19 Burst results for "Mark Smith"

"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

08:00 min | 5 months ago

"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

"Yeah. I think we're gonna stayed for a little while. I mean. I would imagine to even just after looking at what's happened this year. The united states probably doesn't look like a desirable destination for from overseas. I would. I would imagine because for us here. Man don't know. I tell you i tell you something. I was having a coffee with the gentleman of color. Danish and We were talking about that and he was saying the same thing what i love about living in europe i love a lot of things in terms of quality life and quality food and quality. I liked it. You don't have to fight so hard for all of that in. Us if you want the best for your family you want good education. You want to live in a nice place you want. You know you know fresh vegetables and and all of this sort of things and good health care and everything absolutely you can get it. But for i'd say the majority of americans you gotta fight for that. You had a fighting your education. You've gotta fighting your job. You gotta fight and work hard. Be the one who who stays late in all of that kind of stuff to provide that for your family and one of the things that i've deftly found that i enjoy is that they don't roll like that here they don't roll like that you know. They don't denmark is a proud welfare state. they call themselves that it blew my mind house like like. That's not you're not insulting yourself like. That's an insult and for them. They are fiercely proud about that. America is a messy country. But we've always been a messy country. What does success look like for you now. And just so you know it's been intermittently dropping out like every three or four minutes so i'm gonna be curious to see how the final product sounds making a lot of notes that i'm glad that you keep talking. 'cause my hope. Is that skype records. That even though i'm not hearing it go back and listen once. We've we've wrapped. And everything's i'll just i'll ask that again. We're kinda right near the end just so you know so with everything that you've accomplished and you know with where you're at in your life right now. What does success look like for you. Success would look like my studio business doing well. I've been blessed to do a lot of incredible work. When i was at sarraf ski and in doing design seed and other things and i would really love to have that sort of success with my my own collections. And with the work that i do for my clients. So that's definitely what success would look like for me to really build a strong studio business and have that a a studio business of someone of color and to share what i've learned and to employ a diverse team that would be amazing especially to employ a diverse team. One question that. I'm asking every guest this year and i ask you this same question is how are you using your skills to help create a more equitable future honestly. I think just try to do what. I'm doing with my studio. There's so many studios. So many creatives out there creative studios out there that i admire but very very very very very very very few from people of color and black people and for i think a lot of different reasons. We often don't get a lot of exposure. We don't get a lot of credit for the work that we've done. I think there's often a lot of cultural bias. That people are not aware of maybe even themselves or they think well. Unless i'm doing tennis shoes or something. Let's say call it. Stereotypical fits within the black or african american culture or something like that then. I don't need that voice. And so i think having a successful studio and using that success to be able to employ a diverse team and having that be successful would definitely build abby at a lot of equality and be a great symbol so to speak of of a more equitable future. Where it's possible to be a designer. I not a black designer but to be a designer and to be valued based off the body of your work and what that brings and your in how you think and i think that that day has not come yet. So where do you see yourself in the next five years hopefully do my studio business and working with coming into work and greeting my team and and everything like that would be fantastic aside from that. I try to make too many plants. Like i said before i try to listen and i try to listen to to our life is taking me and to make the most of the opportunities that i'm given and to and to honor that into to work hard. Yeah so just to kind of wrap things up here. Where can our audience find out more about you and about your work on line. The best place is definitely my website. Www dot studio mark smith all sort of one word no gaps studio mark smith america s t h dot com. I would say that's the best place on linked you can find me there in a few of the platforms like that but definitely say they can come to my website and just contact and send hello or something. All right. Sounds good well mark smith. I wanna thank you so much for coming on the show. Not just because of your story for the listeners. We have been plagued with technical difficulties. This is the third time we tried to record this interview. And i'm so glad that it is. It is pretty much gone off mostly without a hitch. But no i'm. I'm glad that you were able to kinda share your journey from small town in georgia slash alabama to working in europe and really kind of all the steps along the way. I think it's important to show that there is no one set discreet path to success in this industry that you can sort of bounce around and figure things out and kind of come up with your own plan. Which is what you've been able to do and what you're continuing to do through your studio so thank you so much for coming on the show. I appreciate it thank you. Maria said it was really a pleasure. I'm really glad we're able to do this. And i really appreciate the opportunity to tell my story. This is the first time i've ever done something like this. And so it's really it's really been Fantastic big big. Thanks to mark. Smith and of course. Thanks to you for listening. You can find out more about mark and his work through the links in the show notes at revision path dot com revision path is brought to you by lunch a multi disciplinary creative studio in atlanta georgia. Are you looking for some creative consulting for your next project. Then let's do lunch. Visit us at yup. It's lunch dot com up link to it in the show notes. This podcast is created hosted and produced by me. Maurice cherry with engineering and editing by rj. Basilio our intro voiceovers by music man jury with intro notre music by yellow speaker. So what did you think of this episode. Hit us up on twitter or instagram or even better by leaving us a rating and review on apple. Podcasts i'll even read your review right here on the show as always thank you so much for listening and we'll see you next time.

mark smith europe georgia united states denmark skype America Maurice cherry sarraf twitter atlanta Maria instagram apple alabama
"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

07:52 min | 5 months ago

"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

"Of came out of nowhere. Sounds like honestly it was. I think it's really interesting. I wish it could be one of those sort of stories where i would say you know. It was my big break and i knew it was my big break. I absolutely did not taking the job with sarraf. Ski was that was my big break. It was like was like a rocket ship just from day one it was like just absolutely transformative in the scope of the work. Sean what. I could do learning what i do at never forget. It was literally within the first week on the job. And i'd gone at six in the morning because it was so overwhelming that i thought i just need to kind of like catch up a little bit and as soon as everyone gets into the office like i don't have a chance to breathe. The general manager of the company was there by the coffee machine at six in the morning and he was like mark. Wow so great that you're in early. That's perfect come onto my office. And i was like oh come on like come in at six. I need to come in at five in the morning. Just so that i can get some peace and i go in and and all the heads of the departments are there and he said yeah we were just sitting here thinking that mark should be on this call but you just started so we just didn't think too. We had just hadn't thought to invite you but it's perfect that you're here so we're all here because this is a phone call with china jing and we're discussing designing the largest crystal dragon in the world and you're going to design that so here we go and i was like i'm sitting there like in shock designing the largest crystal dragon in the world for china and it was just. It was like that. I mean just really incredible incredible projects incredible opportunities in incredible growth. Now i know that you know you're not at swarovski anymore. But i'm curious about something particularly. I guess you know as we're hearing this pandemic because so much of consumer spending has changed right now like i don't know if people are really spending money certainly not on travel and entertainment like they used to and i would imagine that probably is the same way for luxury items to how do you see a brand like swarovski. I would even say kind of a brand of what you're doing because you're making custom jewelry. How do you sort of adapt to these times. When there's now probably a new definition around luxury items. I think i. The jury is still a bit out in regards to what's going to happen with the luxury industry as sort of we going forward so when i took the job at serov ski you have to think that i got hired november two thousand ten so it would still very much the recession that time the housing bubble had burst. And and if you had asked me is just sort of a regular person. Would it be the time to sort of build up a department dealing with luxury installations and luxury products. I would have said no. But i would have been wrong. I mean the luxury industry was booming during that period of time. So it's going to be interesting. I don't know. I mean this is a different circumstance. And there's always those who have means and and wanna buy it now with the work that you're doing even the work that you did was rosca you're you know you're designing for an international audience. What are some of the challenges with that. There's a lot of challenges designing for international audience. A lot and i think it took me a long time of development in a long time of training to be able to to design for a truly international audience. And i do say that. In a way where i mean truly international audience. A lot of that has to do. I think the great thing is that. I think once you sort of get to understanding the the difference of the process. It's a lot about understanding what we have in common and we have a lot. It's been said. And i think it always bears repeating. There's only one race in that human race period. You have different body types. Different colors different hair texture different features all of that but at the end of the day there was only one race and that's the human race is dead so designing internationally has something to do with in terms of different body types in different features physical features but i think largely it has to do with thinking more culturally in a more cultural global mindset. So for instance. When i when i draw my inspiration from nature there's not a culture on this planet that does not respond to a beautiful sunset. There's not a cultural. This planet that doesn't stare into a fire and tell stories is not a cultural on this planet. Dad doesn't love kids. Don't want wants to swim in it and play and all of that so i think you know when you think you know sort of pull back you know if we could fly into space pullback and you see this wonderful blue marble that we all share designing internationally is not as problematic as you might think i would say there's more like not over thinking it and yeah i mean they're just really seeing. Everybody is human. I really can't just can't emphasize that enough to seeing everyone. I see it at myself. Every time i traveled to a new place. I you know you go to asia and they love watermelon. And there's no stereotype. There's no stereotype like you know i would is in. Us in the south. You know all black people truth. Is everybody watermelon. Fried chicken fried chicken too and so much of this stuff is contracts. But yeah if you just think about just people who are like you culturally physically then yes than then designing internationally might be challenge so now you're in denmark. You have your family there. Your studio is there in general like what's life like for you there. Do you think there would be something that would prompt you to move back to the states one day. Just curious can hear the honest with you. I really like it wasn't like it wasn't the plan at pride myself in a man of faith and i really tried to more. Listen to what. God is telling me. In where god wants me to go than my own plan. Because i feel like when. I've made plans. That really didn't work out. But i really like living in europe if you talk to me like if you went back fifteen twenty year mark whatever and you. Ask them that he would say. Never two million years. But i love it so and in copenhagen. The people are wonderful. I mean absolutely to some of the swedish people. I've lost my phone on a city bus three times three times. I've lost my sorry once. I lost a twice of loss on a bus once. A loss it on the street i was biking and it just fell out of my pocket and each time someone returned to me. Wow it's a wonderful city and we just bought a house. So i think.

