8 Burst results for "Mark Suzman"

"mark suzman" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

12:13 min | 2 months ago

"mark suzman" Discussed on The Strategerist

"We don't add resources that we put money into. We help. Set it up but now we're able to crowd and how the resources that hopefully will lead too much off treatments and we're always looking for. Is there something we can do that? They're going to help leverage or support. Be Good for other players because the loan will not be offense. You say we really appreciate spending time talking about the krona virus. Another thing that the Bush institute is passionate about though is leadership and so I wanNA spend a minute talking about you personally. We've had a chance to talk to people at some really big jobs on this show and your this has got to be one of the biggest. Do you wake up in the morning and really feel the weight of the world on your shoulders. You haven't been CEO very long understand. You're on the forefront are trying to find a cure for disease that's that's killing people. How do you deal with that personally every day? It's a combination at one level. Yes I mean. I wake up and Mike what actually. It's always looking new. Because we are a global organization so overnight my email inbox filled up with you know lots of updates from India and Africa and other things are people woken up way earlier than us on the west coast of the US and it does feel like. I think there'd be no response to be but it also thanked me. It's it's You know energizing because it does feel that at a time of crisis global crisis the tools and expertise that we've developed over the last twenty years actually has deep relevance for the current moment and the that is kind of It it sort of helps give energy the mental. I think it inspires oust off And it has interests in a feeling of responsibility and accountability after twelve. How do you make choices you make? How do we make sure we all make the saw as possible choices because they're very impactful not but that feeling of of relevance in an ability to contribute actually very motivating as well on your also? Seo You're you're not just making these decisions be also have to keep a large staff motivated at. That's now working remotely. I'm assuming and they have their feeling similar. Wait what's your leadership approach to keep everybody moving forward and feeling strong as sprint. For what feels like a very long time. Yeah so I think all leads struggling with that. I mean there's there's no Model no one had a script in their back pocket for what to do when every employee around the world has to work from home in fact this week we had our annual employee meeting. This is the one time of year normally. We actually bring everybody. We have offices in India China across several African countries in Europe We have a big Washington DC office. We have stop while over the US and this is the one time of year we normally bring them all together to hear from me and bill. Linda are normally Warren Buffett. So we obviously weren't able to do that this week. And so we had to outsource never remote annual employee meeting where I was speaking for my basement but wanted to do was Give people a sense than an inside sales for what the foundation's doing we look back at history. It's Actually Twentieth Anniversary Foundation. We had a couple of interviews with key players globally. Working on the issue we had interviews with key staff members just short ones onto elements because to help people feel connected so they could see. They're all part of a bigger organization whether you're working in finance or hr it facilities or on completely different aspects of work that don't have as a major impact code. You're here's how you're part of Nations lathering up this his why the rest of our work automates important. You mentioned that. Uk Shen but obviously US education team is working overtime. Because we're deeply worried that the current situation with everyone home from school is actually going to widen the rise in the US seriously. And so can we leave in and be smarter about online learning tools and other things which are things we've been working on for a long time so tried to just throw those connections making people feel part of the wider foundation visibility into everything we do and their own connection. And then try to motivate them back to whatever their day job is. They still need to do his wife's critically important. You mentioned education. That's actually one of the things I wanted to talk about next. You mentioned that it could widen the gap and we already see that the most vulnerable populations in the US enrolled wider often. The ones that struggle to get education which perpetuates the cycle. What work are you doing now to try and that from happening even further as this is happening one thing we always do is in Beta so we are? We have launched the number initiatives just to try and track. What's going on and certainly some of the early age I've seen example on completion. Math courses or exceeds some quite dramatic declines when you break down by school district and other related things you see that disproportionately happening in poor school districts. And that's some not as a cry because these are often family they they might not have access to Wi fi on computers. The faculty at these schools or community colleges don't have the same ability to move rapidly into online courses. These things family situation may be less. I will do that so what we've been trying to do. Because it's a little bit wild west Euros. Maybe not quite the right to him. But there's so many different after you go on Google home schooling or something you're GonNa get dozens of thousands of different kinds of tools without any triaging about what's really most effective. What works what's Sort of useful depending on whatever your skill sets are so. We've been doing a number of initiatives with other partners to try and come together and how identify here is sort of almost a validating thing for the the best tools under the current circumstances. The best courses best frameworks and then we're also looking at specific and as you know we have a new a scholarship program the gates Millennium Scholars That we routed we've been trying to address the needs of those individual students as well We've been looking at financial aid issues. FOR SECONDARY. I in in College. Christopher expecting to see a big spike and inability to pay for college and we have an initiative. We've been supporting which will come with conclusions in a couple of months ago to value commission which has been trying to look at them of Value Alba Post secondary education and those financial connection. So it's it's challenging definitely and especially now. We're seeing some big colleges already. Declaring may won't open for classes in the fall. We're not sure what the longer term knock on. Impact is going to be. But they're starting with A. It cannot be good news. Real risk is it will widen gap significantly and we really need to get to try and minimize staff just touched the surface of the things that the gates foundation is working on. Obviously you clearly are very well versed in all of them. You've been at the Gates Foundation for very long time. Was there anything in particular in your in your time up to this point that really made you realize boy. I'm ready for this challenge. I'm prepared now. I'm not sure you ever feel completely prepared. A you need a bit of an edge every just challenges you and make show you. You're not complacent In fact Warren. Buffett's Mike say in and when I mentioned showed the taking on role he. He warned me about his. Abc's which are As ABC's big organizations like ASA arrogance bureaucracy complacency. And I always think about those. Those are things that are very easy to become accidentally susceptible to. I don't think there was a particular moment per se where I just just as I had growing roles as I went through. The foundation is steadily increasing Roles and responsibilities that that allowed me to have some insights and work across a growing of how work initially globally and then domestically I had two roles previously one as chief strategy officer and the second is as president of Global Ocean Advocacy Division. And the two together. I think when we have these annual strategy interviews with bill and Melinda where we basically go over each of the WHO has HIV AIDS whether it's K. Twelve education whether it's agricultural developments in country. And we go over the strategies and we look at their weaknesses and strengths and we look at what their metrics one of their goals. The and that's when we assess their budgets and I think probably lost yet strategy of and went through all of them. You realize that yeah. I have a very good sense of the overall strengths and weaknesses of the foundation. I have a good sense of back to your co question where I think our comparative advantages are where we should set them. That's not the same as knowing you can do job as I say I wake up every day making sure that you know. I don't guess who that would have a tricky straightens out again spot Warren's ABC's You need to keep an open mind and always be aware of what you're doing wrong but I think having that whole sense understanding of the range of work and walk the real strengths of philanthropy. Cano should be be those other. Autonomous is What really helps me the job. We don't want to take up too much of your time but we do want to ask you one last question that we asked a lot of our guests before they go home. And what are we not talking enough about as a nation that we should be talking about. I think you have a little bit of a unique perspective here in that maybe some folks out there have noticed that you don't have a Texas accent like some of us here in Dallas do you. You're from South Africa right. Y- yeah given this global perspective. What should we be talking about more? That we're not talking enough about why Two things I will both of which we're starting to talk about is that one is really about that sense of human southern Harrogate that that my hope even with all the challenges in this current moment is the gates foundation. Believe strongly in its Compton. I'll building that. Every person deserves the chance to a healthy and productive life back out mission and vision and that means every person in the United States and across the world and they're having a proper discussion about what the kind of society we wanted to build as a nation in the US but as part of a global family where the US is still. You know the most important global leader. I worry a little bit that we've become so inward-looking in the discussions that you lose sight at that big picture so that would be what the seconds Which is a learning curve. I've gone on my self. My time with the foundation is new understanding and respecting the importance of science and Research and development and back and how important it is at the moment. The world is massive relying on that. I think that's an area again that we be generous under-funding relative to what he needed is being highlighted. And I think that's a really just discussion for people to have whether it's you know putting signs and our own Thoughts might now families in our education but also what we do as a country in terms of funding and supporting and you try to keep maintain and build on the amazing track record the US has on that regard yet..

