17 Burst results for "Mark Webster"

"mark webster" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:08 min | 4 months ago

"mark webster" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Tunnel vision was it didn't matter what the issue is. But if I can make President Trump weaker foreign election, I'm gonna do it. Pelosi has rejected a Senate Republican push for smaller, targeted relief, insisting more money is needed to tackle the virus. The House passed to more than $2 Trillion bill in May. Nationwide coronavirus deaths were about to hit 242,000 with nearly 10.5 million cases. As more states try to fight the recent record surge with renewed restrictions boxes. Jeff Man also has more live Lisa for the first the third time in five days, Wisconsin is reporting more than 7000 daily coronavirus cases, with hospitalizations soaring, similar narrative playing out in Michigan and Minnesota and Iowa. We know that gatherings are driving numbers, and that's why in the new declaration that we Limited the number of indoor gatherings to 25 people unless you social distance and wear a mask Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds issue with a mask mandate there in Ohio over 5800 new virus cases reported Wednesday. The state also under a new mask orders with more restrictions. They're likely Lisa and Jeff, New York's governor, now barring private gatherings of more than 10 people and slapping a curfew on restaurants, bars and gyms. The vice of the president elect. Rather, Joe Biden continues meetings with his transition team. America is listening to Fox thieves reliable, dependable. If it matters to you, we've got it covered. No, your top local stories are on twin cities. News talk dot com. Minnesota News Network. I'm Scott Peterson. State officials haven't sounded a red alert but are keeping a close eye on pressure that the covert pandemic is putting on Minnesota hospital beds, Governor Tim Walz says even with plans already in place that could almost double ICU capacity, here's the problem. Because Colbert is so widespread and because it's hitting staff, the staffing issue is equally as important as the beds because an empty ICU room with all of the proper equipment. And no critical care Nurse doesn't do us much good walls, is urging Minnesota's to redouble their efforts to control the spread of covert, masking social distancing and limiting the size of gatherings. A new set of regulations affecting bars and restaurants takes effect tomorrow night. The day before those covert restrictions take effect. The Legislature has its sixth special session of the years. Republicans continue trying to dial back governor Walls is emergency powers attempting to garner Democratic support. House Republicans are taking a different tack and proposing that the Legislature be able to selectively cancel certain emergency orders instead of all of them in once. Redwing representative Barb Haley notes the governor had to modify and reissue some of his covert orders, particularly on schools. Whether the proposal gets democratic support, or whether the governor would sign it remains to be seen. Bill Warner. The camp in a rich field man, who was an associate of Prince wants to rename multiple streets in Chanhassen after the musician Mark Webster. Once the Chanhassen City Council to rename Autobahn Road and a stretch of Highway five after Prince this is a man in.

Minnesota Governor Kim Reynolds Governor Tim Walz President Jeff Man Legislature Lisa Iowa Bill Warner Prince Joe Biden Chanhassen City Council Minnesota hospital Chanhassen Pelosi Senate Scott Peterson Fox Wisconsin Colbert
"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

05:42 min | 7 months ago

"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

"Maybe, four years ago someone paid gail to do a bunch consulting in like flu matt somewhere he put that money in the business. We we split away. So it's Kinda like that long-term. Gay were both in this together we both. Want the same thing. We're both GONNA make make equal as has been a big driver plus were both quite. People. I don't WANNA I don't WanNa be well, people will have no ego but. We definitely, both have eagles. We're if it's quite common, we will have a debates about something and then whoever has the correct logical Idea we'll. We'll. The other person will. Okay. Yeah actually you're right. It makes sense I like that. Yeah. You get down to like obviously there's always a motions in wants and needs and personalities and your motive over his or vice versa. But at the end of the day, it's like what's right for business audience whatever your goal is logic is typically the thing that will get their. Emotions are probably get fired up and that's probably gonNA lead the like better ideas and probably a better outcome. Yeah and I could definitely has to the like you know your your focus both have to be in the same place. I've I've had previous business partners in the past. Joe Has as well where you know. One of my businesses specifically, that was my full time thing but it was my partner's side Gig essentially, and that's just a recipe for resentment right like. If, I'm putting hundred percent into something and he's putting fifty percents into something, but we're split the revenue fifty-fifty. Resentment is going to come from. So I think that's sort of something that we both learned from past partnerships like we're either all in on this or were. You know we're out? Also. As you get I mean we've been doing this for for for ten years I'm in my mid thirties. Now will when we started this in our mid twenties and our priorities in life or Actually, difference to what they are now so. Is just accepting that. What you WANNA do in life and long term plans. They're they're hundred percent GONNA change as you get older just like being honest with each other about, hey, I don't really want to do this or hey I'm thinking about doing this we need to prepare for this or. Getting married we need to make more money on one of my house is this kind of stuff and? The other person kind of like being okay. With contributing towards some of the other person's goals even if they're not feeling them at that exact moment or whatever. So you're essentially married. At the end of the day it's very similar to a marriage. Did we can relate I mean we're in the mid thirties. So we've had yeah. Houses kids moving other stuff random things happen and we're always there to. Got The support and he share for us it's a lot of like this shared vision of where we're headed and then knowing who we are, how we work and all that stuff. Then it's GonNa work out as long as we're keeping true to ourselves in that vision that we agreed upon. Yeah. I mean we've had we've had times in our business where like maybe I'd take some extra. Money, because I haven't expense that like Joe doesn't have Joe would take extra money from the business for a month because he needed for whatever reason and we just always know like it's going to even out eventually you know. So I think if you have that kind of approach to it and you're kind of cool and open about that sort of thing, then it should play out well. As soon as They that's bass really key as well especially for expenses. So I am a PC guy through in through So I'm all about building a moderately priced desktop whereas gals like a Mac. He gets the he always gets the latest iphone I MAC or whatever. and. She's like you don't even think about those those kind of things because you know it's especially with an expense abby something contributing towards the business. It's you know you you need money for whatever something in your personal life it's freeing up your time so that you can work on the business. Therefore, it's contributing towards the future growth. So you kind of really have to to think big about these kind of micro-issues as as tempting as in the early days to kind of like, what's he doing? Yeah. At the end of the day I feel like it's something that almost all partners have to figure out through trial and error it's hard to convey that through this conversation. I think people everybody thinks, oh, we're different but then you know not really we've definitely had our ups and downs you know but yeah. Well, either this is super fascinating of the conversation maybe maybe we'll do it again later on or because there's just so much cool stuff or gale maybe we'll have him on his perspective. You guys you guys will have to come on ours as well. Some. I really enjoyed this. I can tell you guys are super passionate about what you guys do and stuff is what really comes across in your ub as well. Thank You well of Utah leads I guess last year he mentioned who has a solid book for hiring is there another book or maybe some resource even podcast that you refer to often you recommend others I'm a big fan of like managing finances properly remit stathis book. I will teach you to be rich for personal finance or Mike McCallum Wits, profit I. Really, really good book for particularly back in our agency days we really struggling to I don't really know where all the money went. We kept spending came in on growth and stuff reading. This book really helped us to flip model on its head and and soon as we did, we're allocating money correctly and planning things. Suddenly, we just had a lot more money because our entrepreneurial drive to. Make things work superseded our ability to spend money. So I highly recommend. Solid. Yet, they're both great and perfect man thirty hacker dot com. Yeah. Find the PODCAST, their courses..

Joe Has gail flu partner Mike McCallum Utah
"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

