35 Burst results for "Mark Twain"

Disinformation is Solvable

Solvable

05:11 min | Last week

Disinformation is Solvable

"We have this ideal of free speech, which is that there's a marketplace of ideas out there that more speeches always better because the good ideas will win out in the end. It's a kind of fundamentally optimistic idea. It comes originally from the political philosopher, John Stewart Mills and his book on Liberty in the nineteenth century, and then it Kinda comes into Supreme Court land in the twentieth century but it often turns out not to be true there various eras in history where propaganda and false ideas have actually won the day in politics you can think about the Nazis you can think about times of Soviet, union communism other nine, thousand, nine, hundred examples of. Fascism and more recent governments in places like Brazil and India, where disinformation has really one out and so I think that we are flirting with that possibility in a scary way in the United States right now the fact is marketplace of ideas was always a pretty shaky concept and so free speech is really important to our democracy but we need I think to reconceptualise how we think about it and how we protect it in a way that really protects the speech that supports democracy instead of threatening it too. So we get our terms clear sale little about how disinformation with a D. differs from misinformation with an m yeah I mean these are sort of. Terms that are only I think the definitions are becoming clearer kind of as we speak but misinformation usually refers to fax that turn out to be wrong and disinformation refers to wrong facts that are being deliberately pedaled for political end. So it's the more sinister version. Disinformation intentional deception often fueled by. Actors of different kinds is sort of crowding out the good information, economics called Gresham's law where you know the bad money the money that's fake gold kind of is circulating everywhere in the real money disappears from the marketplace in a way that something like that happening with information right with is just all of this swirling nonsense depending on where you get your information from and you can't tell what's the good information or if there's any good information in that context way. So one way to think about this is that it used to be hard. To speak, we had gatekeepers, we had these traditional media companies that had a real hold and sort of control over speech. Now, it's really easy to speak, but it's very hard to be heard, and some of what we see in disinformation campaigns is a deliberate effort to drown out true speech or to smear the reputations of people especially online so that they'll effectively be silenced they'll leave the space they won't keep trying to talk, and so it's the use of speech to suppress speech, and that is very challenging for our American First Amendment to deal with. Having you had a really good example in your your piece, which was a me my I hadn't come across that the Democrats were threatening to secede from the country. The election. Just tell that story in brief because it was such a tidy example of sort of you know in the famous like mark. Twain like a lie that God halfway around the world before the truth guidance boots on him and it's just a piece of nonsense spread like wildfire, right? Yeah. So over the summer, a group of academics and former. Administration officials, former campaign staffers, pollsters they got together to game out the twenty twenty election and they played out various scenarios in which one or the other candidate won. It was close there was litigation. There wasn't there basically testing the system of American democracy and Rosa Brooks who was one of the CO organizers of this project wrote an essay in the Washington Post in which you mentioned that in one of the several hypothetical Scenarios Biden won the popular vote Belossi the Electoral College and fictional team Biden talked about trying to ask California and the Pacific northwest threatened to secede as a way of pressuring Republicans to add more succeeds to the Senate there's just a sentence about this in Rosa Brooks's essay Out of that sentence comes an article by Michael Anton- a former trump official and a conservative publication. Arguing that a coup is coming and from that article comes and appearance by another trump official Tucker Carlson show talking about this fictional threat of a democratic coup, very popular right-wing podcast named Dan Bongino. He shows up making videos about this that are getting millions and millions of views on social media president trump tweets in praise of publication called Revolver News, a right-wing website, which is also spreading this false story and what you see here, all the parts of the right wing media ecosystem coming together to really give a big platform to this made up idea that the Democrats are planning a coup.

Rosa Brooks Gresham Dan Bongino John Stewart Mills Biden Supreme Court Twain Official Tucker Carlson Brazil Pacific Northwest Washington Post United States Senate California Revolver News India
Rhonda Fleming, film star in the 1940s and 1950s, dies at 97

Radio From Hell

00:25 sec | Last week

Rhonda Fleming, film star in the 1940s and 1950s, dies at 97

"Will be missed. At the age of 97 Rhonda Fleming has died. Redheaded actress who became a popular sex symbol in Hollywood westerns, filmed OIR and adventure movies Off the forties and fifties. She died in Santa Monica, California. His Fleming's roles included those off a beautiful Arthur Rian Princess in the Bing Crosby musical version of Mark Twain's novel, a Connecticut

Rhonda Fleming Arthur Rian Princess Bing Crosby Santa Monica Mark Twain Connecticut California
Comedian Carl Reiner dies at 98

News, Traffic and Weather

00:25 sec | 4 months ago

Comedian Carl Reiner dies at 98

"NBC Entertainment News Show creator and co star I want to grow old gracefully. Not like you, director of comedy classics, including the jerkin Oh God, An Ocean's 11 trilogy costar Carl Reiner dined at his home in Beverly Hills Monday night. His son, Rob. Minor tweeting that his heart is hurting. His dad was his guiding light over his lifetime. Reiner won nine Emmys Grammy and was given the Mark Twain Prize for American humor. In 2000. Carl Reiner was

Carl Reiner Mark Twain Prize For American Beverly Hills NBC Grammy Director ROB
Comedy legend Carl Reiner, 'Dick Van Dyke Show' creator, dead at 98

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

Comedy legend Carl Reiner, 'Dick Van Dyke Show' creator, dead at 98

"Word this morning that Carl Reiner has passed away Van Take show creator and co star I want to grow bald gracefully. Not like you, director of comedy classics, including the jerkin Oh God, An Ocean's 11 trilogy costar Carl Reiner dined at his home in Beverly Hills Monday night, his own Rob Reiner tweeting that his heart is hurting his death. That was his guiding light over his lifetime. Reiner won nine Emmys and Grammy and was given the Mark Twain Prize for American humor. In 2000. Carl Reiner was 98. Jason Heathens and ABC News Hollywood Well,

Carl Reiner Mark Twain Prize For American Jason Heathens Beverly Hills Abc News Grammy Director VAN Hollywood
"mark twain" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

05:29 min | 4 months ago

"mark twain" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"With a celebration of Mark Twain an enormous amount of work that Richard down to take the notes in the memoirs in the letters much of it is not printed or you have to piece together because it's not in the final books because the levy is standing there reading at night making sure that mark that her Sam Sam Clemens doesn't upset the family honor anymore than he already has by wasting all their money and his money and everybody's money in the whole world knows he's poor all right we're going to get him to Europe they they stop in South Africa he gets in trouble with Cecil Rhodes big deal you'll have to restrain the book because it's funny we're under until London and they are arriving in the heat of August in London and they're going to still haven't piled their way out of Jackson now comes the tragedies Suzy Evans is stayed back in New York and she's a twenty three year old woman very highly strong what happens to our what is she what is she declined so quickly Richard decline is in dire did yesterday and that's in die what happens to a person just need one little detail that they get an addict their spot the daughters are having cable to come over and then they get the claimant Libby and Sam Mark Twain get as a cable back that there there's been a delay and Livvie instantly senses the worst and things that that list Susie must be sick and they board the ship and they're crossing the Atlantic when Mark Twain gets word that his daughter Suzy has died and how did she die so quickly what we night of spinal meningitis and eight it's not clear exactly how she caught it but she'd she declined very quickly and what's the worst for Mark Twain is he's alone he never handles being alone while at all he's alone in a rented house in a in a suburb and in England and his wife is in the middle of the ocean and that there's no technology in that area for him to reach her so he knows that she's going to in three or four days see her brother like crying on the docks either of their their friend who's a minister were weeping on the dock tend to having to tell her that Susie has died and he he just he's just over rod is just the actual scene is even more horrible because they don't get to the ship while it's in quarantine and Clara when she visits the captain's headline that her sister's dad and so she has to tell her mother right and just that's the moment you believe that Livvie started her decline I DO I DO a there's there's it's not really clear that live you ever completely got her her joy in life back I mean their moments that you can see later but this is the decline and and she would be dead eight years later I mean that seven years later living as a young and beautiful woman there's a photograph in the book of her in her forties she was a bells bell in her twenties when Mark Twain married there in eighteen seventy and he adored her and she had toward him and tell apart they were not they were not stable together they could travel around the world but this blow of losing their oldest daughter Susie they lost their son Langdon when he was nineteen months old that was an experience of the nineteenth century the families dealt with but losing Susie without ever seeing her again overwhelmed him and Clara Clara let's speak well of her she lives into the nineteen sixties route Richard and she's the one who is the she's the she's a perfect combination of her mother and father she is she has an ironic I but at the same time she protects the families on right she also basically I had a lot of trouble being in the same room with her father after awhile she realized for self preservation it was perhaps better to to live in Europe when he lived in New York all right let's pay the debts because that was the reason for the journey now Richard has included an enormous amount of detailed very accounting for us to watch the deck page took me longer than anything else in the book right now but I try I can I was taking notes all the time is they're paying the debts off by the time they get to England Livvie Libby is keeping counts because she knows that mark could miss leader of she let's imagine speaking generally by the time they haven't paid it off in the law in England but by the time they get to Switzerland for the summer she believes that there that they have now it achieved an ability to pay their creditors off but not for not without Rodgers Richard he's the hero of this book hero and yeah it's so great that you did you see that because he really is he he's the call mastermind of Twain's strategy to pay off his debts because actually the lecture tour paid off you know it's arguable what number it is but maybe it's half maybe whatever number it is but what saves Twain was his complete works addition and Twain had to rival publishers who weren't even speaking to each other who are furious with less and Harper's voice in Harper's and they'd never would have agreed on a deal and and Roger said that if he had only worked in publishing he he never would have been in business he would kill himself he just couldn't believe how difficult it was to make these men this is a man who put together amalgamated copper you understand this is a master dealer but publishing I didn't just affect him Rick Richard and I both have survived publishing we're aware of the fact that Rogers finally figured it out okay five now a levy will lead up leave us gene will die down Christmas nineteen oh nine but I want to pay attention to paying off all these debts because you've done such a wonderful job at the moment.

Mark Twain Richard
Nasdaq sets record high, S&P positive for 2020 as investors rally for recovery

Motley Fool Answers

02:56 min | 5 months ago

Nasdaq sets record high, S&P positive for 2020 as investors rally for recovery

"June third Ryan, Dietrick L., L. Financial tweeted that the return of the S&P five hundred for the trading day since the market bottomed the Mark Twenty March twenty third. Thirty nine point six percent, the best fifty day rally of the S&P five hundred since it was launched in nineteen fifty seven series. Yes. Didn't it feel like you're in the best rally ever I mean? I just feel. I just can't help but feel that. Yeah, this is just the best time to. Today just fantastic, yeah! Anyway, so the five hundred is now within five percent of its all time high on the Nasdaq on Friday and again today and we are taping by the way on Monday. June eighth! The Nasdaq reached another all time high, so the Nasdaq is at an all time high at this point. According to the bespoke in investment group. There's only one stock in the entire s and P five hundred. That's down since March. Twenty Third Oh hell. And it's down less than two percent. It's cody. The beauty care products. And they're only eight stocks that aren't up more than ten percents. It's mark, Twain, third, and this includes actually some big names Costco Walmart. Kroger sort of the consumer staples got left in the dust during the rally, so looking at the sectors since March twenty third the best sector energy up a hundred seven percent. Followed by consumer discretionary seventy percent in financials, fifty nine percent that said they went up the most, because they went down the most in the first part of it, and for the year they're still down, so energy stocks are still down almost thirty percent of the year and consumer, discretionary and financials still down eleven percent for the year. When you look at the best sectors for the year, as you might guess top performer technology for point, seven percent and healthcare up six percent for the year. Now looking at the biggest companies. In the stock market, we now have three companies worth more than a trillion dollars. Apple is on top one point three, nine, seven trillion. Microsoft. Just barely behind at least as of Friday's close one point three, eight, seven, trillion, and then Amazon at one point, two, two, seven, trillion and Google alphabet is not that far behind at nine hundred sixty four billion dollars, so it's quite amazing. Has As has been the case for years now. Larger growth oriented companies are doing better, which means in some cases, pricier stocks have gotten pricier and cheap stocks have gotten cheaper. Here's an interesting tidbit from Jason swags journal Article From last Friday quote. The fifty most expensive stocks and the S&P five hundred as of December thirty first were up. An average eleven point three percent through June third according to Drew Dixon. The Chief Investment Officer at Abbott Bridge capital the fifty cheapest stocks at the end of last year. Meanwhile we're down sixteen point eight percent so gross stocks doing well value stocks still struggling.