United States gates foundation Warren Buffett Abc Bush institute Mike Research and development CEO Anniversary Foundation Harrogate Google Africa gates Millennium Scholars Europe Washington Uk India Compton India China Wi
"mark suzman" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

14:53 min | 2 months ago

"mark suzman" Discussed on The Strategerist

"Bill and Melinda Gates are known as the impatient optimists Mark Suzman CEO The bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is leading the organization as it goes all in on helping find ways to fight the corona virus. And he's more than optimistic about the progress. We're pretty confident that they will be successful vaccine. And it's going to be the fastest vaccine ever successfully developed human history. Mark Explains The science. That is making him so optimistic. While reminding us that the work done in global health for years prior to this help prepare for this moment he also tells us how it feels to be leading an organization with so much riding on his shoulders alongside the catalyst a journal of ideas from the Bush Institute. We continue looking at America at its best. I'm Andrew Kaufman. And this is the strategic has presented by the George W Bush Presidential Center. We.

Mark Suzman George W Bush Presidential Cen Melinda Gates Foundation Melinda Gates Bill Andrew Kaufman CEO America
Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

The Strategerist

06:10 min | 2 months ago

Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

"We have a really exciting opportunity today to talk to someone. That's helping lead the charge against the crow virus. Mark Suzman is CEO of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation who are putting a ton of resources behind looking for solutions right now and we're really grateful to have a few minutes of your time mark. Thank you for doing this. Great detroi- well. The Gates Foundation has a publication called the optimist which we think is exactly the kind of attitude that we need right now and we'll have time to talk about specifics of the virus in treatments soon but I in general terms at a high level. What's keeping optimistic right now? Well we do have publication called the optimistic with inter-regional you're listening to subscribe. It's a great publication that sort of sends out an US on a pretty regular basis actually comes from Bill and Melinda Gates who are like to call themselves impatient optimists we we decided not to call the publication. The impatient optimists and at times like this. It's sometimes challenging to to feel optimistic but on the real plus side one. We're seeing are really unprecedented progress in of the search for a vaccine that still going to be a wild but we're a pretty confident that they will be a successful vaccine you know unlike say with HIV where we struggle to find one up to more than thirty years. And it's going to be the foster. Sfaxien ever successfully developed in human history there already number of candidates in trials but we have a lot of scientists who look at that and feel pretty confidence and the challenge is going to be really about getting them through as quickly as possible getting them into distribution and manufacturing and trying to make sure that they are globally accessible. Because it's something the world's GonNa need so that probably the biggest one on the horizon. The second one is a cautious optimism. But it's also combined with a worry Which is so far. We haven't seen the kind of days in the developing world which we were very worried about probably off the levels we've seen in the US and Europe. We're working very hard and you. These places with very low and weak health resources to try and help with preparation still worries that there may be major outbreaks but again the steps that have been taken by these countries today despite their challenging circumstances have certainly a voted foul outcomes and that's being another bid relatively good news and I know that that global outlook is really important to the Gates Foundation. What are y'all doing to make sure that the work that you're doing is able to be used worldwide. Yes so that's something we do for like when we work extensively across the US obviously and we have carry lodge program. Which of being heavily disrupted and Writing educational opportunities for low income students and kids of Color in K twelve and post-second buck most by workers in global health and global development issues. And everything we do as informed by what he calls global access so we do a lot of research and development Some of that is in helpings like New Treatments. Or vaccines or things that are Diseases like malaria or tobacco. So I do think that disproportionately affect poor people and we have requirement whenever we make grunts that Any results Former global access. You know they need to be accessible and affordable globally and we support directly a number of organizations that help ensure that happens so the Global Fund to fight. Hiv Malaria Which was actually something where President Bush was the inaugural funded from the US and and was the counterpart to the pet. Far -Unding is a huge operation. That actually helps keep many millions of people on anti retrovirals but also that's bednets across the developing world to prevent Larrea to Berkey Laos's treatments. And what it does is it. Cools or sources including from the foundation many governments including the US which is the largest Funda. And then how? Purchase those at bulk because it is a crisis and then distribute them to the needy globally and we have the partnerships that do the same in areas like vaccines. So I know that scenario that we've worked together on before is in is in global health. We had Bill Melinda Gates recently at our form on leadership for them to talk about the work that they've done and Y'all done a lot of work with global epidemics previously like in global health. You've been very active. What did you learn from the worthy done previously? That's helping you today. So some of it is pretty simple stuff right. You need basic functional primary healthcare systems that that may sound and we're kind of used most people can excess at least minimal basic healthcare in the US effectively but You in very poor countries. That means often. There's barely a clinic with basic equipment or tools. But we need that. We make a lot of investments in trying to support those kind of experts if you have accessible primary care that's able to take early action than that helps prevent a whole lot of the health outcomes and then the car. Koga crisis where you're trying to Provide community engagement or involvement to help support challenges. Where you're often working in situations like crowded urban slums where it's very difficult to sort of isolate if you have symptoms we've seen countries like South Outta go for example which have extensive networks that have been set up to deal with HIV crisis actually being able to mobilize those network to help support Kobe or simply one of the talents we have. We are the largest. Funders globally the. Us is also very generous support of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative that unfortunately it had to be put on pause for why because we can't currently vaccinate children because it's the opposite of social distancing malaria polio vaccine. Excuse me drops that needs to be put in the mouth of a baby. That's held by their parents but we had big infrastructure that we've developed Without the partners over the years including Eunice and the World Health Organization Rotary that is very expert at surveillance and tracking and tracing Things which can now again be used in that Jacobin. So we've had a lot of those kinds of blessedness Which we wish. We didn't have to have them to help. But there certainly are helping with the current crisis

United States Gates Foundation Melinda Gates Melinda Gates Foundation Global Polio Eradication Initi Global Fund Malaria Mark Suzman Polio Vaccine CEO World Health Organization Europe Sfaxien Bill President Bush Eunice Jacobin HIV
"mark suzman" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

