Marie Wilkes. At the time Edward Browning was having an affair is love spoke to police and said that after ready and his wife saw given that day. He claimed that if he didn't get away from his wife Iman killer. When questioned further about the apparently explosive on commit Browning hat with his wife. Detectives learned that she too was seven months pregnant Browning was asked what he was wearing on the day and evening Marie was killed his father and wife said he was wearing a blue and white striped t shirt carry Evans said Browning arrived in Scotland wearing the same people described. A man fitting his description in a blue and white striped t shirt on the m fifty but it would Browning denied owning such a t shirt to toll. This teasha was never a covered and the Paris stone wash jeans. He was wearing that day. Also, never made it back home from the trip Browning said he put them in a skip because they were torn Winona if he had a butterfly knife believed to be the murder weapon Browning denied owning one people close to him confirm that he did. And he had been seen with a black one two days prior to the murder carry Evans in Abidine confirmed. He spoke with branding on the phone. He had not heard from his friend in years and was surprised by the cool. He was also stunned that Browning said he was going to visit him immediately. Rounding drove over five hundred miles to visit heavens arriving off to six AM the following morning. He stayed for eleven hours before he drove high. Any Browning married? He's been wife. You'll ready had a long standing reputation in the valleys. He was the eldest of five good looking boys. And he was popular with the ladies a balancer at the time. They met you've been married before. But his violent tendencies ended that marriage only a few weeks in after having a daughter the peg got engaged in the wedding was planned, but Browning was arrested for aggravated burglary. According to his record. He'd been charged with over twenty burglaries in the area with a gang of seven of men breaking into an teak stools businesses as well as several homes the aggregate part of the charge came from the possession of a revolve around. Munition the Browning was sent to have had an fired after one of the burglaries. So was the wedding approached eighty was on Ramon ding colored if prison, but he promised he would be at the ceremony on the big day. He arrived at the registry office, which was just outside the prison gates. He stood by his bride wearing handcuffs with fellow inmates. Stunning in his best, man. The mother of the bride's spent the wedding in. Tis the end of I t to Browning was convicted of twenty counts of provided burglary and sentenced to seven years in prison. When sentencing Browning, the judge said you clearly the ringleader during the trial, you'll dominance over the others in the dock was apparent. I regard you as determined dangerous criminal while in jail a dispute with another inmate ended in Browning pushing him down a flight of stairs with a broom. Five years later. It would Browning was released from prison. So on June twenty fifth nineteen eighty eight a week after the murder and around the same time, the reenactment was taking place police quietly approach to social club in Petra walked in and arrested Eddie Browning for the murder of Marie Wilkes. He was interviewed for over two days before formal murder charges were laid. This news broke of the charges Browning then in custody in Worcester was placed in a lineup and the witnesses brought in but no witness picked Edward Browning from the lineup. It would be for a month after her death. The marines funeral would be held at Worcester cathedral. It was at the service that one hundred mourners learn that marina were expecting another boy a knighthood already chosen to name him Antony. The Marie Wilkes family appeal fund set up in her Rana, but Ray sixteen thousand pounds. It would be used to help pay drian. I'm baby market back on their feet. And by the end of that year, the fund would increase to thirty six thousand pounds. The waiting trial Browning went on hunger strike in prison. The home of fish was refusing to relocate him from remind in Birmingham to close to hyme in Cardiff. A year in full months after Meri's mudder at would Browning's metro began Shrewsbury crown Colt throughout the twenty six days. Maurice family and friends were heavily represented in the courtroom Browning pleaded not guilty counsel for the prosecution and Finney palm QC alleged the Browning lied. When suggesting that he never took the m fifty that day the theory was that after having an explosive argument with his seven months pregnant wife Browning fled to Scotland along the way still angry and under the influence of alcohol. The notoriously violent Mansour heavily pregnant woman on the side of the road and became enraged again. This was they believed a murder of opportunity an a moment of complete Shawn's palm claimed the tone the evening of marines murder. It would Browning. Driven pasta reshi stood stranded at the cool books seen after he made you turn on the motorway driving back pastor again on the other side, followed by yet another u-turn in order to pull up alongside her is they recuperated all of the sightings of the silver Reynaud twenty five driven by man fitting Browning's description on the road as well as pong near Marie. The theory was that Browning than -ducted Marie injuring her at the scene. Putting renews car and then driving nearly three miles up the road where he beater stopped her in the neck and dumped her down in Bank -ment. Three main witnesses took the stand Mr Hughes who together with his girlfriend soul, the car and man parked on the haunt shoulder next to the pregnant woman. It was Mr Hughes then saw the vehicle overtake him at speed again when he knows the c seven registration plate off duty. Police inspector Clark who suddenly saw the Renault twenty five with a C registration appear in front of him causing him to infer. The you turn to speed. It was also inspect Clark he made the physical description of Browning and sue him in his review Mira pull up to the cool box. With Marie standing the. And finally missed a barrel. You saw the silver Reynaud parked behind the crash barrier. The location marines body was found. Browning acknowledge for the cool. The registration number of his wife, silver, Reynaud twenty five with C seven five four the AD Browning's fath Arriva took the stand as a witness for the prosecution he told the court the winner Diaz Tim the best route to Scotland he told him the n fifty when cross examined about the conversation with his father Browning said he had no recollection of any such discussion the total loss of memory on the subject, but the crown had gathered evidence to support the theory that he had not taken the route. He argued he had C C TV footage. You've been pulled from the seven bridge over the entire period. Carrie Evans, Browning's friend from Scotland also took the stand as a crown witness Evans, confirm that Browning arrived at his place in Abidine around six thirty AM on the Sunday morning. Evan said the first thing he noticed was thousands of flies on the front of the car. He then noticed a smudge of blood around three to four inches in diameter on the Renos Rin near nearside Wheelock after Oscar Browning what it was from. He was told that he must have hit an animal on the road. But Evans felt the blood was too high up to have been from a bird or rather road. Kill it was strange enough for him to have questioned it at the time the following morning Browning of bucket of soapy water and a cloth and spent funk to ten minutes cleaning is calm. Browning denied that the incident occurred Evans, believe Browning had been drinking. But according to Browning you'd only consume Leukocyte. Though Evans had not seen would Browning for some time. He noticed that he was not very talkative with Evans making most of the conversation during the eleven hour. Visit he believes the Browning appeared worried about the argument with his wife one of Browning's brothers. Also took the stunned and confirm that after the media frenzy of a silver gray Reynaud twenty five is accused brother at mentioned that for financial reasons. Possibly to get insurance money. He was thinking of burning the calm. after presenting the witness accounts, the clothing timelines, and they believe motive for the murder. The crown spoke of the theory that Browning had killed marine the calm before dumping her down Bank, -ment bloodmarks and traces have been found in on the Renai who bought two of the marks are not visible to the naked eye. The defense focus their attention on this aspect for their final address, Mr. Jones Griffith Williams QC for the defense. Argued the Browning went to such trouble to clean, the blood off the rear wheel arch. Then why did he leave to highly visible marks behind for a week? You. So all if Marie was beaten so for Roche Asli in the back of the car, then why was there? No bloodstains found even if the seats will meticulously cleaned blood traces would have remained the defense. Adjusted the Browning arrived in EPA dean, wearing the same t shirt and jeans left in these had no blood on them when questioned as to whether he could have worn spec. Close from the com- the defense hit back saying the Evans had confirmed. The shirts were still hanging in the back. So how could he have changed Browning? Denied owning the stripe teasha tool together. It was never located along with the jeans. He had put in the skip. The different scrutinize the apparent skidmarks left at the location marines found tarmacs, but was brought in who stated the day after his analysis of the scene on the silver red, I twenty five it was his opinion that the skid Mark did not come from Browning's vehicle. In his defense at would Browning told the court, I did not murder. Marie wilkes. I had no occasion to murder. Marie. I did not and could not have murdered Marie? At the conclusion of the trial. The judge Mr Justice turn of reminded the jury that they chose to convict Browning. They must do. So with absolute certainty. He also reminded them that no witness picked Edward Browning out of the identity, right? In fact, one witness chose another man when the jury of eight men and four women returned from their deliberations Browning stood for the verdict. It was unanimous the head found Edward Browning. Guilty of the mud of Murray will. Browning was silent the Galleria rutted in applause. At sentencing Justice ton spoke to Browning. You set out to Scotland with your wife, not knowing how long you would be gone. You saw on the motorway the solitary figure of a pregnant woman whether out to spy to right, or any other reason you determined to wreak violence towards that person. It is plain you intend to tikey towns on her because she was defenseless cushy was pregnant these matters which single case out as a particularly grave one. Then ordered Browning to seven least twenty five years of a life sentence. Daydream broke down in his he described the trial is being lock another funeral. He said he in Mark could at least now move on with their lives. An attempt to put the Dale and the loss behind MAURICE father spoke of his appreciation for the public is love for Mark. And how he would now focus on helping his wife another children, including Georgina get on with their lives without fear. Numerous failed appeals threes later in nineteen ninety two so cola just mentioned something to someone to Crown Prosecution conference during the investigation of Edward Browning. She had been tossed with hypnotize ING one of the key witnesses that year, Greater Manchester. Police tasked with investigating apparent video tight which had been made of the session in nineteen ninety eight off-duty inspect to clock the witness who had given a physical description of the man driving the Reynaud. An also the evidence that the registration number began with a C possibly a C seven at undergone hypnosis in order to joke. His memory with mercy police, but withheld the videotape evidence it was never revealed to either the Crown Prosecution or the defense the reason inspect o'clock while under hypnosis described. Reynaud with chrome bumpers when Browning's vehicle had plastic bumpers you'll so gave a completely different registration number two. What he had provided previously see eight five six hike f k Browning's. Wife's registration was C seven five full the AD in the video Clark could also be seen verbally ruling out the letters v. And I. After studying the nondisclosure of the video type the investigation then found that the west mercy police force it file to act on three thousand messages that the murdering quarry team received at would Browning's murder conviction was referred back to the appeals court and in nineteen ninety four the appeal was heard. The appeal. Inspect to Pete clock describe the enormous guilty felt to a scene. Marie Wilkes by the cool box that day he had not stopped to help because he saw the silver Reynaud or any pool in when pushed he denied that his guilt and anxiety found to allow him to disclose to anyone his hypnosis session when he was put to clog, but he deliberately blanked out the evidence he gave under hypnosis never revealing. It Clark told the court that he was not true in any way. According to him only was asked to do was onto the questions that were put to him. He said he had never been advised by anyone to not reveal the hypnosis session. The senior officer responsible for the session superintendent stead men agreed that he should have taken steps to ensure that the cool was told that the video evidence. He described his actions as not in bad faith, about in retrospect, he deeply regretted not doing so. The court found that they had been in a collective ju- teen gross police failure low chief Justice Tyler who along with two other judges sat for the appeal agreed with Browning's defense counsel that had the jury been privy to this information of the trial. They could not be sure the jury would have inevitably reached the same decision. The defence described the original case against Browning as being based largely on innuendo. After three weeks of deliberation. An after serving five years of his twenty five year sentence, the appeal judges found Edward Browning's murder conviction unsafe. Maitha teen nineteen ninety four whom I six years after the murder of Murray Wilkes Ed Wood in Browning's conviction was overturned, and he was freed. I would like to say one thing for Justice for all unison people that are in prison men. Women take heart today. It proves it. If you might any burning emerged from the high cool, Tom com with his wife, Julie both of them claiming the truth was out last and calling for the release of other victims of miscarriages of Justice. And he Browning also said life behind bars had been hell physical, scarves, the mental scars live. No to start building my life back. My wife my family. We've got to start building out backup. Chief Justice spent three weeks deliberating before allowing Eddie Browning's appeal he and two other appeal judges decided they couldn't be sure the jury. The former bounces trial would have reached the same guilty. Verdict had video evidence of a police inspector with a hypnotist be made available to the court the previously. Undisclosed recording suggested Eddie Browning should have been eliminated from the original inquiry. It was conducted by West Mercia police who's deputy chief constable, David. I field said outside the court. He was disappointed with the ruling. Sutton cool listened to the gentleman. At this stage. I have to say no new lines of inquiry that army meet you be a pilot to win for the team lamps in which memories would have faded the appeal court. Judges say they would vote for a retrial. Meanwhile, Eddie Browning is advising the Wilkes family to go back to West Mercia police in search of the truth and the real killer while he returns to Wales to pick up the pieces of his life and put what he refers to as a nightmare behind him. After his release Edward Browning move to a remote farm. In nineteen ninety nine a local newspaper reported the to form a friend of Browning's been paid off twenty five thousand pounds by police following Browning's conviction. Apparently, Kenny Latin had informed police that before the arrest Browning had admitted to him that he killed Marie off the Browning accused him of the pile fund of lying. He told police that Kenny broke into the house, he shed with his wife and beat him with an iron bomb in court on charges. Kenny admitted tipping off the police, but he denied receiving payment or assaulting Browning who ended up with seven stitches. Kenny's defense accused Browning of info pointing Kenny to his home to confront him about the article and start a fight. Kenny, Latin was cleared volt charges. So where are we now? Browning? Boy, this time a divorce is ex wife and remarried he slept with a crowbar under his bed to protect them. In two thousand at would Browning was awarded six hundred thousand pounds compensation for his wrongful conviction. Via's lighter. Browning's license was revoked when he was found driving three times the legal limit in court. He claimed his drink could been spiked by friends. He was cleared unlawfully carrying knife in a public place after explaining to used it to cut hype byles and had forgotten to Tyke it out of his pocket when he left his farm that died. In two thousand tonight with Marie case, technically, regarded as unsolved murder that was talk of it being reopened the original home office pathologist, Dr Peter Ackland said that with advances in DNA technology stored blood evidence, my whole dances to what really happened, but upon re-testing nothing was found. In mighty found. The nineteen sixty three years old at would our in Browning was found dead and he's home in south. Wiles news reports stated that although sudden is death was not suspicious. between two thousand seventeen in two thousand nineteen police appealed once again to the public for information hoping that the passage of time might lead someone to come forward. The police still believe the Ted would Browning was guilty. New forensic testing once again yielded, no evidence. However, the current detective chief inspector Steve Tonks told the press. The case remains on that list of unsolved cases, unlikely lovers would be subject to continuing periodic reviews. Thanks to patriot supporters. For more information, please visit they woke among us put cost dot com. forget to preorder your copy of a new book. I woke among us chilling casebook of horrifying hometown crimes. Available on Thursday. Maitha two thousand nineteen from all good bookshops. Misconduct is a weekly podcast that looks into lesser-known crimes cold cases. Wrongful convictions miscarriages of Justice. Join me, Colleen as I take a deep dive straight into the facts and theories of new case each episode discussing stories that didn't always get the coverage that they deserved misconduct has covered episodes that will take you through. Why oakland? California's oldest cold case is still on the books or how a botched investigation let the murderer of twelve year old girl. Walk free misconduct is on apple podcasts. Spotify Stitcher or your favorite pod? Catching up. You can also find misconduct on Facebook Twitter Instagram at misconduct podcast, new episodes of misconduct are available every other Thursday. So make sure you hit subscribe. So you never miss an episode.