Chief Investment Officer Kroger Costco Drew Dixon Ryan Abbott Bridge L. Financial Apple Microsoft Dietrick L. Twain Google Amazon
Coronavirus conspiracy theories on the rise

Sunday Morning with Elizabeth Espinosa

05:56 min | 5 months ago

Coronavirus conspiracy theories on the rise

"So the video is conspiracy theory as you know it's and the basic idea seems to be is that some shadow we elites are conspiring to use the pandemic to seize power maybe make money by creating vaccines and the star of this twenty six minute clip that went viral is this woman named Judy make of that too has become a kind of hero to the anti vaccine crowd she's a discredited scientist who published a book in April called plague of correction and that sort of depicts her as a truth teller fighting scientists who aren't willing to accept inconvenience facts and so far right publications began to promote her book in this documentary that is forthcoming will apparently be taking an even closer look at these sort of baseless conspiracies this video has since since it kind of blew up has been taken down but tell us about some of the crazy accusations and I mean one of the things that keeps popping up I think it was the main thing that really got to pull down was they were saying that wearing a mask will literally activate your own virus that's right and that is the thing that got it taken down platforms like YouTube and Facebook generally do not want to remove content from the network and they tried to enable a maximum of free speech but they do make an exception for stuff that is actively harmful and while a lot of this video plan that make is just kind of conspiracies saying don't forget a lot of people are making money and other people are going to become more powerful that's not what it got taken down I got taken down because as you say it warned people against wearing masks you know saying that it would re inspect them which of course there is no basis for that whatsoever but you can imagine if a lot of people watch it's that and believe that you could have a really negative a stacked on public health so initially Facebook did it want to remove it but when it sort of stumbled across that particular claim it said okay we've actually got to take this thing down any doctor Judy make if it's for herself she does have a degree in biology from the university of Virginia a PhD in molecular biology she worked on the national Cancer Institute she has a lot of things under her belt but then she started getting into work about chronic fatigue syndrome and vaccines and this is kind of where she was derailed a little bit a lot of people discredited a lot of the later things that she was researching so like in two thousand nine she had published research saying that a mouse retrovirus because chronic fatigue syndrome which got a lot of attention but it was discredited a couple years later and the journal ultimately retracted it and it in this sort of like a weird aside story she was actually put in jail on charges of staffed which apparently involves computers disappearing those charges were dropped but the whole thing was a scandal and she was kind of sidelined and lost her scientific career but after that she sort of drifted into this anti Bax crowd and because of the credentials that you mentioned the anti vaxxers have sort of lifted her up as this brave truth teller even though what she saying is largely nonsense so let's talk about how something like this goes viral the usual players come up obviously Facebook and you to have a huge part in this but there was a lot of Facebook groups that we're sharing this and then beyond that even as you mentioned there's a lot of mistruths in this video but it also takes time for their fact checkers to go through this so as you've mentioned they didn't take it down right away it kind of was circulating around for a while while they were trying to do some of that fact checking it's a really interesting story the way that things go viral on Facebook and you tube is always changing based on the things that the platforms due to try to stop bad stuff from happening and sort of like as soon as they fix one problem another emerges so over the past year Facebook has put a lot more attention on groups getting people to join groups kind of moving away from that news feed and there are a lot of conspiracy groups anti VAX groups where this video clip was very popular in what happened is people were sharing it in the group and what they were sure it was actually a link to you too and so from those Facebook groups they were able to send seven point one million views to one video within a period of between thirty six and forty eight hours so just within a short period of time Facebook drove all of that traffic to you too and so it was kind of an unwitting tag team between the two platforms that sent this thing viral as you noted it did take awhile for the platforms to fully understand what was in the video the video is twenty six minutes long it contains a lot of claims and they had to go through it sort of point by point and ultimately make the determination that it had to come down but it sort of speaks to this cliche this quote that is attributed to Mark Twain that the lie gets halfway around the world before the truth can put its shoes on and that was definitely the case here and it was also this whole thing with obvious all the algorithms and it's this big cycle she had just self published a book not too long ago and it became this thing where searches for her name brought up searches for the video and vice versa searches for them he would bring up searches for her name so it's kind of this big cycle where it's just feeding off of itself for a while until Facebook and YouTube took these things down and you know I think it's important to remember that Judy megabits has something to celebrate she has a book to sell into this whole viral events on Facebook and YouTube has been very good for her she had a number one best seller on Amazon over the weekend yesterday was still at number six so all of this is bound to be huge benefit to somebody who is selling this very day Alicia's ideas that just doesn't have any basis in

Steve Martin On His Years As A Comic — And Walking Away From Stand-Up

Fresh Air

10:00 min | 6 months ago

Steve Martin On His Years As A Comic — And Walking Away From Stand-Up

"But if you could hold Steve Martin has been making people laugh often with highly conceptual humor since the nineteen sixties when he was a staff writer on the smothers brothers comedy hour in the seventies he became a major stand up comedy star filling arenas with his fans he rose to fame along with his then new TV show called Saturday Night Live on which he made many memorable appearances as a wild and crazy guy a medieval barber and a fan of king tut eventually the fame that brought in huge audiences also made it impossible for him to do the kind of comedy that made him original he starred in movies from the jerk to parenthood and in recent years has also written plays essays and books and toured with both his bluegrass band and with friend and fellow comic Martin short Steve Martin won the Mark Twain prize for American humor in two thousand five in was a Kennedy center honoree in two thousand seven Terry gross spoke with Steve Martin in two thousand eight about his memoir born standing up Steve Martin welcome back to fresh AIR eleven returning her thank you I thank you very much I'd like you to open with a reading from the beginning of the book and we've we've edited the slightly to make it crystal a little shorter for the broadcast great be happy to I did stand up comedy for eighteen years ten of those years were spent learning for years were spent refining and for years were spent in wild success I was seeking comic originality and fame fell on me as a by product the course was more plodding than her ROIC I did not strive valiantly against doubters but took incremental steps started with a few intuitive leaps I was not naturally talented I didn't sing dance or act the working around that minor detail made me inventive I was not self destructive though I almost destroyed myself in the end I turned away from stand up with the tired swivel of my head and never looked back until now a few years ago I began researching and recalling the details of this crucial part of my professional life which inevitably touches upon my personal life and was reminded why I did stand up and why I walked away in a sense this book is not an autobiography but a biography because I am writing about someone I used to know yes these events are true yet sometimes they seem to have happened to someone else and I often felt like a curious onlooker or someone trying to remember a dream I ignored my stand up career for twenty five years but now having finished this memoir I view this time with surprising warmth one can have it turns out an affection for the war years thanks for reading that that Steve Martin reading from his memoir born standing up which has just been published in paperback yeah I guess I didn't realize how much you closed the door on your comedy years how much there was like a before and after it ended you were done and that was it right I I I'm it was about nineteen eighty one I still had a few obligations left but I knew that hi I could not continue but I guess I could have continued if I had nothing to go to but I did have something to go to which was movies and you know the act had become so known that in order to go back I would have had to create an entirely new show and I wasn't up to it especially when the opportunity for movies and writing movies came around why would you have to create an entirely new show well like I say the the the act was really it there is a passage in the book which I caught because it was so hard to explain but the act essentially besides all the jokes and bits and everything was conceptual and once the concept was understood there was nothing more to develop it's like saying painting the same blank canvas over and over and over and over and over once the concept is no you don't see the need to see to that and that was in the back of my head that I was really done artistically with with what I had created or pastiche to you know in the reading that you just did you describe yourself as not being naturally talented did you think of yourself as naturally funny I'm I didn't didn't think of myself in that way no although I I just love to comedy I I was raised with laurel and hardy and I Love Lucy Anne and Jerry Lewis and I just loved it and I had a friend in high school and we would just laugh all day and put on skits and you know it's the Andy Kaufman thing over to Marty short thing where you're performing in your bedroom for yourself and I I loved magic and so I would practice my magic tricks in front of a mirror for hours and hours and hours because I was told that you must practice you must practice and never present a trip before it's ready but I was just inclined toward show business but I didn't know what I just like being on stage you got your start working in Disneyland you were living in southern California and when you were ten you were selling guidebooks there then you later work for magic shop demonstrating magic tricks and I get the sense from your memoir that demonstrating those magic tricks you know hours a day and really getting them getting them down because you're doing them so much that that gave you a sense that performance required a great deal of craft that even comedy wasn't just a question of going out on stage and saying funny things that there was enormous amounts of work and practice and thought that would have to go into it well that that idea of that that you really had to work at this stuff didn't necessarily come from Disneyland it I I mean I think yes and in terms of presenting a trick but having having it so well honed in your mind was really giving me a sense of security it was I don't want to go out there half baked and you know you learn that through the years you know you're you do a magic show with a friend and you rehearse it a couple of times and yes every all the timing has to be exactly perfect but while you're out there it's it's a different world it's not your mirror you have to make on the spot adjustments but that's just you know whatever entertainer does actually working at the magic shop really gave me a sense of comedy because it was all the jokes we did the tricks but we have all these jokes I had a friend Jim Barlow who you know he he was the the guy I worked with there but he had patter worked out you know it he would go to customers and say Medicare money I mean help you not and you know call them suckers it was really funny and and kind of friendly rude what was your patter I just took all of Jim's patter I'm I'm trying to think of other ones yeah I said it would just it would somebody would buy something it would say and because you are hundred customer today you get a free paperback it's a little silly things like that but Disneyland I'm fifteen right here at early act was a combination of banjo playing juggling magic tricks and comedy and some of that stating your later at two but it sounds like a vaudeville act yes I was very interested involved it was the only sort of discipline that was a five minute act on stage which is what I really enjoyed ins and saw myself doing and I bought books on it I went to the Long Beach pike which was off the carnival fair you know four is really a place for drunken sailors to get tattoos but there was also side shows is very interested in that but you know there is these are all in there these are short acts there was one of the employees at Disneyland that I worked with was named Steve Stewart and he worked in vaudeville and he did a sack for me one day on the floor of the magic shop and I had a couple of great gags one was that I actually used and I asked him if I could use them because I was very strict about using any material that wasn't mine or that that was taken from somebody else let's put it this way I became strict wasn't strict at first there is one trick that one joke that Dave steward did where he said are not yet a glove white glove in his hand the magicians glove any he said and now the glove into dove trick and he threw it into the air and then it hit the floor and he just looked at it and consent and set up for my next trick he went on and it was the first time I saw comedy created out of nothing of nothing happening and I Glaum don to that wait wait wait you're doing I think is not only making comedy out of nothing but making comedy out of people's expectations which you were going to fail to fulfill well yes exactly and I I really started that when I became a semi professional meaning I was working the local folk music clubs going around either working for free or for a week and I quickly decided that you know the material was you know good or weak or whatever and I decided whatever it was I was going to pretend like it was fantastic and how great am I how great is what you're seeing and I think that's what grizzly hunting it's a tune him too because they couldn't believe that someone actually was that confident