12:18 min | 4 months ago

"mark suzman" Discussed on Amanpour

"I was kind of disappointed. A little not a little a lot this weekend when we had churches bands going around picking up people to bring him to church when we've asked people to socially distance themselves. We don't have to be in a big mega church to be able to to pray. Prayer is personal Your relationship with God can be personal. We don't have to defy. Science defy the the instructions to be able to have a relationship with God and I hope people know that many of the churches that replaces are having an online services. They're teaching US different ways to to be baseball In in so that's been very helpful for me to to be able to call on on to Regina Benjamin. Thank you for being with us this evening. Thank you now. Let's just take a moment to register this. Dr Antony Vouch who is one of the world's leading infectious disease experts and he's a member of president. Trump's corona virus tasks does. He is facing death. Threats a source confirms that he now requires a constant security detail. Imagine that Faucher he has consistently recommended sticking with data and social distancing measures making him the target of online conspiracy theories and haters at a time when we most need Fox experts to save lives and get us out of this danger and get us the vital equipment we need the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has been providing funding and expertise since the outbreak began and Bill Gates has been sounding the alarm about pandemics for years. So I'm joined now by Mark Saltzman. He's the CEO of the Gates Foundation. Welcome to the program a Mark Saltzman. I just wonder you've been listening to a lot of this and there's just such a sense of of anger about ten million or more now in the US on on the unemployment rolls you've got a million here signing up for welfare you've got these endless stories about not enough equipment and Moss and testing and ventilators and beds and the whole lot and your boss. He actually predicted. Didn't he? That this was a possibility this kind of pandemic and the US knew this. What do you think went wrong? Well yes absolutely. So bill and along with many others have said for several years that the biggest potential threat to the world that could cause mass death is likely to be a global pandemic and that there are steps that can and should be taken to help address. That and you know get ready. Prepare Vaccines Treatments prepare protective gear. And I think those messages were heard partially but only partially there were steps by many governments to do initial plan setups after the crisis after the EVOLA crisis but clearly not enough was done and certainly not enough scale and that left many many countries just ill equipped to deal with the outbreak now which is why we're scrambling to catch up. And he said he's written a lot of things. We're going to play a couple of soundbites but he wrote an OP. Ed for the Washington Post it was printed here in the UK as well about steps that can be taken now. It's still not too late. But also he raised this very very ugly specter of all all fifty states for instance governor as a competing to try to you know. Get acquired somehow lifesaving equipment paying exorbitant prices. Some hospitals are being forced to do and the US Department of Health and Human Services warned about all of these shortages in medical supplies almost fifteen years ago in a four hundred page pandemic plan. So I mean that's that's what we knew was going to happen and it wasn't it wasn't taken up. What is now Bill Gates saying are the essential steps that can and must be taken now to get out of this will there at least three essential steps and these steps to not just for the United States. These are global steps for all countries to be taking and I is absolutely follow those social and physical distance guidelines to make sure that we are isolated and bending the curve condemning that that phrase that many people have heard it does work it is working in countries and places where it's observed that it can only work if it's nationwide. It doesn't work if you do it in one spot and then another spot you need to actually do it consistently. And that's one of the real challenges in the United States relative to some other countries including up to this date second beyond that is the criticality of testing we. We've all heard about the testing shortages and testing is indispensable to both understand the scope of the epidemic but also to help you address it. How do you make sure that We know who might already have immunity? How do we know in the long term who had gone to you isolate or quarantine or do contact tracing on and so that massive ramp up is underway now but that's also critical second step third step the search for vaccine? Yeah go ahead sorry. Go ahead the search for the vaccine because that's massively important to and we've been told a whole load of stories about that from the podium of the White House to places you know over here that somehow vaccine is going to be possible in the not too distant future obviously now that we know that that's not the case. What is the foundation. Doing what is Bill Gates? And you'll saying about how long that's going to take in the steps that are necessary so one of the steps that was taken a few years ago after the crisis and after I bill made those initial Comments in Ted speeches and elsewhere. Was We along with the wellcome trust? Some governmental support from Norway. Others did set up a group called the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations. That group right now is at the forefront of the social vaccine funding eight current candidates in real time. There are many other steps onto way but that is an area where we did get a little bit ahead of an things and the current science means we can probably do this on a rapidly accelerate the basis much faster than. It's ever been done before but that still means eighteen months. I mean eighteen months is really are best case on a vaccine and until you have a vaccine you need to have all these other steps which includes also the search for effective treatments. While people being sick we also need to think about. What are the fosters most effective treatments? Do we need to do the same trials tests on communities in real time and then we've also set up something we call the global therapeutics accelerate Again with the wellcome trust which is lodged. Uk medical charity with support from the Mastercard Foundation. Most recently Daca bug initiative the UK government. Just put some resources in. We've had a lot of support from some pharmaceutical companies. Trying to help share some of their knowledge but really how do you get these collective steps to both accelerate treatment? Because that's what we need until vaccine comes along and then get ready for the vaccine. But not just an appearance of maxine we that may be ready to scale and manufacture that maxine literally hundreds of millions and billions of doses because it needs to go global when and we have it and so. That's the challenge we have. It's daunting timetable. And I wanted to ask you because we just heard about the vulnerable communities in the United States and it hasn't quite this pandemic hit in a massive way further south but what about vulnerable communities around the World Care International has got fifteen of the most at risk countries. Which have three times higher risk of exposure to the epidemics six times lower access to healthcare services more than four times higher risk of food insecurity nine times higher risk of socio economic vulnerability over three times more likely to end up providing refuge for displaced people? And we'll put up a little map to show you where where these fifteen countries are. But what happens when this hits the so-called Developing World? Will it is starting to hit limo the call. I did just before coming on. Your show was a meeting with our teams right across Africa and Asia about new preparedness. What they're seeing the bate from Bangladesh Pakistan to India to Ethiopia to Nigeria. You're the viruses there. It's not there at the scale and scope that it is in in Europe or the United States yet. Many of those countries have actually taken much firmer steps more quickly. They are learning from the experience in that have gone into national shutdowns countries like South Africa. India Pakistan are in national shutdowns. Right now and that's important for containing the spread of the virus because one of the really big risks in places like that is these big urban slums make it impossible to do social distancing. If you're living three four five people to a room families you're where you GONNA go That's our big concern. Is that near if the virus really gets loose communities like that it could be devastating especially because those countries don't have access to those medical facilities and all the statistics he would just citing and last but not least. There is a ready a knock on effect in those places that had very scarce medical resources of just routine medical care. What's happening to neo pregnant women with complications? What's happening to your regular vaccination. There's already a knock on effect happening which we're quite concerned about and just finally obviously the Gates Foundation does a lot of work in the developing world a lot of work around Africa and elsewhere. Is there anything specifically that? You're looking at anything. You could sort of target now to try to help out. Well the first is just really helping against scale up their own testing facilities treatment. That was the earliest support we gave. We actually gave support right at the end of January when the crisis was still largely china-based to the African sense disease control to help countries develop the testing facilities because at that time only two. African countries actually had the the equipment to actually test. So we've build that up that's critical. Now you talked about. Fifty states competing. Pb Year what you have these very poor hundred grip countries who are getting outbid massively by rich countries to try and get essential gear and treatment and so we need to try and help them Get ACCESS TO THAT COLLECTIVELY. And then there are also some other steps. Were looking at in with with partners about you other ways. You can get a big emergency treatment facilities outside those big slams for example that might allow you to take some of the most vulnerable people out like the elderly who can't south isolate early People who've contracted the virus so a number of steps underway. A lot of these countries are working really hard and responding well. But it's very very especially with other economic dislocations it doesn't bad thinking about really amoxicillin. Ceo of the Gates Foundation. Thank you so much for joining us. And finally we want to salute the jazz. Legend Ellis Marsalis who has died at the age of eighty five after contracting the corona virus. A jazz pianist from New Orleans. He recorded twenty albums over his decades long career. He was a mental and a teacher to so many musicians including four of his own sons most famous of course Branford on the saxophone and Wynton Marsalis on the trumpet both Titans of American and the World Jazz scene and at the time when we need more music and light in our lives. Ellis and Wynton Marsalis playoffs out.