Edward Browning Adrien Marie Marie Wilkes murder officer Mark Murray Wilkes Ed Wood Georgina Adrian Wilkes Maria Scotland Browning Worcester Reynaud Peter Clark David Cole superintendent Marie father Greenwich
Le Show For The Week Of April 19, 2020

Le Show

56:50 min | 3 months ago

Le Show For The Week Of April 19, 2020

"It from deep inside audio device of choice I own way back selfies. Wiz The and me. So we're Months more than a month that would be months into this thing of sin at home but our loved ones and a lot of people have different ways of dealing with it. Some have cleaned or cleaned out there. long uncleaned closets and other crannies or their garages. If they're lucky to have one others have started reading those books that were piling up. I started that Still others have revived their stamp collections. I'm sure somebody has done that. A friend of mine confessed that in her. Oc Dina's she had pre prepared forty two dinners and was pulling them out of the freezer one night at a time. But what? I'm doing with a lot of my time during this. Well besides catching up on. My sleep is watching that show every night trying to figure it out you know when president trump couldn't do as rallies anymore. It was like he was he was immediately. Shot into a near Earth Orbit. With about half the oxygen he would without those rallies he's he's not nourished in the same way he takes nourishment from having others lavish crowd love on him and look. I'M NOT GONNA die. I understand the feeling I've seen it up close but so he decided to do these every night. Every evening press conferences and I understood that strategy and then I was trying to figure out what is the deal with what he's doing now superficially the premises a word we're bringing the experts Keeping up to date on all the latest information on how great we're doing but there's there's a really interesting other pattern going on. I've noticed because he comes out about the president he comes out and e I reads A statement of course never reads without interpreting some comments like very important which I think is either to personalise the text which clearly was not written by him or to give him a chance to read the next sense. Because he's not. Don't you know? This is not a character flaw. He's just not the world's best reader or second best so that statement tends to be a repetitious recitation. Thank you of what he said the day before the day before. That regarding closing the Closing off flights from China early is the most and how many deaths that saved. If you cut that number of deaths in half and then cut that number of the deaths in half again you'd still have more deaths than we lost during the civil war that that little trope has been repeated. Think three or four times this week in the opening statement. So there's a comforting sense of repetition the familiar and then there are the changeups so beginning of the week. He had total authority absolute authority over the state. And how thing is handled from here on out then next night nano. It's the governor's the next night and we're going to watch the governor's because I have the authority to over rule. Anything they do. If I don't like it and then finally at the end of the week I think the people who are protesting against the gutter governors are acting very responsibly. By the way that activity included according to the former governor of Michigan. Of course these The main protests have been in Michigan. The former governor says that some of the protesters were handing candy from there Gloved hand to the UNGLOVED hands of children. What are we tell the children your uncle Dave gave it to you? So it's the familiar and the different in stunningly quick sequence. It's rhetorical Chiaroscuro isn't it? Thank you ladies and gentlemen if I come up with any less interesting theories on the subject you. Lb and now House is a very very very fine house news of smart houses and the things that make them smart. This is a message was received by people who have smart dog feeders. Yes there are such people and I'm going to share the whole message with you because it's so damn good. Dear pet net users we're currently experiencing a service disruption affecting the connection of generation one and generation to smart feeders. See this is what happens to early. Adopters we're working with outside partners. Hopefully working inside to develop a solution that will restore your smart feeders. Unfortunately you may. Experience extended downtime as we negotiate through resource limitations affecting our partners impacted by code nineteen during this outage users may experience the following one in a bid on the inability to connect or reconnect smart feeder to WIFI inability to control smart feeder functions from the pet net APP error with pet net APP. Net App log screen and smart feeders showing white light. Indicating Smart Feeder is online. Well pet net APP shows offline. Scheduled automatic feeds should still dispense if the unit has not been powered off and of the statement conclusion. Maybe the smartest thing to do is feed your own damn pet. Hello welcome to the show. Golma way this is the goal. lasts no. I'm On sale few years ago on this program you and I I made acquaintanceship of Dr Stephanie Kelton. At the time she was one of the leading public voices for a Heterodox economic theory called modern monetary theory She's had a couple of changes of job since then she was the chief economist for the minority of tended. Budget Committee for a good long period of time and now she's professor of Economics and public policy. It's only Brook University. And we're talking today because what sounded Heterodox and weird and left field when we first discussed it. Which is the sinkhole. Modern monetary theory seems to be what's going on today. Dr Kelton. Welcome back thank you so much for having me back now. Have you taken a victory lap lately? Because we're seeing governments both in the United States in the kingdom a spring trillions of dollars through the economy various programs and The words pay for it or costing as they say in Britain are not being heard. Well you're right and there is definitely something in that that puts a spring in my step so I'm not sure I've I've taken full victory lap yet But I definitely have an extra little bounce in my In my step as a consequence of finally breaking free of this question that so dog dust for you know the the last year two thousand and nineteen of course we had a very crowded field of democratic hopefuls presidential hopefuls and at every turn no matter how big or small the proposal was. They were confronted time after time. After time with this question about how are you going to pay for it? And so what we've seen. Congress do in recent weeks is reassuring because it is evidence that Congress actually does remember how to pay for things when they feel that. There's a priority. How do you pay for them with dollars? Right yet. Turns out that it's pretty easy. Congress rights bill and appropriates funding? And that's how everything gets paid for. And that's how everything gets paid for all of the time Harry and that's frustrating. Part of this is that it's not some new thing that Congress has discovered some new power that it it granted unto itself it. Is You know a little bit like Dorothy in the wizard of Oz. You know she discovers at the end of the film film that she had the power all along and this is the same The same is true of Congress. They have always had the power to fund the things that they deem appropriate and a priority. Now as I recall our discussions because the first thing that always comes up of when this idea is is floated is inflation and why Mar and now Venezuela and as I recall our conversations and your and your writings and the writings of your colleagues The constraint is whether the nation's economic resources are fully employed both the factories and personnel. And if they're not There's plenty of room for demand and it's the new demand when all resources are already being used that inflation. Do I have that halfway right new. Have it all the way right Yeah that's that's exactly right. Congress has the power of the purse and Congress can write a budget and decide. How much money at wants to spend on education infrastructure and a variety of other things and the relevant limit when it comes to congressional spending is how safely our economy can absorb those new dollars. If the government wants to put lots of people to work rebuilding crumbling infrastructure do Medicare for all have lots more doctors and nurses. The question is always will. Does the economy have the capacity to supply those real resources to make good on that spending or is the government spending just going to compete with the private sector at for resources that are already fully employed and thereby simply produce an inflation problem bidding wars driving up prices so as long as the economy has economists might say slack as long as there unemployment as long as businesses can Respond to higher demand by producing more supply? Then you have balance in the system. And you don't get the inflict inflationary pressure. The the risk comes from excessive spending. Would you say we have slack now? Well isn't it just unreal? I mean you know that's the thing we watched sixteen million people people. I mean we see the numbers on the screen but their people and their jobs are gone and in the span of a few weeks and the the really scary thing is that we're just getting started and we're going to continue to see this. We'll see another jobs report. Come out at the end of this week and another one next week and we are not doing a very good job containing the fallout as we've pushed pause on the economy so yes is the answer. There are There are estimates that the US could end up with something like thirty percent unemployment more a higher unemployment rate than we had during the Great Depression. And so you know. We're talking about potential slack where you've got you know. Thirty percent of the labor force unemployed businesses shuttering factories closing shutting down turning off the machines. So there's going to be an awful lot of slack now from the standpoint of people who like you have been promoting this view of the economy of how the the post gold standard economy and the money system works As I say there might be some reason for if not cheering at least a sigh of relief but looking down the road we may be saying something else entirely The people who were deficit hawks for for lack of a better term have not packed their bags and gone away just yet. I don't think might they be reading themselves to say okay you had this big splurge now you must pay for it. Are we looking at a year or two from now the great austerity I? I hope not. I don't know how else to answer your question. It is definitely a risk. Those op-eds are already being penned. They've already been published. Those voices have not gone away. I think you and I in the past of talked about billionaire hedge fund manager. Peter G Peterson Who died not too long ago but the legacy is very much alive. This man left behind a fortune. And those So-called think tanks and institutes are still very much operational and those people have a job to do. Their job is to continue this drumbeat around the need to quote unquote deal with entitlements to fix the debt. Those people are out there. And you know they're getting they get quoted all the time in the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal that turned to these people and they always give them some oxygen to insert this kind of commentary into the discourse so that right now what they're saying is all right. We had that problem before. And because the corona virus we had to expand fiscal policy we had to run more deficits. We had to run bigger deficits and we get it. We had to do that. And that's going to add to the debt so once we get through this health crisis on the other side way awaits austerity. That's when we begin to go. After the deficits to begin to cut programs and their favorites are Medicaid Medicare and social security. And yes. I very much worry that there's GonNa be a battle of very live and heated that Lyon tend to participate Through through all hours of the day in that because It it's the worst possible outcome is if we come out on the other side with an economy that's already badly damaged and potentially looks like a great depression type situation and then we have you know people saying Oh. Let's try to be more like Herbert Hoover in this moment or J. Edgar. If you WANNA pick your hoover's I've always had problems and I think many people may join me in this in the conflation of the two terms debt and deficit When the federal government runs a deficit it is spending more money than it takes in. Taxation debt is when it owes money to somebody and it does that by issuing bonds are the two things necessarily Tightly locked no. They're they're tightly. Locked in the sense that we have a convention of Selling bonds when we run budget deficit so the government auctions. Us Treasuries and we we call that government borrowing and so when the government runs deficits itself treasury bonds and treasury bonds. Become part of this thing that we unfortunately refer to as the national debt so I will often tell people that you know. We do not have a deficit problem. We do not have a debt crisis. We have a communications crisis. We have a language prop. It's the words that we use to describe what's happening that gives rise to all this fear and anxiety when you use the word not you. But when we Use The word deficit that carries with it a connotation that automatically resonates with people that something improper has happened. Something turn on. Yes. Something's missing. There's a shortfall. There's somebody did something wrong if you turn on a sporting event and you're watching your team and the announcer said at halftime. Oh well if the Lakers are gonNA come back and win this. They're going to have to overcome a twelve point deficit. That's a deficit. Right you have to make up for that. And that's the way we're used to hearing that word so when somebody says. The government is running deficits people make. That's terrible thing but it's not a terrible thing because deficit is just the difference. Between how many dollars the government is spending into the economy and how many it is subtracting backout through taxation. So if they spent a hundred in and they tax ninety backout we label it a deficit and we say the government has run a deficit. We write a minus ten on the Government's ledger. What we forget is that if they put a hundred in and only swipe ninety backout then. They've made a deposit. The deficit is a financial contribution to some part of our economy. Now the question is for whom right? Who on WHO's balanced a ten dollars. Now sit and for what purpose you know. Is it a good deficit but when you mentioned the debt the debt is what happens after that after the deficits are run so now that the government has put that ten dollar deposit into the economy it matches that deficit spending by selling a US government bond called Treasury the Treasury and so they hold up this trend figuratively hold up this treasury bond and they say this is a ten dollar treasury bond this these dollars pay interest the dollars that I put into the economy? Don't pay interest who would prefer to hold these dollars the treasury's and sure enough there are people who are gladly. Give UP THEIR NONINTEREST. Bearing dollars and swap them out for a US Treasury now the government does not need to borrow its own currency the the federal government the United States the issue of the dollar no reason economically to borrow its own dollars back. Okay so that's a voluntary thing that Congress has decided to do that. It wants to give people the option to trade up their dollars if you like swap out there deficit dollars for US treasuries but because we call that borrowing and because we label it the national debt it gets people very kind of twisted around where they start thinking of their own personal finances. They say uh-huh borrowing that's a bad problem right uh-huh debt that's not going to end well and so then the the conversation. It's a conversation. Problem is an educational problem. It's it's the problem of your grandchildren are paying for this. That's exactly right. So when they tell us what your share of the national debt they want us to think of that as our own personal liability when in fact it is for those of us who are lucky enough to own some of these things. They're not liabilities. There are assets. It's part of our savings. It's part of our wealth. We're holding those dollars in the form of very safe interest-bearing government security called a US treasury. It's a great thing if you're lucky enough to be someone who has enough money that they don't spend everything they make. They can set something aside. And they want to invest in a very secure interest-bearing asset just a momentary factual question. What percentage of treasuries are held by the Chinese these days They've got about a trillion dollars. So I think in total depending upon how you want if you want to go. Gross like the entire Enchilada I think about forty percent is held internationally. Japan holds about a trillion. China holds about a trillion. Had about twice that much not all that long ago But you know these countries what happens is these countries export a lot of goods and services to the US or in the case of China. They sell more to us than we buy from them. And so as a result we are importing from China. We Pay China with dollars and the Chinese have the same option that any other holder of. Us dollars has they can hold onto their noninterest bearing dollars or they can trade them up in a sense for us treasuries and so what people refer to as quote unquote borrowing from China is nothing more than China saying. I don't want to hold onto my dollars. A checking account. I would prefer to keep them in a savings account and so by treasuries and that's all that's happening but this language problem has feeling insecure vulnerable to a hostile foreign Country that you know. Oh my God borrowing from China and adversary. You know that puts us at risk somehow in the in the brief amount of time we have left. I'm going to shift a bit still on the subject of debt though but real debt because as you indicate the United States doesn't have to borrow it. Can it can never run out of its own currency because it owns the manufacturing facility that that pumps it out a metaphorically speaking but there are countries that do have actual debts That are actually borrowing the countries of the European Union because they don't make their own currency and countries which whether they make their own currency or not are Indebted internationally because of the underdeveloped used to say nature of their economies talking about countries of South Sub Saharan Africa in the countries of the European Union. And the g twenty just this week announced intention to pause the debt repayments of the Sub Saharan countries and other other of the used used to call Third World countries and former colleague of yours. Michael Hudson has been in the Washington Post recently with an op-ed an idea that he's been pushing for a long long time at least in other pages called a debt jubilee that is to say a period where those kinds of debts are just forgiven because otherwise they crush economies. I know this is not your field. This is his. But what's your opinion about that? Yeah I did know Michael. I've known him for a long long time at one of his famous lines is that's that can't be repaid be repaid. And of course he's exactly right. I mean we the IMF institutions like that can string investors can try to stream these countries along With conditionality and more lending And and extract as much as humanly possible out of them but the more humane gesture as Michael proposes is to recognize that you know these. These developing countries is. You're referring to them as we refer to them. They will remain forever developing if we don't allow them the space to move beyond the developing stage into the developed economy stage and that is probably what is required that is Leading them out of the debt trap finding a way to wipe the slate clean let these countries start afresh And to the extent possible. Help them find ways to avoid taking on debt that isn't denominated in their own individual currencies. Because that's what locks them into this perpetual treadmill where once they're on it and they start borrowing in dollars than they've Orient Their economy usually exporting in order to earn dollars so that they can service dollar denominated debt and that usually means that countries produce low value added goods and services and they never become developing economies that produce more high tech high value added. So they don't become wealthy and they don't they're not producing mainly for populations that's right. That's right so much of the productive. Effort is oriented around producing in order to put things in containers and ship them elsewhere to be consumed and raise real living standards Somewhere else just to get the dollars to hand them back over to creditors one one other question because I have to let you go and you've been very generous with your time today as you see the future and I know you don't have a turban on with a with a Ruby in the center is is this as it. Widely predicted going to be a time of international de-coupling Lou globalisation in that sense more manufacturing for the homeland not only in this country but in a lot of other countries the we've we've seen the the limits of long supply chains. I think maybe it will I it local and localism might be the the word of future there where whether it's Ford supply or other kinds of domestic production building redundancies. Problem this crisis. One of the problems of crisis exposes is just how thin the layer is when it comes to supply chain and manufacturing and you know if we had some redundancies built in we were wholly dependent upon certain countries in other parts of the world to manufacture face masks and ventilators medicines. And you