china mark Ski Sean general manager copenhagen denmark europe asia
"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

08:13 min | 5 months ago

"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

"At auburn and my roommate my former roommate at pratt my i remain He'd been industrial design. Major and i just had such admiration for that work and what the industrial honors did. And so i went to check it out and thank goodness. I met the head of the program and he convinced me to go there. I would say the second best decision one of my second best decision of my life at that time to do that. The first number one best decision of my life at that time was to go back home because it was really what i needed an grounded me and it put me in the right frame of mind to turn around yeah. There's something that that you touched on here. That i want to kind of draw out a little bit because i feel i personally relate to it which is being from the south from a small town particularly in alabama going off elsewhere to a bigger city to try to make a name for yourself and then this sort of silence. I guess. Fear that motivates you to do well so you don't have to go back like the way you said that you sort of characterized going back home or you saw it. I guess as a failure but it ended up being this reset. And i mean i'm thinking to myself i guessing it's probably this for other people that are from like small towns. You wanna try to grow out of your situation and sometimes going back to that can feel like you're sort of like regressing or. You're like taking a step back absolutely. I mean i know people who are still in new york. And i think new york city i think most big cities are full of people who you know the quality of their life the quality of their careers the quality of of what they achieve is not really greater. Because they're in that city is city just becomes a great place to hide. It's like yeah you know someone. So yeah there's in new york. I don't know they're doing something. And you and. I knew people like that. Who were just there. Yeah you know. Like i said i i. I think i'm very thankful to my family. They really framed it like we need to hear we want you here and we think it's also good for you to it. Takes courage to leave. And for sure it takes equal to greater courage to come back especially when you haven't achieved what you thought you want achieve. Yeah yeah the only thing i had when i got back was my that piece of paper from pratt which not to diminish it not to say that that was a small thing but the best thing that that paper did was get me into the industrial design program at auburn. Yeah and so. You're back home here at auburn. You founded something at auburn. Call design seed. I believe yes. Yes yes what was designed seed so the concept of design seed is that you have this huge like band that goes through the center of the state of alabama through selma selma's at the heart of it called the black belt and the black belt is basically where all the sort of rich black soil geologically swept down from the mississippi river through the center. This big band through the center of the state and because of the rich black soil there. It was the the most intense center off. Agribusiness slavery plantation in alabama arguably in the entire south. So you had just this concentrated concentrated amount of slaves in this region called the black belt and when slavery ended the blacks of that region were just left to poverty and it hasn't changed at all and so the idea of design seed. Was that the problem with the regions that you really can't make money with right with farming. You can't make enough money to live and the real money is in manufacturing and industrialized employment and an industrialized products. And so the idea was to design products that could be manufactured. Profitably in this region and to cede that region or these micro manufacturing businesses back could start and create jobs and then the idea is that designed seed would use all of the leverage all of the intellectual leverage of auburn university university of alabama funding from both state and federal levels. And all of the sort of concerted effort to create these micro manufacturing businesses. That would then grow up in that area and employ more people employ more people employ more people so that was the concept of design seat. I proposed it. I think literally within the first month of my graduate school and within the first month it got funded from the college of architecture by the end of that semester was funded by the university. And by the time i graduated like a lightning rod for all sorts of federal funding for the university so i actually graduated got a job designing barbecue grills and turkey fryers in columbus georgia at a place called masterbuilt manufacturing so I had gotten that job. I was doing that work. And then i got a call back from my old thesis adviser and who is also my partner to sign do and taiwanese guy. He's now the head of design at north carolina state university and side was like. Hey can you come back. And i was like. What do you mean to visit. He was like no. We need you to come back because we got all this funding after you left and we need you to come back to to run this and so i did. That and everything was going phenomenal. Incredible in two thousand and ten we won we like the longest project to win the southern growth policies innovation award out of kentucky and everything was going great and then the financial crisis hit their two thousand nine. Two thousand ten are all the funding just dried up. We never got a chance to launch even a single business what ended up prompting the move to europe. So i'm imagine that i'm fighting the good fight. I'm driving up to washington. Dc in presenting to congressman and of this sort of stuff to keep my project alive. And i get a phone call from a recruiter from a design that i had done that they saw and they wanted me to interview for serov ski and the krystal company and the first time i said no actually and i told him all the reasons why i didn't wanna do it and i said yeah you know the money's not enough and you're not thinking about it correctly like this. This was a really interesting thing because is never happened to me before since i said all the reasons why they were thinking about the job incorrectly. I did all the things you really not supposed to do. Would you interested in job. Because i wasn't interested in the job and they call me two months later and say we fixed everything which is still be willing to interview for the job. And so i did and i got the job. And that's how it began with ski. Which is headquartered in austria and switzerland. There's two headquarters. One involves austrian. The other ones men endorse switzerland. And i started in their us office in upstate. New york in a small town called plattsburgh our south of montreal. I was there for three and a half years and then.

new york alabama auburn pratt auburn university university o switzerland north carolina state universit selma selma mississippi river europe krystal company columbus austria washington plattsburgh partner kentucky montreal
"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

06:56 min | 5 months ago

"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

"January nineteen ninety three with only enough money to be there for one semester. Wow so you really like took a leap of faith. Absolutely just pure like i just felt i mean it was just i made. I made this sort of tears in my eye. Impassioned plea to my parents and i just felt like if i didn't do that i would just regret it for the rest of my life now. I imagine it had to be a pretty big shift going from auburn alabama to new york city in the winter in ninety three. Like what are you remember about that. First year i remember being utterly unprepared in every sense of the word at never been far from home ever in my life from my were. My parents live to auburn. Had only like a forty five minute car drive. And i never forget my first night there. I realized that i didn't pack sheets. Ono thanks sheets for the bed. So i was on this bear mattress in the dormitory curled up in this winter coat. You know it was. All i had to keep with it and i didn't even know where to buy sheets. I was just completely terrified of everything. I remember putting some backup money in my deodorant can is like the add in all this crazy stuff. I got lost. I mean every like country. Hick boy goes to new york city story. You can imagine happen to me. Wow i realized that while i had the skill for drawing that art is this really complex mental ex. I mean you. You have to be extremely smart. And it's just like an engineering or any of science. The visuals science form science. All sorts of things designed is in practice like one of the top schools in the world for that. So i was completely i was in the bottom of my classes just like in business school but now i cared you now. I was like be the case. What is happening. How is it that. I'm failing this class. And i'm giving my everything to it but sort of took about a year but went from the bottom to top. I was was in the top of my classes. Nice and i really thought that i was in the right place so once you you graduated from pratt and we've actually had a few pratt. Alums here on the show once you graduated from there. Were some of those kind of first design gigs. I'm assuming you probably stuck around in new york for a while once you got the hang of it right. If i had a lot of different gigs. I worked at leather new leather jackets. I remember seeing that in like vibe magazine. Those brands yeah exactly exactly so. I was designed junior designers system. Eva rex i were just doing textile design looking back on it. I did a lot of work within the sort of fashion sector their new york round forty seventh street. But yeah and then i started being a teaching artist which is basically partnering with these sort of foundations. Where they the idea is that you have creative problem solving in creative process. And so you. They would partner a creative with the traditional teacher in underprivileged classrooms in schools like south. Bronx and i was working in East harlem and that and they were party with the teacher who might teach math or science. And you guys would get together and come up with basically more creative way to teach math or more creative way to teach science or history or whatever whatever the the subject was okay. Yeah well that is. That's so working those gigs being a teacher and everything. What changed because of from what i can tell from doing my research. Eventually you did end up going back to auburn. But then what sort of prompted that. Move to go back where you're trying to prove something to yourself. I was just lost. Like i was just lost. You know i went pratt. Mike i said on a wing and a prayer. I guess i thought that doing something like sort of climbing that mountain that on the other side it was like you know the land of milk and honey and i was lost. I mean i didn't really know what i was supposed to do. I was working going from sort of hand to mouth in regards to working in jobs in life. And i thought i was going to be. This fine artists in part of my apartment was like a studio but at a certain point i wasn't even painting or and i didn't like what i was painting and and my parents have to say the most incredible parents you know my dad came up and he had stay with me for a little while and he was just like you know. Come on. what are you doing you just. You're spinning your wheels. And just hoping that one day something's going to be different or you know some break or something or whatever and come home. And i was like what would i do. He's like i don't know teach or whatever but it's better than what you're doing so that's what i did felt i gotta say it mean it was probably the lowest point in my life like i felt like i had done the impossible which was sort of breaking the gravity of the south and going to the big city and going to win best art schools in the world and graduating in doing well and but returned to the south was like really as sort of a failure and With no plan no had all of these skills. I love comic books and i. I used to tell my my parents. My brother like when i was there at pratt. Like i'm getting all these superpowers like. I can do this now at never could have done that before it. Now i can do this. And now i felt like you know like all these superpowers. And it's like what do you remember that you see captain. America did so all he wanted to do was fighting the war right then he gets the syrup and he's like massive guy right superpowers and he's like dancing on a stage like not doing the very thing that he went through all of that to do. That's exactly where i was. So i went back and a friend of my parents had said. Yeah he should go over there and look at the industrial design program.