07:35 min | 7 months ago

"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

"We're gallon. I were a little bit awkward with all this kind of intro. We don't have any sponsors. We don't really have ending to go on the here's a podcast. Alright. Can we start talking? So Gail into the routine of asking me how it's going as like a book I, I'll introduce you to my business partner Mark How's it going mark and? Find Great. Really. Awkward. But in the last episode of our show, we started doing these republics on Youtube as well. So we started doing these. Chapters on. Youtube. So we have like for from five minutes to seven minutes. We're talking about x from seven minutes and strong why? So He's now the the zero zero, thirty, zero, zero five. How's it going? Famous in a chapter where yeah people could skip to it. You Awkward Mark and this one. This one. Chapter feature actually that's probably a cool strategy there for just content general. What's the time stamping right? That's what you're referring. It's really rudimentary how youtube works new just leave a comment at the time stamp and the index or the name of what you described that that chapter on automatic put in I think you have to put in a comment direction so you can't really kind of set it in the backhander at the moment, but we did it this week for the first time on our average wash time on youtube went from like nine minutes to like sixty minutes or. which was huge makes a big difference because people can just. Sounds like you guys usually longer podcasts, kind of kind of like us. To skip to the parks, they want Achy, get the content they they want to get out of it while they're having breakfast or whatever else do you. It's funny because I love it when other podcasters do that but we actually have it implemented that in our you know this is how we do that Hey Jacob you're listening to. So this is how we do this mark. He's he's our editor and helps us with the Youtube so we should do this. Team. Members podcastone visas chapter thing that marks talking about channel. After using Pat Winds player. So we use fusebox which used to be that smart podcast player. They actually have that timestamped interest so you can embed the player on your blog post and do the same time stamping thing to we. We don't use it but it's there. We actually used to use smart podcast players well but kinda remember why we stopped using it I think when we start doing more youtube based off for push that I, we still have signed cloud in everything going out to spotify and wherever else. But. We really trying to push youtube first and foremost now because just seems such a great. Opportunity for not only engagement for discovery in. There is something that's reminded me. I think it was something. Gail said in that podcast which I'm just like, Dear, God I need to nerd out on all these shows that you guys have and that new pages are just like better than anything I've ever seen to for a podcast diagrams and stuff no shit it's amazing but there is like I think gail was talking about like if you WANNA grow instagram your instagram channel like imbed that content on your post like same with youtube it sounds like like imbed that. If you're trying to grow an audience there, why don't you double dip when it's on your own website obviously can capture your pixel. You can do all of that stuff within your control. Says that? One hundred percent because when we're emailing our audience or doing, you know Monday roundups to members about here. Here's some interesting podcast who did this month in the past it would be just assigned cloud in bed or the smart podcast player whatever, and then the show notes sometimes transcript back with me to do full transcripts transcripts rather. But now we just do the same thing. We just stick the Youtube video embedded higher up on it, and that alone drives people to to that platform well. So. For through it's so simple. But when he said I was like. If. You turn to grow something just put it where the eyeballs already are. That's true. So much stuff that we have blind spots and like we'll have a podcast for somebody who's just like. It's also like little things. So we tried doing daily shows for a couple of weeks just to see what would be like as an experiment. It was kind of fun and allowed us to cover shorter topics, snack size content that we wouldn't have necessarily done an hour long episode from. But what happened was it? It really split our audience half of them loved it and half of them hated. So as part of that, what we did was, if you guys if you like this or don't like this, you have any opinions go to YouTube. There's comments there and you know comment on videotape line comment solvency drive engagement on Youtube. It's one of the Mavericks. The. Driving that. So it really spiked are are interested in in our podcast for for those two weeks. When we're doing before we reverted back that's really really smart. Do not honor podcast. Tell you re purposed into youtube videos as well. So you know. Start throwing the comments over there. Over there we'll keep an eye on that. Again there's one last question I wanted to ask but it's sort of a slight change of subject and then we can go ahead and start wrapping up. So obviously, we've got to sort of partnerships here. That are are unique in the fact that they make it past ten years. Or two years now. So so for me Joe, I think that the key to the. Success of our partnership is like really really clearly like knowing who we are in the business, right? Like I know who I am in the business I'm the Technical Systems Guy Right I do advertising Seo. Build system spreadsheets like I'm very techy Joe's more like outreach connecting with networking, speaking, going on a lot of podcast things like that. So like we have clearly defined like these are my things in the business. So I'm kind of curious as sort of a sort of final wrap up. What sort of things do you believe has led to you guys having a successful partnership would certainly that? So it's Our lines low bit more diagonal than that. But so gail, I would describe as like the techie mad scientists like loads of ideas, an experiments in stuff all drawings all over the wall and then I'm I think we're both quite introverted but I'm more the systems processes guy comes along and takes all this craziness in like organizers. A makes it into more of a business so that certainly Skills, I don't have I. Have Skills that he don't. He doesn't have so that synergy has really underpinned. One other thing which we did right the star is that we we were both like, okay this is it. We're both good all in into this no outside projects and in a considerable number of cases where partnerships fall apart. I've I've coach people and talk people about these situations is often because there's they're being pulled in multiple zones will could put all this extra energy into the business but know my other business which does something not too dissimilar. I. Get one hundred percent of the equity or the revenue from the profits from that. So you know Game Theory starts coming in and it's like, what are you really trying to do in? What's your incentives and all this stuff? It gets a bit messy. So we haven't very very clear. It's like this. Is it one hundred percent of everything is going in here I come up with an idea it goes in here if gail comes out with something or We don't do consulting anymore but..

Youtube Gail Joe Mark How Achy partner spotify Mavericks editor
"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

05:52 min | 7 months ago

"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

"With this I, you mean in terms of link building. Yeah. Link building or just really optimizing for traffic in general like do you have joost in there as well and so basically what you're asking is like win a blog post goes live like what are the steps you follow to make sure it's optimized. Right. So so as we're writing the blog post, we will do some of these steps. A SURFER SEO has A. Plug. In essentially which works with Google docs in writing, you can get it. So editor can come in. So long before we publish it, a few of these steps were already uptaking once it's actually live in and out there most of the work from from then mostly on page work is already done we. Joost. Last year couple years ago three years ago they had a bunch of issues. Actually, forget what it, what it was. We've started using a tool called rank math, a maths math It's basically the same as joost, but it has all the features which used to have for free which you have to pay for. UN-USA YOU'RE on a budget to get to go for. Sweet. So we do all our kind of. Technical methods, description stuff like that on on their then is primarily a link building game for for us the title at the. So on had a site, which is already on its way up and has number of articles, some traffic and stuff we will do some internal link building. So that could either be just like looking at our inventory of content, where would it make sense to link to? This is why having A. fulltime person in operations on your team that's dedicated to helping out doing this kind of stuff comes in handy because they know all the the plate, the sites you're trying to put the pages trying to push their maybe top of page to page. One of the few internal links may be pushed it up a bit we have a process i. Can't remember exactly what it is, but it's it's something like if you Google your own sites like sites on thirty acker and then like topic it will come up with Google will prevent topics which or pages which that topic is relate to just on your site, and then that can serve as a a way of identifying internal linking opportunities. So then. That's quite straightforward. The biggest chunk of work is on doing linked properly building like back links. and so we have a number of different processes which will will do some of them are kind of sitewide. So we'll do like guest posting we do a lot of. Help reporter out Haro hidden has been been really good for new newest sites get a lot of really high authority links plus it's it's free to to sign up to join that. newsletters while so. get sight out in the early days, but specifically to content were riposting. Often, will let it sit for a little while and to see, is it going to rank naturally that will depend on competition. If we know it's just GonNa be it's GonNa be an uphill battle as a long term thing will start building immediately trying to get a deep links to that specific page. So whatever we're doing guest posting at the time we will or skyscraper link building we've done a lot of as well. Or things like this, I'm coming on your podcast really to build a link it's more publicity and stuff. But you know there, there may be linked building opportunities for things that had any marketing activity. The you're doing any anything you're contributing to your community like look for a link so we did the. One recently with the we use Asana a lot as I was mentioning for on our processes as reached out to them and said Hey we've we use. Asana. Here's all the crazy advanced stuff we do. we've actually built some training for it in our our course stuff showed them, and they're like, cool with love to do a case study of you guys some they're interviewed us and we're getting some publicity that windows some links coming back from there. So you have to like I. Don't. You just have to always be hungry for links and everything you do to think of as wise link building opportunity where's where's the next one? How can I get my next link building fix? and. Then just as you're naturally doing promotional stuff or A. Real marketing for Your Business. You will come across Numerous options for that for podcasting specifically. I. Mean You candidate did it earlier probably not intentionally, but mentioning I think it was one of the podcasts articles you wrote the case study thing. Wolf Wolfer. Sure link that. So sue WHO's listening who takes our notes I don't know what do you know the number of the episode or? Probably the. Next time I come into podcast. Ready just ask someone asked me that. Just emails the link to that case study in willing. One of the things that we do we go on podcasts is obviously mentioned the name of our show and the link to our site, but we always like to mention. One sort of cornerstone pillar piece of content on the podcast as well. Because now we're getting like a link straight to our our homepage, but we're also getting a deep link from being on that podcast as well. So we always like to do that on podcast is kind of mentioned a few different sources that people can go to. So that now there's multiple links both like to the surface level, but also deeper links will help you out again. That's really really smart actually like should link up A. Sues listening one eighty two is the episode I was like Nerd ing out I think it was your business model on authorities sites or like the structure of it or something I loved how that started off to that was that was. Like this is kind of interesting people don't know who you are yet. So who the fuck are you in the second, that's how the episode started. Like these games. Yeah..

Joost Google A. Plug editor A. Sues Wolf Wolfer reporter A. Real
"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

07:58 min | 7 months ago

"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

"You know the that could be business excel in itself like Garrett Authority hacker just do that. If I even considered doing that one point just focusing one hundred percent on that. Then you've got a hacker which requires us to stop and teach thousands of people this stuff which were were learning. and. So in order to in order to do that, you have to actually not just know the stuff but be good at teaching the stuff and those are two very, very, very different skill set chatting enough people appreciate last you've you guys having bill of course you prob-. Probably understand that dumping on your knowledge in a few videos is not great course no need to really think through and look at how people are using it. Look at while the day to the same survey, your your audience taught people. He's taken US five years to learn to to really do the stuff properly. An an and that's kind of where today but. Really, every single quarterly meeting we have were like, where are we like seventy five, percent authority hacker fifty, percent twenty, five percent you know we were just getting pulled back and forth. The whole time that is our business because we have to do both of these things to to make it work long-term otherwise, we just get rusty in. Marketing. especially SEO changes so fast it was loser loser edge. Yes I'm going to work for for long-term. Now, do you guys do you guys have much of a team behind running authority hacker and some of these other sites or is it just the two of you trying to do it all yourselves? No we haven't. We have a team and we we have a team that goes across all sites. We've. Had Three people working in our agency. At one point, we have a strong desire to keep that team as small as possible. So we've really really careful these days about higher only only high the absolute best people. So we reject the luxury would rather have a role unfilled than bringing someone kind of moderate or or average. But yeah. We've we have a team. In place where we've kind of excelled more aback is bringing in people to. Augment Gail Myself, and so rather than replaced us as content creators which I don't think is going to be possible in the Authority Act I don't think we can bring someone in and they can just you know take over the podcast or Start making courses it just wouldn't be the same a lot of people follow authority. Hacker. Four. Gala myself in the way we teach our. Unique weirdness. or or whatever. So we've we've kind of like taking the bottom up approach to replacing ourselves rather than just trying to step out the businesses in entirely On our podcast shows interviewing a Guy Mike Morrison runs cycle. The membership guys I'm a big fan of of what they're doing their membership site about membership sizing and asked him this question he he what the Exit Plan can you can you is this an his response with death I love this so much I'm just going to do this forever until I can't do anymore and category thinking I, feel like I'm kind of own this track of the as as well to to accent. So you're happy with. The missions driving strong. You know people are stoked on it I feel like that's how we approach this podcast is like this podcast podcast itself like I don't think we ever plan on stopping some of the other little pieces underneath in the business you know all of it's for sale. Yeah Hey the praise I learned that from. Some. Curious mark about like within authorities site if someone were to be in, let's say our shoes where Y- like we have other stuff running. We see the power and team we have some maybe some investment money who are the core roles that you think would be required for authorities say. If. You depend how hands on you be by swimming you don't not vary then you need some operations person who's just GonNa like. Be on it. You can sit there and provide the vision for what needs to happen and check in every week her. Daily stand ups or whatever, but you need someone who can actually like. Really care about what's happening at. Make sure all these processes are executed so that that's one. A writer if you're, you're making any kind of authority side, most likely include a loss of blog content. So good writer very there's lots of writers out there. There's not very many good writers add there are reasonably priced. So hiring writers is a whole other. Kettle of fish that the needs needs to be solved, unending, Aranda, those two peoples while they can get get the site to a decent level When we're creating sites, the Strategy Planning Keyword Research Site Planning, we still do all out one hundred percent of that Ourselves just set the the kind of plan. So we'll will come with maybe two, hundred, five, hundred blog posts me a lot of sites never get this far but. Blog post ideas and then we will give that to operations people who will will execute on those. We'll I I work closely on hiring the writers. These really important find the right type of person who kind of it's hard to explain but someone who gets it It is not just writing like fluffy blog content. They were given a keyword. An article limit. Teaching people, how to create good content having all the processes to do do is is a real challenge as well but those those will be the main main goals are main roles. And we have a link going team that go across all their site. So the processes which we develop on one site for furloughing building for outreach. For Marketing we tend to rinse and repeat null, but a lot of them across across multiple sites. So there's kind of like economies of scale efficiency there as well. Now, do with with the content writers that you have. Are they. First of all, they are they in house or are they kind of like freelance where you hire as you need them? Our entire team is is remote So we we have a number of what I would call like in house staff even though the nocturnal a fulltime part members of the team. Yeah. Our content writers though are are freelance us. Oh, we we use them as and when we need them for a couple of sites that patching means they're more or less fulltime happened for for fairly light won't while but you know sometimes we're like, okay, we're creating more content it's not going anywhere. Car Losses and kind of stop for a while. We we having the flexibility to do that. We've tried with the in house writer before and while you can sometimes get the quality up a little bit faster because you're you're working with closely the more invested in business. What we've universally found is that productivity dips quite quickly when you have someone. WHO's WHO's getting paid a fixed salary to work rather than getting paid per word which is what we pay all of her our contact graders for yeah I think we brought. A writer in house one time ever and I. Think we experienced the same thing where she was really really good in the beginning and then after a couple of months that kind of felt a little more rush in a little more human nature. Yeah. They add same time we gotta structure and account for that. I know this is a deep thing but is there like a quick tip to hiring a good writer like location of Find Him That have a few few tips for that. Say Hello. The pro blogger jobs board is my favorite place for hiring we go. It's seventy bucks. But if you pay hundred forty bucks, you can get a featured listing which I think now two weeks on on the top. and..

