20 Episode results for "Mark Phillips"

On A Mission To Become A Trillionaire From Scratch With Samuel Figueroa | ETHX 134

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

47:23 min | 1 year ago

On A Mission To Become A Trillionaire From Scratch With Samuel Figueroa | ETHX 134

"Welcome to episode one hundred thirty four of enhancing human experience on Mark Phillips. I'm so thrilled that you tuned in today. I have an amazing guests lined up for you. I know you're going to enjoy it. I know you're going to be inspired. Really can't wait like to share this person with you. His name is Sam well Figueroa and he's a somewhat new friend of mine. I met him through Ruth. Romero our mutual friend. Ruth has been on the podcasts before. She's the personal style consultant in the consultant and she shared a lot of great value with us. I'll link night episode down below here in the show notes that Gene Mark Phillips Dot com in Sam's interview episode but when I first met Sam and heard him talk about his story of where he was in a place that is very different from where he is now right he talks about living in mediocrity and even so much so that he didn't even and understand what that word meant and he end at. The time didn't care to go look it up and so as I heard him talk about his story in his journey that he's been on thus far I was was actually moved. I was inspired and moved. I invited to be a guest on the podcast to share his experience with us. Because I know it'll be valuable to you on your journey it. It was valuable to me on my own journey and I thought Gosh I've got to give Sam an opportunity to share his experience and how he is really really transforming in south and and moving from where he was to where he wants to be and and I don't want to give you a spoiler alert but I gotta tell you where he wants to be in where he we'll be I I I totally believe he will be there. is absolutely fascinating. You're going to be inspired so before we get into the episode and before I share the interview with you I just want to and make you a couple of quick announcements then. We'll dive into it with Christmas. Coming up let me invite you to visit the focus and flow store at focus oh Qassam flow dot. Co You know. I know you have friends and family on your Christmas lift and list and I know you WanNa give them the very best gifts that they can use all year long long to make them happy and you know the dull. Enjoy all the things that you want from a gift. Check out the gifts a focus and flow because every piece of whether it's a product Dr a piece of apparel or accessory is designed with one thing in mind and one thing only to help you and the people on your Christmas list remember member that you are conscious creator that you can be do or have whatever you want in life that you can turn thoughts to things and that what you focus on will expand spanned into your experience right. You can focus anything into being. This is the underlying message of the focus flows store and also the message of Abraham Hicks one of my favorite group of teachers. That reminds us that we're conscious creators that we have the ability to create whatever we want in this life. You know the experiences the circumstances we're always turning thoughts. Two things the only thing we have to do the absolute only thing we have to do is to harness that creative power and focus it where we want on it to be right and not be haphazard with it not be lazy with it right those kinds of things so focused flow dot. Co for everyone on your Christmas list list. I know you're gonNA find awesome stuff for them. Their mugs and shirts and posters and hats and always adding things all the time on a continuous this basis. So be sure to check back frequently but again focusing flow dot. Co For all the people on your Christmas list. Also if you haven't picked up being as your superpower power that's the free download at just be at Book Dot Com. Go pick that up. It's free to download and it's loaded with links and timestamps that will help view see how other people have embodied the qualities characteristics and attributes and actually literally transform themselves so that they could attract what what they want in life whether it's lovers whether it's business opportunities right whether it's success and that should inspire you to transform transform yourself so that you can attract what you want in life right. I know you have goals and dreams. I know you want to have better experiences. I know you want to create all the awesome things that Wanna come through you and what better way than to see what other creators have done and be inspired by them so that you can do that as well. That's just being booked dot com. It's the PDF being is your superpower. It's free to download while your air while you're there download the human beings manifesto was well. That's also a one page. PDF that's free so with that out of the way let's jump into today's interview some well Figueroa and hear him share his story. I knew you're going to be captivated by the way if you'd like to see this interview you can do that at my youtube channel. which is YouTube dot com slash G Mark Phillips we filmed the interview and you can check it out there like the video form if not just sit back and listen to the podcast either way? It's the same interview. I hope you enjoy it. I know I thoroughly did. Let's getting to. Hi there. Mark Phillips I'm here with Sam and SAM is one of my new friends. I was super inspired by his story. We met through our mutual friend. Ruth Romero who is an amazing woman and and assigned Biden become on and talk about his experience in his journey thus far SAM. Thanks for hanging out with me. Thank you mark is really a a pleasure to be here with you and do this podcast. That is going to be in inspiring. Aw for a lot of people that are going through a lot of heart hardship in life you know and Yeah and I want to inspire choir. Yeah I'm well and that's why I wanted you to come on and share your story when we met And you talked about how you were living in mediocrity they realized that and your journey out of mediocrity and you're moving to a better life more success more prosperity abundance. Of course I I think it's fascinating because I don't know in my own experience or in other people that they had that realization like I want to really understand how you had that realization. What were you doing doing at the time? What caused that a lot of things you know? I don't know why you know there was this time that I was like in this moment in my life. You know like I was out in my porch looking outside and I was like is this is it. I mean this is in this is all I mean getting married having kids and is that going to work is not life I was like man. There's GonNa be something out there I don't know but I bet Pity for me or for me reading any books at the time the inspirational videos. That had just come out of nowhere. That's what I think is really fascinating. I think a lot of times in life we can get unattractive track and we don't know how much better it can be. We don't know that we're living in mediocrity living less than we can and because that's the first step is to be aware ear and that's why I think it's fascinating about your story. Not everyone has that. You're exactly right. I mean I was like you're what is going on. I mean I think there's more to ninety nine. I didn't even have any goal in life of the moment that you wind on autopilot. Yes by no one is something I know wanted. I wanted to be financially free because I couldn't couldn't give my family what I wanted them to. Have you know like go to a restaurant when I were money and take him out. How deep into work I mean like I used to? I used to be well. I used to work. In Our PECAN hotpots SMA. I used to work in a restaurant so so I go to my work like six six. AM in the morning. Got Off our look around four and then went to a restaurant started like around five. Five I was doing I was doing constantly in. I was like man. There's GonNa be something now also. I couldn't explain them just did it. Did it feel. It didn't feel right. It didn't feel like it was yes. I mean the path that could create the life that you wanted. Yes why I wanted more. I wanted I wanted to see if there's something else out there and I was like there wasn't I'm talking about like become two thousand nine is like ten years ago. Taylor's had that realization. Yes yes and he came to me since since since that moment. I mean a lot of things happened to me. Two thousand nine allowed things change. Since since that moment you mean everything. Then went downhill My really lifelike like you had some negative experiences. Oh yes what what. What kind of things will I the boy all I got separated? I got the boars from from this relationship that I was into so I lost my kids. My I mean my the heck's that point was my wife and I was like from from from that moment on. I mean everything went downhill late so I was deported to Mexico because I met him instate at that time shortly dot porno Mexico because I I was going to pull out of distress so we we got into a fight with my with my ex and I hit her and made that big mistakes. Thanks but I I. Don't I regretted you know I used to read before you got past it. Yes yeah we got to let go of those things because they hold. They'll to hold us back right. Yes and I was like if double happen. I wouldn't be here right now making this everything happens for a reason does this is. I'M NOT A. I'm not a a shame to tell you that I mean this is the first time I share share with while with the Fred yes. This is the first time I share this. I mean you're the only one that I share this and I want to be real. You don't want to be a fake. That's why should while so you had these. Some of these. Negative extremes has happened but they are you see now now a stepping-stone side. Of course man. I mean everything that that bad happens in life I mean is more beneficial than and the Gustav who mind that too. Yeah I from from the back from the bad or quote failure experiences. I learned the most when things are good. Ed You know it's like there's not a lot of learning in there because things are good Buick. I was I was like I just figure that out like two years ago. I mean it hasn't been that long that I figure that out I was like well. I've been learning a lot more from the best than the good stuff I mean. Not a lot of people learn from the bad bad situation. Sometimes yeah right they repeat that they just make it bigger and bigger like snowball and I mean you could serve sir. You can see a person that he has the has all that Bad Energy because they carry it in undermine in the everyday life in the way I see is like I'm not going to carry that all my life me. I'm just GONNA putting back out the window. Yeah man that's how I see. Wow so what. When when did you get on the path of reading all the books and you've attended Some personal growth personal transformation seminars. You just like Canada going forward aren't you yes. That's that's what I'm into right now and It's been I think it's been like five years or eight aridity by reading getting more into reading it's been like a year. It's been a year or or only that I've been getting into really more and nine. I'm discovery and all this stuff love. I mean all this knowledge all this wisdom in the books. What's chained how's that helped you mean what would it be found that the nuggets get some of the best nuggets? He got a la man like I was reading on Grand Card Dome last night. I mean two weeks I mean I've been Rian grunter Two weeks from two weeks and I mean he's good isn't Zinni. He changed my whole way the way I look at the world in a major way. Have you read the text and eggs. Yeah and his A seller be sold. The ten exchange changed the way I perceive the world. And this idea that you've got to do ten times more than you think because you know I was is kind of in the mindset of okay. I'm GONNA do one X and get one x result and it just doesn't work that way and yeah and he kinda shifted my mindset you do hey if you do ten x you you might get one extra salt right ten times more. Be Ten times more focused each so he changed the way I look at everything. Yes I mean have that elamine. Before I didn't think about that. See you know changed my perspective. Oh yes I la I mean by Rian that Diab- grand car don't book unease in his opening my mind like you. Haven't you have no clue. I'm like getting all this knowledge. I'm like WHOA. I mean all those things that you can accomplish if you only change your mindset rewire your a whole thinking. You'll perspective all those things man. Not only the the only thing I see I see my future. I see my future in a better better than I am. Today I see my future visualizing yes pitcher and I see my future talking to to all this wealth of people. Yeah I got that sense when we first met you. You have a lot of conviction and you have a lot of presence and your toastmasters. I know you're developing your public speaking skills skills and I want to talk about what your future if you have maybe designed or mapped out a future if you would share with us if you're if if you're wanting to do that as far as where you think you want to be making an impact what you want to be doing but I I got that sense. You have a lot of presence and because I thought you were already doing that when and we were talking a very commanding presence you and I noticed that in route when we were at Ruth's house you notice the hi it comes across and when I found out you're just starting your journey. I was like dude you just starting. I cannot even imagine what's going to. I'd be like when you have integrated all those tools. You've already been building. You seem to have a natural presence a natural commanding presence to you. Now it's only GonNa get better leggy that will you mean commanding. You speak very deliberately. Your voices vary it throws far it Impacts impactful okay. I sense that I use the sense. The people I mean sense that you know like your special to well we all we all have our thing. Don't we have our. Our gift are genius. Of course Miami and allow people can can I can make people uncomfortable optical in what way I myself I think I mean the does one of the things that I've been That I've been noticing noticing that I make people uncomfortable. Yeah we've talked a little bit about that. Maybe maybe that makes maybe it makes them. I'm uncomfortable they see you growing and becoming more successful in getting more on the path of success. And maybe they're not. Is that what you're referring to kind of kind of like the Mir on where they're at and they're it makes people uncomfortable like maybe I'm not doing as much as I could. Maybe not right yes. That's that's one of the things I noticed that I love people. They're just whiny about their life and trust me. I used to do that before I was the I was the one the the was first in line. I used to complain a lot to complain to skews his and I mean to to get rid of them mindset. He takes it takes work. I mean I'm still on stealing DAFFAE's affaisr right now. I mean this leg. You're not gonNA really we. Rewrite your whole software takes it. It takes time because those pageants deeply grooved. I feel the same way you know. There's patterns of like thinking and behavior and it's been it's so familiar to us until until we kind of overtime perjure little off perjury loft. Change Habits changed the way we think right the goals down they won all those scenes. I totally get it. Yes and it is. It's amazing how the mind works in Bethlehem means to right now developing my mind and to become more than I could ever imagine. I mean we leave in energy world. Everything's energy the whole universe and everything nor bodies where machines jeans were. I mean it's Majid as it is magic I mean not allow people to understand about. I mean the way that I see the world right now by getting to all this wisdom into butch looking at the stars the universe how they were born looking backed up into history how humans where were came into the world all those little things men may make you makes you think a wow man I mean that that's another thing see sometimes if people don't stop to think about how magical and divine and just off the charts. The human beings are that we are it's easy to get into a Rut of Oh this limited mindset limited capabilities. I don't you know when you realize we have the whole knowledge and wisdom and power of the universe behind us. I love the quote by Emerson when he says. Hey once you decide the whole universe conspires I to help you make it happen right. We don't enlist you think about that all the time you forget about it because you think. Oh I'm I'm disconnected on just one being out here doing my thing thing with no support system and cut off whatever you'd get like it's hard and challenging. All yes I mean. It's slick right now. I was looking at the trees outside. You know about the weather in the though win high flows will go some leaves CBS. You know I'm like wow man. Paradise this paradise but humans us we make hill right. Yeah because we can has that we have without power mind is so powerful can make heaven what is supposed is to be a heaven experience right they have all this ability to create and we can make it hell by our own thinking so true views but I mean not allow people sitting in notice that mean we live in paradise we do. We have all those things are available for us. I mean all these beautiful things like watermelon cantaloupe cucumber all these fruits all these these Yeah all those just little things that you think that they're not like important but I mean if you stop for a second and notice that I mean you will see that you live in paradise right. Yeah because it's all perspective isn't one of the things I find really fascinating you know. Even though we're all on one planet and we come from the same place for going to the same place we all have vastly different experiences. And you gotta Ask Yourself. Why is that happening? Why is there you're a super-rich super healthy successful person? And someone who is not like on the other end of the spectrum even though we come in from the same place live on the the same planet. What's the difference and I attribute it to like perspective and what you feel is possible? What you think is possible? Now you look at the world cause some people able to see the world in that way they see only a terrible place where bad things happen. Where things don't work out? Trust me man I been there. That's like saying you kind of transcended that yes I I work. I am a maintenance guy right now. for cars. You knew and I see that in my co workers that they don't they don't inspire to become more. I asked them. Hey what are your goals. The how many goals and they're like I mean they don't their goals that are not that high right. You'd be high end like you can probably relate. I mean there was a time when I didn't have any goals when I was on autopilot just day by day by day. Okay Day which was fine but I was not doing what I came here to do. which push push into the unknown and create stuff and sounds? It's like you've been there to where you're just on autopilot Noguchi Vision for your life doesn't really fascinating that that is exactly exactly right. I mean I is in this corker. Their Lake They're whine nine about the. How much are they getting pay? But they don't they don't change it. I mean they don't do nothing to change that she'd Me Right I. Aw One of the things that I do is not to one. It's a big win isn't it. Yeah 'cause perpetuates This situation gives energy to what maybe isn't working out the way you want right right. Yeah if things aren't working the way I want is because of me. Not Not because of my surroundings. Now I'm not gonNA blame anyone one hours but me I am. I am the one that could make this better. I like that. Yeah so what do you think about the future. Wouldn't you would have some vision. Some goals some impact. You WanNa make in the world. Have you got some designed down. We'd be willing to share with us. Or what were you at. Where am I right? Now is My pursued God. I mean my how do you say you passionately purpose. My passion my purpose and it's kind of funny because before any eighty used to have a passion I don. I understood that were passion. You're not even mediocrity procrastination. All these words I mean. I didn't even have a clue do any. They came by Aydin even bother of acknowledging than trying to find out what what is the meaning of the word. I mean I was like Ch- going through live like Psalm. I call this a some me. I'll call a call person Asami when they don't have no dreams that just go the just go by live life. I mean all the routines and all I mean. There's nothing wrong with them. But I mean he's like your dad he alive uh-huh I call that drifting because I've drifted for many you go with the current. You like whatever prevailing winds are going to push you unless you have your sales up in your engine engine ongoing support you want. I totally get that I. I've drifted before was just like. Oh I'm at the mercy of my country or my employer employer my CD whatever they're gonNA dictate on my life's GonNa play out single years and I mean I used to be like like them but not anymore I mean I know passion something burning. Desire Man is like you. You walk into a building in fire. You Get burnt. Because you're you're orient fire. goswell awesome excited. I mean sometimes I feel I feel like I don't WanNa do nothing but sometimes I'm like I got a commandment I gotta do this. I gotTa do this. Why because I want to inspire I want to and and not even thought about a write in a book but I thought about this? You need to put your stories really really inspiring and I know that it goes can wake up a lot of people like because some people may not know they're in that experience yet know how good life could get a right that they're living in that mediocrity. That's why that's why I wanted you to you in a shared. I think it's been awesome sand. Well that's an awesome experience for me because I mean meeting you in. I've been meeting a lot of people have. I've been meeting a lot of people that the are in the same frequency as mean. They're they're once you're the same frequency. You guys command fascinating. How did you start to change what you're focusing on in life? You meet people in that same in the same area of life. I mean it's not not only that I mean it's like me. I noticed that when when I start talking to someone about all that I mean to not. I'm not afraid of share my ideas. I'm not afraid. We pull our freight sometimes. Yes yes you afraid of sharing dreams goals amount of frame. I'll share with you. I mean you could give me into trouble. I mean in with someone that wants to take advantage of you right or maybe make like you said some people uncomfortable. But that's the price you gotTa Pay Right. I mean if if people want to take advantage of me will be state you know but I'm not sure because I want to I want I don't I don't want to hold it. Hold hold back anything. Yeah that's what I think is really cool. Yeah super cool and I mean it's like you're gonNA make make an uncomfortable by sharing although stuff because they don't see themselves like and what am I doing. Are they taking the wrong way or right. Well one of the things that I'm that I have studied a lot in my work and in my journey is this idea of changing our self concept and changing like who we are in a show up in the world and that's your story of transformation and how you were different person living in mediocrity not having any goals and now you're personnel that changes. Your family dynamics your friend dynamics because you we fit in in a spot in people's lives and when we change who we are we don't fit that aspire anymore of course and when you don't fit the spot with your friends and family you know they've either they have a choice. They can either accept the new you and like integrated in Dan or resist it and become uncomfortable or not like it or whatever doesn't always have to be a separation but when you change especially actually radically oftentimes friendships change in family situations. Change Work Situations. I mean it's just the way that it is. You know unlimited you something man. I know. I'm changing I know. I'm changing because of many reasons with my family right now I mean like I know. They're like 'cause I post anything. I think anything that comes into my mind. Just go to phrase I've been doing that two or three weeks ago since a three weeks ago. I've been doing where everything whatever comes into my mind. I'm going to shed should even though they don't like it. They like it or not. I don't care I mean this is the way thing in does the wait. Why why do that is because me? I WANNA see all my changes. I WANNA see when when I'm in the in the top. I WanNa see how started all the things I did. He know to scenes all the stuff. I mean an in- an alarm my in France that I have I mean. They're not they're not in my circle. Normal why because we we share AH different mindset like you were saying yeah I mean we're not in the same mindset anymore I mean lying's lions in needles fly alone. Yeah I've heard them so many successful people that are successful you get that. It's like a solo journey. I mean because people I look at it this way. We're all on our individual journey in life in the people in our family. Our friends they're not mid to go on our journey. They have their Own like the hero's journey right that he wrote goes alone he gets assistant. See your she gets assistance at times. But no one's meant to go on a journey with the so I I totally have seen that in successful people. I feel that in my own journey like this. It's an individual pathway all walkie ah Lim Limited about About about that about successful people I mean like I was listening to this I was listening to Jim Brown to one a Husam. Bdo's he made and one of the things he said he was by. If you want to be successful in life study success if you want to be happy study happiness. I love that if you want to be a lawyer. Study Law all those things I was like. I want to be successful. Well what do I have to do. Started successful people Sunday. So that's what I'm doing renounced successful people and I I am I am. I've been studying them in. I see old off hurdles that they go through life and how they started. I mean some Oprah Winfrey infrastructure from bottom Elon. Musk my hero. who started from the bottom to these guys are high performance Does what I'm going to become. I perform use person who I love that. It's awesome uh-huh well Sam I really appreciate hanging out with me as has been super inspiring and I know it's GonNa Inspire a lot of people too. I know I know does does one one of my goals in life to inspire my purpose to inspire and create a lot of wealth. One this one of my main things to create allow wealth wealth to share it with whole world. Does I leave in a state of UH abundance right now. Nine nine that night in the state of the scarcity like before I I used to live in new in a state of scarcity that if I'm if I do favor I was expecting something back from you. That's what I said by sketchy. Yeah yeah mom like a the way we want With Dow suspecting something turn was awesome. That's how that's I I've been in in that situation to where you just giving unconditionally and because it fills your cup up and it's it's it's exp exceptionally beneficial for us of course and I mean if you share I mean if you if you collaborate the daughters me you can gain more than just expecting something in return whatever Yeah Lake like. That's that's how I see myself. Since ice stuttered started living in a state abundance. I see I see a lot of -tunities I see fascinating. Yeah Yeah they're all always out. There can't seem if you're not in that mindset right yes I mean it's like grand on. I was watching a video like a few minutes ago and he was saying on. I mean I all I see's money everywhere I all. I see super tunes. Because he's he's in a state of abundance he doesn't have a scarcity mindset. Does that's how I seen. I mean this guy is crazy. Yeah he he is. And that's another thing you know now. All of his companies and all of his wealth at he's creating and helping people create wealth and shifting the way they see the world he all pulled that out of nothing. Those things things did not exist but he made them exist in his mind first and then created them in the world. You help people become wealthy. And that's why he's in south becoming more wealthy and the funny thing is that I don't know I don't know about you about my mind is thinking like Oh that's not true. I mean He. He just saying that toothed boost sal I mean that's that's what my part of that limiting limiting thinking that you're purging out. I'm like that too. Yeah you're like this skepticism system. Because you know if you didn't come from that were raised in that type of mindset again. It sometimes takes a constant tending to to maintain contain that mindset of abundance otherwise. Because I believe that if we don't tend to our mental garden grows weeds and it comes dilapidated. We have to constantly repair it water. I put nutrients in soil. It's like a daily thing. Otherwise you know tends towards chaos sunny tend toward that predominantly. There's a scarcity in kind of poverty consciousness business in the world you know. That's why I only five percenter. Successful one percent are successful. The majority of people I think they live in in the middle part and or the lower part undo. Take I think it takes tending just like takes tending to our body to keep your body in shape takes ten into our mind to keep our mind in shapes. I totally get that that. Sometimes we can slip back gin. If we're not constantly reminding ourselves we live in an abundant universe there there is no scarcity. There's only opportunity you know. Oh yes I mean. It's Lake Nick before I used to wait Three hundred pounds. Did you really. Yes reality the pound to twenty one three hundred so you were big man. You just big no really big gummy. You're going to see my my you will see my checks. They were like bill three hundred pounds. Hundred Pounds yes and that happened when I was Mary. You know like the hours relieve stress that taking care of yourself any caused a lotta an Saiidi although stuff I mean all the best I mean and right now that I'm the rams going through all this one a main thing is health. I mean if you WANNA help people if you want to gain wealth you need to be healthy. It's true yeah you need to have a wealthy minded to like a healthy mind. Yeah it's all connected isn't it. Everything's GonNa Energy in our body. I think about that a lot too. You know if we don't have the energy or feel good can't produce we can do our work in the world And allow people what you have in your mind. You Project you project into your body body body is a reflection right there. Yeah whatever you have hearing my. You're going to play with your body. Sure Yeah and he makes a lot of sense. Yes it makes a lot of sense but not not allowed before understand that. That is one one of the things that I I thought I heard from. I don't remember what hurt but it makes a lot of sense that it makes a lot of sense and I mean all these things that I've been through in life it's an experienced that I'm not gonNA forget you know because I mean is the bad things like I say. I've been more from the bat thing. Yeah death move. They make a bigger impact in our lives. Still think yes I used to regret are things but now like now all it all goes into bucket. It's all now yes and I'm lady is I'm not I'm make it remember memorable. I'm giving I we. A lot of people can can look NC into their lives. But that's what I want to accomplish that it's my purpose in life life and and I have a lot of Ho- how big oh I know you. Yes like a- sure this I'm I'm a chiller I say I'm a tremendous yet. Anybody Acer or would just don't see it true if you have your legs you had your if you have your hands in your mentality you have everything. There's no excuses you have everything. I'm already amateur leaner. Yeah Yeah. It's Awesome Sam. Thank you so much for sharing your story and I I look forward to following your journey and seen what buildings L. D. scores Mark. I believe one day I'll I'm going to be wealthy. I do too. I believe there. Yeah it's about it's all about believing And I believe There's there's some big big walls but that is I'm not gonNA stop me. No that is not going to stop me. I'm willing I'm willing to buy food for Madrid and that's Willisch in that. Once that conviction is there nothing can hold hold you back is not known in. I'm willing to die. I I really didn't once I put everything like I was. I was like I'm GonNa go for it you know and I'm gonNA share this in the future. I'm going to share this with you. Yeah Ah Lim back on this year. We're going to look back into this. And this moment is going to be is GonNa be special right now is being history is moment. I believe I ready to. That's why I'm doing this excited. Yeah Sam thank you so much chatting with me I have through thank you thank you mark. I mean I'm really grateful and though it's a little noisy but I mean we're just excuses uses that's what it's all about excuses and tenets atoll ten x there it is awesome. I love of it. You're welcome well. What did you think isn't that awesome? Can you see the presence. And can you feel and hear the presence in Sam's voice in the conviction and I'm sure you came away with the same conclusion that I had. I have no doubt he's going to go on to create amazing things. And I'M GONNA be watching the journey and hopefully be able to hook up with him when he has created some of the things that he's working on right now and we can look back and reflect and talk about the experience from here from this point until that point right right because all it is is a continuous journey of creation. Isn't it for all of us. And that's what I find is fascinating is to check in with people from time to time as their in their journey of creation nation to see what lessons learned right. We can talk about best practices and we can share what what worked. And what hasn't and and that way. We can go further faster and we can all aw level up are experience based on learning from one another coming together and share in these best practices for living. So I'm really excited. I WanNa thank Sam Sam. Thank you so much for joining joining me on this episode and sharing your experience I really do appreciate it and remember you can always find all of these interviews and every episode of enhancing the human experience as as well as on the go. That's my car. Log Video Style series you can find all those Pieces of content on Youtube Channel. which is YouTube dot com slash g Mark Mark Phillips as you know? I've been putting a lot of effort and emphasis on video. Format video content. And you'll find all that at YouTube dot com slash G Mark Phillips Ellipse. Also lots of good things. Lots of awesome things coming down the line and building a set so I can film youtube videos and Youtube live series and really putting a lot of emphasis on youtube getting way outside of my comfort zone and embracing video in a real way in a real big way so be sure to subscribe also so last but not least if this inspired you which. I'm sure it did leave a comment beneath the video on YouTube dot com slash g Mark Phillips Episode One. Thirty four leave a comment. Let me know your thoughts your experiences how you were inspired. If you WANNA share what. You're creating please do that. That's a great platform to do that again. Inspires other people and Inspires me and when you share and put your your What you WANNA create out there to the world and it kind of solidifies is it? I know that when I'm getting close to something that I want to create when I've got it almost done I need that extra push right. I definitely share it with my the audience and it kind of holds me accountable. Now having said that there's there's an incubation period and I know people fall into two different types of camps in this for for for this KYW type of idea. If you don't feel comfortable sharing don't share you do not have to share. You can keep it close to the vest until it's ready to kind of hatch or ready to come into the world or emerge. That's totally fine. But if you WANNA share if you ready to make us you know put it out there and get some accountability for sure. Share leave a comment. mm-hmm it beneath the video at YouTube dot com slash g Mark Phillips and again. I want to thank you for listening. I really do appreciate it. I know there are so many podcast out there and I love the factor listening to this one so until next time I wish you all the best helped Walton success bye bye.