auburn new york pratt york vibe magazine alabama East harlem Ono Hick partner America Mike i
"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:59 min | 5 months ago

"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

"Than i initially thought it was going be now one of course go more into your design career like i mentioned. I wanna talk about us. But i i wanna go back to the very beginning. You know you. And i have spoken about where you grew up. Let's let's talk about it You're from here in the states from the country absolutely as we were talking before from the country to copenhagen. But i was telling you that. I think that's a perfect title for a book or something. So where did you grow up. So i was born in columbus georgia which is right next to the chattahoochee river and part of my childhood was there in atlanta and the rest was there in alabama. We moved back to alabama. And i was living in alabama when i graduated. I have two degrees from auburn university. One bachelor environmental design and masters of industrial design from their college of architecture programs and yeah just a ghetto. Southern boy were you exposed to like designed art like this early on like do you remember that. Not per se now per se. My mom i mean both my parents were really fantastic. But my mom. She saw that. I was always into drawing and so they were always buying like the. You know those like how to draw books. I don't know if people do that. You know but it's like how to draw cartoons so how to draw horses or how to draw face and she would give me those books and i was just. I was always drawing. I was the one that the teacher in class asked to help with the posters and decorate the bulletin board. And all that kind of stuff but aside from that. I didn't have any sort of remotely formal exposure to it until i would say i think it was like my junior year in high school and then eventually from there. You ended up going i to to auburn university. Is that right like you said yes so. I went to auburn university. When i went to auburn i was a business. Major okay. yeah. It was a business major majoring in marketing and back. Then you know because they didn't of start any sort of formal work in art into my junior in high school. It was always just sort of a side thing and my parents were like. Yeah you know. That's a nice thing. And maybe you can paint on the weekends but you gotta go to school and do a real career and a real job and so back then. I thought it was going to be corporate attorney a whole plan. I was gonna major in business and minor. In pre law. And then go to law school at emory university. Because my mom she her masters at emory In atlanta in nursing. That was the master plan. And then i know it was sort of funny but Kind of the genie in the bottle is like an open. I took a class my junior year through myself into it. Our winning all this sort of art competitions and and everything and and so for my last two years of high school and i was miserable. I mean i was miserable. I tried so hard to just like buckle down and focus and and everything but before you know what i got a part time job designing t shirts at a little t shirt company called massa graphics and i started doing all sorts of artwork like getting paid for it all over campus. It was a pivotal moment. I was painting a wall. Mural restaurant in that was twenty one years old. So i should have been graduating that year. I know it was going should have been my senior year. And i basically dropped out and i got offered a job with blue cross. Blue shield in birmingham alabama to work in our communications department. At all i needed to do was to finish my year. They didn't care what my grades were. They just love the they were having lunch in the restaurant where i was doing the wall mural and they were just like just finish and calm. I realized i don't want that i just. I should've been a static. Horrible business major by gpa. Was not was was was in the toilet. I could graduate. But just you know. And so to get an offer from bluecross blueshield in birmingham and had vessel guaranteed job. And they want me to intern. That summer should have been like. Just you know a gift from god. And and in that moment and i told the recruiter the director of human resources. I said i would love to take the job. But i'm going to be going to new york at that time idea if i could actually go to new york to art school but in that moment it just. It was clear that i had to leave. And that's what i did. I went to pratt institute. winter.

auburn university alabama emory university birmingham atlanta auburn copenhagen chattahoochee river new york columbus massa graphics intern pratt institute. director attorney georgia
"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

06:48 min | 5 months ago

"mark smith" Discussed on Revision Path

"Their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals. Here's your host maurice cherry. Hello everybody welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in. I'm your host mariz cherry and this week. I'm talking with mark smith and industrial designer and copenhagen denmark and the head of design studio mark smith. Let's start the show all right so tell us who you are and what you do. My name is mark. Smith and i am an industrial designer based in copenhagen denmark with studio business call studio mark. Smith here in copenhagen denmark. Nice now i've been asking everyone on the show you know because of this pandemic how they're holding up how are you doing. How is sort of the corona virus and everything being handled in denmark. Right now. it's pretty good. It's pretty good. I think except for public transportation or like maybe going into a restaurant or something like that. You really wouldn't even see people with masks. Yeah i mean. We had the same tough time. I think the world had you know especially in the spring early summer with confinement but now things are are pretty. Good okay yeah over here. It's it's the ghetto man died. It is not great. I mean i don't know how much worse it's going to devolve by the time. This interview comes out but as of this interview. There's you know over two hundred thousand americans dead. No sign of stimulus in the future. And it's still so dicey and tricky from even from city to city let alone from state to state. Just how masks and everything or being enforced so it's wild and of course the economy is just like we gotta keep going so people are out and about like it's no big deal. It's a really tricky tom over here. We feel it a bit less here in copenhagen. I mean it's a much smaller country. I think it's five point. Eight million in the entire country of denmark. But yeah i talked to my friends in states new york atlanta where you are throughout the south end. It's a horrible horrible time. In twenty twenty is definitely been the worst year of my career. So you know so. It's tough. we'll speak enough career. Let's talk about some highlights. At least then. Let's talk about studio mark smith. When did you decide to strike out on your own. I decided it was sort of the last days when i was at Roszke for eight years and we knew my wife and i we knew we wanted to sort of make a move and it had always been in the back of my mind to sort of test. My theories do some work create some products some experiences and yeah. I think it was back in two thousand nineteen. I made the decision to do it. It's been really an exciting journey. That's really fantastic. And i have a whole bunch of collections that keep getting postponed. Because of corona too in terms of launch. There was supposed to launch a twenty twenty but it looks like we. We launched them in the spring of twenty twenty one for sure. Well i want to dive more into your time at swarovski later. But let's kind of a regular day like for you now then the trial on your own a regular day for me is i would say mainly working on my collection stuff. My collection work right now. I'm doing a collection of jewelry. So i have a collection call hidden and hidden began as a collection for lighting and home products. Like a a planter would have around the home home decor type of products. And i was asked if i could bring that in. Translate that story into jewelry. And so i've done that and now we will be launching that in dubai in twenty twenty one exciting. I mean aside from kind of exhibition part. Are there any parts of your work. Third different now. Because of the pandemic different i would say it's funny because the hidden story. The story of hidden is basically beauty in a broken moment. So all of the pieces are like breaking open. An inside there is sort of in for the lighting and for the home decor products. The sort of sort geodesy of crystal and for the jewelry. It's a fine jewelry collection. So it's breaking open and you're seeing some diamonds or you're seeing gold or saying white gold in. It's this idea that when things break inside that there's treasure. If you have the is to see it and i had four wild than really i love the look of like cliffs of dover in england or the grand canyon just that ruggedness in that sort of broken edge for longtime. I've loved that. I see it as something that is beautiful because it's imperfect and i would say that working on my collection during the this pandemic has actually made it clear to me. How important story is in and how important it is to sort of see that silver lining. Yeah i would definitely say the pandemic and everything sort of slowing down has helped me really center and and that has added to the. I think the quality of the collection. How do you approach a new project. Where does the idea. I guess i come into play and how you put that into action. I would say my ideas often are combination. My inspirations always coming from nature and nature is a few see some of my work. It's i have a lot of work that's relates to water a lot of installations architectural installations that relate to water. I think that was a lot of what. I how i worked when i work with iraqi was like doing a lot of water. Things in using the crystal to reflect refracted reflect light. It's coming from nature within on the other side. There's always looking for a job to be done. You know what is something that people need that the it's not being addressed so with these works that you're doing through through the all. These are just your personal creations. You're not like taking on client work anything. Are you know no also taking on client work. Okay absolutely taking on client work discussion with or waiting for word for a client project. They're in the us which is always cool to do work for home and an actually. The jewelry actually started out as a client request Build up so large that the client was like will. Would you be a business partner in this. Because it's it's far more massive.