know we had those redundancies here. At least we would have something to ramp up. When the sort of dislocations happened and food is becoming a very big problem right now the food supply chain and so I think maybe that is the right thing and I think you know if there's a silver lining in all of this. Maybe that's what it is. Is there a conceptual? Conflict BETWEEN REDUNDANCY INEFFICIENCY AND. Haven't we cast our lot ideologically with efficiency? Well we did cast our lot but but I guess what I'm hopeful of is that we're that this crisis is demonstrating that at the cost of just in time production and some of the efficiency Surrounding the supply chain manufacturing that this is not clearly efficient. What we are left with today is highly inefficient so ab there is a worthwhile trade off to be made Not Saying that you shut down completely and seal borders and don't have trade at all but that you know you you try to balance the risks of over reliance on Production and he's just in time supply chains by building in some protective infrastructure domestically and locally final question. You have a new book. The deficit myth. When's it coming up? Jim Ninth Okay. Right on schedule. Yeah I mean the guy who could have known But it it turns out. I think the timing is is pretty remarkable so with any luck it helps us to avoid the the question that you posed earlier. Which is you know. Do we end up in a situation. Where after we demonstrate that we have the fiscal fortitude to spend money and deal with crises and emergencies. Are we going to revert back to? Oh I forgot that you know. We don't have the power to do things anymore because once we get through this health crisis. We're we're GONNA find ourselves right back in the middle of a crisis that we were already facing. And that's the climate crisis isn't as if oh they're the crisis is over now we don't have to act with With ambition and with force any longer we're going to need all of the firepower and all of the commitment on the part of the federal government to continue to deal with the next emergency and the next emergency. Dr Stephanie Kelton. Thank you so much for joining us today. My pleasure. Thanks for having me one night. Foam Brown was taken to ask. Locked up the bond with greed is cast down in the in house. Something stood when shot. This is what they nobody here but US chickens Dane. Nobody here at all. So calm yourself and stop at first. They nobody here but us we chickens trying to sleep and you but in and horrible Habal Habal Habal with your chin. Nobody here but as cheap they nobody here at looking so quiet and stopping them. I they nobody here but us and Conley point that gun of the way and Habal Habal Habal. Often didn't hey. Hey boss pickens ain't nobody here but that's you again now. News of the Godly God. It sounds serious this week. Doesn't it then led Richmond? Virginia Richmond Diocese priests defied the Bishops Order and he started blogging again to help parisioners through the corona virus pandemic. He's been told to pack. His bags cannot Richmond Richmond. Diocese Bishop carry nest out. Remove Father Mark White from serving as pastor of two churches effective immediately father Mark Churches White. This is if white learned of his removal in an email from bishop nest out White was pastor of Saint Joseph's in Martinsville and Saint Francis of Assisi Frank Animals to you and me in rocky mount. He'd been ordered to remove his popular blog. Last year was critical Oh. The blog was critical of churches handling of sexual abuse scandals and Bishop Nest out threatened white to take down the blog or loses job white did remove the blog for a time but as the corona virus pandemic cancelled church services. He got back online to provide help to parishoners through the uncertain time in a press release online nest out said why has been reassigned to chaplain of various prisons in the area. You know places where the virus is rampant news of the Godly Ladies and gentlemen copyrighted feature with broadcast. Now let's check on the old warm thing. Offshore energy producing platforms in. Us waters of the Gulf of Mexico are emitting twice as much methane. That's a greenhouse gas. That's more potent but not as long lasting as Karma dioxide more twice as much than was previously. Thought that's according to a new study from the University of Michigan. Anybody protesting that yet. Up in Michigan get out of the university liberate US researchers conducted a first of its kind pilot study sampling pilot study sampling air over offshore oil and gas platforms in the old government skill. They're finding suggests the federal government's calculations are too low. Um's research found that for the full Gulf oil and gas facilities in approximately a half. Tara gram of methane each year. That's comparable with large emitting oil and gas basins like the four corners region in the southwest United States the effective loss rate of produced gases roughly three percent similar to large onshore basins primarily focused on oil and significantly higher than current inventory estimates offshore harvesting accounts for roughly one third of the oil and gas produced worldwide around the world and these facilities both vent and leak methane. I'd rather leave than I think I don't know about you until now. Only a handful of measurements of offshore platforms have been made. No aircraft studies of methane emissions in normal operations have been conducted. The as annual inventory numbers for offshore emissions are not produced with the help of sampling. No they just put their finger in the air wet it see if it smells like methane. The study published in Environmental Science and technology identified identified. Three reasons for the discrepancy between EPA estimates in their findings one errors in platform counts offshore facilities in State. Waters are more than thirteen. Hundred of them were missing from the US inventory to persistent emissions from shallow water facilities men. Those focused on natural gas are higher than indicated by the inventory and three year three large older facilities situated in shallow waters tended to produce episodic disproportionately high spikes of methane emissions. These facilities. They tend to have more than seven platforms. Apiece CONTRIBUTE. Nearly forty percent of emissions have consistent less of consist of less than one percent of total platforms. If this emission process was identified correctly. It could provide an optical mitigation opportunity researcher said in plain English. Now you know fix. It was the one all but now news in Olympic movement just a little produced by Jim Resolve third. Well Tokyo Olympic organizers and the IOC are going to cut some of the extras out of next year's postponed games. That's an attempt to limit what expected to beat millions of dollars in added expenses hiawassee member. John Coates who heads the inspection team for Tokyo said that cuts were likely in areas such as hospitality and expensive live sites for public. Viewing of quote do we need to make provision for as much hospitality for the sponsors the broadcasters and the National Olympic committees he asked suggesting corona virus pandemic may dampen enthusiasm a year from now. Come on many of the. Broadcasters may not have as big a presence here of advertisers because of the economic downturn. He said he moved coach. Talked about the difference between must have features and Nice to have accessories which may be ruled out when the Olympics open next July by the way we were hearing all about how hot it is in Tokyo in July they postponed the year couldn't postponed until August. No or September. No it's July again back to the story. Kotel so made it clear. Tokyo organizers and the Japanese government will be absorbing the billions in added expenses like the Japanese government caused the epidemic. He said the I would make several hundred million dollars in an emergency contribution to help struggling international sports foundation federations and National Olympic Committees. Stay afloat the money is not destined for the Tokyo organizers or the Japanese government's which are actually preparing the Games we will not stand by international federations collapse. Coats said we'll be sitting at no. He didn't Japan obligation to absorb the added costs as stipulated in the host city. Contract signed in twenty thirteen when Tokyo one one the Games near the IOC nor Japanese officials are offering cost estimates media. Reports in Japan suggests an added bill of two to six billion on top of the reported twelve and a half billion but a national audit says the figure gumby twice that much. So that's two to six on top of twenty four. You do the math literally the IOC was expected to pay out about six hundred million federation this year proceeds from the Tokyo Olympics. Some federations rely almost exclusively on contributions. That wasn't very good planning a reporter for a Japanese. Broadcaster asked the Organizing Committee president if the pitch in cost to help Tokyo. We're in the midst of studying and reviewing the additional costs. He said. Of course we know we'll have to pay. We have to pay. However the general direction is reducing the cost to the extent possible. Tokyo's CEO Toshiro. Muto promised to take a fresh look at the level of services. We provide coasts. Coach was asked to explain how Japan will be in shape to host the Olympics. Fifteen months Tokyo's corona viruses have been spiking and the prime minister is called for emergency measures asking for people to stay home. We've given ourselves as much time as possible. Said coach pointing out some wanted to reschedule for the spring. There was a factor to go as late as possible but not into the football season because it's the Olympics it's a movement and we all need why every day now ladies and gentlemen us from outside the bubble. Hey remember when president trump used to one us that Immigrants into this country were bringing in diseases in what he was right. He just had the the Directional Arrow Wrong Guatemalan President Alejandro. Jemma Tay said this week number of migrants on a deportation flight from the US were infected with the Corona Virus. There are fears of contagion in the sprawling. Us migrant detention system by ICE is spreading to Central America. Jimmy said twelve randomly selected migrants. Who arrived in Guatemala on the deportation flight? Tested positive when examined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggested more on the flight tested positive as well quote a large part of it was infected and he said in a presidential address. That's a flight carrying Thir- seventy-three Guatemalans that left the US for Guatemala City earlier this week. The trump administration is pressured. Guatemala to keep receiving deported migrants despite going concern there that returnees are bringing the virus with them and could infect remote communities only four hundred detainees in the US out of more than thirty. Two thousand have been tested so far. That's the testimony that the acting director vice gave Congress. This week bows committee. On oversight said that same official confirmed ice does not routinely test detainees before deporting them more than sixteen hundred people deported from the US to Guatemala. Over the last month were allowed to go home. And into voluntary unenforced guarantee fears arising and maeve seated the Central American nation with an untold number of undetected cases increasing its vulnerability to the pandemic. There have been thirty confirmed cases if Kobe nineteen among ice employees. Working in the agency's detention facilities only Monday. Did Guatemala Begin testing. Every passenger sheriff flight with someone confirmed as positive. That's plane carrying seventy six. People arrived on a flight from Alexandria. Louisiana migrant was feeling ill with tested and found to be infected leading tests for everyone else. Forty-three tested positive. Despite showing no signs of illness and they are in medical quarantine. Geometry spoke while wearing a surgical mask. He said the CD team also tested twelve of the passengers that on Friday. All tested positive. He said flights would be suspended until the US certifies passengers on such flights are free of the virus and he didn't even say you're welcome news of the warm ladies and gentleman copyrighted feature. This brought with that report was from France twenty. Four Joan is copyrighted feature is broken now so sobbing my favorite from last week which we had hold over because it kept developing accurate acting secretary of the navy. Thomas Mildly remotely apologized for calling the now ousted commander of the US nuclear aircraft carrier stupid in an address to the ship's crew mode Lee told the crew that their former commander Captain Brett crozier was either too naive or too stupid to be in command or that. He intentionally leaked to the media a memo in which he warned about Corona virus spreading aboard the aircraft carrier and urged action to save his sailors. What they are also accused of committing a betrayal in creating a big controversy in Washington by disseminating warning so widely. Although later reports indicated he sent it only to ten officials moly then apologized in the navy for his comment. Let me be clear. I do not think Captain Brett Crozier is naive nor stupid. I always believed him to be the opposite. I apologize for any confusion. This choice of words may have caused. He also apologized directly to crozier for any pain. My remarks may have caused then as a result of the ensuing firestorm. He resigned distributed one final memo to the fleet as his last act. As Navy secretary distributed a memo which said in the Classic Hard Rock Satire Rocky movie called. This is spinal tap. There's a scene in which the lead Guitarist Nigel. Tufnel misspelt is explaining how the band is able to take their sound to the next level. Does this sound like a familiar story to you. How many times near Navy Marine Corps career have you thought about or even suggested a different better way of doing things and the response has been well? That's not how we do it. I guarantee that this has happened to you more than once if not you must not be in the Department of the navy thanks for the spins Sacramento area. Coffee Company Temple TOLD EMPLOYEES THIS WEEK. That protective face masks violated dress code and the workers who cannot show up for shifts due to concerns over the virus pandemic should reach out to the unemployment department company own several locations in the Sacramento region tells it to coffee at most supermarkets. It apologized for the email but not before blowback on. Social Media. Well of course not before that the public's response prompted Temple Founders Sean commissure to announce that he would be stepping down from his role with the company. He'd be giving hundred percent authority on all company-wide decisions to his director of retail operations. It's not a surgical position by the way the email should not have been sent out he said and was not approved by temple operations. It is not a reflection of any of our procedures and policies currently in place. Its contents were inexcusable. And we sincerely apologize. We in recent weeks. A trio of popular dispensers of lifestyle advice drew Pinski Matt and Phil McGraw have appeared on media outlets or digital video downplaying the threat of the pandemic escorting variety Pinski and sundry February and March appearances suggested to farmers to corona virus would be way less variant than the flu. Stole viewers of Fox News Channel's Hannity earlier. This week that having children go back to school might be quote appetizing despite the fact that could potentially help spread the Canadian and result in two or three percent. More deaths Pinski apologized noting that his comments were incorrect. As this week admitted he misspoke and McGraw knocked. Her Phil appeared this week on Fox News Channel. With Laura Ingraham calling for the nation to get back to normal life noting. The United States has not choose to prevent automobile accidents or swimming pool deaths in a video posted. The next day McGraw said we need to safely responsibly. Follow the science and get back to our lives as soon as possible. I don't mean to say that we need to push run. Just run out there and we start pretending that nothing is ever happened. I don't mean that at all acknowledged his use of auto accidents in swimming pool. Accidents were quote bad examples. Dateline Scotland too big place but Scott. Swimming has apologized to its aquatic community. After an online training session with elite athletes was crashed by zoom bomber who subjected around three hundred participants to quote disturbing content. The event was hosted on notoriously insecure videoconference applications zoom. It's faced a backlash from users. Worried about the lack of end to end encryption. A meeting sessions and Zoom bombing uninvited guests gaining entry and disrupting proceedings Scottish. Swimming sincerely apologizes for the incident. That happened this morning. During an Organiz zoom event where the aquatics community. We're invited to work out at the end of last week. We shut information about the workout across social media platforms unfortunately link with zoom bombed with disturbing content shared with circa three hundred people. The video was immediately. Shut down the it's referred to the police cybercrime unit unquote Scottish swimming. Several American banks have been reporting service issues while Americans are checking their balances for the federal stimulus. Checks banks across the country. Say their websites. Applications and phone lines are experiencing problems under the high volume of traffic. First Third Bank always love that name posted that its application phone. Lines are experiencing intermittent and temporary issues. We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience. Bb&T another bank reported problems with their mobile banking and adding. We understand how important it is for you. To have access to your account Info specially now the alliant credit union apologized to a customer who criticized the bank for saying they were delayed response times when the website wasn't working. We apologize for the inconvenience while many people are attempting to view their federal stimulus tax checks. The bank said our team understanding is working hard towards restoring full access to online banking a Paean C. Spokesperson told the hill the PNC customers are seeing intermittent mobile and care centre access. Like other banks. This is the result of an unprecedented volume of customers. Said the statement. Simile another bank. C. E. F. C. You see me also apologize to customers for issues associated with online and mobile banking because of the extreme levels of traffic a two page ad in the Sacramento Bee and Easter Sunday and Good Friday. Set off a flurry of emails to the city's Daily newspaper about it's overt anti Semitic language. The response resulted in a printed apology two days after Easter the Sacramento. Bee issued a ten paragraph apology. That's that's a lot of paragraphs for an apology. Our goal read in part is always to provide meaningful and valuable news and information to serve you and help us live. Better lives through civil communication. The headline of the add an apology. Add with antisemitic. Language IS UNACCEPTABLE. No known connection but the company that owns the Sacramento. Bee announced this week. It is for sale and the same ad appeared in another newspaper another California City Eureka. The time standard ran sponsored contract with vaguely sorry thinly veiled anti Semitic language paid for by a private individual. We apologize said the standard without reservation to every reader and the community as a whole for having published this offensive and inexcusable language. And we'll work hard to ensure this type of content never appears in the pages of the time standard again assuming that there will be sorry they didn't fit and to prove that to our new listeners in Durango Colorado that we will cover the local news to the Durango Herald has removed. Saturday's action line column from its website and regrets it was published it targeted New Mexico visitors and offended many of our readers in the four corners and the attorney. The man went viral and social media early this year. After slapping slapping Hawaiian monk seal has described his client's actions as a brief lapse of judgement North Carolina. Torney blake longs of the man responsible since paid state and federal fines and the attorney apologized saying his client was sorry for his immature inexcusable actions. It's unclear how much he was fined. And the attorney doesn't make his client's name public. Mcdonald's in China has apologized closed a restaurant for issuing a notice banning black people from entering amid the spread of Corona virus. Multiple reports have said. The fast food chain said the ban unlike people is not representative of its inclusive values although there is a Chinese TV ad now for a whitening cleaning product. That has a Chinese woman throwing a black man. Her boyfriend from the books of the ad into the washing machine wind him up dateline Chicago. The company was weekend demolition of a former coal plant in little village near Chicago sent a massive cloud of dust into that neighborhood. Apologize for causing anxiety and fear. Apology did not prevent the company from being sued for the Act the EU European Union Commission. President has offered a heartfelt apology Italy for not helping it at the start of its deadly. Coronavirus outbreak. Did Not apologize to Greece for not helping during the other thing. The apologies of the week. Ladies and gentleman copyrighted feature this broadcast Well who would have thought it? That's it for this week's edition of the show back next week or whenever you wanted on your device of choice and a lot of New Orleans piano music right now. On the Harry Shearer Channel at Youtube. Check it out the show come to you from century. Progress productions and originates through the facilities of the WWF New Orleans flagship station of it changes easy radio network. Thanks to Thomas Walsh and Pam hosted. Thanks to you for so long.

