35 Burst results for "Mark Twain"

Horace Fletcher: 'The Great Masticator'

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

02:17 min | 2 months ago

Horace Fletcher: 'The Great Masticator'

"Born in lawrence massachusetts in eighteen forty nine. Horace didn't play an instrument or hustle. Amateurs at chess no. He didn't cobbled together. Shoes in italy. Horace fletcher like the chew. As a young man fletcher traveled around performing odd jobs following his interests he worked as a writer and artist and even managed in new orleans opera house for a time. He loved to read and he indulged in many of life's pleasures mainly food. It was this pleasure. However that inflicted some of the worst pain he'd ever experienced in his life for one. As he got older he struggled with obesity and it side effects such as chronic stomach pains he also found himself being refused coverage from a life insurance policy or rejection. That sounded alarm bells for him. He quickly realized it was time to make a change one day while traveling to chicago on business the middle aged fletcher began chewing his food. He'd always shoot his food before but this time was different. He kept chewing and chewing and chewing until all that was left was a liquidity goo on his tongue. He believed that this was the key to proper digestion and weight management according to this new practice which he dubbed fletcher ism. All food needs to be chewed until it has been turned into liquid. Any solid particles were deemed unnecessary and could be spat out. It sounds absurd today. But at the time fletcher ism caught on. He became known as the great mass decatur and argued that his practice could increase a person's strength despite reducing the amount of food they actually eight. He also had strict rules about win. To consume sustenance followers. Were instructed to avoid eating when they were sad or angry and to wait until they reached the point. That fletcher called good and hungry. No midnight snacks for him. He started touring the united states giving lectures on his methods methods which were scoffed at by doctors and scientists as nothing more than self-important hokum. That didn't matter. Though fletcher ism had reached far more important spokespeople than doctors celebrities and titans of industry had begun shoeing with wild abandon among them. Were john d. rockefeller and author upton sinclair. Even mark twain was considered a friend

Horace Fletcher Fletcher Fletcher Ism Horace Lawrence Chess Massachusetts New Orleans Italy Obesity Chicago Decatur Titans Of Industry United States John D Rockefeller Upton Sinclair Mark Twain
"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

07:23 min | 4 months ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

"It is pretty funny. The idea of just like by people taking offense they do it al qaeda. Actually i feel like the reason why people are extra excited about juneteenth just because they don't necessarily always get mlk day off right I've been at jobs where people have been like so to. We get this day off or out. Don't know you work through it right. It's like a veterans day. The actual rules about this. But yeah celebrating. But i feel also like i was frustrated especially at juneteenth for having the nerve to fall on a saturday like cool where federal holiday but who gets off who gets off on the saturday and also teens eve. That's should be holidays. Well rollout people were off friday. I was not. I saw white people tweets going up. I know you always resting that day. Oh you working grown. She kept people in the plantation. A tight tight ship. Nobody knows enough it by the way. July fourth is on a weekend this off so everybody cry on my behalf. Thanks i might be seeing you this july fourth. No more narrow misses at parties okay. Okay okay okay. Yes keep it to eat a showing up at a party. After i left last weekend and then seeing photos with unc. Way i want wanna have this again. Okay we showed up at the same. Time is ira edo summer showed up late. You're right you're right. I did come in like eleven. Forty five who shows up at eleven forty five to a poor party. Day party okay. A day showed up at eleven forty five pm. Young muslim woman a young muslim woman who does not swim in public. Okay i came when it was safe for my people. Okay we'll put your jad back on you see where hijab at telling you to show up late. Something has gone wrong. You take it to heart. Take a heart louis. What's your key. I was looking for a keep this morning. And i went on twitter and this one was simply begging to be called out. It said lewis here. I am this movie karen. Which stars taryn manning. A karen nextdoor neighbour from hell white woman with swoopy cake goslin. Type hair the movie is exactly what you expect based on the trailer which is kind of get out. Knock off like there's something sinister going on here very lake view terrace. That's a reference to our friends house which we should add it out. Lewis very lakeview terrace. The samuel l. jackson movie. Oh yes he where he where he terrorized that mixed race couple wolf. You really took me back. Here's the thing. We all had a good moment. Where the karen joke was funny and resident. We simply have hit this too many times. It feels to me like snl sketches from like two years ago now. And i don't think there's any more even macabre humor to be eked out of like a karen calling management or whatever. The the big joke of this movie is and then additionally. It's not the right way. I feel like to investigate actual shadiness towards black people. I don't know it feels a little facile to me. Ultimately i get it the main complaints to our that these get out knock offs. Don't really get what that movie was about. a lot of. it was parodying white liberalism. You know taking black culture and it wasn't just black person in a situation where creepy things are happening. But i will say once again. The pendulum always swings too far in the other direction. You have everyone mad that anyone would even dean to like. Try and copy what jordan peele was doing. And i'm just sort of like filmmakers. Want that. I mean i mean you want to be responsible for creating of like a new john jonah and a new way of telling stories right. You wish that they weren't bad knockoffs john carpenter revitalize the horror genre by doing. They're a bunch of bad knock offs. But you know we got like friday the thirteenth. We got like a nightmare on elm street that were variations on the slasher. Thanks to carpenter so there will be movies. That are great that come out of sort of what jordan peele created. Not everyone will be good but you also can't attack everything because it looks like it's doing what jordan peele did did what tarantino did after pulp fiction. A lot of people you know like copied the matrix after the mcaliskey sisters did that also. I mean it's a familiar type of move. I mean even think of the movie ma or something. Yeah something's kind of rather. But i love mar see. I'd rather instead of karen feels more modern to me. Yeah then it does get out ira. What's your keep it so my keep it. This week goes to that. Tiny rapper baby burning down aptly named i feel i feel like we are constantly saying. Keep it to the baby on the show and it's a good thing though. Oh i like him on that. Levitating remix lewis. So i prefer the madonna version but Well so debate recently did a collaboration with torey lanes who as we now shot. Megan thee stallion last summer. You gotta say allegedly baby for his lawyers. Come for you all right. Thank you start jones. thank you start. Alleged allegedly okay. We don't walk crooked media. We want snapchat to be sued etc so after his collaboration with tori lanes who allegedly shot. Megan thee stallion last summer. He re tweeted a fan tweeting. I guess the baby and tori lanes cool down because they shot somebody and they don't have to do jail time A are then when he's called out on it he responded. I don't know what type of illuminate shits that are going on. I retreat nothing. But ball. If i want to promo i tweet that silly share then once people start tagging sa i tried to delete it and undo the re tweet. Twitter didn't let me what type shit y'all on so come on. Now come on man and it is a pattern of the disrespect to meghan. Who has put you on multiple times even though you continue to ruin the songs of hers at. You're on particularly crybaby. We didn't need that cash was fired. Did what she got to do. And we were all sort of ready to be like. Debate baby stands and then you know as we said. We saw him live at one point at flog raw. And then you know like crybaby. And i'm like the subsequent to baby turn outs are are bad so it's been very awful to see him. Disrespect begging this way because remember that instagram live. They done win. Crybaby came out where. His friend was sort of disrespectful to megan on instagram. Live to it shitty. Do that to her. It's stupid especially for somebody who's career dis- went up and up in accordance with meg's only listening to the baby..

john jonah friday jordan peele Twitter eleven forty five pm July fourth taryn manning Megan saturday samuel l. jackson two years ago louis megan twitter meghan last summer instagram john carpenter snapchat muslim
"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

02:16 min | 4 months ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

"Cybercriminals that sounds frightening. Aura can protect you from the worst of the internet though so you can still enjoy the best of it or provides digital security protection and keep your online finances personal information tech safe from online threats. It's all at one protection from identity theft financial fraud memoir scam sites and so much more with aura. You'll get alerted to fraud and threats fast like if you're online accounts or passwords leaked online or if someone tries to open a bank account in your name or is easy to set up all plans come with one million dollars and identity theft insurance to help cover your stolen funds and experience. Us based customer support. That's got your back or is a new type of security that protects all of your online information devices with one simple subscription so within easy online dashboard alert sent straight to your phone or keeps you in control and guides you through solving any issues for a limited time or is offering our listeners up to forty percents off plans when you visit or dot com slash keep it go to or dot com slash it to get complete protection and savings of up to forty percent. That's eight you are dot com slash. Keep it this episode of keep it is sponsored by today explained a daily news podcast from vox hosted by a friend of crooked sean. Rama's version them. You might know. Vox words award-winning explanatory journalism. And that's what sean and the today explain team bring audio each day they pick one fascinating news story and and some of the best journalists academics and policymakers in the world to help us understand it all better episodes of taken deep ties into voter suppression efforts in some democratic strongholds across the country. Israel's new prime minister and even look at what's next for the kardashian family as they wrap up. The final season of their show. New episodes are released every weekday afternoon. So listen and follow today. Explains your favorite podcast app last week. The new york times released list of the twenty one best american. Tv comedies of.

"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

06:56 min | 4 months ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

"To you telling me that my work shit like i can't cannot deal. It was so it was so bonkers because there's also the people who really enjoy it. Because i mean that sounds much more torturous than you know what i would have went doing graduate school. You know it's like even like the dramatic writing program at tisch. There are people who are like you could tell when they're someone who enjoys critiquing someone's work you know and there's also the people who you feel like everyone sort of has this person can't write as you talk about it outside of class and then when you get in class some of that has to sleep in when you're just sort of like when let me tell you about this scene right here in this play because i don't know it's like some people enjoy the critiquing so much and i feel like that is also one of the horrific parts about these programs and also i wanna ask about like being a black writer to and one who wants to disabuse themselves of the notions of sort of like writing for white people one of the things that i guess we consuming black art. But you know. I feel like also if you are even a black writer who gets to a place of success. Eight times out of ten. You've gone through some sort of environment that involves white people who can decide your career or future right you know. There's not a lot of black people at the top. You know so some professor had to be like you're a good writer. Someone had to be like. Oh i wanna be your agent. Someone had to be like. Oh i wanna give you this book prize etc you know and i feel like one of the hardest points is as you're learning to write in as you're becoming a creative person. The person who is reading your stuff very often ends up being a white person. How hard is it to unlearn that style. Because i feel like my first creative writing. Classes were in high school in milwaukee and marquette university high school this lovely white woman who really cared about literature ran. You know like The literature book that came out every year you know but she's the one who made us. I read invisible man. And you know i really feel like i did not need to be in that class. We're hearing a her discuss invisible man. You know or like the way that she loved to emphasize sang but phrase like nigger in the woodpile. You now. I didn't eat that it wasn't helped for. Oh my god. Yeah we'll listen. There's always that so. I was the only black person in my. Ap language class in high school when we did there is watching god and like that book is heavily dialect and vernacular and like all the white kids hated it and of course they made that my business and so every time they'd have to like read a difficult passage out loud. They would like turn to look like read. It at me had split. I didn't write it. like zora. neale hurston. They hated it. They hated it. They hated in my school. Tom sawyer very mad about it would be very mad when i read the n. Word out loud to in the tests because they say. I don't think you needed to do that. Ira in the bug. Y'all like there's always we white people really love mark twain and they always talk about how he invented the american boys and like one time in a graduate seminar here at this very kind white lady was giving a seminar on it and i was like i just kind of feel like mark twain really the american voice like all he did was make white people talk like black people. And let's talk about that. And the like i'm like i didn't mean to settle the tea. I just feel like that's very obvious and me in this room. Full of white people. Nobody's talking about how these white people in this book are just black off like what's going on But as for like coming up like three creative writing programs and academia yeah like i think one way that you survived that as a black person is just like getting really good at reading white people and getting really good at sort of giving them. What what they want. Sort of not like reflecting back to them like a surface that is like palatable and like non-threatening and all that other stuff so i did that for a long time because i was very high achieving type a person and is like education is like my way out like it was a very sort of cosby like late in the early two thousands energy and alabama everybody's like you're going to get an education etc but then when it came time to like start making art i was like oh the white people are like piloting me like puppet puppet like i'm writing black characters but they they aren't functioning like people like they're just these these facsimiles and part of learning. That is just being like really diligent. Like always asking yourself lake. Is this truthful. Is this honest or is this like me trying to keep the sort of culture from getting angry at me and just being willing to sort of let them be mad. Yeah i mean like once. I started being like oh like they can just be mad like it's not the end of the world. They'll sit tight like it'll be like they don't get to control me just so that they don't have to experience discomfort like they don't get to control my life and that felt like a really radical really important thing for me to do and honestly like that didn't come about until i was no longer like financially like as beholden to making sure the white people in my grad program. Were happy with me. You know like when. I finally got some degree of like economic sureties feet then i was like. Oh yeah i can do whatever i want like when i sold my first two books like great. I've already signed the contract. You can't make me put white people And so i think you know in your creative life just finding little places where. You're not willing to placate the over cultural imagination of the white gays and just like being really honest about your about your life about your stuff and not letting anybody tell you what to do. Where thank you for being here on. What a pleasure again. Hot cast voice. You have when people just actually walk in here and know how to deliver it like. They're like they're like. There's somebody on the voice but for podcasts. I threatened and i thank you for what you bring watch that show honestly i would watch next top podcast or ira glass slams around in a chair or whatever the heck i would listen i would love to be the adam levine of that show. Oh my god. Creating chaos. Yeah now or i'd be. I'd be christina aguilera. You know coming on this show matters how..