mark smith denmark copenhagen copenhagen denmark maurice cherry Roszke dubai us partner england new york atlanta
"mark smith" Discussed on CRM Rocks

CRM Rocks

05:54 min | 6 months ago

"mark smith" Discussed on CRM Rocks

"So you'll find a hyper resources there and the thing is this is not a static area. It's constantly microsoft is constantly adding to it. it's it's called the building new apps to to make it more you know usable for edmonds and organizations to really you know it comes down to one thing adoption of the platform at the end of the day and and really making people's lives simpler. You know because when i look at parrope's ended the day end is or if you look at the power platform. It allows people to focus on important things in their careers. The businesses the jobs rather than the repetitive monday you know that kind of data entry or that capturing or that inspection process all that. Oh anita make sure that you've read these rows and check and we've got those details. You know anything that you know. In the negotiation that involves paper filling or form space completion. I think there's an opportunity for organizations to adopt the pow platform and realize the benefits. Then of course what you don't get an paper buys purses of courses in all the telemetry data as well right which is which is pretty phenomenal when you can see. Trend patents happening over time at different months of the year. This happens because you're app is inherently picking up that information by its usage etc is You know it allows companies to innovative a lot quicker In whatever era they specialize in so yeah go to that website as an microsoft docs where everything kind of resides is that. There's a heap of training resources in links to further A training resources. You've got lots options depending on the size of your organization how you on a scale and adopt the technology And yeah environment. Sit up how to get your data. Gateways and data integration in place how to provide support and help and you know there's a lot there. There's a lot there. It's definitely not a one off sitting that take to get across it. All and that mused that will if you're using this and you have some feedback to microsoft. Dare probably willing to listen to your feedback. Because i mean if you feel some pain with this. You're probably the loan. Yeah yeah and the beauty of right of all these assets that are up. there is at the bottom of the page because it's built on Get up the ability to submit feedback about this page or about this product. And that's on pretty much every page at the bottom. You'll see the feedback option. You as long as you logged. Didn't you can easily provide. that feedback. Found the team very responsive notified. If that's their shapiro and A and get get to fixing it Especially if they're getting a lot of feedback around. That and i mean customers are the expert of this adoption and center of excellence since they are the ones suffering from each right so mean whatever works for them. It's probably important for all of us. Yeah so true so true all right so do you have any public. Speaking preps virtually nowadays for reconfigured new. No i don't do any public while. I have have done any public speaking this year. I don't know serum saturday. No nothing like that. Nine no saw i. I turned down all invites. The sheer and really i was just freshly moved back to new zealand. Decided even before covid happening that i was not going to publicly speak this.

microsoft edmonds parrope anita shapiro
Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart has optional 30FPS or 60FPS mode on PS5

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:42 min | 8 months ago

Ratchet & Clank: Rift Apart has optional 30FPS or 60FPS mode on PS5

"Have even more details on ratchet and clank a rift part of course, guests yesterday. This is one of the big things that came out of the game and get a big old ratcheting clink. gameplay trailer with that we got an announcement of the twenty, twenty, nine, hundred, thousand, twenty, we got we got the announcement of the launch window right ration klenk ripped apart is coming out during the launch window We got even more details including stuff about the the to resolution Moses. I'M GONNA start with reading off an article from Rebecca Valentine at Games is who writes the Games come opening night live showcase today concluded with an extended gameplay trailer Herash clank ripped apart as. Well as the announcement that it would release at some point during playstation five launch window, the was currently set to launch and holiday twenty twenty eighth precise meaning of lodge to remains up for interpretation a now I'm GonNa pull from Jordan Ullman at GM who writes rational clink ripped apart will offer to resolution modes. Four K. at thirty PS and sixty BS at lower resolutions that's according to a fancy interview featuring Mark Smith and Mike Daly of INSOMNIAC Games as by niable on twitter. In the interview me to ask about the supported frame rates and resolutions. Four ration clank ripped apart with daily responding that the game will offer two separate nodes replaced pick from to balance comfortable gameplay with beautiful graphics. One is thirty F- BS At four K resolution in the other is lower resolution at sixty f, the translation reads later in the same interview interpreter mentions that the rationing clank series ditch the sixty PS benchmark set by the PS, two games in favor a thirty F- PS embedded better graphics for ps three amps four players with the PS five release. It appears that they're now giving players the choice between these two different styles

Mike Daly Insomniac Games Rebecca Valentine Jordan Ullman Twitter GM Mark Smith
"mark smith" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:34 min | 9 months ago

"mark smith" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"National line. Really fun, Washington's mall O'Connor show. Joining us right now is Mark Smith. He is a friend of the late Herman Cain. Herman Cain. In fact, Mark Smith. You said he was your mentor, right? And in fact, you now work in politics. You work for Senator Purdue in Georgia, do you not? Well, thank you so much for joining us. I know that this is a tough time. Did you expect Mr Cain to pass away. So suddenly, I mean, we knew that he was battling cancer, and it was very serious and we had learned that he was hospitalized recently. But to me, this came as a real surprise. It was definitely a shock did not expected. What's interesting is about a week ago. I saw people posted rumors about death and and I reached out to a team and that he was doing fine. And then they put out an announcement that you know he was. I was doing this fine. And they were, you know, it just took a while to get your lungs operating again from what he was doing with the news yesterday just came on a sudden shocks, especially After a week where you have some encouragement and hope for a full hour, so it was definitely a shock. I know some people who worked on his campaign in 2012 during the Republican primary for president and have worked with him in the radio business. So they were sharing your Facebook post from yesterday where you were talking about the man you knew, and it really moved me. That's why we reached out. We wanted to hear from you. So if you could just take some time here To talk about the Herman Cain you knew and how important he was in your life. Yeah, um You know, one way that explained it in so many people, new personality and I was so blessed another person. And if you knew the person, Herman Cain, I think you knew one of the greatest people that walk in this door because he believed in you, especially if you were a young person, and he He's given many people. Our friend who was who started off Young college graduate on that campaign, when he ran a 2012 and gave her a an opportunity of a lifetime. If you were young, and he believed in June, you really knew it and he would go out of his way to Support you and lift you up on that How it is when we met. I was a college student, and I introduced them at a college Republican event at Morehouse College is also is on the modern. And you know all you have to do with a Hey, that was a good sweet thank you. Instead, he said I was so moved by that I want to read that on my radio show. I want to put it on my website. On DH when she did, and from that moment, I was flooded with so much support so many people on opportunities. On and then friends with me when he would be across the nation, and he would quote sums. A portion of that speech, and he will quote it they would send the video of it. And, you know, I would just be son that He just remembered what I would say a little old me of and that I made that must have been packed in and I just hope he knows he made such a great impact on me in And since that moment we have spent, you know, I would see him across the state plenty of times. Once a year, we would go Teo, his country Club, Eagle Planning and Stockbridge. Gordo, and that's where he would give me Ah, a lot of career by a lot of life in a fight. So I was really blessed to be able to spend that time. With him to spend the time with the Someone of his magnitude That really believe me kept pushing me on and help me understand that there really are no limits. In this country of ours, and he waas so dearly. We're speaking with Mark Smith, who was a friend on DH considered Herman Cain, a mentor on clearly based on that story, He sure was. And you're both alums of Morehouse College. Notable alums include Samuel L. Jackson, Spike Lee and, of course, Dr Martin Luther King Jr..