Steve Martin Staff Writer
So You Want to Do a Book

LensWork

09:54 min | 8 months ago

So You Want to Do a Book

"Here's the editor of Lens Publishing Bruce. Jensen almost every photographer. I know wants to do a book of their work. I cannot tell you how many conversations I've had over the years with photographers. Who particularly in review sessions say? I'm here primarily because I'm looking for a publisher and would you be interested in publishing my work or if you're not interested in publishing my work can you tell me how to find a publisher or what. I have to do to produce a book of my work even if it means funding it and producing it themselves all well and good the problem. Is that when I talk with these photographers? A little more deeply about their desire to do a book of their work. I've found that few of them have any clear idea why they WANNA do a book. There's lots of fantasies that crop up about what they think book is going to do for them but generally speaking those are unrealistic ideas and there are primarily five of them that I've identified over the years that are reasons people say for wanting to produce a book and I WanNa take a look at those five reasons and and look a little more deeply at them so here they are the first thing people say is they wanna make money and they think that rather than selling their original prints they think they can make money by selling books second. They think a book will help them broaden their audience get their artwork their photographs in front of more eyeballs. And that's what they're primarily interested in his audience and so a book to them. We'll get a lot more people to see their work than having say an exhibition third. They say they want to add their voice to photographic history. They somehow perceive all the famous photographers. They know come from their experience of seeing work in books relative to galleries. We see a lot more books than galleries and exhibitions and museums and etc. And so they think they can add their voice to photographic history by producing a book and somehow put themselves in the Pantheon of the march of photographic artwork through the ages fourth. They say they want to be taken seriously or the way I tend to think of it is they somehow think that producing a book of their work is going to be some sort of validation of their artwork like they've arrived particularly if a publisher a third party agrees and solicits them to publish their work. That that's some sort of validation rather than if they were to self publish. Which has a lot less validation about it. And the fifth reason people say they want to produce a book is because they want to produce something for the ages they think somehow that producing a book will be more substantial than producing just their individual photographic prints and having a book out there that's in libraries or special collections or owned by people means that their work will live beyond them so there's a mortality issue involved now curiously enough all five of these common reasons people offer up for why they WANNA produce book have one thing in common and that is that they think somehow the medium of book publishing holds the key to all of this success when in fact the medium of book publishing is just a medium. It's another way to get your work out there in the world but it really doesn't hold the key to any of this success in fact what is the key that opens up. All of these doors is the quality of their work. But it's so much easier to focus on the medium than on making better more meaningful more sensitive higher quality photographs that. That's a mystery about how to do that. Every one of us are involved in that mystery. And that's what I call leading the creative life is figuring out how to make more impactful artwork. That is true to ourselves and at the same time share something of value with people. That's hard work and that's very difficult to do. Making a book by comparison is relatively easy and so the focus becomes. Let's zero in on the medium rather than on the work. Well maybe not to the exclusion of the quality of the work. But somehow the idea is that the medium will unlock all the doors and it just doesn't because each one of these has some problems involved with them and I want to take them one at a time. So let's start with making money. The problem with wanting to produce a book of your work in order to make money is that the financial aspects of. It's simply don't work the book. Business is not a very healthy business right now partly because costs continue to escalate on what it takes to produce a book tax laws work against you because essentially they make it a one year project. You can't any longer amortize your costs over the life of the book and there's this nitpicky thing called break even so. I know it's hard to follow numbers but let me see if I can share these fairly simply. Let's say it's GonNa cost you twenty five dollars to produce a book that's paper printing binding. The cost for the printer at twenty five dollars is what is going to cost you to produce your book and let's say you can sell your book for Fifty Dollars Good. Looks like you're going to double your money. The problem is in order to get the cost of the book to be as low as twenty five dollars for example you might have to print a whole bunch of them and just keep the math simple. I'll say you have to print a thousand so twenty five dollars per book a thousand a year into it twenty five thousand dollars and let's say that you can sell them for fifty dollars if you work out the math you realize you'll have to sell five hundred books just in order to recuperate. Your initial investment of the twenty. Five Thousand Dollars. It takes to produce the book and by the way it may not be your twenty five thousand dollars. It may be the twenty five thousand dollars of the publisher. It's the same thing they're only going to make that financial gamble. If it makes sense for them so the question becomes. Do you have the ability to sell five hundred books well again to make it simple? Let's talk about self publishing so you put up to twenty five thousand dollars. You produce the thousand bucks now. You've gotta go out and sell them. Well you start with your friends and acquaintances and your family. But of course a bunch of them are GonNa want a book for free so they may or may not give you fifty dollars a book because after all they're your friends and family etc and so let's be generous. Let's say you have two hundred friends and family members all of whom are willing to pay you fifty dollars for your book okay. That's two hundred out of the five hundred that you have to sell in order to break. Even you got three hundred books left to go now who you going to sell those two. You've already exhausted all the easy contacts. You have your friends and family. Now you've got to go out to the general public. Somehow which means you've gotta get bookstores involved which means distributors which means that the Reseller the bookstore is GonNa WanNa make some money and if you work through a distributor. They're gonNA WANNA make some money so you're no longer GONNA get fifty dollars book. You're going to get probably maybe twenty five dollars a book which is barely going to cover the cost of printing and binding. So you're not gonNA make any money on those now sudden you have to sell way more than five hundred books in order to recover your initial investment. Making money with a book is almost an impossible proposition. Now you can. And here's where it gets seductive. There are photographers. There are publishers. Who MAKE MONEY SELLING BOOKS. But the reason they do is because they have already an existing huge market when a famous photographer ansel Adams or well. Let's take somebody who's contemporary to take. Steve McCurry of Steve McCurry wants to produce a book. The greatest chances are he's going to make money on that book because he Steve McCurry because there are lots and lots of people who are fans of his well. How many fans to you have? If you're a very famous individual then maybe you can make money with books but probably for most of us. That's not a realistic assumption. So making money has gotta cross that one off the list because it's probably not going to happen in fact it's probably going to cost money. You might say well. I'll do a blurb book okay. Fine but you're not gonNA make any money on a blurb book because the book that sells for fifty dollars. That's produced blurbs. Probably GONNA cost you fifty dollars to produce it at blurb and so there's no margin there there's no way for you to make money might get your workout in the world but making money through books is almost an impossibility and less. You're already famous. Which always reminds me of that. Great Mark Twain quote when he said banks are always happy to loan you money when you can prove that you don't need it.

Publisher Steve Mccurry Jensen Editor Mark Twain Ansel Adams
Defining Healthy Relationships

The Daily Boost

05:45 min | 8 months ago

Defining Healthy Relationships

"So let's talk about the finding a healthy relationship now. When I wrote the title for this I was thinking. Wow that could go just about any place depending on where you are in your world depending on who you're dealing with depending on what your mindset is you could've seen that a thousand different ways that well okay. I can't quite figure out what every possible ways going to be. So that'll do. That'll do to finding a healthy relation Oldham. And that's what we want because the quality of your life is going to come down and be defined by really the The results are what you have in your relationships who you know who you spend your time with whether it be the boss or or spouse or friend or your neighbor next door depending where you live you may have a neighbor. That's really not making your life. Great right so relationships are in fact everything and people say well you know what I have a good relationship with my dog. That's okay was mark Twain. Who said that the more I get to know my dog the more I don't like people. He was pretty close to write about that. But you know what I find personally yourself when you align your personal values who you are on the inside when you your values with folks who have like values. You tend to have really good relationships. It's when you start bumping into folks who don't go frankly just believe in the things you believe in and you try to make it happen that it gets kinda rocky cannot possible but kinda rocky so we definitely wanted to find those relationships now whether it's personal it's professional or or even business. There are three ways. I think to play this relationship game and oh it's not a dating game. I think there's only one way to win when we do this with three very distinct types of relationships that you will have along the way no matter who you're dealing with you're ready for number one. Every single relationship begins with two individual people. You and somebody else. I'm not talking you at a bunch of folks that you an individual person so every single relationship begins with two individuals now. What happens if you remain individual an independent? What happens if you do that if you remain that way? You're never likely to really connect you never going to do a real relationship that you can kind of go back and forth and really really rigby get the benefit of it if you will a lot of folks do that. I'm an independent person. I'm an individual. I'm going to be that way. It's really impossible to be around anybody else and have that kind attitude but a lot of people do and a Lotta people do it after they may be Ben Burtt a couple of times or just can't figure out what maybe ran into somebody who maybe you know. He just didn't get lucky. Right it wrong person so you kind of hold back a little bit you decide. Just be a I'm independent. I am who I am. It's okay I like you to be independent. You should be independent. But it's not gonNa work if you stay that way all the time. So what's the other kind of relationship that you might run into? Well some become very co dependent. Honestly I run into a lot of that kind of work that I do this. A lot of that going on right now at developing this kind of codependent relationship means well you lose your individuality right. Isn't that what you were attracted to the other person in the first place for individuality as I came her for who they are but when you get too close he become very very codependent. When really you kind of begin to lose a piece of yourself and again I run into this all the time often it. Somebody has a job. And they've gotten so codependent on the job and the CO workers and the hours pay and everything else. They've lost they are also see it with a lot of married relationships. Where one partner is so dependent on the other. They lose themselves as satisfying anyway. So it's it's even worse than being just independent. It's really bad place to be so the first place we start being very independent person and you want to be an independent strong person. Don't get me wrong on that the same time if you stay too independent if you don't open up a little bit if you don't allow a little space you never really going to get with anyone and when you do connect if you let yourself go and you sound all in and you become codependent. Oh my goodness oh my goodness becomes an issue too because you kind of lose who you were. We don't WanNa do that. So what is the place you WANNA be or if you're doing the math right now if you're thinking this through just take a guess what would it be. You probably guessing might be kind of a blend or something right. Pretty close his. I believe and I've seen this again and again and again you want to merge your skills you emerge your passions you emerge some of that individuality and you want to create a more of an interdependent relationship and you'll see this in whether it be business or with your employees or with your spouse or your boyfriend your girlfriend you notice how some people just become a good team. You can go too far with that because I think if you become just to Interdependent also begin to lose yourself a little bit along the way but if you notice when you get you that Nice little balance you get to be yourself you get to rely on each other quite a bit and you're working as a team to get what you want. That's where you want to be no matter where you are in any relationship when you get to that place. It's really a solid foundation. You could build a whole world on that and you already have and you will in the future pretty simple stuff when you take just a couple of minutes to think about it because it's so easy to get caught up in the caught up at one day rely so my gosh. Where am I so the three different kinds of relationships that you're going to run into your what? Which one are you now? Where are you? Are you completely independent? You're fighting the big fight. Have you become co dependent? The place it's maybe not healthy for you are you interdependent. Is it a good healthy place to be? Are you good team? It's a great place to be. That's where you are

Ben Burtt Mark Twain Rigby Partner
California's oldest newspaper gets an unlikely editor

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:45 sec | 8 months ago

California's oldest newspaper gets an unlikely editor

"I cherish newspaper here in California finds itself in the news in the gold rush town of Downieville population about three hundred the mountain messenger has been rolling off the presses four hundred sixty six years making is California's oldest weekly newspaper even Mark Twain once wrote for the messenger for the past thirty years its owner and editor has been don Russell a man with a ready laugh because there it was ready to sell but couldn't find a buyer until we address is Carl but showed up and I'm just delighted that I found somebody stupid enough to take it over yeah

California Mark Twain Editor Carl Downieville Don Russell
A Live Chat with Two of the Biggest Rabbis in Phoenix

Unorthodox

08:52 min | 8 months ago

A Live Chat with Two of the Biggest Rabbis in Phoenix

"Have two of the biggest rabbis and Phoenix here with US tonight. Rabbi Dr Smelly Yanko. It's the president and Dina validate me Josh and Rabbi Pinchas. Illusion is the founding rabbi of Congregation Beth Safina in Scottsdale Arizona. Come come welcome rebuttal. Don't usually have two guests because things can get really off the rails so we'll see what happens here rabbis. I'm GONNA call you. We'll we'll we'll figure out what we're GONNA call you but let's start with this question for both of you. Why isn't this Jewish community different from all other Stephanie Loud Mark this is why all the people who don't touch the MIC? Don't have problems every house. That better josh all right there we go sorry Stephanie. So let's start off because there's like no spoilers here because only spoilers so rabbis. Why is this Jewish community different from all other Jewish communities? Are you guys even Jewish? You're letting each other speak. It's an excellent question you went on to. I twenty all right so I think for two main reasons number one. It's a community that has just been founded really in the past. Few decades other communities are centuries old. This community is quite new and therefore its future is still very much ahead of it. I think that's why many people are really attracted to the potential of the community year as I was when I first move you thirteen years ago. And it's buzzing with excitement that's number one number two. I also think that it's a community. It's quite diverse and it's diverse in its culture it's diverse in its levels of observance of background. But it's not just the diversity that is attracting and that is quite unique to Phoenix. But it's a unity within the diversity truly feel that we're a united community which can't be said about Kish Committees. That was speaking about before in other places so those are the two main things that I see almost immediately like musing. Yeah well you say when. I was thinking about moving in the middle my seventh year. The two points that people shared as to why I shouldn't consider it. They said it's an intellectual wasteland which is totally untrue. We have people coming out to our learning events every night interesting ideas. And secondly they said it's a moral morally passive community very private very individualistic which is also completely untrue. When we have various activists campaigns people lined up lined up to show support. Who said that? And should we beat them up here? Do you want the crowd here? That can go after them. We the J. Crew here I want. I want to address the thing that you just said. So I'm kind of two minds about the activism angle. There's a part of me that thinks that it's really beautiful and essential for community of face to be very involved in you know social political elements and feel this kind of moral calling and there's another part of me that is a little bit kind of taken aback by how dominant this political discussion. Become just you know. Want to go to show just to hear the Torah just to be together with Jews and worry about that later some other place. How should we be feeling about? Its connection being social justice and question so Rambam my monitors in the third section of his guide for the perplexed. Says what's the purpose of all this stuff and answer is the welfare of the body and the welfare of the soul by which he means the well. If you have to know a little play there which we do. The welfare of the body means just state and the welfare of the sole means the perfection of the intellect so basically the goal of Judaism view is our inner life and our outer life which is to say the inner life is our ritual or beliefs or spirituality stuff. You're touching on and the outer life which he comes to say becomes the priority is that Jews should be on the front and center of fostering the Jus- -ociety and so I think we have a problem. Today I think that The traditional segment of Jewish life prioritizes the parochial and the traditional and not the universal. And I think the more liberal segments of Jewish life prioritize the universal and less of the less attritional and this middle ground of saying yes we care about the world we care society and we care about Jews. That complete package is what we're GONNA do. You agree that he taught us to call them. Yeah that's pleasure. No NOPE BRONCO. Way Back like twenty minutes back calls me peony so all my friends do so no problem. I I would agree with that. I would say though that needs to be a healthy balance of course between the two because if almost like Mark Twain said some people are so open minded that the brain spill out. Sometimes we were so much in open that we forget the message. And so we have to be steeped in the roots of Judaism very much so and yet not forget a calling to go to the outside point out also that if there is an emphasis in Judaism on which side counts the most. It's the outside if you think of the idea of Mitzvah. Most of the six hundred thirteen meets vote are outside oriented. They deal with the world that don't really deal with the internal world. I can only think I don't know maybe you can take more of to mitzvahs on top of the mind that deal with the inside. Prayer Torah study but otherwise everything else really deals with the outside so there is. I do find this emphasis on. Tacona LOMB on trying to rectify the world of course with God's light and with God's message but on the other hand also not forgetting where we come from forgetting to be a steeped in our roots as possible. Something we talk about a lot on the show. Is this idea that a lot of juice today don't necessarily feel like they can just walk into a synagogue and be welcomed or would even feel comfortable. There would even know how to get there. What do you think is the best way to connect with Jews? Who Don't haven't necessarily found their place within the institutional Jewish world thank you. They should go to the valley. Bettman rush to go ahead twenty. I was first before you go second. I'm sorry what did what are these. Mutations Paul Ince Geneva come on these guys could pull off a Juku. They've got the organization got the intellect coming the trail be stealthy. It's a fascinating question and I think that was a really good at alien one another. It's true and I think that the percentages of Jews were not engaged. Not because they're disinterested because they've been alienated is also very high and I think the challenge here is to embrace pluralism which does not bracket are absolutes but creates space for other absolutes. That means that for those of us who are really fervent beliefs. We learn how to create space for others. And those who are more relativistic and actually don't hold. Views are able to cultivate those in our space. I'm worried about those on the margins. I'm worried about single folks who have had had trouble finding partners and we were the people of Color feel alienated those of lower socioeconomic status who feel alienated Those who are converts all types of marginalized Jews that I think are. Establishments can do better being inclusive those with physical disabilities or and really a whole host of others. And I think our community is very good at embracing those who naturally fit in. I would agree also. I think it's an excellent question because he hit it right on the now. I think the biggest challenge we have is rabbis is to make Judaism not just relevant but also accessible and I would say that the lenses I try to wear as rabbi and I think that all Jews should try to wear is the lenses of what my rabbi teaches in his book. We Jews the STEINFELDT He came up with the idea that he was the first one since then. I've heard it many times. But he came up with this idea. That Judaism is not a religion. I don't approach another Jew because of religion nor do I approach another job. Because he's part of my ethnic group. Judaism is not an ethnic group. Judaism is also another nationality. We don't have to live in Israel to be Jewish. What is Judaism? Judaism is a family. I approach another Jew. Because he's my family and yes you could have two Jews and seven opinions but as another Aba of mine taught it's one heart and we can't forget that we do have one hot. We we are part of that. Same family what unites us is much greater than what divides us as the CLICHE goes. But it's not just a cliche it's the truth and therefore not do is better than me. We all have the same soul. No Jew is wiser than me. No Jew is deeper than me. I think every Jew in a way is a part of God and you can't add measurements to divinity to the infinity God is God and Jews that reflection of God he has that Jewish soul and together as a family. That's what unites us. That's what we celebrate. There's that great bit in Michigan where they say that you know. Why did God make us all descended from the same couple so that nobody could say you're better than my father is so so