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59: I'm Feeling A Bit Trunky

Latter-Day Lesbian

56:52 min | 6 months ago

59: I'm Feeling A Bit Trunky

"In this episode we talk all about the crazy crap. That is Mormon missions. I also open Pandora's box expecting into just talk about missionary work and finding a whole heap of other offensive shit. Oh really that's always a fun. Box always one open it with us. They always want to open your box. Oh my God we'll be right back. We are supported right by new dating APP. Hey listeners raise your hand if you think dating after mormonism is difficult. Probably Ninety. Five percent of our listeners are raising their hands right now. You know it's hard hard meeting someone and having to explain your whole Wacky Mormon upbringing. We went through sand since your faith transition. You've probably been kicked out of the singles ward. So now what Ooh that is challenging. Check out new. It's an ex mormon dating APP available for download on both android and iphone. Are You you ready to find post Mormon of with someone who understands your story. I know I am too late. visit new dating APP and learn more. That's new dating dot APP. Hey everybody welcome to latter-day lesbian the podcast on the next Mormon Monier girl just trying to figure out her. Name's Mary my name. Is Shelly musical today. I it was Kinda boring. My name is show Ali. Are you serious eating me. No Yes yes oh yes okay absolutely All right well this episodes kind of wild it sort of sprung out of a letter we received from a young guy heading into the MTC the mission training center and getting ready to go on his mission and he was pretty much full on panic. Yeah yeah panic mode and he reached out to us and we're going to read his letter. Explain what happened from there And let you kind of know where he is now. We also have a guest on to tell a little bit about her experiences on her mission PTSD sort of things. And I also was doing some research. No we need to you get a he said what in a film law he said one and every I was looking for he said was I was expecting to just find like a little thing and move on but I came Kim across his book that unfortunately I had purchased for my children my boys two years ago. Thank God they are not readers never read it. It's called honoring the priesthood. As a Deacon a teacher and priest in this is by John by the way by the way John by the way sucks ass. John's by the way. But we'll get to that. I WanNa talk about something else verse. Oh Oh yeah we have exciting news so pumped yeah. We are partnering with Marco Polo. We have talked about Marco Polo before this program. In fact remember member Kimberly Anderson just sort of pitched it on that one so she was interviewing us. Yeah because that's the only compensation is in Marco Polo. Yeah And Somebody said Oh. Yeah it's like snapchat for old people Whatever don't listen to those haters? I was maybe the one who said I would suggest that. It's a really awesome communication tool for us and our listeners. Yes so this is how it happened. Marco Polo the executives of Marco Polo contacted us to help us pilot their new program. It's called Marco Polo channels. And what it is if any of view out there already use Marco Polo Awesome. This will make sense if you haven't been probably download the APP. It's really cool. But what will happen. Is Mary and I will record. Marco Polo messages messages. which is basically video and US talking Kinda like facetime? Yeah but it's not a live conversation right we record it and is out there and then the people in our channel home they can then see that video you know at their leisure whatever and then they can record video back either to us or to other people in the channel so it's like a big text group with US and other listeners of the podcast but everything's video you could see faces and see emotion feel and talk and it's just one more way to connect and it's an amazing way to connect. There's something honestly that I feel special about Marco Polo how you get to see the faces and the reactions and there's also not that pressure of being live xanax right but you can watch it as it's being recorded you're we've probably have over explained it at this point but it's going to be amazing and the medical card is that you can use macho voice off right that one a law. Yes our plan for that is that we he will send a message out a polo. We call him video message and we can just all talk about it. It's like we're just closer together. We have a sign up going on right now. If you WANNA get on a waiting list are thought is that we would record a message every morning. Good Morning. Let's be honest recording more than that because I'm addicted to my phone. Well that is true. I'm only going to commit to one a day. Okay I promise you get a lot out. You're probably be like we just ten you. It just was crazy. You don't actually have to listen to it. Yeah sure but you will ask me. We're still working it out but it's going to be amazing but what we need need from. You is your support in getting your name on the weightless and answering just a short handful of questions about how you feel about this kind of thing. Yeah this is an interesting brand new. We're launching this pilot and it's yeah bad ass. We're going to see where it out as we go. We're GONNA shut up about this now if you're interested go to our website. We've got a special link latter-day they lesbian dot org slash Polo. Yeah I love it and the more raise your hand winning just that my hands are really comfortable. My hoodie pockets. I didn't WANNA disturb them. Quicker on the draw quicker on the draw. Okay shall we. He moved onto a boom PAS. Yes in a spirit of this being a missionary lesson. Obviously we have to have a mission in related film Pod by the way there's a billion of them. Oh yeah thank you to everyone who had been sending those in the one that we decided to go with today is from Jenny any okay. Thank you Jenny You Ready. I'm ready cheese Music it's okay marriage as fucked up Mormon phrase of the day is Trunkey Trunkey trunkey Well are I've heard you say trunk or treat before in reference to Halloween. Is that related to keep going easy very the aggressiveness way off. So I just had to make sure you understood how way off you question question the volume of my meals Erdal violated from aggressives. Gradsoflife kidding. Yeah Okay Trunkey Trunkey Use It in the sentence if oh yeah please do. That's sister. Slash elder is getting trunkey. That's not all for putting people in the trunk drunk. That's how desperate they are to baptize or like if you own agree. We're getting your ASS GONNA put you in the trunk and take you to the church or some stupid bullshit. uh-huh again no well. That's unfortunate that that's not the right answer because that's the answer I'm sticking with. Oh my gosh it's raw raw okay. Fine if someone could please insert like a triple buzzer or your attitude with your wrongness. Tanning me yes. In Jail Trunkey and a missionary is nearing the end of their mission and getting close to packing their trunks. conches suitcases and going home usually said when missionaries are getting restless and not behaving like good missionaries because they have one foot out the door okay. Hey so they're almost out there like fuck and you don't do anything then. trunkey bathroom like a elder sons was getting tricky. Because he's leaving a month and so he's not working as hard these expression seriously. There's so many got and I just sit here. These are ones that I'm naming it to tell you what they are but save them for another day when if we need another foon pod. I'm going to run through really quickly. A ready Broth nonprofit golden investigator. Greenie trunkey mission genealogy AP SEO's pres- While pile bucket dark Mark White Bible. Wow is one of them W O W world of warcraft. They bore would go on their missions if it was I think. That's a veritable. Shit ton of missionary from pods. I think what I'm GONNA do now. I'M GONNA use that word trunkey a lot for example like when I'm been work all day and I'm ready to go home and a Texas Mary. I'm just feel real trunkey. Pack your trunk and I'm not GonNa Power Trunk and leave yet but I'm going to start screwing around and not doing anything until the end of my Who uses the word trunk for suitcase anymore? I don't know we're going on a steamer trip around the world. Get a pack my trunk get it. You're right it's very old. Everything about mormonism seems very rarely known. Don't Retro Retro Sounding. That's true they're trying to take something old old-fashioned and kind of Lehman outdated light trunk and turned into something called culinary. trunkey Mormons. Just stop. Stop trying to be doll not cool. ooh nothing cool about being Mormon. Oh my gosh okay. Should we go ahead and do A. He said what before we get into the letter. Yes this before you get into it. You want to do the sort of q music for this. This is a three to one with music on this. I've learned how he's what is not an acute music foon pod the roast the troll qaiser all and you MUSICI- The pod if I'm dying that yeah. Yeah so should we do three to one yes three to one. He said what. Yeah yes three to one. He's a one You haven't cut me on yours some lenders. Tma I liked the harmony. You Go. Hi Al Golo a okay. This is all great. This is loser. Yeah they're gonNA love it okay. Ready listeners there's right in and tell us how great this is. Okay if we have Margaret Paula channels going already. They could tell us that's true. I think we do channels. We'll do a little bit of Marco Polo Channeling WHOA OUR PODCAST? I love can then replied each other and to us with what how lousy we do we are. Ah But yeah that is such a good idea. Wow I'm really attracted to you right now are you wanna go make uh-huh maybe during the break we'll be right back okay. Let's get through this. I'm going to go low. You'RE GONNA go. Hi Okay K.. Three to one he said Wall I would take that out. That was ridiculous. Thank you live I love you I love you too okay. That was fantastic. Let's continue yeah. I found this very quickly and easily by typing in like missionary. Something on the Internet's okay. This is from less than eleven of of a teaching manual unless called the field is white already to harvest wight not ripe. Like the feel is when is it cotton. I assure sure the purposes says to help class members resolved to strengthen the Kingdom of God through diligent service particularly by sharing the Gospel through through missionary work sounds riveting Okay so the manual says. The Lord warned the elders not to be idle and said that they should go forth forth rather than Terry how this warning apply to us. Why do some of the US delay sharing the Gospel? Then here comes the good part elder Henry. I hiring who is dead of the of the twelve related the following experience. It's easy to say. The time isn't right but there is danger. In procrastination nation. Danger Danger years ago I worked for a man in California. He hired me. He was kind to me. He seemed to regard me highly. I I may have been the only latter day. Saint he ever knew well. I don't know all the reasons I found to wait for a better moment to talk with him about the Gospel. I just remember. Remember my feeling of sorrow when I learned after he had retired and I live far away that he and his wife had been killed in a late night drive to their home home in California. He loved his wife. He loved his children. He had loved his parents. He loved his grandchildren and he will love their children and will want to be with them forever now. I don't know how the crowds will be handled in the world to come. But I suppose that I will meet him and that he will look into my eyes is in that I will see in them. The question how you knew. Why didn't you tell me leave that Shit holy guilt? You don't share the Gospel with your neighbor. You never know they might get hit and killed on the the freeway and then we'll never know about the Gospel and then when you die and you'll see them and they'll be like you had the truth. Why didn't you yeah and it's your fault because you know when I go to my attornal place? It's all going to be about blame. I'm going to see who I can blame for anything that went wrong in this life. Oh hell yeah sounds like a great way to spend eternity Blaming people. Imagine that in your head when you're missionary. Yeah Yeah. The guilt manipulation continues Tinubu's. I wish we could gather every piece of Mormon literature that has guilt and shame messaging. There is not a library. Large Large Enough Library of Ray could not fit. Yeah that Shit. It's crazy everything you read. It seems like has this built in subtext. Exton of guilt and shame all in there. I think that's religion. Well Yeah Yeah for sure but Mormons Glare guilt all right. That was great. Thanks was dead. I'm right so something very special happened concerning the people who listen to the PODCAST and I want to share that this has to do with missionary work aright. We received a letter On the twenty ninth of December from from and changing names here from a boy named Adam. And how old is Adam. Adam is eighteen or nineteen okay. He says I found your podcast at work work. I'm not supposed to listen to ear buds but I wear a beanie to hide them. Ha- good trick Good Job Adam. Anyway I was raised a member of this cult talk and for the most part I always believed everything. They ingrained into my premature malleable child. Head and I was happy. I'd go to church every week with my parents because that's just what you do you. That's what I thought everyone did. It wasn't until around like fifteen and started to fall away. I never believed any of it but I couldn't bring myself to tell anyone because I live in to Willow valley a couple miles from Salt Lake City and everyone here is Mormon Yeah I just wanted to fit in so I did whatever everyone else Ostad. Eventually I researched and found all the horrible things. Joseph Smith did an all the horrible ways. The churches treated anyone different from them yet. I pretended to be see the Best Mormon boy ever to make my parents proud. I turned eighteen seven months ago. And I'm supposed to go on a mission in the next week case we is eighteen. I want along with it telling myself that I tell everyone eventually that I just cancel it and things would work out. I never could. I was and still am so terrified to tell my parents that that I don't believe the church is true It's GONNA be tough. Yeah one night. We had an argument where I kind of admitted not being into it. My parents told me that everyone goes through a phase where you doubt your faith and then I just needed to pray about it and that God would make himself known to me and would comfort me or whatever I tried so hard and and nothing. Wow their solution was that I wasn't praying hard enough of course You you. It's something wrong with you. Yeah any other concerns. I boys are just shut. Down immediately. Tossed aside is just teenage angst. That sucks like teenagers. Can't say I think this is a bunch of bullshit because parents What do you know rebellious? Yeah dismissed When I finally decided that I would tell them that? I don't WanNa go on my mission. I came home from work and my my mom told me that my grandpa was just on the phone crying because of how proud he was at his first grandson was following the path to exaltation on my gun so so I couldn't I finally devises plan where I would go for one month to the MTC in Provo and then come back to this nice place. I was planning on living with a couple of other guys. I was GONNA leave. Leave all my clothes and essentials in the room I was going to have and in a month I would move in officially then. My car broke down. I bought a new one. That also broke down at this point. I barely would have enough to pay even two months of rent not to mention have to walk the two miles every morning to get to work. Well I was willing to do it anything to be free but I was just told that there is not a place for me at that house any more than my boss told me that he can't give me a month off and so I was fired. My parents guide Ed. If I were to come home early from my mission that I would not be welcome in their home. How honestly though I would rather be homeless? Continue limiting living here God. All this happened in one day. I don't know what to do now. I'm supposed to leave to the MDC and a few days. All anyone can say is how proud of me they are. And I'm I'm in such a low place. All my friends are on missions. And I have nowhere to go but I would rather kill myself than waste two years preaching something that I adamantly despise. I have nothing Um I don't know what to do and I'm scared. I WanNa go to college but in a month I'll be homeless or working all day just to afford rent itself. I don't know how life works. I know I should have just come unclean earlier but I just couldn't. It's so hard for me to leave my family. I don't want to see a born disappointment. If not resentment in there is if I didn't go so here I am. I'm freaking out and just need a friend. I was raised in the church. And it's taken both family and friends away from me. I'm just so scared and I don't know where else to turn your. podcast cast helps though. I really appreciate you guys. And it's nice to know there's other people who are not diluted assholes sincerely Adam Wow poor guy that's a lot to take on at such a young age baby. I mean I'm an on disrespectful to him but he's a baby he's he's like not even grown. Yeah think think about how you were at eighteen. Nobody knows what's going on nothing. No nothing the world's a scary place. Yeah and then to think that if you don't do everything exactly right right you're GONNA be kicked out of your home clear. Parents are going to kick you out crazy. It is crazy. Yeah the best part of this though was when he wrote that letter. I responded you responded and I said Hi Adam. I'm