writer Garrett Authority US Gail Myself Mike Morrison Aranda Ourselves
"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

07:10 min | 7 months ago

"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

"Creating amazing content. So we build a lot of processes for how to identify those opportunities how to. Create really good content. I used to always get annoyed by White Aseel marchers back in the day who Very, abstract advice like just build great content. I'm a very systems guy. So someone says that to me I might what does that actually mean? So how do you define great war steps? How can I document this process and so we've attempted it's not always easy salt as possible. We attempted where possible to to do that in in all sorts of areas content being one of the link building being being another. We have also branched out into podcasting as as you guys have So we're we're at two hundred, thirty something episodes now. So it will weekly weekly show with with Gal by the way I think it's so much easier when there's two people. Running running podcast I feel sorry for for these these people running solo podcast the guest on every single week it's tough. Managed down this. Yeah. So it's a solo show that's called authority accurate like the podcast. Yet. Not. A Solo show very well. Yeah. But I was GONNA say yeah, I guess Duet Show but you don't have guests on right so it's always just very rarely maybe like five or six times a year we'll have have some have someone on. Mostly, just chatting about what's going on it's Kinda Yeah I felt like we had a lot more of those back in the day but then we just had this desire to get more different guests on and stuff. But yeah, we we're always getting pulled back to like we need to give back on the Mike just the two of us. You know we have a sneaky secret to we've really really good at ranking for our guest name for Seo. Guests that we have on we try to get on page one of Google for their name. So now if you search most of our guest's name, like the Evergreen prophets hustle and flow chart like podcasts is right in the mix that those people's names. So that was sort of like an intentional. Hey, what we interview guests we sort of boost quite a bit so a challenge to ourselves but now we're seeing like, oh, actually this is really benefiting. Our guests. So it's kind of cool. Yeah. That's awesome. I. Never I never. Savvy you actually I was about for having guests on as you can kind of get exposure to their audience promote. She's been which has worked well for us in in. Some cases but. Yeah Anita start reverse engineering. Yeah. We'll let you know typically when Seo guys on it's a little bit harder but. A lot of our guests we do. They don't put any focus on Seo just like a little smidge of focus on Seo and we can jump straight to page one. Yeah. But it was. So with the thirty Agassi had the PODCAST, he had the the the site you have some training as well right courses and all that stuff to help out. Maybe, two two and a half years. After we started the site we started a course authority hacker pro, which was just like all a collection of all our advanced tactics and ideas. In like step-by-step video format, and then what we found was that there's quite love beginners newbies joining that chorus who is really not suited for. You already need to have a with traffic to make that work. So we ended up building a beginner's courses while which even though the content is is easy for us because it's beginners as basic stuff. That's the hardest thing to create because it's more about getting people to actually do stuff and teaching complex things to them quickly in a way that they're not gonna just give up after you know these get stuck in keyword research and find out it's actually pretty hard to build a website. I think for us. We've found one of the reasons we phased out courses part of our business model was we were talking about such technical topics. Right we were talking about facebook ads, Google ads. Various podcasting, stuff, affiliate marketing, and like a lot of the tools and things that we teach people to use they evolved so quickly. So it's like if you have videos facebook ads two weeks later, facebook's going to change something render herald videos irrelevant. Do you deal with that and if so how do you deal with that? Welcome to my life. That is that is one of our biggest challenges and facts. They'll these tools often their maybe smaller companies as well. So they don't have changed logs about announcing what's what's changed are. They don't really announce it particularly well is someone in our communities. All of this doesn't look like this. How do I find this? We have to reshoot it, and then if you're if you're shooting a bunch of videos and sequential order that relate back the other one, you have to go through it all again up all the examples and. A lot of people they look at courses visiting yet. Know don't need inventory. You can sell to anyone online these funnels thing. I know a lot about this. I can make a course. That's right. You probably can but building a few videos and calling a course maybe like ten or fifteen percent of the work. All of the rest comes in like what you mentioned they're updating it. Managing. Your your customers community, the sales funnel sale cycle getting New People in the door all that kind of stuff. So. Yeah it's pretty challenging. Yeah we. In a minute, we'll do shortly because there's like a whole balance I know it's like. There's the work that you're teaching, and then there's this other side of your business which are your portfolio sites. We're chatting about before this hidden recording. That's what I'm super curious about. So describe like what you're doing outside of the public facing you have this whole other model happening again, the scenes. Yes. So we we actually have a number of other websites, not just authority hackers who were not the marketers who teach marketing and do nothing else. You kind of lose your your edge quite quickly if you do that. So out of necessity I mean I think we've probably make more money if we just went all in on authority actor training but out of necessity more than anything else we actively spend considerable time working on other websites as well. So we build them from scratch in all cases so far though we're looking at buying some maybe in future, just to to skip forward a little bit in some of the timelines. WE YEAH WE WE HAVE affiliate marketing website summer monetize by by ads, and where possible we draw this experience into authority hacker. So we did a pretty detailed case study about how we built built in grew one site. And then sold eighteen months for a pretty decent amount of money. And then we also document law these in courses and we have examples or. Case studies sites within each course? So that we? We show people how actually build the site and we build an actual site together and things like that. But ultimately. There's like I'm constantly being pulled by two ends from from from these businesses. So on the one hand. You've got the need to stay sharp the need to actually do what we say we can do in other industries, other niches A. Be Good Seo because online marketing.

facebook Google White Aseel Mike Agassi Anita
"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