Bill Gates United States Gates Foundation US Department of Health and Hu Mark Saltzman CEO Africa Ellis Marsalis Wynton Marsalis Pakistan baseball Regina Benjamin US India Dr Antony Vouch Melinda Gates Foundation Uk
"mark suzman" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

13:14 min | 4 months ago

"mark suzman" Discussed on Amanpour

"I had a patient who went from seemed okay to needing an ICU. Bed and being on a ventilator so there is something about this infection in terms of how it inter-plays with the immune system and I think a big part of the story. Is that you end up with an immune system. That's overly revved up. That's causing too much inflammation and that in itself. May in fact be worse than the viral infection itself Doctor Salim Professor Tim Specter. Thank you both so much for joining me now. Nowhere is the inequality and fragility of the US healthcare system more apparent than in poorer communities. Of course Dr Regina Benjamin served as the US surgeon general under President Obama and she founded the Bio clinic serving a poor fishing community on the Gulf coast of Alabama. Having worked through Hurricane Katrina that taught through the south in two thousand and five. She talks about Walter. Isaacson about the lessons learned. Dr Regina Benjamin. Thank you for joining us. Thank you good to see you. We're about to see the effect of this epidemic in rural America. And what it's going to do to the world health care system. You've run a clinic and Bilo Bodry Alabama. You know the Gulf Coast area there. What are you seeing? What are you worried about? My biggest worry is having people to take this very seriously. Most of the people are really embracing the social distancing. But you're seeing pockets of people going to the Beach. Go into the plane in As as my governor said this is not time to have Your friends over supper. And you're seeing that sort of thing. So that's my biggest concern. Tell me about the by ULIBARRI. Clinic is on the Gulf coast of Alabama. You started it worked on for years. How's it doing now? And how has it preparing for this crisis? It's doing fine. We're seeing the challenges that everyone else has seen I've converted the clinic mostly now to the Gulf States Health Policy Research Center to start to look at some of the social determinants of health. We're focusing more trying to improve the entire health of the community and the entire health of the Gulf region. The states that border the Gulf of Mexico Alabama Mississippi Louisiana Texas and Florida. We had the poorest health outcomes in so we've been trying to buy Why is that? We have some of the best medical schools the best doctors and yet our health outcomes are poor and when you put on top of that a a disaster as I called it. A This pan-demic it stresses it. Even more I look at this as a As a category four now category five hurricane sitting in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico. And it's not a matter of will. It hit landfall as a matter of win. In how hard in the areas where you've worked which is basically the Gulf coast of Alabama and nearby areas. There's not a whole lot of insurance and health coverage and security. What's going to do when it hits areas? That are highly uninsured. The uninsured is a big part of it but even more so we got in small towns. We have hospitals who have already been stressed. Were seeing the critical access hospitals closing over the past several years. They're gonna be even more stressed And they've been taking people who have uninsured underinsured. These folks are really vulnerable because when we talk about testing or we haven't attesting available. Will there be charges when we go to rural areas for example. You see in bigger cities. They'll have drive through testing. Many people in rural areas. Don't have cars in. So how are we going to test people without a car? Are they going to get a ride with somebody else? Which it beats the purpose so those are are real concerns and I hope that our our government and our leaders are trying to make sure that we don't be separated by economics. That are your access to care. Doesn't depend on your income or your pocketbook. This virus is particularly brutal to people with underlying conditions as their applicable problem. You face in the poor and rural areas of America would offer greater numbers of these underlying conditions. So we're you know with the health disparities. We've been speaking a lot about health disparities over the past year several years to anybody who will listen that we do have Disparities and in certain illnesses particularly African American communities WE HAVE MORE DIABETES. Hypertension strokes. And we're seeing that. This particular virus is is particularly Worse on on people with underlying conditions. And so you're seeing places like like New Orleans like Detroit. We have a number of people with these underlying basic conditions. Where when they do come in the hospital. They come in and sicker and they're getting sicker faster. And so we have to kind of start to pay attention to that and oftentimes Many of the folks Normally could get by. And they're they're getting by. But then you got a history of high blood pressure or history of diabetes and some people may not even know they have high blood pressure or diabetes. And they come in. Let's sicker do you have to deal with a lot of misinformation that has to be corrected? I have to deal with misinformation all the time. Things like how you can get. The virus in high can't Their myths out there. Like if you hold your breath ten seconds. You won't get it or if you can hold your breath a certain time or if you Questions about around food for example. Do I wash my vegetables in Clorox? No you don't wash your best choosing clorox in their these types of myths that you see