Sam Sam Youtube Ruth Romero Mark Phillips Mark Mark Phillips Co Yeah Lake Rian grunter Gene Mark Phillips consultant Abraham Hicks Figueroa Wan Buick Canada mark perjury nuggets Oprah Winfrey
Cultivating Corporate Social Responsibility With Tontine RSE Founder Sophia Lara-Grine | ETHX 130

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

16:00 min | 1 year ago

Cultivating Corporate Social Responsibility With Tontine RSE Founder Sophia Lara-Grine | ETHX 130

"To you from Boise Idaho Come From and how they apply creativity in their business and personal lives. Now here's your host Mark Phillips along with Special Guest Interviewer Mark Stinson a human experience a world of creativity a series of unique interviews with successful people from around the globe how they get inspired where their ideas fascinated DESA FIA by sort of the Organization the cause and the purpose of of your new firm to- teen Difficu- interview with Sophia and another colleague in Delhi redrew so but we wanted to continue I was because you know working in small company yes are and the fact that you know sort of has a social basis but I wanted to understand more how it was organized than and how it's working for are you I know it's a couple of years in the making and so just give us a little update on the company the Organization and some of the things that you're doing working also engaged and some simple that scene was about rents so far I will ask or your Dr Savage waste with the money's meaning that's all old movies I call those onstage like very small day over France started working actually your chainmail welcome back to this session where we're talking with Sophia about her special project and now we just had boot smoke things or exam whole catching a Japanese sport agencies printing teas how ninety sites about market I games there is what I'm going to say say say for example I'm willing to do that all this not a whole lot of worke needs you've been either small things this thing with knowledgeable the scientists north as Mike is not phone while her we use for the credits uh-huh Yes yes of course Sarah Branch team I believe it's not their own and the Knox name loves inch way this Sunday meaning that its chancellor I like here is to have a challenge round humbling years the warming that I say that is wasted more citizen about slummy source yet of the day and this in a win win museum said so maybe what walk as the take the idea to me was to rate something where people yet also for a social cause or nonprofit contribution that it it really served both both causes both needs are to be given to nonprofit organization that people will be choosing is this case the productivity vestments or for some needs of all of three hundred you know the operations of it but this idea that you know you would feel more ownership in the company savings but not just for the Prophet Sake but percents then Shari's then all her savings are for the team for many that sends can be used for so yeah that that's what I found and of course I was trying to do my best to translate it to understand ooh balance I caught system retirees people citizens unuseful Florida territory wear of the because it felt support life so it's mets people will have never during those savings it is useful in a d just a whole knows merits Maltese and they'll savings what he is let's see something you can find out who are who leads the viewers are there helping nonprofit lunch knew that is able Howard course it's like my lifelong one thank you so much mark for us or you're entrusting project so right now the only money in the company and the ladies who also see us our policy have used and they have saved our lives you how it works how I'm I agree I wasn't how by her I mean for example Khalid and that had cancer and each turns out that purposes Russian help you process and you haven't heard of it how did the humanize make more human on say okay this week I'm willing to pay more to ensure of my business that says if you do save some money but we can also then donate whether that's for clean water or for you know helping the homeless or very soft you know do what's the purpose of the company but you're helping to operationalize it by creating this platform serving more also be more waiting for being active living monkey the people want to work with a company that has a higher purpose you know they're just not serving the shareholders but they're also serving the community but but it's or four you know training new workers in new technology something something that has a broader impact and so you've taken something from the concept and making a real you know like I said operational platform and that's what I found really intriguing and I hope you're getting some traction with it Johnson -bility is on so many people's minds and there are surveys both in the states and internationally about they have chosen nonprofit organization you want us to you and I think The reason I was intrigued by it and I think other people would would be interested is you're right this this concept of corporate social these kids aren't power about topics especially and walser allows small yes because have you ever day companies and society are links so your company using to retiring where there is a lot John and thinking about charging a whole use lawrence really about rated well we have been working market research you see the more more and more anxious about what they who seeing viewing news want serve you won't serve the business either and the sacrifices people working in company they are citizens so the whole project in that sense yes starting two years now on this year because I'm now I have a march of women that are your example well very lean so one September I'm them work it's terrific it's very exciting and so telling her listeners where they can go to find more information about your company and maybe

Boise Idaho Mark Phillips Mark Stinson two years
Tune In To High Vibration Emotions With The Preferred Experiences Mug | ETHX 120

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

07:32 min | 1 year ago

Tune In To High Vibration Emotions With The Preferred Experiences Mug | ETHX 120

"Welcome to episode one hundred twenty of enhancing human experienced podcast. I'm so glad you tuned in today on this episode. I'm going to be sharing with you just the audio portion of a recent blog post that i posted at the focus and flow log at focusing flow dot c._o. Or on my youtube channel at youtube dot com slash g._s. Mark phillips this video. The audio that pulled from this video is all about the preferred experiences mug now. I've talked about the preferred experiences shirt before and now how that idea that concept is available on a coffee mug any either a black or white version again. You can find these all to focus flow store at focusing flow dot c._o. But i thought i'd share that with you. In this episode this week's episode of the hint hanson human experience podcast because is it is really important to know the experiences that you wanna have if we don't know what we want. There's really no way we're ever going to arrive there. There's no way we're going to get there and that is the key that's where the rubber hits the road knowing how you want to feel the emotions that you wanna have the experiences that you want to have in life puts you into alignment with situations that are gonna bring you those experiences. That's why i'm so enthusiastic about these. The preferred experienced line of products so one thing that i did not do individual as i didn't read all of the experiences on a mug. I don't think i've done this actually with the preferred experiences shirt either course you can see them when you go to the website but i'm going to read from the mug all the experiences here now as i do this. This is how i think of it one. You may be asking yourself. Is there a rhyme or reason to the order that these words are are in. You know what of course there's a reason right. I'm super meticulous about the way i ordered these words and the way they go in sequence on on this preferred experiences on the experiences product regardless of the product you find it on where shirt mug whatever else coming down the line the sequence will always say the same aim the experiences with all was. We'll always stay the same so yes. There's there is a method to the madness and hopefully you kinda tune into that as you listen to this me read read these but then after i read it we will jump right into the audio and you can listen to this audio version of the recent video that i posted on the focus and flow of log all right so i'm reading from the mug here so just kinda sit back get tuned in getting a relaxed state eight and listen to these peak experiences health wealth and success passion purpose jason meaning gratitude appreciation and acceptance peace prosperity and abundance fun freedom and adventure enthusiasm excitement and zest friendship love and connection awareness understanding and enlightenment vim vigor and vitality alignment satisfaction wellbeing fulfillment contentment empowerment optimism anticipation and eagerness happiness joy and bliss that what is the preferred experiences mug. You see why i'm excited about this right so i talk about what the impetus was for the smog or a portion of the impetus was for this mug in the audio that you're gonna listen to so without further ado. Let's jump into that and again. Thanks for listening. I really really do appreciate it and thank you this week. Episode of enhancing human experience podcast all the best health welton success enjoy the audio welcome to another episode of the focus and flow blog. I know it's been forever since i posted a blog update eight and shared a product with you or some insights to help you on your journey but i am really excited to share this new product. This has been in the store for a while now and i call it the preferred experiences mug earlier i shared the preferred experiences shirt with which is currently available in long sleeve and most also coming up with a couple of different options and different font style a little bit different vibe with a different layout for short sleeves and some other products at a pair of putting that on there but this i'm super excited about so this is a mug version and as you can see it is available. This is the black doc version right here. It comes available in white as well as black to white. Obviously has black writing on there then to black here has the the white. I'm really excited about this month. Because when you start your day being tuned in to the experiences that you want to have in your life you're going to attract those experiences right what we think about we bring about. We'll be focused on expands. That's the core principle of the corp philosophy of the focusing flow product line caroline and the folks emplo mug here or excuse me different experiences mug. Here is one that i'm really excited about. Let's let's talk about where i get these ideas from a lot of these experiences come from the abraham hicks scale scale of vibrations and at the very top end of that scale you have things like joy and happiness and bliss and you know optimism and positive expectancy those types of things as you can see here on the mug we have all of these types of experiences right well-being anticipation all of the things that we all want this is really super super excited about this whole mug here and and the potential for you know awesome experiences that it will help you tune into because at the end of the day it's all about tuning in so this is available right now currently only in the focusing slow store and look for more products and apparel with dip referred experiences ideas on them to coming coming down on the road and coming into the store or very soon if you haven't subscribed to the focus and flow email lists go ahead and do that that would be super awesome and you can stay up to date with all these new products wchs and apparel. I haven't really done a whole bunch there with that because i'm working on some other products and putting together courses and stuff like that but that's on my list to start developing that i've got some content extremes that i think healthy on your journey hope you tune in focus on the things that you want to have in life but go check out some of the products and apparel in the store tat focusing flow dot c._o. Until next time i wish you all the best health wealth and success. Thanks so much for watching have an awesome day bye-bye.

abraham hicks Mark phillips hanson jason
The Power Of Play | ETHX 127

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

07:21 min | 1 year ago

The Power Of Play | ETHX 127

"Coming to you from Boise Idaho the fastest this growing city in the US and recognized as one of the most creative and vibrant cities to live in this is a special edition of enhancing the human experience experience a world of creativity a series of unique interviews with successful people from around the globe how they get inspired where their ideas come from and how they apply creativity in their business and personal lives now. Here's your host Mark Phillips along with Special Guest Interviewer Mark Stinson. I'm Mark Phillips Sam here with Mark Stinson. We are the CO hosts a world of creativity the series inside of enhancing human experience mark how great to talk with the again yeah absolutely What do you got for us today. Well we we've been conducting some fantastic interviews with folks and along the way we've been asking them what were some of their influences and inspirations and might have been a mentor and might have been a book it might have been a class. They took that sort the thing so we thought as we're continuing to schedule interviews into the future we'd also offer a little snack size bite size inspiration from a book that inspired me I've been going back through my library and just sorta wanted to update some of the key principles some of these important innovation patie- influences that have that have helped me and I thought we cheer that absolutely. Let's hear what she got well. The the book today is called play and how it shapes the brain opens the imagination and invigorates the soul which is a terrific absolutely but this idea of play. The author is Stuart Brown. He's an MD but he's also the founder of something called the National Institute for play. So here's a guy who's a medical doctor. A psychiatrist a clinical clinical researcher that founds an institute for play well no medicine and his whole fought here is that play is as big a part of our daily life. You know that can be an important factor for fulfilled. We feel and how creative we we feel not just being happy but really being able to sustain social relationships think about when you were a kid. Your social relationship was built around playing yeah. So why don't we do that more. We think of work networking. Why don't we have play networking. Wouldn't that be a lot more fun. I would so ah Dr Brown Dr Stewart Brown shares release a stick step framework. He says the first thing about play is the anticipation that you can't wait to go outside and play where I can't wait to open the game. You know I can't wait. I mean there's game nights every night of the week. At some game shoprite is it doesn't have to be soccer or something yeah but and then the second is the surprise and play has the surprise element like. I didn't know it would be this this fun or I didn't know who would be playing and so. There's a bit of surprise. The third is of course the pleasure. This is really been enjoyable. I've enjoyed it. The fourth is then. There's an understanding I learned something from this game or I never thought I would be this good at this game or I really didn't know that I would learn how these people I interact with. The fifth is strength and a lot of play from an exercise standpoint. Is You gain strength. You gain stamina you gain you know even strength the mind and then six poise that the more you play. Hey the more you able to relate to each other and the better you're able to be coached. You know things like that so it was really terrific. I really really appreciated the fact that he has a play assessment or a play history and I would challenge our listeners to take this poll mentally if you're listening and while you're driving you're listening while you're reading about these questions for a second. The first is when have you felt free to be and and do what you choose and usually. That's why you're playing. You know we're doing something you find enjoyable. When would that be for you. listeners second. Is there a part of your life right now. That play fits into next. What do you feel stands ends in the way of your achieving more personal time. PERP for play for freedom and then finally are you able to feel feel what engages you the most effortlessly because it's play you know I don't have to do it. You know and you think about even when you go to sports or something that you know I really don't WanNa go to is it still play it so gray area right it is yeah so the the author encourages us to expose ourselves to more play nourish our sense of play and this is. I really found this book on a and reminder yeah go ahead well. No it's just a great reminder. We we forget we grown up and we're like I'm done playing. I'm an adult now. I'm going to do my thing yes. We don't have time to play adopt. Arnold claim to be seen now. Were you know now. I feel like cats in the cradle song coming on you. Don't have time to play. I'll get back after work. It's like well. No it's the time to the we you know the value of playing opens up that channel for creative ideas and spray. Shin absolutely thanks for sharing. Stay tuned for more of these great interviews. We'll have with creative people from around the world but in the meantime hope you enjoyed this book review with an by the way and mark. You always say this at the end of every podcast but we'd love your comments. We thank you for your suggestions. If there's a favorite book you half please put it in the notes. Please put it in the comments wherever you've been listening to your podcast is great reminder that Yeah I love that. Thanks for reminding us all right signing off We'll talk to you soon bye. No thanks for listening to this special edition of enhancing the human experience a world of creativity with Mark Phillips. If you like this episode and want to know more checkout G Mark Phillips Dot Com and please leave us a review on Youtube itunes or wherever however you get your podcasts see exile

Mark Phillips Mark Stinson Mark Phillips Sam Dr Brown Dr Stewart Brown Boise Idaho US Stuart Brown soccer researcher shoprite Youtube MD National Institute founder Arnold Shin six poise
Successfully Balance Creative and Analytical Activities With Marty Johnson | ETHX 125

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

38:02 min | 1 year ago

Successfully Balance Creative and Analytical Activities With Marty Johnson | ETHX 125

"<music> coming to you from boise idaho the fastest fastest growing city in the u._s. and recognized as one of the most creative and vibrant cities to live in this is a special edition of enhancing the human inexperience a world of creativity a series of unique interviews with successful people from around the globe how they get inspired where their ideas come from tom and how they apply creativity in their business and personal lives now. Here's your host mark phillips along with special guest interviewer mark steyn welcome to another episode of a world of creativity special series on enhancing the human experience mark phillips. I'm here with mark stinson mark. How are you. I'm good mark. We've really got an exciting interview and i think people are really again like it. I think one of the things that <hes> this guest margaret mardy johnson is an accomplished attorney and as a lawyer you know i knew of his very analytical thinking and i was hoping to hear about some of his creative pursuits in passions almost like as a diversion like here's a chance for me to get away from this analytical thinking but i think i you heard it differently <hes> the way he said these creative procedurally feed is <hes> you know so both sides of the brain get fed <hes> and i think the listeners are really gonna find. You know how that works for mardi useful yeah one of i feel the same way after hearing him talk talk about how he compartmentalized his different passions and how they feed feed one another and they support one another and they kind of you know work in. It's like a assistant. I thought it was really fascinating. That's why we dive a little deeper into how he does that because a lot of people can't do that well exactly and it's a it's a very popular taught to say that you should be whole brain thinker. Don't just be left hand left brain. Don't just be right brain but the the way he describes it and the way it works for him again. I think it's very practical and <hes> i think very useful. <hes> and i think people can get a lot aww it so. I'm happy to share it. Yeah i am too wall lunch. Jump into the interview and see what marnie has to say. Welcome to another episode of enhancing human experience for instance world of creativity. I'm mark phillips. I'm here with mark. Stinson wilhelm are great and we have with us mark johnson on the line here marty. How are you good morning gentlemen. Everything's great awesome era. Where where are you guys located this morning in. We're in boise idaho in boise. Okay hey great. You say you're in shreveport yeah. We have a little more heat than you bargained a lot more a lot more humidity so mark. Tell me how you know marty. Marty is <hes> an attorney now entry ford but we'd go back all the way to high school days and <hes>. We had a a lot of creative pursuits together in high school. You know creativity has a whole nother meaning of course but <hes> always thought <hes> you know one way to to really attract the girls in high school would be learn how to play the guitar because then you know the campfire songs and they'd say play song for me and whatever but marty had the trump that and learn how to play the banjo the band joe was more cruel and attracted talk to play the banjo just about as well as you learned how to play the guitar. Which was that is true. It isn't it kind of all about holding banjo. As fifty percent of the the gig young. I didn't lot of it has to do and i didn't realize this at the time and this is what kept me from progressing any any farther than i did was it has to do with how you use your fingers it around the neck to to do what they call hammer the streams and you're literally pressing down or very quickly on the strings on the neck at the same time. You're picking with your other hands and that's what makes it sound like it playing so fast. Wow yeah that was a long time ago. I had our i'm digging way back into the vault on these are about pushing in sixty in the end. You're talking about half a century of total between the two of us a full century and experiences and you go. We'll be here until nine o'clock tonight. So <hes> so obviously these creative pursuits <hes> in our took different directions <hes> we both did some time in radio <hes> <hes> d._j.'s local stations and martin continued that <hes> on a part time basis a lot longer than i did but <hes> i want my advertising avenue <hes> as i said marty lawyer a well accomplished attorney in town <hes> and marty. I guess that's that's where we're intrigued by this overlap of business and you know whether it be other creative pursuits as hobbies. He's as passions <hes> how how do you leverage all of that creative energy and channel that into the various parts of what you're doing in life well. One of the things that that i've always heard is that you know trying to focus on one thing. You'll get really good at it. If you try to spread yourself out and attack a lot of different pursuits he won't really get very getting any one of them in as they are for some reason my interest have been so the very going back to childhood basically my interest in radio was picked by my grandfather who was a ham radio operator and it just absolutely blew my mind that you could talk over the air to somebody ten states away. I just thought that was the coolest thing in the world and that's what got me interested in radio. In somehow i got interested in photography and i've been doing that for a long time and i got interested in video editing drones and and doing that kind of stuff <hes> i i guess spent enough time at it all of those things to get relatively good it some of them but i never really felt that was good enough in any of them to make a living at it so that's when i went to law school if had a very wonderful career that over the years in new orleans realize this until about ten or fifteen years ago those two things enable me at least to <hes> <hes> exercise one half of the brain and then the other half of the brain in sort of an alternative way. I can do something creative creative. <hes> take pictures edit pictures <hes> do things of that nature <hes> when i was doing and then you know go to work and spend time using debt side of my brain that requires <hes> logic in in critical thinking and analytical thinking but it's a the process of being being thankful to have the freedom to be able to do both <hes> and it sorta for me kind of a time of day thing certain times of the day i may have the creative straight great going and other times of the day usually have the the analytical streak going but but the key to keep both of them fresh i think is to alternate them and not spend too much time on warranted the exclusion or the other that's interesting because i was wondering whether you know you're saying one side feeds the other <hes> but this idea of alternating alternating what what what do you think is happening in that creative side of the brain to. I guess what <hes> fresh in it. You know keep the the thinking fresh chemical happening in there. What's the rush that you get from. These creative sides well there. There are actual ethics studies john some of the the workout did don't work on cases involve people that have a claim to have brain injury from accidents and i've had an opportunity to study up up and learn a little bit on the different of sectors of brain the different structures within the brain and <hes> what part does what in how they interact with one another another and <hes> a lot of that escapes me now because i guess <hes> not working on it and have it worked on it in a couple of months but the gist of it is i believe that it has to do with a allowing one part to rest while the other part is working <hes> when i'm doing analytical olitical work associated with the practice of law that creative side of the brain is <hes> having an opportunity to west and recharge and rejuvenate for the next time. I choose to call on it to do something and for me. A lot of it is is a time of day issue. <hes> i i tend to be more can't really say whether it's more creative or analytical in the morning but it's one or the other if it's if it's a weekend day i attend to be creative in the morning. If it's a weekday when i'm at the office it is definitely the analytical side because <hes> i get the vast majority of my legal work done don between seven thirty in the morning at one thirty in the afternoon and after that i start to fade a little bit in the creative side will take over when i go home in the evening may wanna pull out some pictures and shot in a a wedding reception two months ago and tweak them a little bit because that's one thing kind of getting back to your original point in question question mark is that i find that if you're working on something of a creative nature and you have been working on it for thirty minutes minutes or an hour or two hours eventually get to a point where you're just blocked out and it doesn't work anymore and <hes> i found myself editing like i'll shoot some video drones ooh and i'll be gathering little clips from five or six locations taken over the course of a month or so and i'm i'm trying to get them put put into a single cohesive piece of work. It's about a minute and a half long that that fits the attention span of most human beings. I'll how work on it for a while and after a while you think man this is just not working. This is just not happening now. Step away from it and come back three days later and bam all of a sudden it hits. You like wow wow this is what this is how i envisioned it and you. Just you know go through it. Incomplete it quickly after that so i think a lot of it has to do with time of day how much time you've been so you spent focusing on one thing getting away from it and then coming back to it later insane it in a completely different light and being able to complete whatever project it was and have have come out the way you saw it in your head and it sounds like you're able to compartmentalize. You know there's activities in other words. You're not over analyzing the editing or you're not over analysing the the choices <hes> photographs or something and maybe <hes> on the analytical side. You're not over creating or a making up data facts you know case so it was segment those things and it's it's it's a clarity of thought kind of issue when after i've been doing something you know involved with the creative eight if pursued for a period of time i'm better able to <hes> sit down in front of a computer or with a book or some briefs or papers in front of me and and clearly think as to how those pieces fit together <hes> in a in a more empirical in objective way so it's it's it's two completely different processes. I guess there's some cognitive overlap between the two but they still have more often than not more things more distinct features than they have in common and and i guess one feeding the other <hes> do do you find that your analyses. You know oh you were saying hey. We're gonna go to the brief. I'm gonna look at the case. I'm going to look at the facts of the case is your creative interpretation of the case more more more enlightened against informed by the creative side and you go i i. I got some light bulbs going on here. Yet can be here. Here's a really good example of that. I think when you for example when you're preparing to present a case to jury <hes> <hes> most of the time early in my career like most lawyers. I think it's most common you wait till the last minute to really even start thinking about how you're going to go about doing net because you're spending all your time interviewing witnesses taking depositions doing all of these nuts and bolts things <hes> to try to gather as much information about applications. You can and you're not really when you're doing that. You're not really thinking about how to present it in the form of a story and that's the key and i learned five five or six years ago that through the process of reading materials attending seminars and stuff that that process is very much like telling a story like writing screenplay and if you talk to any screenwriter they're gonna tell you. The first draft is never the one that gets put on film. You start out with a story and over time it's constantly being revised and updated than there's a creative element to that. You're trying to think of the case in terms of how can i <hes> tell this in present this information in a way that will hold the interest a judge or a jury and i think that process employees some of the creative elements that that been talked about a little earlier yeah <hes> great you know you mentioned something earlier in the podcast here about how you are multi passionate and have a lot of things that you want to pursue. I think a lot of people struggle with that so i'd like if you can unpack that a little bit and talk about your own journey because for some people it's hard to cut off those things things and they carry all that baggage with them every day and do ten different things at a mediocre level or mid level. How did you trim the compartmentalize. Departmental is those and focus on one thing and still have those passions that you still do. How did you do that well. I guess it it it has something to do with the fact that the the things that i enjoyed photography the radio in any of the other number things are strictly for fun. All it and don't have to rely on them. I hope to someday. I hope that someday i can step away from the law practice this in five or ten years and if i'm still healthy enough still be able to engage in some of those creative pursuits if sort of a side hustle ritchie here so much talked about today the date to earn a little income but <hes> the interest in in photography. I'm not sure where it came from. I started about forty years ago. Sutin film had a darkroom. Mark probably remembers the darker. My parents talk round boy. My parents had a guest bathroom. Catherine set it up as dark room and played around with that and had a little overlap with the radio. What about my boss at. The radio station. I worked at howard clark was was a very well known national guy. Programmer famous disc jockey worked all over the country back in the sixties and seventies he was very he was photography. Nut cut in and he taught me a lot. He gave me a lot of tools to to learn into <unk>. Does things like for your out have said exposure on camera how to evaluate light in again. This is getting into the process of that some of that kind of stuff martin one of the interesting things he gave me insight on how to study what other people do like he was a big ansel adams fanatic and and he said look there are three books ends adams wrote about photography ones about the camera once about the negative ones about the crazy said you gotta read those three books and i did it was fascinating. They're not easy read like reading a textbook really take a lot from that and <hes> so <unk> but you know. I don't know how i've been able to <hes>. I guess to some extent not <hes> you. You know the ability to jump from one thing to another. I'm not sure where that comes from. I'm not even sure that jenny could <hes> that. That's a good thing but <hes> the the <hes> <hes> i think the new mentioned mark the struggle over that some people have rethink where you kind of talking about someone being in a position to say hey. I'm a photography lifestyle. I wanna get better but i can't get that much better. How do i how do i do that or do. I move on to something else. Is that what you were kind of asking. Just referring to multi passionate people i meet a lot of people in the world and they've got a lot of passions that they they do all at the same level instead of kind of making one the forefront air or in a business endeavor like the the law practice and that's what i was curious about is e seemed to have compartmentalize those very effectively so that you can have success in your business but also you know have creative pursuits as well. I know that some creative people they struggle with that and they just <hes> do all the things at an equal level instead of kind of you know we're putting him in a hierarchy to that or are you manager through that. Some people don't focus yeah in other words. They're not pursuing really a lot of things equally. They're pursuing a lot of things. Search in attentively yeah in march mentioned that too and that was great martin. Were you said you know focus on one thing. I think that that sums it up and that seems to be a beneficial strength that you have a bit. I can only focus on one thing for a fairly limited amount of time. I think you know some of it may be a little a little a._d._d. Anna but moving from one thing to to the other. It's there's just just a certain universe things that have always fascinated me. Throughout life in photography is one radios another anything electronics basically computers. You know my parents or eighty five years old they have satellite t._v. and voice only cell phones and that's the extent of their technology <hes> on your anything so i didn't get that genetically from either one of them but i think it does probably come camelot for my grandfather who was a real gadget freak but the <unk> so much of an ethic is just a matter of time again going back to that original point time and time of day when the time of day when the creative juices flowing so to speak in ad frankly i. I don't really have a lot of control over that. I can't explain that it kinda comes and goes and <hes> but the the one thing about the process that seems to fascinate me quite a bit is the effect of how stepping away from something in coming back to it later clarifies your original vision of what you wanted to do and i think that applies across the board at applies to some legal work. I'll be working on a brief and i'll get to be after about an hour and a half. I've just developed. Writer's block and it's just is not working anymore. If i go to work on something else and come back to it a day maybe two weeks later <hes> all of a sudden it clicks and you're able to complete inhabit turn out <hes> in a way that is as you originally envisioned that and i don't have any explanation for that or how're our why that happens but as far as practical advice urge something of that nature. I find it does help that. If you get to that point were you are blocked. Step away by all means. They say that i've heard guys that sheet weddings for a living for example photographer say that when you you get back from the wedding do not begin to try to edit those photos that night or even the day after wait three or four days until you've worked worked on something else come back to that project and in you'll have much better ability to come out the way originally envisioned in that works <hes> sometimes if i'm shooting we have a lot of mardi gras events here in shreveport and i take a lotta pictures those come home that night. Sometimes i use a stamp like three the clock in the morning because i'm so excited about him. I wanna see what they're gonna. Look like but invariably. I will get bogged down can't get out the way i want to go to bed then the next day even two or three days later come back to them and see them in a completely different light and visualize a completely different way of manipulating manipulating or editing them and make them try to come out like i want <hes> in the end result after that process of doing it stepping away and coming back results results in a finished product. It's much more like what i originally saw him hit well. Let's let's pick it up on <hes> mentors over you were talking about <hes> howard clarken larkin photography and such but i can only imagine some of the other mentors and and folks in your network along the way what what kind of influencers <hes> really helped your creative process years yeah that that's been a huge factor <unk> mentioned howard clark in radio and photography. He was also a mentor. You know somebody you had a lot of respect for because of their accomplishments and <hes> and they're they're they're virtuosity it doing what they did in because you could see that firsthand because you knew these new him and you know you knew how what he was capable of what he had done in the past <hes> you know i've i've had mentors in in the legal profession charles sally who was the senior partner at our firm who is retired. <hes> was a major mentor to me in legal business. You know when you go to law school. They teach you what the law is but they don't teach you a whole lot about out of practice it and you don't really learn that until you get out into the school of hard knocks and that's why it's been so important is so so important especially for young people getting out of school now to have mentor programs at a lot of bar associations including shreveport has developed a a mentor program the economic tier for <hes> to help people <hes> who were just just i entering the profession <hes> randy rice and baton rouge. Who was the program director at the radio station. I worked at down. There was a tremendous influence and another thing marc another thing we used to do a lot of we spent a lot of time. Listening to air checks and air are a <hes> recordings of radio stations that are made no do this anymore. I don't think the back in the seventies this jockeys would record themselves and there was just this underground network where these recordings would get swapped all over the place and copied multiple times and we would sit around and listen to those things engine just sorta marvel at what some of these other guys were doing in in in through the process of doing that in in enabled you to kinda to get better to develop your around style and in that works in i think in a lot of other creative areas you have these people who are really you don't have any first-hand knowledge a relationship with them but they are mentors to you in a way because you're listening to or viewing whatever their their work from afar and you try to emulate them <hes> the same thing is is true with photography music video styles. <hes> there are some guys out there mark. You probably clearly aware this. There's some him guys out there. That just do some fascinating things with music videos that can be done now because we have the digital tools to do them the cameras that are inexpensive the computers in the editing software that can do things light years ahead of what used to be able to do on film or videotape so you can have not only mentors that are people you have personal relationships with but it can also be people that you observe <hes> people that you have read their books or or or or seen their work in a museum whatever networks <hes> just as well and can be just as important in in molding <hes> your own creative vision in your your process of doing things yourself. This is great as we as we wrap up mardi gras i couldn't help but think about the longevity of the creative creative process and let let's dive back into radio and music but <hes> so the rolling stones are on there like hundred nineteenth to or whatever never a just opened up in chicago what what what accounts for mick jagger at seventy seven years old having heart surgery and then going out on the stage at chicago's i <hes> soldier field <hes> how long can creative brain lapsed man. That's that's a great question and i've never seen the rolling stones in my life telling me about three days ago. We're going to see him in new orleans. The end of next month with another is another friend of mine who were both. I'm sixtieth birthdays within a few months of each other so we thought it would be appropriate to go see the oldest rotman yes but you know the thing about that is somehow you if you can cultivate either comes naturally or i don't know maybe it comes from just the process us with being engaged with with things in their artistic in nature. You can kinda cultivate an ability to to to continue to learn and appreciate new things for example. You know go back to howard clark. Howard clark used to always say it didn't matter what kind of music was he could appreciate associate hit whether it was country rock whatever you can find myself listening to rap music with my twenty two year old daughter and kinda getting into it because i can appreciate it <hes> because a lot of it has <hes> there forms of music out there that would probably seem irritating waiting to most people our age marquez age but <hes> i find it enjoyable because it has a lot of it is very musically complex and it's just i just find it interesting so you know as time goes by as things change <hes> if you can somehow just remain interested in it and i think the best way to do they just keep exposing yourself to it. If you cut yourself off from it completely <hes> you. I think you'll clearly lose interest in it. <hes> <hes> <hes> but i continue to to be fascinated by popular culture the things that mold popular culture the artistic trends <hes> the that occur over time for some reason that just continues to be fascinating to me. I think the reason for that is just i continue to expose myself to it out haven't lock doc myself offering for whatever reason i can't really explain why that is but every time somebody comes out with a new form of music <unk> at least want to sample it in <unk> dub step came out you remember that mark young dubbed steps little say <hes> maybe it's not but i reme- the ad artists like scroll ix and i don't know who some of these others were my daughters listen to that. I said that is the craziest junk i've ever heard in the world but the more i listened to it it is it's fascinating music. It really is and <hes> so i think somehow you know continue to be exposed to you'll remain interested in if you have you you know interesting in the first place and at a price to music and applies to literature books <hes> just about any kind of form of artistic expression. It's a great point marty and one thing. I'm curious to get your take on is do you think that people are innately the creative and want to create or something has to be or want to be inspired or something that has to be kind of maybe primed at the beginning to the sound secure a very <hes>. You're into a lot of things. You're very quick. Inquisitive curious individual. Do you think that is born people or do you think you've kind of nurtured that over the years. What's your take on that well. I think you have to have a propensity to for that. At the outset. I think you have to be of a personality type of to to have interest in that <hes> but the other thing is in mrs <unk> dovetails with the my legal education when you go to law school. Will i mentioned earlier that they teach you the law but they don't teach you how to practice it. The process of the legal education requires you to figure out things for yourself. <hes> when you are in grade school high school college a lot of the material is kind of spoon fed to you know you have to do is regurgitate the facts in an accurate way to get a good grade legal education is completely different and all you're doing is reading volumes and volumes of material over and over and over it just talk honey. I mean the amount of reading the assigned to us just staggering and there's no way you can do all but that's the point of the point is to teach you how to call through you all at material and figure out for yourself. What is important in what's not in over time you you kinda cultivate the ability to do that and i think that going through that process sort of boosted or perpetuated <unk> natural inquisitive nature because even today i may you know this afternoon. I may get a new case in in paul some <hes> widget that used in the oilfield in oiling alling dash drilling. I've never heard of before <hes> in order to deal with that. I've got to figure all at out myself. Nobody's gonna teach it to me and i think that's true of every lawyer. Taber passed the bar and appear in a courtroom and i think that <hes> that component of doing what i do for a living probably helps keep alive the the the interest in the the spark of creativity in the interest of things that are artistic in in staying open minded about accepting getting in embracing new forms of art new forms of expression great. That's awesome amari. We really want to thank you for spending time with us today. Dan sharing your creative endeavors in your experience with us. That's great thank you is we need to. We need to have another one with mark telling war stories. He's about four radio days. Oh i got one. That would be fun. I don't know if anyone else wants to listen to the right. The air the subscribers but what's interesting about it is how much it's changed in. How different is today than it was before in the story of how it got from point a. to point b. is is really interesting and fascinating so you guys ever one. If there's ever a need for discussion of that nature market i can probably talk your ears awful math to you're a and when you're talking about what you call them. Cut cut tapes cut rails air. Check air check. Yes so that is things that were not published alleged renat post. They were like they were like. They were like samples of they would record. Just it's funny because we laugh at it. Now and jenny has always making fun of me. Even when i listen to him today that you're taking only the talking and the commercials all all the things that everyone else doesn't wanna hear and you're saying let's make a tape of nothing but the talking and the commercials all the songs around run smart jumps to the end where the disc jockey starts talking again about. You've got fascinating and everyone else's sign. Why are they talking over my song yeah. Hey hey made commercial versions of those you can buy. They were collections and they were primarily used by radio people to hear what's going on in the other <unk> other parts of the country and it was a it was a marketplace of ideas is basically what it was another source of is you if you were working in in in shreveport and you wanted to move up to a bigger city you would make an air check of yourself to sand is an audition tape to send to other radio stations so they can hear what you sound life and that was another big source of them. In the radio station i worked at in shreveport had a lot of job applicants and we had just boxes and boxes of tapes from all these you guys all over the country and i've still got a lot of and they will still play mark on that not acts of tree bernie yeah. It's fascinating how technology and the way we approach these these things change. Isn't it jurors yeah well martin. Thank you again and we really appreciate it. Thanks it's been a pleasure join a guys thanks and have a great deal ticket right well. That was mardi johnson talking about how he approaches creativity some of the ways he gets insights and some of his creative endeavors that feed off one another. Would you think mark well. I thought it was terrific. I learned a lot <hes> and i knew marge. You know i learned about the way he doesn't just use his creative pursuits to get away from work. You know turn off work but rather how how the creative passions actually feed <hes> the other side of his brain to be a better analytical thinker so rather than saying. Can you know i i need to get away. It's rather like he. He describes it as compartmentalize where you can give focused time to both breath when i'm at work. I'm at work when doing creative things. I'm doing creative things and i'm not trying to mix and match yeah one of the things that stood out to me and i and i think we talked about this. The other day is how he makes it a point to focus on one thing on the micro and the macro level even when he was deciding what to do with his life career to get into he had all these passions still but he focused on going to law school becoming a lawyer and instill nurturing those other their passions on the side. I think it's challenging for some people to let go of some of their passions and maybe put one in the point lead. Mardi doesn't seem to have a problem doing that and it seems to have served very well now i. I think you're absolutely right. You know i think the other thing is i come away from this interview. <hes> wanting to the try new things to read something different to listen to a different radio station. You know whatever the case is to stay current to stay fresh <hes> not to to stay in a rut. You know i try to consider myself a pretty creative person but when you realize <hes> you know have have you tried a new dish. Have you gone to a new restaurant. Toronto drive a different way to work. I mean all these things when you say how to stimulate the brain and get the synapses firing a little different way. <hes> mardi really underscored that the whether it'd be music or anything else <hes> you gotta try new things and stay current because that keeps the brain fresh. I totally agree well. This was another other great episode and <hes> we'll sign off at that point in time and stay tuned for another episode of world creativity special series on enhancing the human experience experience marketing last words now. This is fantastic. I can't wait for the next one me too all right. We'll see you later. I know bye-bye thanks for listening to this special edition of enhancing the human experience a world world of creativity with mark phillips. If you like this episode and want to know more check out g mark phillips dot com and please leave us a review on youtube itunes tunes or wherever you get your podcasts see you next time <music>.