Phoenix Rabbi Dr Smelly Yanko Josh United States Beth Safina Rabbi Pinchas Arizona President Trump Stephanie Kish Committees Mark Twain Jus- -Ociety Paul Ince Dina Israel Michigan Bettman Juku
Oldest newspaper in California saved by an unexpected new owner

WBBM Evening News

01:00 min | 9 months ago

Oldest newspaper in California saved by an unexpected new owner

"One of America's most cherished newspapers finds itself in the news to paraphrase its most famous past contributor reports of the papers death have been greatly exaggerated here's John Blackstone in the gold rush town of Downieville population about three hundred the mountain messenger has been rolling off the presses for a hundred sixty six years making California's oldest weekly newspaper even Mark Twain once wrote for the messenger for the past thirty years its owner and editor has been don Russell a man with a ready last who was ready to sell but couldn't find a buyer until his call but showed up is delighted that I found so many stupid enough to take it over but to retire to Downieville about a decade ago bought them out messenger instead of taking a long

America John Blackstone California Mark Twain Editor Downieville Don Russell
Six Nations: Andy Farrell 'happy' after Ireland win over Scotland

BBC World Service

11:05 min | 9 months ago

Six Nations: Andy Farrell 'happy' after Ireland win over Scotland

"The US secretary of state Mike Pompeii and has had bike strongly at accusations of the United States no longer believes in the international community addressing the international security conference in Munich he took issue with the German president Frank voter Steinmeier's opening remarks about an American retreat from global cooperation Mister Pompey essay did nothing could be further from the truth paraphrasing Mark Twain he said the death of the trans Atlantic alliance have been grossly exaggerated the foreign ministers of China and the Vatican have met in Germany and was believed to have been the highest level talks between the two sides since the establishment of the people's Republic of China seven decades ago is Roger Wilco when he and arch bishop pull gonna comment on Friday on the sidelines of the security conference in Munich both are said to have expressed a desire to build on the recent agreement it said the Vatican should have the final say on the appointment of Roman Catholic bishops Beijing also now recognizes the pope as the supreme leader of the Roman Catholic Church until twenty eighteen Chinese Catholics was split between a state run church and underground institution there is still no diplomatic relations between room in Beijing the pope Francis is said that he'd like to visit China Australian major report same members of the parliamentary committee have scrapped a planned trip to Britain as part of a worsening diplomatic row between the two countries China wholesale is in Sydney in a rare show of disapproval the UK's High Commissioner has reportedly written to the heads of two Australian parliamentary committees to formally protest the leaked details of sensitive talks with Britain's Foreign Secretary Dominique rob during his visit to camber last week according to local media reports the deputy chair of the intelligence and security committee Anthony burn strongly criticized Mister rob he reportedly said to the to allowing China to build bridges five G. telecoms infrastructure was equivalent to letting Russia constructed the parliamentary committee and the high commission of both declined to confirm the reports you're listening to world news from the BBC who the rebels in Yemen say they've shut down a tornado will play belonging to the Saudi led coalition that intervenes in the country's conflict five years ago a rebel spokesman told a Hootie run television station that ground to air missiles down the aircraft in the northern province of Joel the security forces in Mali say eight to the soldiers have been killed and four others injured in an ambush in the central region of cow early at least twenty people were killed in the multi region imbalance between two ethnic groups Molly has been blighted by instability since an Islamist rebellion began in the north in twenty twelve public press sermones involving thousands of monks have been held in Thailand a week after a soldier show dated twenty nine people the killings began when the soldier killed his commanding officer and stole weapons from a military base he was shot dead by the security forces inside the shopping mail researchers in the United States have warned of the psychological and moral dangers posed by the growing availability of sex robots with artificial intelligence the annual meeting of the American Association for the advancement of science was told that agencies were too embarrassed to investigate and regulates the use of the robots hello good reports the number six robots are advertised online including one large sized mannequin that links and sinks it slips as it talks researchers say that they're concerned that such sex robots pose a psychological risky uses Machon real relationships and they also worry that there's a more risk to society by normalizing operant behavior towards the machine for example some robots can be programmed to protest to create a rape scenario the scientists have verged regulators to investigate the risks of A. I. six robots before they use becomes more widespread and that's the baby see news hello this is Max basin and welcome back to the world this week this week has seen a dramatic shift in the political landscape of the Irish Republic general election produce results which few soul coming including apparently the party which came talk in the poll shin Fane I said that because if shin Fane had fielded more candidates they might have found their way to forming a government a little easier as it is shin Fane widely referred to over the last forty years as the political wing of the IRA secured roughly the same number of seats in the Dublin parliament as the two major parties fina Foyle and fina gale Chris page is our island correspondent it was a huge leap significant results really breaking the mold of Irish politics which is held for several generations shin Fiennes surge in the general election means that it's not up there with the two parties that have really dominated government in the country for decades FIFA fourteen FIFA Gail both centrist parties challenged by should fit in which is very much on the left and shin Fane and its leader Marilyn McDonald ready very successfully positioned itself as an alternative to the tea party some she termed as the establishment art fits of Irish politics focusing relentlessly in issues of housing and health but resonated very strongly with the are selected and Sinn fin really remembers a unique political organization certainly close to unique and that it operates in two different countries as well as not being the second largest party in the Irish parliament in Dublin it's also the second largest party in the regional parliament in Northern Ireland towards parts of the devolved government so in terms of its old Ireland's positioning in politics well it's not an extremely significant position and don't very much mainstream certainly in the in the Irish Republic which is an extraordinary transformation fission fame because this was remember interviewing Gerry Adams for example the formation vainly to in Northern Ireland during the nineteen eighties found that sometimes an intimidating affair with his body guards around him and the association with the IRA and now it's about small country the image yes should finish ready in thirty years gone from being a political pariah to a party of governments in Northern Ireland in the party that's challenging for government in the Irish Republican in many ways stop reflects the journey of the Irish Republican movement from guns to government does he say throughout the course of the conflict in Northern Ireland should fit in links to the Irish Republican Army the main part of the trip fighting for Northern Ireland to leave the you can be absorbed into you the Irish Republican took more life than the other group and not very lengthy conflict since the IRA cold cease fire in nineteen ninety four but shouldn't be in Studley increasing its growth in the power sharing government in Belfast in Northern Ireland and noisy positioning itself is the second biggest party in Dublin and very much in the running to be part of the government there should be taken the chin vent itself is been surprised by its own success given that they they could have run more candidates in in Ireland's proportional representation system possibly could have formed a government yes I think that's certainly true shin Fane Philip forty two candidates that's for a hundred and sixty six in total of thirty seven of them were elected night one of the other parties to be during the course of the election **** a few days ago that if Sinn fin had run say twenty more candidates will that of one probably ten more seats so that's a sign shin Fane strategists themselves didn't quite see a surge on this scale coming so not some really old on to the a parliamentary arithmetic if we got a bit of a three way standoff three to four nine for the gill say they're not going to go into a coalition government with should fan because of policy differences on because of the party's pasta associations with the IRA so you have should fade trying to put together a coalition with other smaller left wing parties but even if all of them came on board we still find that particular coalition coming short of the eighty seats they needs to form a stable administration I think we're going to find this whole process taking certainly weeks if not months and it's also very possible but it will be resolved the toll on will be heading back to the polls for another general election and how much of a problem is that for an island to be in the midst of such uncertainty when you know major things are happening around it well certainly the major international challenge Ireland will have over the coming months is the trade talks between the UK and the European Union since what with which our shuttle trip starts in in the aftermath of the U. K. exiting the E. U. so certainly I think everybody in this whole negotiation process in Dublin would agree it's better for Ireland to have a stable governments to lead the country three about process not the last politics is politics the voters are given their verdict not spend we have this very complicated picture on resolving about is certainly not going to be easy Chris page it's not just an island that old certainties are coming under scrutiny this week saw an unusual cloud of uncertainty descend over German politics the woman angler medical had hand picked as her successor and a great crime Kambala or a K. K. resigned as leader of the governing CDU the Christian Democrats the move was raised all sorts of questions about the future direction of German politics as I've been hearing from Damien McGinnis in Berlin this latest crisis was ready Spock's by a local florist see she shows after votes in the eastern German state of Thuringia in which I'm peas in her policy I voted for candidates as premier of that state's also supported by the far right AFP this display needs that she lost control of her policy because one of the big round was going on within the center right CD you is whether to work with the following safety particularly in eastern German states like syringes or whether to keep this firewall gave the far right that we have right now so I KK stepping down as clearly as you say a very poor reflection on the leadership of the CD you but how much of a blow to the party and indeed to angler miracles supposed plans for a succession if anything the struggles of any potential successors show how indispensable under the necklace so personally speaking it hasn't really hits her very hard but what it does to damages under Michael's vision for her policy and for Germany because what time the mac was done what I leading Germany is ready for a policy to the sensor grounds and what's cook conservative critics want to do is really make a center right possible Conservative Party again on this is a big impacts on the country as a whole because this part is the biggest party in Germany it could well be in government next time and the question is is Germany's biggest policy does journeys next government become more conservative I'm potentially one day even work with the far right safety or does it potentially stay in the US and around the maybe even one day from

Mike Pompeii United States Munich President Trump Frank
The Mothman Cometh

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:01 min | 9 months ago

The Mothman Cometh

"This podcast isn't so much about hidden history as it is about aww forgotten event and that's the case. Today's podcast the moth man. The town of point pleasant is located in West. Virginia is a county seat for Mason County County population of about forty five hundred. The town isn't without its history though. Mark Twain grandparents called quite pleasant home as did kid kid pros who in nineteen forty came up with the design for the cheat and one of the last confederate generals John Closely and made his final Home there and died a Grimm's landing in nineteen twenty seven when you enter downtown point pleasant. You can't miss that twelve foot statue. The moth map the first off man side was by five men digging graves the cemetery and Clendenin West Virginia. Not far from point. Pleasant wasn't the date was November. Sixteenth nineteen sixty six. The next sighting of what was described as a man with giant wings of blood. Red Eyes was reported reported to the sheriff by two couples. Roger and Linda scarberry and Stephen Mary Mallett who said it followed their car that November number. The point pleasant register printed an article titled Couple Seaman Size Bird Creature or something. The national press picked up on the story and spread it across the United States of their sightings flooded into the sheriff's office including from to volunteer firemen with the sightings. Came Trad Pity after nearly a year of reported sightings and point pleasant on December Fifteenth Nineteen Sixty Seven. The silver bridge collapsed killing forty six residents in Russia. A Moscow sighting of the moth man was attributed to the nineteen ninety nine bombing of a large apartment complex. In point pleasant alone there for over two hundred reported sightings was similar descriptions. The moth man was also cited in the United Kingdom Germany France and Ireland. The interesting in fact is that all the sightings have nearly the same description unfortunately the sightings are often related to tragedy and from this emerged. John John Keells book the Moth Man Prophecies followed by the movie in Two Thousand Two starring Richard Gere titled The Mothman Prophecies But like like bigfoot flying saucers aliens the moth man despite many reported sightings from half a dozen countries and upstanding citizens with no ambition ambition for fame or financial gain or dismissed by skeptics while the original side of the Mothman comes from a region known as the Ohio Valley and are often written off as imagination poorer under educated a religiously superstitiously influenced individuals many of the sightings in Chicago. Oh the UK. Germany France Russia in Ireland can't be so easily dismissed.