Herman Cain Mark Smith Morehouse College Washington Facebook Dr Martin Luther King Jr Senator Purdue president Samuel L. Jackson Georgia Spike Lee Gordo Teo Stockbridge
"mark smith" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

12:47 min | 1 year ago

"mark smith" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"This is a three CI podcast and this is published or not. I'm sure there's something we've all felt we've said or done something and then thought oh it would have been better to have done or said something else this is how we change the Indian character whose honest about himself and where he lives we gotta jump straight in to a little bit about him from page twenty investable tough is the golden ticket if you get tough breaks tough going tough luck tough pills to swallow well tough shit you have to accept tough love talk tough tough tough it out be a tough nut to crack and when the going gets tough short get going but don't think he can save up decided sixteen is nothing age too young to behave like an adult too old to act like a kid doesn't help that my puberty took a time out voice hasn't fully break in my facial hairs fluff am I binds grew too fast for my skin so I look like a spent a month on medieval torture wreck Oh acne so that's nate mccay he knows he blurts something regrets it and then over analyzes and obsessed is about it for the next hundred years but he also believes in alternative realities has he how does he put those down he doesn't consider himself garage but he has notebooks and he he writes things down to in his way of offloading I think the worries that he carries around he's the warriors he thinks about everything too much and this is his way of not carrying too much stuff around with him so he he thinks of the night books as a well he drops the Stein's in the well and then he doesn't have to carry them around he's not a hero heroic enough do nor those starnes anywhere else Z. certainly not from my for much of Volkan and even then he's he's not a true hero in that he's brive or resourceful or anything like that he's just trying to get by but he Dan rather things down he can his beautiful rata he's an imaginative human being well we I mit mitigate medium in the prologue and he's aged Woah where he's out with his dad and he's met with his dad's met camping in the Bush now this may sound like a father son bonding time but in reality it was caught one newt two tenths and three Isky what did Dick Nights Dad want night to do this is an initiation rot or a blooding so to speak where where nights on the eleven years old and yet he's expected to handle the gun and shoot a great and that's it's difficult for him to do on one hand wants to impress his dad and he wants to be a man but on the other hand it goes against everything that that you know his is in him and saw this is this repeats throughout the book this moment that if he could have changed inched not miss shooting the goat would have been a different person well now sixteen years old and lives in her how the dysfunctional family which in I'd say they're pretty dysfunctional though so I think fairly typical of Some lower socio economic disadvantage families his love and his fun and this you know there's all kinds of stuff with this also lights of dysfunction going on yeah nights mother left where we found out that there was a reason for that and his dad deck is now will nights now got a new stepmother zoning eight years older than he said and this twins now stepbrothers twins jake and artists they were once inseparable but now Otis's three he's walking and he's talking and he's starting to act out more like his father towards his in brother his definitely starting to mimic deck in many in his mannerisms his attitude towards women you know he's quite critical of you signed mom at three is old he will close jeep id Things like that sending contrast this his younger his twin brother artists artists is has disability who was born developmentally delayed he the family folklore goes that Jake is a bump on his chest and Otis hesitant as jake when they separated twins took a pace of Sweden and but it's it's wash right season Otis's is that they have they communicate without speaking because because at this point is he's not verbal but he can only repeat words for things that he already knows he's Stu whiting to reach that level where he can tell us what he wants tell us what eighteen his mind and is one would that he refuses to say he will not site Dick or dad brings out upon perhaps a little bit more now nate back tonight he loves facts and Rod Sabra about prey animals and creditors he knows pray must group together up but only got one friend made through proximity over personality who's that friend this Kinda Merrick he lives in the unit across the I live in a group share a group of units so they've been friends for the last six years America ways comes to the wind I never to the front door and they kind of consider each other friends by accident but there's much more to it than that it's a very deep in bonding friendship now he also has very difficult family life but nate describes his maters he has to control his tim pump he is trapped in a body the can't control his mouth he does Merrick gets into situations quite often he's rather would rather jump in and swing than doc in means and he'll he'll bite into situations that he however which he has no control and drag night along with him well these two out the only dis- ebbed teens in the town in suburb where they all made with this I've placed beside places is youth which is pickle of many youth centers I think around Australia I've been to a few and they will they will have the same feel that I think the kids that guy here the ones who don't have the tribe quite often or who who's hyme life is is just not safe this they need somebody to be able to just do things like h occasionally shower you fall asleep on a couch without wondering whether it's unsafe that kind of thing may see when you said you visited youth areas somebody like my see I think the best youth where the work has a lock my st in that they come from within that world and have an undisturbed deep understand adding of it so that the exchange between the youth workers and the children is much more honest in Ecuador as opposed to do gooders hanging in and trying to make changes without really understanding what these kids are up against so macy's sort of by her look and not so much growth authority but by her ability she controls this up people do feel safe there she's a survivor and the thing that kids since that they understand all just looking at her that she's she's been warned she's come out the other side of it and therefore they willing to follow her right we'll sort of night comes here too series homework and rod his nights he loses some pages of his notebook what happens then which is terrifying for him because the the things that he brought Newsnight booker intensely personal and never meant for anybody else to see or hear so he's lost lost a couple of pages and then a few days later one of his superiors graffiti on the wall to as is a way of protesting the post punk leisure of of the Santa suspect he immediately suspects tash a young lady who goes to the youth center he has some rather superior skills and she she is she doesn't hide the fact that she thinks he should stand up more for what he believes in and actually fought for the things that he cares about she's always more removed often she's she's scary really and look apologies to listeners but if you've witnessed disgruntled teenager the best way to just described as nate does is she has a fuck fuck off ice that's exactly what she deploys regularly graffiti leads the possibility of the youth closing down and this is a pretty safe place because school really isn't sport is the arena for bullied and quite often night has the blood noise or whatever but there is Mr Reed there's yes he's the English teacher who are rather deliberately right as Stereo taught in the beginning of the book and I had a bit of fun with that are made him out to be Must Robin Williams Caricature but I guess the point of that was to flip it later on when he realizes that he's altruism doesn't really come from a good place he's come from a private school he wants to make it changes help these kids and but he's reasons for doing that PEPs a little misguided he doesn't really understand the world they come from and he needs to deep he needs to understand his reasons for being so flips not quite so selfless after or anything can they have an exchange in a way of moving forward he it's nice and a few others back to this private school that's got since to have everything and for a vocational Guidance Center China they walk around these doctors and I think you know how can they become a doctor or a lawyer or whatever so you know court from the book to He talks about the other students who may get into these occupations they're free to save the world the rest of us have to find our way out of the jungle I well mister aid sort of talks to them about choosing the path of least resistance but it's more difficult to be the resistance and he also talks about they have to be Wants it's very much a case of you you'd like to help these kids to lift themselves but it unless they wanted see that you really up against you know it's a pretty thick with their defenses across strong will even story to sit this subject this essay the pen is mightier than the sword and Neko's often thinks about Oh yeah you know we've got middle detectors for the for the swords and stuff and bat there's that's where you have to grab a quick weapon than Penn is as good as anything out here and there's the court from Walt Whitman that really is appeases graffiti under bridge tell us the story of how you chose that one oh how we know how to find it show I sound Barrick Europe over the roofs rooftops the world it's pretty common I think comes up a lot in English essays and I just wanted I wanted moment where he realized what it doesn't really matter what other people think it means that only medicine what he thinks it means and so he's seen it in graffitied on the side of the the the concrete under Hosni's thinking about that and what does it mean to him so we follow in as nights on a realization within himself and he realized that he's really gotTa Poetic Saul and we see that in his writing there's so many other things that we don't we're not gonNA talk about near the witnessing an attack.