shreveport marty mark mark phillips howard clark boise idaho attorney mark steyn mark stinson new orleans mark johnson martin jenny mardi johnson boise margaret mardy johnson marnie Stinson wilhelm
6 Big Ideas From 10 Interviews With Creators From All Over The World | ETHX 137

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

12:41 min | 1 year ago

6 Big Ideas From 10 Interviews With Creators From All Over The World | ETHX 137

"Coming to you from Boise Idaho the the fastest growing city in the US and recognized as one of the most creative and vibrant cities to live in. This is a special edition of enhancing. The human experience a world of creativity a series of unique interviews with successful people from around the globe. How they get inspired where their ideas come come from? And how they apply creativity in their business and personal lives. Now here's your host Mark Phillips along with Special Guest Interviewer Mark Stinson. And while we've had a number of absolutely amazing guests joining us in this series of world of creativity mark. What do you think as we wrap up here? Yeah well I think as a concluding chapter to our world of creativity podcast series the breadth of the people. We've had a chance to talk to has been amazing. And the I guess depth of the conversations again it it's it's broad and it's deep and that's what's been so fun about it because the very experiences that everybody has had The quality of the input. It's just terrific and I thought in this episode we might just summarize not necessarily recap by name rank and serial the number in every bullet point that everybody but just to kind of say what were some of the key thoughts and I. I think there are six that I took away from this diverse. Talent Alan Poul. The first was the toolbox that our guests had methods. A processes They they couldn't just be called habits but they had an approach that said when I'm faced with the creative challenge. Here's my go-to process. And some of them were I draw nine nine box grid on a piece of paper. Some of them. I do a triangle and then some of them I have a ABCD and then some of them. I you know I go to a creative brief but everyone had you know kind of a goto process and I thought that was interesting. And there's a lot to learn from that and when you go back through the episodes you know to even look in the show notes. For example we've highlighted much at many. Try to pull those out so when somebody said here's my Go-to who tool. Then we could benefit from the WHO number two was the perseverance the resilience the never never give up. Whatever it takes attitude of all these individuals? they there was a commitment to be more creative and and and to grow In several of the podcast the idea of you know. Can you exercise your creative muscle. You can be more creative. I think going in you you might have like I did you know you're kind of born creative and people say oh you're really creative person as if you know nature just bless less the same but I think all of them said Through reading through practice through taking on new challenges through using new tools that you hadn't when used you can have a go-to tool but few something new every now and then you know challenge yourself. I think every every guest had this whatever it takes I can be a better. You know creative thinker. The and I found that very inspiring The third was kind counterintuitive and had to do with the facts and the data and the numbers. Many people think you can just be so creative and just be free with the facts. Totally don't don't bog me down with the okay. So how do you use data and numbers. So for example Mardi Johnson was talking about in his legal profession. You know you've got to have some analytical analytical you know go through the cases go through the facts of the gates and then start creating and weaving the story or find the answer to the question And then go from left brain into right brain and back in a very almost pulsa title Manner and this I think is what people can benefit from. Is that if you we start with. The foundation of facts gathered the facts the data. The numbers analyze them. Then that's the foundation to build on And I remember Knbr John Bags and Danilo fratello talking about this. Yeah is that you know I get the facts. Build that into your creative brief and then let the ideas plan polymer. Kado talked about that as well. You know a very using that to help drive and for feedback and to kind of move these things along. Yeah that you can look at the performance data you can look at the analytics but then ultimately translate that into something and what the fourth it's point then is what you translate that into and that's the personal and empathetic and the understanding and the individual and I think all all of our guests had this on the one hand personal transparency. You know it's personal so for example. Our First Guest Sherry tally. I was talking about authenticity that I can express my creativity in a more real fashion. That may be you know in her first career iteration ration- as a television order and that Her artistic and creative expressions now might be different than than what they were. The other side of the personal personal was cultivating the understanding and empathy with your target mother. It's target market target consumer or target reader eater. You know target viewer however you view your content you know consumer and to visualize them as a real person Real life facing real problems. I just thought that was ready. So Bob ours was talking about really seeing the person and whether it's their struggles or whether it's their aspirations he he described visualizing and making it personal very compelling. Yeah that rather than calling rolling them target markets you know this is a yes and And and in many cases you see people naming their target target where we're going after an individual You know we're GONNA call her Mary. Ann and that way we can personify it the fifth affairs again in creativity. You say oh. Yeah the sky's the limit. We're thinking out of the box but the fifth point I gathered any way was that there were always need. I need to be a plan for the obstacles. A plan for the negative contingency plan for when something went wrong or a what could be considered a negative view. But it's really were viewing the prop potential problem that we're trying to address and our last guest Jenn unreas- for example was talking about when you're a solo female traveler. You need to understand your surroundings and not to be scared but to be wise to be informed be prepared and I think all our guests had this look at all our options Look at the negative. You may not A. B. Focused on the pothole except for. There's a pot all right. What are your creative ways to go around it to you fill it? What do we need to do? Yeah now the last point I think is Six point is very compelling the this idea that there is a leadership ship For the individual that there are mentors that there are resources that all of our guests were looking for ways to elevate elevate the creative inputs and influences they had in their world and the this is very much what we were doing and talking to people all over the world as like. Let's let's get out of our own heads. Let's get out of our own spear. We talked the same people about the same issues every day. And so let's let's break sat up and that there are books and there are podcasts. And we've listed him again and and the show notes you've been good enough to capture them but how do we expand our our networks. How do we get more inputs and So Kevin Fox talked about you know a classical music and foundations I oh I think about Sophia you know getting involved in in corporate responsibility So just getting out of our own heads and looking for other her Creative leadership Can Be very stimulating. Yeah and And these six points and even as I described these six I find that I have gone to a tool. That's one of my go-to tools and this was inspired by Edward de Bono. Who has the six action shoes? And I've just gone down the six points. That Edward de Bono My one of my creative prevention him in the sand It just it helps me. Organize these thoughts uh-huh so it's it's examples like that we say who are your leaders and mentors that I think are very valuable and I think the takeaway from all of this is when we think of a world of creativity pretty. I think we went in even thinking. It was a world meaning literally though world the globe but maybe redefining that as while. Aw a world of thinking Which is wider and broader the universe of inputs And how that can change the way we approach the world. Yeah yeah well. It's been an amazing series integrates with enhancing human experience into work creators. I love the fact that we are whether it's business or Lyft I like. Jen talked about creating experiences for her personal life. There really is only one bucket whether you call it business life. It's all in the mix and I think we we've got some great tools tools from all of our guests. You know how to create how to contain it how to look at it and I know that I've come away with a lot of great ideas. I'm sure you have to and I think our listeners. As well too I think so too and I think back to And I think it was in March time of the year when you had a chance to interview Joshua Pollick ooh author of the Harmfulness Way and I thought one of the takeaways from Josh at that point was the world community and people talk about about wanting to change the world but really the world is a collection of us. You know who global citizens and if we're going to seek to change the world we're going to do one person at a time and it could start with us and there was this man in the mirror moment you know in several of the interviews that we did in this world of creativity that said if I I WANNA be a better citizen of the world if I want to be a better person and grow and and be more creative and be more open than it would have to start with me yeah. That's that's something that I think we could put a punctuation mark on perhaps absolutely. I think it's great while we're going to wrap up the series. We hope you've enjoyed it. We both thoroughly have and He keep coming back Iran nuclear on the website. Yeah come to him anytime. You need a Dosa inspiration Definitely all right thanks mark so much and wrap it up all the Best Health Walton success. Thanks for listening to this special edition of enhancing the human experience a world of creativity with Mark Phillips if he likes this episode and want to know more checkout G Mark Phillips Dot Com and please leave us a review on Youtube itunes. Or wherever are you get your podcasts. See you next time

Mark Phillips Edward de Bono Mark Stinson Boise Idaho US WHO Alan Poul Iran Youtube Mardi Johnson Kado Joshua Pollick Jenn unreas Bob Ann Kevin Fox Josh John Bags Jen Danilo fratello
The Healing Power Of Humor With Comedian Megan Bryant | ETHX 122

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

The Healing Power Of Humor With Comedian Megan Bryant | ETHX 122

"How's it going welcome to another episode of enhancing unseen human experience podcast. I'm mark phillips and i am really glad you tuned in today. My guest meghan bryant is an author a comedian median an improv coach and a mother of four and also i would call her an overachiever. She does a lot of cool stuff. She is funny funny very engaging interesting to watch or social media posts on her facebook page. Which of course i'll have links in the show notes on my website at g. Mark mark phillips dot com. Excuse me the social website is g. Mark phillips dot com but super interested in what she's doing in the world. That's why invite editor to be a guest on the show and i may have mentioned this in a prior episode that i actually took one of her improv classes. One of the things she does is she puts on improv classes to anyone who wants to go but also to corporate america right helping them be more open and live a yes and end life and we'll talk about that in this episode she'll talk about what that is and how it can help you have better experience in your professional career in your personal life and speaking from my own experience it was one that was pretty uncomfortable to to go and do but what we know about life right. The things that are uncomfortable notable pushes out of our comfort zone. They're the things we need to do right and but it was super rewarding i came away with feeling a little bit more empowered right where i should say a lot more empowered like just done something that was way outside of my comfort zone and had a better sense of connection with people and got out of my shell a little bit right right and so if you're in the boise area and you want to learn more about her improv classes will have links in the show notes at g. Mark phillips dot com where you can find find out how to do that and connect with megan and learn more about what she's doing the world so we talk a lot about we talk a lot in this episode paladin. I wanted to touch on all of her things that she he does like. I said she's a rockstar so stay tuned for this episode and you will. I know you're going to enjoy it before we jump into the episode. Let me just remind you do that if you haven't picked up being as your superpower that's the free p._d._f. Download that you can find at just be at book dot com. You should go do that and the reason you should do that is because of its filled with people that will definitely inspire you and remind you that as a human being being being is your superpower the ability to decide who you want to be and how you wanna show up in the world to attract the the things experiences. You wanna have sounds pretty good right what i did in this p._d._f. Is in my journey and all through my travels. I'm really tuned in when i hear people talk about how they reinvented themselves became a different person to have different experiences in life and i'm really tuned into that so when i hear people on talk shows or in podcasts or in videos on youtube i capture that link. I saved the spot that it happened and i built this this p._d._f. Download which has links to all that content but also time stamps so you can jump right to the specific part of the video. You don't have to watch the whole thing is some of these things are you. You know our or too long but it's people sharing their story about how they how they became a different person in order to have different experiences. It's people like dan unlock a super successful entrepreneur up in vancouver british columbia sharing his story about being a professional public speaker and it's people like david geoghegan's you know david david goggin right the navy seal who kind of rose to fame after jeffrey eizer wrote the book living with the navy seal and put him on the map but he was well on his way to being on the map prior to that super inspiring guy talking about how he reinvented himself and changed the direction and the gender of his life right he just went in a way that was super awesome. He created at the life that he wanted not the life that he kind of was falling going into by default so his stories really inspiring to me. Also people like gary keller who of course is the co founder of keller williams realty and his his idea that it's not about the money it's about being the best you can be right. That's kind of his one of his core philosophies that when you be the best you can be. You're going to attract act experiences. That are the best experiences you can have. Do you see the kind of the common theme here so that is available at like. I said it just be a book dot com. It's called being is your superpower superpower download it. It's free and it will take you to each of these pieces of content and so what's the purpose of me sharing this with you well. The purpose is to inspire spire you when we see other people doing awesome stuff. What does that do to us. Eight inspires us. At least it does for me and so. I hope that you're inspired to you. Start asking yourself this question of what qualities characteristics and attributes do. I need to embody what persona what identity how. How do i need to reinvent myself in order to put me into alignment with what i want right. That's the internal question in dialogue that hopefully you're gonna have after you do that again. It's a just be a book dot com. Go pick it up so let's jump into this episode with megan <hes> and find out what she's doing. How comedy comedy and laughter has helped her heal and helped her become you know more open in the world and get through challenging situations lots of goodness in this episode owed and she shows a lot of nuggets that you can apply to your life. I know i took a lot away from this episode as i'm listening and making notes about some of the things that she's gone through in the experiences she's had that are kind of common in the human experience you know we're all fighting or in certain types of challenges in our life overcoming certain challenges oranges and when we learn from one another we can definitely take get takeaways and find out little tips to improve our experience so there's a lot of goodness in this episode road without further ado. Let's jump in here. What megan how say megan thanks for hanging out with me on the podcast happy to be here awesome well. I guess the first question i want to start off with. Is you you know. Why are you making the rest of us like you kind of showing us up. You do a lot of stuff what the always been an overachiever. I think it's ah don't wanna be on. This site rocked in it rough for you. Is that what you're telling. It's an interesting challenge because it's not it's <hes> it's not like when back in the day have had other corporate jobs that need to go and know what your tasks are done for the day and that certainly not the way it is when and when you do the types of things i do. It's always going i can. I can imagine you do a lot. You know and i wanna cover all those things or try to cover all those things the in your interview today so you you have out of corporate job. I take it in the past. I was in retail banking for ten years the branch manager for many of those as years so managed a lot of money and people and <hes> then i also spent another handful of years managing federal grants from fema for volunteer firefighter <unk> fighter programs or things like dairy queen i have. I've had a job ever ever since <hes> like literally the day i was legal to work and i've always had at least one or two jobs to. I guess maybe i always have i've always been an overachiever kind of and i got that from your book and wanna touch on that so you so you're right. You seems take your like a really hard worker. I'm curious about the the time and we're you transition from that world working for other people into doing your <unk> own thing talk about. Was it like i'm done with that and i'm going here was a baby stepped in. Would you do baby step anywhere. Ever it was is a little more abrupt than i had wanted. I ever started doing comedy and writing and doing all these other things as a hobby. I knew i wanted to who eventually if i could have it be just my primary function and so when i had my last day job i was six months pregnant at the time and i was not very happy with house. The things were going down. <hes> in the workplace there was some <hes> inappropriate use of funds and some challenging workplace <hes> mm-hmm relationships and that was when i was <hes> managing this grants with the government money and so i was kind of done there and i'm not the kind of person person that can hide my feelings emotions. I'm pretty blunt. Though i had started piping in on things that i was not comfortable with that were happening in the workplace and <hes> i actually got fired when i was six months pregnant and yeah it was not ideal and i did go with a couple of interviews interviews for jobs that would have i would have had a good skill set for and i know that anyone would ever say it out loud but i could see the looks on people's faces when i'm coming into interview and i'm like bulging human and you know so. I thought okay well against them. Not going to get hired another job and so i just put my nose to the grind and just when all in dug in my heels was like okay now i gotta figure out how to really put my money where my mouth is literally be able to feed myself and mega with all these the things that i have at the time had been working on you know close to ten years and and some of the young haven't gone back that was almost five years club coming up on five years ago as when the transition i was kind of pushed over the ledge ready or not so would you say would you say to you back against a wall and you had no choice and you just went for it a little bit yeah. It was like but it was exciting. It was like i mean it was scary obviously at the time to suddenly not have steady income and to be be pregnant and then have lost those benefits and things that are kind of important to get comfortable with <hes> but i was so unhappy with breath things that were going on that. I just was like well. Okay whatever i'm not afraid of a challenge <hes> and even when i do get scared i put on my brave face real good and i just thought you know i've been working on it long enough to kind of be like here's here's what should happen. I was still married at the time and so there was still some income from my <hes> ex husband's job and whatnot and so i was like well. We've done some stuff in savings. I know that i'm gonna work my butt off. I'm just gonna go for for it and see what happens when you started zips app saw or was that comedy more that was the official start of zip absorbs op which i hardly use that name anymore real the thing that i use the <hes> sometimes companies like to see my formal like the website that i have offers zips up which team building corporate training <hes> in a leadership retreats all using the applied skills of improv and i still do all of that it just became came that i had so many different <hes> either websites or places though sending people in confuses people when i do anyway so the last several years i've been doc back in and it's really just all everything falls under the megan bryant brand. Which is this easier so i still do all those trainings. It's just easier to send everybody to one and website to my website that now house a page for the corporate training a page for the comedy. I'd been doing comedy and stuff since two thousand six. I just hadn't really formalized it. My brother earn i kinda came up with that name zip zap zoff the team building like as far as making it presentable putting together the marketing we'd already been doing doing it though for a while <hes> in in small doses both performing company parties and doing interactive workshops and so it was just a matter of structuring of the looked formal for potential clients but that was definitely him and it was like yeah game on i had to make it look look like what it was has hired a new at work already believed in it people that loved it and <hes> and then yeah it was like okay we'll do what you'd be performed comedy comedy and unique and so then then began the journey these past four and a half five years of stopping doing the things that i knew i could ed do in order to put all the energy towards the stuff. I love the most and have the greatest impact isn't isn't that awesome win because it almost like we have of an unlimited supply of energy to do things. We love whereas you for doing something. You don't love. There's like super limited. Isn't it yeah yeah. It is really you can very much feel well it when you're in your grew when you are totally in that space where you are meant to be as cheesy way to say it but yeah i i can tell when i'm doing something that is from my very core something that i feel like is serving humanity and the more i can just hone in on that one thing <hes> i love doing a lot of different things and that's the thing that's been really difficult. In my particular case is that. I really actually loved doing a lot of things. In the creative space base. I can use comedy for writing for tv commercials for stuff online. I mean there's an just performing can't <hes> straight up comedy shows oh stand up or improv <hes> and so narrowing it down sometimes also means having to let go of some of the things i actually also like that are just not resulting in what i i need right now to sustain my life as a single mom yeah well. How do you grapple with that and choose which project to work con. If you have multi things that you're interested in. I finally decide yeah. It's <hes> toggle back and forth was getting me nowhere not too long ago so i actually got out a big stack of three by five cards. I wrote down on each card. Everything that i do every type of project every like from everything from freelance writing waiting for magazines to <hes> helping organizations put on comedy show for a nonprofit fundraiser to all things right and and things i wanna do in the future additional additional books. I hope to every single task that i have done in the recent years that i enjoyed and thought could potentially do in future. I put every single thing on a card and then i categorize them and now if anything anything that does not fit in the scope of me using my love and passion for improv at the core. You're doesn't get to be on the plate anymore so even things that decision in and he goes yet. I straight up. I put a big pile on my desk. Ask and i sorted them and some of them. I kept so i kept those cards and i sort of filed them away with. Maybe i'll do them later. Maybe those three year down the road thing. Maybe a five year her. Maybe it'll end up you know i i believe strongly in still putting things out there that we love <hes> into into the universe or whatever you wanna call it and then the timeline meaning circumstance may line up and then it might fit into improv world in a different way that even like different age groups like people want me to do so many different oh you should do you can imagine this you should do whatever couples groups which i've done in the past two and i'm like any marriage or or relationship in those actually for me shows that it was working because i was like i was i was in a situation where i was getting out but it a lot which is opposite of yes and a really yeah and and obviously i had my shortcomings as well and so i just when i will very quickly jump onto appeasing appeasing other people i have a very strong sense of responsibility to others and and then i just find that i'm using those talents and skills in a way that is deluding and and so i just don't want to do that. I won't do it anymore. Very strong boundaries of what will and won't do anymore well yet. I've read that in your book. You're you sound like me a reformed or a people pleaser reform pleasers that one of your challenges yeah and yeah and what was really magical and i hope that anyone who's listening and is if there are people pleaser is when you shift gears and you are honoring yourself and what you are doing what you can do your very the best at it serves other people even more it is. I am just finding that. Nobody is disappointed or angry at me at least not that i know of maybe they are telling amy if i if i politely shift that energy away from the many suggestions of things i could do and find ways to include them in other things that i'm already doing that. I love and i and i'm still filling that void of whenever i felt like i'm not serving other people enough by serving myself itself to the highest capacity. It is actually bringing a lot of lum fulfillment to how can still provide things for other people all just a little bit differently because i know myself better than they do. You know yeah well and i think you bring up a really good point and something that we all grapple with. Is you know maybe maybe it's the sense of what we think. We know what other people want from us but do we really know right right yeah absolutely because we hear recorded another another podcast yesterday from my own podcast with thought and thought had come up like even if we are hearing words that people are saying we still don't understand fully exactly exactly the lens that they're seeing it through and the experiences in their life that have led up to that moment of whatever those words are and we have different understandings of certain words in situations in things and so no matter what we still will miss the mark even if we're trying to deliver unless the loosen a- expectation like sometimes. I've been asked to do something where they're like. They just trust me and they're like kay. I need this event and you're the in this is your strength and so you do you run with it. Instead of other moving in like this is the event and this is miami or my <hes> vision of make my vision come true and i can't always see their vision. I can see how their concept could be. I would know how to make it a cool thing but it would probably be a different vision overall. Yeah it's hard to it's hard to execute. Another person's vision isn't it it is yes so they give you kind of carte blanche and say hey we know you go and do your thing yeah yeah and that's where i liked the ultimate creative freedom. That's awesome. You've got you've you've made you've arrived. I get those few and far between i'm like okay well. That's at least where i'm setting my bar now is that it's been scary the last few months particularly that i have said no to certain things because it's still just not quite the best fit and i and so they notice some paychecks because i know it's just more emotionally taxing for me to you even if it is one where they're like your yeah you kinda. Take the reins on this. I can tell if someone is really not on board with my vision is so there's a lot of variables that i've learned how to focus in on and still make a decision like is this going to be the best in the long run or am. I gonna feel like i just got a chain around my ankle and i'm you know i'm going to be stressing about this until it's finally done all that energy could have been going to something else yeah. I totally get it well. It sounds sounds like you're tuning in a lot to what's what wants to come through you and then there's a big contrast when someone else owes you something that is out of alignment at that and you see. It really apparently only don't ya yeah very much so anymore. That's awesome so let's talk about the improv worked edu with corporations. How was that journey. Since you started seems like an i took your class. It was super awesome. It was very outside of my culprits. <hes> nothing like i thought it was gonna be the need for in many raids how response than in the reciptivity with corporations are they do see value how do you how do you show them that this super awesome to open people up and get them into this like free flowing zone yeah. It's it's still an ongoing challenge. In many ways from the time i really started though i it was still building my own confidence in in marrying what i knew about corporate environment and mindset from my own experience and what i knew you from house changed my own life and helping people understand it because it is truly experiential and like you said it wasn't what you expected like the way the way i teach improv. Improv is very much lifestyle mindset. It's looking for the ways to navigate through challenges quickly and and have <hes> sort sort of a better sense of self and respecting others around you and so a lot of it has been like when i was really starting to dabble with some strong intent i asked a couple a couple of people who had who had seen me perform improv and i asked them if they would let me back at the first handful of them were <hes> free because i was like the the reason it works as a comedy art form is because of these rules can i come and show you and so then when people would see it and experience it then then it started to become driven by word of mouth and some people <hes> who just again like people have known me in this community. I was born and raised your. They've known me in this community for a very long time. I have <hes> luckily are not. Luckily very intentionally built a strong track record that people can rely on me and that if i say and a._m. And do something i will deliver it no matter what which is for better or worse sometimes the burden. I wish that <hes> but was some trial alan error. It was gaining trust in myself. <hes> some of them i took some gigs that felt a little out of desperation and trying to prove that worse and when you find yourself in a space of having to prove your worth to someone who doesn't understand the value it actually can in many ways put you back a few steps uh-huh like some people i just i like to meet whoever's in charge and i tell them a little bit about how it works functionally but i don't really try to explain blaine the activities anymore because if they don't if they've never done it they just it doesn't make sense and they will try to steer with what they know. In space that it's not relevant and so really the the phrase or the another what they always say is trusting the process. I've learned from some painful experiences -periences where the leader of a group tries to take over my my segments of unpacking they tried to interject a lot instead of just participating debating with the group many law a lot of this is just me lolly gagging to get to the point that i still find a little bit of a struggle and i. I don't even push where someone that doesn't get it. Some people think nick preach culture they preach that they want their people to shine and to be empowering to their employees ways and they don't activate the things that allow and i can tell maybe this is just a really cool trait that i have if people are or not i could just tell if they're not really in it and so i'm room on in and i look for people who are just looking for that genuine connection or like my i biggest purpose in putting on the workshops where have on saturday afternoons or my four week classes where people will just general public consign up once they've experienced and they go. Oh aw i can take this back to the place i work or i could take to my family reunion. You know whatever it is. People have their own got hamas and so truly. I get a lot of stuff stuff that toggles between people who have signed up because their business coach told him to take an improv class and then they in turn can refer me to someone that they're the client that they're coaching that they're doing internal restructuring and whatever and so it's really a kind of a fun dance between <hes> <hes> serving serving each other and finding our talents complemented each other as we're all working on our different goals yeah well. I can imagine dip dip your your class. The people that attend your classes are your biggest advocates because like you said it is experiential and then they go out and do your do your bidding for you for lack of a better word other than yeah and then once a company will get bring me and like i have had someone like a friend a friend of a friend hired me for his company event for twenty any by people or whatever and he worked for a huge company with many groups and then he referred other people within his group and then they didn't even have to know me and they didn't even have to really we know the process. He is just like you need this year next team. Building event just trust me and so it's been really magical that <hes> and then you know then those people like people again and then it starts becoming more removed from people i know because now i am get referred to people that i don't even know than they have the experience and then it so in within that company any i've done five groups all from the one person who was a friend of a friend who still didn't even really know the process was which is pretty fascinating to see that people are really just willing that shows me that those people in that company were willing to try something that sounded unique and unusual and they didn't have all the answers and they went for it anyway. Yeah that's a bold move but also i think all of us could relate to the fact of sometimes the things that you know nothing about or are. You have no idea what it is. It might be the biggest beneficial experience in your life friendly right back to that idea yeah like we we think we know what to do and how to get our our goals and this and that but we're looking at it through this lens of our own perception and how how cloudy is that right. Oh i totally agree so so what are we do. You touched on some of the takeaways that you've seen people to go to the class or they've either giving you feedback or you've experienced this. What are the some of the things that they come away. Okay with in their experience like the way they feel the way they approach life. You know it's a little bit of a mixed bag. Almost all of it is positive occasionally really though because of the structure and because of the fact that it becomes a safe place for people to say or do things that might be a little out of their norm <hes> <hes> and some of the exercises are there. They're designed to take you internal a little bit and so there have been several times where people bulwell get triggered unintentionally <hes> because they've even somehow a memory has been spurred from childhood situation that was not pleasant or or something from a relationship that went sideways <hes> or you know different we all have different things right yeah and so the beauty of of the space that i get to working erkin is that it allows those connections in that safe space and yet. I've learned that it needs to be. I need to be cautious conscious to not inadvertently pull up something that people are not ready to pull up or i can imagine like i actually do <hes> recently have added a little bit of disclaimer to let people know hey you may feel some things and migraine things up for you and that is part part of the process and i have a huge database of people can refer if they do end up wanting to address. Those things like honestly that's. That's what i want to have happen that my my biggest fantasy of my work is to use it in ways that are healing and help people make progress because it's that's been what it's done for me. It brings joy back into my life in the moments that i need it most and so it makes the safe space and so the takeaways takeaways are that people it's it's always the people that was not what i expected. They thought they were going to be put on the spa or made to feel like they have to be funny and really. It's not not about that at all. It's about human connection. It's about understanding how you show up in the moment. It's about stepping into your personal strength and your confidence in your deliverable well whatever that is and then respecting your neighbor has the same innate worth right and <hes> and so becomes a lot more are emotionally involved and thought provoking than people would think than just stepping in and being like women do some goofy scenes and those things are are are fun because we understood why connection is important. That's that's why comedy works. It's because of connection is because of human interaction and emotional motion connection that we're looking for yeah. Wow wow so. Were you surprised to see that some of these. He's like when you first went into this thinking again back toward the thinking and expectations. Are you surprised to see where it's those kind of. Things are coming up some almost like emotional healing healing or or working through trauma that had been repressed surprised about that initially like the very first couple of times that it happened. I was not surprised. I eased at the fact that it was happening. I was a little surprised in frustrated that it took me that long to understand how to help facilitate that 'cause there's a balance that i've learned that i mean i already knew it. Would it could do that because i've been i've personally broken down into tears many times at the positive power of using yes and in my life like using is acceptance tool of some really challenging things. It's easy to say yes to the fun lighthearted exciting things. It's really a chance to put your your whole being to the test when you have to work through the hard stuff so i already knew that it worked. It was just interesting for me to transition from the mindset of keeping things in a corporate environment. I have to to be a little bit more careful to not dig as deep but to show them. What is there so like not making people feel so exposed that they're not gonna wanna show show up to work tomorrow. You know what i mean. So when i'm working with an actual team i will like open their eyes hopefully enough with some exercises that they get to see the magic that is there and hopefully they would want to continue as an individual and then in the groups where it's just general public signing up it <hes> it's not surprising so much as it just gives me head to toe chills every time when i do certain exercises if i can tell the dynamic of the team is they meld some melt quicker than others and in more ways and so i can do some of the more in depth exercises and they end they will come come to kind of joyful tender moments and there will be this just sometimes no talking at all and there is such a surge urge of energy of human connection and validation and so it doesn't surprise me anymore. <hes> <hes> it just it makes me so excited to be alive and it makes me want to just serve others even more and help them see how special and unique we are and how we over complicate stuff so much. It doesn't have to be so hard so true so true absolutely so i'm curious. Uh tell me if you would about your you know so did the comedy lead into the improv did like you sounds like you did stand up first then improper. How did that play out started improv. I actually by a few years and i had been invited into the world by my brother who who was more familiar with improv and so i jumped into that pretty blindly kindly and thought oh wow this is really cool fun performance outlet always been goofy and high energy and love making people laugh and singing all the time and just very much little performer mode everywhere i go and and <hes> to find an outlet for me was really great so that was in two thousand six. I started in the improv world as a performance art and then i really quickly saw how much it was shaping the way that i was showing up everyday just as a regular as a human right right and then some of my friends were in stand up at the time and we're also doing improv and so then i stumbled into the hell and unwilling unwilling uh-huh unwilling so tell me about your first experience i went to an open mic night where my friend was hosting and some of the other local comics were performing. That's where an open mic is where people go and they practice potential material. They see if it's even gonna work. If it makes people laugh how to word things it's like a whole will like exercise in for your your art and so i was there watching and then my friend announced the next comedian as megan brian's and i was like what oh no no no no but then i knew deep down. I was like oh are crap. I can't say no and so i went up and it was only three he minutes and <hes> most open mics very short amounts of time for brand new people and <hes> so i just told some story some truth i knew enough about comedy that it has nice to be rooted in truth and so i told a story about a recent trip i had taken for my day job and talked about some goofy things that i do when i'm on the airplane and there was a couple little giggles out in the audience and and some very looks on peoples faces and i didn't die and then i was like oh crap crap now now i have to try this too so yeah a lot of really the greatest things in my life have come from other people bowl offering me the opportunity and me saying yes to it and trying it and and so yeah it without regard to thrown in the deep end there weren't you yeah yeah and and and then it wasn't as scary as i thought it was. That's the thing that i found in life is i actually i cannot think of something that i've ever done in life where i was so scared and then i finally did it and it was in fact as scary or scarier than i thought it's always not as bad as i thought whole word or just the fact that it was as scary or difficult but i could do it and so within that raised my confidence so i just i just i'm so obsessed with people taking an opportunity to say yes and try dry because it builds doesn't it because once you do the thing yeah then you realize hey i i didn't i love. I love that you said that i'm still here kicking and end. I overcame a fear some dot stronger right and it helps people find out what they don't want to do. I think there's a lot of value instead of sitting in a space of indecision to actually go okay okay well. Here's my options. I don't care what happens to. This happens to quit asking what happens. Just try one of them and then if you then and you don't have to do it anymore and now you know okay option was not a good fit and then you move on instead of sitting in that space of balloon. Oh i can't make a decision. What if someone sees me. Fail would've embarrassed myself. Whatever it is that we do to hold ourselves back when in fact saying yes and just trying the thing will will help us eliminate the don't want way quicker. I totally agree. I totally agree and i think you know 'cause. I definitely have that mindset throughout life and who knows how it got implanted or what it's this. It's this notion of almost like don't you don't want to take action if you know it's not gonna work out or might not work out and then it kinda keeps you box. Doesn't it sure sure does it sure does absolutely so after the first you're thrown up on stage thin. Did you get that bug and you started regularly going up and doing comedy. You don't play out already much <hes> i. I'm really like a strategic person. I have to understand how things work in order to feel like i can put my best foot forward and so a friend of mine actually stumbled upon a standup comedy class at the university of washington and it was a one week mass and i'm like oh. That's it's crazy so i signed up for this class a flu myself to seattle <hes> it was three nights of like how to ride a joke and practicing in front of our class and the seasons comedians medians who were teaching microphone etiquette. How do you talk with people in the clubs like all these things so i could fast track my ability to approach it it and then the the final for the class was a show at the comedy underground in seattle which is a really cool chick club and a full of friends and family of most of the people that took it obviously were local. I was the only one that flew in but <hes> it it was like we we went from zero material to do about a five minute set in a week and so then i of course i was hooked and it's easy to get me hooked on being on a stage anyway but i had understand if i could do it in a way that was professional and i could be confident in how i look like. I know what i was doing. I don't don't lie to fumble for too long once they make a decision to do something so i decided to dive in yeah. I like wanna learn how to do it. What other people done before that i love to learn from other people's people's mistakes and so i sort of fast tracked at the time i thought it was fast tracking myself and then <hes> life took some other turns so i just didn't how they amount of time you really need to go to every open mic and to really get in. You have to do a lot of free work to get your stand up comedian then even once you get to a point where you're getting paid. It's minimal until you are some sort of celebrity status and it's just not sustainable. I recognize that pretty quickly that anything in a club environment was not going to be the right path for me <hes> and so then again it was like keeping that corporate mindset of how so i go in and use that comedic talent in the corporate environment and that's where i've kind of found my sweet spot yeah because it'd be that that that investment in the time investment in that plays into what you're currently doing doesn't know yeah for sure it all goes in and i i dance around occasionally like i just did a weekend at the local club in boise or where i live it. Will you gotta. Do those things really digest best stretch your chops in it's a different environment and i like to challenge myself <hes> so yeah. I still dabble in there a little bit but it's it's absolutely not what pays the bills yeah. I can imagine i can imagine so speaking of challenging yourself back to my original statement so you just did a spartan race. What the heck were you thinking. It wasn't pretty that's awesome. Congratulations super inspiring away us thank you. I you know was weird. Is i had that week that i signed up. I had been thinking i was feeling like i to overcome so many emotional challenges in the past few years navigating through a divorce and doing some big shifts <hes> stepping into my own space <hes> and some things some big shifts with my religious position <hes> stepping away from the church that i grew up in <hes> just to get some breathing room in life and so lot of my emotional and spiritual journey had been happening for several oh years and then i was realizing along the way i've been trying to be healthier physically a year and a half ago. I started to really mindful of what i'm putting into my body. How i'm eating drink plenty of water making sure something active every day as little as it might be a little walk to the park with my kids or or maybe it's a day that i actually get to go out for a jog or whatever i was committed to shifting but i i didn't really know how to challenge myself and so i saw a friend who posted hey. I just signed up for a spartan race. You know the prices are still this rain until whatever day and i would love to have you on my team and i was like oh. No this is it sounds sounds terrible and i'm terrified guest crap. Where's my credit card. I guess i got to do it and honestly i didn't know enough about it or good for. You wouldn't have done if i did so i kind of like the comedy maybe round lutely i just yeah because i think if we look too far ahead we underestimate estimate our own abilities and so i- honest to goodness did not look at the full list of obstacles until the nineteen four race because i i just knew it was gonna be hard and i didn't wanna scare myself because i'm afraid of water and i'm afraid of heights and both of those are involved and and so i just was images prepped myself as best as i can and i'm gonna just try it and my goal was to get across the finish line and not die and and it happened obviously right. It's not an excellent that really well completed sixteen of the twenty obstacles and put in a good effort on the other four and and there and then it ended up being even more delightful to i see this giant community of people who are trying to be better people so there was people cheering each other on total strangers were helping me in moments where they could see fear in my eyes has like there was people that had done before that were giving outages of how to get over a certain obstacle and i. I almost came to tears a couple times because you're there were a total strangers. Be like you've got this. You got this and and <hes> and just it was amazing. That's where our get so driven by trying the hard things because the the results and the camaraderie of other people who are in that arena who are saying yes to hard things. That's where i wanna be yeah yeah. That's a it's awesome. I mean again. That's just a super awesome thing. Let let me let me ask you this. How do you think comedy and that vehicle role helps you get through challenging situations in life like that physically mentally emotionally home or does it. It does oh it always does. I'm constantly looking for for that. Release that of the tension that comedy gives me and sometimes it's not when it's funny like my friends that was sometimes when i'm venting and really mad by i'm just throwing words out there and they laugh when i'm really mad and then they're like that's quick imagine you being serious seriously. You're joking. May that's when i will actually make some good notes but like when i'm in it's the moment i'm in a challenge that i become very very very hyper. Aware of all the factors that are contributing to that because i want to be able to understand what are the things that are bringing pain points and how do i avoid them and process them in a healthy way and and then move through them and not stay in the in the anger of the soup that we send him mm sit in and we're boiling over and and comedy for me because i could do a whole other lesson on the difference between comedy where some some comedians do stuff in there and it does come from a mean angry place where they're bashing on stuff and it can be very divisive obviously political or religious or whatever type of in categories adoption versus abortion like there's some very sensitive things that some people may want to go there 'cause they wanna trigger people in a shock value way and and i recognize that at i i appreciate that and i i guess i always use comedy mighty my understanding and my passion for it to know that i want to use it as a way to to connect and to pull that tension out of a situation and and so <hes> yeah i'm always looking at things and i i will make comments in my own brain all the time and figure out. Is this going to be something that is hurtful or helpful full for myself or for people like before. I even say things out loud. Sometimes i'm like okay. I don't wanna be bitter and censor. Censor yourself and i do only only a little bit because i do want people to know that even though i've gone through a really hard stuff i don't. I'm not mad about it. I'm not angry at the people who have done things that hurt me whether they did it on purpose or accidentally everyone's going through their own journey and we're very self-centered really and <hes> and so nobody's really thinking about the other people as often unless something really negative his happened. There's a whole whole on there but it's absolutely always in my mind kind of how is this experience something that i can use to connect people and then when you find those connecting points that's how i can structure. My jokes is to to be funny about the things that we can all be like oh man yeah when that happens with the worst because then we're all in it together or not <hes> like only the only one going through this alone. It's it's still a very connecting tool for me that answer your question. I can imagine and i'm sure right abs- absolutely yeah it does because the reason i asked is because i i do believe that it you know laughter helps us release tension and gets us tuned in with the joy and and can be really healing being in cathartic and so that's why i asked you that cia facing challenges some people who don't have that tool you know they haven't developed that laughter muscle or that comedy muscle. Oh i think they have a little bit <hes> they've gotta now deal with the emotional stuff that tension that doesn't get released a valuable valuable tool absolutely and it doesn't have to necessarily we always be funny. Ha it's like there's some little comedic tools that just allow you to accept the things that are happening and and and not stay there like there. You can definitely sense it when you're around people who don't know how to process it. They're the people that are really angry and that are you you know finding joy and trolling the internet and being mean to other people and using sarcasm allot like sarcasm is a dangerous territory in my opinion because sometimes people say really mean things and there they act like those just a joke. You can't take a joke and it's like well. That was a joke within rude but you're you're saying it in a way that you're pretending it's a joke and so yeah some people it's it's challenging and it hurts my soul to see when people judge they stuck in there so mad and they're so angry at other people that have hurt them or a religion that has hurt them or whatever it is and and they don't even know how to get out of it in it really i can. I can certainly see that makes me think of the you know how life has been described as the tragedy in the comedy right to kind of both things all bundled in has to be so interesting has england makes it rich doesn't it it makes it worthwhile and like variety and all that kind of stuff because you know i've heard it said that you know if we didn't have the tragedy or if we didn't have the have the so-called old quote unquote bad times. We couldn't have the good times. We need those yeah. I think i think there's a huge tendency in as human beings to say i only want things to be awesome awesome all the time and i never want to have we we numb ourselves in whatever way we do and we but it just doesn't work like that. Does it doesn't exhaust interesting. Yes yes so tell me about your book here. As we get close to wrapping up here <hes> what was the process. Was this something that wanted to come through. You ended the book. I'm referring to for people that are listening is not my plan sucking it in until i had to push it out which you you know as a man reading this i mean i'm looking for ways to identify and i certainly can because i think you convey the experience. You went through. We all have something we go through like that. It was this something that wanted to come through for some time you've had in the work or what's what's the story there well. I think for many years so the fact that that story is based doc of hiding an entire pregnancy up until delivery and then being kind of encouraged to move on with my life all those years ago and not really talk about mounted a whole lot. It was something that obviously was really it was simmering deep within me for many many years and i felt like i shouldn't bring it up and then i finally dawned on me as it was <hes> in recent years on the home stretch of what i was going to be able to potentially reunite with this baby i had had and had ultimately placed referred word option and i had reconnected <hes> phone call with phone call and face look with her mother who adopted her and we were both feeling strong strong urges of sharing our story of adoption just to keep the dialogue open <hes> around what happened. You know what are the options. When you have an unplanned pregnancy <hes> because politically you hear a lot about abortion and or keeping the baby those are the two options that are the most widely most commonly talked about and lesser on the adoption front and so we just wanna do <hes> throw some open dialogue in there and honestly. I didn't really want to write a book because it's hard to imagine draining and i didn't really wanna pick it. Those scabs that had kinda healed back then although i learned through that process that there there was a lot of stuff i still needed to resolve from those many years ago and so it's been such a blessing in my life but i wasn't really planned it eventually. The thought occurred to kind of both of us at the same time that we wanted to share some positive adoption stories. I thought it was just going to be a blog hosted. A video would be done and then <hes>. I felt a a strong urges that it needed to be a little bit more of an unpacking partially because i was going through some some kinda heavy marital challenges at the time and i wanted to give my <hes> husband at the time some breathing room to work on things he was working on and see if we could get on the same page so i needed something to focus on as well and so i went from start it to finish to book in hand in less than six months which is not normal process but i put my head down. I was constantly. I just wanted to get it done. I dug up my old gentleman level those files from back then i opened up those wounds to feel those feelings <hes> and then i realized how much in the book actually ended up telling me was why comedy so important because i didn't even realize until i read it back to myself that i had talked about what my journey was to getting into comedy and how much that has been something that has carried me through life and how how vital it has become and how much we live in the space of judgment of ourselves and others others and and sure as you said my journey included this unplanned pregnancy the themes i hoped would be relevant to anyone because just showing that we all have struggles and then we what to do with it and so it's been it's been really great a difficult journey i've since reunited with with that family with my my daughter and and learning how to navigate that relationship has challenges to even though we love each other and had such a positive experience we still are human <hes> struggling to find these balances relationships and now you know we're a couple of years into that and it's been a beautiful thing and now i can look back twenty years ago. This was almost twenty years ago the pregnancy and and the things that serve me now because i let them become a positive thing that shaped it to me. I continue to be showered with blessings from having that experience under my belt and that's my biggest drive with with everything i do is sharing stories and connecting with the humor and and knowing we can survive the hard things and then let those things the <hes> a badge of honor instead of a negative label or a statistic little who cares if you're statistically if we yeah. Let's learn like why are those things happening. How do we change things for the better early. It's all good. It's like you said yeah and you furthering the conversation. You know i mean it was just you know ah reading. It was super gripping that you actually hid this pregnancy for that long and talking about some of the feelings you were going through the time yeah it was isn't it's an intense read it and but i liked the way that you did put the humor into it and i think that helps it connect like you mentioned you can connect with people once you kind of play with that extreme that connects us all right and when we when we connect then we don't feel so alone. I think that's what i love. The most is occasionally hear from people that they've they've read a book or heard one of my podcasts or whatever it is and then they're like i can totally relate to that and then for those moten we don't feel alone and and sometimes we do like i've had those those moments in the dark of night. You know crying on my floor wondering what my life's purpose is supposed to be in. Why is it so hard and matt god and whatever with the moments and so the times that i get to go oh my gosh they get it they we have these shared feelings and maybe not exact experiences but we get it and then and and then it's just you get one more day or sometimes we get through one more minute and and we count that as a victim and so it's very wonderful and powerful oakland scary in fulfilling all at once i can imagine yeah and i think the other thing like you said everyone has those highs and lows as good and bad days <hes> <hes> sometimes. I think there's a perception in the world that some people don't have those people out of so-called made it or you know have all their ducks in a row but it's just not true is no nevarez says i think that's the fun how with the with that space especially improv is is that it's we're never going to get to a place probably where we're just easy easy street for a long period of time. Life is the struggle ama- joy simultaneously and so being able to put those together constantly will only serve you <hes> so true so as we get close to wrapping up because you have a lot of things that you've created out there and you know the opportunities for people people to do the same province stuff. Will you run through a list of ways that people can learn more about you and your work including your podcast talk about that <hes> just give us a kind of a for people listening and i'll also include this in the show notes so people can find out more about you and your work. If you kind of do a rundown of stuff that you've got out there for people to find the one of the easiest ways to connect his my website is meet meghan bryant dot com which has all the things the book improv stand up by like all the blurbs and connections to social media. I'm super active on instagram my favorite so that's at kooky megan k. o k y an e. g. a. n. which is also my twitter handle and whatever else i'm hardly ever on twitter but yeah i'm all over the place. It's super easy to find even if you just google meghan bryant comedian eighty in boise like there's a lot of stuff. I can't really hide anything in life anymore. <hes> but yet right website is probably the best because it does link to to my podcast which is called har hardly know her which is a stemming from one of the next books that i'm working on as i always liked to do that job so it's like i see the sign of a liquor store liquor. I hardly know her now. I'm always like the <hes> then. I'm like wait a minute. Oh who's anybody we hardly know each other until we opened up and share stories thousands of that steamboat my podcast and i love that so that's the meaning behind that the title of your cassia and yeah just really yeah we don't have to we don't have to be like these amazing naming celebrity wide known one hundred thousand followers to do big things in life and so that's kind of the energy behind the podcast. I yeah i like that. That's one of your messages there that because sometimes i think peop- we get in this mike thinking that all i need either a lot of money to do. These good works no the people it's just not true yeah absolutely start with yourself starts with maintain yourself happier person and then everything else starts to fall into place exactly so true so so people can find <hes> find you meet megan brian and all of your stuff then feeds off into that yeah just finally had that sucker revamped so it's pretty user friendly and has all the meagan good use in one place. I saw that it is a great looking website. So it's a fairly new revision that guy actually happened to be drug to one of my improv classes by his wife and then <hes> anyway we well yeah. I love looking for that. I've had so many times a really classes and then it ends up being like we get on each other's podcasts there. We do other things or each other you know then i was given new website and he happened to be a web designer so it looks great yeah. I noticed that i forget what you're i think i've remembered your past one but yeah this is. It looks super fresh super good. It was a branding guy to or just fight up website as some of the branding stuff as well very talented designer. He loves his sweet spot though is building the websites and he loves doing video recording stuff steph zach springer. I'm allowed to give his name plug but he also wheat free audio recorded my book as well so that i can put it on audible <hes> <hes> so he does a lot of the things where it's those technical the technical side to make us creative types in whatever any business look pretty and modder ya in in line so i i saw that yearbook his on kindle audible and the print version. That's those are the three ways right. When did you publish it by the way it was like would be published in this year. She was actually published in june two thousand sixteen so it's the old out long ago. I really didn't do anything with it so now. I'm like like as i'm working on my next book. I've been re-launching this book because i really never marketed it. Just was a laborer for two yeah and then i was like oh man but just to see that in the progress and changes at gone through since i wrote that book has been really just another testament to how exciting life can be if we just keep our nose to the grind and keep working and and and saying yes to doing the things that are the best for us so <hes> yeah. I just started re- not momentum. I hadn't really ever done a lot with it before yeah. I guess i should do something with this book that i wrote well and i i find that to you know the things we've created can sometimes sit there to ready to promote them right and you can pick them up and run yeah. Absolutely what will you give us a glimpse of your your coming book and you said it's based on the title of your podcast right yeah. Even with a title is influenced her. I hardly know her because it's exactly louis rain like who the heck. It's a little bit of a mockery of y like we just say oh. I'm going to be an influence her limited to bring that all internal so it's a lot about like what are we allow into influence us. How how are we allowing the world religions. We grew up in our family dynamics. The the the the town we were grown grew up in all all these little factors are even what type of media do we consume <hes> and then how are we reciprocated back out into the world and so it's like you. We have how this perception of what a quote unquote influence or is supposed to be and yet. What value are we adding. If you're just trying to be an influence or for the sake of being an influence and get people pulled your intent is not to increase the joy among humanity then but to me that doesn't count you don't get to just do that so sort of my opinions on and taking all of these things that we are learning and growing from and being the best person we can't and continuing to learn evolve and love others and then our our influence will naturally become hopefully a positive one to our kids or the are the people that we insist insist on time or a church congregation wherever we go if we focus on being better ourselves. That's where the influence needs to start. Wow wow. I think that that's going to like positively. Shake up the internet so to speak to cyberspace. It's necessary yeah. That's awesome. What what's the timeframe when when you projecting to release they have it in with a publisher a manuscript pretty well fleshed out and i am looking for some different options to publish <hes>. I learned some lessons the first time did you the my first boca. I paid more than i needed to just because i needed to get done <hes> and so it a lot of it has already written. The photo shoot for the book covers already happened. I it could be as soon as a couple months. It might end up being longer. I really i don't know but i believe when it's when it's supposed goes to be done. Sure sure sounds like yeah sounds like a lot of it is is well underway concern close. That's awesome well. That's that's exciting what you're doing megan again. I appreciate you sharing your journey with me. Thank you. I appreciate you giving me the opportunity absolutely well. We'll wrap it up then and again. Thanks so much for hanging out absolutely absolutely thank you well. What did you think super awesome right so hope you came away with some ideas and concepts that you can apply to your own life to have a better experience. I know that i did and i wanna thank megan for joining me on the podcast. I really do appreciate it. If you want to share your feedback maybe you've taken any improv class and you know megan or read her book and want to share join in the conversation. The best place to do that is on my youtube channel which is youtube dot com slash g. Mark phillips this episode as long as as well as all the episodes of enhancing human experience ultimately go up on youtube as well as any of your favorite podcasts players. I like youtube because it's a great platform to share information information and knowledge we can <hes> find out what's worked for other people what insights all the good stuff that youtube is for so again you can find that at youtube dot com slash g mark phillips lips and while you're there why not subscribe like i said all these podcasts go up there. You can capture them all and find just the one you need to help. You have a better experience experiencing any of your life so i want to thank you for tuning in today. I really do appreciate it and until next time all the best health baltin success bye-bye.