08:11 min | 7 months ago

"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

"And all that stuff. Yeah. That's exactly. Yeah. So honestly when we had, we had many many months when we had like zero savings in the business bank account and we were making like a fifty dollar net profit at month or something, and just hang on just being able to pay rent next month. So it was touching touching, go for a while. But we up growing fairly quickly we. Ended up developing a number of productized services. So we would sow guest posts. For example, we had linked verse Link Building. Packages. which other agencies would would buy from US and we're kind of fulfiling them die like that remotely there. Yeah. Because like a sustainable client then right or at least more. So than a onesie Tuesay Clint. Exactly exactly. But there's this two thousand, thirteen guest posting. Guessing what it was back. Then really guest posting it was just you know sponsored sponsored links, totally link farms that started. Off A bit. We ended up focusing more on our clients. At the time we we ended up becoming more boutique we downsize bit we move to smaller office, and we're getting some pretty good results for for many clients and it was kind of like a nice happy balanced. But we never really optimize our our sales funnels, our sales processes. We were more good at the service end of things, link delivering work, but acquiring new clients especially US being in Budapest and not almost clients were sort of in the US or the UK. So it's Kinda hard to meet people face to face and whatnot. So we we realized that we just weren't enjoying it we'd be didn't enjoy working with clients and there was one particular case that really stood out. Like a wedding DJ Company in the UK we did a really really good job for them. So we got in so many leads that they were booked up solidly for six months. So they fired us. House like. We've. We've we've got to stop building other people's businesses for them and start. Feeling your pain right now let's talk about the agency because we have very similar stories. Well. Yeah. I mean literally almost exactly it's like you do really good work and I think for us it was a little bit as he stuff we had a content marketing agency and We should all this crew of leads like tracked everything and then there's like, yeah, we have a new marketing person you guys are gone. They have they have their own ideas like. Okay they came in and try to reverse engineer what we were doing for, and then and then they fell off the rankings so. SCREWED FIGURE They come they come back and ask you. Well. By that time we already went in like that was sort of the last straw for us in our agency was when that happened, we had done such a good job for them for. So long we'd travelled for them. We did all sorts of stuff for them and like when that happened, we're like you know what we could make so much more money doing the exact same thing but doing it for ourselves. And there'll be no red tape no client reporting. You don't have to work on their shitty websites. You can do stuff properly now and you could actually scale to the worth that you're bringing to. You're not capped by some retainer per client. Yeah. We we actually had one client that we went and bid to them like a agency service of doing content marketing like weekly blog post forum and sort of helping them move up in this we weren't really seo is we more focused on content we? Knew some basics of SEO but we basically bid him three grand a month to go do it for him and he declined it thought it was too expensive. Well, this person happened to have an affiliate program. We wouldn't sign up as an affiliate made a blog ourselves and started creating content about that product and we we grew it to where they were paying thirty thousand a month in in affiliate commissions instead of the three K. that we initially bid them. So we've made it is amazing. I love that story. I'm plus at the same time, you guys were building an asset like you though the website which had a lot of values well, don't have that when you're when you're working for for other people working for clients, they'll make sales to this day. So it's like it's it. It works. But so how how do you? Yeah, I was GONNA say how did you transfer to authority hacker? How did you decide? We're going to start making these these sort of like. Detail blog post about all this stuff that we've been learning. Yes Oh about a year and a half before we end up selling that agency we knew it was it was kind of coming and we saw planning start planning what we're GONNA do next at it just made sense to. Start getting into building our websites. Affiliate marketing affiliate websites were very popular at the time. There's a few people talking about like authority side of thority mode coined the term but I think authority hackers actually a mix of life hacker Duncombe which has a big fan of and while authority authority weather that's where the name came from. But actually just just maybe the six twelve months before we started authority hackery start another website in the health space. Where we didn't know him at health but we we got a writer to come in and work with us to create content. We did although website the SEO, the marketing monetization. And then we learned quite a lot in the first year from that grew really really well about because we're really determined to have something to move onto next after we exited the agency, and so we ended up deciding start authority hacker really as a way to document our processes and what we were doing on this website So how we how we launched it how we would do arket research how we would buildings at the time and also stuff like that was kind of an exercise in. Having, forcing ourselves to documents it. We thought through the process much more clearly. So we were able to to optimize their own processes better. Second we could also use it as training for the people who we wanted to bring into execute these processes and third. Maybe we can start a blog or some kind of online marketing Siamese. We had a point while five years experience doing this stuff. And that's that's kind of grew into authority hacker That's what I like about your vision is that you've always wanted to give back and so it started sounds like as like internal documentation more or less. But at the same time, you're sharing it with the world and then yet that's that's what's kind of Nice with this agency I. Guess One of the benefit is that you're getting paid to learn. Yeah. So that's that's a cool thing but then even even more so and you have a little bit more control documenting that it's forcing you to refine your processes even better. Yeah. For sure and I as much as I hate on the agency days I mean, I think you're you hit the nail on the head there. You've really do learn so much because we weren't on maybe five hundred different clients over four years and saw so many different types of websites big swollen every industry, and the knowledge you get from from that is is pretty immense. Yeah. It's cool. So I guess describe what authority hacker is. Now because I know there's a lot of different. Points to it. You know it's not like an obvious. It's not just a blog KITA. There's a whole business model that's happening behind the scenes but he the scoop there. Yeah. I really need to Work Elevator Dog We have in our gets he gets. So the two second version as we teach website owners how to grow their business The two minute version is that we teach online marketing. There's a big skew towards Seo content marketing we do everything. So white hat in terms of link building we're not trying to go against a Google we've been burned with more back in our our agency days. So we also try and create a teach people to create like really good content not just like a was the minimum I can do to make some money and get people to Click on my link is like how can you build something which is GonNa be long term survival survive this next Google update of the next ten or the next ten years of updates usually by just creating amazing content. So we build a lot of processes for how to identify those opportunities how to. Create really good content..

US Google UK Tuesay Clint engineer DJ Company Budapest writer
"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

02:39 min | 7 months ago

"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

"The system kind of pushes you through and I just remember. was working in this insurance company. I just remember fifteen minutes after my first house is this is this what work is included the Fella giving sold a lie? I. Guess I just had a natural entrepreneur. Inclinations. Wanted to didn't really like taking. Direction from other people to be on this So started plotting my way out of a eventually I just quit and went traveling for a while all this time I was learning a lot of stuff reading as many books that can affiliate marketing for dummies, him Seo for dummies, all these kind of really basic stuff as on all forums back in the day as well as reading what other people who probably didn't really know what they're doing same that was working and leaving it all and try to build building. Few websites tried some at arbitrage all the school stuff black hat links back in the day. That eventually stumbled my way onto to making this one website can semi successful and just learning enough of I needed to to know to have the skills to to to repeat s, and that was around about the time I'm at gale than that, we we decided to start agency and do it for other people. Did, you were your parents entrepreneurs or anything or did you decide this? Dr Can. Slight. Like no like anti entrepreneurs demos knows that they're like. My Dad's like a salaryman through and through. mean he came from like not the the wealthiest backgrounds and he was like the first since family go to college and stuff. So it he had a pretty good job for for most of his life in your oil company, and so that was the direction directional get a job be safe. You know take take that route but I just like even from an house at twelve years old I'd paper around and I just absolutely hated working for other people I always wanted to do my own. Thing always had these ideas. just just took me a while before I kind of found my stride and was able to to to kind of step out there and do myself. Yeah. Well, and you said the agency thing we've we've all been in agencies in. We'll probably circle back how this plays at heart and it's not an easy but this balance of business but I'm curious of what that agency looked like and how it evolved into authority hacker now as you have it. Yeah. So we started my business partner Gal. I started this this website selling Seo Services intially I'd we would fulfil those? Six hundred bucks a month seo package..

first house Dr Can partner
"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

08:49 min | 7 months ago

"mark webster" Discussed on The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

"And. So we ended up deciding authority hacker really as a way to document our processes and what we doing on this website So how we how we launched it? How do arche research how we would buildings at the time and also stuff like that? It was kind of exercise in. Having forcing ourselves to documents that we thought through the process much more clearly. So we were able to drop my their own processes better. Second we could also use it as training for the people who we wanted to bring into execute these processes and third. Maybe we can start a blog or you know some kind of online marketing side. We had an point five years experience doing this kind of stuff. And that's kind of grew into authority hacker. This is an intro intro intro intro. Flow chart with four. Hey. Oh. Hello. There I didn't see you there. Yes I've only been sitting in this room all day with you. But like your sounded like it had a British accent. of his feeling exquisite. But maybe it was because it says Scotland on the top of my nutrient here for Mark Webster because he's in Scotland yes and I don't think that's where the laugh came from but just ironic. Well, Mark Webster. Yes. He is one of the CO founders of authority hacker dot com, which is a really cool site. It's actually a site that I've referenced quite a few times around things like SEO and. Believe they've got a bunch of like a tool reviews and stuff I think they've got a premium in-depth. Review of like H refs they got a a great company. It's awesome company. They're technically not sponsoring this episode, but we level. Toby back though and. They feel like they kind take a similar stance to us in their own way where they're only gonNA stand by products, any affiliate promotions and things like that are things that we use or or things that we've at least gone through and we've seen yeah, this is bitch and unique. And that's like them too because we're like, we don't make the money off of that but so there's no skin in the game or US telling you about it. Yeah I think what we're having this conversation you and I were just kind of we kept looking at each other. By the way we're starting to do video version so you could find a video of Jodi looking at each other but we started. Laying sort of chuckling because of how sort of parallel their story was to are they both been gale and mark they've both been running a well have been running authority hacker but they both been partnered together for like ten ish years. They're both in their mid thirties. They're both have content marketing as they're sort of like core of what they do. They're both the coolest guys ever that have the highest make their money off affiliate marketing and they just look great. They're just cool. US Now or them all of all of the collective aura over just like the parallels. This is what we're talking about. You don't even met yet. Took it. I'm just assuming based off of the parallels you can keep rolling with this. He's a cool dude. So what are we talking about research? On this episode, let me Tell Ya. Wanted asking me but then you said, let me tell you. So I'm confused. So let me tell you. Okay. Go for. US. So. We actually really dive into their process of getting content created for their blog. They're very very prolific with the amount of content they put out. They do a lot of SEO. So we talked about their content strategy, their SEO strategy, and then we even talked about their partnership and all these weird sort of overlaps with like how we're all twins. We are twinsies and I love the fact that they have these things called authorities sites, which is a key component of authority hacker. This is like they have a training around it, but really you'll get into you. Break down what they're authorities sites are that's yeah. That's where the content riders come into play and talking about like what is the what are these sites and he actually said that one of them sold recently mid six figures or something like that, and these are like niche. Out there that they develop and they have a network of them and they have a whole like training it's really cool and really cool thing is that they share how to do all that stuff. Yeah. which like their big vision is essentially for their readers like if you're in a day job, one of the sites can replace your income like that's really what they're trying to show here, and you can obviously stack them and make it bigger and then scale it and we don't go on all day here on the podcast but that's what really attached me this guys like these fucking. Cool. Cool mission a very scalable model and they're just chill dudes sharing it like freely at the perfect Combo Yeah I love it. We. Yeah and we took notes of course. Oh, hustle and flow chart dot com slash comp. That's dot com slash. COMM issue. To remind him about the. Felt rate. Getting tired man. Blue Dot, com slash com get them not baby was a very late last. been podcasting. But Get not yet two weeks I know just Just. Ebola. Whatever explain myself. Talk to mark? Webster. Hey Mark. Hey I'm fantastic. How are you guys? Great. Yeah. You're you're out there in Scotland where hopefully this weird covid steps not as not as weird out there I don't know I'm actually kind of curious. I haven't I haven't really heard about it from Scotland much. I've been in my house for about four months. Now they're they're just starting to let people outside now So it's been pretty strict here. That's good. Yeah. It's like gun this like weird wave thing in the US I'm sure the news shiny that like, Oh, well, we won't go down that road. The rest of the world looking at the US just like. The thing is though I work at home anyway. So really not much has changed in my life. Yeah. Just just don't really go out. More, but then again, every release to go that. Anyway so Matt and I were talking about that like this is like my sweet spot for this like I think of adapting because I'm not naturally personality I kind of liked to see people and. I'm like I. I definitely lean a little more introverted, and now I have an excuse to say no to going out. So I'm just. Saying. I think you and your partner gale are doing some amazing. But you have you been doing stuff together for what ten plus years now I think yeah. Two Thousand and ten we we we we start agency together then. Nice. Yeah. So it's like matinee we go way back to read around the same years actually. Year before so but either way long rare man had had you guys originally meet and kind of get this thing going. It was so random we met in a bar in Singapore and we both happened to be going to quell import next like on our on our trip and we met up being up again and just becoming friends and we drunk one night decided it'd be good idea to start a business together. So we did. That websites obey Seo we started in agency, and then four months later quitting or other stuff going full steam in that, and we we ran that forget four or five years before moving onto to to building our our own sites. But you're you're right. It's very rare to two people stay together as business partners for for any length of time more than a couple of years especially through multiple businesses as well. We actually did a podcast about it recently talking about the I think it's just you have to kind of bring something that the other person doesn't have had just like fully. Fully kind of trust that both your futures outcomes are are going to be the same sometimes. Is, GonNa give more sometimes the other person's GonNa give more and just kind of be okay. It's not exactly fifty fifty all time Yeah. No, that's that's really smart I mean it's it's impressive that you've lasted ten years with your partner Joe and I we we sort of quit our day jobs so to speak and nine. So we've been about eleven years now. So we're kind of on that same boat, but it's it's always fascinating because when we go on other people's PODCASTS, everybody's like I've had business partners I can't make it work past like two years. How do you guys do it? So I mean maybe maybe that's something that we can. We can touch on a little more but. Before we do. Let's let's go into your back story a little bit like what were you doing before you? You know had your meeting in Singapore with Gail and did all that like what what did you do before this and sort of how did you transition into this stuff? I was on the traditional High School College University Graduate Job at a finance company track that.