so glad you reached out to us. Please know that you are loved and there is a huge support group of ex Mormons in your area. Your situation sucks ass and I'm so sorry. Take a deep breath and know that there is help and you can get to the other side of this and find so much happiness. I'm impressed with your courage to learn the truth and all the lies for yourself that speaks volumes to what a strong person you are. You have so much to give. And I know you'll be able to help others like yourself as you continue your journey life after mormonism is so freeing although of course it comes with its share of Shit but freedom is priceless. You can do it. Would it be okay. If I anonymously published your letter on social media we can find help for you in your area. Please don't hesitate to text or call if you feel desperate he replied saying wow that was fast. Of course you can publish my letter. I just don't know no where to go from here. You know. I'm so dependent on this awful church and I just can't wait to get out. Yeah so at that point. I published his letter. Yeah in an on our facebook groups facebook groups on my wall I can I put that out there. The outpouring of support was amazing. I knew your good people that would say hey. We can can help but I was shot. Yeah like brought to tears a few times from people who I've never met bright saying what can we do. What can we do? Let's let's start go fund me. Yeah I can get a job I can give them a place to stay. I have a room for rent for free. My uncle could give him a job. I contacted him. I have some savings. Let me know how I can see him. People just jumping on this chance to help this poor kid who was stuck I was an awe. I know amazing amazing and so what I really wanted was for this kid Adam to see the kind of love and help. That's out there because so many people in his situation fuel alone for sure no family no friends no one gets it. He stuck in so I tracked him down on facebook and then I said I hope you've seen all the replies on facebook to your letter Adam so many people want to help and support you. Would you like me you to connect you with anyone to help you. My inbox flooded so even just post on the facebook pages. My inbox the lottery. Lesbian inbox the email inbox. Yeah just so so so much any support. Yes amazing and I wanted him to know that I wanted him to Syria. Sure absolutely not allow. You're not allowed. You're you're not stuck where you're at you you have so much ahead and Ryan he replied. I have seen all of them and I'm so grateful to you for everything. I honestly didn't think that anything like this would happen. I need to decide what to do. First and foremost almost but all this love and support is truly touching. I didn't know there were so many people out there who have been in similar situations. Yeah that's how these high demand religions religions get you. They make you feel like you're the only one feeling this way Something wrong with you right right right right. And so as people ex Mormons X.. Whatever damaged damaged hurt people when we are brave enough to talk about it and We start finding other people that have felt the same way. And then there's a community they're gonNA help each other and you can get out of it. I said so. You're not alone. Remember that we are all in your corner ready to help you. Mormonism keeps you isolated. Trust me there's a huge wonderful and accepting world out there he says. Thank you so much then. I asked what we can do to help. He says I'm going to figure out my next move but to be honest I didn't even know how to react. I didn't expect anything like this. It's amazing nets gray a love it Then then I just was kind of you know. Let us know when you need anything. I asked what he was intending undoing. He said I think that I'll end up going to the MTV for a couple of weeks. Just because I'm so close to it then I guess I'll just I tell my parents that I tried and go from there and I said good luck in the. MTC Don't listen to their guilt Blah Blah Blah. He and I will so then the day he was to go into the Anti. Just send a message saying thinking about you today. He replied with a heart. I said Hanging there I wish I could give you a peek into your future life after you get to be your authentic self. It's going to be amazing. He said Yeah. It's been the last couple of as over and over again. Chungbuk guilt and shame I have tons of episodes from your podcast and many others to keep me from going too crazy. I just hope it goes by quickly. I can't wait to be out. He's GonNA listen to us. In the callosum he pyden those ear buds under the beanie can. We learned that he's planning on staying into the MDC until his grandma leaves because grandma was staying at his house all around celebrating that he's going but he didn't want to deal within my Gosh So I messaged him and said when you leave the MTC if your family kicks kicks you out or whatever just remember. You're not alone not stuck you. You don't need to be hopeless. People in your area have contacted me with job offers free housing money just to help you get your life going. Your future is so bright he replied with if nothing else. I think it'll be refund just to hear all they're talking about being the MTC. Oh I see I'm really nervous. I won't lie but I feel so much better. Knowing how many people out there in similar situations and see you share he feels like oh I can get through this. Yeah he felt this important Thank you so much for getting back to me as soon as I get back. I'm probably going to hit up some of these amazing people just because I don't know what else I can do. The support is amazing. And I can't wait to get to a place where I can help others like you guys are helping me. That's amazing the great yeah. That's what happens when you when you make people understand that they're not alone and you help them and they're like oh my gosh I want to help you it's a feeling The church assumes that you're a bad person person and not able to love as fully when you leave but like you guys say the opposite is true. No one in my community would be willing to help me because I'll be coming home early from my mission and yet a long list of complete strangers have volunteered so much to this random kid. They've never even met. Yeah it's really touching and it helps me know that even though this is the hard word path. It's the right one yet you know. I never learned to be a good person in church. You know what I mean. That's not what I learned there. So yeah you absolutely we can do. Great things outside of the church the Church and corner the market on good deeds or feeling spiritual. That doesn't have to do with church at all necessarily barreling up so cliffhanger. Okay Adam did go into the MTC. All right we communicated a little bit here and there they have phones yes. Of course he wasn't allowed to monitor. That shouldn't yeah so he would message me in delete so we did that little bit back and forth just about what his plans are. What does he need when he gets out he he has left the MTC at this point? he is living with a friend and he wants to be a guest on the show. That's fantastic I said. Would you be willing to be a guest and tell us your experience being the entity. Because he wrote me a lot of the bullshit that goes on the MTV. I remember you did but I'm going to save that. Oh Save Save and Regis give us one little juicy. Pardon God fine. Everyone here is homophobic. Actually one of my roommates and I started arguing because he said that people of different races should not get married. seed be cursed as he puts on it's also much BS and brainwashing and it blows my mind how devoted everyone is to this concept that makes zero logical sense God the next thing is companions. The reason they do the companion is so you can stay safe which does make sense to a degree three. But they don't even let you go to the bathroom without him. Oh my opinions are just assigned to you and you have to keep them with you at all times. Otherwise you'll be called out in front of your the district and have to talk to the branch president on why you aren't obeying God's rules while also constant monitoring WHOA hello that's insane? So that's what's happening at the in the mission yeah What do they call it again? Mission Training Centers Raynham snazzy. I mean that was just a small it. He was telling me what's going on in there but I'm GonNa Save Them that when we have him on the show Hedin Talk more more kind of felt like we had a plant in the. MTV's uh-huh cheering for him to get out. He was telling me okay. I'm going to leave the Saturday Blah Blah. And how. He's going to do anything to send him a message to the MTC president and I just was cheering for them. Yeah cheering cheering for him. Like I said right now. He's out he's doing great. He's got a place to live A. He said he just was able to find a car to us. Okay so he's making things happen but for those of you who have have message in and offered help to him the second he says. Hey I could use a hand I will contact you. Okay and thank you so much. Yeah that was amazed. May's yet you touch this kid's heart. Yeah whether he ever needs anything from you as far as money your car Jordan. That's all secondary this kid's heart was changed and he realized he's not alone and the difference in the messages that I got from him through the MDC and now compared to before he went in Yeah night and day he has confidence patents. He feels like he's a human being with confidence yet of just this kid. That's kicked around and forced to do. Something has nowhere to go and then he feels loved and supported ads. Wow that's fantastic are l.. Dealers are the best. Yeah they kick a lot of assets so much all the kick every single all of you thank you so much. We should probably take a little break when we come back. We have a special guest and he wants to talk to us and tell you all about her experiences on her mission as far as learning manipulation tactics and the PTSD that she was handed by the time she left so that sounds like a great time. Okay we'll be right back. We are supported by apostate. Coffee Damn Good Cup of Joe I would like to bear my testimony that you will love this blend with every refiner of your being. You mean being yes absolutely the lesbian medium dark variety rooted in small batches to ensure freshness zero bitterness this and balanced acidity with the sacred not secret combo of Caramel and cocoa very fancy. This coffee will nourish and strengthen in your body Nice so stop drinking subpar coffee gave the lesbian blended tried today to Pasta Coffee Dot Com. That's apostate coffee DOT COM. We're back so before we introduce our guest. I think we need to hear from fanny fact Chen Esther Fannie appropriate by the way speaking of sister. Did you realize that from time girl in the church becomes like an adult or whatever ever she goes by the name sister Blah Blah and the boys go to serve missions. They become not brother elder. But you're still a sister. Yeah Yeah and when you become like a president of some things in the church like president stake president or president something you become President Blah leveled law about President of Relief Society. No you Mr. All you can be is sister something no matter how high up the ranks which thoroughly you really can't is is. This is a prize now. I just mentioned on facebook today and it's like have you forgotten right. Yeah so a couple weeks ago we were wondering where the slats are located. I can't remember my mother. One of her favorite expressions is kick them in the slack. Yeah we've had a few smarty pants thinking they know the answer and telling me the answer and they've been wrong by the way so I don't know what this has to do with missions except for maybe you WanNa kick your mission president on the slats. Yes perhaps yeah but we're GONNA turn it over to well Ben and then fan in fact check and find out what they think. Fan tastic all right here we go and now we turn the time over to sister. Fanny fact thank you Presser Ben for preventing US women from having any independent thoughts. Set All sister shelley. You ask about the cheerful expression. Good swift kick in the slats you ask specifically where in the human body we might find an anatomical structure called the slats the literal answer for this is your rib-cage slats in a bed. Keep the mattress from falling on the floor so slats in your body. Keep your lungs from falling on the floor in the nineteen twenties and thirties when Americans were so helpful and kind and friendly toward each other offering to give somebody the gift of a good swift kick in the slacks was somewhat similar to offering to gift someone with a good punch in the throat. Nowadays they are both good many times. They are swift and they are always for the benefit of the receiver. And I leave this with you in the name of Jesus on a jet ski he man and we'll think sister now we now now. We know it's all cleared up I'm making a list of people who slats I'm GONNA get okay. Don't get on on Shelly's list. Don't be on my slashed list. That's not a good one. No shall we get to our guest. Yeah so we have a special guest. Anne who's WHO's going to share with us some of the things she learned on her mission. I am let's get to it Welcome Manny Alani. Thank you so one of Andy's verse letters that that we receive talked about the experience that she had on her mission. So this is what we're super pumped to hear about what I WANNA do. First is just kind of read the letter a little bit and then she's GonNa tell us a little bit more everybody by me she says I serve my mission in Saint Louis Missouri. RIGHT SMACK DAB in the Bible Belt that had had been fun arches or I guess. It's just the one art donaldson. John McDonald yeah Let's see one nice thing about my mission was that we never had to explain the concept of God to anyone but it also meant that they had their our own ideas about God and religion which we didn't like I was mostly in little towns surrounding saint. Louis there would be church on every corner and everyone went to church so any any sets the scene there and then and I'm talking about you like you're not here we know you're right there. I know. Okay then she says now that. I've set the scene for you here. Some some tactics we were taught to us. This has caught. My eye was the tactics. She was taught to us to get baptisms. And just to interject any these are tactics that you learned at the MTC see right the missionary training center set right. Yes definitely in the MTC. That was mostly focused on. Hey this is how you teach the things that you need to talk about. In the main point you need hit. That would say their sales tactics that you're using your teaching and then sales tactics and then once she got out then you kind of learn from other missionaries and just trial and error door approaches right FEM YEP for sure. So this is Andy to experience other people may have had different experiences in the MTC. You're on the rations. But this is what was was experienced by any. So here's some of the tactics says notice the things in the yard before you get up to the door like toys flowers sport decals and be able to talk about that and then transitioned to a church topic. Nice place you got here. You have a hooters. Bumper sticker interest in boobs. Go on women and women are second class citizens in our trucks. That you could missionary Asian area. Enjoy the guard and you have in the truck tire out front. Yeah if you can give you an example so like the Washington nationals. That's like your big team out there right and yeah if I like walked up to your door and I saw you guys had like Washington national details on your cars if you had stuff in your windows if he had like a flag then it'd be like Oh my God I love except I won't say Oh my God. There is a lot of baseball there. Mazing Mike How's your team doing and then you transition and so you're making yourself relatable to the people and likable. Because like like they're normal person and then maybe they're not a sister wife and then they let you inside. Oh God okay. Let me read some more of this. We even learned a little about other Christian Christian religion so we could spend mormonism their ways. Well we were told to find families harp on the idea of eternal families. So you know when people ask me they ask. Why would anyone any? We'll get PAP ties into mormonism. That's so fucked. Up Crazy and wacky and sexist racist and I'm like missionaries. Don't knock on doors and say hey. Did you know the black people weren't allowed to be Dave until nine hundred seventy families. Wouldn't you love to be with your family forever. And never we have the authority blabbity Blah. The answers like probably not Let's see we rarely gave out any book. Mormons Freak people out too much we mostly gave out pamphlets. We're taught and pushed as people to get baptized in the first lesson. Yell so we'd say something like if you receive a confirmation from God that this church is true and and you will. Will you be baptized by the proper authority of God. Yup Not even kidding. We were taught to overcome concerns eliminate distractions talk about hard topics and help them feel the spirit so they would want to be baptized. Hell feels around the spirit. What does that look like? Little hungry tired. I love you read a little bit more Sprinkled with all this mission training to manipulate people stealing was manipulation of missionaries feelings. We were never good enough. Never spiritual enough witted. Listen enough we should be working harder. Always striving to improve if you had three baptisms one transfer you were going to get four the next transfer bigger and better more and more till you were so drained so tired. I literally did the math one day and it was insane anyway then and he goes through and she explains like how much money is spent for. These poor mischer spent out of their pockets to basically be less