megan boise Mark mark phillips Mark phillips gary keller america facebook meghan bryant keller williams realty seattle editor vancouver hamas co founder jeffrey eizer england university of washington
2019 Year-End Review And A Look Forward to 2020

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

13:06 min | 1 year ago

2019 Year-End Review And A Look Forward to 2020

"Welcome to episode one hundred thirty eight which will probably be the last episode of the year. There's only a few more days left. It's been an amazing year. So many great things have happened and it's coming to an end very quickly happy holidays by the way. Merry Christmas in this episode. I thought I would talk about coming home. And the real value of returning to who we are what we are so the became kind of ground ourselves and get reoriented to go out into the world to create the things that we want to create aches. I'm really excited for this episode. I think it's really fitting to talk about around the holidays. Something I've been thinking about for the last week or two. So how was your holidays. I hope you had a chance to relax and use the time wisely. I know that on Christmas Day Christmas Eve I should say I spent a bunch of time time. Working on the set that I'll be filming a lot more Youtube content on already filmed a few videos. That'll be coming down the line ones already up at YouTube dot com slash G. Gee Mark Phillips talking about the set itself and it's just it's this has been months in the making I wanted to make it super cool okay Because you know there's a lot of competition on Youtube and a lot of people Have a really great channel. I learn a lot from so many people so I wanted to make it gets something really special and it's been probably taken the last half of the year five guests five or six months. A number of ideas went through my head. About what what I was GONNA do. I had to change direction a few times. But it's really close like a set of already filmed one video to give you a little bit of a teaser on the bucket list. That movie firm. I think it was two thousand nine with Morgan Freeman and Jack Nicholson. It was really awesome. I filmed a video sharing my five big. The idea is five takeaways that will be releasing soon on the channel and so you can look for a lot more content to come video video wise but but I will still be doing the podcast and you know like I said this year was who's been amazing. We recently wrapped up mark. Stinson and I my collaborator on in a world of creativity series. I I was just blown away by the people we had on there while all my guests are super awesome. But I gotta I tell you. We did a deep dive into business and entrepreneurship and creativity and innovating and marketing branding advertising seeing. I mean if you're a solo printer or an entrepreneur or someone who wants to have some more deep knowledge to add to your toolbox and and develop a better understanding of what you're doing in business how to make a bigger impact how to design products that actually resonate donate with your target client. Boy I gotTa tell you this was phenomenal. You can catch all of those episodes at you. Know Enhancing Hansen Human Experience PODCAST on any of your favorite players. The last one went up on its episode one hundred thirty six. What I've done there is if you go to that episode in the show notes at the bottom of the show notes you can have access to all the other prior episodes? You can kind of pick and choose what you want to listen to and and this is on my list of things to do my my ever-growing list of things to do is I'm going to be. I want to do a live stream team which is another streaming content on putting out on my youtube channel due to dot com G. Mark Phillips Where I talk about five of my favourite favourite takeaways? That have really will help you on your journey right. That have made a huge impact on me blown me away. This is the best of the best from these creators entrepreneurs preneurs and business people from all over the world. I should say we've talked to people. In the Philippines France India South America of course here in the states just just phenomenal phenomenal information. I WanNa pull those nuggets because I realized that you may not have the time to go. Listen to all those podcasts. But I want to give you some actionable things things that will help you on your journey. Because I know that as you're pushing in having these insights ideas to putting your bag of tricks as in valuable Bosa look for that to come along. And I guess I'll I'll put it out in some form or another I really want to do live streaming. But if I don't do that it'll be a video so looked at look for that to becoming very shortly cause I wanNA capture those ideas and get him get him shared with you but absolutely phenomenal all right before we jump into the episode. Let me just remind you if if you haven't picked up being is your superpower. Go get it. It's super awesome. It's filled with insights from successful people about how they created success. You know I'm a real big junkie for this kind of information because success leaves clues. This is what Anthony Robbins tells us all the googlers. Tell us this it. It doesn't just happen happen happenstance. I mean it's not a random event right there are concrete things that you and I can do to create the success that we want. And so what I've done is in my own journey. I hear successful people like Dan. Lock out of Vancouver British Columbia Sharing His story Rob Dudek shares shares his story. He's an entertainment. He's built a new payment empire multimillionaire very successful. In fact his stories actually about his wife about attracting acting his wife into his life. How he how he changed himself? He reinvented himself. He put himself into alignment with the type of person that he wanted to attract acting happened. Also you will be blown away by David. Goggin stories shares historian the Joe Rogan podcast and I captured it. Put the Lincoln this book Doc. Being is your superpower available at just be book Dot Com. And you don't have to watch the whole interview that these folks are in. You know these are links to youtube or podcast cast or in some cases just quotes and ideas about your power of being right your power to reinvent yourself to put yourself in alignment with the experiences experiences that you want to have in life so I've also giving you the time stamp. I know your time is valuable. You've got things to create. You've got places to go people to see all that stuff and I don't born to waste your time so I'm giving you the time stamp so you can jump right to that spot and I gotTa tell you the best is yet to come. I have captured assured another interview. This is actually from a youtube. Logger who has channel has blown up in the last year. And you'll see why when you watch the video I got to include that into this being is your superpower. I designed it to be updated. You'll see the one point o on the front of the version if you go download it today today but that will change. And I'm going to be coming out with V two point. Oh very soon and that's going to have this new story it's going to. It's going to blow you away. I was literally floored when I heard this guy. Talk about this because it's the challenge we all face. How do we become a new person when we've got this vast amount of experience and also we've impressed the way we are on other people and so they're holding that pattern for us to how do we become a new person to do things to do different things in a different way to get different results to get better results right? How do we improve ourselves? How do we improve our self concept this? This guy talks so eloquently about it and he really puts his finger on the heart of it. I cannot wait to share it with you. That's again on my ever-growing list of things to do but it it is coming because I'm thrilled. Go pick up that being is your superpower at just book Dot Com. I know you're going to enjoy it. Get a lot out of it. It's free by the way while you're there pickup The human beings manifesto. That's one page inspirational motivational document to put in your personal transformation personal development binder to help you remember that you can consciously create yourself. You can change who you are. We have that ability as human beings. All right let's move on. Let's talk briefly about coming home and grounding yourself south in who you are in this kind of flows nicely into what I was talking about. We are spiritual beings having the human experience. That's the basis of the podcast broadcasting. A lot of my work. This is the idea that Pierre Desjardins talks about where infinite spiritual beings but we also have one foot in and we have one foot in one foot out one foot in the spiritual realm one foot in the physical realm when we bridge that gap where life gets Super Fun. And I know you've experienced this for yourself off is when we can bring those ideas from the ether right as Thomas. Edison talked about create them in our consciousness first and then translate them into the physical world and make them a reality. Make them tangible things. That's what we're here to do right now. The problem can arise when we get a little bit off. kilter get a little bit out of alignment we get off of our purpose. We lose our way because there are so many things going on John in the physical world so many distractions and I don't use distractions in a negative way. I'm using that as just the ship call him events or things or bright shiny shiny objects right. This is Shiny Object Syndrome that we can fall prey to if we don't allow ourselves to return home to our true nature to our roots. What we are what we're here to do? What our purposes right and then we can get off we can get way lost? We can get way off course and so given the fact that it is the holiday season I thought it would be really fitting to share this with you again. This is what's happening on my own journey. There's so many things going on right so many things vying for our attention attention. This podcast is one of them. But hopefully it's valuable to you on your journey and giving you some good insights and sharing best practices for living but so many things vying for our attention. We really do have to be careful to return home from time to time to our true nature who we are what we are. Ground Ourselves Get reoriented renewed reinvigorated. And then go back out into the world with that sense of what our purposes and who we are right. The we're here to have fun. We're here to create things. There's really not a lot of pressure to get things done or do things. The system has already been taken care of right. It's it's just here for our enjoyment on our pleasure and our ability to translate those thoughts into things. That's the that's the idea that I'm coming to more and more over over time that there's nothing really forest to do except enjoy this experience and turn those thoughts things and have fun and play this game of life. Hyphen is really a game and again. This is the thing that I'm constantly reminding myself of especially when things when I start to get a little out out of alignment I start to push too hard and start using too much effort and not using enough of that spiritual power that flows through all of us. Maybe you've experienced a senior own life life so this idea of coming home returning to our true source of power are true nature and then allowing those things to happen in a in a more effortless way right in and more easy lighthearted fun way that is really much more enjoyable. So that's what I offer you in this episode of the PODCAST You know it is that time of season where we return to our roots. Get a grounding and I hope you can do that as we move forward into the new year. A lot of awesome contains coming in the New Year. Lots more changes on my channel and I look forward to sharing all that with you again. If you haven't subscribed you can do that at Youtube Dot Com uh-huh slash G Mark Phillips will wrap up this episode. The last of twenty nineteen. It's been an amazing year. Thank you so much for joining me being a part of this this thing we're doing doing here. I'm super thrilled to have you along help. You got some value out of it if you have. It'd be super awesome if you would leave a review at I tunes or leave a review on your favorite episode so youtube and that would mean a lot to me so I really do appreciate it so until next time all the best. Merry Christmas happy holidays and and happy New Year. I wish you the best in this in this coming New Year look for more great content to come along until next time all the best helped Baltin success bye-bye.