Mark Webster US Scotland Singapore partner Toby Jodi Ebola High School College University Matt Joe Gail gale
"mark webster" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"mark webster" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"Smart at Bainer media. Welcome Claire Thanks for being here I carry so happy to be here now. You have a pretty interesting background in college. You studied philosophy and bioethics. I also know that you're a drummer and I know that you have a personal passion for are fostering collaboration between creative artists and scientists. Why is the mix of creativity and innovation so important to you and how has it led you into the advice technology world growing up at points? I didn't actually know exactly what I wanted to be when I grew up and I remember my mom actually being the one who always told me. Don't worry the career that you're going to have probably doesn't exist yet. And reflecting back on my windy path she was absolutely right and not sort of sentiment sentiment has stuck with me and it allowed me to embrace curiosity and excitement for what's possible and looking at the future so I'd say you know regarding innovation. It's really not about novelty about the ability to see an existing challenger situation through an unexpected Lens. And that's why I think it's really really important for people to I have an interest in a broad range of hard and soft sciences understanding the way things work but also being able to question them but also in art which is really about an ability to express express or communicate. What's in your head but getting back to my pop invoice? It's been pretty line. He as I'm sure a lot of folks working mistakes Can Charlie empathized with but I actually started my career in visual expert. Bowman commercial production. It was at the time when I found was just about to come out and there was this disruption of content on demand anywhere streaming sharable and screens were really dominating the conversation but but I left after several years to focus on human computer interaction. User interfaces at Grad School and ended up spending time thinking about new user interfaces and how to interact with digital information without the aid of a screen so working in the IOT space for a couple of years it was only natural to sort of progress in enjoy. Yeah I love that and I think you're right you know there's so many jobs that have been created yet so I think it's wonderful that your mom said that she was such a young age and I do think I've I've said this before. There are so many creative people in the voice space so it makes sense that kind of all these things that you've studied and your great are now coming to fruition within this space as there's a whole sort of a happy coincidence it's only in retrospect that you start to see the patterns that brought you to where you are yes and I was doing my research on you. You and I saw this wonderful article you've written in two thousand fourteen almost six years ago and it was published in you talked about new threshold at the edge of a digital world. An an you wrote something that you asked. I think you wrote it so eloquently and I wanted to share you ask the question. Could the use of deeper spatial metaphors that extend beyond desktops and overlapping lapping windows be beneficial neurological development and could are experienced with digitally stored information enhanced cognitive capabilities and empower power. The use the imagery and interactions. That alludes a spatial expiration and synthesised between physical and digital. And so I'd love for you to explain what this means hands especially back then and I'm curious what your answer is to that question. Almost six years later in twenty twenty especially as we embark into a more voice enabled world. How now first of all? It's been a very long time since I read that. So thank you. For digging in the archives it was actually for an architecture publication hence in talking about the census between the physical world and the digital world and new thresholds. But I think I was making a couple of points there and I probably would write the the question that you just read a little bit differently now that was quite a mouthful but the first point are interfaces. Don't have to be designed the way that they are currently really and I think that we get stuck in the past. Bring them over to new technological context. That's why we have this metaphor of desktop with files boulders when were working on their computers or we have the metaphor pages for the Internet carried over from things that we can relate you from past interactions of information and but as an example in article I was imagining a more spatial way of storing and retrieving files probably influenced by the Memory Palace techniques that have been been used for hundreds hundreds of years for people to store and recall information in their minds and if the metaphor of storing and retrieving information. Were like a building that we could navigate or even a city rather than pages in the files or older. The question is would we be able to recall information more without ability to see strengthened rather than offloading to remember for years so sort of a different way of thinking about just structuring our memory of information but but in terms of how that could apply to voice. I'd have to give it a little bit more thought because it's been so long since I thought about that but the general sentiment resonates because it's all about questioning the way that our interfaces are designed at the moment and I think that's a really powerful thing to keep in mind and it's one of the reasons I've been so Attracted to the situational design approach. Put forward by Paul cut senior in his PM at Amazon Alexa. Where were no longer thinking about? Just operating a menu options and requiring that the user conforms to the way that the computer speaks but really trying to get out more conversational away of designing and then on the metaphor side. It's it's been really interesting to hear. Mark Webster from Jobe who has given a couple of talks on questioning whether the paradigm of voice assistant as always useful in every case and so I think the line yeah and I love for you to touch more on the current state of design a little bit more especially with where we're at now and where we're going because as you just said should we all be using voices of work for every situation no similar to other things that we look at. It's really making sure that it's useful. It's usable in the right capacity. So yeah if you could talk more about that current state of design and where you think it's going that would be wonderful. Yeah well I guess taking up on the previous question. I think that there's definitely room for New Paradigm some new metaphors as we get away from screens or spend more time out screens thinking not so much in a file folder structure. We're diving deeper into things things. But at this March either top level or maybe there's another way of thinking about it so that we know how to navigate these systems without using the eight of screen or having to continuously actually be given a verbal menu of options. The other thing I think in terms of the future voice design we offered speak about voice or even conversational design in an isolation from other inputs and outputs we speak about multi-modal as sort of an afterthought sometimes and it's important to consider but I think the distinction distinction of voice designer Rome product Zainur interaction designer. More broadly will eventually disappear. And it's just going to be important for anyone working on a product or digital the experience to understand at a high level at least all of infants at their disposal including voice or gesture or texter image recognition other sensor data and of course on the other side all out that's at their disposal which of course could be audio or verbal response or could be vibration or it could be An audio cue or visual view or text response. There's so many different ways are different tools that we can employ depending on the context of the user. And what's most appropriate yet. I think from a user's perspective. They don't really care what the input as to. What the platform is they just want to use? The one that makes no sense in the moment and in thumb cases using my voice might be ACHIEVE A goal but another scenario that might be the click the buy. I completely agree and I like that. You're bringing into this whole audio the importance of conversational design as an integral part. I've been having some conversation with linguists. Recently there are some of the most creative and fascinating and talented pupil that I've met and they're really talking about the importance of conversational design. Not just developing something because the user wanted really making sure that that interacts with the human in the most effective and efficient way and really includes everybody as well totally and you know. I think that this is another case where we have have inherited certain paradigm conversational design. Where somewhat building on the legacy of IVR's are interactive Voice Response Systems and I've yard were built on a legacy the touchstone options so press one for extra super? Why so I think? In some cases we may still be holding ourselves back because were allowing are designed to be dictated detained by those historical paradigm or thinking about what is the ideal your interaction. And how can we take steps to build towards that. Yeah can new share with us any examples of the work. Your team has done at vader media or even things you're currently working on or maybe things you like to work on so that listeners can understand and how creativity and design will enhance the user experience. A bit more chur in terms of some of the projects that we've worked on. We have worked on a couple of experiences for JP Morgan that bring audio commentary really complex market reports which is a fun. Use Case. I think are really interesting. Use Case at least we've collaborated with origin on a scale. They launched relaunched alarms on Google assistant with three lego experiences. I think the wait wait quiz from. NPR is probably our most popular experience and hats off to the team at wait. Wait because they're writing and audio quality is just so nominal. One of the things that I'm most interested in. The moment is sort of what I was alluding to before using like s forecasting approach that allows us to imagine possible future states and how conversational experiences could be and then taking steps towards building what's would be ideal experiences. Situation Design is one that supposes an alternate more natural way of conversing with a assistance. But it's not super common at the moment but it also provides principals and guidance in designing towards towards that end. So we've actually used situational sign on a couple of projects that aren't public but we have one that's coming out in the next couple of weeks for lifestyle editorial company which will be really interesting. I've also designed a speculative project. That's a plan. Finder purchase and carry experienced illustrates situational. -TUATION design principles. But it's in need of an inventory of anybody has Plants they would like to create an experience for data. That I'm really interested in is the Canadian depth of sound design and how audio cues can be introduced in place of verbal response when it makes the most sense for instance. I have echo buds and when the the battery is low. I hear Alexa. Tommy your battery is low but I think a more subtle way that that could be implemented as the first time she says when you hear this telling your batteries slow. Hello and every other time. I hear that tone and I understand meeting about sound so little subtleties surround sound designer. Really interesting to me in terms of projects that I I like to work on I think the moment of unblock seeing or receiving a product that is shipped to you and having a voice interaction with that brand or for around that product is a really interesting moment so it could be for garment and what is the soundtrack to try it on for the first time or it could be care instructions but having a CPA va printed on the box. And when you open this product you have this new dimension of experience where fit is really exciting. Yeah I think those are all good ideas and I've said before to you as well as two other people out on the show. The wait wait. Don't tell me skill you guys have done is amazing. It really integrates with their show very well. Oh and it uses the gentleman's.