neale hurston christina aguilera mark twain Tom sawyer milwaukee adam levine ten zora Eight times first two books one first creative marquette university high scho one time one way three creative writing program alabama Word the horrific parts hardest points
"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

04:15 min | 4 months ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

"I feel like everyone was discovering new books I was so excited to read it. Because one you were writing about being black engaged in the mid west so typically records kansin specifically like a state and then from But also you know a a no madison wisconsin very well because friends of mine from high school went there and visit them sometimes and it was just such a exciting book to read and also. I'm so fucking jealous of your pros. I think roxanne gay pointed out to. I mean like the pros is phenomenal. The pros is the main reason to be there. I mean fuck you storytelling. I wanna live in your pros honestly. That's all i've ever wanted to hear about my writing. And so i am now close to all further. Compliments a pros. I mean i to such. I'm there for the pros honestly. But i'm so thrilled that you that you've found it well. Hopefully not to trigger madison. Wisconsin is a very freighted place for the black gays. I feel it's very particular place Yeah i didn't find it trigger ago. Though i will say i got the wildest email from someone who i feel like. They were white but they send me an email and they were like trying to remember this word for word but it was like there. Were basically just mad. That i recommend the book because they said i am really upset that you would recommend this book for me to read because i'm reading it and you know and it was very it was like it was very hard to read and at the ends. You know. it's like there weren't even any answers to do. It was just sad. And it made me feel sad. And you should be recommending these kinds of books to people and i was like god damn. Have you read literature before. It's it's always to the back in the correct answers. Yeah it's not. It's not a algebra. Is that a eyes on the prize. It's not a call to action documentary so was a really shocking review. Incredible these people who white people who when they read the book. We're like this just made me very uncomfortable. And like. I don't know if i liked that and i was just like a welcome to be in black great to feel either. You know there. And then i always feel sort of conflicted when white people recommend the book and then they'll give trigger warnings for racism and i'm like i think early warning. It's it's a weird. It's a great book but you will feel really sad because there's some racism in it. That's so helpful to know as an onlooker. Thank you so much and also speaking of responses to your work something. I thought that was interesting. When i read an interview of yours. I think it was the guardian or g. q. I apologize for not knowing that you talked about specifically the kinds of words. You hate reading when people review your books and two of the words. You use where i thought were interesting raw and visceral and i'm like okay. I'm thinking about when people would use that kind of descriptors and it does feel like it's kind of only for black writers like it's just like a familiar trope. We return to and i was wondering if you had other just things you return to things that are actually cliches. That are meant to be like wonderful compliments. So yeah ron visceral for sure Music they love the throw end. Ask the whole book ribes god. It's just a wrap. They love authentic. That's wine. They love a hot authentic. They love a searing new voice. It's just like things that are just painful like any like if you don't know if they're describing about appendicitis or a book usually the author that they're describing is like a brown or black..

Wisconsin madison madison wisconsin mid west roxanne two of the words kansin
"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

02:11 min | 4 months ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

"The twenty. Who the fuck is doing that when album cover baby and baby it'll look like you it'll start off. What is what is the. What is the thing. That might so speaking of earlier. When i was saying two thousand and seven was a weird weird time. Nikki was working on her first. Mix tape with the little boys. As i'm sure and t pain approached her and said joe i love your music. I just wanna make us on what you and she was like. No no. i'm working on my own music. Honey and two thousand seventeen pain like he was on the charts. This was this was an artist and he was a a mixed tape. Artist is trying to figure her stuff out but so for her to deny t pain. He recently went on the eighty five south show carlos miller and she go being celebrated team listen to the registry but that sounds like she was being an independent one. Man i'm not mad at her for that now but she. She apologized for it. T pain like told us that it happened and then she she was like maybe i have my own music to make like i. Can't i support it. I love it. I'm not mad. At nicky pedal deserve that song. We deserve this. Is this true. We do deserve that saw. What then that was like the era when he was like making a sorry for britney on blackout hot as ice. A fire esau. I love that song by the way somewhat rare to hear stories of celebrities being even remotely kind of rude to each other. That reminds me of the famous story where. Tmre went up to charlene. Darren at some yoga studio was like such a big fan and according to allegedly. Charlie's laughed in her face. So i'm just saying. I can picture it. Don't know the veracity really. But i'm stretching negro this comeback. My name is charlie's africa not lease talks to african americans. Only one baby can.

charlene Nikki Tmre carlos miller first Charlie Darren twenty one baby charlie britney two thousand seventeen pain african americans two thousand pedal five south eighty africa seven
"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

Keep It!

07:45 min | 4 months ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Keep It!

"Only one here today. it's cancer season. I've been acting up. I've been acting up. And i'm alive and i'm very very much so alive y'all get on my dm's okay you know. I'm sad when a show. But i got to be an actress. Now i gotta do other things but hello hi i gotta let my co host speak. It's actually my dream to burst into tears and scream. I'm an actress on. The show hasn't happened yet. i'm. I'm lewis for talent whose this other guy i am. Ira madison the third reminding you that leo season starts now because as i said before when i see a cancer i floor it. So you're worried about aida being alive. Now she might not be. She might not be ira- ira- i know kansas acting up to. Because you've been fully black socialite. You're up there with missile. Laurie harvey jordan woods outside. Ira where my bed dragged the iro. Why am i seeing you with with the cast of selling sunset. Planning you looked fun. It looks very cute. I want to point out that the connection between me and chris shell is the fact that she is close friends with another friend of mine molly in the days of our lives together. That's beautiful also. If you patrol sunset enough at night they just let you hang out with selling sunset cast so good for you girls truly. I just want to point out that they are the most fun straight people. I've ever interacted with time. This is not even a critique. This is a beg for invitation. This jon favreau. I said what i said. Okay you're gonna you're gonna stick stick with that okay. And i think everyone would agree. Oh you know what she's up there. She's like top percents I was also cited to see former keeping guest. Nina parker their early keeping guess so low. Seeing her shine you know hosting daily pop having her own fashion line. Doing what all the other girls wish they were doing. I wanna have a fashion line. I can dial into this zodiac season. Because i believe zodiac is a cancer early. Nice how it works out. How long have you been working on that. I love teaching the girls work. All right cross dot. What often your notebook movie production. Your story was like three hours long the other day. Alright girl. I explained the christmas. The crispness of the visuals. I need to know what was going on louis. Oh well i use the one gay filter. What she's talking about is. I didn't instagram story. Where i just answered pop culture questions for our due to i guess narcissism but it's fun so there we go. There's like one filter that everybody uses that for some reason. Instagram notable and friend. An la friend of ours. Kyle krieger. i think invented but it gives you like this orangey peachy glow. It's really helpful for people with say rosa like me this everyone use it. Yes it's or do you keep using. It is seen many people use it anymore. Okay well guys. I don't know how you're going to help me with this pinky but he did his best. So named after our favorite and recreate glitziest song hero. Of course if you're paying attention. While i was drinking during the weekend i must have missed it but i did get. Dm's so sent me like one of your stories by this went to look ice cream recorded. oh you dead. Thank you question was do. I prefer iras french accent or english accent and i said murder-suicide so i do have a murder-suicide accent. I feel the same i love. We agree yeah all right. Well i guess we gotta get. This show started all right fine. It's time you're no. They missed us so much. We're back with a vengeance. This and then jinse. Yeah despite the we have so much to talk about. The celebrities are acting up. Okay so we will. One discuss The other thing that i got plenty of deums about the chrissy teigen michael costello situation. I wanna point out that we started to discuss it last week without all of the proper information and that is why you all felt the need to. Dm me about why there was a large cut at the end of last week's segment. Most people didn't notice but some of you are Listen to too many murder podcasts. And probably just listened to keep it with too much of a attuned ear stub doing that. The michael hostile situation. We were only like five percent of the way through the story by the time the episode dropped and now the necessary information has come out and we can be the proper literary detectives that we are. Yes plus there's some new gay athletes in the world. So that's exciting and me at san francisco pride. We'll be another athlete. Watch me go. Is that where you're going this weekend. I'm going to win the long jump. High jump in the all the gems jumpsuit. Could are you going to. sf right this weekend. I sure am oh. I'm horrified about that. Complete what lewis at world. Pride in new york was like. I was concerned for him. Oh yeah well. I mean it's like tasr tasr to interact socially in a responsible way but he's you know task manian devil. Yeah that's the one. We'll just call them tasr now. I'm over casual ever since. I bought those leather coats in the nineties with him on the back side. No i do want to say that. I have been trying to hunt one of those down. Oh yeah i missed the like hipaa looney tunes characters on the back of jackets starter jacket. Synchronicity got tweety bird shirt yes bring tweety bird back bring them all back was a tweety with with a bandanna though lash a strip lashing abandoning going i feel like the hip hop qualities were evenly distributed to the looney tunes. Like was there like hip hop daffy so it really was mostly like tweetie and maybe task and maybe marvin the martian drop airing tweety pox core. I wanna see granny with hoop earrings and doc martens. Yeah i wanna see lola dukes. That's what i want anyway Shared a disturbing story about us for lewis not even heard get so. Can't wait to tell him about that. It's also comes on the heels of a disturbing story about him. Nicki menaj like it's just strange. I didn't hear that one. yeah was just about. Oh we'll get into it. We'll get hurt. My stall has a bar Well it is. That happens every week anyway. So you can't be bob without being disappointed but nikki every week also the new york times released its list of the best american comedies of the twenty first century and got some thoughts about that. Tv shows yes. No it wouldn't it wouldn't be keep it if we didn't find the list gravely wrong so we'll get into it yelling at lists one of the most unproductive and satisfying things.

Kyle krieger Nicki menaj Ira madison jon favreau last week new york michael costello Nina parker Laurie harvey christmas today instagram five percent third Instagram san francisco chris shell english Ira lola dukes
"mark twain" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

03:50 min | 4 months ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Overdue

"He's surprised as all of us to learn all the stuff that tom new at the end when aunt polly shows up. And i mean i guess nominally stuff turns out okay because everybody in town thinks that jim. Jim's and alright guy and he does ultimately get his freedom and aunt. Sally who is aunt polly sister has announced her intention to adopt huck and so leaving us whereas huck stay much like the much like the end of tom sawyer with this opportunity for huck to have a family after all. Where's huck stabbed though ox. Dad died when they so in the river adventures segment they find. They come upon this like hut floating in the river. And there's a dead guy in there. And jim is like huck on. Look at the sky. It's bad luck or you know homework. And then at the end of the book it's like well. You know this thing. That happened three quarters of the book ago. Actually that that was your daddy die. Yeah has he. This is the stuff. I remember reading it. Everybody's laboring under a bunch of false assumptions Toward the end of this one and it made me kind of upset because they thought that cheapened the other stuff. Those happening in the book. And i think that there are many schools thought about this. Yeah reason dot com forgive. Forgive me for citing reason dot com book. Podcast does does mention that. The you know the critical opinions at this part of the book were tom. Sawyer shows up kind of sucks commonly beheld to suck. Ah and then the the article ends with a quote in huckleberry finn reveals in ugly detail the limitations of that adolescent mentality when confronting the reality of american race relations caught in his own solid. Cystic worldview tom. Not only is incapable of understanding. Jim suffering he puts the slave in mortal danger to fulfill his own. Romantic notions of escape. Enduring do so completely deconstructing. His signature creation twain not only forces his readers to reevaluate a national icon. He embodies the american dialectic. Got some very generous read there. I think it is also as well but but if you're gonna rival knowledge that is a way you can read it there. Either way i read. It was that it wasn't as good as the rest of the book. And it made me mad on behalf of all the non tom sawyer characters in the a because everybody every character in this book. When tom shows up is just a puppet for tom sawyer to manipulate with his little creepy kid hands. And i hate it. I found a a a scientific american article by maria. Kondakova from two thousand twelve said is huckleberry finn's ending really lacking non if you're talking psychology and kinda cova very deliberate talking psychology. The i'm talking. I read this book. And i hated this. It's really fun because cobras like listen. I'm not here to talk about the artistic merit to the book. I'm just gonna make a fun little argument for the fact that like this is like when you knew some jerks and college and then you haven't seen them in a while but then you meet up at a reunion and they start being jerks again and you fall back into peer pressure like letting them be jerks because it's real like that type of personality like slide and regression with people that have a big effect on you does happen I would have thought was a neat like yes. That's the thing and certainly things that teenagers do a lot but it definitely does not make for a cool ending to a book that has not been about that all the entire time i am fascinated by the alternate universe. That the rest of that..