Youtube G. Gee Mark Phillips Bosa Anthony Robbins Morgan Freeman Philippines France India South Pierre Desjardins Vancouver Stinson Mark Phillips Joe Rogan Jack Nicholson Dan Goggin Lincoln David Rob Dudek
Value-Based Creativity With Sophia Lara-Grine And Mridhu Verma | ETHX 129

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

28:44 min | 1 year ago

Value-Based Creativity With Sophia Lara-Grine And Mridhu Verma | ETHX 129

"You from Boise Idaho human experience a world of creativity a series of unique interviews with successful people from around the globe how they get inspired where their ideas uh-huh and how they apply creativity in their business and personal lives now here's your host Mark Phillips along with Special Guest Interviewer Mark Stinson and went from Delhi in India and we're we're going to explore the creative process that each of these people go through and what I'm working on then there is a company was looking for some collaboration collaboration in U. S. so that's where I'm working on all right welcome to another episode of a world of creativity Ni inside enhancing human experience podcast Mark Phillips some here and art since March so yeah there are different kind of products which are running under me yet I'm enjoying working on that and it sounds like this is what's great you know you're both doing something that you're excited about you're passionate about and so mark I I met both of these women Doing market research projects so Sofia helped with a market research project in Paris probably Russian Sarah Ben Eight or nine years ago almost which I can't believe the second now boy we've been looking forward to this interview for a while now and we have a couple of terrific business women from one from Paris the and just see what inspires them and how they think and how they approach their work in their personal life and so forth it's going to be a lot of fun yeah thanks and helping them in decision making providing strategic analysis so this is my whole world revolves so if you would ask me like like you just Marie Doodoo jealous what you're working on today short first of all I would like to thank you for having me on the poor has today basically I'm a technical headed delve inside and may just possibly to bring innovations in the Chen what exactly I'm working on so I'm actually working on different static projects Lake market analyses of anti-infection is when worked recur on a Business Research Project where we were trying to understand customers and and the market and I'd like to ask both of you ladies from the storm point anymore maybe through the introduction of new projects joining new juniors standing guard conferences all around the world meeting people and understanding their request cal time flies but really really to understand you know how customers think and what they do and then similarly with me drew i Sofia welcomed from Harris Iran tell us a little white working these days so here I define myself I'm working of you know getting insight into how people think and that kind of market research background having your approach that how do you get to know people are just customers but as real humans so fia what's your been your experience with that we'll start with along the virus two years of all now I have been part of this you actually look to do in my background art facility who will several colds being and so did he do not give you much more time to know each other personally so when I talk about that I think I have yeah and I think we sounding where art some people who would like to involve themselves into that understanding of the personal stuff a to the conference in us again I met him so so it's like a you know like you get to know each other more rarely a chance you get to know about the people who are working on the other side I mean there are more and more into the work and mission making they would like to step up and go more on the personal side and to know more about like how I think how and Sophia you're working you know with a lot of business people were concerned with their operations in their profits But you have a nice wine Sophia in your program what's been your experience why well first of all I mention the right in Copenhagen and I like somehow through the business traveler's event Tokyo for a seminar and I met him again and again then all the technology coming in cheese bigger revolution about you know put heart into your work how do you find that people want to be inspired more from their heart at work how are you both roles in society revolution well versus great in Madrid when you're doing your analysis howl you getting to understand the person disease now from walks hardly making news on Food Culture Religion Society snotty now I know what exactly he's into what kind of goals what exactly the visions he has and the family met people Bosnia Leeann I know them and I think now we are friends so so like one off the Guy I met in the conference amusing question I would say okay so I I would seek when when you're into business I mean it it's you love Mucci chance meeting people yeah I'm glad you mentioned that because you know many many people think even the word technical in your title can you hear me worry yes and so drew how do you find that you're able to bring an emotional side to your have been so I think use work I see what you're saying it's not just on a personal level but lights out society and teaching more more and more with me forts wild since I have representatives and they were making the Denver this auden once the word out of trouble a lot of which makes sense for me because you would like to create something massive on board for your clients so that they can take heart society and hope worse and make sure that decisions on their best tragic portfolio so yes it works for me so this has me in getting more clarity Martin walks and special non are really having in mind when thinking about their futures st I become more focused with my approach and on and deliver value to the clients and this is how I work I mean I'm has I think it will be discussed about everything and you know venue venue are more on the floor snow side I think it's challenge that the clients have shared with you do you do you have a systematic approach or is it more intuitive I I'd be curious about your process they work and what what kind of goals I have yes I I would just say that it's rare but there there I start from scratch I started reading the stuff I do law second research to understand what exactly I can bring on board to create also because the trustee of putting for like in my case the work which I have provided to them so satisfied with the work that day we need a right eh focused and describe more about the yesterday by called at your creative process how did you approach the problem or the worth and all this so I think that people mine meaning minds worth home more coke approach go work I think there is no emotional side now when I work I I tried to understand more more on the project side then brainstorm a lot and it for example if things are not working battles I'd say that's great and so Sophia when you're taking on a new project or a new engagement or framing do do you have a process what she's needed so I try to create some kind of methodology Vich could work for that project and for my client and then I put up put that of in front of my client and we disconnect together so yeah so like if you ask me on the creative process so basically I I've heard of it's the first committee meeting listening to all all the way up to the societal level yes that's the third because the action there is a lot of articles receivers is how people then I go for a walk and come back and it gives me a different dimension to think this is how it works with me I'm in their personal lives and works you need that tell now work was can believe full-service Trans all yet the news quite the impressive so yeah I try I work more anti discuss and then the all refined my process and metrology what's that you start with the their first outlawed burst awareness what year and your name the technology invention everything yeah this is great so people still use pen and paper whiteboard it's like you have to feel it there's something tactile about touching the ideas take nacre an expert or a book or anything that you referred to for my napping hide of my own I'm very focused so gender raking it's quite different from those Before I start Entra Jake I envisioned the outcome I will I do a lot of mine I think and we all love that it's just so much forcing content uh-huh right yeah no this is fantastic and is there a source that you I'm curious oftentimes people ask me to not mind mapping do you have a particular Komo news very nice it sounds great and live in such vibrant dynamic cities I can own it you know Ju- just the food and their color the art and the Mir Gerke I really loved for example artistic words up in their lives are but where where do you personally find your creative inspiration or you say I just I need a dose of inspiration what the history social return says it can be a lot of different references though can be vows you like the mind nothing in that quite sure if I'm on Seraing and if you ask me assume any but it's less related to the hobbies are you can say like you know just watching a movie or against like moving there are a lot of ideas running into my mind and I tried to put in to put it into the reality so it's and so I'd like to see more on the personal side you know you've talked about drew just taking a walk sometimes and Sophia museums and things both of I'm doing so so major inspiration is like a van I'm working I'm very focused on I'm very focused museum I write down everything I've seen on yeah what's your personal go to Madrid what about you honest is a very difficult question for me but I would like to answer it in defend way the keys finished you use a pen and paper or are you using an APP of some sort to do the map I hold spiel I'm using their maker I have a inspiration outside of work mine I'm so little sun so franch healthy sounds great well yeah that's that's the idea that we would be excited and inspired by our craft and our work so that's great so feel where where do you find us most of the time I have a I have a big team and we keep on discussing with each other and yes sometimes a bit ideas more often than you can say just refining my ideas my work I think inspires me I enjoy working a lot of this it really depends on the project to project honestly like for example it's like very very different kind of project which will rugg didn't do so what I do I but terrific office vibrant neighborhood and I said where's a good cafe or bakery and it was literally I'd across the often ask if if there is a book or a resource or a podcast you know what what are you reading or listening to these days that so by doing it in huts mean clearing besser the output for my clients sometimes it takes students even analyze how the outcome should be the nineteen I it so we out and getting some inspiration or never happens with me it is actually more related to the ideas are my craft are you say my work what exactly so now one of the things I remember merce about jazz meeting Sophia for the first I'm is going to their offices was at Your Prior Company Sofi of course breath nation the one eighth opposites and has just about data length was woman Redo what are you reading or listening to these days vulne like I mentioned before I'm majority of the time who can ha- video Niger's now again visits museum use our housing for mute or yet reference you buy overfeed getting to better which is our right now that's great are you can say like spend more time on stem figuring out some new books something so but but I and so I I'm fascinated by Yoga Practice Star what what does that do to help sort of refresh or calm I'm married respective also get in science fiction and some strategy assumptions if you talk about marketing Odyssey's already fuel talk about some different kinds of projects via the primaries own ideas and them you'll invest way it's just thinking of your own wise and moved Eh in the morning while I do I do yoga for example I challenge myself over there also yeah yeah you'll love and I always love to hear that because so many of our interviews it's like a technology's wonderful the Internet's APPs you know and everything else but how many no I'm an acting good and absolves lot of thoughts and ideas from said beings we skinks Mu engaged most of the time so I actually do not get trying to OMAHODIC around the idea righted naked infrequent yeah this is this is great I wonder alive wow yeah listen this is the phone conversation and you know the theme of our podcast a world of creativity are both of you have opportunity to have global finding that we are a more global community that are creative exchange you know crosses borders and cross cultures a lot more than having a cafe coffee mass start flowing in well and you find some creative inspiration from so feel what about you right now I'm reading the looks for me because all the time is there something which I'm doing different I have to involve fully in the case of Yoga I then just a terrific conversation mindful of our tonight and thanks for sharing your insights and ideas and as we close I'm curious no p interview the fact is that when you are in process you have and maybe when you began your careers yes of course yes it's huge enjoy exponential as I mentioned that I do visit conferences worldwide so I think it's important I mean you go to connections you know across different continents and countries are and Sophia at the outset you mentioned the Internet and how close we are now are you I do cross which blocks my avenues taught I sometimes cook it's like not something something which is I'm friends meet New People have got his conversations with them you dental on a lot I met a guy he was working on digital Topix live from Robin Shurmur and this this was quite my favorite book have some kind of technology innovation and that drives you crazy ball I mean people around the world are making something very waited that not only inspires you that inspires your school to create something bigger and it's cheap I mosque headstones so and I like mentioned before I envisioned myself being stabling the headstones position before practicing every day uh I do meditation I practiced sub some different guy in all for Austin's for example I want us that's Great Redo how have you seen culture creative exchange I know my while we want to thank you to for joining us we really do appreciate it and we'll we'll wrap it up here here's the loved operates in England French I love our third and Cranston have a break offered for in the S so Dabo so alluring I'm in was so great to know that you tend to different kinds of things one person is doing something success thanks for listening to this special edition what a great interview we WanNa Think Sophia and redrew joining us in this episode of a world of creativity and now I'm able to do stand good for you good for you yeah well this has been enhancing the human experience a world of creativity with Mark Phillips if you'd like to this

Mark Phillips Mark Stinson Delhi India U. S. Boise Idaho nine years two years
A World Of Creativity With Guest Host Mark Stinson | ETHX 118

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

25:57 min | 1 year ago

A World Of Creativity With Guest Host Mark Stinson | ETHX 118

"<music> how you from Boise Idaho the fastest fastest growing city in the U._S. and recognized as one of the most creative and vibrant cities to live in this is a special edition of enhancing the human human experience a world of creativity a series of unique interviews with successful people from around the globe how they get inspired where their ideas come I'm from and how they apply creativity in their business and personal lives now. Here's your host Mark Phillips along with Special Guest Interviewer Mark Stinson welcome to our series on creativity and I'm here with Mark Stinson Mark Welcome. Thanks for having me absolutely. I'm excited the Diet Hi. This is GonNa be a great series. I mean I'm very excited and I I love <hes> what you're doing with the podcast and this idea that we're enhancing the human experience variance <hes> and that's why this creativity series is going to be fun because <hes> how how people are using creativity to enhance their own an experience but also how they're bettering you know the experience of others <hes> whether that be professionally or personally so it's going to be a lot of fun. I'm excited I it. Is You know when you came to me with this idea. It is very much in alignment with what the podcast is about where creators you know and it becomes win win when we create and it enhances other people's when were inspired to create and then answer other people's lives some really looking forward to it yeah and I think you <hes> you know we're GonNa talk to some great people and I think that this conversation is just sort of set that up <hes> when we were starting to flesh this out <hes> we we identified a lot of different people from different markets different professions different career paths even where they are in their career pass early lake eight retired startups in business and so just to kick things off. We've invited <hes> people from fourteen different countries countries and <hes>. They're in a wide range of industries. A wide range of experiences and I can't wait to put them together and that's GonNa be a fun part yeah. I'm really excited to see how this plays out. Because it's the diversity that's going to add this element of of unknown and that's what we were just talking about. You know <hes> as we talked about. We're leaving. It very open ended where it's GonNa go where it's GonNa go. We're GONNA have a container to put this in but as far as you know what the expectations expectations and outcomes are we don't even know what that's going to be and the fact that you use the word <hes> diversity. You know it's <hes> it's a commonly used term now. It's something we're all aware of now but it's not only diversity of <hes> you know age gender race ethnicity and so forth but I I think the diversity of thinking and experiences that we're going to have on this series is gonna be terrific. <hes> the fact that we have people who have different a tool sets and different things that they use. I think <hes> a different approach to the way they think in the way they create <hes> a different way that they even seek creative inspiration outside their profession. I think this is going to be the surprising part when we say we're going to leave it. Open will ask them. Where do you find creative inspiration outside the nine to five outside the office outside outside your you know sort of day to day work and so when we hear them talking about <hes> photography painting Music Dance <music> You're meditation. We don't know what we might hear <hes> because I think that creativity and the sparks you know people say I get my best US ideas. You know taking a shower. Get my best ideas. When I'm running or hiking <hes> we're gonNA find out where these people get their ideas now they might apply them in in their work or they might apply them in their social settings but where where they get the inspiration that's going to be fun yeah yeah. I'm excited because we all have our our own. We all have our own areas where we get inspiration or were they were doing something and hearing other people and to your point about the different cultures and different countries countries. I've experienced that in my past profession you know where you have a piece of software that comes out of Sweden or its design. They there's a different way of thinking and I'm really excited to see what these people how they think and how they put together because there is differences. Have you experienced that in your professional desk yeah and I think you know I I've dedicated pretty much my entire working career to this idea of exploring creativity you know early on I took some classes at the center for creative creative leadership out of Greensboro North Carolina yet layered on that with some Edward de Bono <hes> thinking skills <hes> thinking about <hes> <hes> Yeah Dale Carnegie Jack Canfield these other influences right but I think how it's applied in other words the principles may be the same in Copenhagen Austin Hong Kong and Moon by and Melbourne Australia but how they're applied may be different. There may be cultural influences. There may be <hes> just the working styles <hes> that people have in different so it'll be interesting to see not only kind kind of I always think of a ven diagram. You know what's what's in the middle. That's in common might be the basic tenants of creativity but outside. You know how they compare how they contrast. <hes> is going to be fun. That's really interesting yeah. I totally see what you're saying. You know within the cultures creative ideas. We're going to express themselves differently. Pantley aren't they yes but when we say almost tongue-in-cheek will it is a global world <hes> no longer. Maybe do we see the same barriers area that we used to see if everybody is working in a global economy if people are working with multinational companies where we're zoom meeting and skyping typing and you know sharing every day <hes> with people cross borders <hes> does it become more common and yet won't it be the interesting if we talked to somebody in Florida and talked to somebody in Brazil and say look at that we're the same <hes> imagine imagine what sort of forget political but you know social global impact a conversation like that might make one to one and then does that have ripple effects <hes>. I don't think we can underestimate the power of creativity and who knows what will uncover in these podcast interviews news yeah yeah you bring up a really good point you know at the end of the day you know there is a common basis for this regardless of what country were in or what field ran it. It's still has to come through us. These ideas right and it may be again <hes>. I'm very anxious to hear the goals People Express Express when they say why do I want to improve my creativity. Why do I want to find more ways to be more creative. Is it for career career. Enhancement is it for my entrepreneurial growth is it a networking thing you know is it from my own personal development because I want to have a more artistic. Dick side of me. You know I've got the business side but now I want the the more artistic side <hes> I don't. I don't think we can assume what people's those motivations are right. You know and I know some of the folks that will talk to pretty well. I know some of them not as well <hes> but <HES> even the folks that may be. I've known a decade. I don't know the why you know when you had these taxes for has the indepth that says well. Why do you want to be an iron man you know why do you own a record collection. That can cover an entire wall you he you know why did you take up painting. After years of being a news anchor you know why painting and what what is your goal with that you know. What do you hope to find either in your heart. Your mind your relationships <hes>. What are you looking for so when somebody he says nine to five I work all day you know in an office but when I go home my young son and I pick up guitars and we jam well is that because I want to be in a band I don't know is it because at that creativity is an instrument to build relationships <hes> with family. That's GonNa be a great discussion. Yeah it really is because you know at the end of the day we all. We have to find a channel. It seems like to create and and maybe if you can't get it in your working day to day you have to let that out you know and so these are the things that will will reveal themselves as we go forward and I am really also hoping that <hes> maybe the fact that we know these people a little bit you know at least from my introductory introductory standpoint <hes> because there is the shadow side you are they're going to be. I must become more creative. I'm facing obstacles in my business. <hes> I started a business. It's not going so well. This is the third business I've started the the last two failed and I really don't WanNa make the same mistakes. So is there a force to be more creative but is there a different to overcome obstacles. I WANNA think differently. I just don't want to stay in the Rut. <hes> you know. I was in a meeting last week. When we were talking about thinking outside the box and it is such a Cliche we always go. Let's think outside the box well. What is the box and how do you get out of it. You know and I really want to hear from these people about that. Is it curiosity like I just need to be more more curious to know what other people are doing or is it openness. I've been successful. I'm going to go to the same well. You need to be open to new ideas. Is it risk taking yeah. I just don't WanNa take risks. I lost all my money in the last business so I have no risk to take. It must be successful except pressure. It is a lot of pressure and that that's that's fascinating to bring it up because some of the listeners will be in that spot. I mean who hasn't been in that spot at some point in their lives. That's one of the things that I think about all. The time is that you know there. There is always more innovations to be made. It's just a question of WHO's GonNa. Make them right. I mean in <hes> the this notion that there are continual advancements for the human beings in every industry every sector it just a question of what channel is. GonNa come through and that's what I think is so fascinating because creativity all life is is getting better and improving in solving problems in any industry any business and we've talked a little bit about the Auburn of the world and Bill Gates and in his new <hes> <hes> sanitary Porta potties for the Third World countries those are ideas that at one point in time didn't exist and they came through someone to solve a specific problem absolutely fascinating one of my friends teachers from Awhile Back Gerald Hamid. He added a company called. Thank you better and <hes> he he basically you know and he may not be the only in first person to say this but he really drilled into me. That creativity is coming up with the ideas but innovation is implementing them while and pulling them through and actually making whether it be business or some sort of concern out of the ideas because <hes> again you walk out on that person's really creative <hes>. They got some great ideas. You know who who among us haven't said wow I had this great idea and then a couple months later or a couple of years later. Somebody does it and you go. Oh I had that idea. I had that idea in two thousand thirteen man. I can't believe they stole it from me. No because you didn't do anything with it <hes> so I think you know what what Gerald and others you know in that phrase. <hes> were trying to say is that creativity perhaps as a pursued or as an enjoyment cement is great. You know to have this artistic expression or to have a hobby or whatever but if you want to make an ovation you're going to have to figure out maybe the implementation of IT and again. I think through our interviews were going to hear from people who say you know I was a sales manager for a global company <hes> but I use creativity to be a better motivator to be a better trainer to really engage <hes> my hi salesforce around the globe and had to do it differently in Asia than I did in Europe than I did in Latin America <hes> which sounds sounds like well of course she did but you know it took the creativity pulling through to the implementation of that innovation to really make it happen and I'm looking forward to hearing some of those stories yeah I. That's a great distinction. There is a very big difference between being creative and being able to execute that that idea because the there's a different I look at things as you know bringing things from the spiritual or unseen side into the physical side and once you cross that barrier that becomes logistics and execution platforms and vehicles you know it's all fun and Games until crosses that barrier then it opens up into Ah really diverse ways to execute that and sometimes you get stuck there big time and and <hes> and they could be real obstacles breath or they could be imagined or what have you I think again one thing a thread that may come through these interviews his I'll be listening for is that these are all very successful people whether they be in their business or again in there <hes> pursuits of any kind but <hes> <hes> you know there. There's one guy that will talk to WHO's a very successful attorney and yet he has this you know sort of side love of of photography and even a drone photography and <hes> you know it's like where does the drone photographer <hes> blend and in with the successful attorney <hes> but I I think we'll also see what you're talking about. When you talk about limitations what what will here is. Is this whatever it takes mentality that these folks don't seem to be limited by. I don't really have the money. I don't really know anybody who can help me while I'm going to have to incorporate my business. Well need seed money or you know. I'll have to put a lot on credit card. I mean there. There's a whatever it takes mentality and <hes> and the Edward de Bono. You're sort of model of creative thinking <hes> <hes> he has you know descriptions of they call it a brown shoe around Baroque and that this kind of <hes> wingtip shoe in imagine the salesman beating the bushes you know and it's a hole in the bottom of the shoe that you just beat the sidewalk you beat the maidment and do whatever it takes shakes <hes> to make it happen and I think again the the mentality that you'll hear from the people we talked to is like I I may see a brick wall but I'm I'm going to figure out a way to go over it around it under it threw it out catapult. You know what whatever it takes right and <hes>. We're here some of the career because that's again. Creativity thing right eight is right in its its perseverance and determination in its sometimes you. We're go like you said I'd love the Magic Wall or the physical wall right. It doesn't ultimately it doesn't matter if it's potentially stopping you. It doesn't matter whether it's real or imagined agenda's thing and yeah whatever it takes attitude is. I hope that comes through in August. I'm eager to see what they say about that and I think <hes> most of all I think we're going to hear a personal side of these stories that <hes> you know beyond the resume beyond the Lincoln profile beyond the letters at the back of their names. You know we're going to talk to at least one or two P._H._D.'s. We're going to talk to people who have degrees in professions NHS and things like that <hes> but I think the personal connection. That's going to be made you know when we put these people on the phone together and go now. I had no idea you did this. And how did you you know sort of a balance your scientific mind with your creative mind signed <hes> or you're very strong business sense. You know with the fun in the exploration when you went skydiving when you wrote on elephants you know when you took these risks or chances how how what would that impact you personally. Yadda and so these personal connections will be fun. These are the people that we might know but that I don't believe as we've looked at the pairings. I don't believe they know each other as exciting and so they'll be you know I think the the listeners can expect some some Chitchat and get to know at the beginning of the interviews but then it'll be wow I had no idea or I had the same experience or I wish I would have handled it differently or I learned something from you. <hes> because of these personal connections that will make and I think <hes> you the listeners will will really relate to these as people and then who knows if if it inspires you to pick up the phone and maybe call somebody <hes> across the ocean or across the time zones that you haven't talked to in a while or that you feel like you could collaborate with again. I I don't know about you but I think there's a lot of people that you say I always wish I could do something with that person while this might be the time to <hes> to write that email to pick up that phone and make that call the <hes> <hes> and and to that point one thing that I foresee us doing is pulling out some of these <hes> key <hes> ideas or nuggets from these people bill and sharing them in the show notes on the website at G. Mark Phillips Dot Com and throughout social media because I think when we aggregate these things that was when we aggregate aggravate the data so to speak will be able to see some interesting things going on and it's easy to share those things too yeah yeah. I think that's gonna be terrific so some some summary of of <hes> these ideas and say well you know. I didn't know it really boiled down to these five ten. Who knows what they might be but <hes> yeah what do they have in common? What could we learned from exactly. We'll talk about the logistics for the listeners so they can understand what what they're getting themselves into here. <hes> so this is a series within enhancing human experience a creativity series and it will be potentially ongoing it will be like you said talking to people from in fourteen different countries and we have a all these pairs <hes> give some ideas of far as what you foresee. You know you know we have talked about leaving. This somewhat somewhat open ended. We're letting it dry itself. We're not having any preconceived you know putting it in the box so to speak right <hes> what are some of your thoughts on outcomes that that people should expect here in the series yeah well. I think we're going to take a page right out of some of the creativity principles and that is we're not gonNA wait for everything to be perfect and aligned <hes> we're going to start and it might be a little messy at first but we're GONNA we're GonNa Start and that that's part of the fun right <hes> so we have identified as I mentioned these <hes> people from fourteen different countries <hes> and we're going to pair them up so you'll hear <hes> <hes> you and I am interviewing to other people and <hes> instead of maybe expecting this to be. You know perfectly weekly every seven seven days. I mean you. You've done a great job enhancing the human experience podcast of having these regular updates but this is a special series will be an ancillary to that back so you know it it might be a little more episodic might be a little bit more irregular but you can count on it and <hes> I think as we evolve the series <hes> whether that be the length or the topics or the regularity and some of the schedule <hes> we'll see how it goes but <hes> ultimately ultimately you know we'll we'll get some of these things under our belt and then we've loved the feedback <hes> if you want to provide comments as a listener <hes> we'd love to hear <hes> questions you know that you'd like to hear from these folks other suggestions of people we should talk to <hes> and that's what this when we call it a complementary series you you know we we want to show how creativity can complement enhancing human experience and so quite logistically this series of podcast. I will complement what you're already doing. Yeah regular show yeah exactly and so like we talked about. It is a series within a series. You can listen to <music> this. Lino on any of your favorite podcasts players including youtube as far as you know how to get their hands on it. You know you can always get your hands on on it at G. Mark Phillips Dot Com. I'll have a link somewhere on there whether it's a an image that links you to the playlist on Youtube or a podcast but also on social media and I'm an ask for your social social media to hear for listeners <hes> my social media of course is at G. Mark Phillips everywhere except facebook that is g Mark Phillips Fan. If an and of of course we'll be posting and sharing all these will be sharing clips on all those things so if you wanna find it. You'll capture it somewhere. What about you mark. Where can people find it <hes> in your network or circles yeah so I'll be posted on my website. Is Mark Hyphen Stinson Dot Com. My instagram is at brand innovator vader and <hes>. I have a facebook page. That's Mark Stinson author. Okay yeah so we find find it in any of those areas unlinked and I'll be posting and that's another place. I'll be hitting up with links because I think that's going to be a great platform as well. All the platforms are GonNa touch some unique sector yeah and and just hearing those overlaps I mean Lincoln is not facebook which is not instagram which is not a website so how <hes> you know an even how these these people <hes> use social media will be a part of the conversation you know if somebody has a professional <hes> website or <hes> whatever and then they all of a sudden have this side creative pursuit that they want to put their photography. They WANNA put their music on <hes>. How how how do they either manage that balance that hasn't been there right right and and somebody says oh well well. I knew you were a great advertising creative director but I really had no idea you were involved in this music or that. I could download your music or that. I could see your event calendar clubs. You're going to be playing at its now. We live in an amazing time right now. There's a lot of those barriers that we talked about. Our are are lower than they used to be in some cases nonexistent yeah. It's going to be tour exciting all right awesome. Well that gives you a sense of what to expect in this series series on creativity and want to thank you for joining us for this first episode launching the the the series were very excited. <hes> closing remarks Mark No. I'm looking forward to to sharing these ideas and <hes> I know these are people. I like to hang out with and I talked to you know on a regular basis. I think thank <hes> I think you're gonNA enjoy listening to him too. They have some great stories. I have a feeling I am too yeah all right. That's it thanks for joining us and stay tuned for four episode number. One of our creativity series coming up soon see you soon thanks for listening to this special edition of enhancing the human experience a world of creativity with Mark Phillips. If you liked this episode and want to know more check out G MARK PHILLIPS DOT COM and please leave us a review on Youtube itunes or wherever you get your podcasts see you next time <music> <music>.

Mark Phillips G. Mark Phillips Mark Stinson facebook youtube Edward de Bono People Express Express Boise Idaho US Greensboro Gerald Hamid attorney Bill Gates NHS Sweden Pantley Dick side Mark Hyphen
5 Ways To Develop Your Network: Never Eat Alone By Keith Ferrazzi | ETHX 123