Vikki Wakefield and Mark Smith

Published...Or Not

09:51 min | 1 year ago

Vikki Wakefield and Mark Smith

"Character whose honest about himself and where he lives we gotta jump straight in to a little bit about him from page twenty investable tough is the golden ticket if you get tough breaks tough going tough luck tough pills to swallow well tough shit you have to accept tough love talk tough tough tough it out be a tough nut to crack and when the going gets tough short get going but don't think he can save up decided sixteen is nothing age too young to behave like an adult too old to act like a kid doesn't help that my puberty took a time out voice hasn't fully break in my facial hairs fluff am I binds grew too fast for my skin so I look like a spent a month on medieval torture wreck Oh acne so that's nate mccay he knows he blurts something regrets it and then over analyzes and obsessed is about it for the next hundred years but he also believes in alternative realities has he how does he put those down he doesn't consider himself garage but he has notebooks and he he writes things down to in his way of offloading I think the worries that he carries around he's the warriors he thinks about everything too much and this is his way of not carrying too much stuff around with him so he he thinks of the night books as a well he drops the Stein's in the well and then he doesn't have to carry them around he's not a hero heroic enough do nor those starnes anywhere else Z. certainly not from my for much of Volkan and even then he's he's not a true hero in that he's brive or resourceful or anything like that he's just trying to get by but he Dan rather things down he can his beautiful rata he's an imaginative human being well we I mit mitigate medium in the prologue and he's aged Woah where he's out with his dad and he's met with his dad's met camping in the Bush now this may sound like a father son bonding time but in reality it was caught one newt two tenths and three Isky what did Dick Nights Dad want night to do this is an initiation rot or a blooding so to speak where where nights on the eleven years old and yet he's expected to handle the gun and shoot a great and that's it's difficult for him to do on one hand wants to impress his dad and he wants to be a man but on the other hand it goes against everything that that you know his is in him and saw this is this repeats throughout the book this moment that if he could have changed inched not miss shooting the goat would have been a different person well now sixteen years old and lives in her how the dysfunctional family which in I'd say they're pretty dysfunctional though so I think fairly typical of Some lower socio economic disadvantage families his love and his fun and this you know there's all kinds of stuff with this also lights of dysfunction going on yeah nights mother left where we found out that there was a reason for that and his dad deck is now will nights now got a new stepmother zoning eight years older than he said and this twins now stepbrothers twins jake and artists they were once inseparable but now Otis's three he's walking and he's talking and he's starting to act out more like his father towards his in brother his definitely starting to mimic deck in many in his mannerisms his attitude towards women you know he's quite critical of you signed mom at three is old he will close jeep id Things like that sending contrast this his younger his twin brother artists artists is has disability who was born developmentally delayed he the family folklore goes that Jake is a bump on his chest and Otis hesitant as jake when they separated twins took a pace of Sweden and but it's it's wash right season Otis's is that they have they communicate without speaking because because at this point is he's not verbal but he can only repeat words for things that he already knows he's Stu whiting to reach that level where he can tell us what he wants tell us what eighteen his mind and is one would that he refuses to say he will not site Dick or dad brings out upon perhaps a little bit more now nate back tonight he loves facts and Rod Sabra about prey animals and creditors he knows pray must group together up but only got one friend made through proximity over personality who's that friend this Kinda Merrick he lives in the unit across the I live in a group share a group of units so they've been friends for the last six years America ways comes to the wind I never to the front door and they kind of consider each other friends by accident but there's much more to it than that it's a very deep in bonding friendship now he also has very difficult family life but nate describes his maters he has to control his tim pump he is trapped in a body the can't control his mouth he does Merrick gets into situations quite often he's rather would rather jump in and swing than doc in means and he'll he'll bite into situations that he however which he has no control and drag night along with him well these two out the only dis- ebbed teens in the town in suburb where they all made with this I've placed beside places is youth which is pickle of many youth centers I think around Australia I've been to a few and they will they will have the same feel that I think the kids that guy here the ones who don't have the tribe quite often or who who's hyme life is is just not safe this they need somebody to be able to just do things like h occasionally shower you fall asleep on a couch without wondering whether it's unsafe that kind of thing may see when you said you visited youth areas somebody like my see I think the best youth where the work has a lock my st in that they come from within that world and have an undisturbed deep understand adding of it so that the exchange between the youth workers and the children is much more honest in Ecuador as opposed to do gooders hanging in and trying to make changes without really understanding what these kids are up against so macy's sort of by her look and not so much growth authority but by her ability she controls this up people do feel safe there she's a survivor and the thing that kids since that they understand all just looking at her that she's she's been warned she's come out the other side of it and therefore they willing to follow her right we'll sort of night comes here too series homework and rod his nights he loses some pages of his notebook what happens then which is terrifying for him because the the things that he brought Newsnight booker intensely personal and never meant for anybody else to see or hear so he's lost lost a couple of pages and then a few days later one of his superiors graffiti on the wall to as is a way of protesting the post punk leisure of of the Santa suspect he immediately suspects tash a young lady who goes to the youth center he has some rather superior skills and she she is she doesn't hide the fact that she thinks he should stand up more for what he believes in and actually fought for the things that he cares about she's always more removed often she's she's scary really and look apologies to listeners but if you've witnessed disgruntled teenager the best way to just described as nate does is she has a fuck fuck off ice that's exactly what she deploys regularly graffiti leads the possibility of the youth closing down and this is a pretty safe place because school really isn't sport is the arena for bullied and quite often night has the blood noise or whatever but there is Mr Reed there's yes he's the English teacher who are rather deliberately right as Stereo taught in the beginning of the book and I had a bit of fun with that are made him out to be Must Robin Williams Caricature but I guess the point of that was to flip it later on when he realizes that he's altruism doesn't really come from a good place he's come from a private school he wants to make it changes help these kids and but he's reasons for doing that PEPs a little misguided he doesn't really understand the world they come from and he needs to deep he needs to understand his reasons for being so flips not quite so selfless after or anything can they have an exchange in a way of moving forward

Hundred Years Sixteen Years Eleven Years Eight Years Six Years One Hand
"mark smith" Discussed on The Wild

The Wild

11:19 min | 1 year ago

"mark smith" Discussed on The Wild

"This is Chris Morgan people out in the wild for all kinds of reasons was my water that's a real Okay Good Chris Morgan impersonations so are we ready to go. I think we're ready to go all right so we wanted to do something yes I am the editor of the wild and who are you and I'm Martin I'm the producer right we got that out of the way all right so anyway Chris interviewed two documentary film-makers about filming penguins in Antarctica Jeff Wilson Mark Smith and we wanted to play an uncut version of this interview just to give you a sense of how the podcast sausages made Yeah penguin sausage if you will anyway so in that same spirit we wanted to Kinda share how this interview came to be on the morning of the taping we had a bit of an issue yeah a little bit of an issue in the Tulsa about that Matt so this was a real logistical nightmare to get this interview put together because Mark Smith and Jeff Wilson they live in the UK and so we had to find a studio there for them to talk to us here in America and you'll get wants schedules together and we finally got it set and triple and quadruple check the time difference we're going to have to be early in the morning for their afternoon we had it all set and we are ready for early the next morning so everything sets perfect you're good to go good to go right and then I wake up in the morning brushing my teeth and then I get ding I'm on my phone and it's a message from Mark Smith and he's saying hey we're in the studio waiting for you guys to connect so there there an hour early so there an hour early and I go into panic mode I'm freaking out 'cause I don't know if we miss this opportunity I don't know if we're GONNA have another one to get both of these guys into a studio again to do this interview so I start making phone calls I call you I call Chris tell him to wake up the engineer and I'm running down to the studio and Jeff and mark great that just went and got some coffee and waited for us to get our game together and then about forty five minutes later everyone's in the studio we get a going and luckily we got a really good conversation and you know what the problem was jim what damn daylight savings the UK which is their clocks and a week before we do America that's just wrong it is wrong backwards yeah so my takeaway is that we just need to get rid of daylight savings across the globe I'm I'm with you on that but it was a little stressed for that morning it's kind of like a duck come on a pond but underneath the water's just frantically paddling away yeah and so that's what we wanted with his bonus episode we wanted to give you guys a little example you get this nice polished podcast episode but there's a lot happening behind the scenes to make that work so this is kind of like the behind the scenes interview with me Mark Smith and Jeff Wilson so we'll start the interview right where Chris got connected to market Jeff in the UK could you increase the volume a little bit of their end or who's WHO's controlling the three studios involved here juggle in it we should probably hello yeah yeah they go it's great that that's much better thanks guys yeah everything good with you guys were just talking about how we really don't WanNa talk about bad so let's get that out the way so uh-huh anyhow introduction was going to be funny she say that Jeff because my first line has we I I remember the first time you're right on the beach there at Camp Mayan Solos Best Jeff that you it is one of those moments isn't it when you see that for the first thing isn't it you know we have such a small industries wildlife filmmakers and thirdly everybody who comes back from Caddo that part of the world says it's going to be one of the up three wildlife experiences and then we'll we'll kind of brushed it off because we've all had amazing wildlife experiences and then then you arrive and you you you get it it's amazing you know that kind of proximity animals and just the world of the places is is mind blowing and it's still it sits at the to this day I think yeah it does doesn't it and I've got so much I saw a clip the other day mark of you with a bear that bear walking right behind you along the riverbank there I remember you filmed right up to the last minute and then just turned around in your eyes like sources kind of thing is a startling place to be is it was it was really good to to meet with you guys but you know the one thing on you know no road no no road access to the area floatplane access only you know but but some of the places you guys have been an and worked it makes that place it seemed like a city park almost you know I just wanted to touch on a very famous clips that that almost everyone is seen at the sequence in planet earth of the Snow Leopard Jason it's prey down that vertical cliff and and that was you guys that captured that and you know just one example of one of extreme places that you've worked what you came away with that was an amazing thing to say well it was an incredible one of those boyzone adventures that you you you never really forget and comes down and we would ways Nestle who is the guy who helped us with that whole the logistics we just having lunch with him just before this so yeah we were just reminiscent about the whole thing and it really is one of those one of those trips which you know Kinda visit is a major landmark in your life really because everything just together with a lot of luck and a lot of planning but a lot of luck as well a you often the that was such a cliche in our industry for things to happen at the last minute Ah that was genuinely one of the times when we were failing miserably right up until the last minute and then and then this amazing amazing mother and popped out of the out of the cliff Ason to offer themselves to us which is just an extraordinary situation I think that genuinely is that sequence started whole thing of an on the last day we got lucky because I actually genuinely that day we've been filming for for weeks with a lot of luck with the snow leopard but still hadn't gotten to you know a hunt sequence which we we'd been dreaming of all these scenarios where it might happen literally was supposed to be flying out not lost day didn't President President Musharraf kind of conduct our our helicopter things what we were told writings there was a helicopter Geeta coming Surroi Pakistan decided that he needed to use it and so we had nowhere to go so we just went back to where we saw this lepers Larsen mark got the magic after but it was completely oh that's a great story so experiences like that sort of sort of ready do for the next extreme thing that you had to take on another one of my favourite behind the scenes clips ever as you guys in the frozen in frozen monnet narrated by Said David Umbro where where you're describing how you film this sequence in this colony of Adelie Pa- Deli Penguins where will you can you set that scene for us you know an and why this species Adelie penguins just kind of bring us into that spot with these oh so we were obviously making a series about the the polar regions and really fortunate access to American Antarctica which really means flying into McMurdo Base from New Zealand and what Mcmurdo Base gives you inability to to sort of shotgun out from their base of logistics into some amazing wildlife experiences and we had teams who were going off and foaming penguins and teams who are going off and filming underwater and mark and I think probably drew the short Straw because no one else wanted to do it and they sent us to the Adelie Penguin Colony which is you know everybody it was an extraordinary if you remember but people would would look at us when we told them that will to this place called Coke Kate Crozier fantastic famous place in polar expedition kind of literature because Scott had sent a team of scientists that collect some eggs member penguin eggs and and that formed part of a story called the worst journey in the world so in literature it's a very famous place but when you arrive in Mcmurdo people look at you and they go you're crazy okay good luck with that and like we might not think that people volunteer to go and then US we kind of naively did and paid the price and you were there for on that project four months was filmed well no full months we had a break in the middle but yeah we were there for a long long time and and mock what were the what were the conditions like that how can you describe what life is like for Penguin or film microfilming penguins in a place like is pretty bleak I mean the reason that the people were laughing about Cape Crozier was go reputation for the strongest winds and the reason the the colonies are is because the winds are so strong they blow all snow and ice off off the ground so at least the penguins have bayrock to to nest on so it's not surprising that it's not surprising the very windy place and so we we've got there and it was aroma very well it was beautiful day we got everything on packed and sold is going to be a total literally within twenty four hours we went out and the winds start to get up and we go into one of the biggest stole well the big storm I've been in winds up to one hundred fifty one was an hour and we were stuck in his cabin for three four days and it was just you know we're literally sitting in nothing can this the roof is going to come off this thing we're GonNa die all equipment is going to be blown away and and it was just extraordinary experience and we can have the penguins going off to a fairly positive list of things you know we would literally have been thrown in the defend at that point so these kind of an extra and I am an assistant field assistant who who is so and the scientists who who joined us came we spent our first month kind of exploring the whole thing on our own having obviously we talked with the scientists at length before we'd gone on the shoot when I remember one of the things that someone had failed to explain to us is that we intentionally arrived before the daily had come back to the continent of Antarctica and someone had failed to Clinton the entire and the deadly Connie is basically built on thousands and thousands of thousands of years of decaying dead penguins and so I remember walking in to the colony that first time and all you see for as far as the I can see is basically penguin carcasses and and I can read distinctly remember thinking body.