Sally Jim two thousand Sawyer maria. Kondakova jim three quarters of american dot com polly every character tom sawyer twelve finn tom
"mark twain" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

05:11 min | 4 months ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Overdue

"It's multicultural so american literature should probably reflect that so he goes on to recommend. You could also read some relevant langston hughes or richard right. If your goal is to expose folks to twain in high school maybe you could just read the jumping frog story and then move on. If you want to talk about you know the narratives and books that center enslaved people. There are plenty of a slave narrative books that you could read. There's a pretty decorated twain. Scholar joscelyn chadwick who the gym dilemma. And there's an article in interview with her. I found in two thousand in the year. Two thousand where she suggests. You should totally read this book. But you got to be prepared to back it up and you could also read a book called yola roy. By francis harper. I was published in eighteen ninety two. It's one of the first novels by a black woman. United states and it also depicts. Slavery focuses on a black family. But that depiction. It's still challenging. So you gotta be ready for it but i. I don't know we were joking before. We started recording. That like we're going to come out of the spot like we will have the take that saves we're gonna figure it out. I don't think that we have to break it to you andhra. Don't think that we will. I think the thing that you'd said about like you can discuss the issues that this book is bringing up without actually teaching this book. If you yeah. If you'd rather avoid the like i think it is as to adults discussing the book. I think it is i. I prefer to have it with as originally presented and then evaluate it within the context of its time and with the you know the the critical or body of of work that has arisen around it like i value that stuff and i think it is more interesting for our literature podcasts to discuss the book in that context. But if you're in high school in you're trying to teach stuff like yeah you could just. You could talk about this without reading it. You could do something else like there. There are other options that are available. Yeah you could. What you probably shouldn't do is watch the nineteen fifty five. Cbs tv adaptation of this book. That come wheatley sounds roughing away completely removed jam as a character less. Ko with the issue at sure. Okay sure he's like the the sal you know the with the whatever. The word is for your secondary yet like your doer. d- do do attack. Your you know the one. Do your do agonised your dignity. Yes yeah or you could watch the nineteen seventy-five abc version. That has ron howard. I don't think that they cut him.

United states richard Two thousand joscelyn chadwick francis harper two thousand one langston hughes Cbs nineteen first novels ninety two ron howard yola roy black abc american nineteen fifty seventy-five eighteen
"mark twain" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

05:57 min | 4 months ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Overdue

"My name's andrew. Welcome to our book podcast. Welcome back we're back. We're here with through the through the miracle of time we require. We have not experienced the show. The way you have this last week we recorded an episode early. We recorded our our moon quest episode early because we had stuff going on. Maybe every time we go more than seven. Gregorian date is between recording podcasts. I feel like it's been months. Yes is correct. It feels like we are learning how to podcast again. We're base. i don't remember how to do it anymore. Okay when for our book podcasts. Where one of us every week reads a book that we've never had before tells the other person about it tells you about it. We have some laughs. we have some cries. Find out a little bit about ourselves and about you somehow at home. anyway. I don't remember how to do it anymore. So this one is bad. I'm sorry that it's bad. Okay we're all doing our best. I think it'll be fine. We should probably a few minutes and now talk about what book we are discussing this weekend. Ripple read read the adventures of huckleberry finn by marcus twain. His name yeah marcus well. His real name samuel clemens but His pen name is marcus to mark twain. That's him we have previously discussed. Ms twain's work on episode fifty nine The celebrated jumping frog of calaveras does use pronounce the zero that i put into our episode numbers to make sure that they organize correctly when i'm looking at them in windows explorer. Yup we all episode episode five nine. Go back and hit that one. We also talked about mark twain recently on episode. Four seventy three. When i read the adventures of tom sawyer. For the first time we got an interesting response from one or listeners. Twitter user ham pineapple. Is this about the one where we talked about. How mark twain is problematic. And we didn't even scratch the surface of all the different ways that he's probably just wanted to give a good shot to him. Pineapples on this one quote listening to overdue. And i hate how easy it is to discuss. How problematic mark twain was never even dip into the man's like collection of ten to sixteen year old girls. So i did look into this There's an article in the paris review. That was called mark. Twain's disturbing passion for collecting. Young girls seem to collect pok mon. He did. he called them his angels fishes. Mostly that sucks. Yeah you could stop there and this would be pretty bad. And there's you know from everything. I read in that article and a few other sources. There's no evidence of Like you know. Explicit abuse of any kind is mostly a as reported anyway. Just a gross thing to do. Yeah so.

marcus twain mark twain samuel clemens marcus windows explorer twain Twitter mark Twain andrew ten last week more than seven tom sawyer sixteen year old adventures of huckleberry finn first time one moon quest Ripple
Interview With Author Francisco X. Stork

What Book Hooked You?

02:13 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Author Francisco X. Stork

"So francisco. What book hooked you. Well when i was a teenager. I think freshmen in highschool one of the one of the books that hooked me into wanting to write about the young characters. was j. d. salinger's books Specifically i think the you know the the short stories. I found very interesting and also freddie and so we i. I couldn't imagine you know how he managed to keep me interested in a book. Were nothing happened. Essential so i figured i'd like to learn how to do that someday. So do you remember what the age you were when you were reading Jd salinger especially like frankin. Zoe yeah i was just i had turned fifteen so An hour each leverett ahead. Read other bugs before but it was. That was the kind of like where i really wanted to write for. Would characters that were that age. You know age and i thought it was. You know it. It took a while for me to do that. But that was the beginning as i think of the little. See that was planned. It of You know the kind of stuff that i wanted to write and you mentioned you were fifteen at the time. So were you a big reader. Was it easy to get you interested in books or were you You know they call them reluctant readers or were did you have to grow into your interested in reading or was it always with you know. I grew up. But i was born in mexico and i grew up obviously reading spanish. I think the first book that i read was a translation of mark twain's to princeton to popper at. I was in first grade. So i was like a big. You know a big hit there to tell people that story. And then i obviously. I started reading in started reading in spanish. I grew up a little bit in the the the latin america. Boom you know when you had all these great writers there were there. Were coming to be become beginning to be known

Jd Salinger Frankin Salinger Freddie Francisco ZOE Mark Twain Popper Mexico Princeton Latin America
Episode 45; Chopsticks, Fruits and Vegetables, a Best Day Ever and a life without regrets - burst 1

The Old Man's Podcast

01:12 min | 5 months ago

Episode 45; Chopsticks, Fruits and Vegetables, a Best Day Ever and a life without regrets - burst 1

"Coming on episode of the old man's podcast. I want to solve the mystery of the five servings of fruits and vegetables we all know about our daily suggested intakes supposed to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables as net very specific. Get a little more specific with you. So you know exactly what you've got to work with. We'll talk about Best day ever. You've had them. But i'm not talking about the typical that's day ever know the birth of your children. Your wedding things like data just too easy. How about the days that you like to live over and over again. If he could that makes for a day. I was in a chinese restaurant recently. And there was this hipster dude. They're just had to have chopsticks. I want to tell them to get some old technology in the upgraded. Recently in the pep talk for this episode comes from a quote from mark twain. Often use subject here on the old man's podcast regrets so that on this week's episode of the old man's podcast

#Lifewithoutregrets #Noregrets #Healthyliving #Bestdayever #Judgingpeople Mark Twain
Overcoming Fear and Finding Confidence

Sprinkled with Hope

01:53 min | 6 months ago

Overcoming Fear and Finding Confidence

"I have a few quotes. We love to quote. My first one is anonymous. It says a flower doesn't think of competing with the flower next to it. It just blooms. And i thought that's the same thing with with us as humans. We don't have to compare ourselves to the person sitting next to us. We have to compete with that person. We have to compete with ourselves. That's the only one or we just bloom. We do whatever we want in life and the same thing with confidence. Weaken confidence comes from within each one of us. And i think as we look back on little children. I believe that children start to develop confidence And maybe they're taught that and then as we get. Older confidences is taught out of us. So we start to listen to what the world is telling us and rethink. Oh we're not as confident as we should be and that's where we get into trouble. We need to get out of our comfort zone and push past that fear. Sometimes that hold us back of competence. So that leads me to the second quote that i wanted to share from mark twain and he says courage is resistance to fear mastery. Fear not absence of fear. So wanna keep that in mind as you think about people that you might view as confident people that they're just brimming with confidence. It's not that they have that they have no fear. Everyone has fear they just have found ways to push through that to control that more than the fear controlling itself. I honestly believe fear holds people back in a lot of things and confidence is also one thing

Mark Twain
Sean Tucker Shares His  Thoughts ON Photography And Spirituality

Photography Radio

05:17 min | 8 months ago

Sean Tucker Shares His Thoughts ON Photography And Spirituality

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine. My name is scott olsen. And today we're diving deep today. We're gonna get into not only magnificent photography and intriguing so may gang but into philosophy and spirituality. We're talking with. Sean tucker. Sean is well known throughout the world for his videos on youtube and elsewhere and his images frankly are breathtaking. so welcome. how are you doing today. I'm good thank you. Thanks for having me scope. It is my pleasure you know. I'm really looking forward today. Because so much of the work we do is well beyond the technical aspects of photography and so often we look out our window or door. We're going out to shoot and we think what in the world am i doing. What what is it that this work is really all about behind all the technical stuff. There is the core. There's the soul there's motivation. There's vision that there's all the things that make photography special and you have made a good bit of your career in especially with the films that you have on youtube talking. About the spiritual side of photography you quote may certain albert camus. Carl young a niacin and mark twain and a dozen other philosophers. And you say again you somewhere in your web presence you say. Photography is more than a technical exercise for me. it's also a spiritual practice. I couldn't agree more. And i'm looking forward to unpacking that a little bit with you but like so often you i. I wanna start at sort of the beginning. You say you mark the beginning of your career of when you were eight years old and you took a picture of a seagull. Tell me that story to tell me about the very beginning of your self understanding as the tougher it would probably i would say eight zero nine years old and at the time i think my dad left home about four years before that when i was about four and i think i was a pretty rootless shy retiring little boy and i suppose with my family was struggling to find my place within my family because my mom had remarried and his new man in my life i was hoping would be a father wasn't actually keen to sort of get the package deal of a a mamun two kids so he said it made it clear to us that he was going to be my sister's father when she came along but he wasn't actually are far the so we were kind of sort of on the side or felt very much on the side of things and were shipped off to boarding school fairly early. And i suppose whether diffa me was just made me constantly look for affirmation. Because i didn't feel at home in my own family was looking for people to tell me i was okay and i wasn't broken or i wasn't doing things wrong and we gone down to the seaside one day. It was just my mom and my little brother and myself and we'd be walking around. Oh my grandmother. We walking around the town and we got down to the harbour at some point. And there's a tradition in england. Where you where you have Hot chips wrapped in newspaper is the quick goto meal so we went to one of these chickpeas local gypsies and we picked up in a newspapers usually covered in salt and vinegar the seeps through the paper and we go sit by the harbour front worst the boats come in if you've been to the The kale and seagulls a particular menace. So eating your food. You really have to be careful. That one doesn't dive bomb. You nick meal out of hand so we we were sitting there eating watching an i. I'd recently been given a point. Shoot film camera with zip zip wind on back plastic little thing but i loved it because i think at the time as well. It gave me something to do creative distraction but it also. It's sort of made me look busy to the adult. So they wouldn't bother me as much. Because i was quite shy and retiring and so seagull landed perched on their on the railing in front of our bench. Kind of eyeing us up. Grandma little cameron. I stood up and stalked him. He let me get really close to him. I think because he was i think he thought i was bringing him chips but stalking place. Replace a mask really close to and snap a shot of him and when my mom had that film developed and we were sitting over the kitchen table probably in a week or two later. We've sort of leafing through the prince. She pointed that one out with the seagull. And she said that's a really good photograph and she said maybe you'll be a photographer one day and that for some reason at that point we had these little things people say is that they might have said in passing but the meant a great deal to us even though they were throwing for them. That little comment from my mom was like oxygen. It was like just all the affirmation i needed the world and i think somewhere that kind of love of photography attached itself to that feeling of being affirmed for doing a good thing and i mean it would be years before i became a professional photographer. I think it was. I got into professional photography in my mid twenties but it just sat in the back of my head a photographer one day and that's where it came back around. I think