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

15:27 min | 1 year ago

5 Ways To Develop Your Network: Never Eat Alone By Keith Ferrazzi | ETHX 123

"To you from Boise Idaho the fastest this growing city in the U._S. and recognized as one of the most creative and vibrant cities to live in this is a special edition of enhancing the human experience a world of creativity a series of unique interviews with successful people from around the globe how they get inspired where their ideas come from <hes> and how they apply creativity in their business and personal lives now. Here's your host Mark Phillips along with special guest interviewer Mark Stinson. Welcome to episode one twenty three of enhancing human experience on Mark Phillips. Thanks so much for tuning in today. I really do appreciate it on today's episode so I'm GonNa play a segment. It's about six or seven minutes long that Mark Stinson and I recorded to kind of supplement our world of creativity creativity series. That's the series within enhancing human experience for we're talking with successful people creative people from around the globe to find out how they get inspired aspired how they apply creativity and how they you know make more success in their business and their lives by doing you know creating in a certain way and sharing best practices. This is for living. We're really enjoying this series. I want to recap the series so far and then also give you a little snapshot up what we've got coming down the line before I jump into this segment. If you recall the very first episode of this series was episode one eighteen of the enhancing human experience. That's the kickoff that marks tencent. It's an idea that we kinda laid the foundation so you can pick that up on my website or any of your favorite podcasts players or on youtube at YouTube dot com slash Mark Phillips the first interview. The guest interview was really awesome. We interviewed Sherry tally. Sherry is a former broadcast journalist from Shreveport Louisiana Hannah and also she's an artist and <hes> has many ways of expressing her creativity really insightful awesome interview the title of that one is being authentic authentic exploring your world and continually recreating yourself with Sherry tally. That's episode one nineteen of the podcast our third interview you. We interviewed two amazing gentlemen. One of them is John. Begs from Australia and the other one is Danilo Frontier Gelo FRAT Angelo. That's a challenging aging last name but this was. This was another find interview. We talked with both of these gentlemen in kind of the that was the idea is to have multiple people on the show. You know get a conversation going bounce ideas off one another share best practices. Get Insights Dee Dee podcast takes a whole different foreman when you have multiple people in this case four people sharing a conversation about creativity is really was finding an exciting and I encourage you to check that out. If you have not done so oh that's episode one twenty-one the title of that episode is called outcome focused creativity with John. Begs and Danilo frat Angelo really awesome and moving along that leads us up to this installment in this series here where Mark Stinson pulled a book from his library that is called called never eat alone by Emma get the title here by Keith Ferruzzi and Marco's over the five point process. That Keith says you know to create more success in your life. These five points taken from this book. Never eat alone really really good lots of value in this episode. We hope it's going to be you. You know help you apply in your business have more success you know more meetings more collaborations more networking all the good stuff that moves businesses forward forward so we're really excited to share this episode with you so as I as I mentioned I went over Kinda the past episodes within this series a world of creativity now. Here's where you can listen to it at. I already mentioned youtube dot com slash Mark Phillips but it's also available on any of your favorite podcasts players. If you're google person if you're an apple person stitcher spotify iheartradio anywhere you get your podcasts you can you know subscribe to enhancing human experience. It's and then those episodes that I mentioned are specifically related to a world of creativity. That's where you can listen also for every episode episode. I've done this from the very beginning of the podcast. I always pull a one minute. Sixty seconds sound bite of what I feel is one of the if not the the most important negative information that my guest is shared with me and I continue to do that on these episodes in the case of Danilo End John Begs were have to folks. I I pulled to sixty second snippet snippets clips and share them out on my social media and you can find those clips at on Instagram at Aggie Mark Phillips on Facebook at G. Mark Phillips Fan if an and also at twitter aggie Mark Phillips so I I know that you have a lot of stuff on you're played in your busy and I pull those clips because even if you don't have time to listen to the whole podcast I want you to be able to at least here. The nugget the sixty second sound bite that that I feel is really important one of the most important gates that my guest shared with me so I do that an effort to save you time and give you the give you the good seeking. Put it into practice. Get on with your life and and create the things that you came here to create so you can find all those on social media all right before I play the sound the this episode that marched incident. I recorded earlier earlier this month. I WanNa tell you give you a little glimpse of what's coming down the line. We talk about this and the episode as well but we've got a number of people lined up. We're going to start recording again in in September and bank a lot of those episodes and then share them with you in the podcast over the next coming months and and we're really excited. I mean like I said this. This thing is <hes>. We're learning a lot. We're getting a lot of insights into how different people work and a lot of applicable things tonight. I WanNa give anything away but we are talking about putting this in some type of a format. I don't know whether that's going to be a book or some kind of audio thing or a you know some kind of bullet point thing but some kind of tool that you can get your hands on that really will distill all of the things that we're learning from these. These interviews and we definitely are learning a lot. <hes> it's just a really exciting process in a really exciting thing to be a part of it. I WanNa thank Marc Stinson for you. Know bring up this idea it. It was just it's just a great idea. We are creators. <hes> everything that is existing in the world came through US everything that will be we'll come through us. It's just just a question of you know who's GonNa create how they're going to create it is going to be beneficial is going to be easy is best practices kind of thing so it really is interwoven interwoven with the the theme and the core concept of enhancing human experience being creators creating you know the things and experiences that we really. WanNa have having life. You know we get to determine what shows up in the world. We we get to make a conscious decision about how our businesses unfold what business we've and enter into what products products and services we enter how valuable they are all these types of things so it's really exciting and I hope you're enjoying this this series so without further ado. Let's jump into this this episode again. We're talking about the five point process that Keith Ferruzzi shares in his book never eat alone. I think it's super valuable. Enjoy this <hes> sound bite here <music> enjoying the world of creativity special. I shall series within enhancing human experience Mark Phillips. I'm here with Mark Stinson. We want to chat about creativity just a little bit today. Yes fantastic. The the series is <hes> developing galloping really nicely. I mean so far. We've we've heard from folks in Australia. <hes> Brazil <hes> the Great State of Florida Yeah <hes> on TAP <hes> you know we're going to be sharing more interviews from Germany <hes> India <hes> France <hes> and again <hes> some folks in the U._S. So <hes> <hes> we we're hearing from a lot of really creative and inspirational people and in the meantime we just thought we'd share some small snippets of other creative inspiration expiration with you <hes> along the way so you know two or three minute <hes> snack sized bite of the Asian. I I've been going through my my library. <hes> mark and I'm sure you've got a great library of <hes> taxed but specifically thinking about this the question of creativity and <hes> one of the books that I thought I would share today is called never eat alone <hes> by Keith veracity and even the subtitle never eat alone and other seek seek truth secrets to success one relationship at a time well and <hes> the premise here from Keith Pirozzi as you could basically ask any accomplish C._E._O. Or entrepreneur other professional you know how did they achieve success and he says I guarantee you won't won't hear a bunch of business jargon and it won't be their degree and it won't be you know they're professional training. You'll mostly hear about the people who helped helped pave the way for them and somebody who mentored them or give them a reference or an introduction and <hes> so they're not caught up in their own success. US rather than the recognize how other people help them so the premise of this book and never eat alone mean says it was somebody else <hes> <hes> but also the idea that maybe you should have a book with you. Maybe a listen to a podcast while you're eating but you know why why waste the time and it's kind of interesting productivity absolutely but let's hit a couple a highpoints of this book in this very brief review so building a web of relationships so Peradze says our full-time career lifetime employment is dead so we're all basically free agents and we're going mm front. Even if you have a full-time job. It probably won't be for life. You know you won't retire at the same job you started rear with so the currency of this issuer network <hes> what what are the people you know and what are they offering so the audacity of building this network and being able to ask people for what you need. <hes> is what this is all about now. I don't know about you mark but I hate cold calls. I hated him then at all so this this idea that you can kind of get over your fear of embarrassment or fear of rejection that cold calls represent by saying. Would you like to have a coffee you know. Would you like to have lunch. Inch is a lot easier than I can. Take an hour of your time to present the features and benefits my product or I would. You take a look at my resume. Would you like to interview me <hes> so he basically has a point process here. I find a role model that you you know admire and that you think you could learn from from second. Learn to speak and tell your story in a nicer saint kind of wing and be comfortable with that <hes> three. We get involved so we're going to talk about meetings. Conferences things like this is where you meet people so again. A lot of people don't like networking groups. A networking group doesn't have to be oppressed. The flesh you know speed dating out business cards kinda fashion so get involved in a group for you. Develop yourself so you've developed. You're storing your learn to speak articulately about it but also then develop you know your your self confidence <hes> develop how you present yourself and then five just do it so it set a goal of initiating initiating a meeting with one new person every week <hes> so you don't have to go from zero to eighty say never eat alone three meals a day contact but one new person a week that really and again the audacity would be they would never have lunch with me. I can't call them well. You'd be amazed used so friends relatives colleagues professional organizations. He has a list of like twenty idea starters for Tuesday. Gear starters people you socialize with people who may have you know provided services to you know what if you call the people that did your lawn service. You know what if you call the people who helped install your Internet <hes> you know what's great is the network could go anywhere so basically the you know the the fifteen minutes of coffee. Maybe it's at conferences. You're inviting somebody who might share a workout with you. You know golf is quite uneasiness popular. Maybe WANNA quick breakfast. <hes> you might invite somebody to the theater to a book signing event. <hes> someplace ace that you think you would share in common with you so. I really found this <hes> again re-energizing. It's not a new book. It's been on my show along. I heard of it so this idea that you you know maybe this also encourages folks to find some creative inspiration on a book. That's already on their shelf reopened opening. Henry familiarized themselves. We that's like you know we need that constantly putting things in front of us that says these are great ideas and you know helpful people get their their mind going so as we <hes> continued interview people in a interview podcast series here you know we'll be asking them where they got some inspiration shen so I thought in this brief short sort of interim episode in between interviews which are <hes> one of these books gray enjoyed it yeah yeah awesome well. Thanks mark and stay tuned for future episodes of a world of creativity. That's the series inside of enhancing human experience you can pick it up on any of your favorite podcasts platforms perform and on Youtube so stay tuned for future episodes. Thanks for listening to this special edition of enhancing the human experience a world of creativity with Mark Phillips. If you like this episode and want to no more check out G MARK PHILLIPS DOT COM and please leave us a review on Youtube. I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. See you next time <music> <music>.

Mark Phillips Mark Stinson Aggie Mark Phillips Danilo End John Youtube US Sherry tally Keith Keith Ferruzzi tencent Boise Idaho Danilo Frontier Gelo Danilo frat Angelo Marc Stinson google Shreveport Dee Dee
How NLP Helps You Succeed With Daniel Mahan | ETHX 141

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

41:16 min | 1 year ago

How NLP Helps You Succeed With Daniel Mahan | ETHX 141

"Welcome to another episode of Enhancing Human Experience Mark Phillips. So thrilled that you tune in today my guest today is Daniel me hand and Daniel and I go back. Maybe twelve years we met at reshapes on. Kito here in Boise under since they all under on Osceola all ongoing PODCAST NUMBER OF TIMES RUNS. One Hand speaks also hosts owned odd. Cast A storytelling gas. But a number of students were SUPER SUPER FORTUNATE TO BE STUDYING. Aikido under all hundred. He's just Amisi human being. And that's how Daniel I met and we recently reconnected. Facebook and realized we had a number of interests in common site. Invite him to be a guest on a little bit of background on Daniel. He is a professional realtor. Here in Boise may also has a background in. Nlp neuro linguistic programming and in this episode. We dive in and unpack a lot of things that are going on in NLP that are specifically applicable to business and interpersonal relationships communication. Just so many good nuggets in this episode. I came away with a lot of practical tools and techniques that I know are gonNA benefit me moving forward and I think you're GONNA get a lot out of them as well so without further ado much been in to see what Daniel has to say. Thanks for having me. I'm looking forward to chatting view. Marquette. Thank you. I'm glad to be here today. Absolutely I love it so I mean you and I. We practiced Akito ten years ago. Plus I mean time flies and I think it was between two thousand and eight. Two thousand eleven. Yeah I can't even believe it was that long ago and we recently reconnected. Had A lot of things in common and I'm eager to jump into what you're doing. Now you're in real estate. Never background and Personal Development eeks. Nlp and hypnosis. And I cannot wait for you to share your journey since we last talked anyway so as ten years you visit guy. I've been doing the best I can to keep busy and just keep growing. You know what it's all about. I mean a big fan of that idea that the more we grow inside the more our experiences get better and like it's better but it's at internal journey. It seems like for my in my experience. What about you? Definitely the path of personal development. I think has been one of the biggest things in my life Not just for me personally but helping me with my family with my business. Just it's an all around really good thing to have in your life. Yeah absolutely so. You're in real estate. Tell me about that journey. I mean what what what drove you to get into real estate. Which by the way is is kind of a secret love affair of mind. I love the real estate game. I'm not in that game but I learned a lot from realtors because I know they have a high level personal development and sales skills. What drove you. What brought you to that. Industry will what drove me to. This was the fact that I'd worked with several realtors. Who were either part time in the business or you know? It wasn't their first passionate. Wasn't the thing that was really driving them. And so we kind of always got left on the sidelines. With things you know real estate can be a very fast paced market and so you find a home to act on it fashion. You get your off ran. It needs to be done right. There needs to be a lot of attention to detail in a commitment to both the the deal and you know the relationships that you have with people in real estate and I just wasn't getting that and we worked with several realtor we bought and sold a few homes over our our time raising our kids and doing those things and I just got to the point in my own personal development as I was working with realtors in the industry for I said you know know I could put more into this and give people so much more than what they're getting. I can give people what they deserve to get out of their deals. And so the next thing I know I'm taking classes and I've got my license and here I am. I'm an active real estate. Agent and one of my biggest goals is helping veterans. People like myself so that I can educate them Just on the benefits that they get from being in the military and serving the country and and then the deals that they can get because the banks have such like right now. The interest rates for veterans three point one percent interest rates are different from for because of certain programs are different for veterans than they are for non. Is that Kinda they are? Yeah a whole different lending system for the veterans and then there's programs that are set up just specifically more but for veterans and myself being a Navy veteran of the Gulf War You know it's something that I wanted to use. And just a lot of people don't understand it and so. I WANNA be that guy that to help. Educate people and to help get them in their homes and you know what better way than to see that smile on their face when when the whole deal is done and and they're happy with what they got. that's awesome. I think your story is similar to love people story where they see you know. They work with people in an industry so to speak and they look at that experience and say well I can improve on this in this way and that way and they died in. I think that's so common I think so too and I think once you find that passion for something something that that you know you you find a hole in that were. It's just not being done correctly and then all of a sudden you're there and you're helping those people and you see the difference that you make with it and I think that's what really drives lead to keep moving former. Yeah like I said I I just love the real estate game it forces you to become a better version of yourself so that you can serve people better and level you know. Everyone seems like a win win of experience where you're growing you're helping people. I dislike everything about it. If I wasn't in the online game in the in the content marketing you might be realtor. Well I come sign you up anytime you want to come over and absolutely were talking prior to the podcast prior to the interview here how we live in h when people can do multiple things that I want to dive into some of your other passions as well Just got back from a conference in Vegas and average folio was talking about being a multi passionate entrepreneur. And you don't have to do just one thing. Any more people could be well rounded and show up as this kind of multifaceted person and do work in the world in many different ways. And I I kinda see that's what you're doing a little bit. Yeah I feel that's been a you know. The real estate was was where I found myself where I I wanted to be was was helping people and so it started out with my own personal development. My own personal growth and I started learning more about NLP neuro linguistic programming. And it really is. It's a communication style that helps people to be able to you know get rid of the generalizations deletions in the distortions that we use in our everyday speech and so that you can really get to the bottom of a problem and once. I saw the the problem solving portion of. Nlp was as good as it was. I took my sales background that I've had since I was a little kid. You know going door to door with my grandfather selling air fresheners to people and I thought you know what? What can I do this going to help people the most and still be able to use these skills that have gotten in? Nlp and real estate was the biggest thing that came to line Some some of the biggest problems that a person will ever face is with that big purchase that they make in their life. That's real estate. And so you know one of the things that happen as the the buyer the seller has something that they WanNa do and real estate agent. They get really busy next thing you know. The communication breaks down and once that happens. Well then just. Nobody's happy anymore. And so I think that by bringing my own personal development through. Nlp into the game in real estate it really helps me to be a better communicator. A better problem solver and just all around better person and the other thing is is that you know sometimes people are going through other emotional stresses in their life and you know the one opportunity that I have is now in front of people and maybe something is going on through the conversation or you just see that. They're having a rough day and so I can help out with that. Do the other skills that I have. Not just as a real estate agent and so I think that really rounds off you know what I'm doing in a better game for everybody absolutely and at the end of the day I love the fact that you bring bring this up communication and just helping from like this broad spectrum but sometimes it specifically as a realtor and you can bring all those those powers in like things that you've developed by yourself in onto that experience and you're right it is a it is the purchase. It is very stressful. I think that's why I think that's why it's so challenging rewarding at the same time it is right you face these huge problems and you have to. You have to get creative a lot of times so now. You're thinking outside the box because while in real estate there really is no box right. Every deal is different. And that's what I find. Exciting is not things are ever the same. And so you get out there you find a problem you get creative you solve it. And then everyone's happy. Yeah and you talked a little bit about how he can help you be about a realtor and serve your clients in the best way. What do you see is the maybe some more key differences between a realtor who maybe doesn't have that deep deep knowledge and you've got you've had training for many years in onto seminars and whatnot? What do you see as some key differences Has IT versus? All new doesn't have that. I think a big portion of that comes down to listening skills. And that's something that you're taught within L. P. and such I mean we all hear about it right. Everyone has their own style of learning. Some people are visual. Some people are auditory. Some people are kinesthetic. Well that's also true for the way we speak so we may take in what you're saying and you may be speaking in auditory output and I may be a visual person and so even though we're both speaking English we're really speaking two different languages. Take something really easy. I say something to you you say oh I hear you real common thing but just because you hear me. I might be trying to paint you a visual picture and you can't create that picture in your mind. It's just not something that you you're doing. So maybe what you need is you need to have the same story told to you and auditory way so now I use words that are more auditory so that you can hear what I'm saying rather than see the image that is a visual person. Create some people when they talk. They talk in terms of Kim Aesthetics and so they feel that they have real strong connections to things when things get out of sorts and they think it's heavy but when they're when they're not stressed out it's light it's airy it feels good right and so that I think is really where. Nlp helps me to be able to communicate with people. Because now I'm listening to the words that you're saying and I can tell you whether your auditory person a visual person kinesthetic person whereas you might be working with someone who is very visual very kinesthetic and you're not and and at that realtor isn't thinking along those lines. He's not listening to half of what you're saying you know. Or She's not being heard in the way that she wants and then the frustration kicks in and who hasn't been in a sales situation. We're at a car or something store and you WanNa ask a salesman the question answering your questions. You know but you're thinking I hear you know saying stuff that is just not registering. Yeah and so I think. That's why bridge that gap. I think that's where I excel in that area over the person that doesn't have that because it's just opened me up to those different channels. Yes Oh and advantage it. And you know what you said is so critical because in a big fan of this Relationships or communication that you know what percentage of the success of the relationship or communication. Our our. Our roller are perner. We responsible for and people who are really good communicators high end salespeople and effective people. They say it's one hundred percent your responsibility because that's how much control you have over it. That's kind of what I'm hearing from you and also being adaptable to talk to people in the way our communicate with people. I don't want to narrow. It could communicate people in the way that they understand that requires like you said a high sensitivity to how they are they listening to and then one other factor and there is only seven percent of our communication is actually through works. Ninety three percent of our communication is through facial expressions tonality body language. I mean. There's so much that when when you ask a personal question there's so much more going on there than just the words that are coming out of their mouth and so you know if I were in. Turn my back to the camera right now. I could say something to you and you might go well. That doesn't make any sense for for what you're asking me because you're not seeing my facial expressions and if I was real monotone in the way I answered your question you'd be like today understand my question correctly and so there's just so much more that goes on in a conversation than just those those verbal things that we say yeah. I love that you brought that up because I think people forget that where we were so focused on the words or whatever but there's so much more going on like almost like below the subconscious level that were eating off. Oh it's it's fascinating. I'm glad you brought that up So let me ask you this knowing what you know about. Nlp and obviously integrating it in with your business in your life. What are some like Goto principles or ideas that you've found of helped you in not only your business relationships but even your day to day life there certain things that you always go to your. Nlp training for to help you in a wide variety of situations. Like your favorites. Yeah so one of the biggest things is is There's no such thing as I mean and this is going to sound crazy but no matter how out of person that's being you know whether it's a child throwing a huge temper tantrum or a person that you know. Maybe we see as a huge criminal in life right. It's all about their intentions. And when you really start looking at what's going on in a person's life it it has to come from what intention. They're hoping to accomplish for themselves right when I started learning. Alpay at heard this phrase my entire life The Path to hell is paved with the best intentions house. That that is a crazy way to say something but then all of a sudden you start looking at you know this person's behavior and how bad it is and you know other people look at him and her and they say wow. That person is just so messed up and you know you have to put a label on it. Then you start talking to the person and you start. Finding out that you know and bullying in school is a big word right that that child is bullied. He has to throw up a defense mechanism and so he throws up this defense mechanism that that we see as bad behavior while now all of a sudden that kid is an adult and he's still got that same defense mechanism but now sitting in a meeting with people and any feels something may happen that triggers that emotion from when he was a little child and now he throws up the defense mechanism and maybe says something really sharply to the group. And everyone's like that guy. He's he's just his so abrasive while y you know what? What is the important thing that he's trying to do? Maybe he's trying to protect himself. Keep security and so you know as soon as something starts going off in a conversation. I think that's one of the biggest things that I do. Is I look at that person and I think what is the intention of that behavior is trying to get for him inside right and if you can bind that intention find what. It's trying to get for that person. You can communicate on a level does now. They feel secure. Now feel safe now. They feel heard maybe before. They just didn't feel her. So so you can change that. You can alter that behavior in get better communication better results out of it. I think that's one of the biggest things that I've taken away from an LP because that's huge. That's absolutely huge. I'm just seeing feeling the impact of that in daylight because again you when you get outside of yourself and see where this person's coming from again helps that communication and I'm a big fan of intention just in general setting attention in an intention for the day for for episodes for interviews and it really does in my experience prepaid the road but when you look at it for the person standpoint. I can see that being really powerful. That's awesome right right and it's just it's such a simple thing looking under saying so what's going on inside them. Let me try to step into their shoes for a minute. Feel what they're feeling. What is it that I said? What is it? That's going on and and just the whole circumstance here. That's making that person. Feel that way because if they felt the way they wanted to feel and just outweigh that made them feel good the communication when change what they're getting out of it it's going to change and now you know now all of a sudden you're back on a level playing field again and and now you're able to help them through this problem and maybe it was. They just couldn't boys the way it made them feel in the way they were being treated in a transaction or the lender or the seller and the buyer. Whoever's in the in the situation they weren't getting something from it but now they can see that the kingdom? Yeah that's that's step in problem solving. Oh totally an and the other thing that I can see it. I want you to unpack this idea in a moment here about. Nlp The other thing I can see is that it sounds like it's a really effective way to help people level up their own software you as a practitioner and trainer because like like you said that's the name of the game like not doing the same not thinking the same thoughts feeling the same feelings and behaving the same way as we were only seven but right up leveling our software all the time which is frigging so important. I mean is that an accurate statement design. Help help you get some perspective on your own software and say hey I need to grow and grow and grow. I'm glad that you reference it to software because it's so funny that we think of ourselves as as you know humans but this freethinking mind where we're able to think of anything we want and we do but the other thing that we do is just like a software program if then else problem is if we go if then and we don't have an exit strategy for that debt that thought pattern right and so The if portion is a trigger something happens in someone's world where they're now all of a sudden in an unrestored place in a place where they don't have an emotion for this feeling and and that's another thing that I think we've lost us as a lot of people as we don't differentiate between emotions and feelings unpack that a little bit so a feeling is something that we feel in our body and everyone I think at some point in their life has had an Zaidi. Feeling you get in. Your chest feels like someone sitting. I knew weighing you down really just making hard to breathe and and we don't understand that feeling won't emotion is a feeling with awe attached to it and so you know now someone told us when you're when you're getting that feeling we're sitting on your chest. He can't breathe and things are just not feeling right. Things will now if you can recognize that. That's because -iety well. How do you feel when you're not feeling anxiety right? Oh I feel good. So what does that feel like? I feel like I don't feel that things sitting on my chest and so just by talking someone through these things a lot of times you can talk them out of their anxiety because once they recognize that they have this feeling and I can put a thought to it. So what was I thinking just before this happened? What happened to me just before this? This feeling came on. This anxiety started to happen. Oh I was thinking about how much stress dismiss causing me all K- well what if it didn't go that way? What if instead of you having that thought of of you know that situation but the outcome of it is is a good outcome? Now you know. So maybe it's buying that house and and you really need to get out of your house that you're in but at the same time you need to be another house all. What am I going to do this? House GonNa sell got houses going to maybe be gone by the time I get there. Bygone between what we can do is we can put the intention on the whole thing and say okay. Look we can maybe sell your house. We can put a contingency in it. You can rent the house until we get this house deal complete and now with that with that whole thing in place. How do you feel about the deal? That does not a stressful okay. So when you don't feel that way and then you you look at this whole situation now through this perspective. How does that feeling change in your chest right some so once? You can put an emotion onto the feeling you know so put thought onto that and so now the you have a way to identify that this is what's causing it so the first seven. She's yeah yeah it all starts with thought right and then it becomes the story that you tell yourself in your mind so so now you've got this. This thought you start talking it over in your mind but you're saying the same thing over and over to yourself pretty soon that feeling starts to grow it starts to get. Heavier starts to get bigger schools from a mouse sitting on your chest to the elephants sitting on her chest. And so then you can just reduced at you know. Sometimes it comes with a spinning feeling in your chest right so if you can identify and this one that I'd used on people before while does it have a motion to it. Sure is spinning way. Well spent the opposite direction so they think about a minute. Spend a feeling the opposite way all of a sudden now instead of feeling xylitol now. They're excited Because they're very similar. It's just how you perceive it and what story you're telling in your mind. Yeah it really is. It seems so simple. But we'll get into this loop can we can't get out of the loop so the next thing you know we get stuck. Yeah and you know. Sometimes that can turn into depression. It can turn into all kinds of things but if we can change the story in our mind change the feeling that we're having then we can check that drives. Yeah well it sounds like you know like everything you know. It's there is two things going on one knowing what to do and to practicing and both of those things I think knowing what to do sometimes easier because you get the knowledge I find in my own experience actually practicing in this case the internal over thinking different thoughts disciplining your mind to to go here rather than there I think that's where the rubber hits the road and it separates you know successful from non successful or you know courageous from non courageous so on and so forth asset. Is that what you re experience? I mean you have to practice. He's seen don't you? You do have to practice them. And and the hardest thing is and I experienced this myself when I first started out matter of fact one of the first classes that I ever took a live class. The instructor was talking. And it hit a nerve on me and I went to that unresolvable place and and next thing. I was just kind of sitting in the chair and I was getting really panicky. And she looked at me and said I've given you the tools. Get yourself out of it and like I don't I can't i. Don't even know what you're talking about at the moment so even though I knew exactly what I was supposed to do. I was so new to it at the time. I couldn't change my state from an place to resourceful place. And she was able to do it with me within just a few seconds and and that was so powerful to me in that moment because that was the same sort of path the same sort of loop that I'd taken still many times because of the same triggers and and it was really nothing more than just explaining to me that there was an exit strategy to it and once I was able to see that entire feeling was gone when I was back to normal again. And so yeah. It's very empowering kind of feeling and anyone can learn to do it with a little bit of training and a lot of practice is very similar to meditation accent. Now when you go into your meditation then you start having positive thoughts and that really is a big key to it is positive thinking and so people talk a lot about affirmations and affirmations are a wonderful thing and I think everyone should start their day off affirmations but the key to it is getting into the right resourceful state. I said that. Yeah so meditation is a wonderful thing to get you into that state right. How do I WANNA be so? Get excited get motivated. Get whatever you need get that sense of peace you meditate on it for a few minutes when you feel that feeling that you wanNA feel now. Start saying all your operations. Now start going through that list. I'm confident I'm strong. I'm successful and wealthy right and you start getting that. When you're in the positive state those things stick and they stick well and so you know some people they start off in the morning you know. And they've been told just look in the mirror and state those positive affirmations get up there with a piece of paper and meeting a fit and their look in the mirror but the first thing is seventy looks in the mirrors and I don't like the way my hair looks fat. I'm getting old wrinkles. I'm competent decibel. So they don't believe it. And so you start off with that state of positivity that wonderful feeling that you want to feel you go through those positive affirmations and now you do now you can start to believe them. Now they become something that's powerful and useful and that's the kind of stuff like teach people you know and I think that is just an absolute thing that once a person learns that and they find that within themselves now they have the power of the ability to change anything they want in their life. It's huge you know that that That getting into correct state. I've heard that from other people and I wholeheartedly agree because otherwise we're just kind of going through the motions. Just have you know autopilot through the other thing that I think is really interesting about your story with the trainer is something I think about all the time that the the time to practice isn't winning. You're in middle of this situation right. I mean the Practices we have some space to kind of learn and not when you're thrown into the deep end so to speak you know right right. Yeah it seems like it would coach. Pardon was great to have a wonderful coach. Yeah someone that can teach you through. It can help you when you are down. You know just a switch that state and then just so that I think when we're in a unresolvable place we don't have the ability to recognize what it is that we want and how to get there and so once you have a person there that can say okay. This is how we're going to get in this positive state. This is how we're going to get feeling good again. And because they're an outside source they can look at you and say there. It is that's right. That's the source that you need to be in that you're there now do this and once you've recognized once you've felt that switch within yourself once you've seen that switch within yourself you hear the tone of your own voice change then all of a sudden you can go there. It is So now I can do this on my own but just to be told to go off and do it on your own. It's really difficult. Yeah I think. That's what the benefit of coaching or mentoring or consulting any type of working with other people. Because they can reflect back at you things that you can't see right and aspects of your story you're you're you know how you see the world and they're like you know. Is that really serving? You in his this in alignment with what you want and you sometimes go. I never really thought about it. But it's not a fan of all those things up you know odds beliefs feelings and actions and results but sometimes if something's off `specially if the beliefs are off of course you're going to struggle. Yeah exactly and if you have a negative belief about something you know then you have the negative thoughts which you have negative feelings which lead to a negative behavior and so you know change. The thought change the feeling changed the behavior. You've got a new belief. Yeah that's so awesome while we're on the topic of NLP one. I WANNA have you share. How people can contact you to learn more about or your consulting coaching services. But I WANNA ask you. Do you have any favorite books in that in L. P. Spectrum or podcasts or whatever things that you think might be helpful to US LISTENERS. To people listen do it. It's the funniest story I started off and so I was actually in a very unresolvable place About five years ago or so. I might have been a little bit longer bus six years ago and I read a child's Book Children's book it was called the Little Prince. Ooh and and it's just about this Sky who gets stranded in the desert with his airplane on comes this little miniature duties at little prince and he just starts telling him stories and and during that process. I had a change within me and I knew it I felt it. I just didn't understand what it was and and so the next thing I know I. I'm looking at books on NOCES. Nlp and just the whole process. While I've come to understand that what happened in that book was If a stories written well it's a metaphor for life and all it needs to do. Is someone tell you the story and you take the message out of it for whatever it is in your life and you might hear the same story and have a different reaction to it. But what I needed at the time to reframe myself to be a better person and I was so confused by the time I got learning. Lp It just SORTA happened that way. So I read all these books by Richard Bandler Dr Bound he's the founder of. Nlp Him in another guy named Grinder under they were the two big. Nlp guys from back in the sixties and Seventies. And what they did is is. They were both physics guys and they'd gotten to the top of their profession in physics. And they said you know if if everything in matter works the way it does and people are nothing more than energy and matter than these things should work for them and they went around and they started interviewing people. These great people that were in the industry of making people feel better and one of them was Milton Erickson and he was at the time. One of the biggest psychologist hypnotherapist of that era. And what they did is they came up with a whole bunch of questions on how to model somebody and so the whole premise of NLP is modeling. So if someone else has done before I can do it. I just have to find the resources out. There implement them in myself and then I become dislike that person. Check the qualities out of it that I won't leave the qualities behind but I don't and and become a more personally developed person and so any of their books and battlers books are are much more Ready readily available. Then grinders are then. I read a book that was really surprising to me. It was Thinking grow rich I Napoleon Hill written after the Great Depression or actually during the Great Depression and he talks about so many of these concepts and principles in there in a way. That really is resourceful for people and it really is just that mentality of you know staying positive having a passionate and a desire for something he talks about it in there is being well now you can define well however you want that financial wealth physical wealth. You know mental spiritual. I don't care what you want to put on it. You pick your your type of wealth you want. Have the faith in yourself. Believe in yourself that you can make it happen that you have all the resources in order to do it and then by writing things down the goals for yourself feeding be definite about the goals that you want for yourself right down. You would go back to those affirmations again. Those affirmations are part of that goal. How am I going to get there? Who am I going to be when I get there you know? How do I WANNA show up when I do out this and you follow that plan and you will make it happen because it's your thoughts? Bring those things forward and you tell yourself the same thing every day. I'm successful of this. I my goal is to help you know. Forty people find the home that makes them happy. This year I can achieve that goal because I have the faith in myself. I have the tools that I need. I have the resources demand need for that and I can make it happen and I will make it happen. And that's what's so beautiful about it and so I think if someone's really wanting a great self-help book I think. Think and grow rich isen amazing book for that Nlp If you're looking for the tools to do this you know more completely than There's tons of books out there and say start with the ones that are written by the guys that did this the beginning another coach that I really love out there. Is John Oberdorf okay? He's he's an older guy as well. Some of these guys are getting to the point. Where I'm I'm hoping that I'll get to see them before they retire. Yeah but I've learned a lot of stuff from one of John. Students and his name is eagerly Tchaikovsky. He's through hypnosis training academy but his stuff is all conversational. He wants to help people and be able to get people to see change within themselves without having to go through a formal hypnosis process. You know so instead of telling you Color is you know that whole bit through hypnosis. You just have a conversation with someone to get them to go inside to find the resources that they need to make the changes that they want and keep that change and he's really good at doing that those debts. That is an awesome list of resources. Thank you for sharing that. Because I know for one I WANNA learn more about this and I know the listeners will for sure absolutely so as we get closer wrapping up a couple of minutes here. Tell us how we can get in touch with you. to either learn more about your real estate services or the P. Coaching. Give some resources and I'll also link them in the show notes at G. Mark Phillips Dot Com awesome. That'd be great You can contract me on facebook. I've got a my regular facebook page. There also got a business page for my real estate there. I'm on twitter Instagram Lincoln. And then you can reach me by email Dan at capital group co Dot Com phone number two zero eight three seven one four three seven. Four how you can give me a call and you know however you WANNA do. It prayed in touch with me. Send me a quick text. Send me an email. I'm more than happy to reach out to assist you with little coaching. That's what you're looking for personally professionally or Help YOU RESTRICTION TRANSACTIONS. So awesome awesome. Well in in Boise. Is You know one of the. If not the hottest market in the states right now People love it here. We've also way of life so This place to be. Yeah it really is and this year. They projected an eight point. One percent growth for the Boise market alone. Which actually was the number one growing market in the nation? So yeah I mean there's no slowing down here. We're going to be a big big city before too long. It's happening all around. Us drive downtown. See the cranes and the buildings. It's exciting an ally and speaking beings -iety it's all good though. It's all positive 'cause changing that that's an exciting thing it is it really is and you know that changed that growth. It just brings new things that that we just haven't experienced here before you know some of those ways of life the culture. I love the culture. That's cowboys awesome. Oh it is the different foods. The different styles just thinkings keeps you on your toes. It really keeps you in a good positive place. Definitely definitely will well Dan. I've thoroughly enjoyed having you on and sharing your experience. I really do appreciate it. Thanks Mark I appreciate this was. This was a good time off more of these. Absolutely all right. We'll sign up again. Thanks so much I appreciate it. You're welcome thanks for having me your welcome yes.