than minimum wage labor. For the church. You get more people into the church paying tithing which is horrible and Bullshit. All right Andy. We're turning it over to you. Cover what you want. I'll answer getting people to feel the spirit so we were the best. Investigators were referrals from people who are already remembers so somebody in the Church says hey I have a friend g WANNA come meet within this time this week. Cool sure so we go over say there's like the TV on the kids are running running around the lady who were going to meet with his like super stressed so we would know how to get rid of all of that and then we would like sit her down and have this really intense conversation Shen and of course about the Gospel and immediately like the first thing out of our mouths would be like God is our loving heavenly father which it's the Bible belt so everybody's like. Oh yeah ah again. It's not relatable. Oh these aren't as weird as I think they are. And so then when you have these young kids who are super passionate about this thing that they think because really helped them in their life. I think that makes an impression on people and then you start to promise them shit like that attitude question which literally I asked hundreds hundreds of times like verbatim. People like to know that the path of the Ron is going to bring them happiness and peace for sure one hundred percent because that's what we're promising we're promising them a path of like a sure fire way to get back to God and be with their families who wouldn't want that so we packaged it. The way that they do everything in missionary life is done for a reason I mean albeit a stupid reason sometimes and like the way that the lessons are ordered. Like what you teach about in when yeah it's crazy. They know what they're doing and it's well thought out. Wow were you trained in how to recognize if someone is quote unquote feeling the spirit. Yeah and we would say that to be like I noticed that like. You're getting kind of emotional like you so good right now and be like yeah like okay. Well that's the spirit of God so he would interpret their feelings for them outsider's point of view. That's so nice. It'd be like if I was walking down the street and someone walked by and said Hey I feel like what you're feeling right now is Blah Blah Blah. And that's from God who the fuck does atten random more missionaries. Thanks Mormons Feel like they have the right or the ability he do interpret someone's feelings from God. It's crazy to me that people will agree to be baptized like grown ass. People having these kids these nineteen nineteen twenty year old kids in their house because they have a nice haircut and they speak with confidence that they can tell them what. God's trying to tell them it just so you're endowed first of all all right and then yeah and you're seeing. Is this like Endowment Temple Bushes and that brings us right back to the hooters decal doubt and then in your car so this is pretty typical so like the day before you go to the MTC your family you go to the Church and the state president is there and he he gives you a special blessing that says like you are called to be a missionary and that means that you have all the rights and powers associated with that bunch of fake ass power our in your head and Literally yeah so that also gives you confidence and then I mean you're dedicating your life literally like I was studied for like three. We hours a day. So you know this shit you sound like you know what you're talking about and then people feel good when they're around you because I think for the most part most missionaries generes our sincere because they really do think that what they're doing is a good thing. They think the God wants them to do it so that would probably confidence and people typically like to be around competent competent absolutely. They're building them up. And saying you know like you're an amazing person your child of God and like you can have this amazing lice life and being this great community. It's crazy but it's not too crazy like when you break down like that it makes sense just to put my own spin on the crazy bullshit. One time I had a job selling vinyl siding ooh I did it was telephone job. It was sort of a senior in high school and did these phone like cold calls to try to get people to buy vinyl siding. My job was to get them interested in and then I would turn them over to a sales rep right. I thought it was complete bullshit and didn't think that anybody really needed vital citing so I was not very successful. The question is like how much did you believe it. Oh my God where you fool on in like Hook Line sinker or did you think. Oh I'm just doing the spill because I have have to poke line and sinker. I was incredibly convincing. Made many a person cried because they were just emotional and they were touched by God but I was the first of my parents kids to go on a mission. Do you have any regrets now looking back because clearly. You're not in the church anymore back in wish. You wouldn't tab or he just like fuck. It does part of my life experience. I you know we'll get a little personal have. PTSD for my mission Aw Sorry thinks you know. I wasn't physically abused in any way wasn't raped her anything horrible. I thought that I've heard a lot of other sister. Missionaries talk about but it definitely finally was a fucking hell hole just like the mental strain. They put on us with absolutely insane. And so I'm a huge proponent of therapy ah I go religiously so I'm still dealing without EIBNET. What was it like for you when you finally had the recognition that Oh God this is just a big big fake shitty Colt and then realizing I preached this? When I came home I was having all the classic signs of Ptsd but it was just and so far off my radar's like what the fuck is this? Like Why am I having nightmares? Why am I having panic attacks? Why is it really difficult for me to stay in church? I'm done a year at Byu. Before I left on my mission and then back and just could not handle it. You Guys Aren't even worshiping God anymore. This isn't about God And then I got diagnosed with. PTSD and depression anxiety and stop going to church. And so when I was a Byu. And I was like fuck. Like I don't feel good. I don't feel good about this shit. I don't WanNa be here anymore. Well Oh yeah and then I left the church stop going and then a few months after that. I figured out. I was gay. Raspy if you could pinpoint one or two things about your mission that you think would have brought on that. PTSD is there anything specific. It was really that we were never good enough. Yeah there was never any acknowledgement or validation from the leaders themselves so they would never say you know what you guys are doing such a great job and we know that you're working so hard not even from my rich president or my mission president's wife you never ever ever ever and it was always always like you need to be doing better in doing this and why aren't you doing that. And that would trickle trickled down to like my leaders that were closest to us and then people will get so freaked out by not following the rules. There were legit sisters that I knew of in my mission mission that would have panic attacks if they were home. Five minutes late way to live but especially for someone who is volunteering appearing to go do it. I'm for sure in their own way. I'm paying you a salary to do this shit and so you need to obey the laws of the job. It's like you're giving eighteen months to two years of your life. You're paying for it and you're coming home with fucking PTSD like that's horrible. As you're talking about the levels of leadership you know every level has to report their numbers to the level of them going down to the mission president report to WHO has so. Everyone's freaking out panicking. Because they want to report the person above above them a great job you know and no one's looking down being like oh my gosh thank you so much. They're just like fuck. I needed twenty ten now. I've got to go important. It's one less all with a grown ass. Old adults presidents. They're freaking out because they have to report numbers to the people above them all this climbing the ladders. Because dammit if you're going to be in the core of of the twelve apostles or a seventy we need to be Mr President I typically and you'd better pat a damn good track record as mission president so fucking. Yeah no you hit it right on. The fuck knows like elder Ballard or some shit. Yeah you like basically handed my mission. Presidents asked to him on a plate and was like why is it in your mission. Doing better aboutism. Yup and what I find hilarious is that after I left. They had a dry spell for about a ear that no one in our mission was baptized. Hon Nobody and we're talking about my mission was half Illinois and half of Missouri. That's where Jesus was kind China moring. I wonder why the numbers were so low because people are like yeah. I don't think so I think it was because my mission president was so fucking looking for deals with the rules. That's why people were focused on instead of no more about numbers to my brother's submissions. But I remember one of my brothers breath when he came home. I'm he had talked about how he got in trouble because he wouldn't go into the refugee camps. In Germany there were African refugee camps. He wouldn't go in there and baptized ties because what they're agreeing to speak English so my brother was like no. I'm not going to do that. So he was always in trouble with his mission companion and his own leader and Blah Blah. Because because the other companionship's would get twenty thirty baptisms a month for refugees in my brother's like I'm not taking part of that crap so he was trouble. Yeah too baddies still a Mormon. The Osman me think of my dad was emission president in Germany and my oldest brother was gonna be getting married read and he was getting married to a woman. They weren't active. They weren't Mormon anymore. But this girl who my brother was marrying was really upset that my dad wasn't gonNA come to the wedding because the mission presidents are are not allowed to leave. My Dad really wanted to make this woman phil accepted and so she was angry. Oh like your dad can't even leave Germany for a weekend to come see his oldest son get married. I mean there was a lot of problems there and so my dad called President Monson who was the previous profit to Nelson today but he was in charge of Michigan stuff back then and and explain the situation and saying can I just go for a weekend to be their sport. My son who's fallen away from church. And maybe this'll be a good thing and president Monson said absolutely you can absolutely go and be there for your son's wedding will replace you. What the next mission president in line exactly and and my dad told me the story back when I was tm and he told it as in showing how important the missionary work is so important stuff and like Oh my God? These narcissistic men like what the fun. I'd just deliver that information. I absolutely feel free to go. we'll just replace you go ahead. You feel free to make your own decision. We'll just punish the wrong decision. Yeah you're so you're free to leave but will fire you exactly. Oh God I know I know this has been some good stuff from like the inside of the manipulate it's no wonder why. PTSD is so common amongst return missionaries. Because everything that you described would be shitty enough if if it was was like a corporate job but this is your in your mind. You're working for God. He's judging what you're doing an asshole. Aw taskmaster Jesus yes. Yes so layer that in there. It's like fifty times worse so and then you have to think about daydream of the missionaries canaries themselves. That is the age range that Colt leaders and groups aim for eighteen nineteen twenty twenty one because they know that if they get that age range They're more likely to stay in the church for the rest of their life. This has been fascinating in. I opening. Yup I bet we could do an entire series of just people telling their fucked up mission story because I don't think anyone has ever come home for emission and has had like some sort of PTSD. They are not going to talk about it because the church true you know it. Put that aside and what. I've been talking about it. We're going to keep on living the Good Mormon life and be obedient in. This is sad. I am so glad that my ex and I got ourselves in our kids out of the church before they were near mission age. Yeah absolutely yes. Well we're glad that you survived at any. Thank you and good for you for being in therapy and good for you for wanting to be a therapist like that encode a great way to Ya. Take what you've been handed and be able to help use it for good around around awesome on your Anne Great. Well thanks so much. For being part of our podcast. horsh wash cluster. Shelly should we just take one final break and then get to hatred. Yes stay tuned to hear all the fun Patriot. Names teams and fund patriotic announcements information. At like giving information. We'll be right back we. We are supported by better help dot com. We have mental health professionals periodically on our show and we wanted to find an affordable online therapy option for our listeners. I better help opposite. Yup they will assess your needs match with your own licensed professional therapist and you can always change counselors if you want. You can send messages to your counselor and receive timely responses and you can schedule Agile weekly video or phone sessions. It's more affordable than just normal counseling and financial aid is available and through this exclusive offer l. e.. Ehlers get ten percent off their first first month visit better help dot com slash. LDL That's better help. H. E. L. P. dot com slash L. E. L. for ten percent off your first month. Start living a happier life today today. We're back with some information. I I have to make an extreme patriotic correction. Oh really yes. Okay a couple of weeks ago. I was reading patron names and there was a heather end and a Michelle in and we accuse them Emma being lesbian lovers or sisters or sister wives which I still think. That's the logical conclusion. Right if they both have an n inicial it's going to be the same. They actually have the same last name. Well that's what I thought. Oh until he went back to my nose and realized that I had read it wrong. We're sorry Michelle N.. Is Actually Michelle. Gee I I don't know how that happened. Issued the original Jeez the OJ. Likely not married to heather in so anyway heather and sorry that we put you with someone who mark with and Michelle G.. We're sorry that we gave you the we. I gave you the wrong initial and that we I just assumed you were a lesbian lovers with heather. Maybe there's some sort of weird Edifice goal matchmaking. You're doing because remember that time we were Was the Atlanta Pride Festival festival and two random people came to the booth and then they ended up going on a date. and that's an email so so you just never know you never know other in Michelle if you're looking for love tonight then download the new dating up uh Like what I did there. I did a good segue segue awesome. She we get to the Patriot names in China. To fuck it up shell I wrote it down and the only one person gave us a last name on this so k.. Number One. Okay out of exactly five Susan L.. So that's the one last initial. Yeah yeah that's the only one. No her whole name is right there. But I'm not gonna read it. Well no I understand but okay L. stands for ever right and with an L.. Last name your lesbian. Even if you're a man perfect number two rebecca thank you Rebecca. They deal leading to give her last name. You'd go for Rebecca fritos. I'm going to name her things in the wall. fritos Rebecca fritos with is GonNa be fun on next one Jamie Unicorn Magic Ring Toss thank you Jamie. We're down in the den where the kids come. And there's a lot of games and with kids games books only who we lock them in the debt that is not true we might Eddie. What growling like the last name of Unicorn Magic Ring already? That's James last name. Can I do the next last name. You can't even see the wall behind. You can see some stuff okay. Lauren or wait Lauren. In La you are in a win on a last name sleep shorts Laura. I'm looking at a sleep shirts. Pillow right now. You know. We haven't talked about sleeps in a while. No we haven't if you all have not downloaded that podcast of ours. Let's do at night the Hell's wrong with you or you can just stream it on your favorite part. We're actually currently working more episodes so we will be putting a little more effort to that one anyway. Rensselaer last is Kelsey Z.. Wait for healthy Bob. Ross Art of Chill Gema long last name. I can't see your last name Kicks Advocacy Bob. Ross artificial game. Thank you for your Chil- our game and looking at that's funny. We should play that game sometime. That sounds actually kinda fun. Okay eh naked. Oh she plays Strip Bob. Ross Art of chill game as long as we don't see Bob Ross naked Their note cards or anything with him. I would hope not of Kickin Saw got well. Thank you pay you really. We do appreciate your sport. I know we say this every time. MM-HMM YOU'RE probably tired of it but we want you to understand how much we need and appreciate the support you give us. It makes all the difference in what we're able to do here as far as podcasters Sammy's lately really appreciate that. If you would like to support us we would love that so much. Please visit Patriotic Dot com slash latter day. Lesbian to sign up Thanks so much. That's going to do it did it. Another one in the Yup Once again I wanNA thank Lebron and Dan from extension audio audio thanks. Dan Thank you Dan for the rest of you. Remember steer clear of cults because they are no Ooh no joke touchy later bye-bye.