all the time but keeping good information out there is really buydell. That's why I think it's so important that we give good science. Good factual information. People are hungry to know what to do in what's safe and what's not say when you're talking to people in your community. What are they asking? You? Most people say what happened. Some how do I know if I'm starting to get sick? You know it's allergy time. We got all this. Pollen around on sneezing getting sick. Should I go to the hospital there? Practical Connor questions that that ever. Everyone is is seeming to ask In of course those complicate things We're also getting questions about Family members who have illnesses Should the grand kids come and visit or if we're in the same house? Can they come in the same room? Those kind of questions the very everyday real questions that I'm getting and it's you know it's it's really everyone's different. You know how you respond if your grandkids have been Socially distancing for the last two weeks in his probably okay or but if they've been out in the community and stuff they may bring something back in. It's not and so those are the kind of questions I'm kinda getting. Are they. Afraid this gear. We all are scared and you know people are scared. The unknown is is frightening We're hearing all these numbers possibilities of a infection in possibilities of death in probabilities of these numbers are real in. So it's going to be someone is probably going to be someone we know or we love in. So that's very very frightening and people are are told to socially distance when you really need to be close together so the mental health issues. Those concerns are real and so we have to find ways to stay in touch. Stay connected with those that we love because you really need that emotional support right now. Particularly when you're you're fearful of the unknown. Are you hearing from people with mental health problems now? And what do you do to deal with the mental health problems that might become amount of this so the mental health infrastructure in our country has been week? Anyway we haven't put enough resources in almost every state has needs for more mental health services. here in Alabama. We really really need more more services available so is very difficult to get people into mental health services before this in now. It's going to be even harder. Art is harder already. They're different stages of of mental health severely mentally ill which are afraid paranoid that those are are made even worse. But then there's the other part where it's just simple depression simple anxiety. Simple fear in those were seen as well in those adjusters real. Were probably going to see more domestic violence because we're stressed. We see domestic violence increase during stress. We saw during Katrina People are are together a lot more in. So how do we deal with those in? How do we let people know that this is a possibility so we can prevent that from happening? This is not the first major crisis of the Gulf coast is faced. Let's discuss could. Trina which you and I remember. Well what are the lessons? We learned from Katrina hurricane that might be applied to this situation. There are a lot of lessons for controller The I listen. I would say is right after Katrina. We learned that the federal government wasn't gonNA come and rescue us right away. We head to roll our sleeves up and do for ourselves a couple of weeks later they did some time in a stepped in but it takes time to ramp up so we had to take care of ourselves in so we did as a community We also knew that it wasn't again. Geographic Boundaries Katrina affected the entire Gulf coast in there. Wasn't you know the counties of the State borders that that it that it affected it was all of us We learned that The rebuilding took all of us together as well and we putting a number of things around to get us ready for disaster planning and that's why I think we already know what some of these things to do we have processes in place that we just have to activate in some of the community. Some of the mayors in county commissions are now activating them It would be better if our states would activate them all at the same time in. That would help because we have those. We did all that planning. So we learned from Katrina. We also learned from Katrina that we will get through it in. We'll overcome it. What would you recommend in the future if you were surgeon? General or part of the public health core again. What should we as a nation be learning from this and doing I think the public health infrastructure has to be solid? It's encapsulated in in. Remember that the public health infrastructure is there. And that's not just going to the doctor that's do you have clean water Do you have good sewage? Do you have clean food? Those things are part of public health. And you can't We can any one of those and we need to strengthen every single one because they all relate you come from an incredibly strong family and you have a very deep faith. How is that affected your way of looking at this pandemic and help tide you through this as you look at the people in Alabama and other places that you served we all have a sense that we should have a sense of duty that we really should have a sense of taking care of each other I because we can look at what happened in Italy in we. You know when I saw that the hope stop mass. I don't know if that's ever been done in history Catholicism yet it was the right thing to do in so we're as a world where we're linked in so our.

Alabama Gulf Katrina America Gulf States Health Policy Rese Dr Regina Benjamin Hurricane Katrina Gulf Coast Clorox inflammation Doctor Salim Professor Tim Spe Bilo Bodry Alabama DIABETES Isaacson
"mark suzman" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