Boise Facebook Daniel Mark Phillips Hand Akito Osceola Navy Nlp Little Prince Vegas Dan Kim Aesthetics L. P.
Connecting Health And Creativity With Epigenetic Health Coach David Krantz | ETHX 133

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

1:01:31 hr | 1 year ago

Connecting Health And Creativity With Epigenetic Health Coach David Krantz | ETHX 133

"Hey how's IT GOIN'. Welcome to another episode of enhancing enhancing human experience. I am thrilled that you tuned in today. There's going to be an awesome episode. We're talking about tuning up. You're helping you feel better helping you have more energy the all the good things that we want so we can go out and create the things that Wanna come through US really excited about this episode. I hope you're fall is turning out awesome. I hope you're enjoying the the cool will air if you live in the climate that has the changes like we have here in Boise and a couple of things to get out of the way before we jump into this episode for one. I want to invite you this holiday season to visit focusing flow dot. Co and check out the products and apparel there. You know all of those stings are designed to help not only you but people on your list tune in to the experiences they wanna have in life went you you know we are conscious creators. Hopefully we're conscious creators when were tuned in to our power and where we're focusing deliberately right when we're thinking about the things and experiences we want to bring about in our life right. That's when we're consciously creating our life as opposed to unconsciously creating or creating by default or doing what we've always done getting what we've always got all the products and apparel there are designed to remind you that you have the power in incredible power within you to create the experience you want to have in your business and your life to consciously create them so I'll be putting more information about those products addicts and ideas for you to purchase gifts this year that are designed to help the people on your list get what they want all year round right. We've got the preferred preferred experiences shirt. Preferred Experience Mug. We've got the I love you mug all of the series from keep calm. Keep calm and live in the end to keep calm and follow your bliss. Keep calm and follow your dreams all these things are daily reminders. On Your desk at work you know when you're having your morning coffee all these things are daily reminders that you have the ability to create the experiences you want to have in life so like. I said I'm planning on doing a whole video with a lot of ideas ideas. You know making gift bundles gift baskets and what I call like a like a Mug gift basket right putting awesome things in a mug buying a mug for the loved the ones or or friends and family on your Christmas list. What a great gift right filled with higher consciousness things not just the stuff that you've been buying lying maybe for the last twenty or thirty years because everyone else is buying it right? These are thoughtful things. These are things that are actually gonNA help them feel better helped him tune in to do the experiences that they want right so. I'm really excited about that. To that point I'm also in the process of building a new set to film home episodes of enhancing human experience podcast also to make videos moving more into video as I've mentioned before on this podcast and also on my Youtube Channel Gemma EXCUSE ME YOUTUBE DOT com slash G Mark Phillips. You can check out that. They're definitely putting a big shift in video getting outside of my comfort zone to do that. And so look for more of that coming down the line in the next month or so. Hopefully the set will be done by. I'm hoping by mid to end November. We can start pushing out videos but again I'm going to go over some ideas for you to give conscious gift right conscious gift giving us what it's all about so I invite you to check out focusing flow dot what's CEO before you go and buy the gifts on Christmas lift. Just check it out and see what you think like you say. All those are designed to help people get what they want. That's the that's the name name of the game right. How better experiences feel better create the prosperity and good feelings that they want some really excited about that all right? Let me tell you about my guest us today. So my guest today is David. Krantz and David is an EPA genetic health coach. He reached out to me recently and I invited him to be a guest asked on podcast. You know I'm all about getting the needle or the percentage as high as possible to eating the best foods foods and and like getting a little exercise getting the energy up feeling as good as I can now do. I sometimes eat junk food absolutely. Do I sometimes have alcohol Paul. Absolutely but my whole philosophy is getting that needle up as high as possible and getting the percentage as high as possible. So that when I do have a whatever you WANNA call it cheat day or craving that I can satisfy that craving and get back on the path and so I never feel guilty about this because the rock desert right whatever the rock does. I'm going to. I'm going to do as well so we talked about a little bit about that in the episode about cheap meals and kind of you know satisfying that craving you. You have on on occasion so I was thrilled to have David on and dive. Into what epigenetics is you know. I didn't really know what that was. I knew had something to do you with modifying our our genetic makeup and and again tipping those percentages more towards feeling better having better energy and you know activating certain I guess jeans our turning them on or turning them off with our diet and exercise and things like that a lot of goodness in this episode. I know you're going to enjoy it. So let's jump into the episode and see what David has to say and we'll talk about how you can get in touch with him at the end of the episode. How you can find his his website and his youtube videos? I've watched a number of his videos are super awesome. We'll also talk about the the blue light blocking glasses which I have a pair those news and there's a lot of goodness in this episode's let's jump in and have a conversation with David Krantz and genetic health coach. David thanks for joining me. I'm super excited. The chat about epigenetics in your work. Yes thanks for having me on Mark I'm really excited to chat with these wealthier. Absolutely so I think for starters. Let's start with what epigenetics is I. Don't think a lot of people know this. I had to kind of look it up and we'll definitely look it up and refresh my my mind about what what is the. What is epigenetics connectix? Yeah absolutely so. epigenetics is the study of how genes change their expression over time in response to different stimuli from the environment It's it's also kind of the study of how things get passed on inter-generation -ly Genetically and so. This is a little bit different understanding of what I was taught when I was in high school. Biology because scientists had not really nailed down yet When I was in high school learning the basics of genetics the idea was your genes genes code for proteins and those proteins? Make up all the different things in your body that caused you to have these different traits your hair color eye color What makes you? Oh you and I was kind of. And what scientists really discovered in the past twenty years or so in really kind of the revolution in the past past fifteen years. This has really become the Kind of forefront understanding is that there's another controller to our jeans if you imagine these genes producing these proteins the like you can almost think of it as each one has a little bit of a Dimmer switch on them that can turn up or down those those proteins or change the way those proteins are made In response to different things like actually when your hair goes gray That is an EPA genetic process Your you you kind of lose some of the pigmentation. Those genes actually get turned down Another example would be You know when your your baby. You're you're designed to be able to tolerate lactose from your mother's milk and a good portion of the population loses That ability to make a lack days to process lactose Over time and that's another EPI genetic Kind of thing that happens over time and these epigenetics changes they happen on different timescales so some things like that ah are Kind of encoded aging and then some things are happening on the twenty four hour cycle That actually help your body go to sleep and wake up and If you you can kind of think about it as You know this complex symphony. And they're they're almost being a conductor. That's Kinda causing these. These changes to happen happen routinely An so epigenetics is really broad. Category where We've kind of discovered that almost every single health promoting health attracting acting process in the body. Have some type of genetic component to it because it's so pervasive and then just so underlying everything But yeah it's a pretty the exciting thing to And sounds like it. Sounds like it's the lake. The Control Center for for everything I mean are at the foundation of are all the things about us that are changes in our body. Is that fair or I wouldn't say every single thing but it's pretty close and Most major changes are going to be are going to have some EPA genetic component to them. So that's okay pretty powerful. It's if it affects a lot. It's our could affect a lot and it's also kind of an empowering perspective too because it really actually shows that we actually can change a lot of things that we previously didn't think we could. Yeah and that that's what that's what fascinates me you know. I've I've read and seen people having experienced with say going on A plant based Vegan Diet and their hair color coming back and maybe different types of skin elasticity. I mean are you. Experience is that part of this. I mean is that potentially a possible. Yeah definitely I mean I see it with all kinds of diets and that's the thing that I'm I'm super fascinated by is sometimes I see things like that positive. Osita changes kind of miraculous. Things happen from a plant based Diet. Sometimes I from someone who's been a Vegan for ten fifteen years switching to a high quality meat based Diet and so sometimes it's you know giving the body the nutrients and Food is a major EPI genetic modifier. So yeah and that's one of the things that I'm really really fascinated to dive into here because you know in my experience I always go back to you. Know what are you eating. And what are you thinking because those are like foundational national building blocks you know thoughts or things and they. They actually affect the way. Our body kind of expresses itself and things happened because of those things and then of course the Diet. So what's been your experience when you seem positive changes when when people change a diet Talk about the difference between like you. Look you look at it on an individual basis. It sounds like and that's what I think a lot of people. Don't they just say well. My friend is getting awesome results with this diet. I'm going to do it and they don't really look at themselves and that's what I've seen a lot but you look at an individual. You analyze the jeans. I ride and then tailor a diet yet and I just want to Speak to what for saying about you. Know both thoughts and you know what what you're feeding yourself with your thoughts and physical food all next impact and there's really awesome studies these That show how you know your belief system and the way that you carry yourself emotionally can impact yourself epigenetics pre strongly. I know yeah so like For example like meditation regular meditation has been shown to change the expression of of a couple of thousand different genes jeans And just like putting yourself in those types of is is is really powerful Wow Yeah it's a so so that we have sounds like we have a lot more control than we think I'd say so and like the changes And this is an area that I'm really fascinated in right. Now and there's there's not a ton of research at There's there's actually like maybe six or seven studies show this strongly but they've looked at changes in people going to psychotherapy therapy and looking at the benefits of Maine of having like a positive relationship with the therapist and looking at epigenetics changes and they find that people will in these studies that have the best outcomes show epigenetics changes in certain areas. So it's about you know re re patterning the way you think about yourself herself in the way you relate to other people can have impact on the way that your genes expressed pretty fascinating. Oh Wow yeah how so like you said this is these this is research it's coming about. How long have we been like studying? These EPA. Genetic like this idea is fairly new field Fairly new field. I mean the first China China Hints of this came in the in the eighties numb and then once we mapped the human genome in two thousand one or so. That's surreally when we started to have the actual tools to be able to look at this stuff So we're really only about fifteen twenty years into like a really good good understanding of this kind of thing. Wow wow so t tell us about you know when you when you coach your clients and how that process works and what what kind of changes they can experience in when you're working with them. Yeah for sure so I I regularly and routinely see people with both better energy better focus really looking at better cognitive function for people weight loss But it's because exactly like you said I'm really tailoring tailoring things for people's individual Gino type and You know I'll answer kind of what you're what you're saying before about looking at people's genes So there's kind of want to distinguish that you're based genetic code like the the sequence of the amino acids in your DNA that you sometimes see it written out lake ag t like all those leads That doesn't change. That's going to stay the same and it's the expression of that than I am but what I do with people is I look at that base code and Based on what that code looks like in certain places. We know that you might respond differently to certain certain Things and have actually different EPA genetic changes like a good example is there's a gene called. APO that Has Really while studying now and Certain variance of it or are predisposed to more plaque buildup in cardiovascular risk as well as cognitive decline and Just General General Neuro Inflammation But it's what they found is it really only happens when people die that's high in saturated fat Like saturated fat and low exercises sizes like a major trigger for that But when people eat a die that's lower in saturated fat than have variance that the risk kind of normalizes. So you see you know. The diets gotten really popular. Bulletproof that kind of thing And for certain people that don't carry those variants and have and the kind of coated response where they're going to do well saturated fats. I see fantastic improvements for people with with Kito But then August people that have been on Kito in like this isn't really working for me And like it's not helping energy. It's not helping them. Bogus and clarity. Is that but you find you in certain people if they have those earnings that are gonNA create more inflammation with saturated fat. So like you said it's like you kind of were kind of at a point now. I think it's time to get beyond the idea that like. Oh yeah this diet worked for my friend or my neighbor So it worked for me. It's more complex than that. Yeah when I saw that in one in your videos on youtube but I I like that where you talk about the three things. That kind of irritates you about the certain people you know pay for coach Taylor Specific Diet to them and that you bring sounds like you're bringing it down to more the masses about what. Elite athletes are elite performers. Do and and you talked about the fact that they're going in there getting these tests so they know they know what food to eat and what things to do to like make their energy higher and make them perform better. I love that. Yeah Yeah I mean it's I mean the the most people don't have the you know obviously there's a cost and there's an you know involvement to that a lot the people are so busy just scrambling around trying to keep up that they don't take the time to like no themselves. I think that's awesome. Yeah I think it's one of the best investments you can make I mean in terms of looking looking at You know as a creative or entrepreneur. Someone that's invested in you know your your time. It's like that. Give giving yourself the opportunity to really have the cognitive function and energy like ongoing you know is such a valuable investment so absolutely absolutely talk talk about the costs what are like what does it cost to get these to get your genes like identified or go through this process and what is that process. Yes yes so The cost ranges for my clients. And what we're seeing right now is there's a lot of tests on the market that are Inexpensive but don't really necessarily summarily give you the full package What we're seeing is that It really requires working with someone who knows what these genes are doing doing to help you kind of implement it. It's Kinda like you can buy direct tests that will give you readouts. But it's kind of like going and try and interpret blood test on your own. It's really helpful to have someone so I think the coaching model makes it more effective than trying to interpret the stuff yourself like I just know that based on what I see in the direct consumer market. Like if I didn't know it I know I'd be so confused with a Lotta the stuff. Yeah so you know the cost ranges you know you can get one of those tests for for a couple hundred bucks My services tend to range between five hundred thousand But it's because I'm taking usually three to four hours To go through your genetics before we ever meet and look through them that there's a lot of time spent on my end actually Had a sifting through things comparing it to your experience and what your goals are. Yeah so that's the initial cost for the test in your analysis to to move forward Yeah and then And then I do some ongoing coaching when you have like sex in twelve months packages and As really where we take it and implemented over time and you know that that's really where I do see the best results because I'm able to kind of help. People tweet refined the routine and continue to stay in touch and do some additional testing if we need to attract some things. Yeah what is what. What is the ongoing coaching? Look like are we talking weekly sessions and you. Are you helping with Diet and lifestyle. What is that process gas? So that's usually once once or twice a month And that's kind of meat. We check in can get a download of what's happened in the last month and then look at the next phase because you know just to give you an example when I do a full genetic read for someone. I'm looking at about eighty pages of information that we are in a in an session and so it's a a lot of things that you could do and so what I do is going to help people narrow down at these are the most important high impact things Let's do this first. And then we'll know answer kinda get those in place will revisit some things and maybe add some things in So you know it's about Kinda staying in in In a sequence of of events that makes sense and yarn you know what will any no you know just from my own experience. I mean if you do everything the thing that you're supposed to and keep up with this and that and Diet and exercise it can be overwhelming in. It's kind of like going to the gym. You Know I. I've kind of adopted the model of the you know. Do core core exercises you know squats dead lifts and get the core billed as opposed to like twenty thousand different small things. Is that kind of a what you're seeing people. We'll get overwhelmed with all the information and do this do that. Oh yeah totally actually. That's a really good analogy. I mean I admit like you know I'm A. I'm a health coach but I don't do you every single thing that I could be doing. You know it's it's about doing those core things and really kind of figuring out. What are the basics that I need to do on a daily basis? That's GonNa an leave me feeling good and then you know kind of at you know. I go through cycles. Were like real on it for a few weeks a month and I do some extra things and then it's it's just life you know Bar Yeah but exactly yeah. I never burdensome a ads. And you're right you know. Sometimes we slip and I I never feel guilty realty anymore eating a cookie or some some sweets after I see the rock posting his cheap meals right. It's like a ads is he. He given the the okay to go for or it totally. Yes so I tried to Take that language out of what I do with people like the Cheat Day thing just build it in. You know it's like I. I call it selective hedonism like I know I want to like have something that's GonNa be. You know pleasurable and not in line with the perfect diet it but honestly I think the reward in just like the not even the word but just like building in that ability to do things that you WanNa do is super important and it's about occurred like a crate Philo craving right. Yeah it's like building the resiliency in all these other areas of your life goes so far so that you can you can eat the cookie and and like not crash from you know. Yeah well and that's kind of the the approach that have adopted. I kind of look at it. As a percentage you know thing you know I just want the needle to be as I wanNA eat as clean and his you know low sugar and like you know as possible but if it duck dips a little one day aged Big Deal as long as the overall percentages like high as far as dino nutrient dance and good quality. Oh yeah totally so. I'm curious what it would have some things that you found found. That have worked really well for you. Your core well I you know I I know that. Definitely lots of fruits and vegetables When I'm really on on my game I do green smoothies because for me and like you touched on earlier you know being creative and and you know I feel we're creative beings and it's all all about maximizing our energy so we can actually do things right and so? I really try to go for walks in the morning do exercise because when they energy dips you get lethargic and you're like I don't want to create anything. I don't want to do anything and so for me. I look at it from an energetic standpoint and also clarity and focus but I just try to eat you know so as clean as possible plant based I do eat meat of of course I've played with the plant based Diet. But you know I like like you've mentioned I've heard that some people well don't do well on a total plant based Diet other people thrive so I just try to eat it. EAT Super Clean and get a little exercise and do do that kind of thing just again again. Keeping the percentage is higher. I switched off years ago in my twenty S. I had this epiphany thought you know if I start eating really clean and unhealthy now carrots and vegetables and whatnot. I won't have to start later and so I kind of adopted this debt. This diet and did you know went for the most part hard. I was off milk and dairy for many years and then I kind of integrated back in back to the thing you know if someone makes a chocolate cake. I'm not GonNa you you know not eat it But I have almond milk and coconut milk and coffee in a home but again just trying to learn from what other people of kind kind of their experience and reading books and stuff like that. Try to integrate more plant-based unhealthy foods and it's it's been working out. You know I feel good there. You know what I'm on that game so that's my kind of what I do treasure you which you go ahead. I was GONNA say the term plant based is funny to me because when when I think about what that means it's like You know a lot of people use that term to mean fully plant only. Yeah but I like I I think most all all healthy diets should be plant based at some level. You know like you're GonNa like at the core of most healthy diets like lots of fruits and lava at least lots of vegetables troubles You know and so I look at that as kind of a baseline thing but then When you can get pretty granular as far as really looking at what types of a a fats like olive oil or coconut oil or Your you know what types of oils really work. Well for different people I see some really positive results assaults would when people kind of get that piece right Yeah I've seen that too. So so what it. What about you? What you Obviously you've probably analyzed your own genes will what do you eat for your what your general diet kind of guidelines for yourself so. I'm kind of a low CARB guy I do pretty pretty well with More of the higher fat low carb kind of approach lower protein I do really well with hi monounsaturated. Fat Actually don't do too well with a ton of nuts ton of polyunsaturated fat some that looking at my genetics really kind of helped me understand understand And it's like one of those things that after I'd like saw that And there's a gene called. Apo a five that Has To do with how. Your body transports polyunsaturated Omega six fats. Around and not going to be a lot of what's nuts and after I After I saw that for the first started experimenting with it I realized like Oh yeah when I e ovary nuts like the next day I feel inflamed in Puffy So that's been something than that of a played around with and You know I I try to get at least twenty thirty minutes of exercise if I can most days around my bike and do strength training happy strength training about once a week and One of the big things for me has been late eight And that's a big area that I think is kind of under appreciated right now is light exposure and really looking at. I saw that in some your videos. Yeah Alad so so you you you. So what about light exposure dude. What what? What do we need to know about that? Yes so really trying to minimize artificial light exposure In favor of Sun Exposure We evolved on this planet under very tightly controlled electromagnetic environment government And you know the whole electro-magnetic spectrum is light is a chunk of that And so for up until the last hundred years we never had any type of artificial official lighting and when you look at the spectrum balance of what's in fluorescent bulbs or led bulbs it very very different than what's what's In sunlight unlike even though like full spectrum son bulbs on it's very weighted towards the blue end of the spectrum. And when you look at the research that's been coming out and there's a explosion of this right now in the in the scientific community of looking at the effect of different frequencies of light on the human system Blue Light is pretty detrimental when you're getting way too much of it especially on sleep especially on Things that can influence mood and Depression anxiety a lot of what we're seeing you know kind of in in culture right now. suicide rate is up tremendously and one of the biggest impacts of suicide is is is poor sleep like actually when you look at some of the military studies on on what put people at high suicide risk like Lack of sleep is one of the top thing And so I think we're kind of in a middle of like a asleep epidemic Society right now. That's that at some level is being caused by. I just extreme overexposure to blue light of. That's like you know computer screens iphone screens. Everything like that Martin what that does is is. It oppresses Melatonin melatonins going to be one of the most important hormones to help you to sleep and so what ends up happening. If you're looking at a screen screen right up until you go to bed Your Melatonin synthesis doesn't really start for another couple of hours so you're losing a couple of hours of quality sleep even though you might going to sleep and getting eight hours. You're only maybe only six or so of that. Five or six of that is going to have the proper amount of Melatonin involved with it. So I'm a I'm a real big proponent of just light hygiene in general I saw you wearing the the the orange glasses. uh-huh are the yellow lenses at yen. Did the Blue Light Block. Yeah anyway blocking lenses. I think it's really important and I think it's one of those things when we look back at this point in history the and I hope you know in five years. We're going to look and go while we were making a big mistake. We're going to look at it. I think in retrospect lead paint or tobacco. That kind of thing. That's the thing you know even though technology's awesome and it has allowed us to you know do a lot of things. Sometimes we create eight stuff that ends up being harmful on some level and then years down the road. We're like oh but but again you know pro along with progress comes a lot of things that you you don't know until you know ride like you said could be years from now people be like. Oh that was. This created a a big like What do we call like a by product that was nine nine? That was not positive. Ositive right totally and it's like we're still using paint. We just switched out the lead refined. Fix those things Yeah that's one of the things I did back all. It's been a couple of years now. has picked up a pair of Google. You know the blue light blocking glasses you know so when I'm at night and evening put those things on and You know hopefully. It's helping helping some degree. How how much did so? It's just a couple of hours. Is that how long can take like you're working into the evening Do you just wear yours in the evening. You're not wearing day sort of a thing. Yeah like the heavy heavy blue blocking ones like the red lenses Orange Lenses awaren- mm-hmm at night My glasses right now have have a little bit of a blue blocking aware when I'm doing computer work Actually try not to wear them if I'm going to be outside aside just in sunlight because our you know there's there's some natural blue light that's that's good for you. You want that from the sun but it's an yeah so so you so. He just kind of integrate them in in evening. Sounds lying integrate them in the evening and I try and You know have some bulbs that are low blue light and I I like More traditional incandescent. S- are a little bit better balance. yeah tell me. Tell me about the appearance center center. Is that the company you're associated with. What is that yet? Appear on It means it means limitless and Greek. So that's where that word comes from So they are a peak performance and optimal health related company. And they They offer coaching trainings As well as a high the and one on one work with some of the physicians there so I've been involved with them for about three or four years I initially got linked up. Put Them Because my background is in music actually Emma originally audio engineer and we saw yes. Oh my I was hired by them initially decorate some Meditation and by Neural Beats Kinda brainwave and train NOCCO programs on or it's a funny story high actually met them. I was At a point in my life where I had kind of just figured out a bunch of my own health problems I Kind of really into the biohacking world and I was working on my own stuff just listening to a ton of podcast doing my own research And add the doctor who owns that company had a podcast. It's called biohacking for optimal health. And it was one of my favorite podcasts and I Took a walk on my lunch break at work and realized that the logo of the podcast on the building next door. and Oh you're so turn up. They had a clinic next to where I was working and so I I made an appointment to go see him because I wanted to get some blood work done and it just kind of turned into this thing where they were looking for someone who is an audio engineer and kind of had like a health background two. That's awesome so one of those life. Changing synchronicity candidates Yeah so so. Tell me tell me about Some of the things that you were able to kind of dial into and tweaking your own helped journey. Yes so you know. One of the big things for me was circadian Awesome My like my mentioned like my my background was music. I Create Electric Music Stole Do that really music and and play gigs. Here and there But that was my main thing for a while and being in an environment where I was just staying up till three or four in the morning and plagues all the time and working on music at odd hours and flipping my schedule back and forth kind of wreaked havoc and I think that was at the core of a lot of some of the stuff that was going on. But you know I also wasn't paying any attention to what I was eating was kind of like an unhealthy vegetarian bread cheese -tarian And you know I think the circadian rhythm thing kind of just like exacerbated everything else and so you know I got back on a normal sleep rhythm really dialed in the IOS a plant based diet a closer to Akito kind of plant based kind of approach Started voted taking some supplements and things that You know I just never touched before. I didn't know this stuff existed and I think that's one of the reasons why I'm so like interested in this work and talking to people like yourself and talking to other creatives is that You know the stuff is pretty popular in like the sports performance world and in certain circles of like you know kind of high performance Business CEO kind of stuff. But it doesn't really get talked about outside Especially especially in the more like artistic creative circles. Like there's there's not much focus on on you know how you're treating your body translating into into into better productivity in focus in that kind of thing so I saw such a just a major transformation in myself and like on a on a the psychological side of things too like it was all of a sudden. I had the mental energy to process emotional stuff that I hadn't dealt with you know and and really got myself in place. Place record do the self development work And so you know. I think that's a big piece of it to like kind of taking the the The energy and the better brain function and saying all right. How can I look at by My patterns in my life and really kind of work on the emotional psychological Joel side but at the same time I think that just reinforces. Yeah well in you know. It's I if assing one of the things that came up came to mind as you were talking. I think I think this is definitely from my own experience. Sometimes we in our either our energy level goes down or a clarity level goes down and we just kind of like frog and hot water kind of thing. We don't. I know how bad it is until we start to tune it back up and we just think oh well I need to drink eight cups of coffee today or I need to drink red bull all day to stay Energia energized and until we start tweaking with it and kind of optimizing our I and what we're thinking and exercise to get those energy and clarity up. We don't know how good it can can get can. It's like a slow steady sloped down a slippery slope and you slide into this doldrum life and then it's just like autopilot at a low level right. I couldn't have said it. Better better. Yeah you you just don't know what you know Yeah you don't know how good you can feel and in and that's what I think is fascinating about life is sometimes you think well. Well it's it's just like this like I'm my energy levels like this and my die eat this diet. And what else can I do ride. You just go for it but what I'm fascinated about is okay when you get some information and try some tweaks and changes and start eating you know good food and getting exercises and stuff like that you can actually feel better and create eight better and stuff like that. Oh yeah absolutely and I it really comes down to that growth for fixed mindset type. Where are you someone that believes is that you're capable of change or this is just how I am and that translates from the health aspect of things into so many areas of of life? I mean when you look at research with centenarians you know people that are over one hundred. It's that fixed mind or that fixed. Verse Growth Mindset where. They're looking at hat all these different situations in their life overtime as opportunities for growth that that's one of the big things that kind of sets those people apart that creates the conditions to wear their body. Two years is GonNa last a really long time. It's just that mental perspective is so important. Yeah I totally agree. I I love that growth versus fixed. Mindset you know in my own experience whether you know would venturing into online business and and learning you know prosperity and abundance and then it you know you can have a better life than say what you are programmed from you know during your informative years childhood whatnot. It's fascinating that we have that that we we have the power and that ability to do that that more. I think more people are waking up to that all the time. Yeah absolutely and it's really interesting on that note To kind of think about what. Let your your programming was growing up around health and nutrition and like what messages you got about that you know it was feud something that you were told can impact the way you feel or was it just something that you did. They didn't have any connection to that. I mean that's something that I had to kind of Retrain myself few now too because you you know we whatever you know generation you come from the MAC and cheese generation right or the wonder wonder wonder bread white bread. If that's what you know that's what you know but until you get broader perspective and start peeling back the layers and saying hey you know what's possible here. What should I? What should I be eating? What like you said you know? What do people who operated a high level? I I think of Tom Brady say. What are these optimal athletes athletes in these? You know CEO's and business people you know Incan. In addition to their meditation practices. What are they eating? What are they thinking? What are they consuming? Because those are the high high-performers yeah absolutely. It's and you know it's not necessarily about copying those people directly it's right. You know I think about it a lot. Like if you're an artist Say Your painter. And you're developing your own style like you Kinda have to start with copying the masters right Akita meaning do some things that have been passed down and and you get the technique rate but then over time you kind of take all those elements and sort of reconnect July allies them and make them your own thing and I look at the the process of creating health and really similar way where you know. Yeah there are some important techniques to learn but the way you combine those techniques is not gonna be necessarily exactly like someone else. Yeah good point. Yeah Yeah you're right right because like you said Dave. They've identified their specific gene type and body style. Probably right and what works for them and it sounds like we need to all do that on on our own individual level yet. Totally an an. And it's like you know a lot of those people You know not have not necessarily looked at their genes but they've done enough experimentation to where the kind of and then gotten right right and You know when I work with certain people that are already high-performance and have figured out a lot of the stuff. Sometimes unions will confirm a lot of what they already know now. They've already tested trial and tested. In kinda gotten that information via the trial and error. kind of a thing right exactly like your already. They knew that Do Dairy but here's actual reasons. Why like here? Here's some genes that are likely to not processed dairy in Make make your body process dairy port. You know So it's really helpful and connecting the dots and there's only almost always things that also you just couldn't have known through experimentation. There's there's there's some things you can find out but then something's with genetics. It's like a whole braid understanding there too. It's like you know comes back to the you know age old advice vice you know. No Knowledge is power. And then when you know you can make changes in your life day to day activities. which are eating that? Can you apply that acknowledge. Yeah absolutely I mean the information is everything and I think also You know Kinda the choice would that I think people can make to be empowered by it rather than kind of be afraid of information. It's like there's some people out there with genetic testing where they say. Well I'd rather not know these things because then I'm more More responsible for for having Ryan Lucas. It into being random is is that that's I I've seen people like that and I can understand that. What's your thoughts on that? Say That last part again What's your thoughts on the people that are you know I don't WanNa know? I just WanNa live in ignorance and bliss kind of thing. Oh that's their choice And I think that's indicative of the fixed kind of mindset of you know I'd rather not the have the information that's GonNa let me Change or maybe it's people that aren't really seeing themselves as capable of change or don't don't want it. You know people get comfortable Nandor. They're the most comfortable thing you can do is to do the same thing you've always done. the question that you have to ask yourself is is. Are you happy the results. You're getting you know so it's like But I think a lot of times people are more You know now out of people that I work with but at at large are more comfortable. Just you know not knowing but I'm part of these conversations and What I'm trying to do is help us understand that it's worth it? It's worth it to Really take the dive into what's possible for you when you do have that information and when you do start excellent changes you. Yeah Yeah you know this theme of uncomfortableness I always kind of described myself in sometimes as a a comforter hollick right Many years of my life kind of on autopilot. You know working having fun but really not pushing the boundaries of what's possible but what eventually I think you know. Sometimes it may never activate and people if they have like you said if they're getting the results they want if they're happy if they're happy with their life but I think the nature of human mm-hmm and beings is like expansion and growth and we we came here to kind of push into those boundaries. And you know that's why I say I always have like I think about this like an alcoholic does they're always kind of have that tendency to slide back into comfort but we know that gets much more full and rich in and much better when we're pushing pushing our potential and doing things that are really like stretching us. Oh yeah absolutely I mean I think that the anxiety in the fear of what people perceive as the potential suffering. That's GONNA come from putting yourself out of your comfort zone is the actual reality of that is is almost inherently every single time. Less than the suffering that you're to happen that's going on now. Totally right like the the discomfort of lifting reading the heavy thing ten times is way worse than you know Feeling like your back hurts because you'll have that stroke. Yeah I'm sorry. The back hurting is way worse than putting the effort right for for from lack of use and lethargy or then you'd move one weekend and you you heard it right as opposed to lifting that weighed eight over periods of time and strengthening and I agree. Yeah and it's Kinda like You know once you get a taste of that. I mean all speak from my experience once I got a taste of that It made me start to realize. Oh the supplies in other areas of life and it comes back what I'm saying with like some of the psychological work of like being willing to look at painful oh shameful things that are no longer painful or shameful but at the time were you know. And it's like you and yeah sitting through that and addressing acknowledging Collagen it yet that sucked in the moment but It's way better now because I took that little bit of of risk and chance and I love that word though. The Comfort Hollick thing. I mean it just because I mean who who doesn't want to be wrapped themselves in a blanket. Lincoln lay on the couch all day. You know that's there's some level of like bliss to that but over time you know what what are you what he opportunity costs that you're missing out on you know because the F. coded into us to fricken push into the universe and do things Is Fascinating Yeah I mean I I love curling rolling up a blanket. And you know it's it's just imbalance I suppose with Well and you know the thing of it is you know we we back to your Talking about Doing the strength training and pushing into what whether we're looking at emotional issues and healing those or strengthening our resilience. One of the things that I've experienced in my own life and I see this other people. All is it's counterintuitive but the safest place for us is in the eye of the storm so to speak you know maybe getting proper exercise on on a consistent basis doing hard things on a consistent basis and this was very counterintuitive to me. You know you think okay. Well I just WANNA have a safe comfortable middle class life life but you realize that especially after you know two thousand eight crash that the that the safest place may in fact be what you perceive as the most risky right in the eye of the storm. Kind of a thing whether it's physically mentally economically as one of the things I'm finding emerging In many people indefinitely myself too. Yeah what are what are some things that you've done that kind of Kind of have pushed you into that. That either storm says well you know really just tuning into the to the little voice within the guidance that lives within us and in to what am I. Seven five five to seven years in launching online business. After seeing a number of people that I follow follow have success taking their passion and building it into a business And then just venturing out there putting yourself out there because you know as a comforter Hollick look as a former people pleaser again. I'm people people pleaser Hollick as well and so. That doesn't really help you when you're trying to create stuff because you're always wondering how is this going to be received or people going to judge this kind of thing but again back to the eye of the storm kind of thing in my own experience. It's like you gotta go for it because because sitting on the shore waiting for you know trying to hunker down leading storm pass you just get beat up too much and you don't move forward you know. And so that's one one thing is just like creating and it's still challenging whether it's a video or a podcast or be content and I'm still i. I also call like baby exception on baby stepping my way to my end destination. And so it's just you know doing what wants to come through me and letting it go through and embracing that fear and just saying. Hey you know this is this is how it is and and you know David the only thing or one of the major driving forces is I know what's back back there waiting for me if I don't do it and so I look at as like I have this model of you know moving forward and actually taking action. I called a polarity tool and you know on one side of it. You've got what you don't want with a the life that you had or the life that you could have if you don't take the action or create the thing or you know be valuable able to to the world and on the other side you have what what can potentially be for you. What's waiting for you? The lifestyle the the business opportunities that connections and once you put those two together it moves you on a daily basis if you look at those lists of things that you build. So that's that's a major tool that moves me. What's waiting for me and what was well? You know what would be waiting for me if I'd Oh. Yeah that's that's great like the synergy of both that push and pull mike at the same time absolutely wrong absolutely you know because you know in my experience what you know we. We're we'd rather move towards. We have a much more aversion to pain. You know we want to move away away from pain as opposed to. Sometimes you know what's waiting for us was be like. Oh you know back to the comfort thing you know. I'm comfortable in this water. That's x number of degrees easy. You know even though it's not ideal you know. This is the temperatures turn up. I think that's one of the reasons why humans crash and burn is because they're not doing enough they're they're not creating enough they're not pushing into those unknowns in those scary situations and again speaking from my own experience but what you see from what I see from high performers former and people that are having the success a lot of success they are every day constantly pushing themselves to do more and to create more and to be more valuable arguable and just to get out of your comfort zone. Yeah absolutely and I was tried in a at continue to try and you know it's it's daily. It's exactly like you said it's easy to slip back into it and I think that there's You know the need for kind of constant self assessment self-awareness. And and not getting comfortable. Because there's you know it's it's kind of an ever-increasing threshold of what is that risk. What what is that next step because what was risky? You know. A few years ago might helping now He had good point. Yes and at the same time. It's like I I think there's a myth of perpetual growth and perpetual progress In all areas you know but it's more about selectively choosing like all all right where do I want to see change and where where my curious about I mean for me. It's really the curiosity kind of leads me there. You know it's it's almost more of a Of Justice the engagement with the unknown. That's that's really exciting. It's it's like Trying to just leverage ATMs and stay in touch with that I feel like is really helpful in that process at least remain Yeah Yeah and just you know letting matt sense of curiosity guide were putting my energy Tense to at least so far have yielded the best results. Yeah no I I totally get that you mentioned By neuro beats and biohacking. What's the in sounds like you have some experience being music creator and whatnot? What would we need to know about by neuro? Beats what are they what are they doing are they. Are they beneficial. How are they beneficial to us? Yes I think they can be beneficial. what they do. We is help a tune the brain to certain brainwave states So when you're going through your day going to sleep. Your brain is predominantly only different brainwave states. So when we're awake we're paying attention to things were mostly producing Beta brain waves. which fire at about twelve to twenty times per second when we're going to sleep deep You GotTa Start Out in that like ten that you bring which gets lower as you go to sleep and so meditation is associated with Theta and an and Alpha brainwaves Seven to twelve eleven hurts Times per second and so what what By neural neural beets and other forms of brain win treatment can do and by no beats. Aren't the only type it's a specific kind of technology but they help the brain Into those states with a little bit more fluidity and ease and so that can be very helpful for doing things like assisting in meditation assisting in going Lina sleep assisting in focus and they're they're very helpful for developing that neuro plasticity And really kind of giving your yourself some just assistance really in changing your brainwave state. So I found a personally helpful for learning in how to meditate and really kind of prompting my brain to get into that state and actually do have a company called inner depth audio radio You can check out the Websites inner depth audio dot com. And I make some brainwave in training programs and if a free five minute Sample you can download But I've got things that help people with Focus a relaxation and meditation sleep. Then I've got some other just kind of experimental interesting stuff stuff there that I've made that you know you can take for a spin and see what happens. Stir Winch Wendy. You used by neuro beats. Is there a certain time of day or or as anytime fair game to put the headphones on and go for it. Guess so it kind of depends on what your purpose is You know anytime would be okay. He just kind of want to make sure you're using the rate frequency and the ray type Snow all use them most often for getting work done for for kind of putting my brain focused state date and I like the Fourteen hurts range for that kind of the low Beta High Betas more associated with like anxiety agitation in like little too much Energy going on there the low Betas with like relaxed focus so I find it pretty helpful for Kenneth Zoning into some work in just kind of blasted through Writing or putting together an outline or anything like that Yeah Awesome What about supplements and vitamins and stuff? What's your take on that for for people well again probably comes back to an individual basis but the any overall guidelines or information we we need to know? Yes so I'M A fan. I think that With our current state of Food and agriculture there's a Lotta mineral depletion and the soil So even if you are eating a a plant based really healthy diet there still could be gaps and you know while it's unfortunate like ninety percent of the US soil was depleted of Magnesium uh-huh so there's a pretty amazing deficiency going on right now And you know there's some there's some kind of general things like I think most people probably could you some magnesium but then it does get very specific and that's a lot of the work that I do with clients is really looking at what pathways in the body are going to require more nutrients. You know what let things are going to take Say Vitamin B twelve or full eight or six and Kinda use more of them for certain people just because there's certain in biochemical processes that require these nutrients and with genetics. You can really look and see all right in this step of that sequence that the synthesis sequence You know Are you gonna be someone who requires more of this nutrient and so based on that you can kind of get a feel for all right. I should either supplement or focus on these specific diffic- foods and I think a lot of benefits to A number of different herbs for certain things and phytochemicals and You there's all kinds of different classes of things that I think are very helpful for an elite aging and all that but it does tend to be pretty individual Some things that I think most people could do well with but at the same time I hesitate to to mention anything. Make a blanket. Yeah Yeah I get that you know I. I've heard that too. Is You know the way I kind of looked at vitamins and minerals as it's kind of like a a little bit of an insurance policy to make sure sure you're like you said you're getting those nutrients that may may or may not be in the foods that you're eating I'm okay with having Expensive P if I if I. IPO Yeah right yeah. Yeah if it's going to help you get those energy levels up or the clarity or you know improve in some some way get that get. Did that get that needle to optimize. Energy right yeah. Yeah and and you know I I really look at Kind of the potential of people's health with ads kind of existing in multiple phases where You know there's kind of the unbalanced to balance phase and that's really where have mainstream three medicine stops. You know they say like all right. You know if you don't have a disease like your good right like that's kind of weird downs But then there's also kind of the the balanced to optimized and enhanced kind of phases where you're really looking at you know using a lot of the same techniques technologies and and supplements but looking all right what's possible what's the next step And so I I really like working on that kind of thing with clients in terms of using nutro picks and things that improve cognition. Russian really can help kind of Take you from what you're at no matter where you're at and Kinda move you up the ladder so to speak. Yeah that's totally awesome. Well this has been awesome chatting with David. It's this really fascinating yet. It's been a pleasure to really appreciate your perspective and No love some of the stuff that you were saying about the Comfort zones and all that super important and just obligated everywhere. I I I feel so yeah but before we wrap up tell people bowl how they can get in touch with us a website social media. Where where can we find out more and follow you and contact you absolutely so my website is David Hyphen? KRANTZ DOT COM K. R. A. N. T. Z.. And you can look around look at some of my offerings Real little bit more about what I do. I've got some articles up there And I also offer free thirty minute consultations for anyone who's interested and thinks this might be benefit Kind of talk about what your goals are. What what your needs are and see if we're good fit to work together together So you can book an appointment online there And also on instagram. Handle a whole systems health and I put a lot of food and nutrition Russian stuff. They're awesome so people can contact you right through your website then awesome. I'll put those links in the show notes beneath this episode G Mark Phillips Dot Com so people can find him David dollar appreciated again. This has been super awesome yet. It's been super awesome too. I mean you know and if there's one takeaway I I'd say that You know we're kind of entering a phase of understanding where we're moving away from the one-size-fits-all thing you know. The the Food Pyramid mid is kind of a failed experiment So the question is what's next and I think the new the new ways really to