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The Mitchell Paradox | Chapter 10

Boomtown

45:39 min | 6 months ago

The Mitchell Paradox | Chapter 10

"Andrew Aydin here host of the brand new podcast from H. L. N. down the hill. The Delphi murders. This is the story of teens. Abby Williams and Libby German in in February two thousand seventeen they went for a hike in Delphi. Indiana and vanished. Nearly twenty four hours later their bodies are found also found Libya's phone which has video and audio of the killer who remains on the loose down the hill the Delphi murders subscribe and listen now on Apple podcasts. It's IT's around noon. On a Tuesday January Patrick Peyton the newly sworn in mayor of Midland Stroz up to a podium beneath an arch of red and white balloons the bush convention center in the heart of downtown midland is packed with Peyton supporters. He's dressed in a dark gray suit with his hair slicked back before is Mayo run. And he spent nearly two decades working as a pasture at a local mega church when he speaks. You can still hear the fervor none of us would be wasn't to the foundations of those who've gone before us all of us and she said thanks loose does she said but now she's just realizing community calls now. We stand here to that because of the foundation for us we are the most important cities in the world. No it's not just fly walk. You realize it's not I think. Washington DC most awesome emporer sitting worlds the ones driving world. The race for Midland mayor had been one of the city's as most talked about elections in years. And for good reason as you've heard throughout the podcast the oil boom has brought unprecedented challenges to the Permian Basin Jason from the roads to the schools to crime and pollution. Even the region's biggest boosters admit that the quality of life for residents has suffered a while there is some skepticism about the longevity of this boom there plenty of experts who predict that oil and gas production will continue to grow for years to come to reap the the rewards cities across the region will have to make some major changes to exemplify this kind of bold visionary thinking Peyton Invokes folks in name. You're no doubt familiar with by now. George Mitchell often called the father of fracking people will take risks. Who else takes the West Texas? Who else take ceres to poke holes in the ground that you still can't see what's underneath there and do something great happens and we stand on the shoulders? George Soared Michigan. figure out what we do. George Mitchell is credited with innovating the fracking techniques that have turned the Permian Basin into the center of the Energy Universe and Peyton is right without George Mitchell the region would likely be a very different place but for those who know much much about Georgia's life hearing midland's new mayor invoke. His name in this way is a little jolting. Payne envisions a bright future for the Permian built built on the riches that can come from fracking. But George Mitchell did not he had a much more complicated relationship with the technology he helped to create. But that's a side of the story you don't hear so often in the Permian Basin allies with God. Bless you you are is list listen. I'm Chris Wallace and this is boomtown a podcast about the historical soon playing out right now in the Permian Basin way back in episode three. We told you the story of how George Mitchell's company. Innovated fracking racking in the late. Nineteen nineties in this episode. We take a closer look at the life of George Mitchell. He's arguably one of the most important figures of the last century knoll man since John D. Rockefeller has had a greater in back. We consider what his legacy says about the future of energy and the plan. I was this week by reporter. Mitch borden one of our friends. MARFA public radio. You'll hear Mitch Voids timer to this is so so tin the Mitchell Paradox George. Mitchell wasn't your classic swaggering wildcatter. In fact at first first glance. He was kind of boring when I started doing the book. I wondered if if I was going to actually be able to have a book there you know this. Does this guy have enough of a personality to really carry carry it through. That's Lauren. Steffi a journalist who recently published a biography called George P Mitchell fracking sustainability in an unorthodox quest us to save the planet. You might remember hearing from Lauren back in episode three. Lauren says that George was straight laced compared to other Texas wildcatters but the more or Lauren learned about George the more he realized that. This bookish mild-mannered man was actually fascinating But when you start looking into into you know this. Intellectual curiosity had on so many fronts. It's really kind of captivating. I mean he found so many things interesting when he found something interesting he would just start you. You know putting resources towards it to see what he could do which is really kind of not something you see a lot these days In the business world he could have had a private jet if he wanted it he could have had a fancy. It's a yacht But instead he put his money into you know solving really big problems trying to stand really big issues and thinking fifty years down the road. What the world going to be you like? How are we going to? How are we going to solve the problem with with population growth on a planet of finite resources? Those are the things he spent his time thinking about. As opposed to you. Know How do I make my next million. That mindset grew in part from a difficult childhood. His parents Mike and Katina were Greek immigrants. Both were illiterate it before making their way to America Mike had been a goat herder in Greece Father it actually emigrated from Greece when when he was about. Nineteen years old and came into New York can actually went to work for the railroads. His name was Savar paraskevas apples and and so you wonder how did how did this. Greek family get you know today Mitchell. he was working on the railroad. There are several variations of the story. But the gist of it is he. He went to get his first paycheck. The paymaster asked his name and he said Savant Paris Capellas and the pay bathrooms like no. I can't say I can't spell it and if you don't do something I'm GonNa fire you. And so he said well what's your name and the guy said well. My Name's Mike Mitchell. He's like hey that's my name too. What a coincidence with his newly adopted name Mike and Katina Tina moved to Galveston Texas? The city is located on a barrier island in the Gulf coast about an hour south of Houston George was born there in nineteen nineteen. The same year prohibition was passed. He was the third of four kids at the time Galveston was still recovering from the great storm of nineteen hundred a hurricane. It remains the deadliest natural disaster in American history. It had also developed a reputation for being a rowdy port town. This was kind of the wild old. You know rough and tumble days of Galveston. It was known as the Free State of Galveston gambling. Prostitution and organized crime flourished in Fact Act Galveston was a lot like the old patch boom towns of that era during prohibition it became a haven for rum runners ships loaded with liquor from Caribbean. Caribbean ports would sneak into uncontrolled peers along Galveston Bay. Tusa Cillian brother's named Salmon Rodeo Moscow were among the most notorious mobsters lobsters of their time. They ran their listen empire from Galveston. They're infamous lounge. The BALANESE room attracted well heeled patrons like Frank Sinatra Entre Howard Hughes and plenty of old earns so the macy's were a couple of Sicilian immigrants who came to galveston early nineteen hundreds about the same time Mike dead and they started out Ah Barbers In fact they cut the Mitchell boys hair. Sam As you cut their hair at Murdoch's pier and they just Grew to a lot of influence. Let's say they ran Some nightclubs and eventually the valley's ballroom which is a famous Site is not there anymore wiped out in Hurricane Ike but if you're Z. Z.. Top Fan they wrote a song about it. The Moscow's were eventually busted by the Texas Rangers in the fifties but at the time they were community. Heroes Rose they donated money to build churches and passed out presence at Christmas. Mike Mitchell got to know the Moscow's well and he was a regular presence in their gambling parlors or lease though he was uneducated. Mike was resourceful in charismatic. He was really a character. I mean he kind of got by his wits Had never had any formal schooling schooling But he started closed pressing business and and you know kind of did little little businesses going here and there to make money he and he. He was very likable guy. And he knew a lot of people in town Including a Lotta lawyers and bankers still. The family was often barely scraping gaping. Bhai he was not well off. I mean you know they they sort of got by but it was. It was always a struggle and I I think that growing up as a child he was very aware of the financial national struggles with the family. I mean you know. He would oftentimes get up when his when he was eight or nine years old he would get up and go to the the seawall and catch some fish and bring them home. Give them to his mom And then she would you know that that would be dinner. And then he'd he'd go off to school and if you're catching fish for dinner Before you go to school you're probably pretty tuned into the fact that that you you know maybe in the French right. George wasn't like his gregarious father. He tended to keep to himself. The legend goes that he had read all the books in the city library by the time us fourteen but he also spent a lot of time outside exploring the islands lagoons and beaches and also when he who was a child. He told all of us that at one point he wanted to be an astronomer. He just would look up at the stars and wonder what is going on out there. That's meredith it. Drives the second oldest of Mitchell's tin children. She remembers her father as a loving but perplexing figure he was kind of like Mr Magoo round the house and one time really this crazy story but we were talking about dark energy and And some astronomy subjects My Dad why are you interested in dark energy and he said well if we can figure out what it is. We can harness it for energy. Oh my God Dad. You're just out you're out of your mind but that's the way he thought it was always like. Well what is this inlet safe. We use it. It can be an alternative to fossil fuels when George was thirteen tragedy struck. His mother passed away after suffering a sudden stroke so After his mother died You know the the two older boys John and Kristy world enough. They kind of fend for themselves but George and his sister Maria were still pretty young and Mike. You know wasn't really really prepared to to care for two little kids by himself. And he was also soon after he was hit by a car and broke his leg supposedly in twenty two places. Maybe not quite that many but but That's the way he tells the story. George went to live with an aunt uncle on the mainland in a tiny town outside of Houston called Dickinson. His younger sister Maria was sent away to live with relatives and San Antonio. Here's his daughter Meredith again and I think that affected them just terribly because the family was divided Vita that that point and he went to live with the knuckle and his younger sister. My Aunt Maria went live with another set of Aunts and uncles and it just really broke up the family at that point and I don't think he ever quite recovered from that that grief frankly in a letter to assist her Maria a few years later George wrote words cannot describe the feeling I have in me now I to fill the longing for mother someone I can go to some place second call home. Keeping family close would become a driving factor for the rest of Georgia's alive in even after the death of his mother. Her influence on George was profound. She wanted him to become a doctor so he he actually he graduated from high school early. he was sixteen years old and he applied to Rice Ace and got accepted But they told him you know you're you're too young you you need to take a year and grow up a little bit and then come back now that we're well past the start of the New Year it's easy to fall back into old habits and forget our resolutions especially when it comes to money as most most of us have found out the hard way getting into debt is easy and getting out of debt is hard especially if your credit score is great. UPSTART DOT COM is here to help. Health upstart is the revolutionary lending platform. The knows you're more than just your credit score. They offer smart interest rates. Help you pay off. High interest credit card debt upstart goes beyond the traditional credit score when evaluating your credit worthiness and they actually reward you based on other factors like your education and job history you in the form of a smarter interest rate plus they make it fast and easy to check your rate since it's a softball it won't affect your credit score for yourself so from the burden of high interest credit card debt by consolidating everything into one monthly payment with upstart. See why start is ranked number one in their category with over for three hundred businesses on trust pilot and hurried up start dot com slash boomtown to find out how low Europe start rate is checking your it only takes a few minutes. That's upstart dot com slash boomtown Andrew Aydin here host the brand new podcast from H. L. N. down the hill the Delphi murders. This is the story of teens. Abby Williams and Libby German in February two thousand seventeen they went for a hike in Delphi. Indiana and vanished nearly twenty four hours later. Their bodies are found also found lease phone which has video and audio of the killer who remains on the loose down the hill Delphi. Murders subscribe and listen now on Apple. PODCASTS George took the year as an opportunity unity to see a bit more of the world. He went east to Louisiana to live with his older brother. Johnny Johnny was working on rigs and the swampy Gulf coast oilfields at the time and it was there. The George got his first taste of the patch working as a roused about moving pipe and doing grunt work. And just you know fell in. I love the oil business and he started thinking about medical school. He'd also always had a love of astronomy but he. I think you know the that childhood. The financial hardships of his childhood hood really kind of made them focus on. How do I make a living? And he always said he decided to go go into oil gas because he wanted to be in a field where he could. He earned some money at the end of the year. Mitchell decided it in not enroll at rice. After all instead he went to Texas A. and M. to become an aggie there he studied geology and was part of the first wave of true group petroleum engineers. The Rock counts had been sniffing for crude for over a century binding and extracting all was just becoming its own academic field field of study. George was the top of his class. He also served as a cadet in the schools military core amd played on the tennis team but he he was constantly wracked with worry over money. It was a constant struggle. He was always threatened with with being kicked out because he couldn't pay his bills. He would call his dad and he'd send his dad his grades and he'd say you know data. I'm really they're about to kick me out. I need I need you know forty dollars. Whatever twenty five dollars and So his father would go go to Sam missio and he would say you. Look my son's at the top of his class but he's going to get kicked out. He needs some help. Can you give me a hundred dollars in San would give them Mike. One hundred dollars Mike said fifty onto the George and keep fifty for himself after trying to make money in a variety of ways from selling candy to operating his own laundry business. He finally hit on a successful scheme his senior year. He started selling embossed stationary which he realized the freshman would buy no matter what pricey put on it because they would right they were they who home second they would write their girlfriends back home. That how much they miss them. And so you're selling the stationary turned into kind of a booming. Busy started making about three hundred bucks a month selling stationery so so from then on his money. Problems got a lot better. The stationery business became the first in a long line of profitable enterprises for George. He graduated in nineteen forty eighty and spent the next four years serving in the Army Corps of Engineers during World War. Two after the war ended he moved to Houston to work in wool. It was a good time. I'm to be striking into the business. The decade following the war was the heyday of the Texas woman. All across the state newly rich wildcatters were building temples of wealth from art museums to lavish hotels and Houston was the booming financial capital of the industry. This was a time when all men were putting tigers hikers in their backyards and steamboats and they're swimming pools as stunts. There were several outsized personalities in Houston but there are a few in particular killer who came to embody the stereotype of the wildcatter often found strutting through books TV and film one. Was Glenn McCarthy the hard drinking old man who inspired the character Jett rink giant McCarthy poured a ton of his own money into a massive new hotel outside of downtown Houston the opening of the shamrock hotel in nineteen forty nine is still considered by many historians to be the biggest social event in the city's history McCarthy had it decorated in sixty three shades of green as a no mosh native Ireland but not everyone was impressed when famed architect architect Frank Lloyd Wright visited. He reportedly pointed at the lobby ceiling and said to one of his apprentices. That young man is an example of the effects of venereal nereo disease on architecture. Of course McCarthy wasn't the only big name in town there is also red. Smith be was very wealthy. Leave very well known and he actually helped bring the Colt forty five's to Houston. They became the Astros and he actually had a hand building the astrodome. A hell helping get. That process started. The astrodome would become known as the eighth wonder of the world shape of things to come. Our National Sport as baseball season gets underway eighty spanking new astrodome. The new thirty one million dollar home of the Houston Astros a Dome Stadium. Nearly fifty thousand for a baseball game and more conventions and meetings Mitchell didn't have the personality to match some of the other woman in the city in fact quite the opposite he was kind of quiet almost shy in a lot in cases but he became clear right away that he had a knack for reading rock and sniffing out oil. What you see early on his in his career is that a a lot of big names in the business guys gene McCarthy Red Smith? They learned pretty quickly. This guy can find oil at one point. Red Smith had an IFFY prospect prospect in the Texas panhandle. And he wasn't quite sure what to make of it so he farmed it out to some geologists just to see what they would think and most ovum said. Oh don't bother. It's going to be a dry hole. George said No. I think you should drill. I think she drill despite or whatever and so did and and it turned out to be a pretty significant find aligned and so from that moment on Red Smith was like okay. I want you looking at my stuff george and his brother Johnny eventually decided to start their own business. Together and Smith became one of their biggest investors that company later grew into the Mitchell Energy and Development Corporation while other oilmen partied at McCarthy's shamrock. Am Rock Hotel. George would spend his nights pouring over drilling logs looking for potential strikes. He'd passed those funds onto his brother. Johnny who is is a lot like their father charismatic outgoing Johnny would head down to the Espersen. Buildings drugstore a hub for a woman under thick clouds of smoke can over countless cups of black coffee. Johnny built their fledgling company one handshake at a time. The brothers business was touching. Go for a while. Here's George describing it years later to the Houston oral history project for May the well would go to the bank and bar. Someone against we loved rile with just back Cry And if the business his big break came from a Chicago bookie in the early fifties who claim to have a hot deal. George was skeptical but agreed to take a look. It turned out that what the book he had was a collection of seemingly worthless leases near Fort Worth and so so George looked at it and there have been thirteen. Dry Holes drilled on it in fact did kind of been known in the areas the frustration fields. There was a landowner their name Hughes his And he really believed that there was oil under his land but nobody could find and So he kept Tom. Just keep drilling boys. You'll find it you know. And they never ever did and so George looked at it and he realized that that he was pretty sure that they had actually missed it. They drilled right through the deposit the right through the the gas deposits and they were drilling too deep. Basically they reopen those thirteen wells and George turned out to be right. Ten of them produce news in fact they're still producing natural gas to this day. That was their big fight and once they realized what they had they had about three hundred acres that they at least with that project check and they immediately went out. At least I think it was three hundred thousand acres so they took this huge chunk