Chris Morgan Jeff Wilson Mark Smith editor producer forty five minutes twenty four hours three four days four months
"mark smith" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"mark smith" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Third year at Missouri. Four twenty to go Mark Smith from right to the lane takes it all the way down the lane, flips it over his head on airball lose Paul picked up by Zach Reichel Reichel outlets to Ethan Thompson. Ethan up the floor hands it off to trace tinkle trays will go around Mark Smith down the lane and on the dump pass off falls down pretty hard. And they call the foul not an offensive foul. They call. It bodies falling everywhere, you never know. And Mark Smith. I think is the guilty party of Mark Smith now has four thousand so Smith Tillman with four each Torrance Watson will come in. Smith will have to come out and traced tinkle will go to the free throw line. That's seventeen thousand now on this Missouri squad. And it was on a pass off. So it should be a one and one for trace tinkle. Four old four remaining to be played here in regulation with the fevers down sixty one to fifty out of a timeout when it was forty eight forty four. Missouri. They went on a run in the papers did not free throw the front end of the one and one good for trace tinkle. Trace. Three for six from the line tonight. And he'll get another opportunity on the way. This was perfect. All right. Sixty one fifty two nine point game. Peterson a full court press. Tako will pressure the ball on the baseline, and they'll trap once it gets in Geist splits. The double team all the way up the floor has a three on two guys takes it all the way on his own and stores. Jordan Geist a one on one move over Zach Reichel, and he scored sixty three fifty two to lead is back up to eleven for the Tigers. Here's tracy. Kalorama picks has it knocked loose by a steel for purrier the big guy per year, then takes it into front court and waits to give it to a guard gets a guy. Missouri fans are up sharing this one with three and a half minutes to go guys back to Xavier Pinson, sixty three fifty two Tigers over Oregon state right now. Beavers are three and L coming into this ball game. Here's torrents Watson shot clock down to eight down to seven Jordan guys works against sack Reichel stops left to the lane following jumper on the way. No good. Alfred Hollins gets another rebound holidays to Ethan Thompson up to four looking there's the trailer. Alfred over to trace trace goes against per year up and under his shot is into the beach zone by per year. And we have a timeout three..

Mark Smith Zach Reichel Reichel Missouri Ethan Thompson sack Reichel Zach Reichel Torrance Watson Smith Tillman Alfred Hollins Tigers Jordan Geist Tako Peterson Paul Xavier Pinson Kalorama Beavers Oregon
"mark smith" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"mark smith" Discussed on KOMO

"Ninety seven seven the numbers are still coming in but we're starting to see the picture develop following. Tuesday's primary elections across the country but might all need university of Washington political science professor Mark Smith spoke with komo's, Charlie harder Mark I was reading, today an analysis on CNN saying at least in Washington state Democrats have reason to be hopeful for the November election do you agree with? That assessment yeah definitely in that if you look at various legislative. Districts around the states you find, Democrats running from several points stops. Montana's fifteen points higher. Than they normally do so. If you're say a traditionally somewhat leaning Republican district of five to ten points. Those kind of districts are now up for grabs and could potentially flip democratic come the general election In two districts which caught my attention were the eighth district, in which Dino Rossi is going, to be facing off against a democratic challenger and then the sec I. Believe it's the, second day with, Spokane where you have Cathy McMorris, Rogers he's, a member of house leadership, facing. A strong challenge from a former, member of the state Senate yeah that's right so those those two congressional districts are, certainly in play we expected the eighth district one. To be in play less so the second, but. In the in the eight often you can do, at least a back of, the envelope projection of the general election it you take. The two party vote in the? Primary, benefits split up, between different candidates you assume most Democrats who voted for, one of the democratic cancer probably gonna be for, whoever won over the Republican candidate and. Vice versa and when you when you do that for the eighth district I think, Rossi was at forty seven percent and the three democratic candidates combined where where it. Over fifty so Right now Kim, shires barely in the. Lead but assuming she stays. In the league she's, likely to consolidate the democratic support and she at least starts with an advantage in the in the general election and that's the district that if. Remember correctly I don't think has ever elected, a democrat for our Republican friends. The as we take a look at the broad picture here is there anywhere particularly in the country. Particular, race perhaps. This just the US Senate where they might be able. To hold a little hope that their party is going to perhaps do welcome. November I think they have a lot, of hope for for two main reasons one is the map especially in the US Senate. We're only a third of the seats are up so even if you know the. Country had a certain desire to flip some of those seats it just can't happen because they're not they're not up and if you look. At the ones that are up there disproportionately in in red, states and you've got some democratic, senators in those states they're facing tough challenges so that's true in Indiana. And In. Montana in West Virginia in Florida so the US Senate even if there's a Blue Wave a, democratic wave Republicans are pretty likely to. Hang onto this. To the Senate in house various projections show the Democrats have to win nationally by something like seven percent university of Washington political science professor, Mark Smith Mark I. Hope you can join us again Your money at twenty and fifty past. The hour on KOMO news and here's your KOMO propel insurance money updates dots bounced between gains and losses. Throughout, today's, trading session and, were mixed at the close the Dow Jones, industrial average dropped forty five points, closing at twenty five, thousand five. Eighty three the. NASDAQ, composite rose. Four points the and p. five hundred closed down less than a point Twitter will not join other tech and social media companies and banning conspiracy theorist Alex Jones from their platforms Twitter CEO Jack. Dorsey said Mr. Jones, has not violated the company's policy, which bans bullying or threatening behavior but not posts better merely offensive that's your money now lime disease I. Found in Connecticut in the nineteen eighties has now spread to, all fifty states, a study, by, Quest Diagnostics, shows. A steady rise in the number of The positive tests for the tick borne illness over the past. Seven, years, the biggest increases, outside the northeast were in California and Florida, will the Long Island town is, now offering pet therapy, to people. Who feel stressed. Out, over having. To pay up their property taxes hem says tax receiver Don klavan says you'll find dogs and cats in the office to Pat while dropping off a check Do show time with animals help reduce. Stress anxiety lower heart rate to we're gonna provide that in the office at these are adoptable animal he's selling pet therapy is the health dividend he says simply by adopting a pet while paying. Your taxes you reap big benefits and, gain a lifelong friend and family member health update Sara Lee Kessler NBC News Radio It sounds obvious that exercise is beneficial but ABC's Brian Clark has. Details on new study that shows how one group in particular can benefit us thinking about. Retirement should, not just kick their feet up that's because a new, study that measured, fifty, three hundred people between the ages of sixty and sixty four found that those who did, low or moderate physical activity or in better. Health than, those who did no physical activity the groups surveyed, reported better levels of respiratory and cardiovascular fitness and lower levels of inflammation all. Steps important in avoiding heart, disease.