Sean Tucker Carl Young Scott Olsen Youtube Albert Camus Mark Twain Sean England Nick Cameron
Hal Holbrook, Emmy and Tony-Winning Actor, Dies in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, At 95

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

01:28 min | 9 months ago

Hal Holbrook, Emmy and Tony-Winning Actor, Dies in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, At 95

"Emmy and Tony winning actor Hal Holbrook has died at the age of 95. The New York Times reports. The actor died in January on the 23rd at his home in Beverly Hills. ABC is Bill Deal looks back at his career, Holbrook was best No. One for his many performances, his Mark Twain on stage and on television cam by railroad. It is all no stranger gets tired over seven minutes as to stop and rest for three quarters of an hour in 2008 at age 82 Holbrook became the oldest male performer ever nominated for an Academy Award for his supporting role in into the wild. Don't you think you're getting a job and making something of this life? We got one plan. Under Alaska will be all the way out there. Yes, While Holbrook loved acting and told ABC is Robin Roberts, somebody asked me Why do you keep working and I said, well, Well am I gonna do play golf Working is more active is more fun than golf. In the fall of 2010 hellhole. Brooke was cast into guest starring TV roles, one on FX, His Sons of Anarchy and NBC's conspiracy thriller series. The event. While he played many parts during his long career, it was Mark Twain. That was, as he put it, something precious my side arm through life. He called it Holbrook was married to actress designing women star Dixie Carter, who passed away in 2010. Will deal. ABC News

Holbrook Bill Deal Hal Holbrook ABC Mark Twain Emmy Beverly Hills The New York Times Tony Academy Award Robin Roberts His Sons Of Anarchy Golf Alaska Brooke NBC Dixie Carter Abc News
Hal Holbrook, prolific actor who played Twain, dies at 95

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 9 months ago

Hal Holbrook, prolific actor who played Twain, dies at 95

"Actor hal Holbrook has died at the age of ninety five according to his representative I'm marches are a letter with a look at his career hello Holbrooke was Deep Throat in all the president's men telling a reporter to follow the money he was the widower who befriends Christopher McCandless in into the wild he played Abraham Lincoln in two separate mini series he portrayed Mark Twain on stage for fifty years Holbrooke said in a nineteen ninety three a P. interview during one performances Twain he made the horrible realization that his fly was open I thought if I look down the place a break up will never get through the same if what I suspect is true but finally I had no choice I doubt that it was true

Hello Holbrooke Hal Holbrook Christopher Mccandless Abraham Lincoln Holbrooke Mark Twain Twain
Hal Holbrook, actor who played "Deep Throat," has died at 95 in Beverly Hills

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:31 sec | 9 months ago

Hal Holbrook, actor who played "Deep Throat," has died at 95 in Beverly Hills

"And Emmy and Tony Award winning actor Hal Holbrook has died at the age of 95. He reportedly passed away a couple weeks ago at his home in Beverly Hills. Holbrook's career spanned decades, including the 1987 film Wall Street and looks in the abyss. There's nothing staring back at him at that moment, man finds his character That is what keeps him out of the abyss. Holbrook was acclaim for his betrayal of the government source, known as Deep Throat in the political thriller thriller All the President's men and, of course, on stage Mark Twain to fantastic and You know what a

Hal Holbrook Holbrook Tony Award Emmy Beverly Hills Mark Twain
Woman shot during Capitol riots in Washington, DC named as US Air Force veteran Ashli Babbit

Pat Walsh

00:50 sec | 10 months ago

Woman shot during Capitol riots in Washington, DC named as US Air Force veteran Ashli Babbit

"Identified as Ashley Babbitt was shot and killed as she tried to breach the doors of the House Congressman Mark Twain. Mullen was there and said the officer had no choice. He has actions well, maybe judge a lot of different ways moving forward, but his actions I believe, saved people's lives even more, unfortunately, did take one Capitol Police made 14 arrests. The Washington D. C. Metro police made dozens more for violating curfew and federal prosecutors drug charges against 55 riders. They said A large amount of material was stolen from the capital that investigators are still working to take. Stock of two pipe bombs were found Band of people Or terrorists, not Patriots literally occupied. The floor of the house drove the Senate out of its chamber. And the question for the country is How could that happen? 20 years after 9 11. In

Ashley Babbitt D. C. Metro Police Mullen Mark Twain Capitol Police House Washington Patriots Senate
Disinformation is Solvable

Solvable

05:11 min | 1 year ago

Disinformation is Solvable

"We have this ideal of free speech, which is that there's a marketplace of ideas out there that more speeches always better because the good ideas will win out in the end. It's a kind of fundamentally optimistic idea. It comes originally from the political philosopher, John Stewart Mills and his book on Liberty in the nineteenth century, and then it Kinda comes into Supreme Court land in the twentieth century but it often turns out not to be true there various eras in history where propaganda and false ideas have actually won the day in politics you can think about the Nazis you can think about times of Soviet, union communism other nine, thousand, nine, hundred examples of. Fascism and more recent governments in places like Brazil and India, where disinformation has really one out and so I think that we are flirting with that possibility in a scary way in the United States right now the fact is marketplace of ideas was always a pretty shaky concept and so free speech is really important to our democracy but we need I think to reconceptualise how we think about it and how we protect it in a way that really protects the speech that supports democracy instead of threatening it too. So we get our terms clear sale little about how disinformation with a D. differs from misinformation with an m yeah I mean these are sort of. Terms that are only I think the definitions are becoming clearer kind of as we speak but misinformation usually refers to fax that turn out to be wrong and disinformation refers to wrong facts that are being deliberately pedaled for political end. So it's the more sinister version. Disinformation intentional deception often fueled by. Actors of different kinds is sort of crowding out the good information, economics called Gresham's law where you know the bad money the money that's fake gold kind of is circulating everywhere in the real money disappears from the marketplace in a way that something like that happening with information right with is just all of this swirling nonsense depending on where you get your information from and you can't tell what's the good information or if there's any good information in that context way. So one way to think about this is that it used to be hard. To speak, we had gatekeepers, we had these traditional media companies that had a real hold and sort of control over speech. Now, it's really easy to speak, but it's very hard to be heard, and some of what we see in disinformation campaigns is a deliberate effort to drown out true speech or to smear the reputations of people especially online so that they'll effectively be silenced they'll leave the space they won't keep trying to talk, and so it's the use of speech to suppress speech, and that is very challenging for our American First Amendment to deal with. Having you had a really good example in your your piece, which was a me my I hadn't come across that the Democrats were threatening to secede from the country. The election. Just tell that story in brief because it was such a tidy example of sort of you know in the famous like mark. Twain like a lie that God halfway around the world before the truth guidance boots on him and it's just a piece of nonsense spread like wildfire, right? Yeah. So over the summer, a group of academics and former. Administration officials, former campaign staffers, pollsters they got together to game out the twenty twenty election and they played out various scenarios in which one or the other candidate won. It was close there was litigation. There wasn't there basically testing the system of American democracy and Rosa Brooks who was one of the CO organizers of this project wrote an essay in the Washington Post in which you mentioned that in one of the several hypothetical Scenarios Biden won the popular vote Belossi the Electoral College and fictional team Biden talked about trying to ask California and the Pacific northwest threatened to secede as a way of pressuring Republicans to add more succeeds to the Senate there's just a sentence about this in Rosa Brooks's essay Out of that sentence comes an article by Michael Anton- a former trump official and a conservative publication. Arguing that a coup is coming and from that article comes and appearance by another trump official Tucker Carlson show talking about this fictional threat of a democratic coup, very popular right-wing podcast named Dan Bongino. He shows up making videos about this that are getting millions and millions of views on social media president trump tweets in praise of publication called Revolver News, a right-wing website, which is also spreading this false story and what you see here, all the parts of the right wing media ecosystem coming together to really give a big platform to this made up idea that the Democrats are planning a coup.

Rosa Brooks Gresham Dan Bongino John Stewart Mills Biden Supreme Court Twain Official Tucker Carlson Brazil Pacific Northwest Washington Post United States Senate California Revolver News India
Rhonda Fleming, film star in the 1940s and 1950s, dies at 97

Radio From Hell

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Rhonda Fleming, film star in the 1940s and 1950s, dies at 97

"Will be missed. At the age of 97 Rhonda Fleming has died. Redheaded actress who became a popular sex symbol in Hollywood westerns, filmed OIR and adventure movies Off the forties and fifties. She died in Santa Monica, California. His Fleming's roles included those off a beautiful Arthur Rian Princess in the Bing Crosby musical version of Mark Twain's novel, a Connecticut

Rhonda Fleming Arthur Rian Princess Bing Crosby Santa Monica Mark Twain Connecticut California
"mark twain" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"mark twain" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"This is our final one. I love this one. Mark Twain. Here we go. October. This is one of the most dangerous ments to speculate. Stocks in the others are July, January, September, April, November, May, March, June, December, August and February. I think you name him all the pressure and so It's very, very true. I mean, there's been all sorts of studies that have tried to analyze this and over a long period of time. There's almost no bad month or good month and It's such a nominal little difference, even though sometimes it feels like it. I mean, there's been some famous crashes in October, but there's also been some famous ones in March. There's been some famous lows in March. The 2020 crash in the 8 4009 crash for both in marches. Right, So it's march, a good month of by after things crashed Well, there's also been crashes, though another month. It's really more about if this is a concern of yours. Then why are you playing right? I mean, one of the best ways not to lose money in the casino. Is you don't play right. So if you're not comfortable playing in gambling, don't But the problem is, if you got a fora one k, you don't have a choice. They're going to force you into the market. The stocks and bonds markets which are all basically kind of a quasi form of gambling, right, so You can have lower risk. But wouldn't she have money in Ira's? Once you'd roll that money out, Then you get a pic how your money is earned, and how risk levels had and No, That's when you can really have the risk that you want. So you need to have some foundational income. You have some foundational asset stuff that can't go away. We also need to have some steady income. Some money. It's going to be paying your dividends. Every single month's ideally right now around 5 to 6%, and then you have the market money. But you gotta have all three types. And if you want to retire successfully, that's on ly ways of having all three types if you have everything in stocks and bonds. You are going to be in a world of danger and heard at some point because we know there's crashes. That always happens so again, if that's what you want. Do you want to look at that risk level that you have? And you want a second opinion on that risk risk level and look at what foundation last that sweater? Steady income options. Olly Adios gives call 804 54 11 84. Again. 804 54 11 84 Oregon Book directly online at Wolf.