Virginia United Kingdom Two Thousand Two Mason County County Clendenin West Virginia John John Keells France Mark Twain Germany West Ireland John Closely Richard Gere United States Moscow Russia Ohio Valley Grimm Stephen Mary Mallett
Ken Burns: 'America's Storyteller' on His Creative Process

After The Fact

06:03 min | 9 months ago

Ken Burns: 'America's Storyteller' on His Creative Process

"Ken Burns has been called America's storyteller a title earned over more than four decades and thirty three films including his most recent one on country music. We traveled his barn. That is his office in Rural New Hampshire talk about how he creates art from history. My first film was on the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and when I started fundraising forward in seventy seven. I looked about about twelve years old and people delighted in turning down saying that. This child is trying to sell me the Brooklyn Bridge and when I finally amassed a a can't say a critical mass But some money to film I started filming and I finished most of the principal photography in the summer of nineteen seventy nine and realized allies with all this footage and no money that I needed to get a real job and I had a really nice offer for a job but I felt in my bones in my guts that if I put the footage up on top of the refrigerator on a shelf I'd just wake up. Twenty twenty five years later and having not finished it so I wanted to move to someplace where I could live for nothing and figure out how you made a film about a bridge. How you how you told stories in history how you animated old photographs how you use sound effects and music and I moved here to the house? I'm living in now. I rented it for a couple of years. My oldest daughter was born there and so I had to buy hi it. The best professional decision I ever made was deciding to stay here. Once that film was nominated for an Oscar. Everyone said Oh you come back to New York and I said no I think. Can we stay here. The work I do is so labor intensive it's like academic or medical scientific research takes years and years and years to do it right and and it was more important to put the very difficult still to this day grant money and I'm very grateful for for pews involvement for for decades in the work that we've done put that all on the screen to have zero overhead in essence So that we can tell the funders that look. It's it's on the screen if we're take ten and a half years to do Vietnam or eight and a half years to do country music or the war. The history of the Second World War that we did that that the the felt that their money was going not some costly rent in midtown Manhattan But in a rural area where it's very clearly all all up on the screen. The work clearly energizes you. Are there things outside of work that allow you to have the energy and vitality and creativity the practices that you do yourself that allows you to sort of grows beyond as a filmmaker that also influences you as a filmmaker. Being a father is the most important activity. Yeah I have four daughters. I'm blessed I'm rich and daughters who ranged from the late thirties to a nine year old. They're the greatest teachers. I live in the spectacular. Her place that nature continually Reminds me of my insignificance and so the humility that comes from understanding the ending. How much nature us is actually makes you bigger just as if you if you think that you can say to somebody you know? Don't you know who I am. Doesn't commend you to the smallest and weakest little place and first of all in Walpole New Hampshire any notoriety variety award celebrity plus fifty cents. Gets you a cup of coffee. I do the New York Times Crossword puzzle in INC in physically. I buy the paper everyday we day and I read novels or magazines and watch television mostly for news and sports rabid baseball fan and then mostly I walk and I do that at least once a day. If not twice a day by the end of the day I have about ten miles. What happens in walking is very interesting hosting its meditative? Sometimes it's it's it's social. I can talk to daughters. I can talk to colleagues but mostly it's so lower with my dog and we've just sort of watch things leaves falling from trees SUNSETS and sunrises. That's what Emily Dickinson called the far theatricals of day which I still think is one of the greatest phrases of all times and I am very much addicted to the far theatricals a day. One of the things we want to do is talk just about your creative process. That's how you go about doing what you do. We start with the most basic question. Which is how you pick your topics? You've talked a lot about how you've got a whole range going out for the next next ten twenty years which is amazing. But how do you decide you know the glib answer is that they choose me. I I'm just looking for good stories in American history and that's what I want to say I is that I'm a storyteller. I'm not looking to make a political comment on the present though I know is Mark Twain is supposed to said that history doesn't doesn't repeat itself but it rhymes that is to say I've never finished a project where I haven't lifted my head up at the end of this long usually multiyear process and not seen the way in which the themes the important themes are not only evergreen but are resonating in the present. We do get completely distracted by the idea. That history repeats itself it does not it never has please show me where it has you know. Are we condemned to repeat what we don't remember no. It doesn't seem team that that's the case is knowing history thing. Of course it is so I think we just come to it from the sense that we have an amazing story to tell in our country. I feel that too often. It's it's been sanitized and that the real version which is incredibly diverse. An incredibly complicated is the one we ought to be focusing on and that in no way does does it diminish the positive aspects to give Some of the negative stuff the novelist Richard Power said the best arguments in the world won't change. I'm just single persons mind. The only thing that can do that as a good story so I'm not in the business of changing people's minds but I am in the business of trying to figure out what a good story stories

Brooklyn Bridge Rural New Hampshire Ken Burns New York Times Principal America Walpole New Hampshire Emily Dickinson Oscar New York Vietnam Mark Twain Manhattan Richard Power INC
Former 'Jeopardy!' contestants share their experiences on the show

Slate's The Gist

05:27 min | 10 months ago

Former 'Jeopardy!' contestants share their experiences on the show

"For the last couple of nights on prime time television and extending who knows how long jeopardy has jeopardy. It's a game show answer in the form of question staged the greatest of all time tournament and I think this is a case where the contestants really do live up up to that title. Brad Rutter the all time winningest contestant in jeopardy history Ken Jennings who blazed a trail of glory when they changed the rules to allow people to win for as long as they win and James Holes. How're all face off in an interestingly formatted and much harder version one of your favorite answer and question show joining me? Now are returning champions or a returning champion. Justin Peters who writes for slate he was well. I'll read you the headline of one of my favorite articles. He's ever written. I got a second chance on who wants to be a millionaire. Last year I became one of the biggest losers in gameshow history going back with terrifying. Justin knows gameshows. Hello Justin. It's me and Lizzie leary. Who is the host of of slates? podcast what next. TB An old friend of mine and a jeopardy contestant. Hello Lizzy Hello Mike. I'm jeopardy contestant into jeopardy real jeopardy honest to God civilian jeopardy tell me about your jeopardy nece I was on Washington power player jeopardy in two thousand twelve thing. I don't know if it's still living but it was a thing. It's like celebrity jeopardy but for politics and media people a- Ah so if Washington is like Hollywood for ugly people what's power play jeopardy jeopardy refer. I know you were on it. You're better looking than almost everyone else else. On jeopardy isn't on television aired on television. Yeah Yeah in twenty you play your opponents. I played against Chris. Matthews and Robert Gibbs now Chris Matthews doesn't like anyone else to get a word in edgewise. Did that affect gameplay. I mean I think it affected the banter with Alex and getting and Gibbs. He's a former White House. Press Secretary Presser because he's pretty smart smart smart guy. And how did your go. I want to be clear that going into final jeopardy. I was winning by a lot too. So I'm they're on the the measurements that matter. Yeah I was. I may not have the best bedding strategy. Fine did you get final jeopardy right we we all got it wrong. Oh Oh I had like a slightly more aggressive than Robert who liked bet very little dinky amount that might have been the best bedding strategy because you had to cover all in right and you just have to Eke past you. So in that case actually the person in second place will almost always have the advantage. I had to cover like what if he goes all in and gets to this point. Okay and just for like one real. I don't know horrible footnote. The answer her the question the question was who is Bill Cosby we all whiffed. Oh Wow yeah. What was the question? The you mean the answer. I don't know what this celebrity won an emmy. The Mark Twain Prize and the Spin Garn metal right updated today serving garden given by the end. Tapie we all look like a bunch of really clueless white people which we were well and if you updated for today and is now serving ten to thirty in Philadelphia Correctional Institution almost unfair. And just do you watch jeopardy all the time Yeah as much as I can that I'm a man who has not but yeah a little bit. Yeah you guys excited for this show so exciting. What about it is just such a good idea? I mean jeopardy occupies Very unique place in sort of Pantheon of game shows and it's champions more so than any other game show are sort of known. People know them James Wholesaler throughout the first pitch at Wrigley Field. Glass Year So it is just a cool idea to take the three quantifiably most most successful players in the show's history. Pit Him against each other. Yeah and also they do tournaments of champions at tournaments of all time champions and you could say it's like the rock band who keeps claiming claiming that there never touring again and then does but with Alex tra- back having pancreatic cancer. This is going to come to an end and sadly it's going to come to an end fairly early soon so when they say this is the greatest of all time champion. This is the greatest of all time. It is like they were all wearing purple. Ribbons is that for him. Yeah let's talk a little bit about Alex Trebek's I understand that he. I have critiqued him over the years. I think that especially in the QA in a sections. I mean let's unite. QNA's I mean he's a game show. Host is not an interviewer and he it comes across the he doesn't care with his to go to sentiments. which are good for you and I'm not going? There says that one a lot so yeah I understand like what he does is a skill skill and he's obviously good at it but the fact that he is battled cancer and came back from it. And there's this this whole outpouring of Love I. I think it's deserved. I can't I can't find fault in that jeopardy fans are loving and miss already missing al now not at all. I think it's okay. I'm good with

Justin Peters Alex Trebek Robert Gibbs Pancreatic Cancer Chris Matthews Brad Rutter James Holes Ken Jennings White House Washington Bill Cosby Secretary Presser Lizzy Mark Twain Prize Philadelphia Correctional Inst James Wholesaler Alex Tra Lizzie Leary Wrigley Field
Lying in states: fibbing politicians

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:20 min | 11 months ago

Lying in states: fibbing politicians

"But I as twenty nineteen draws to a close. Our top story takes a step step away from the news to examine a trend that's dominated the year. The world is accustomed to hearing the lies of dictators that North Korean leader Kim Jong is a Demi God that America caused Venezuela's economic mess looking much happened on June fourth nineteen eighty-nine Square in democracies to all additions have always massaged the story even mangled the truth say this. I did not have sexual relations with that woman. But there's something different and about the age we live in today. What's different now is that there's more grazing and open and repeated political lying in democracies. Don Parker is economists editor at large. So the best example of this has this little Miss Leader of the Western. Some world is trump himself from. Keep saying that. We're building the wall building a wall on the border of New Mexico and we're building a wall in Colorado. We're building beautiful wall. He keeps saying that the comedy is never been better. Nobody's ever been president. That has the greatest economy in the history of the country. This is the greatest economy and history of our country. These are the greatest unemployment than trump lies so frequently that there are several websites sites devoted to his misleading information and the one kept by the Washington. Post says he's made thirteen thousand five hundred law knives or fossil misleading statements in the course of his presidency. That's running at about twenty a day. That's enormous number. And trump lies is more brazenly than most. But he's certainly not the only one. Boris Johnson British. Prime Minister has a long record of telling lies. He got fired from a newspaper. Job for making up a quote. He misled the Queen. which is a fairly unusual thing to do so there have been a surprising ising number of politicians who haven't just sorta bent the truth the beach they've told flat out walls? And how easy is it for voters. Do you think to detect when politicians are lying. They walkers or the more subtle kind people find it difficult even in the olden recalls of their lives to distinguish wish. When somebody is lying now there have been tests of this and it seems like we are to use the word of the main tester. GEICO Tim Levine. At the University of Alabama. We're hard wired to believe what people tell us simply in order to make communication possible if everybody were having to justify everything they say. From first principles communication would become almost impossible symbol so we default to believing that what we're told is true so that communication can keep going between people and viewed through through that Lens. It might seem that those who would want to tell untruths or essentially sort of exploiting that hardwired nature. I mean having seen that play out. Why don't we disrespect that. In the politicians nations there is a curiosity about trump and Johnson and others which is put bluntly people tend to support politicians even though their lines. Why is that though. Why wouldn't voters be bothered by dishonesty. In what should be example setting leaders one very important consideration here is fat. Political decision-making isn't dominated by rational Ford. And somebody amazingly enough tested at this out by putting people inside an MRI scanner and looking at which bits of their brain lit up when they were told things supported reported what they believe anyway and things which contradicted what they believed anyway. The one of the brain that never lit up was the part most commonly associated with rational rational thought. So political decision making is intuitive. One's not so worried whether something is true or not related eighteen to this every body has what's called confirmation bias the tendency to seek out the kinds of information that confirms what you think anyway. A Nice example of this from America is the tendency of Democrats and Republicans to consume totally different types of us in the Republicans. Watch Fox News. Democrats read The New York Times and in those those two places. They're basically told what they think anyway. In addition to all that very very interesting perception by a guy at Cornell called Thomas Guillevic if your face with something that challenges your point of view your reaction is must. I believe that. And if you're faced swith something which confirms your point of view you say may I believe that not must I believe. Let me give an example on this one. You don't really believe that climate change is real so you ask. May I believe as it were that. Climate change isn't real. All you need is one self-proclaimed climate scientists say no. No you can continue to believe that climate change change is really happening and you will believe that people aren't looking at the balance of judgment and coming to an impartial troll views. Something not like other jury or the judge. They're much more like the prosecutor and so in this case I think identifying lies. That's it's just not important to the way people make political decisions I mean if these are the biases that are evolutionary baked into humans and the the exigencies of political decision making having always been the way they are and this sort of flexibility. With the truth that's required sometimes in such positions. It makes you wonder how. How did the truth ever have a chance yes. I agree with that. People always complained about politicians distorting the truth telling outright lies but it's made possible. Oh by some more recent developments which I think the most important is fake news. There's much much more fake news around and of course fake news is a product of people's willingness to tell lies but it's a cause of it too. There's just so much fake news that it exaggerates the the confirmation bias that exists anyway and there are some tests published in science magazine last year. which showed that actually fake political basical news spread more quickly than any other kinds of fake news so mark Twain and Winston Churchill accredited with the notion? That lies is run two or three times around the world while the truth is still up. It's boots but that turns out to be always literally true. John Thank you very much for that. Very real news discussion. You know why they won't be insane. Everything I just said is supported it by the psychological testing and rigorous fact Chen. Exactly