12:56 min | 4 months ago

"mark suzman" Discussed on Amanpour

"Here in the UK. There is rising anger at the government's failure to ramp up masturbating even for medical professionals. Only five thousand of being tested so far and the country is lagging behind much of Europe when it comes to this crucial crucial issue but today the health minister pledged to reach a hundred thousand tests per day by the end of this month. As we said the government is under real five because of this with me to discuss is. Tim Spector a professor of genetic epidemiology and lead researcher on a special tracking up for covert one thousand nine systems. It was devised by King's College London. And it's done so to better understand the virus and on the issue of testing ventilators Mars hospital beds in the United States. We're joined by Dr Selene ground up an infectious disease specialist at nyu. Both of them adjoining so welcome to you both so let me first ask you about testing Tim. Because this is a real big issue here and you've seen all the headlines and all the news even in friendly outlets to Boris Johnson. Adjust fit to be tied and even today the national The health minister said that they're not even going to prioritize frontline health workers the testing when it ramps up. We'll go to patients. Just tell me your take on that. Well my view is that the testing now. You've is probably a little bit too late. I think people have a thinking that based on our estimates paps third of people have been infected anyway. And if you've been working hospital long enough tiny likely. You're either a carrier. Will you be infected So I do I do worry about that. And I really. Testing patients nowadays You know most of them are going to be infected if he got into these hospitals so I think I would be looking more to protect the medical stuff and promoting the idea that people have at the test in the past and they can go back to the front line pretty much knowing they're going to be immune and reserve for the people who haven't been exposed so I I I I'm worried about those priorities. But it all comes from a general lack of getting the testing out there early enough and so I feel so why. Why didn't they think well? You have to ask the government why. They thought that they could continue with other ways. I think there's a general idea in the in the NHL that If you do things centrally it's done well and so. They had this idea that could do everything in this center. Just outside London Colindale on the no one was allowed to get involved because I actually was approached by a company about six weeks ago. Who had a rapid test and I tried to get them some samples to test that they was giving them any. They said No. We're not. We're we'RE DEVELOPING ALL WE'RE GONNA. Make it big. It's all going to be fine so they really count off any entrepreneurial activity quite early through this centralized system which in other situations can what well but I think in this one is with clearly sing. It's IT'S BREAKING DOWN. It's a it's more of a mindset about how how the government's tends to work in a place like UK dominated with one big city so so in the last twenty four hours in the UK. Five hundred sixty nine people have died of corona virus as the biggest leap since this crisis began the biggest twenty four hour leap since this crisis began. I want to quickly turn over now to the United States to Dr. Selene gowned up. You also have major problems of testing their. The president promised five million very rapidly. Maybe a million tests have been done and produced. What is the structural impediment? Dr Kaunda as best you know it to the lack of testing there and presumably unlike in Britain it's not too late to keep testing and therefore isolating and figuring out what is the. What is the pattern and how best to to stop this right so just a backup a little bit. Cristiana helpful for people to understand. There are different kinds of tests. So there's the test which is really to look for the DNA. Rna of the virus that genetic material of the virus in person and the purpose of that test is to figure out if the patient sitting in front of you has Kovic nineteen and that is really necessary when you have a patient who comes in with symptoms of respiratory distress that could be caused by any number of conditions not just cove in nineteen. And where what you do in terms of treatment will really matter. There's a second kind of test that's just coming online in the United States now and also available elsewhere which is antibody testing. Now antibody testing will tell you if somebody has been infected in the past and if they are likely to be immune and I think for much of the general public. That's actually what they WANNA know. They WanNa know where the symptoms. I had a month ago from Kobe. Nineteen and we would also like to know for both healthcare workers as other as well as other essential workers have they already had this they already been exposed and might already be immune in which case it would be safer to send them back to work than somebody who has not yet been exposed. You are also frontline medical doctor. Cellini also frontline. You're in the hospitals. What are you seeing in the hospitals now for the for the health professionals and also you know obviously for the patients. I mean ventilators Mas all those things. Well we are really running in very short supply. On the ninety five respirator mask. Even the very basic surgical masks face shields gowns were really in very very dire straits when it comes to supply of those materials and with respect to ventilators were also in a very difficult situation and the ventilators that were supposed to be sent to us from the national strategic stockpiling. The United States as we're discovering now many of them