Mark Twain Olly Adios Ira
Comedian Carl Reiner dies at 98

News, Traffic and Weather

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Comedian Carl Reiner dies at 98

"NBC Entertainment News Show creator and co star I want to grow old gracefully. Not like you, director of comedy classics, including the jerkin Oh God, An Ocean's 11 trilogy costar Carl Reiner dined at his home in Beverly Hills Monday night. His son, Rob. Minor tweeting that his heart is hurting. His dad was his guiding light over his lifetime. Reiner won nine Emmys Grammy and was given the Mark Twain Prize for American humor. In 2000. Carl Reiner was

Carl Reiner Mark Twain Prize For American Beverly Hills NBC Grammy Director ROB
Comedy legend Carl Reiner, 'Dick Van Dyke Show' creator, dead at 98

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Comedy legend Carl Reiner, 'Dick Van Dyke Show' creator, dead at 98

"Word this morning that Carl Reiner has passed away Van Take show creator and co star I want to grow bald gracefully. Not like you, director of comedy classics, including the jerkin Oh God, An Ocean's 11 trilogy costar Carl Reiner dined at his home in Beverly Hills Monday night, his own Rob Reiner tweeting that his heart is hurting his death. That was his guiding light over his lifetime. Reiner won nine Emmys and Grammy and was given the Mark Twain Prize for American humor. In 2000. Carl Reiner was 98. Jason Heathens and ABC News Hollywood Well,

Carl Reiner Mark Twain Prize For American Jason Heathens Beverly Hills Abc News Grammy Director VAN Hollywood
"mark twain" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"mark twain" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"With a celebration of Mark Twain an enormous amount of work that Richard down to take the notes in the memoirs in the letters much of it is not printed or you have to piece together because it's not in the final books because the levy is standing there reading at night making sure that mark that her Sam Sam Clemens doesn't upset the family honor anymore than he already has by wasting all their money and his money and everybody's money in the whole world knows he's poor all right we're going to get him to Europe they they stop in South Africa he gets in trouble with Cecil Rhodes big deal you'll have to restrain the book because it's funny we're under until London and they are arriving in the heat of August in London and they're going to still haven't piled their way out of Jackson now comes the tragedies Suzy Evans is stayed back in New York and she's a twenty three year old woman very highly strong what happens to our what is she what is she declined so quickly Richard decline is in dire did yesterday and that's in die what happens to a person just need one little detail that they get an addict their spot the daughters are having cable to come over and then they get the claimant Libby and Sam Mark Twain get as a cable back that there there's been a delay and Livvie instantly senses the worst and things that that list Susie must be sick and they board the ship and they're crossing the Atlantic when Mark Twain gets word that his daughter Suzy has died and how did she die so quickly what we night of spinal meningitis and eight it's not clear exactly how she caught it but she'd she declined very quickly and what's the worst for Mark Twain is he's alone he never handles being alone while at all he's alone in a rented house in a in a suburb and in England and his wife is in the middle of the ocean and that there's no technology in that area for him to reach her so he knows that she's going to in three or four days see her brother like crying on the docks either of their their friend who's a minister were weeping on the dock tend to having to tell her that Susie has died and he he just he's just over rod is just the actual scene is even more horrible because they don't get to the ship while it's in quarantine and Clara when she visits the captain's headline that her sister's dad and so she has to tell her mother right and just that's the moment you believe that Livvie started her decline I DO I DO a there's there's it's not really clear that live you ever completely got her her joy in life back I mean their moments that you can see later but this is the decline and and she would be dead eight years later I mean that seven years later living as a young and beautiful woman there's a photograph in the book of her in her forties she was a bells bell in her twenties when Mark Twain married there in eighteen seventy and he adored her and she had toward him and tell apart they were not they were not stable together they could travel around the world but this blow of losing their oldest daughter Susie they lost their son Langdon when he was nineteen months old that was an experience of the nineteenth century the families dealt with but losing Susie without ever seeing her again overwhelmed him and Clara Clara let's speak well of her she lives into the nineteen sixties route Richard and she's the one who is the she's the she's a perfect combination of her mother and father she is she has an ironic I but at the same time she protects the families on right she also basically I had a lot of trouble being in the same room with her father after awhile she realized for self preservation it was perhaps better to to live in Europe when he lived in New York all right let's pay the debts because that was the reason for the journey now Richard has included an enormous amount of detailed very accounting for us to watch the deck page took me longer than anything else in the book right now but I try I can I was taking notes all the time is they're paying the debts off by the time they get to England Livvie Libby is keeping counts because she knows that mark could miss leader of she let's imagine speaking generally by the time they haven't paid it off in the law in England but by the time they get to Switzerland for the summer she believes that there that they have now it achieved an ability to pay their creditors off but not for not without Rodgers Richard he's the hero of this book hero and yeah it's so great that you did you see that because he really is he he's the call mastermind of Twain's strategy to pay off his debts because actually the lecture tour paid off you know it's arguable what number it is but maybe it's half maybe whatever number it is but what saves Twain was his complete works addition and Twain had to rival publishers who weren't even speaking to each other who are furious with less and Harper's voice in Harper's and they'd never would have agreed on a deal and and Roger said that if he had only worked in publishing he he never would have been in business he would kill himself he just couldn't believe how difficult it was to make these men this is a man who put together amalgamated copper you understand this is a master dealer but publishing I didn't just affect him Rick Richard and I both have survived publishing we're aware of the fact that Rogers finally figured it out okay five now a levy will lead up leave us gene will die down Christmas nineteen oh nine but I want to pay attention to paying off all these debts because you've done such a wonderful job at the moment.

Mark Twain Richard
"mark twain" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"mark twain" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The nineteenth century according to all American book readers however it is now amber fourteen eighteen ninety three and no one is laughing Mark Twain has gone to Wall Street to bag because of his death he's with his printer publisher assistant Fred hall a former tell of type II a former printer as assistant who became the head of mark Twain's publishing company and they are deep in debt and don't know what to do can't go anywhere else they've been to Hartford they've been to all their relatives they can't raise the money and it's tens of thousands of dollars because of the failure of the publishing company and also the fact that Mark Twain is a profit when he has cash in his pocket this is America's funnyman in tears Richard Zack is the author of the new book chasing the last laugh mark Twain's raucous and redemptive round the world comedy tour this set up here is the deep Jack the shame and the fact that the creditors are chasing with court papers and subpoenas we don't have a debtors prison but near to because Mark Twain is married to one of the dearest ariss in America livia livia Langdon she's humiliated and ashamed they have three daughters they're all set back because they don't have enough money to live in their marvelous house that they built in Hartford Connecticut so that they're living on the on the fly in hotels but here we are September fourteenth and I welcome and congratulate Richard for this moment because something is about to arrive out of heaven it's not quite a comet but near to Richard a very good evening to you congratulations your book is a treat it's around the world with Mark Twain it takes many years however H. H. Rogers is about to arrive who is he and why does he decide to help Mark Twain at this moment in his life good evening to you and good evening to you or you're right it's almost similar miraculous entry by Rogers he he was always a fan of Mark Twain and they had a usual friend the doctor and the doctor knew that Twain was in deep financial trouble and H. H. Rogers was one of the half dozen wealthiest man in America he was John D. Rockefeller's right hand man he was he was at Standard Oil he he also would later do amalgamated copper and federal steel and he had read roughing at one of Twain's early travel books and he loved it so much that he read it a second time allowed to his family so this meeting together gets arranged in Rogers is able to supply money that there's no one else I mean tweens steepest longest dearest friends from Hartford had turned him down I mean Twain was pretty bitter about how his friends have responded in here comes the stranger that he might have met once or very possibly mean never before in his life comes in and is ready to to step in and help with these problems from his from his publishing house and from his printing printing PLS drive how to and got into this fixed because he never met a stock he couldn't buy and see himself lose everything Rogers is the opposite AJ's Rogers we hear much about deal making in America right H. H. Rogers is the real thing this is the real thing he is John D. Rockefeller engineers know how to deal making this is that this is the man who probably is Rockefeller we know is amalgamated copper and he put together deals that we now regard as the robber Baron but if they're not they're all Rogers how he's about to take on Mark Twain what is in the heart of his life he would write back now he's worth fifty million dollars which according to you Richard is worth we can multiply that times thirty is that of a one and a half billion dollars in and that doesn't really sum it up today now with the crazy dot com you know money is that I I mean say fifty billion I mean it's just you it was extraordinary wealthy right at and and he could write a check and cleared all but Livvie we need to introduce a living Langdon Clemens refuses to take money from Rogers she refused to take money from everybody why Richard what it what held her back she was the daughter of the wealthiest man in Elmira New York so she was basically a provincial Eris with very Victorian values and she thought that someone of her social status should not accept charity she just found it absolutely wrong she knew that her husband could continue to write she knew that that her brother had some money there was a family coal company Langdon Cole she just refused to accept the idea of the church that they were paupers and I love the fact that Rodgers and Clemens cannot overlook over rider the the funniest man in America in the most one north powerful wealthiest men right and they can't and don't be is still she will not stand living it living is the she's the Wendy if the if we're doing with Peter Pan Wendy Vitter rule yes who the who the lost boys must attend to including Peter who's frustrated when when he's around anyway let's talk about the debts I Twain Twain's first publisher was a scoundrel named bliss so we decided to found his own publishing firm do you know anything about it what went wrong well I love the whole idea in the beginning he got he basically got a first book deal like a lot of us and it was not a really good deal he got a five percent royalty when the standard in the industry was probably ten or fifteen depending you know and so but he was just he got such a bitter taste in his mouth and then bliss kept telling him that he would that he would give them fifty percent of net profits but then he never did and then he died before he let he lived up to that promise of Twain was always chasing this fifty percent of net profits and he decided to found his own publishing company any install his nephew Charles Webster any name the company Webster and yeah and it was a disaster it started out fantastically well their first two books were the memoirs of Ulysses S..

Mark Twain
Nasdaq sets record high, S&P positive for 2020 as investors rally for recovery

Motley Fool Answers

02:56 min | 1 year ago

Nasdaq sets record high, S&P positive for 2020 as investors rally for recovery

"June third Ryan, Dietrick L., L. Financial tweeted that the return of the S&P five hundred for the trading day since the market bottomed the Mark Twenty March twenty third. Thirty nine point six percent, the best fifty day rally of the S&P five hundred since it was launched in nineteen fifty seven series. Yes. Didn't it feel like you're in the best rally ever I mean? I just feel. I just can't help but feel that. Yeah, this is just the best time to. Today just fantastic, yeah! Anyway, so the five hundred is now within five percent of its all time high on the Nasdaq on Friday and again today and we are taping by the way on Monday. June eighth! The Nasdaq reached another all time high, so the Nasdaq is at an all time high at this point. According to the bespoke in investment group. There's only one stock in the entire s and P five hundred. That's down since March. Twenty Third Oh hell. And it's down less than two percent. It's cody. The beauty care products. And they're only eight stocks that aren't up more than ten percents. It's mark, Twain, third, and this includes actually some big names Costco Walmart. Kroger sort of the consumer staples got left in the dust during the rally, so looking at the sectors since March twenty third the best sector energy up a hundred seven percent. Followed by consumer discretionary seventy percent in financials, fifty nine percent that said they went up the most, because they went down the most in the first part of it, and for the year they're still down, so energy stocks are still down almost thirty percent of the year and consumer, discretionary and financials still down eleven percent for the year. When you look at the best sectors for the year, as you might guess top performer technology for point, seven percent and healthcare up six percent for the year. Now looking at the biggest companies. In the stock market, we now have three companies worth more than a trillion dollars. Apple is on top one point three, nine, seven trillion. Microsoft. Just barely behind at least as of Friday's close one point three, eight, seven, trillion, and then Amazon at one point, two, two, seven, trillion and Google alphabet is not that far behind at nine hundred sixty four billion dollars, so it's quite amazing. Has As has been the case for years now. Larger growth oriented companies are doing better, which means in some cases, pricier stocks have gotten pricier and cheap stocks have gotten cheaper. Here's an interesting tidbit from Jason swags journal Article From last Friday quote. The fifty most expensive stocks and the S&P five hundred as of December thirty first were up. An average eleven point three percent through June third according to Drew Dixon. The Chief Investment Officer at Abbott Bridge capital the fifty cheapest stocks at the end of last year. Meanwhile we're down sixteen point eight percent so gross stocks doing well value stocks still struggling.