Boris Johnson Don Parker Miss Leader Kim Jong Fox News Washington Eighty-Nine Square Geico Donald Trump America Editor Prime Minister University Of Alabama President Trump Post New Mexico Chen
Adina Hoffman: Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

Bookworm

09:37 min | 11 months ago

Adina Hoffman: Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

"I'm Michael Silver Blah this bookworm arm and today I'm very pleased to have as my guest. Adina Hoffman the Dina has written a life of the great almost mind boggling screenwriter Ben. Hecht the book has the Subtitle Fighting Words moving pictures this Ben Hecht had his. Oh would you say finger in so many tries He starts out now having moved with his family to the mid West as soon as he graduates from high school. He realizes this is. The college is not for him and he high tails it to Chicago where he becomes a very well-known newspaper this paper Man Song well known that his adventures in the newspaper business but come perhaps the most is famous play ever to be written about newspapers that he wrote with Charles MacArthur. Yes called the front page. The the front page becomes his girl Friday with cary grant and Rosalind Russell and thereby hangs a tale every the time Ben Hecht turns around. There's a revision of something. He's done a new who've version of it by someone else that he in turn revise right even his own memoirs has multiple versions of what happened to him in his own life life. He's kind of astonishing. This came from the days when face at a writer wrote right. These were people who wrote all the time there's also literary life that Hecht has in Chicago and actually this was one of the fascinating things for me is where his kind of the big city You know newspaper world met the world of the Chicago Renaissance and a lot of the people who were in that newspaper world. People like Carl Sandberg. who was a really good friend of Heck's you know he was also a reporter and they were sort of Newspaperman by day and then by night they were writing their poems in their novels and Hecht was not only hanging around with people like Sherwood Anderson Jason and he was also publishing in the little review which is unbelievable magazine? Push some of the first chapters of James Joyce's ulysses and they felt. What was her name? Margaret Anderson Anderson felt that Ben Heck was every bit as much a member of of the little review says dream straight. And he's there on almost every single issue. He was a kind of a pet of hers. He was sort of in love with her. She was unfortunately Very distracted by high art and she was also a lesbian was not interested in in that way but she loved him and she published him. Ben Has a great fiction writer. I mean he was. He fancied himself self novelist But he was very devoted to that calling but at the same time that he was writing. These very heavy breathing stories for Margaret Anderson. He was also writing he. He was whipping off these commercials stories for Lincoln at the smart set. HMO MINKIN was one of his heroes. Mencken was a cynic cynic and a sophisticated and he had every bit of hostility toward the dumb aspects of American culture. He was trying to make America smart op. He wrote fascinating essays sason books on the American language as opposed to British. We don't get an American writer per se until until Mark Twain who's writing the Mississippi River. Talk that he learned when he was a boatman. Well by the time you've got the middle of the country Chicago you've got gangsters you've got prohibition you've got flappers you've got an American language wood jr that was invented here and Hecht loved. -actly yeah and I think for me. That was one of the wonderful things about spending time with him. I was reading. This book was spending time with his language. I mean whatever you WANNA say about. Whether his books are wonderful books or not so wonderful books he was a wonderful maker of sentences and paragraphs graphs and just terrific wit on top of it and he and Macarthur wrote the front page. which was kind of Valentine to that newspaper World of Chicago? You go where they've both been cub reporters you see. He comes in to the newspaper office. Writing these things. In Extreme Telegraphy Telegraphy as as you quote them right they are made of twenty three delight phrases. He's putting them together hurling them together and eventually he's going to have some fame as the newspaper Komo's rining calms every every day made up of just what he heard some Hobo say right or what some very wealthy people were saying in a casino no to be a writer then will start out as journalists. That's where Hemingway starts. He proposed this idea of. But this daily column that you've mentioned which would become known as a thousand and one afternoons in Chicago and they're kind of remarkable pieces they're just little snippets and there's a sense that the news is not just test the news of the grant headline it's also all these sort of marginal lives and people. You know the guy who runs the laundromat and the woman who works as a manicurist and has to fend off her lecherous clients. There's a way in which he's tossing this stuff off in a very casual way reading them daily. They're published on the back page of the newspaper next to the to the comic strips and he's not taking them too seriously or taking himself too seriously and there's so much better than the fiction into which he was pouring his all of his artistic ambition. That just is not the effective whereas these things that he was doing kind of on the fly as you say they're wonderful and they're incredibly generous and sympathetic. You feel him identifying with all of the city of Chicago In a way they kind of anticipate the work of later colonists people like beat Hamill and Jimmy Breslin. Who would become more famous in a way for doing doing that? who may also by now have been forgotten but act. was doing that early on. I'm talking to Adina Hoffman about. Don't her book Ben. Hecht its subtitle fighting. Words moving pictures and it's published in the Jewish writers series series published by Yale University. Press you mention that a lot of these people have been forgotten even people more recent Jonathan head so why Ben Hair. Well IT'S A. It's the question that I get all the time. And it's a good question and I mean basically at some level I feel like I've known Ben Hecht before before I knew Ben Hecht if you grow up watching American movies. He's his words are in your head even if you've never heard his name and so and I used to watch a lot of old movies as a kid but it was only when I became more conscious conscious and started to read about film history I actually worked as a film critic throughout most of the ninety s Then I was very aware of who Ben Hecht was and I I read his wonderful memoir child trial of the century. And I thought wow you know okay the movies he's known as you know. Pauline Kale called him the greatest American screenwriter Gianluca Dard said he invented eighty percent percent. Of what is used in Hollywood movies today called him a genius and all of that is true but the fact is that for heck the movies were really just a piece of it and in some ways they were actually may be one of the smaller pieces pieces of it in that memoir is full of all these other lives that we've just been talking about so I was first of all fascinated by that multiplicity of his the fact that he could contain multitudes dude but I also was drawn to heck in terms of his relationship to Jewish things. And here's a place where he basically an American Jew who claims not to have really paid much attention to the fact of his Jewishness until his consciousness was sort of raised by the Holocaust there. He's been in Chicago. He knows the woman. Editing the little review he knows call Sandberg. He knows Sherwood Anderson he moves to New York becomes friends with Herman Mankiewicz Herman Mankiewicz and also the roundtable tape Dorothy Parker and Benchley and S J Perelman and the Algonquin New Yorker Gang. He he moves to Los Angeles. He does what's so many do he has nothing but contempt damned for the people who started the motion picture industry. You say that you're interested in Hicks. Judaism with those were hits Jews. He didn't like them. There are a lot of Jews in heck's life he was actually born on the lower east side and he spent the first few years of his life. There and I don't actually think that that's Unimportant I mean. He grew up in Racine Wisconsin. which is this pastoral American American place etc but there is a way in which those tenements were in him in a very deep

Ben Hecht Chicago Writer BEN Margaret Anderson Anderson Adina Hoffman Ben Heck Charles Macarthur Cary Grant Sherwood Anderson Michael Silver Herman Mankiewicz Herman Manki James Joyce Extreme Telegraphy Telegraphy Rosalind Russell Sherwood Anderson Jason Los Angeles Yale University Mississippi River America
"mark twain" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

07:42 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Today. You learn why classic diners are shaped like train cars. Why multitasking is impossible and what you should do to be productive. Instead and how you can use a simple tip for Mark Twain, stop procrastinating, unimportant tasks, let's stop putting it off. Instead of spy some curiosity on the award winning curiosity daily. Have you ever wondered why a lot of classic diners? Look like train cars diners are the best. They are do you. Always order breakfast. No matter. What time it is? I do. Yes. That's the right way to do it. We can go to diner together. Love it. The word diner covers a pretty broad spectrum of dining establishments. These days from your mom and pop joint around the corner to national chains like Denny's but diners have much more humble origins before diners were buildings. They were portable and before they were shaped like train cars they were shaped like horse carts in eighteen seventy two. An entrepreneur named Walter Scott from Providence Rhode Island got an idea he fitted a spare horse cart with the bare essentials. He needed to make food and he rolled it out at dusk. As a night lunch wagon for nightshift workers and theatergoers and anybody else out late at night. He served coffee, pies eggs and sandwiches. And he was so successful that he was able to quit his printing business, of course, other mobile lunch carts started to copy the idea and by the early twentieth century, the market was pretty much ruled by three manufacturers were Chester lunch. Car company tyranny and O'Mahony they kept growing and over time. The new dining cars weren't pulled by horses. They were hooked on the cargo trains when those dining cars arrived at their destination. They would lose their wheels. But keep the late night hours by the nineteen twenties dining car was shortened to diner. And by the thirties, the art deco style popular in train cars started to creep in diners to best when the diner really took off and became a piece of American identity. And here's a fun. Fact, do you know what? Diner capital of the world is New Jersey with more than six hundred diners, although my favorite diner is the double our diner from twin peaks, which by the way, it's called tweeds cafe in north bend Washington. And yes, I've been there. This must be where pies go when they die research says your brain is not wired for multitasking, but we all love saving time. So today, we'll tell you what to do instead of multitasking to spend your time more efficiently. I think I had multitasker as a bullet point on my resume for like ten years. Really? Yeah. Did you remove it after you got the job here? Believe it or not. I haven't updated my resume lately. But next time, I do I may remove it for this reason. Yeah. The thing about multitasking is that you're never actually doing tasks at the same time. You're just switching from one to the other and back again that's switching eats up more time than you probably realize in a two thousand seven study people who are interrupted by an Email or an instant message during a computer task were twenty to twenty five minutes behind by the time they resumed the first task even though the interruption only took ten minutes a third of those people took more than two hours to get back on task. So do the opposite of multitasking. And instead batch your tasks the idea is that you split up your tasks by category things like e mails writing and idea generation, then do all of each type in one chunk of time that chunk can be one four hour session on Mondays or a thirty minute session every morning and evening, whatever the tests calls for market in your calendar, and treat it like an. Appointment now, this works great for things like responding to emails or scheduling tweets, but it doesn't always work with creative tasks like writing and designing a twenty seventeen study out of Columbia business school found that when people regularly switched between tasks they performed better on a test of creative thinking than people who worked on one task the whole time. And even those who switched when they felt like it. So at the end of the day a little bit of both might be best batch those pesky tasks that eat up your time and save you're switching around for the creative stuff like how his reading emails the whole time. You read that I loved that. Very good, Cody. I was listening. I promise on topic. Today's episode is sponsored by purple metrics better sleep better. You remember multitasking is impossible. But try getting anything done when you haven't gotten a good night's sleep. That's really impossible. Yeah. Here curiosity. We are definitely no stranger so the benefits of sleep. And that's why you need to try purple mattress. The purple metrics will probably feel different than anything you've ever experienced because it uses this brand new material that was developed by an actual rocket scientist. It's not like the memory foam. You're probably used to the purple material feels unique because it's both firm and soft at the same time. So it keeps everything supported, but it still feels really comfortable. It's also breathable. So it sleeps cool. It ends up giving you this zero gravity like feel. So it works for any sleeping position with purple mattress. You can get one hundred night risk free trial. And if you're not fully satisfied, you can return your mattress for a full refund. You'll also get free shipping and returns free in-home setup. And. Mattress removal, and it's backed by a ten year warranty. You are gonna love purple and right now curiosity daily listeners will get a free purple pillow with the purchase of a mattress. That's an addition to the great free gifts. They're offering site-wide just text curious to forty seven forty seven forty seven. The only way to get this free pillow is to text curious to forty seven forty seven forty-seven that's C U R S two four seven four seven four seven. Message and data rates may apply. Ready to become more productive. We've got a tip today. The comes from Mark Twain, supposedly we made a video about this on Facebook earlier this year, but it's worth repeating on our podcast, and it's called the frog rule. Do you ever use this? Ashley, I always use this. Actually, I try to always use this when I fail it's obvious and succeed it's like the best day ever. If you don't know what this rule is. Supposedly, Mark Twain once said something along the lines of eat ally. Frog first thing in the morning, and nothing worse will happen to you for the rest of. Of the day. There's actually no definitive evidence. That Mark Twain spoke or wrote the phrase, there's even an alternate version that goes a little like this and this might help make this tip. Make more sense, quote, if it's your job to eat, a frog it's best to do it. First thing in the morning. And if it's your job to eat two, frogs, it's best to eat. The biggest one I on, quote and more practical terms, the frog is your worst least enjoyable task of the day that thing you're dreading. But a lot of the time. It's also the most important thing for you to do that day. At least a couple authors have written about the benefits of doing this self-development, author and public speaker, Brian Tracy wrote that quote successful effective people are those who launched a wreck into their major tasks and then discipline themselves to work steadily and single-mindedly until those tasks are complete unquote and retired US navy Admiral William mcraven says that he makes his bed every morning. So that he has a sense of accomplishment, the sort of his day not to mention some pride in sticking to a good habit of self-discipline tried at work this week and see how it affects. The rest of your work day that is where I find it is really really helpful definitely sending those dreaded emails making that phone call. You just don't want to deal with get out of the way before noon and the rest of your day will just go so smoothly. Totally