Bainer media Claire Memory Palace Charlie empathized Bowman Alexa IOT NPR Google Amazon Alexa Zainur Paul Grad School JP Morgan Mark Webster Jobe
"mark webster" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

14:14 min | 1 year ago

"mark webster" Discussed on VUX World

"I was thinking as I often do about adoption of voice and the different environments that we're seeing voice crop opinion and whether they barriers to adoption and that we haven't yet spoke about one of the common barriers is often spoke about his ability so people quite often vocal about how invoice finding stuff is quite a challenge. You don't have a screen or you have is is the ether nothing you can't see what you do in and so find in what these things are capable of when I the things I mean smart speakers find out what's mass because a capable of is a challenge you theorize that is why potentially they released. Amazon Amazon released the echo show on Google with the home hub or the nest. Hope as it's now called still can't really bring myself to call it so maybe that's why they released a screen is because it's easier to see store on easier to find stuff and browse with a screen voices never really being good up browsing but that's just one challenge the we speak quite regularly on the podcast and plenty of guests live have commented on the discover ability issues whether it will ever be solved who knows but as it stands is really on the onus is really on the person who creates the experience to promote the experience and get adoption of that skill or whatever you WanNa Call Action Apple. Whatever but there's another couple of things play things are also challenges that should be looked at eleven. It'll be more closely and when we had mark webster on the podcast one of the things he was talking about is a lot of this stuff is a design challenge. You know discover ability could be he perceived as a design challenge and there's a lot of limitations in the platforms at the moment whether that's through implementations of skills all whatever it might be both marks philosophy is design. COMPLA- pie in solving a lot of these problems some of the one of the challenges. I've noticed this. This is still just a developmental thought as it stuns really bummed out completely but it's just something that I wanted to solve throw into the mix. One is really a kind of Habich a-all psychological level I think in the Wiz with smart speakers on an order we speak all the time and the podcast about how smart speak is our interface to voice assistant an access point to the voice assistant. It's not the voices and voice will inevitably be ubiquitous on everywhere and everything will have a voice interface and you'll access various obvious voice assistance through whichever interface is closest to you at the time that's fine but smart because in particular have driven the adoption of voice. There's lots of studies out there that show about smart speaker adoption. If you have a smart speaker and you use it. You're more likely to use the voice assistant on your phone more more than you did before. You got this speaker so smart. Speakers are kind of category defining productivity Doc David Essentially Amazon largely responsible I would say of essentially defined the new category of products with this speaker and obviously obviously they want to get people to use every single day same with Google and the home home and whatnot. Is you kind of want to have frequency of use. Amazon's big thing right. Now is frequency frequency of use. What can you do that gets people using the devices on the assistant every single day repeatable habitual stuff and it's. Tony just dawned on me really why that's so important. I was thinking before that. It doesn't really matter whether your skill is used every single day or whether it's used once a month. If it's that kind of skill you wouldn't order just eat takeaway every single day some people ninety two but you probably won't around for that long to use Alexa for much longer and that kind of food every day but you're not gonNA use the everyday but that's fine you know I think that's fine but why then Amazon one unable to use the speakers particularly an Alexa every single day and the reason for that is because it's a new product type type essentially a new category of products. We don't actually house any habits at all formed around the device Type Smart Smart Speakers of habits foam around our phones and we use all phones for absolutely everything. Some people will pick up the phone open. Check the phone before they even get out of bed on so so we have so many in grinned behaviors. Taito phones so many habits enough spoke about this in lots of videos and I'm sure mentioned on the podcast befall about the habitual connection that we have our phones and some of us. We don't even know we're doing it. We don't realize checking our form. We just are. We don't realize it's been fifteen minutes on our phones. We think we've just kind of gone to quickly. Check an email before you know what you're on facebook and then you're on instagram than you're watching Youtube video and then you've lost twenty minutes of your life so so we've got habits formed and centered around the phone and what smarter speakers. I is if you want to use his Ma speaker sorry let me buckled will Smith's because doing is presenting a new device type in a new way of access in content information against done but because we're so wedded phones it's actually pretty difficult to get people to use smart speakers because regularly and often enough because our thoughts are immediately to pick up all phones and if you think about voice on the phone. I use voice so my phone quite a lot and the trend seems to be that those have small speakers as I mentioned and abuse invokes on the phone mall. You can start to substitute some some of the stuff that you do on your phone with your voice. So if you want to check an email you can ask Siri to check your emails all Google assistant aw well. Everyone knew us. If you want to send a text message you can do that. If you want to play a podcast plaza music check on your calendar when you schedule set time do a calculation. There's a loss of that. You can do even initiate a google search series not fantastic but you cannot least initiate the search inch with your voice and some things I isn't. It's not as bad so sometimes we'll get on so so you can start to replace some of the routine stuff that you do on your phone with your voice over time but that's not necessarily GONNA do. I'm isn't any favors and they won't necessarily to your brand that many favors because I'm as that you use Alexa over and above anything else on your brand name is that as people will interact with view on these new surfaces in these new environments and a voice first environment now you could hang around and wait for Siri to flesh out the shortcuts a little bit more you could invest in kind of in-app actions on Google Assistant to get people into your up a little bit more seamlessly and you can do a whole Lotta order stuff with your current estate to try and twist it and move in maneuver into a voice ready environment but the still these these smart speakers and unique platforms Google assistant and Alexa predominantly the have opportunities for you to do something different and have opportunities for you to remove your interface entirely and provide a completely frictions experience for your users the way the the GOP is because we're habitually use no phones all the time and we can supplement our habitual usage with some voice interactivity activity but that's not necessarily going to translate to this Mass Baker the the M would think from Amazon's perspective would be to try and thank you to once you've superman some of that routine use on your mobile trying to when you're in the home at least are wearing headphones or have access to Alexa aw what have you starting to translate some of the usage onto a small speaker when you're in your home and if you can start to use the smart speaker fall some of the things that you would otherwise use your phone fall then you kind of own you wear into shape a new habits around smart speaker engagement or around voice in phase usage in general but that would just be for routine still that would just be fall the same kind of stuff that you do on your phone now routinely check your calendars and checking emails and sending text messages making phone calls on all kinds of stuff and all of that is all within the first party experience. It's all stuff is built into Siri built into Google. Assistant assistant built into Alexa is the first pie stuff and that's what most people use most of the time I think it was voice how to study that showed that most people use news the first party stove skills if you like or actions most of the time as in time what's in my diary as some of my shopping list nice to wake me up at five in the morning. You know play some music. All I pi- stoff turn the lights on and off. That's like second party stuff. I suppose but still it's not third party branded content so the the challenge is that third party content third party voice experiences on the assistant platforms require a change in people's hobbits not just in terms of the we had to change it to change in the routine that they do and they perform how bits essentially a for me formulated relented and consists of a trigger a routine reward so the trigger could be bought him. The routine is that you pick up your phone on the reward. Award is a brick from being bought right so all of these hubby formula for Harvey for habits fall might. Not Essentially so for third party. This is difficult to and this is where you can tell them that. My thoughts are just formula in on it because let's say for example. You have a brand that is Let's see you a taxi firm right. You've got uber or go direct to the business. Now you're competing with is Uber on the mobile so people could just googly autocracy eh taxis in London taxis to dwells find your number and call you all they could use google. They could use uber so you know y'all kind of fight in ways Uber. We're doing which is trying to shift people's habits the routine the trigger is to get the routine is I either do Google search all use the Uber op and the reward is that you taxi so when it comes to implement and thus inexperienced speaker the brand the taxi firm is responsible bull for changing the habits of the user right now. You're not just one in someone to use your Alexa Skill to book a taxi acce- You really changing the habits that people have and the routine that they go through when it comes to book a taxi and you're probably not not going to be able to do that yourself. You know one taxi firm in the middle of two umbrellas is never going to be able to change your habits so much that you use your smart speaker regularly enough for for everything that when it comes to book in a taxi you would naturally do that. You would naturally perform routine so it's and the point uh-huh kind of get into is it's not fall and this is just must be because I think voice assistant usage will continue to grow and we'll use that for whatever we use it fall in whatever environments we end up using them on in headphones 'cause mobile excetera purely for smart speakers which is where along the adoption is in terms of the device sales where the attention is in terms of media coverage for Osma speakers in particularly we need to craft space in people's Day where they will use it device ice to perform that routine rather than use that phone another said for this for the small town taxi company. That's a very hard job to do but if you're if you're creating an Alexa skill of any description or Google assistant action of any description that is essentially what you are contributing to your contributing to try to change the habits of the routine of uses so and so yeah that's essentially Elliot. That's the so in summary. That's probably what it is is that everyone creates a skill discoverable. Yes it's an issue however we're approaching it from the mindset of the Internet and how you can kind of Fuji Website to get it to run can google be discovered organically but in in reality voice might not welcome not there might not be that much organic discovery it might actually be that rather than one in a free meal and having skills discovered led by default whenever we launch one what if it's too.