Chief Investment Officer Kroger Costco Drew Dixon Ryan Abbott Bridge L. Financial Apple Microsoft Dietrick L. Twain Google Amazon
Coronavirus conspiracy theories on the rise

Sunday Morning with Elizabeth Espinosa

05:56 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus conspiracy theories on the rise

"So the video is conspiracy theory as you know it's and the basic idea seems to be is that some shadow we elites are conspiring to use the pandemic to seize power maybe make money by creating vaccines and the star of this twenty six minute clip that went viral is this woman named Judy make of that too has become a kind of hero to the anti vaccine crowd she's a discredited scientist who published a book in April called plague of correction and that sort of depicts her as a truth teller fighting scientists who aren't willing to accept inconvenience facts and so far right publications began to promote her book in this documentary that is forthcoming will apparently be taking an even closer look at these sort of baseless conspiracies this video has since since it kind of blew up has been taken down but tell us about some of the crazy accusations and I mean one of the things that keeps popping up I think it was the main thing that really got to pull down was they were saying that wearing a mask will literally activate your own virus that's right and that is the thing that got it taken down platforms like YouTube and Facebook generally do not want to remove content from the network and they tried to enable a maximum of free speech but they do make an exception for stuff that is actively harmful and while a lot of this video plan that make is just kind of conspiracies saying don't forget a lot of people are making money and other people are going to become more powerful that's not what it got taken down I got taken down because as you say it warned people against wearing masks you know saying that it would re inspect them which of course there is no basis for that whatsoever but you can imagine if a lot of people watch it's that and believe that you could have a really negative a stacked on public health so initially Facebook did it want to remove it but when it sort of stumbled across that particular claim it said okay we've actually got to take this thing down any doctor Judy make if it's for herself she does have a degree in biology from the university of Virginia a PhD in molecular biology she worked on the national Cancer Institute she has a lot of things under her belt but then she started getting into work about chronic fatigue syndrome and vaccines and this is kind of where she was derailed a little bit a lot of people discredited a lot of the later things that she was researching so like in two thousand nine she had published research saying that a mouse retrovirus because chronic fatigue syndrome which got a lot of attention but it was discredited a couple years later and the journal ultimately retracted it and it in this sort of like a weird aside story she was actually put in jail on charges of staffed which apparently involves computers disappearing those charges were dropped but the whole thing was a scandal and she was kind of sidelined and lost her scientific career but after that she sort of drifted into this anti Bax crowd and because of the credentials that you mentioned the anti vaxxers have sort of lifted her up as this brave truth teller even though what she saying is largely nonsense so let's talk about how something like this goes viral the usual players come up obviously Facebook and you to have a huge part in this but there was a lot of Facebook groups that we're sharing this and then beyond that even as you mentioned there's a lot of mistruths in this video but it also takes time for their fact checkers to go through this so as you've mentioned they didn't take it down right away it kind of was circulating around for a while while they were trying to do some of that fact checking it's a really interesting story the way that things go viral on Facebook and you tube is always changing based on the things that the platforms due to try to stop bad stuff from happening and sort of like as soon as they fix one problem another emerges so over the past year Facebook has put a lot more attention on groups getting people to join groups kind of moving away from that news feed and there are a lot of conspiracy groups anti VAX groups where this video clip was very popular in what happened is people were sharing it in the group and what they were sure it was actually a link to you too and so from those Facebook groups they were able to send seven point one million views to one video within a period of between thirty six and forty eight hours so just within a short period of time Facebook drove all of that traffic to you too and so it was kind of an unwitting tag team between the two platforms that sent this thing viral as you noted it did take awhile for the platforms to fully understand what was in the video the video is twenty six minutes long it contains a lot of claims and they had to go through it sort of point by point and ultimately make the determination that it had to come down but it sort of speaks to this cliche this quote that is attributed to Mark Twain that the lie gets halfway around the world before the truth can put its shoes on and that was definitely the case here and it was also this whole thing with obvious all the algorithms and it's this big cycle she had just self published a book not too long ago and it became this thing where searches for her name brought up searches for the video and vice versa searches for them he would bring up searches for her name so it's kind of this big cycle where it's just feeding off of itself for a while until Facebook and YouTube took these things down and you know I think it's important to remember that Judy megabits has something to celebrate she has a book to sell into this whole viral events on Facebook and YouTube has been very good for her she had a number one best seller on Amazon over the weekend yesterday was still at number six so all of this is bound to be huge benefit to somebody who is selling this very day Alicia's ideas that just doesn't have any basis in

Steve Martin On His Years As A Comic — And Walking Away From Stand-Up

Fresh Air

10:00 min | 1 year ago

Steve Martin On His Years As A Comic — And Walking Away From Stand-Up

"But if you could hold Steve Martin has been making people laugh often with highly conceptual humor since the nineteen sixties when he was a staff writer on the smothers brothers comedy hour in the seventies he became a major stand up comedy star filling arenas with his fans he rose to fame along with his then new TV show called Saturday Night Live on which he made many memorable appearances as a wild and crazy guy a medieval barber and a fan of king tut eventually the fame that brought in huge audiences also made it impossible for him to do the kind of comedy that made him original he starred in movies from the jerk to parenthood and in recent years has also written plays essays and books and toured with both his bluegrass band and with friend and fellow comic Martin short Steve Martin won the Mark Twain prize for American humor in two thousand five in was a Kennedy center honoree in two thousand seven Terry gross spoke with Steve Martin in two thousand eight about his memoir born standing up Steve Martin welcome back to fresh AIR eleven returning her thank you I thank you very much I'd like you to open with a reading from the beginning of the book and we've we've edited the slightly to make it crystal a little shorter for the broadcast great be happy to I did stand up comedy for eighteen years ten of those years were spent learning for years were spent refining and for years were spent in wild success I was seeking comic originality and fame fell on me as a by product the course was more plodding than her ROIC I did not strive valiantly against doubters but took incremental steps started with a few intuitive leaps I was not naturally talented I didn't sing dance or act the working around that minor detail made me inventive I was not self destructive though I almost destroyed myself in the end I turned away from stand up with the tired swivel of my head and never looked back until now a few years ago I began researching and recalling the details of this crucial part of my professional life which inevitably touches upon my personal life and was reminded why I did stand up and why I walked away in a sense this book is not an autobiography but a biography because I am writing about someone I used to know yes these events are true yet sometimes they seem to have happened to someone else and I often felt like a curious onlooker or someone trying to remember a dream I ignored my stand up career for twenty five years but now having finished this memoir I view this time with surprising warmth one can have it turns out an affection for the war years thanks for reading that that Steve Martin reading from his memoir born standing up which has just been published in paperback yeah I guess I didn't realize how much you closed the door on your comedy years how much there was like a before and after it ended you were done and that was it right I I I'm it was about nineteen eighty one I still had a few obligations left but I knew that hi I could not continue but I guess I could have continued if I had nothing to go to but I did have something to go to which was movies and you know the act had become so known that in order to go back I would have had to create an entirely new show and I wasn't up to it especially when the opportunity for movies and writing movies came around why would you have to create an entirely new show well like I say the the the act was really it there is a passage in the book which I caught because it was so hard to explain but the act essentially besides all the jokes and bits and everything was conceptual and once the concept was understood there was nothing more to develop it's like saying painting the same blank canvas over and over and over and over and over once the concept is no you don't see the need to see to that and that was in the back of my head that I was really done artistically with with what I had created or pastiche to you know in the reading that you just did you describe yourself as not being naturally talented did you think of yourself as naturally funny I'm I didn't didn't think of myself in that way no although I I just love to comedy I I was raised with laurel and hardy and I Love Lucy Anne and Jerry Lewis and I just loved it and I had a friend in high school and we would just laugh all day and put on skits and you know it's the Andy Kaufman thing over to Marty short thing where you're performing in your bedroom for yourself and I I loved magic and so I would practice my magic tricks in front of a mirror for hours and hours and hours because I was told that you must practice you must practice and never present a trip before it's ready but I was just inclined toward show business but I didn't know what I just like being on stage you got your start working in Disneyland you were living in southern California and when you were ten you were selling guidebooks there then you later work for magic shop demonstrating magic tricks and I get the sense from your memoir that demonstrating those magic tricks you know hours a day and really getting them getting them down because you're doing them so much that that gave you a sense that performance required a great deal of craft that even comedy wasn't just a question of going out on stage and saying funny things that there was enormous amounts of work and practice and thought that would have to go into it well that that idea of that that you really had to work at this stuff didn't necessarily come from Disneyland it I I mean I think yes and in terms of presenting a trick but having having it so well honed in your mind was really giving me a sense of security it was I don't want to go out there half baked and you know you learn that through the years you know you're you do a magic show with a friend and you rehearse it a couple of times and yes every all the timing has to be exactly perfect but while you're out there it's it's a different world it's not your mirror you have to make on the spot adjustments but that's just you know whatever entertainer does actually working at the magic shop really gave me a sense of comedy because it was all the jokes we did the tricks but we have all these jokes I had a friend Jim Barlow who you know he he was the the guy I worked with there but he had patter worked out you know it he would go to customers and say Medicare money I mean help you not and you know call them suckers it was really funny and and kind of friendly rude what was your patter I just took all of Jim's patter I'm I'm trying to think of other ones yeah I said it would just it would somebody would buy something it would say and because you are hundred customer today you get a free paperback it's a little silly things like that but Disneyland I'm fifteen right here at early act was a combination of banjo playing juggling magic tricks and comedy and some of that stating your later at two but it sounds like a vaudeville act yes I was very interested involved it was the only sort of discipline that was a five minute act on stage which is what I really enjoyed ins and saw myself doing and I bought books on it I went to the Long Beach pike which was off the carnival fair you know four is really a place for drunken sailors to get tattoos but there was also side shows is very interested in that but you know there is these are all in there these are short acts there was one of the employees at Disneyland that I worked with was named Steve Stewart and he worked in vaudeville and he did a sack for me one day on the floor of the magic shop and I had a couple of great gags one was that I actually used and I asked him if I could use them because I was very strict about using any material that wasn't mine or that that was taken from somebody else let's put it this way I became strict wasn't strict at first there is one trick that one joke that Dave steward did where he said are not yet a glove white glove in his hand the magicians glove any he said and now the glove into dove trick and he threw it into the air and then it hit the floor and he just looked at it and consent and set up for my next trick he went on and it was the first time I saw comedy created out of nothing of nothing happening and I Glaum don to that wait wait wait you're doing I think is not only making comedy out of nothing but making comedy out of people's expectations which you were going to fail to fulfill well yes exactly and I I really started that when I became a semi professional meaning I was working the local folk music clubs going around either working for free or for a week and I quickly decided that you know the material was you know good or weak or whatever and I decided whatever it was I was going to pretend like it was fantastic and how great am I how great is what you're seeing and I think that's what grizzly hunting it's a tune him too because they couldn't believe that someone actually was that confident