Mark Twain Cody gov Hamer New Jersey Columbia business school Admiral William mcraven Brian Tracy Denny Westwood One Providence Rhode Island US Walter Scott Facebook scientist north bend Washington Ashley twenty five minutes one four hour thirty minute
"mark twain" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

07:42 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Today. You learn why classic diners are shaped like train cars. Why multitasking is impossible and what you should do to be productive. Instead and how you can use a simple tip for Mark Twain, stop procrastinating, unimportant tasks, let's stop putting it off. Instead of spy some curiosity on the award winning curiosity daily. Have you ever wondered why a lot of classic diners? Look like train cars diners are the best. They are do you. Always order breakfast. No matter. What time it is? I do. Yes. That's the right way to do it. We can go to diner together. Love it. The word diner covers a pretty broad spectrum of dining establishments. These days from your mom and pop joint around the corner to national chains like Denny's but diners have much more humble origins before diners were buildings. They were portable and before they were shaped like train cars they were shaped like horse carts in eighteen seventy two. An entrepreneur named Walter Scott from Providence Rhode Island got an idea he fitted a spare horse cart with the bare essentials. He needed to make food and he rolled it out at dusk. As a night lunch wagon for nightshift workers and theatergoers and anybody else out late at night. He served coffee, pies eggs and sandwiches. And he was so successful that he was able to quit his printing business, of course, other mobile lunch carts started to copy the idea and by the early twentieth century, the market was pretty much ruled by three manufacturers were Chester lunch. Car company tyranny and O'Mahony they kept growing and over time. The new dining cars weren't pulled by horses. They were hooked on the cargo trains when those dining cars arrived at their destination. They would lose their wheels. But keep the late night hours by the nineteen twenties dining car was shortened to diner. And by the thirties, the art deco style popular in train cars started to creep in diners to best when the diner really took off and became a piece of American identity. And here's a fun. Fact, do you know what? Diner capital of the world is New Jersey with more than six hundred diners, although my favorite diner is the double our diner from twin peaks, which by the way, it's called tweeds cafe in north bend Washington. And yes, I've been there. This must be where pies go when they die research says your brain is not wired for multitasking, but we all love saving time. So today, we'll tell you what to do instead of multitasking to spend your time more efficiently. I think I had multitasker as a bullet point on my resume for like ten years. Really? Yeah. Did you remove it after you got the job here? Believe it or not. I haven't updated my resume lately. But next time, I do I may remove it for this reason. Yeah. The thing about multitasking is that you're never actually doing tasks at the same time. You're just switching from one to the other and back again that's switching eats up more time than you probably realize in a two thousand seven study people who are interrupted by an Email or an instant message during a computer task were twenty to twenty five minutes behind by the time they resumed the first task even though the interruption only took ten minutes a third of those people took more than two hours to get back on task. So do the opposite of multitasking. And instead batch your tasks the idea is that you split up your tasks by category things like e mails writing and idea generation, then do all of each type in one chunk of time that chunk can be one four hour session on Mondays or a thirty minute session every morning and evening, whatever the tests calls for market in your calendar, and treat it like an. Appointment now, this works great for things like responding to emails or scheduling tweets, but it doesn't always work with creative tasks like writing and designing a twenty seventeen study out of Columbia business school found that when people regularly switched between tasks they performed better on a test of creative thinking than people who worked on one task the whole time. And even those who switched when they felt like it. So at the end of the day a little bit of both might be best batch those pesky tasks that eat up your time and save you're switching around for the creative stuff like how his reading emails the whole time. You read that I loved that. Very good, Cody. I was listening. I promise on topic. Today's episode is sponsored by purple metrics better sleep better. You remember multitasking is impossible. But try getting anything done when you haven't gotten a good night's sleep. That's really impossible. Yeah. Here curiosity. We are definitely no stranger so the benefits of sleep. And that's why you need to try purple mattress. The purple metrics will probably feel different than anything you've ever experienced because it uses this brand new material that was developed by an actual rocket scientist. It's not like the memory foam. You're probably used to the purple material feels unique because it's both firm and soft at the same time. So it keeps everything supported, but it still feels really comfortable. It's also breathable. So it sleeps cool. It ends up giving you this zero gravity like feel. So it works for any sleeping position with purple mattress. You can get one hundred night risk free trial. And if you're not fully satisfied, you can return your mattress for a full refund. You'll also get free shipping and returns free in-home setup. And. Mattress removal, and it's backed by a ten year warranty. You are gonna love purple and right now curiosity daily listeners will get a free purple pillow with the purchase of a mattress. That's an addition to the great free gifts. They're offering site-wide just text curious to forty seven forty seven forty seven. The only way to get this free pillow is to text curious to forty seven forty seven forty-seven that's C U R S two four seven four seven four seven. Message and data rates may apply. Ready to become more productive. We've got a tip today. The comes from Mark Twain, supposedly we made a video about this on Facebook earlier this year, but it's worth repeating on our podcast, and it's called the frog rule. Do you ever use this? Ashley, I always use this. Actually, I try to always use this when I fail it's obvious and succeed it's like the best day ever. If you don't know what this rule is. Supposedly, Mark Twain once said something along the lines of eat ally. Frog first thing in the morning, and nothing worse will happen to you for the rest of. Of the day. There's actually no definitive evidence. That Mark Twain spoke or wrote the phrase, there's even an alternate version that goes a little like this and this might help make this tip. Make more sense, quote, if it's your job to eat, a frog it's best to do it. First thing in the morning. And if it's your job to eat two, frogs, it's best to eat. The biggest one I on, quote and more practical terms, the frog is your worst least enjoyable task of the day that thing you're dreading. But a lot of the time. It's also the most important thing for you to do that day. At least a couple authors have written about the benefits of doing this self-development, author and public speaker, Brian Tracy wrote that quote successful effective people are those who launched a wreck into their major tasks and then discipline themselves to work steadily and single-mindedly until those tasks are complete unquote and retired US navy Admiral William mcraven says that he makes his bed every morning. So that he has a sense of accomplishment, the sort of his day not to mention some pride in sticking to a good habit of self-discipline tried at work this week and see how it affects. The rest of your work day that is where I find it is really really helpful definitely sending those dreaded emails making that phone call. You just don't want to deal with get out of the way before noon and the rest of your day will just go so smoothly.

Mark Twain Cody gov Hamer New Jersey Columbia business school Admiral William mcraven Brian Tracy Denny Westwood One Providence Rhode Island US Walter Scott Facebook scientist north bend Washington Ashley twenty five minutes one four hour thirty minute
"mark twain" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"So let me ask you a question that you've probably Kirkby before that question is. Do you know the definition of what insanity is wow? According to Albert Einstein. It's doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results from the moment, you started investing probably fresh out of high school or college it became very apparent to you that the market goes up in the market goes down you've seen it over and over again that every few years, the market crashes, and sometimes it crashes hard for for most of your life. He didn't really care. In fact, if you're like me, I wanted the market to crash back when I was in those younger years, and and why because it was a buying opportunity. Besides I knew the market would recover, and I was young enough that how wasn't gonna use the money anytime soon, but you know, things are different now the closer I get to retirement the less cavalier. I get towards my retirement money, the more I realize that a very little or no. Oh time to recover from major market corrections. And remember Mark Twain once said, I'm not so interested in the return on my money as the return of my money, you know, the quotas true today as it was when he said it corruption uncertainty ups and downs in the market has really not gone away. So are you interested more in the return of your money?.

Albert Einstein Mark Twain Kirkby
"mark twain" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"And go it became like after like the two thousand to two came after nine eleven it was literally doing this mark twain award in washington elect i think almost a month after nine eleven and people were kind of going sees it was just like lifting siege went oh jeez it is good to get back out and do this shit oh yeah i mean i saw you it's new york a couple of times going on and it's very small place or at the comedy cellar and like i mean you you know i mean your desire to connect and your your your style like like you were saying before there's this weird thrill where the people they see you get the team this off often then you're gonna find and then yeah you gotta get in it and we were talking about that before at the comedy sewer that the honesty where you're at your point in your life now where you're at the age now and you having the experiences you're at now i it takes some balls to really deal with that stuff to do i'm not to the point where parka talk about it and so fucking deep but that's your inspiration yeah minds bhushan the people doing i mean you talk about nothing chris rock kristen the most amendment said you know it's weird all of a sudden if you get a sexual you know if you gene on why everything is a felony i agree but then should be like if you get a blowjob in georgia from stewart that should just be a misdemeanor a best friend that's a felony and you go like this team for your wife but not yet right but it's at bones about what can you talk about isn't it funny the balls is not it's not relative to to transgressing any cultural taboos but it's i don't know she'll take that shit goes into the real they really are come home to that oh yeah even even been dating them two months ago will come cheese and then you can't pull that thing it's like it's my act it's not your act with you when that happened that was me when you look like you're going down on a girl that's too looked like coffee and it's like you know that's the scariest part but it's also people when you do jokes about famous people or anybody and then you went into what fan we're never forgave me for something series kinda i mean i did this joke right used as a descriptive you know like i mocked adam sandler fans and then i run into him at the improv one night and he's here you're talking about me i did on television you gotta get over what's your problem and i'm like dude your cultural icon at some point we can't immunity i'm in no position like it's not like i have any cash i'm still able to make those kinds of states the liability for me is what you're not in the group you know you glued it and they're also that you'll never get in now you fuck do you want it no no coach amongst of do you want to be a member of a club that would have you as a member no fucking frightening thing i mean one time of doing this thing it was benign impression of stallone you know as being monosylabic billy billy crystal even when he's here hi and then you gotta go then you gotta deal with how did he deal with it he was funny he's not saying what bob cat said that during the vietnam war teaching jim this with school bills that he was a little about fitness that and he said you actually attack their character yeah if.

mark twain washington two months
"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Persona two weeks before he was born in eighteen thirty five halley's comet which is visible from earth every seventy four to seventy nine years arked across the sky in its closest approach it would make until nineteen ten in one thousand nine hundred nine twain said quote i came in with halley's comet in eighteen thirty five it is coming again next year and i expect to go out with it it will be the greatest disappointment of my life if i don't go out with halley's comet the almighty has said no doubt now here are these two unaccountable freaks they came in together they must go out together and quote and he was right twain died of a heart attack on april twenty first nineteen ten the day after the comment was seen closest to the sun he was buried in the langdon family plot in l myra with the rest of his family clara commissioned a monument for the family plot that was twelve feet or two fathoms tall and eternal mark twain to greet mourners in admirers assuring all those who seek adventure that safe passage lies this way don't forget to check out the great women of business podcast each episode tells a different woman story and teaches the business principles they use to find success the twelve episode series has already debuted so you can hear episodes on coco chanel julia child and martha stewart right now listen to great women of business wherever you listen to podcasts.

halley l myra clara mark twain langdon martha stewart seventy nine years twelve feet two fathoms two weeks
"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Quote i've been looking in jean and envying her i have never greatly envied anyone but the dead i always envy the dead end quote it's published statements like these that cast perhaps too dark appall on the last years of twain's life most of the time when people learn about mark twain they're taught that his last years were spent brooding alone and lonely that he drank too much and regretted outliving so many of his friends and family his last years we're grooved with huge personal tragedies and periods of depression but he also remained social and traveled genuinely engaging with friends and fans until more or less the day of his death he even started a club and this is going to sound suspect for girls between the ages of ten and sixteen called the angel fish and aquarium club the girls were his angel fish and he corresponded with them had them over to his house and took them to cultural events and right that does sound a bit odd i know but there were never any accusations of impropriety or abusive behavior according to twain he viewed them as the grandchildren he never had so why girls and not boys maybe he was reliving his daughters childhoods maybe he enjoyed that they were more freely affectionate with him that he could be flirtatious and tease them but since they were prepubescent his actions didn't have the same lecherous undertones honestly it's impossible to say now player eventually put a stop to the club calling it in proper the point is for someone who is traditionally given out to be a bitter old codger at this time in his life he was also warm optimistic and playful history almost as a rule flattens the textures of a life as dynamic as twain's research and retelling are more often acts of omission than revelation his biographer pain wrote that his appeal as a writer and public figure was that he was limitless lee human an apt encapsulation of his perfectly imperfect.