don't even work so when you have a patient who goes into respiratory distress and needs the assistance of ventilator. You don't have days. You don't have hours. You literally have minutes. So it's really critical that we have those in the hospital and set up and ready to go and we. We unfortunately don't have what we need in that respect right now can I just ask. I want to go back and ask you tim. Because this up this tracking APP as well is really important. Can you explain why? And what has it done this this tracking out for symptoms? What does it actually do in terms of the big picture of trying to stop this pandemic? We launched about a week ago at King's with a a biotech. Paul Knuckle Zoe who put together an APP. In about three and a half days and using social media we rapidly Got a million an hour job to two million users within a week which is pretty amazing. Everyone is basically logging symptoms whether they have them on all so we're asking people in every part of the country to tell us what's going on a sort of form of radar if you like in their area to say whether it's an at risk area or not and at the same time so that gives us this early warning device because the problem of everyone is now just facing these hospital council these death count's in different areas and that's really four weeks further down the line and then these early symptoms. So what would sing is something. That's able to h area each district or for example in the US state would have with your mobilized its forces towards those problems which currently they just running around blind at the moment. So it's like a type of radar if you like and then secondly it allows us understand more about the disease in which drugs etc might be causing it or make it Preventing it what type of people that really at risk and all those old people again getting it the infection. So they're gonNA be a problem later and then finally what we've discovered is that actually there isn't just to symptoms of this disease that perhaps a dozen are related in some way and in the APP. People give they allowed to give these symptoms Not just the coffin the fever but actually whole range of other things one of the comments ones we see it. And this is based on four hundred thousand people who reported symptoms. So it's a huge study. Which would manage to get together and just about two days but it does tell us. That fatigue is the number one symptom and particular. One is really severe fatigue. That people can get out of bed. Get not not classified as recognized as a as a necessarily important indicator but as well as post voice and Chest pains at the one that stood out we we found Only through this population survey was an acute sudden loss of taste and smell. Yup At that is like a an early warning sign. That someone's got an infection. Some stay like that's and get nothing else. Others might go on and progress and get disease but they said a findings are like we've actually what we're trying to do is work algorithm the people put these symptoms into Into the APP and then we're hoping it would be Outta. Tell them well that Johnson's that if they had had a test positive because in the UK although like the US we don't have that many tests the proportion being tested and so when you've got two million people you can base it on that sub Martian that are being tested to see if that is symptoms matched and basically saying like taste is really important for that so we think we can use these symptoms like a surrogate for actually having these viral tests. Which probably won't reach everybody in time so another way of. Let me let me go spree. Yeah let me ask. Let Me Ashley Dr Salim. Whether you think that would be useful for the United States. Because I'm hearing so much about this loss of smell and loss of taste and also in the US you seeing you know you're seeing not just the elderly who everybody said. Oh people with preexisting conditions. They're very young. I mean there was a baby who died and all sorts of a range of people who succumbing to this well. We're certainly seeing younger people. I would see say. The median age of patients seeing the hospital with Kobe. Nineteen or actually in their late forties. So that means half. The patients are younger than that. We're certainly seeing patients in their twenties and thirties. I think one risk factor that's significant in the US and also in the UK is obesity. A third of people in the United States are obese and other third or overweight and that clearly seems to be associated with worse disease. So that is that is concerning here. I should just say yeah. We have just launched in the US. Actually so it'd be interesting to see how it does okay and so And that's with colleagues in mass general so You know the take up in different areas. We'll be right important but has the ability to see if these symptoms all the same and people can download the APP now in the On our website which is very very useful. Yeah Kevin Dot Join Zoe. Earning look at it and see the maps in real time in their area which I think will help local good okay. That's great. I'm Dr Selene Dr Ganda. I just want to know what you make of Dr Foul Chee saying earlier that this is an unusual disease I I'm fascinated to say Sanjay Gupta by what I would call the pathogenesis get so many people who do well and then some people who just bingo there on a respirator. They're on oxygen support and then they're dead. How how difficult is that for you as a doctor and as a professor trying to figure this out well. I think it is quite startling. Help quickly some of these patients de compensate. So where do they go from? Not Needing any oxygen or minimal. Oxygen support at all to requiring ventilator. And this happens quite suddenly over the course of a morning for example..