Steve Martin Staff Writer
So You Want to Do a Book

LensWork

09:54 min | 1 year ago

So You Want to Do a Book

"Here's the editor of Lens Publishing Bruce. Jensen almost every photographer. I know wants to do a book of their work. I cannot tell you how many conversations I've had over the years with photographers. Who particularly in review sessions say? I'm here primarily because I'm looking for a publisher and would you be interested in publishing my work or if you're not interested in publishing my work can you tell me how to find a publisher or what. I have to do to produce a book of my work even if it means funding it and producing it themselves all well and good the problem. Is that when I talk with these photographers? A little more deeply about their desire to do a book of their work. I've found that few of them have any clear idea why they WANNA do a book. There's lots of fantasies that crop up about what they think book is going to do for them but generally speaking those are unrealistic ideas and there are primarily five of them that I've identified over the years that are reasons people say for wanting to produce a book and I WanNa take a look at those five reasons and and look a little more deeply at them so here they are the first thing people say is they wanna make money and they think that rather than selling their original prints they think they can make money by selling books second. They think a book will help them broaden their audience get their artwork their photographs in front of more eyeballs. And that's what they're primarily interested in his audience and so a book to them. We'll get a lot more people to see their work than having say an exhibition third. They say they want to add their voice to photographic history. They somehow perceive all the famous photographers. They know come from their experience of seeing work in books relative to galleries. We see a lot more books than galleries and exhibitions and museums and etc. And so they think they can add their voice to photographic history by producing a book and somehow put themselves in the Pantheon of the march of photographic artwork through the ages fourth. They say they want to be taken seriously or the way I tend to think of it is they somehow think that producing a book of their work is going to be some sort of validation of their artwork like they've arrived particularly if a publisher a third party agrees and solicits them to publish their work. That that's some sort of validation rather than if they were to self publish. Which has a lot less validation about it. And the fifth reason people say they want to produce a book is because they want to produce something for the ages they think somehow that producing a book will be more substantial than producing just their individual photographic prints and having a book out there that's in libraries or special collections or owned by people means that their work will live beyond them so there's a mortality issue involved now curiously enough all five of these common reasons people offer up for why they WANNA produce book have one thing in common and that is that they think somehow the medium of book publishing holds the key to all of this success when in fact the medium of book publishing is just a medium. It's another way to get your work out there in the world but it really doesn't hold the key to any of this success in fact what is the key that opens up. All of these doors is the quality of their work. But it's so much easier to focus on the medium than on making better more meaningful more sensitive higher quality photographs that. That's a mystery about how to do that. Every one of us are involved in that mystery. And that's what I call leading the creative life is figuring out how to make more impactful artwork. That is true to ourselves and at the same time share something of value with people. That's hard work and that's very difficult to do. Making a book by comparison is relatively easy and so the focus becomes. Let's zero in on the medium rather than on the work. Well maybe not to the exclusion of the quality of the work. But somehow the idea is that the medium will unlock all the doors and it just doesn't because each one of these has some problems involved with them and I want to take them one at a time. So let's start with making money. The problem with wanting to produce a book of your work in order to make money is that the financial aspects of. It's simply don't work the book. Business is not a very healthy business right now partly because costs continue to escalate on what it takes to produce a book tax laws work against you because essentially they make it a one year project. You can't any longer amortize your costs over the life of the book and there's this nitpicky thing called break even so. I know it's hard to follow numbers but let me see if I can share these fairly simply. Let's say it's GonNa cost you twenty five dollars to produce a book that's paper printing binding. The cost for the printer at twenty five dollars is what is going to cost you to produce your book and let's say you can sell your book for Fifty Dollars Good. Looks like you're going to double your money. The problem is in order to get the cost of the book to be as low as twenty five dollars for example you might have to print a whole bunch of them and just keep the math simple. I'll say you have to print a thousand so twenty five dollars per book a thousand a year into it twenty five thousand dollars and let's say that you can sell them for fifty dollars if you work out the math you realize you'll have to sell five hundred books just in order to recuperate. Your initial investment of the twenty. Five Thousand Dollars. It takes to produce the book and by the way it may not be your twenty five thousand dollars. It may be the twenty five thousand dollars of the publisher. It's the same thing they're only going to make that financial gamble. If it makes sense for them so the question becomes. Do you have the ability to sell five hundred books well again to make it simple? Let's talk about self publishing so you put up to twenty five thousand dollars. You produce the thousand bucks now. You've gotta go out and sell them. Well you start with your friends and acquaintances and your family. But of course a bunch of them are GonNa want a book for free so they may or may not give you fifty dollars a book because after all they're your friends and family etc and so let's be generous. Let's say you have two hundred friends and family members all of whom are willing to pay you fifty dollars for your book okay. That's two hundred out of the five hundred that you have to sell in order to break. Even you got three hundred books left to go now who you going to sell those two. You've already exhausted all the easy contacts. You have your friends and family. Now you've got to go out to the general public. Somehow which means you've gotta get bookstores involved which means distributors which means that the Reseller the bookstore is GonNa WanNa make some money and if you work through a distributor. They're gonNA WANNA make some money so you're no longer GONNA get fifty dollars book. You're going to get probably maybe twenty five dollars a book which is barely going to cover the cost of printing and binding. So you're not gonNA make any money on those now sudden you have to sell way more than five hundred books in order to recover your initial investment. Making money with a book is almost an impossible proposition. Now you can. And here's where it gets seductive. There are photographers. There are publishers. Who MAKE MONEY SELLING BOOKS. But the reason they do is because they have already an existing huge market when a famous photographer ansel Adams or well. Let's take somebody who's contemporary to take. Steve McCurry of Steve McCurry wants to produce a book. The greatest chances are he's going to make money on that book because he Steve McCurry because there are lots and lots of people who are fans of his well. How many fans to you have? If you're a very famous individual then maybe you can make money with books but probably for most of us. That's not a realistic assumption. So making money has gotta cross that one off the list because it's probably not going to happen in fact it's probably going to cost money. You might say well. I'll do a blurb book okay. Fine but you're not gonNA make any money on a blurb book because the book that sells for fifty dollars. That's produced blurbs. Probably GONNA cost you fifty dollars to produce it at blurb and so there's no margin there there's no way for you to make money might get your workout in the world but making money through books is almost an impossibility and less. You're already famous. Which always reminds me of that. Great Mark Twain quote when he said banks are always happy to loan you money when you can prove that you don't need it.

Publisher Steve Mccurry Jensen Editor Mark Twain Ansel Adams
Defining Healthy Relationships

The Daily Boost

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Defining Healthy Relationships

"So let's talk about the finding a healthy relationship now. When I wrote the title for this I was thinking. Wow that could go just about any place depending on where you are in your world depending on who you're dealing with depending on what your mindset is you could've seen that a thousand different ways that well okay. I can't quite figure out what every possible ways going to be. So that'll do. That'll do to finding a healthy relation Oldham. And that's what we want because the quality of your life is going to come down and be defined by really the The results are what you have in your relationships who you know who you spend your time with whether it be the boss or or spouse or friend or your neighbor next door depending where you live you may have a neighbor. That's really not making your life. Great right so relationships are in fact everything and people say well you know what I have a good relationship with my dog. That's okay was mark Twain. Who said that the more I get to know my dog the more I don't like people. He was pretty close to write about that. But you know what I find personally yourself when you align your personal values who you are on the inside when you your values with folks who have like values. You tend to have really good relationships. It's when you start bumping into folks who don't go frankly just believe in the things you believe in and you try to make it happen that it gets kinda rocky cannot possible but kinda rocky so we definitely wanted to find those relationships now whether it's personal it's professional or or even business. There are three ways. I think to play this relationship game and oh it's not a dating game. I think there's only one way to win when we do this with three very distinct types of relationships that you will have along the way no matter who you're dealing with you're ready for number one. Every single relationship begins with two individual people. You and somebody else. I'm not talking you at a bunch of folks that you an individual person so every single relationship begins with two individuals now. What happens if you remain individual an independent? What happens if you do that if you remain that way? You're never likely to really connect you never going to do a real relationship that you can kind of go back and forth and really really rigby get the benefit of it if you will a lot of folks do that. I'm an independent person. I'm an individual. I'm going to be that way. It's really impossible to be around anybody else and have that kind attitude but a lot of people do and a Lotta people do it after they may be Ben Burtt a couple of times or just can't figure out what maybe ran into somebody who maybe you know. He just didn't get lucky. Right it wrong person so you kind of hold back a little bit you decide. Just be a I'm independent. I am who I am. It's okay I like you to be independent. You should be independent. But it's not gonNa work if you stay that way all the time. So what's the other kind of relationship that you might run into? Well some become very co dependent. Honestly I run into a lot of that kind of work that I do this. A lot of that going on right now at developing this kind of codependent relationship means well you lose your individuality right. Isn't that what you were attracted to the other person in the first place for individuality as I came her for who they are but when you get too close he become very very codependent. When really you kind of begin to lose a piece of yourself and again I run into this all the time often it. Somebody has a job. And they've gotten so codependent on the job and the CO workers and the hours pay and everything else. They've lost they are also see it with a lot of married relationships. Where one partner is so dependent on the other. They lose themselves as satisfying anyway. So it's it's even worse than being just independent. It's really bad place to be so the first place we start being very independent person and you want to be an independent strong person. Don't get me wrong on that the same time if you stay too independent if you don't open up a little bit if you don't allow a little space you never really going to get with anyone and when you do connect if you let yourself go and you sound all in and you become codependent. Oh my goodness oh my goodness becomes an issue too because you kind of lose who you were. We don't WanNa do that. So what is the place you WANNA be or if you're doing the math right now if you're thinking this through just take a guess what would it be. You probably guessing might be kind of a blend or something right. Pretty close his. I believe and I've seen this again and again and again you want to merge your skills you emerge your passions you emerge some of that individuality and you want to create a more of an interdependent relationship and you'll see this in whether it be business or with your employees or with your spouse or your boyfriend your girlfriend you notice how some people just become a good team. You can go too far with that because I think if you become just to Interdependent also begin to lose yourself a little bit along the way but if you notice when you get you that Nice little balance you get to be yourself you get to rely on each other quite a bit and you're working as a team to get what you want. That's where you want to be no matter where you are in any relationship when you get to that place. It's really a solid foundation. You could build a whole world on that and you already have and you will in the future pretty simple stuff when you take just a couple of minutes to think about it because it's so easy to get caught up in the caught up at one day rely so my gosh. Where am I so the three different kinds of relationships that you're going to run into your what? Which one are you now? Where are you? Are you completely independent? You're fighting the big fight. Have you become co dependent? The place it's maybe not healthy for you are you interdependent. Is it a good healthy place to be? Are you good team? It's a great place to be. That's where you are

Ben Burtt Mark Twain Rigby Partner
"mark twain" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

07:42 min | 3 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Today. You learn why classic diners are shaped like train cars. Why multitasking is impossible and what you should do to be productive. Instead and how you can use a simple tip for Mark Twain, stop procrastinating, unimportant tasks, let's stop putting it off. Instead of spy some curiosity on the award winning curiosity daily. Have you ever wondered why a lot of classic diners? Look like train cars diners are the best. They are do you. Always order breakfast. No matter. What time it is? I do. Yes. That's the right way to do it. We can go to diner together. Love it. The word diner covers a pretty broad spectrum of dining establishments. These days from your mom and pop joint around the corner to national chains like Denny's but diners have much more humble origins before diners were buildings. They were portable and before they were shaped like train cars they were shaped like horse carts in eighteen seventy two. An entrepreneur named Walter Scott from Providence Rhode Island got an idea he fitted a spare horse cart with the bare essentials. He needed to make food and he rolled it out at dusk. As a night lunch wagon for nightshift workers and theatergoers and anybody else out late at night. He served coffee, pies eggs and sandwiches. And he was so successful that he was able to quit his printing business, of course, other mobile lunch carts started to copy the idea and by the early twentieth century, the market was pretty much ruled by three manufacturers were Chester lunch. Car company tyranny and O'Mahony they kept growing and over time. The new dining cars weren't pulled by horses. They were hooked on the cargo trains when those dining cars arrived at their destination. They would lose their wheels. But keep the late night hours by the nineteen twenties dining car was shortened to diner. And by the thirties, the art deco style popular in train cars started to creep in diners to best when the diner really took off and became a piece of American identity. And here's a fun. Fact, do you know what? Diner capital of the world is New Jersey with more than six hundred diners, although my favorite diner is the double our diner from twin peaks, which by the way, it's called tweeds cafe in north bend Washington. And yes, I've been there. This must be where pies go when they die research says your brain is not wired for multitasking, but we all love saving time. So today, we'll tell you what to do instead of multitasking to spend your time more efficiently. I think I had multitasker as a bullet point on my resume for like ten years. Really? Yeah. Did you remove it after you got the job here? Believe it or not. I haven't updated my resume lately. But next time, I do I may remove it for this reason. Yeah. The thing about multitasking is that you're never actually doing tasks at the same time. You're just switching from one to the other and back again that's switching eats up more time than you probably realize in a two thousand seven study people who are interrupted by an Email or an instant message during a computer task were twenty to twenty five minutes behind by the time they resumed the first task even though the interruption only took ten minutes a third of those people took more than two hours to get back on task. So do the opposite of multitasking. And instead batch your tasks the idea is that you split up your tasks by category things like e mails writing and idea generation, then do all of each type in one chunk of time that chunk can be one four hour session on Mondays or a thirty minute session every morning and evening, whatever the tests calls for market in your calendar, and treat it like an. Appointment now, this works great for things like responding to emails or scheduling tweets, but it doesn't always work with creative tasks like writing and designing a twenty seventeen study out of Columbia business school found that when people regularly switched between tasks they performed better on a test of creative thinking than people who worked on one task the whole time. And even those who switched when they felt like it. So at the end of the day a little bit of both might be best batch those pesky tasks that eat up your time and save you're switching around for the creative stuff like how his reading emails the whole time. You read that I loved that. Very good, Cody. I was listening. I promise on topic. Today's episode is sponsored by purple metrics better sleep better. You remember multitasking is impossible. But try getting anything done when you haven't gotten a good night's sleep. That's really impossible. Yeah. Here curiosity. We are definitely no stranger so the benefits of sleep. And that's why you need to try purple mattress. The purple metrics will probably feel different than anything you've ever experienced because it uses this brand new material that was developed by an actual rocket scientist. It's not like the memory foam. You're probably used to the purple material feels unique because it's both firm and soft at the same time. So it keeps everything supported, but it still feels really comfortable. It's also breathable. So it sleeps cool. It ends up giving you this zero gravity like feel. So it works for any sleeping position with purple mattress. You can get one hundred night risk free trial. And if you're not fully satisfied, you can return your mattress for a full refund. You'll also get free shipping and returns free in-home setup. And. Mattress removal, and it's backed by a ten year warranty. You are gonna love purple and right now curiosity daily listeners will get a free purple pillow with the purchase of a mattress. That's an addition to the great free gifts. They're offering site-wide just text curious to forty seven forty seven forty seven. The only way to get this free pillow is to text curious to forty seven forty seven forty-seven that's C U R S two four seven four seven four seven. Message and data rates may apply. Ready to become more productive. We've got a tip today. The comes from Mark Twain, supposedly we made a video about this on Facebook earlier this year, but it's worth repeating on our podcast, and it's called the frog rule. Do you ever use this? Ashley, I always use this. Actually, I try to always use this when I fail it's obvious and succeed it's like the best day ever. If you don't know what this rule is. Supposedly, Mark Twain once said something along the lines of eat ally. Frog first thing in the morning, and nothing worse will happen to you for the rest of. Of the day. There's actually no definitive evidence. That Mark Twain spoke or wrote the phrase, there's even an alternate version that goes a little like this and this might help make this tip. Make more sense, quote, if it's your job to eat, a frog it's best to do it. First thing in the morning. And if it's your job to eat two, frogs, it's best to eat. The biggest one I on, quote and more practical terms, the frog is your worst least enjoyable task of the day that thing you're dreading. But a lot of the time. It's also the most important thing for you to do that day. At least a couple authors have written about the benefits of doing this self-development, author and public speaker, Brian Tracy wrote that quote successful effective people are those who launched a wreck into their major tasks and then discipline themselves to work steadily and single-mindedly until those tasks are complete unquote and retired US navy Admiral William mcraven says that he makes his bed every morning. So that he has a sense of accomplishment, the sort of his day not to mention some pride in sticking to a good habit of self-discipline tried at work this week and see how it affects. The rest of your work day that is where I find it is really really helpful definitely sending those dreaded emails making that phone call. You just don't want to deal with get out of the way before noon and the rest of your day will just go so smoothly. Totally