Google Amazon Alexa mark webster Taito facebook Youtube Tony Smith Fuji Siri Osma London Harvey Elliot GOP
"mark webster" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"mark webster" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

"That. Your help with me greatly appreciated. Oh ed ed i i. I was sad when i heard this because about a year and a half maybe two years ago i spent a long time looking for this device and the only one i found was like one hundred twenty twenty dollars or something ridiculously high and i was like nip or it didn't quite do what i wanted it to do. Think there was one out there. That was only bluetooth compatible and i was like nope. The point point of this is that i want to do it when i'm in my house in my bed. I don't know i don't want to be next to it but time is our our friend in technology development cycles so we now have found a device that will work for you in. It's not crazy expensive. It is about fifty two dollars dollars on amazon or eighty dollars s._r._p. This is the orbit beehive at smart hose faucet timer that also comes with a wifi hub bob it is compatible with google madame a and apparently they have a home kit certified version of this as well if that matters to you but you didn't and mentioned that so we're not worried about that and even though i do not like hubs. This is a really small little hope. It's plugged into an outlet and gosh it looks like a looks like like a bridge looks like a very small bridge. I mean basically you know if you've got a bluetooth lock. You probably have one of these to connect via wifi so it's it's basically it sits in your plug in what this does is. It has a timer that you can create it. Also lets you remotely turn on and off your spigot. You're going to put this between your or spigot and your hose which is very normal for this type of device even the old school timer devices but what it also does is it looks at your site site conditions orbit makes sprinkler heads and all sorts of irrigation stuff for lack of all the stuff is there's. There's a lot of irrigation stuff. I i don't know anything about and what this does is. It pulls in weather data in and actually can create a smart watering schedule for you if you wanted to. You could manually turn this honor off. Perhaps through your phone but if it's smart enough you may not have to. This is only for north america. They do have international national versions but you have to be outside of north america to get it so for all of you outside of the u._s. The orbit brand is still the same. There may be a slightly different product number so the product here is the orbit to one zero zero four beehive smart. Who's posit timer. Yeah i feel like we should also tell you that if you have an actual irrigation system or sprinkler system i've had a lot of luck with rossio. It also works with madame and google so if you're interested in that sort of thing that is also an option but if you just want the hose thing because that's where your life than this is a really reasonable way to doing right right but the ratio is going to be more expensive but it is charles obviously many yes you. There's like an eight zona sixteen zone. It's my the ratios. Two hundred fifty fifty dollars for the sixteenth and orbit actually makes other things so you can actually use this wifi hub and connect just the smart hose faucet. That's only bluetooth truth so you could buy one of those for an additional. It's like roughly forty dollars and then voila another zone right there. Yes you have a system no so so ed we hope that helps you out and it feels like it's about time for us to in this segment and hear from our sponsor stay tuned because is after that we're going to be talking about voice in the enterprise with mark webster from adobe is going to be talking about design considerations use considerations and why he does not not believe that a digital assistant is has to be synonymous with voice. It's gonna be good. Hey everyone we are taking a quick break from the internet of things podcast for a message from our sponsor..

google north america mark webster amazon adobe charles one hundred twenty twenty doll Two hundred fifty fifty dollar fifty two dollars eighty dollars forty dollars two years
"mark webster" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

11:10 min | 2 years ago

"mark webster" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Kyko limited experience head to head against, Dan. But talking to Benintendi expected a lot fastballs down and in. And then that slider guarding doubted away. Recommended on the grass but off the line at third snap. Throw the first and bets dives back in safely on his belly. Mookie Betts stole thirty basis. This year caught six times the Red Sox as a team were third in the majors. Steal second stolen base percentage. Boston to top off into the majors by runs per game. The Belle Paco. Fires. I wouldn't miss his downstairs. It'd be assumption. Is that you know, obviously lefties would struggle more against him, but he actually has reverse splits, not dramatic. But right handed batters have have struggled more against Alscae and lefties. About thirty point difference than average. Lucky sit in to seventy nine against them. Chandy open stance left side Tikal. Kicks deliver. Ground. That's a base hit inside the third base back between Greg mid and the lines while base it the other way. That's a single Benintendi to on. Nobody out. And here comes the big D H J D Martinez. That one was just middle middle and Benintendi, let it get deep. And then just kind of blocked it down third the baseline, and that's the approach to have with Dallas. Kyko. He is not the pitcher gonna get into one time just gonna let it loose. You gotta let it travel lefties hit it to left for the righties aim to the right center field corner. No doubt right center field. That would at least on paid for bold. Well for the guy the plate JD Martinez with substantial power to right center field as much opposite field. Power is any one of the game is the pitch and that's on the outside corner for a strike. Perfectly docks that outside corner with that sinking. Fastball. The top ground ball rate in the majors this year. Groucho at someone in this spot. Real backed up at first Marwick Gonzales the second basement shaded up the middle. Paret bregman on the left side. Outside this time. On a strike to JD. Of course, everyone knows the history. JD Martinez originally drafted by the Astros played with the big league level thousand eleven twelve and thirteen and then was released in spring training of two thousand fourteen. Downstairs and low. Talking with Dallas Tikal this season about his approach to JD Martinez. Is you just try to get into expanding? You know, he's a great hitter power hitter. He's not afraid to chase. And that's what Dallas was picking right now. Trying to pick that low in a way corner to get JD Martinez to get himself out to and one down at the bell fight. Dr it inside the first base line down the right field line off the sidewalk that surround us score Benintendi, all stop at third JD Martinez with an RBI double the opposite way. In the Red Sox have jumped out it is one to nothing as why Titas goes the opposite way to double down the first baseline the same location. Same part of the plate is the two fastball. See-saw prior accepts this one a little bit further up. So it's painted almost off the plate. But JD Martinez again if you're approaches right field. That's exactly what he did. He hit a ground ball. It's just this placed in the perfect spot. Here we go Red Sox with three straight hits. Runners at second third presenter Bogart's. Bogart's at twenty six years old playing in this. Twenty sixth post-season games. So so young into his career it already taught a postseason experience. I offered missing outside. Call one no strikes. He's Andrew bold guards to eighty eight during the regular year. Twenty three homers knocked at a hundred and three. Joe west are played on par. Mark Carlson it first Chris Guccione at second. Mark Webster's third. Straight back. Bill Miller is in left field down the right field line. Carol. Outfield left to right defensively for the Astros camp Springer and reading. The first of the bregman Korea Gonzalez Korea. Gutters at second and third and nobody out one nothing Boston where the job of the first Kyko come set. The looks. Throughout the short charging gobbles it up. Fires on the move in time. They get full guards on the play Benintendi scores. And it's to nothing Boston. In that spot. You got the ground all that. He was looking for and Zander Bogart's happy to trade out for a run. I like the approach of the Red Sox have had is not to try to do something you really can't against Tyco, which is really get the ball in the air. He makes a mistake. You will. But to just get pitches that you can find Scott from the field. The ninety feet each time. Get a run across deal comes into your seat Pierce. Outside. No strikes. Stocking. First basement. Martinez the runner at third again infield in swing. Man. Steve. Here's the way the division series ended with Steve here space sleepiness splits on that stretch of space to do it. A couple of times. Are we doing a lot of hamstring stretches before the game? Offering bounced ballot third. He said, I'm a five ten first baseman. He said I need to use every piece of Steve. In order to make it work over there at first base. Title Pat, his number in his career, though. Well strikeouts in twenty two at bats against. China's third infield halfway Red Sox jumped out to do nothing. All one and the pit ground ball right side. Love by Gonzales stares at JD Martinez. Looks to I. First pitch today at four ten local time, sixty three degrees, insight, sixty degrees outside Tommy temperature. Brought to you by Marcus by Goldman Sachs, personal loans, Marcus by Goldman Sachs or financial homerun. They've dopey spics rates that even have a reward for paying untie. Learn more at Marcus dot com. Dow to away and here is it Ordos with Amanda third and the infield drops back. Socks to the Astros. Nothing. Half of the first. China Nunez getting to start against the lefty. Has it been a great playoffs for him? So far just to for fourteen at the plate. And the defense has been shaky attacks. Shaded the other way the pitch. What is infrastructure? Alex Cora the mandate that he set the guy's going to drive the ball. He said we need to hit the ball the year. It's not so easy to do against this guy. So far the carved out a couple of runs you'll want outside. Started game three against the Indians went five. He looked to runs on four hits us. Okay. And flashes the signs, but one on the ground line into the dugout of the Astros. First base sat over there by Justin Burland as much power booed is this Red Sox lineup has one of the things that they do really well is contact Dallas paiko doesn't get a lot of swing and miss tonight. And you've had one swing and that was the Pierce the last at bat. Now these teams Volk could slug podcast Astros. Second highest contact rate offensively the majors Red Sox the third highest rate intimate. Slanging ally drive out of the year by Marlee Gonzales a second golden Martinez stranded at third but the Red Sox score twice in a half inning. It's Boston to Houston coming to back. This is the American League championship series on ESPN radio at ESPN app. Presented by auto zone. The stage is set. These bans are reading the lights are on. Baseball's teams chase. October's crown.