United States UK government respiratory distress Kobe Boris Johnson Dr Selene Dr Selene Dr Ganda Europe professor Tim Spector genetic epidemiology Paul Knuckle Zoe Mars hospital nyu King's College London NHL Dr Foul Chee Dr Kaunda London Colindale
"mark suzman" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:14 min | 4 months ago

"mark suzman" Discussed on Amanpour

"In a matter of days our largest banks could figure out how to distribute assistance to small businesses in a very short period of time. We need the kind of patriotism from our business leaders that we saw during the Second World War Kenneth Rogoff. Who's a professor of economics at Harvard? Where you used to be president has said that this is already shaping up as the deepest dive on record for the global economy for over one hundred years. Everything depends on how long it lasts but if this goes on for a long time it's certainly going to be the mother of all financial crises. Well we've discussed a little bit about that but let me ask you the Finance Minister of Denmark on this program last week and they implemented I know. Denmark is a smaller country than the United States. However they went out fast early and big and bet on freezing their economy for some three months and guaranteed ninety percent of people's wages. Obviously some people will not will not manage but for the most part they guaranteed that and now Denmark looks like it's going to be able to emerge as quietly quietly saying that they may be able to get back to work in the next couple of weeks. Are there lessons to be learned from that or is it apples and oranges? Look that illustrates the first law of crisis response. It's much too easy to do too little than it is to do too much. You're much better off overreacting. Then you are under under reacting and yes more containment more quickly supported by more income is the right answer. And when the record is written those who contained more and provided more financial support during the containment will be those who did better. We've still got states in the United States where people are all over the place where people are off taking tennis lessons playing playing golf and going to all kinds of stores and mixing a with each other that is madness and we need to impose the control the more control and the more money we commit early the less we will in toto. That is the lesson of every financial crisis. What made the depression. Great was that people took so long to respond if people had responded aggressively nineteen thirty or nineteen late. Nineteen twenty nine. The total cost of the world would have been a much less. That same principle applies a today. We're not even thinking for the most part in the Western world about the catastrophe that's to come in Africa. The catastrophe that's to come in the developing world and there's one human gene pool and so that catastrophe is not gonna be confined to those places and we're not going to be able to build walls. We need a much more aggressive response. Then we're saying well we're going to dig deal with that part of the story later in the program. But for now Larry Summers thank you very much indeed for.

Denmark United States Finance Minister of Denmark Kenneth Rogoff Harvard Larry Summers professor of economics president Africa depression toto
"mark suzman" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

12:50 min | 4 months ago

"mark suzman" Discussed on Amanpour

"Everyone and welcome to. I'm on poor. Here's what's coming up. Another six point six million American sign up for unemployment benefit as almost one million Britons. How do people whole economies recover? I asked former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers and and I want to say special word about testing because it is so important and is Dr said for weeks and weeks. This is the way through under quarantine and under-fire British Prime Minister Boris Johnson again promises to ramp up testing while president trump admits the united is running out a vital supplies plus five years ago. His boss Bill Gates predicted the world would face crippling pandemic gates foundation. Ceo Mark Susan on how to avoid.

Bill Gates Ceo Mark Susan Larry Summers Boris Johnson Prime Minister trump president