Mark Twain Cody gov Hamer New Jersey Columbia business school Admiral William mcraven Brian Tracy Denny Westwood One Providence Rhode Island US Walter Scott Facebook scientist north bend Washington Ashley twenty five minutes one four hour thirty minute
"mark twain" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

The Box Of Oddities

07:04 min | 3 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on The Box Of Oddities

"Boop, boop, boop dots and dashes. But here's the thing that I think is the most fascinating about tesla tesla claimed that his inventions showed up in his imagination fully formed that he would think of them and he would visualize them in picture them in his head completely done in functioning. And then he would reverse engineer it in his head. Graham, like he was getting the diagrams from some outside source. I don't know. That's kind of how I imagined things is done and then figure out how I can make that work. For instance, my invention for the cellphone holder toilet stalls I came from noggin. So you're comparing your bathroom, stall cellphone holder to Tesla's pyro magneto electric generator, Hannah sense. I just think it's fascinating that the idea would come to him and he would picture it just completely done and then just take it apart in his mind in deduce how it worked fully formed. Pretty amazing. He wants shook the poop out of Mark Twain. I don't know what that means at all. Well, this is kind of a legend surrounding tesla. He had developed what he called an earthquake machine in his Manhattan laboratory that shook the building nearly brought down the neighborhood during his experiments. His device wasn't actually an earthquake machine, but it was sort of a high frequency oscillators. Okay. Piston set underneath a platform in the laboratory shook violently. As it moved. It didn't bring the block. Ruins, but Mark Twain was visiting and tussles like, hey, Mark, check this out. Go stand on that platform. And so Mr. twain ambled over and stood on the platform and tesla turned it on, and it started shaking in apparently, Mark was going through some intestinal discomfort at the time and shit his pants. You got to give people a heads up when you're going to do stuff like that. I think, but to Twain's credit, he lasted ninety seconds before jumping off the platform and running for the porcelain facilities. Know as I mentioned, he was born July tenth eighteen fifty six. It was during a lightning storm. Ironically. And one of his mother's friend says, this is a bad sign. He's born during a lightning storm. He is going to be a child of darkness and his mother allegedly said, no, he is going to be a child of light. And of course, one of the most famous photos of him is him sitting at his his lab and Colorado with lightning bolts all around in from the tesla coils. Pretty much everybody has seen that. So it's pretty interesting. It became almost a self-fulfilling prophecy. Sure when he died in nineteen forty three at the age of eighty six. He was alone, living alone in room, thirty three, twenty seven of the New Yorker hotel. His body was found two days after he died by a maid who had ignored the to not disturb sign on his his door. The medical examiner said he, his death was due to coronary thrombosis, two days after he died, the FBI ordered the alien property custodian to seize Tesla's belongings even though. Tesla was an American citizen. He was naturalized citizen. The FBI went in and just took all this shit. A professor at MIT whose name was John g Trump. He was a well-known electrical engineer serving as a technical aid to the national defense. Research committee was called in to analyze all of Tesla's works is papers to make sure there was nothing in there that that if released could end up in enemy hands and be developed into a weapon, his thoughts were that primarily most of Tesla's work with speculative philosophical, somewhat promotional in nature and didn't really pose any kind of threat to anybody. But interestingly, they never released a big portion of it through the freedom of information act. I guess the two hundred fifty pages of it have been released, but they're still huge reams of stuff that has not seen the light of day and people wonder why it could have been that one of his inventions in later years was what he called a death Ray. Well, that just sounds cool. Very science fiction. He he had developed some sort of a system that could disintegrate things and it was just a light source. I think a lot of that actually led to the development of the laser beam. Sure. Yeah, that makes sense. Do lasers not disintegrate you and kill you? I feel like they do burn through. I think they could in one thousand nine hundred eighty two following pressure from Tesla's nephew, Kassa Novick Tesla's entire estate. What was left of it was shipped to Belgrade in eighty trunks marked n. t in Fifty-seven Cosa Vicks secretary, Charlotte, muzar transported Tesla's ashes from the United States to Belgrade. The ashes were displayed in a gold plated severe on a marble pedestal in the Nikola tesla museum. So kind of a sad end to a guy he invented and discovered so many important things that really led to today's life, not the least of which in one thousand nine hundred four. He pitched JP Morgan on a concept of collecting stock prices as well as news. I. Items in transmitting them wirelessly to hand held devices. He foresaw the iphone, the smartphone. That's pretty amazing. Yeah. Now they're just the concept that you would have that ability to carry something with you wirelessly that you could get information of that nature on is mind blowing at that time, its roots really incredible. JP Morgan didn't see any value in it and pulled all of his funding. That's why we have an iphone and not a j. p. Morgan phone. Incredibly sad that he gave so much in was taken advantage of and stolen from and died a broken man feeding pigeons from his hotel window deal with pigeons. He was obsessed with them. He just like them, yeah, he even when he was dirt poor toward the end of his life. He was this one pigeon that ended up on his window sill at the hotel. New Yorker was a white pigeon, and he, he loved this pigeon. It was wounded and he spent what little money he had in any money. He could get developing a some sort of an apparatus to ease this pigeons pain. I've heard estimates could have cost as much as two thousand dollars that he didn't have to help this little pigeon. It seems weird that he had an obsession with germs yet. He's feeding pigeons from his window. Yeah. Well, I mean better than electrocuting him at a fair.

Tesla Kassa Novick Tesla Mark Twain Nikola tesla museum JP Morgan engineer boop New Yorker hotel FBI Graham Belgrade Colorado Hannah coronary thrombosis Manhattan MIT Ray
"mark twain" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"And go it became like after like the two thousand to two came after nine eleven it was literally doing this mark twain award in washington elect i think almost a month after nine eleven and people were kind of going sees it was just like lifting siege went oh jeez it is good to get back out and do this shit oh yeah i mean i saw you it's new york a couple of times going on and it's very small place or at the comedy cellar and like i mean you you know i mean your desire to connect and your your your style like like you were saying before there's this weird thrill where the people they see you get the team this off often then you're gonna find and then yeah you gotta get in it and we were talking about that before at the comedy sewer that the honesty where you're at your point in your life now where you're at the age now and you having the experiences you're at now i it takes some balls to really deal with that stuff to do i'm not to the point where parka talk about it and so fucking deep but that's your inspiration yeah minds bhushan the people doing i mean you talk about nothing chris rock kristen the most amendment said you know it's weird all of a sudden if you get a sexual you know if you gene on why everything is a felony i agree but then should be like if you get a blowjob in georgia from stewart that should just be a misdemeanor a best friend that's a felony and you go like this team for your wife but not yet right but it's at bones about what can you talk about isn't it funny the balls is not it's not relative to to transgressing any cultural taboos but it's i don't know she'll take that shit goes into the real they really are come home to that oh yeah even even been dating them two months ago will come cheese and then you can't pull that thing it's like it's my act it's not your act with you when that happened that was me when you look like you're going down on a girl that's too looked like coffee and it's like you know that's the scariest part but it's also people when you do jokes about famous people or anybody and then you went into what fan we're never forgave me for something series kinda i mean i did this joke right used as a descriptive you know like i mocked adam sandler fans and then i run into him at the improv one night and he's here you're talking about me i did on television you gotta get over what's your problem and i'm like dude your cultural icon at some point we can't immunity i'm in no position like it's not like i have any cash i'm still able to make those kinds of states the liability for me is what you're not in the group you know you glued it and they're also that you'll never get in now you fuck do you want it no no coach amongst of do you want to be a member of a club that would have you as a member no fucking frightening thing i mean one time of doing this thing it was benign impression of stallone you know as being monosylabic billy billy crystal even when he's here hi and then you gotta go then you gotta deal with how did he deal with it he was funny he's not saying what bob cat said that during the vietnam war teaching jim this with school bills that he was a little about fitness that and he said you actually attack their character yeah if.

mark twain washington two months
"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Quote i've been looking in jean and envying her i have never greatly envied anyone but the dead i always envy the dead end quote it's published statements like these that cast perhaps too dark appall on the last years of twain's life most of the time when people learn about mark twain they're taught that his last years were spent brooding alone and lonely that he drank too much and regretted outliving so many of his friends and family his last years we're grooved with huge personal tragedies and periods of depression but he also remained social and traveled genuinely engaging with friends and fans until more or less the day of his death he even started a club and this is going to sound suspect for girls between the ages of ten and sixteen called the angel fish and aquarium club the girls were his angel fish and he corresponded with them had them over to his house and took them to cultural events and right that does sound a bit odd i know but there were never any accusations of impropriety or abusive behavior according to twain he viewed them as the grandchildren he never had so why girls and not boys maybe he was reliving his daughters childhoods maybe he enjoyed that they were more freely affectionate with him that he could be flirtatious and tease them but since they were prepubescent his actions didn't have the same lecherous undertones honestly it's impossible to say now player eventually put a stop to the club calling it in proper the point is for someone who is traditionally given out to be a bitter old codger at this time in his life he was also warm optimistic and playful history almost as a rule flattens the textures of a life as dynamic as twain's research and retelling are more often acts of omission than revelation his biographer pain wrote that his appeal as a writer and public figure was that he was limitless lee human an apt encapsulation of his perfectly imperfect.

mark twain writer jean
"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Yeah there was grumbler rambler josh and john smokes sergeant fathom thomas jefferson snodgrass quintas courteous snodgrass and are you ready w opinion anonymous addressed perkins and w a pen menendez addresses blab hard to say what he was really going for here or why he finally decided on what he did but thank goodness he picked mark twain definitely mark twain made his debut on february third eighteen sixty three in a humorous letter to the paper kim planning about a party that purportedly kept him awake for two days mark twain was born now it's time for a quick break as host of historical figures are love of learning didn't stop when we finish school that's why we love the great courses plus and want you to check it out to the great courses plus is unlimited access to learn about anything that interests you from the world's leading professors and experts there are thousands of lectures to stream in virtually any category they're even ones for hobbies like cooking and photography and you can watch and listen from anywhere i listen to their brand new course the aids of benjamin franklin i was shocked to learn that he was a high flying ladies man i didn't realize that benjamin franklin had any musical talents let alone that he invented his own version of the glass are monica start your free month you'll love it sign up at the great courses plus dot com slash figures that's the great courses plus dot com slash figures and here's something else.

john thomas jefferson snodgrass perkins menendez benjamin franklin two days