JD Martinez Red Sox Astros Boston Zander Bogart Benintendi D H J D Martinez Dallas Steve Mookie Betts Kyko Belle Paco Marwick Gonzales Alscae Paret bregman golden Martinez Goldman Sachs Korea Gonzalez Korea
"mark webster" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"mark webster" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"And what I've seen is the actually a lot of people who are just getting into voice from marketing angle don't have that experience in radio don't have experience in audio in particular. Later, and they don't realize that some of the rules are different than if you're working in predominantly visual medium. Yeah. Absolutely. Well, you know, we used to talk about the the theater of the mind, right? And I think that was the part of radio that I always enjoy this idea of of you, you could really they always talked about never tising if you can think of it can be produced. We would even apply that approach television. But with radio, it really is you can imagine pretty much you can create that that that environment or that situation out of anything just pull it out of San AER based on whatever you describe. And and I think there's I think there's a lot. Well, actually, I was reading through your your your your most excellent. You Exeter voice. You exa platform, I think somebody guide in. I think somebody was sitting there talking about the opportunity to use more sound effects and things like that. I think there is a big opportunity for things to little things like sound. Effects to make suggestions in maybe nudge, somebody off into a certain a certain perception research sensibility, using strictly audio I think that's probably there's probably a lot of unexplored potential there. Absolutely allowed unexploited potentially. I think it was Mark Webster. Who's over say sprang who made that comment in some other things, I think I wanna say it was too Maccari from discovery communications in that report who'd said that there were little things is visual designer. That's it was his background that he had learned where you can't put the most important point up front. Like, you do in visual media or you always want to say, this is the point. And then everyone skims the rest of it. He said is soon as started working with food network and all these other things became Alexa, skills. That you need to put the key point at the end or else. People forget it. That's a big one. Isn't it? You know? It's funny. I just one of the podcast podcast fanatic in one of them. I listen to is is grammar girl. And I it was just listening to this this weekend. She was going off about sentence structure, and how in in most English sentences. It sounds better. If you put the weight of the the weight of the messaging at the end of the sentence. So that people have easier time or grasping the the meaning of the sentence. And and I think that's a huge factor with voice, if you just think about trying to remember any sentence that you've heard it so much easier to remember, what was at the at the absolute. Well, the other thing I just remember have have done some of this work in sort of interactive audio in the advertising side, one of our early learnings was if you do a prompt you can't say anything after it the prompt what you want them to say has to be the exact the absolute last thing that you put in sequence. Because if you say anything. Say yes, if you want this, then they get confused, and you don't really have that natural dialogue flow. But you say if you want this. Yes, they get it. Like all the time. Sure. Sure. Why even to make visual analogy of that? You wouldn't put a you wouldn't put buttons you wouldn't put to navigation buttons. Let's say you're doing a landing page in your trying to drive customer down. One of two conversion funnels, you wouldn't put the buttons in the middle of a big block of copying. So give them the button choices and then continue talking right into expanding on what you're trying. That's exactly right. And it's one of those things you don't really think about and I really liked the way Tim characterize said in visual. We pretty much have to put the main point up front just because that might be the only attention. We get from them early. The only full attention. We don't wanna miss that opportunity scan up, but because of the can scan it and skip and all these other things whereas in the linear aspect of audio you can't do that. So that I think that's interesting, but let's let's pivot off of that a little bit. I definitely want to talk about how you came to be interested in this space around voice..

Alexa Exeter San AER discovery communications Mark Webster Tim
"mark webster" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"mark webster" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"Turned up Wayne and then people in it that it, you know this, this became heroism hair-raising. I think what learn though is, you know, people do with their supposed to do, and it isn't fair to me to have a sit in judgment that you then you should have done that when I did the twenty fifth anniversary, I saw all the kids again. And I said, mentoring, average Christie's truck, and it's been great as thirty stable family. And if you the kids, they live the life. They wanted to lead the live that they should lead and I put my own imprint. You know, they seem satisfied. They might be sadness. You can see there is some of them really miss, you know, playing in front of twenty thousand people, but now this is life and you do which maisy or you're supposed to back to Dessus heck, no one says about me because or the not really the TV show. They don't care about that, and I have. Friends, Brian, Travis defense. Right. Tony attend for life moving will always in my life if you'd be a pain in the neck because he can get emotional involved. But he's in my life forever and and all those all those kids are, you know, the coach, Gary Gaines was fixing between he and I, but I understand he is all primacy that kills me. That's just kills me. He was Dr. I think that we're wrong, I felt, but still him to have early all-time aid which you know basically any plate sixties. So it's always going to be a part of my life. And I'm, you know, that's his had thirty years to pick this book and find falls, and, and that as you know. Suggestive as as we all know, they've negli- found a single, hey, they may not like at this is that keep claiming. We're not racist. We we don't use the n. word and they did a school polls approve that. And you know what? Money the kids use the n. word it once a week, once a month kids in high school. So you know, they, they stop themselves of their own foot. But I, you know, the only thing I regretted is the only thing I note for and that becomes hard. You know, sometimes Jesus, I became high school of literary the quarterback, and I've done a lot of things other things in my life that I'm proud of. But you know, nothing will ever reach. You know the height of Friday night lights. I always find it interesting. When you talk about the idea that people like only know you for this because I think a lot of people myself included. I would love to be known for doing something like this. Like my father is the founding president of the national conference of black political scientists, WBZ boys. He wrote his guy, and I really do look at this book is being in line with sociological studies on that level in explaining this so it. What is it about people putting such a focus on this? They're Bosnia's just the idea of knowing some of the other things that you've done. Look, my my father said, you know, being a baby, you know, shut up, you probably have, and it is. I think, you know, I wrote the book. The first book I wrote, I was four years old. I didn't really know what I was doing. Great passion. It worked out the on my wild imagination, and I think part of life, you know, moving around feeding other goals for yourself and feeding them, and and you know, I, I figured out pretty early. I was not every success and popularity of this. And yes, at times it it has depress me, but you know, 'cause I get older. Right? And I'm what? What. Look, it's I wrote the book in nineteen ninety. So what is it? Twenty eight years later we're having session about it. That's amazing. That's remarkable and I did that. I, you know, I did that. I tend to be hard on myself, but you know, I'm proud that I did that. It was a great idea and I took them list Bill. That's like quit my job, and I moved my twins down there and you know, got married with actually with a fortunate. But you know, I let the Mark Webster Friday life is part of the inactive and and you know, I leave a Mark on society as wasting and over emphasis in sports impact. What they're going to ask you before we let you go is that this book actually talks about two high schools in Dallas..

Gary Gaines Tony Christie Dr. I Wayne Bosnia Mark Webster Brian Dallas president Twenty eight years thirty years twenty fifth four years
"mark webster" Discussed on Bang the Book

Bang the Book

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"mark webster" Discussed on Bang the Book

"Twitter, certainly very good for this for falling beat writers and all that type of thing. But there are some injuries that do get a lot of mainstream media coverage. One of them here this week. Rodney Anderson the running back at Oklahoma done for the year with a knee injury. Very unfortunate for Lincoln Riley as offense. I thought he was a Heisman type of candidate here or the Sooners this season kinda Murray's played really well, but know not having Anderson once we get into big twelve play. Once the Sears get challenged a little bit more, could wind up being detrimental for them. Did you make an adjustment here for Rodney Anderson. I did. I only made at one point right now and that's because of trae sermon the, you know, they have traced cermony started three games last year rushed for seven hundred forty four yards and six point one yards per carry. It may be a situation that right now I just at a point and it's one of those notes or an asterik that if they start going on the road against foes, where they need to run the ball more well, then you're putting them are Celje Sutton. Their third string guy who was a senior really hasn't rushed at all. So as long as sermon can stay healthy. You know right now I only downgraded of one, but if I see a drop off when his backup comes in, then you have to drop them more because their whole different team. I mean, because when you went from Anderson the sermon, there was really no drop off at all. You were able to rescue guy and you had the same productivity and they're sort of like the Browns with Dobbins and Weber. I mean, it doesn't matter who's in, but. But the fall off comes with the third string guys. So as the season progresses, I have an asterik to perhaps drop the more because of that. Yeah, I only took him down a half a point, but it makes sense to a point there because like you said, you know the difference Anderson and serve and not a ton. The difference went sermon and on down the depth chart. That is something that is a little bit more note worthy. How about Minnesota here? We know PJ flick wants to run the football wants to row that vote on the ground. Rodney Smith out for the golden gophers here, a big win for them. Last week. It's Minnesota. Whether the most incredible picks I've ever seen from Anton Winfield junior, of course, his dad played it Ohio State, but Rodney Smith out how much of an adjustment was that for you for Minnesota. It was a point for me and you know, it was another situation where you know when I when I make these early injury upsets, you know, you just keep notes running. I haven't excel sheet and I have my starting number down and then I make my judgment. I put a note why I made the adjustment. And the reason is just for the same reason, we talked with. With Oklahoma, you know, let's say you use lose a running back or you lose, you know, an offense of Lyman to me when you use lose multiple people in the same position like you're one and two guys or your to your left tackle and your left guard. All of a sudden, maybe that one for a player becomes three for multiple people or four if you've got three people out for the unit. So again, it's a fluid situation where I make a one point change now. But again, I have the injury marks and then make any further adjustments that there's multiple people from that unit. Are much bigger adjustment required here for the Duke blue devils. They lose quarterback Daniel Jones. He's out for at least a month. They also lost the top defensive back. Mark Webster us of two big injuries for Duke last week in that game against northwestern. How about the adjustment here for the blue devils about their starting quarterback. I made it three and I was thinking about going higher just because you know, you have a junior quarterback who had made twenty five starts coming into this year. His numbers weren't great. I mean, hurry pass fifty, seven percent last year with a fourteen eleven ratio, but with cut clips offense, he knew how to run it. He knew how to get them to where they needed to go to not turn the ball over. He knew we had a great defensively didn't put him in bad positions..

Rodney Anderson Duke blue devils Rodney Smith Sooners Oklahoma Minnesota Twitter Dobbins Lincoln Riley trae Browns Sears Celje Sutton Daniel Jones football Anton Winfield Murray Mark Webster
"mark webster" Discussed on This Week In Voice

This Week In Voice

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"mark webster" Discussed on This Week In Voice

"Designer for echo notifications odd alexa and some skills on my own time and they are in my free time i run a concern essentially a design education firm called idea platz which allows me to visit companies and conferences with workshops about voice you y technique can deliver bowls delivering talks about the future of oisee why it's a subject i'm very passionate about and i i'm very glad to be here today we appreciate you being here today and for anybody who's listening to this who wants information about idea platt stand the type of design instruction the cheryl provides in the workshop she doesn't so on badly is included on the show page we will include that in the show notes as well cheryl thank you for joining us thank you glad to be here we also have mark webster with this marks a low hello to mark arrived fleet daddy back thank you for joining us giving us some of your time mark you are ceo and founder of say spring tell us what stay spring guts sheriff say spraying is a design and prototyping platform for boys interfaces we integrate with amazon alexa anguilla sustained when the ideas too how do we give the creative community access to the medium of voice so that we can build delightful conversational experiences uh without needing to code before we actually putting the final effort to develop these things you know anyone who's used a bunch of the skills that exist alexa knows that they could be a lot better and so we're bringing the design community into the fold for help voice live up to its promise excellent thank you very much for.

platt mark webster founder idea platz ceo amazon alexa