mark twain writer jean
"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Wearing not only black but also a veil over her face emerging from his own slow grieving process her father in nineteen oh six suddenly dramatically began appearing in public only wearing white head to toe white jacket white shirt white pants white shoes and if you have an image of mark twain in your mind he's probably wearing all white right it's known as the author's signature look but most people don't know that he only adopted it in the last years of his life and when he debuted the look it caused without exaggeration a nationwide sensation it's easy to think what's the big deal about a guy wearing an all white suit today but it was considered a borderline unhinged move when he appeared in the get up for the first time at a senate hearing about copyrights in december the december part is the key white or light colored suits for men weren't unheard of in the summer months in twain war and saw them all the time in bermuda which he insisted on pronouncing bermuda a vacation spot he frequented but to wear one to a formal event in the dead of winter was in those days like coming to a party in a wedding gown or going to a funeral in a bathing suit the media went wild for it newspapers ran headlines about twain's resplendent and remarkable outfit in defiance of winter twain enjoyed this attention immensely he was never shy about being front and center and his new habit seemed to provide an endless spotlight when questioned about his sartorial choice and everybody questioned him he explained by saying that he simply found light colored clothing a much happier and more pleasing fashion choice because he couldn't force the rest of the world to dress a certain way he would now do it himself it seems that two things were happening simul take.

mark twain bermuda senate
"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Only film of the author twain even dipped his toe into inventing things creating a successful self adhesive scrapbook a scrap booker himself he was tired of dealing with glue as you grew more and more prominent he began endorsing products everything from sewing machines to cigars he became the most famous man in america read in every corner of the nation and one of the country's first real celebrities putting the name mark twain on just about anything guaranteed that people would buy it it may seem like we're suddenly zooming through large swaths of time but knowing where to stop detailing mark twain's life which was meticulously recorded is difficult to judge he travelled widely especially for the time period and so many of his experiences he chronicled himself in letters lectures and essays or mixed with invented tales and characters in his books and short stories his biographers have written many thousands of pages about the man starting just a few years after his death and continuing up to today twain never lost for words even wrote his own autobiography that fills several sprawling volumes and remember he was super famous and he relished his fame perhaps seeing it as a marker of how far he had risen in status by his own efforts so he wasn't shy about the spotlight or staying in the public eye the press followed him around incessantly sought his comment which he was happy to give even on trivial matters and fastidiously reported his comings and goings right twain was and is an extremely well documented person and it's nearly impossible to create a full picture of them even if this podcast where five hours long that's why we just have to say it the best way to get to know the life and mind of mark twain warts and all.

booker mark twain america five hours
"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

"When they arrived in buffalo and piled into sleighs to be driven to what twain thought was a boarding house the couple arrived last only to have the doors of the most beautiful house on the street flung open by their friends and family light streaming from within decorations adorning the walls twain was dazed and utterly next and could not understand the turn of events until livvy took his arm and explained that it was all there's a gift it was a fortuitous beginning in a letter to her sister susan crane livy wrote quote our days seemed to be made up of only bright sunlight with no shadows in them and quote but that sunshine wouldn't last mark twain and his new wife livy we're married in february of eighteen seventy but the new families happiness was quickly checked by livy father's failing health for march of eighteen seventy until august his health wavered and he finally passed as a comfort of friend of levi's came to buffalo to stay with them but she fell sick with typhoid and also died it was only a few months later that livy gave birth to the couple's first child langdon but he was premature in sickly following his birth livy had a month long recovery from childbirth and then caught typhoid their unhappiness now associated with buffalo shorten their time there besides twain's enthusiasm for journalism began to wane in eighteen seventy one at age thirty five he sold his house and his stake in the buffalo express and relocate.

livvy susan crane livy mark twain levi typhoid langdon
"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

"And police brutality he witnessed once more as writing got him into trouble and he was forced again to flee west for safety except continuing west meant waiting straight into the pacific so that's exactly what he did in march of eighteen sixty six aboard the ship ajax he journeyed to the sandwich islands but we would now call hawaii and traveled around for four months while writing letters for publication in the sacramento union newspaper under the name of mark twain he explored who maui and the big island of hawaii on horseback he even met king ca mayhem may have the fifth and witnessed lava flowing from an active volcano how many americans could say that only a few thousand foreigners had ever said foot on hawaii at that point in history returning to california twain turned his letters and other observations into only half serious talk called the sandwich islands lecture the tickets and posters he used advertise the lecture promoted ludicrous things like fireworks and circus animals his tagline doors open at seven the trouble begins at eight later in his life twain would happily admit to making things up or not actually remembering which of his memories were real or fake so while the sandwich island lectures were certainly based on his real experiences in hawaii it would be hard for the audience to know just what exactly was real which made them that much more exciting his lectures in san francisco filled a fifteen hundred seat theater and he left audiences roaring with laughter reading this humorous transcript now a modern audience would notice that pervasive ethnic insensitivity and cultural fetishism.

mark twain hawaii sandwich island san francisco sacramento union california four months
"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Yeah there was grumbler rambler josh and john smokes sergeant fathom thomas jefferson snodgrass quintas courteous snodgrass and are you ready w opinion anonymous addressed perkins and w a pen menendez addresses blab hard to say what he was really going for here or why he finally decided on what he did but thank goodness he picked mark twain definitely mark twain made his debut on february third eighteen sixty three in a humorous letter to the paper kim planning about a party that purportedly kept him awake for two days mark twain was born now it's time for a quick break as host of historical figures are love of learning didn't stop when we finish school that's why we love the great courses plus and want you to check it out to the great courses plus is unlimited access to learn about anything that interests you from the world's leading professors and experts there are thousands of lectures to stream in virtually any category they're even ones for hobbies like cooking and photography and you can watch and listen from anywhere i listen to their brand new course the aids of benjamin franklin i was shocked to learn that he was a high flying ladies man i didn't realize that benjamin franklin had any musical talents let alone that he invented his own version of the glass are monica start your free month you'll love it sign up at the great courses plus dot com slash figures that's the great courses plus dot com slash figures and here's something else.

john thomas jefferson snodgrass perkins menendez benjamin franklin two days
"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Somewhat moot to paraphrase one of his biographers he was an abolitionist but there was nothing left to abolish during the war while sam was further west his confederate and cessessionist leanings did give way to union sympathies but you'll still find lots of problematic ideas and terminology and his works let's keep going and talk about what he did do in eighteen sixty one when he ran out on that confederate volunteer militia at age twenty five he went west into the nevada territory to meet up with his brother orion in virginia city orion had worked on abraham lincoln's eighteen sixty presidential campaign he was given a stake in the territory as payment and he became the secretary to nevada's governor in eighteen sixty one virginia city was a rough wild town full of drifters griffey's and all manner of people looking to make a fast dollar as well as folks who were just down on their luck even more so than the small towns in missouri where san grew up for genius city was one of the true edges of western civilization he made himself at home there and was a heavy drinker and cigar smoker for the rest of his life sam always looking for excitement intended to be a silver miner in the nevada territory which was then in a silver rush but he was reportedly lousy at it he just sat around telling stories to the other miners he later recounted stories from his time in the nevada mining camps in his book roughing it at age twenty seven after utterly failing at mining sam was hired on to be a reporter and editor for the virginia city newspaper called the territorial enterprise in july eighteen sixty two when he realized that everything he was interested in writing couldn't be reported strictly speaking he started experimenting in fiction and in mixing fiction with reality while most people were writing news sam was writing exaggerated accounts and stories usually humorous and sometimes satirical it was during these years in the nevada territory that sam clemens began adopting pen names when he wrote let's write names plural it didn't just come up with mark twain right away i wish he had some of his other pen names were truly atrocious.

sam abraham lincoln missouri reporter editor mark twain nevada virginia griffey
"mark twain" Discussed on Sooo Many White Guys

Sooo Many White Guys

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Sooo Many White Guys

"So i just want to just hsun bunch together analyze why this is peak comedy she deserves like mark twain price for comedy commercial guess whatever your julie i'm so glad that you can speak italian so fat i soon so backwards yet god loved i know people fucking read her to fill for that i loved it listen guys obviously i feel for instance with the met gal this year so many people just play to safe and i feel like i missed the like the selene dion who wear the backward sued or that you know bjork with the fucking swan dress maybe you should be that person i want to be what's your thing going to be i hope that that you wear like a tiny top hat no i just wanna do like big big very obviously black woman hairstyles i may think just like in your face i won't be at the oscars wearing a hair wrap that's like so tall the steven spielberg is like what is this do i need three d goggles for this what's happening in the shape of anything i think it'd be in the shape of an oscar so obvious what if it's just like in the shape of the spaceship from close encounters it's like so y.

selene dion oscars steven spielberg mark twain
"mark twain" Discussed on Motley Fool Answers

Motley Fool Answers

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Motley Fool Answers

"Here's the story of the brilliant man and everything he does in the way of business success is a clamming millions of dollars or squandered and lost and yet he never loses his sense of of of possibility to possible not the love mark twain samuel clemens it's impossible to live with this man and go through these adventures with him and not feel enormous amount of sympathy but to enjoy his his personality throughout that's why that's why when i got done writing it i was i was a little sad because i missed him it turns out that mark twain was actually born at a good time to be wealthy because you cite research about how of the seventy five richest people ever born thirteen were americans born around that time at carnegie and morgan around eighteen thirty five yes that's true and mark twain certainly made it an astute business decision to be born when he did it is true that this was a period of tremendous economic expansion in the united states so that great fortunes were made that's undeniable the industrial revolution was beginning to pick up great fortunes we're going to be made in steel and railroads and coal and all of that industrialization was beginning to really take root so he's born eighteen thirty five and florida missouri right and he comes by his financial mismanagement honestly his father was not very good with money now he came by it honestly and not by fraud.

mark twain united states fraud morgan florida missouri
"mark twain" Discussed on Motley Fool Answers

Motley Fool Answers

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on Motley Fool Answers

"This episode of multiple answers is brought to you by casper asleep brand that continues to revolutionize it's line of products to create an exceptionally comfortable sleep experience one night at a time get fifty dollars off select mattresses by visiting casper dot com slash full and use promo code fool at checkout also thanks to harry's harry's is so confident you're going to love their blades they'll give you their trial shave set for free when you sign up harry's dot com slash fool just pay for shipping this is multiple answers i'm alison southwick and i'm joined as always by rubber can't personal finance expert here at the motley fool hebrew who hello else else in this week's episode we've enlisted the help of author alan pell crawford he's written a book about mark twain and all the money mistakes he made we're also going to talk about the downfall of theranos and it's two nations deceptive founder all that and more on this week's episode of molly pouliot so what's up alison's yeah that's right it's let's up alison what's up throw this week we switched it up on you guys so what's up with me is that i've been thinking about how glad i am that we no longer live in a world of medical quackery where someone can claim a technological breakthrough and then investors think a ton of money into that but then it turns out the inventor was lying the whole time i mean just outright lying that doesn't happen anymore yes so recently the sec is charged there no ceo and founder elizabeth homes and her coo with perpetrating an elaborate fraud to deceive investors into believing that their portable blood analyzer could conduct comprehensive blood tests from a single drop of blood normally these kinds of tests require vile after vile and they have to be sent out and they come back it's very labor and time intensive so this said oh we've got a solution it's our edison which they actually later named the mini lab.

harry alison southwick mark twain founder molly pouliot sec ceo elizabeth homes coo fraud casper alan pell fifty dollars
"mark twain" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"mark twain" Discussed on The Young Turks

"That is approximately twenty yards higher than it is today so almost all of our coastal cities would be gone now it doesn't happen overnight but as we've seen this year and the legendary mark twain quote change happens really gradually and then all of us up so this year we begin to see all of a sudden as we hit got hit by hurricane after hurricane drought after drought fire after fire and now carbon levels higher than they have been three million years which led to gigantic uh water levels earlier and it is now increasing as they explain a hundred times faster than it was at the end of the last ice age because it is not natural it is man made and we are intensifying all the problems just when you thought that was bad enough that i got a report about methane separate report the wmo 's report also points to a mysterious rise and the level of methane in the atmosphere which were also higher than the 10year average this pause here this is from engage that earlier story was from the guardian so we know that methane is going to get released when the ice sheets melt because there's a lot of methane trapped they're a methane is actually worse than carbon so for greenhouse purposes so wasn't nothing gets released there's no way of bringing back into the ice but things are worse than the scientists the magid an and i told you this so many times scientists are by their nature conservative.

hurricane mark twain three million years twenty yards 10year