land Before anybody really knew what was going on which is of course what you do to get a good price and so that really became the crown jewel a company that carried them through the nineteen nineties at the time. Natural gas wasn't worth much but George so it's potential hebr addicted. It would become the fuel of the future. He struck a deal with the natural gas pipeline company which was selling gas to Chicago go for heating because Chicago was such a huge market. The company needed a major guaranteed supply. George could promise them that and in return you fetch a high price for the gas so he was selling this gas to Chicago at above market prices and it was a thirty year contract or something like that so we locked in these these really high prices for very long time and then because he had his own gas plant he would strip out a lot of these byproducts. Fa and things like that and sell them to the chemical companies on on the Gulf coast near Houston so he really kind of you know maximized what you could do with this one property. This deal was the bedrock for all of Georgia's future success. Lauren calls it Mitchell energies. ATM as you might remember from episode three. It was there that the Mitchell actual engineers spent almost twenty years trying to crack the code of how to use fracking to open up shell formations when they finally succeeded in nineteen ninety eight that same region that was once called. The frustration fields became known as the prolific Barnett Shale. It's one of the largest natural gas this deposits in the United States and its enlarge part. Why in two thousand and two George was able to sell his company for over three billion dollars others? But we're other oiling. Gas Tycoons might have immediately jumped into their next big money venture. George went in a different direction. We choose to go to the moon and this decayed and do the other things. Not because they are easy but because they are hard because that goal well-served to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills when President Kennedy gave his famous Moonshot speech in nineteen sixty two. John was standing inside a packed stadium at Rice. University smack DAB in the middle of Houston. George Mitchell's adopted hometown. I don't know if George Orange was there that day but throughout the sixties as NASA was broadcasting the first pictures from the Apollo missions of what Earth looked like from outer space people. The world world over began to think about sustainability with the newfound urgency. You I'm all for man. Seeing the planet from that distant vantage inspired people including George. He began attending the Aspen Institute and International Gathering for the wealthy and powerful to debate solutions to the world's biggest problems albums sort of like a pro Ted Conference only more elite. The story goes that wall. Aspen Hebrew ended the famous inventor and futurist Chris Buckminster Fuller. George had many famous friends throughout his life. From Jimmy Carter to Stephen Hawking but fuller's influence might have loomed largest gist fuller is probably best known for inventing geodesic domes in coining the term spaceship Earth which inspired the golf ball. Looking sphere. Ebb caught in Disneyworld anchored by eighteen. Stories Speier called spaceship Earth Epcot futuristic for billions display the neon and laser technology of tomorrow Orel spaceship Earth was fuller's vision for the kind of comprehensive global planning needed to make sure Earth's rapidly growing population could live comfortably without destroying our most essential ecosystems fuller was an optimist. He believed humanity could do it. But it was going take a massive coordinated effort to pull it off. George became convinced of the same thing in the sixties George decided to launch his own many spaceship earth experiment by attempting to create a sustainable community outside of Houston called the woodland's to lead the project. He hired a a leading environmental designer from the University of Pennsylvania. He looked at everything from flooding issues. Drainage he studied all the different species of trees Animal Life you know how do we. How do we build a city with as little impact as possible? And so you know they would. For example study the soils us. And where the soils were more porous. Those would be the residential neighborhoods. Where you had the harder soils as it'd be the commercial areas because that would minimize runoff? And you know just just a million million little details like that but it was really It became a quite an undertaking. Obviously but something that George was very very committed to wind. Wind up calling the woodland's his eleventh child. There are some employees at his energy company that grew concerned by the amount of money. George was diverting into his suburb herb. What happened was Mitchell energy would would be generating all these profits and George was basically taking them on funneling all into the woodland's so the energy you guys were getting a little frustrated because they're like we're making all this money and you're putting into this real estate deal? You know what what's happening with this. They didn't quite understand it. George moved the company's headquarters there there and today it's home to many of Houston's energy executives though George didn't quite achieve utopia he dreamed of where people of all social classes asses lived in harmony. The Woodland's did become a global model for sustainable suburbs. In nineteen seventy eight George and his his wife created the Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation which they use to support programs to preserve land and limit the impacts of oil and gas drilling since it began. The foundation has given away over seven hundred and fifty million dollars of the family's personal fortune Georgia's daughter Meredith ran the Mitchell Foundation for some two decades when she stepped down in two thousand eleven George's granddaughter. Catherine Laurens took over when I called her her. Catherine told me that George was constantly evangelizing about whatever. Big Idea had last peaked his interest. I mean I remember every time I see him throughout college and afterward he would hand like whatever the book was he was reading. You GotTa read this Book About Sustainability About the planet or it was always been talking when I saw him always without you know the environment and and and she she would always say you know he by I literally like two hundred bucks or whatever that because in mail to all of his friends especially those in leadership positions at companies. So I would remember you know go into possessing boxes at these books in a car that he was spending around the world and give me five. You gotta give it to all your friends to and And you know this wasn't just one book. It was kind of whatever the off what he ends you at the moment. Talking about sustainability in the planet and the need to take care of it. When George I began trying to crack the code on fracking in the eighties he surely knew it had the potential to make him and his company a lot of money but he also believed that if we could access the vast reservoirs and natural gas trapped in shale it could benefit the planet one of the things that George? Mitchell really believed that if we're going to have you know a growing population and we not only have to have environmental sustainability economic sustainability. We had to find a way to provide for all these people you know using these finite resources and so so you know the reason. He believed natural gas. Fuel of the future was because sooner or later we're GONNA need a cleaner fuel than oil or call or whatever and so while he was not he didn't really see renewables taking off in his lifetime. He definitely believed that they should he. He said in the nineteen nineties. We need alternatives. But they're too expensive. We're going to have to do something I think so. He's all natural gas as a way of getting there. In some ways. Georgia's been proven right. Natural Gas produces about half the carbon dioxide night is coal for comparable price since the fracking. Boom the rise of natural gas has led to a major decline in the use of coal and because of that. US Carbon Emissions recently hit at twenty five year low. The boom also lead to lower energy costs for consumers to a tune of some two thousand dollars is per household and it's been a boon for some parts of the economy with an estimated four million jobs tied fracking but no one could have predicted. Just just how much fracking would take off in two thousand. There were twenty six thousand gas wells in the entire. US fifteen years later there were more than three hundred thousand gas wells today some sixty percent of all US crude oil comes from wells but the record breaking waking levels of production comes at a cost. fracking requires far more resources than a conventional well especially water which is already a scarce commodity in West Texas a fracture well might require between two and eight million gallons of water and in the Permian a single fact. Well can require twelve hundred truckloads of sand water and equipment and even natural gas Mitchell's fuel of the future has a downside while natural gas. That's produces less carbon emissions. It also contains methane a potent greenhouse gas when companies burn off natural gas using flares or allow wells wells to leak methane then the climate advantages of natural gas or wiped out when fracking really started to take off in the early two. Thousands Lawrence says it didn't take long for George to see how the industry was going to exploit the technology. He knew he told his son in law. You know these cowboys are GonNa ruin everything and you know. He knew what the business was like and he knew that people were going to. We're going to basically abuse desk and you know as you see the the footprint from fracking growing as as the number of wells increases and whatnot. you know. I think he would have become increasingly concerned about that. The earthquake issue The the methane leaks but he would also I say these are fixable problems right we can solve this. We need to not rather than just abandon the whole process. We need to find a better way of doing it. In Two thousand twelve the year before his death George Famously Co op Ed. In The Washington Post with now presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg the two main called on drilling companies to be more socially conscious and asked the government to put stricter regulations on fracking. They wrote mostly. It's the loud voices at the extremes who are dominating the debate debate those who want either no fracking or no additional regulation of it as usual. The voices in the sensible center are getting drowned out with was serious repercussions for our country's future. The rapid expansion of fracking has invited legitimate concerns about its impact on water air air and climate concerns. The industry has attempted to gloss over. In fact he used to admonish not just other oil executives but business leaders in general that they weren't thinking enough about the importance of their role in the community. And the sort of you know that he believed that. There are a lot of big problems. That only business could solve George's daughter. Meredith errative actually lives part time in West Texas in the town of MARFA. She's watched the boom unfold in the permian basin over the past decade. Mitch spoke to her. Recently Elliott Morphou public radio. I think my father would be horrified by the what's going on in the Permian Basin because a lot of it is absolutely unnecessary. It it it's just it feels to me just looking and hearing about it. That is just the Greek on wild. And I'm I'm not even sure we need all that oil and gas right now especially the gas and fracking. That's going on and we've ruined environment and I think my father would be horrified by. Frankly how do you react to that. That people who are so pro drilling and fracking in the Permian would invoke your father's name as as someone who helped them get to where they are. Today it's kind of For me it's kind of embarrassing. Frankly and I feel feel like that. They the people who invoke his name don't really quite understand what he was all about and I think he would not like it either or if he were alive. George P Mitchell chairman of the board and President of the Mitchell Energy and Development Corporation in one thousand nine hundred eighty four George and his wife. Cynthia attended an honorary dinner. Were George was presented with the Horatio Alger Award the annual award recognizes a figure that embodies to classic rags to riches story other inductees have included Buzz Aldrin. Maya Angelou and reba MacIntyre the typically reserved. George was in a jovial mood that night. He even cracked a joke to start things off war. They don't have happy hair on this. Hit Hair you shouldn't get along well. My my wife just reminded me that before I met her. I was nothing and since I met her. I did pretty well so I want to give her a tax. He could've talked about. Anything mentioned most attendees probably expected him to talk about his accomplishments and oil and gas instead. He sounded a lot like his old friend. Buckminster Fuller in this country we have the economic environment in which to the pursuit of success can really be honorable and enjoyable game and if we play the game Preferably everybody wins by properly and preferably. I mean that we must work hard and be fair. We must be compassionate and decent and we must return to society as much as or more than we got out of it. It's clear that George wanted to leave a legacy beyond being known as the father of fracking. But it's less clear what his legacy. The actually is in George's later years after his wife Cynthia died in two thousand nine. He left the woodland's moved back to his boyhood town of Galveston. He lived for a time in the tournament house a hotel that he and Cynthia had bought in the early eighties as part of the historic preservation. Program that your mom continued to operate eight is a working hotel. Even as George lived there you know they had reserved tables in the restaurant and in the lobby and he would come down from his sweet and just sort of sit there in the lobby and You know the time was their former governor mark white just happened to be coming through Galveston and came up and said hello to him and they chatted for a few minutes. That's Russell missile gold a senior energy reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Russell is the author of two books including the boom. How fracking ignited the American Energy Revolution? Shen and changed the world. Russell met George at the hotel a few years before George died he was kind of enjoying the the the sunset of his life Just Holding Court In in the lobby of tremont hotel in downtown Galveston and it wasn't just governors. You know anyone who came by he you would try to engage with them and talk with them and you sitting there and his He had a little Motorized wheelchair of sorts and remember it had a bumper sticker on it right Say Informing everyone that he was he was nagy. There were certain things he would engage with certain stories. You would love to tell but there were certain things when you really kind of tried to drill down and try to understand a little bit about what he thought of his legacy and unleashing so much new oil and gas drilling in the United States dates and elsewhere That he didn't want to engage with He my sense was he had closed the book on that and and didn't WanNa talk about it anymore. This is part part of what came to be known as the Mitchell Paradox. Here's Lauren Steffi Ya son Todd Actually dubbed at the Mitchell Paradox And while while nobody remembers George actually talking about it in fact even when he was asked about it he would just kind of wouldn't answer He had two parts of his life. He had the business part he had the Mitchell energy part where he was drilling gas and figuring out ways to draw gas and then he had this other part and it wasn't listen just it wasn't just in in oil and gas. I mean here's someone who was genuinely worried about overpopulation. And he had ten kids You know it it there were just complexities to life. That that at the end of the day you you just. You couldn't resolve George's daughter. Meredith remembers giving him a hard time when he'd Fred about the planet's growing population. Oh Yeah we always taste about that. So what are you talking about this dad. You had ten kids. He said Yeah I know. Now I'm not gonNA worry about that. He just said it's true Georgia's life is filled with all sorts of contradictions. Plenty of people have pointed and out that Georgia's pleased for more regulation and more corporate responsibility really only intensified after he'd sold his business and after after he'd made his billions and that that concern about the environment did not spill over into his company and he did not create a company Benny Alternately and oil and gas company that showed us a new way of both getting oil and gas out of the ground while being an environmental steward. He showed us a new way to get oil and gas out off the ground and it really is left to to the current generation into new people to figure out how to be an environmental steward at the same time. In the mid nineties Georgia's Georgia's own company was marred and lawsuits over questionable drilling practices and water contamination. At one point Mitchell Energy and development lost a lawsuit route. There would have cost the company over two hundred million dollars. The case was later appealed and thrown out by the Texas Supreme Court but Russell says that the state still oh found. The Mitchell energy had quote deliberately misreported the way the company was building their wells. It stain his reputation. I've a lot of admirations for George Mitchell His legacy is one of being a stubborn inventor and someone who was willing to keep trying to do something because he I just had a a deep seated belief that he be able to fear out how to open up these incredibly thick rocks. And you know that's that's an incredible legacy and maybe do you know. Is it fair to also ask him to to have a second legacy of of being an environmental steward and figuring out how to oil and gas Production in an environmentally Faithful way for the future generations. That might be too much to ask anyone person He certainly failed in that. But Lauren on the other hand believes Georgia's legacy was much bigger than fracking. So I think that that ultimately when you take all of these things you know fracking sustainability. You know the the big science stuff you know what you see. His real legacy is a celebration of big ideas you know. He was a primary funder early on the giant Magellan Telescope. which you know when it comes online in a few years you know might just attacked you know intelligent life often the universe which would be kind of an interesting way to kappa a really unusual Legacies here's George's granddaughter. Catherine literally had had ten times every time you for the last twenty year life. If you can't make the world work with six billion people how you make her with nine billion people and what are you GonNa do about it and he would like what are you about. George believed the world needed to eventually move away from oil. Instead his technology she has helped make America into the largest oil producing country in the world. Despite this Lawrence Steffi says George would have been undaunted if he were still around I think he he was always an undying optimism. I mean that's kind of what drove him forward. was you know he didn't believe in some sort of dystopia future. I mean he really believe. We're GONNA figure all this out and in fact no less than Stephen Hawking at his memorial service said you know not many people can say they changed the world but George Mitchell was one of them. So that's from a guy who knows right next week on the final episode of boomtown we look back on our journey and look ahead to what the future might hold for the Permian Basin. Boomtown is a CO production of imperative. Entertainment and Texas monthly executive producer. Is Jason Hoke produced and engineered by Brian Stanford who also wrote the score. Boomtown is edited by J K Nickel and Megan cry and Co reported by Lee Freak Stat or theme song is written and performed by Paik Rossi. I'm your host and writer Christian walls. This episode was made with help from the crew at Marfa public radio. Thanks again to Mitch. Borden for his work reporting and Co writing this episode. If you're outside West Texas you can follow them and Marfa public radio DOT ORG special special thanks to the Houston Public Library Houston Metropolitan Research. Center and the Horatio Alger Association for allowing us to use recordings of George Mitchell. The full interview and other talks with influential. Texans can be found on the Houston Public Library Digital Archive. Texas monthly's parent company also owns interest in the midstream oil and gas ass. Industry among other diversified investments are editorial judgments are made independently of any such investments. Don't forget to tell your friends about boomtown on and leave a review on apple podcast if you like the show. Boomtown is so series with new episodes available. Every Tuesday follow us on social media and visit a Texas monthly dot com slash. Boomtown for more on this story.

George George P Mitchell Houston Georgia Mike Mitchell Mitchell Texas Lauren Steffi Meredith errative Permian Basin Mitchell Energy Mike Mitch borden John D. Rockefeller Johnny Johnny Galveston Apple MARFA