US Senate Dino Rossi university of Washington Montana Mark Smith professor KOMO Florida US Twitter komo CNN Mark I Sara Lee Kessler Spokane Washington Cathy McMorris Indiana Dow Jones
"mark smith" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"mark smith" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Espn radio sportscenter moore grabbed american patrick reed has the lead after two rounds at the matthew three the us ryder cup star looking for his first major championship out of six hundred sixty six friday lead over australian mark smith extensions alone its third five under four shot thoughtfully geiger would he's thirteen shots off the pace barely making the cut it for over got the understanding well something magical is going to have to happen for him to pull up rabbit out of his hat or shoot a special weekend and need help i'm not in control my own destiny so far back for tomorrow but i need to go out there and she's mid sixties and hopefully do the same thing also fair to make the cut free time phil mickelson over at seventy nine on friday it was a long night in new york for the yankees and orioles fourteen innings before pedro alvarez smoked the grand slam it baltimore at seven three victory over the yanks to the nba minnesota trying to wrap up a win over the lakers and they do so one sixteen thirteen ninety six eighteen for jimmy butler in his return now the wolves with a half the lead over again with the eighth and final playoff spot in the west denver's got two games remaining the t wolves have won the first ever top seed for toronto raptors get that after knocking off indiana ninety seventy three philadelphia holds up one thirty one thirty a half came ahead of the cavs but third in the eastern conference is that living up to your expectations what is tiger go from here and house this fit into the tigers backstory that more monday will cain show weekdays three zero on espn radio espn app and he has been.

philadelphia espn cain tigers indiana toronto nba baltimore mark smith Espn cavs moore denver jimmy butler lakers pedro alvarez yankees new york phil mickelson geiger
"mark smith" Discussed on Bang the Book

Bang the Book

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"mark smith" Discussed on Bang the Book

"They will be dangerous in the anc aa tournament mark smith is the biggest and jim in college basketball in olea that he keeps getting players to go there but watch out for davidson this keaton aldridge kids saint bought of its could stop them uh the bunnies beat him in triple overtime 117 one thirteen up i did they clearly the mission team they have to win the tournament and the way they're playing right now i think davidson dose win this tournament uh i can see them beacon book the bodies in that the semifinal game and davidson try to punch the tickets and i love the eight ten teams go into the nc doubly tournaments you better look out well this is a particularly interesting year for the ten because you know does seem like rhode island a bottom venture in you've got a potential bid steeler and davidson but also this coverage server what used to be held in the new york new jersey area lease from two thousand seven the 2016 moved to pittsburgh last year this year moves to washington dc so another different shooting backdrop for these players and so you know does that favour offense of teams is that favour defensive teams will have to wait and find out what you would certainly hope you know for davidson that they can get pr acclimated pretty quickly here to the shooting site lines in that game coming up on friday night well and you know uh who at the apps quick is this gonna be the one that has an opportunity in sometimes teams to get that extra game also get a bit of a rhythm and then they wear down as the tournament goes on uh iif the problem is we tried it sometimes we overthink it adam a sometimes we'll sit there and say the final force played in indianapolis or you know who's in a dome ed you'll be so worried about look shooting lines you're going to be and then these guys to him light it up uh don't be times when that happens but uh i i'm inclined to think that these kids will adapt and that that quickly.

mark smith basketball olea davidson rhode island indianapolis anc keaton aldridge new york pittsburgh washington
"mark smith" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

Dear Hank and John

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"mark smith" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

"Take me there do you have a lie says cut out of mark smith been hiding from me this canton now i i was i don't know how i got there but i once looked for mark spitz posters on ebay and really diverse routes fixed well i really don't know how i got there i you know i linked to look for his weird stuff on uber younger its y you bigs this there's a longer it's weird trying to fight this sense of dread with temporal things that's my description of what you'd be feels like okay which reminds me the today's bug has those are brought to you by ebay ebay trying to fight this sense of dread with temporal things and lastly this podcast is brought to you by benz day at work don't ask about it no donor after a benz there wasn't great today podcast also has an actual sponsor and we're so grateful to them today's actual sponsor is hellofresh which is a meal kit delivery service that shops plans and do what is your favorite step by step recipe in pre measured ingredients so you could just cook eat and enjoy you can get thirty dollars off your first week of hellofresh by going to hellofresh dot com and entering either dear hank or dear john there is no dear sarah sorry about that but it's dear hank or dear john i recommend dear john but they both work we made a hello fresh meal last night last night john i made from however fash these gorgeous greens pharaoh bowls with grilled zucchini in a asparagus and they were fantastic was really really really great it was vegetarian that really filling and very well balanced and the perfect amount it was excellent it was my favorite meal delivery service i've ever had and i just thought the flavors were really good at also thought the portions were really good is an important thing for those of us who were trying to watch our figures portion control is the biggest struggle for me and i i just felt great after eating that meal you know how if he just if you can just bring yourself to naughty too much in need the right amount if you.

mark smith john sarah mark spitz hank thirty dollars
"mark smith" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"mark smith" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"And it's called wilder country he go writing a sequel can be a challenging affair can the original story be sustained and built upon mark smith the author of the road to winter tixx up that challenge as he continues the saga in wild our country some out welcome back to threec i if that is supposed to be here now the sequel has to be a stand alone book but at the same time pick up on all the pre he is thread so writing that first chapter must be a real soldier struggle at times it is it's like a weaving process as much as anything else because you waving in some detail from the first book while introducing the second book i suppose so if you have a look at the first couple chapters of water country the sequel i'm you'll see the way fiend gets the opportunity to reflect a couple of times on on what's come before on the situation that is in at the moment and so that by the time we get to the second chapter halfway through the second chapter your often running with the with the news story that you've got then the back rent the sign characters rowdy scenes dog casimir whose cans again yes icaza is the the young silje the sixteen year old silje that that fiend has rescued in a way in the in the first book and bought back to his town of and gary is corn to in town and silje short for the sought solace short for asylum seeker so i i wanted that would to make them sound like an underclass because they are in the stipe in society that been voting from detention centres insult us lives the public auction with picked up on the theme of survival again because thin and cast a living on the coast by themselves the hunting for for rabbits for food and all sorts of things but there's also a quest that comes into this as well there is a quest and the second book is.

casimir gary silje stipe mark smith sixteen year
"mark smith" Discussed on Published...Or Not

Published...Or Not

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"mark smith" Discussed on Published...Or Not

"Grace gazed at the picture strip of herself and fill from the photo booth instant kilda in the first one they set chased lay side by side in the second he had one arm around his shoulders the other hand clasping hers in the next fraternity he was kissing her cheek and had been lost he was crosseyed with these tung clerking at beside raise math as she kissed him just in front of his ear goofy she near but the precious memory of his some manashe when the sunset had been burndred and the wind blew hot dry visit air across the water there last not before he lift for the tropical hatred singapore tropical heat of singapore so we noise would know what happened in singapore said we're not going to go into that and as i said the todd law is we the lift now of course in the newsroom it's some days of very quiet this list reporters around but then melbourne cup day there's nobody around because they've all the reporters route do in sort of local news each stuff but there's another day and this is this is a day which is of importance to many members and members of the community and grace gets her first reporting job what does she reporting on this is the um the day when all of the memorial services were being held at each of the um the major churches around melbourne sire m h denomination held its own service and joe with sorry few reporters left now general reporters m grace was given the task of going to the scots church and i'm taking notes um using her shorthand that should landed secretario school to um to take notes of the service as it went along so that she could bring those back in one of the subeditors would would rot those nuts up into the major story covering all of the services yes as she gets of.

Grace kilda singapore memorial services joe scots church melbourne