David Krantz EPA youtube CEO Mark Phillips US Melatonin Boise Co connectix Wan Gemma Google Control Center Kito Maine Hollick
How To Manifest Extraordinary Experiences With Tifane Falvey | ETHX 143

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

41:51 min | 10 months ago

How To Manifest Extraordinary Experiences With Tifane Falvey | ETHX 143

"Welcome to episode one forty three of enhancing human experience. Mark Phillips really glad. You tuned into this episode. We've got another amazing guest. She has been a guest on the podcast before I. Think it was last year or maybe the year prior probably prior time flies, but her name is Tiffany Saudi? She's a good friend of mine. I always enjoy having her. Join me on the PODCAST. She's I described her as a master manifester. I have seen her manifests amazing things. She has some very. Specific and conscious things that she does to manifest experiences for herself and her family in her, and her friends and I've been able to witness this so many times, a woman that tried to peel back the layers on some of the mechanics right and how she actually does that mean. We're in an interesting time right now with the pandemic and the social issues I. WanNa say Fires or flaring up right I mean it's an interesting time, and there's a lot of change, and there's a lot of turbulence in our in our world, and so I think it's really important as conscious creators to. Make sure that we're focusing on the experiences we want in focusing on the road. We want who we want to be in that world. What we want to do a network how we want to serve each other right? I think this is an opportunity for us to really get focused and disciplined our thinking and our emotions, so that we can create in a more conscious way and so I thought it was appropriate to invite Tiffany on and talk with her in this episode. I want to invite you if you are I the first time here listening to the PODCAST, I want to invite you to subscribe and I would like you to do. Do that on my youtube channel, which is YouTube dot com slash G, Mark Phillips, or on any of your favorite podcasts, players including Google podcasts, apple podcasts stitcher spotify. All the places listen to podcast so that you can stay in the loop. This is a monthly podcast. We talk about business lifestyle design. We talk about health and wellness, manifesting all sorts of fun things that I know beneficial to you and your journey and try to bring on guests who can help you in their own unique way. Their own zone of genius and Tiffany is one of those guests so without further ado, let's jump into the interview and have a conversation with name. How are you? Awesome thanks for hanging out with me today Matt. Thanks for having me. I was excited to talk to you. I now took us a while to actually connect, but. It looks like the stars aligned. It's rainy day in so my schedule opened act instead of yours in here we are I'm glad I'm glad because you know. It's I mean when you are. On last. It was last year two years ago was a very different time and I know that we've been chatting a little bit about what's going on I. Want to die deep into manifesting and some of the principles that you've been going back to your foundational. Tools in practices in share them, but this is I almost feel it's like. Time that people are having to being forced to do the work of the focusing and the controlling. They're putting into their bodies in their minds is kind of making us level up our game. What's your thoughts on the current situation as as manifesting being? I think that similar to what we have going on right now. Politically Riveria divided in those of us her choosing to do this work in our downtime, because it's very uncomfortable to do the work, and often were not being guided I. Mean One of the things I love so much about being interviewed by. You honestly is that when you guide me through the process of some of these deeper questions? I'm able to come to some answers. I wouldn't have normally come to without somebody. Inspiring me to actually think about things in different way, and I think that the majority of people I mean no majority. Majority is the wrong word. Many of us are sitting at home and were depressed. A because our lives are different. We don't handle transition very well, but we're also fearful because we have not been taught how to be uncomfortable. with uncertainty, so every day is uncertain. We have no idea if God forbid are bars are going to close down or if a mask is gonNA be necessary for us to enter Costco or not. We just don't know what each day is. GonNa Bring in so those of us that are doing the work. You're absolutely one hundred percent correct those events doing the work are. Spending this downtime really reflecting on what it is, that causes us to fill happy to feel healthy to fill. Seated in grounded in just our lives as we see it, you know when when you're unable to go shopping to get things to fulfill that that. That you have which we all know that it isn't really something external something internal so right now what we're able to do is we're able to look around and say. How can I be content? Rid this amazing lawn chair that I have in my yard, although it has a little crack, or it's not the perfect launch air, how can I be content with? My lights or might the food that's in my refrigerator. How can I just be okay with that or the amount toilet paper that I have? In my cabinet house inches. Knowing that perhaps my neighbor might spare role. Should I need it? The beans that with managers station, everything that is necessary for you to live. The life of your dreams is always right there waiting to be delivered to you so whether or not you can trust in that really has an impact on whether or not. It's going to come your direction so I. Know that if I run out to the paper. I know that there's GonNa be a line of people say hey. I got taken care I got a I would call my brain Maher. I'm going to just have him get. Jet. Off over. Because I know you do it. He's that good of a fresh young C.. N. N. you've touched on something that I want to unpack a little bit so. Some people don't know like I know you're a very strong in a very powerful investor, and like you said, give us little hinge clue because you know what how do you think you know and other people don't I mean? Why is it that you know you done or practice? Do you have more trust? If you see more examples more evidence, not the fun question. It's fun for me to reflect on for a second I. think that it's because I have been. Living my life on the edge of not knowing so whether that be dating a boy. Or man whenever liked to call them boys because at heart, I think. So you could be dating boy in. have no idea where it's GonNa. Go right you go on your first date. You have no idea if there's going to be a second third four. A wedding ring a child, you just a divorce. You don't have any idea and there's a lot of people out there that. Don't put themselves on that edge for example being an entrepreneur, you know just as wells I know you're always on. The Edge is an entrepreneur. You do not know what ventures gonNA come up next. You don't know what right is gonNA spontaneously? He pulled out from underneath you in the most beautiful way because you get to practice your graceful fall, so I say. That tiffany has done a lot of practice with the graceful fall in. You might say I. Don't know if I ever want to practice a graceful fall well. I WanNa do everything grace, and so if I can practice falling gracefully Naza scared of it, not scared of falling I've been. I've had experiences. New Senior. Skin, your proverbial knee and you. You realized it's not that bad. You just doesn't frighten you anymore. That kind of. No more than that, it's not it's not that bad I'm pretty good at it. Like I I can make falling look beautiful. Experiences in my life that aren't very pretty and from the outside people say. You didn't Let's say raising exam raising children. That's a good example. It's hard work. It's every day hard work in a lot of things people don't talk about. They just want to talk about how mazing, it is. How great isn't it? It's all things, but there's a lot of work involved that. You can make good for example not going out in the evenings because you're doing a bedtime ritual, right or sacrificing a wouldn't be sacrificing choosing tracer kids instead of career. You can make that look amazing like I lived in the laps of luxury right. I would lay out every day Golden Brown, whereas someone else could choose to do that and not really have that experience because they're comparing it to something. That's not comparable. Right so so when we allow ourselves to be out on edge that ledge of life, which is what we're all doing right now. We every single of US gets to have that opportunity and what we're getting to see is how people manage that. However they miss you not knowing if there's GonNa. BE I. Did go to Cosco this week just randomly. For boost. The essentials. Maybe I'll just take quick. LITTLE SWIPE BITES EAR off. Though is not my favorite spot checking out, and they were out of all the paper products every last one of them and I found myself saying. You? have got it at home. I'm fine with that. However, many people they panic in that Moma. Now like. Oh, my gosh, it's not here. What is this mean? There's so many different ways that you could read that. Are we digressing? Are we back in fear factor? Should I have been thinking about this notion i? Run somewhere else in buying even more in all of it is obsolete when it comes to getting grounded in comfortable in what's happening in your life in his very presence moments. Well Yeah, and. I look at this and I'm I'm assuming due to opportunity to get our hands on those resources in will be resourceful. Trust the universe you know almost like a game like if someone takes half of your supplies and send you off in the woods and says okay now. Can you forage we're? Spiritual beings and have this power right to manage his things and change our mind state and change our state of being. It just seems like it's a opportunity for us to do that. Instead of having everything be. Just cookie cutter kind of like Howick typically has been the whole board got tipped upside down turned upside down, and it's kind of forcing us to. Diving tap into our true powers feels like. Yeah, it's also on the opposite side of our tree power. They're very true fear so I would say it's really inspiring us to take a look at where fear lies and I'm not I wanNA. Raise my hand and say hey. When all of this went down I. Mean I have babies? Not Babies grown baby. Always be your baby so right, but the very first thing that I thought of is I need to be able to feed the need to be able to take care of them. How can I best take care of them? And I went out, and did what about the country get and I made sure that I had enough paper towels toilet paper in canned soup. Tuna fish in all of this depth that I used to care for my family, right? And what I found was it's it's still there. You know what I think. You're not alone haven't used an event sequels rain. In. Their off, living their lives, and not using toilet paper to be honest, I have more than I've had in. Probably be drafting. A probably different brands than you used to write. I had an this story, but I got quite my bum with lavender scented toilet paper. I just I really needed it. Is I never even heard of it? I didn't start out with the hoarding mentality like everyone did, but then at one point, I'm like Oh shoot. Maybe I'm just not being smart about this. All at my sleeves in played this game so I got like. One little section, I think it was at Fred Meyer one little section. There's like maybe six packages of this Apron Burnham like yes. Yes, so I get it and bring it home. It probably took me about four times. It's going to the bathroom. Ethical has now that beautiful snow half. LAVENDER. Created that. Selena. Oh yeah I I walked by that aisle in the store every time and I just I just would stand there and look at it. Because it was such, it was so weird in the most abundant land in the in the world to see those aisles bear. It was just surreal. It was absolutely surreal. You know so. That's fascinating. It's an example of collective collectively as a society. How We? Are Afraid. That, that's what you're looking at. It's fear. Yeah Different is we haven't had that need? No, that's what I say that that's why there's been. It appears that when you have abundance everywhere, you look I mean people can order anything. You can get anything they want. They don't horrid right, but and that's white. It almost seems. Like some of the people that I follow online whether they're ex, military people are super high end. Athletes or CEOS they have a level of discipline, mind and body that it seems like for them like they're routine has changed. Their things has changed, and so, but for the rest of us that maybe have been slacking and I know. I have to degree on the disciplinary on talking about the mind and the by. It seems like we were kind of throwing the deep end and forced to level up our game almost instantaneously. Yeah think you're right. and. And and that could can be a good thing. Right? I know what I was used to ski. My friend got really good were the ones that? They're older. Brothers took them on the black diamonds, and said you gotta go down at right whereas me on practicing on the Bunny Hill. Who would you say is helping? These people level up. Well that's what I kind of want to one I think I think there are higher south is helping them and I think they. Other human beings they're being so I'm definitely inspired by the example that that people who are very disciplined and are very resourceful in our very grounded are are spreading the message so kind of other people, but I also think our higher selves are kind of always there with us to kind of help us guide. US In level. Also guidance through that so. Let's talk about your no higher self. Going through those feelings of fear, not knowing of wondering what tomorrow will bring, how is it what your process of tapping in your higher self? How does that work for those that are watching this today? They're like what are the. What is he talking about? Higher Self assured on the loudspeaker when sitting there or is it? GonNa come through game of thrones as HBO gives me Spree Series that I've. impaling like the aware. Sometimes I think maybe perhaps I'm having some. Iron consciousness coming diaries show I. Don't know, but I would ask you the question. Well for for me, you know I go back to meditation and journaling just to build a connection between the spiritual aspect of at least who I am, and and draw from that, and only reason that I have been doing that for many years on somewhat semi consistent basis this forces even more because it seems like it's much more important now like they're the world's in. kind of shaken moving and shaking right and so I wanNA. Make sure that I'm tapped in as much as I can to that interview. Is Dome I've always felt that that's where the real jus comes from y'all can get inspired by someone else. You can have them do that of my real power comes from that infant, you know. God Force or sourced. It's flowing through me and so I WANNA make sure that that connection is really well and like I said medication listening to the little voice route like you mentioned like you opened the podcast with this kind of trust in this kind of knowing like a safety nets therefore us. That we can't get hurt too bad. You know if stay keep that connection, so that's kind of some of the things that I do. which all the consistent practices I think it would be helpful for us to explain to whoever. Is Happening to stumble on this video because they're met to watch it. Meditation so many people aren't familiar with meditation is or seems like something. That's very woo woo, enough! and. You, can obviously Google it, so you can google meditation what that means if you don't know what it means. If you're sitting at home, you're depressed. Fearful and you're like I. don't even know where to start. Honestly, there's so much out there on. Online you can google, or you can go to youtube. And there's guided meditations and I know when I very first started meditating, it was so helpful for me to have someone that had studied this, and was able to walk me through the process while I was in the comfort of my own home, sweat cans without a BRA, laying down, and just listening to somebody coming through in telling me what to focus on what to visualize on, and that was the beginning. That was the beginning step for me. So for those of you that are watching. There are a lot of resources out there for you to figure out what meditation means for you in your world. I know that sometimes it sound meditation which means. I listen to all the sounds that are happening in my in my immediate surroundings, so it could be the birds it could be a fire engine could be a police car. It could be yelling or child playing, but I allow myself to go there. Because what happens when you go, there is now your mental mind chatter. The volume goes way down on that and essentially. That's what meditation out is turning. Turning the mind Cheddar off in tapping into your deeper more essential source of who you are, and so that's one way for everybody to get started with education, and then as far as the journaling I would say that everything I just said is applicable to a lot of people say generally. What do you mean and there? I think there is a right way in Hong. WAIT TO JERSEY. Infinite ways right. A lots of different options. We should say wrong. Wrong is right the different options. Are People. Originally thought journaling would be complaining about your life or everybody working Israel. The bad things that happened to me today A. State of the world and I can't believe that anybody ultrasound so. I can't believe I spoke to this. Ease political beliefs on that, so so that is not the best bang for your buck when it comes old. So again research it, but if if nothing else comes to you, one of the things that I found most powerful is what's called stream of consciousness. So you sit there and you're like I have no idea what's right, and so you're right. I have no idea what right? The Sky is full of rain today and my bird feeder is full of water, and so the birds are not coming. I need to make more hummingbird. Jude Water for them. And then you just start going and you'd be really surprised at how that. Process unlocks the I guess. It's like a a perfectionist thing you know. We think when we're writing that. It has to be perfect and I found that it doesn't have to be perfect, and it's even better when it's not perfect. If you go back and read it, you'll say oh. Wow, I can't believe I even was able to tap into some of those feelings that I had about maybe this person or about this situation in my life. Maybe it's about my job. Maybe you just use a miniature know about her job. talk about all things I love about my job. You can even journal about the things you don't about your job. Make sure that on the flip side of that. You talk about what you want if you're right. I think that's the key I. Don't WanNa work nine to five. I don't WanNa lift heavy boxes all day I. don't want to serve. Bass food. Okay, that's great, got it. Is impressing away right either way. What do you want? That's what inspires. The brain is to sit there and think about what they do so if you're sitting at home right now, and you're fearful or your irritated or you're anxious, great. What do you want if you don't WanNa feel anxious what he wouldn't fill. How I do it, too. Yeah. What do you WanNa fill and right now one of the biggest things I'm seeing. My coaching practice is that people want to feel connected. And covert has. It's it's almost been a layer that's come in between people and their feeling, a being connected, so we have obviously layer the mask, which is the physical layer, but then we also have the layer of Oh. My Gosh, what if I catch something from you? Right? What if I catch something so there's like this invisible virtual energetic layer. That's that we put our name I was. Hiking trail when Elvis was. Very scary mean still scary, but. And I found myself holding my breath when I would walk by runners because I felt like the little burst of whatever it was going GonNa. Write? Me! The fear. That beer and so think that the the issue that people are doing with as far as building connected to one another I would say well. How can I feel connected? And that's been the most fun process to be helping people with? Is there so many ways to build connected there so many ways to genuine I've had some of the best connections I think I've had in ten years over the time this Kobe with reaching out to people I wouldn't have normally reached out to you. Saying very heartfelt things that I wouldn't have normally said in a kind of circle back to living. What if this was your last year? Live winterson things you'd like to say. Like to reach out to and what better time to do that than when the world is on pause Yeah, yeah, that's why people are reconnecting in building relationships that they might not have had time to build. Again one of the opportunities that exist in this I wanNA have. You checked just a little bit about the stream of consciousness. It sounds like. It sounds kind of because I've done that before, too with varying I guess degrees of success I generally do more future journaling like right now. I want it to be but I I know a lot of you will stream of consciousness and I know it's huge ocular. Do you find? It almost sounds like a meditative process like it seems like it's very relaxing at the end of that process. I. Acting, I find that it releases a lot of thoughts that I have that. Don't fit into my perfectionist paradigm. So, it allows. Parts stream-of-consciousness not supposed to worry about capitalization or punctuation or any of the rules right? You're supposed to just let it. Flow of you expressed freely as as you would in so for people that are perfectionist that sometimes challenging his. You're thinking. Oh, my Gosh! I need to put a period at the end of this need to capitalize this in all of that is what I think really screwed us up in lie. Is Like how important is that? Yes, of course we were top at. We were in school. But how important is the capital? T when you're sitting in your own home journaling really I mean how important is. It's not important at all. You're going to photos different end goal, not a Grad grammatical correct goal. When you get to the end game of everything whether that's. In business whether that's in pleasure. There are no rules. People WanNA teach you sales processes right. You follow this process and you'll so million. Copying me, she twitter busy cell, so not that it's not dropping all of ads about connecting with the person you're talking to in real time. It's about speaking the way that you speak out the way you think that you should speak in. All of those things are what you come back to. When you do stream of consciousness, whether it's something like what you and I are doing right now. There's no rulebook to it. There's a notes that we're following. We're just allowing it to flow out and yeah. It will be perfect for sure you're not perfect. For sure not perfect in so. I think that it gives people permission when we first give ourselves permission to live our lives in a stream of consciousness, it gives everyone else permission to do the same, and then that's when some pretty miraculous things happen whether that be personally or professionally, but you could have somebody come out of the blue, because their response to you a name I, ask you to do something completely random in spontaneous right, or they may want to partner with you in a different way than you ever thought of, and it's all because you practiced this flow of stream of consciousness without putting all these barriers to it on how it supposed to be. and. We do that I think that that is so true. We kind of get out of our own way and let. Our. I don't know are true or self are more true self. If that's a word. Come through like you said speaking your own way. We'll the most genuine. Seems to be the part that we're most ashamed. And I think that's because as children were so raw. We're so vulnerable and we're so loving and just perfect, and there's somebody out there that. Let us know that's not good enough whether that. Be The way that we dress the way that we speak the way. We laugh the way that we don't laugh the way that we talk too loud, not loud enough. Really. What we do is humans, but I don't do that, though did they've got their little quirks, they're they're able idiosyncrasies that are super, attractive and superfund. were. And it's almost like the way I think of childhood. It's like everyone's conforming to an idea that no one is right. It's like everyone's dressing. The same way that no one wants to dress in the. They're talking the same me that no real person ever talks you know we'll sell. Here's the thing now. What if you make your little idiosyncrasy? Right at your 's that you've always had since you were a kid. A kind of an interesting example, my oldest son when he was little, he couldn't say excuse me in. Practice manners quite a bit in our home, so he would say skilley with Hugh. Larry is. And we still need to stay like if we're in the kitchen. I'll be like skewed and we all know exactly what what I'm saying. No one else would know what I'm saying, but we know what I'm saying and I think that what if we gave ourselves permission to let scully be something normal that we used because I just love the uniqueness of every individual it's it's endearing and it's like. Oh, my Gosh! There's a real human being not some proper. Everything's pronounce the right way. It's like a real human being there. Yeah, and and. The more unique. The human being is just like this rare jewels, diamonds or gems that you would find think about this. The more rare, the more unique it is, the more value has, so we're talking price tag here, but it's not necessarily the price tag value. It's the fact that no one else has one is very very special. So why do we as humans attempt to be the carbon? Copy of the. We're not even attempting. Be Real diamonds. Where like cubic Tony? It's like it's like a fake of fake right because we already been realized our value, we don't have any idea what our values at you and I both know a lot of mutual. People that are pro pro players that even they don't realize how mazing are. Because they don't realize how amazing. They will. File away the edges of their beautiful stone. The they can fit into a society that hopefully will value them. And it has the exact opposite effect of what they would watch exactly. It's like. How do you find that? Though I guess that's the question removal? I'm that. It almost seems like you know going back to childhood. It's like kids are born with that natural innate. Uniqueness and quirkiness, and then it almost gets conditioned out. What for whatever reason you know? And then the the game in my perspective is like finding that again or reconnecting without a we've talked about this reconnecting connecting with your child that you may be put in a corner or put in a room and said okay. You've embarrassed me, or you're weird off. Lock you away so I can conform the like everyone else, but then later in life the magic happens in my experience when you reconnect with that child and go. I need those because like you say that's the differentiating factor in especially when you're talking about business to differentiate yourself in a unique diamond in the world. You've got to go connect with that little child. What is your unique traits? Pressure A I was. On the playground I, say there. There is g mark. Guess. He's the only one on the playground that does this. This is pressure for me. I mean look. Let me let me answer that a different way what I will say. This hear me out. This will flush it out in come out from a different angle because you know me. I. Don't want the spotlight on me too much. So. In in. In a different way I will say what I enjoy. Is Talking to people finding out what their experiences I enjoy. Entertaining people and hopefully making their experience a little better. At the end of the day, but that's what I enjoy, so if you WANNA look from the other way, maybe that's my. Special unique talent, so I'll say, I'll tell you because i. am your friend and I have seen on the playground. And, one of the things that I find really unique about you is. You are the guy that's always available, right? Everyone's the playground and there are some people like tiff would have been doing cartwheels. I'm not really available for tap on the shoulder because I'm showing how to do cartwheels. Were I'm telling somebody story about how to change their lives. I was doing that six years old all right? This is what you have to do when your mom yells Going to Rome. Marks guy that's always available for the tap on the shoulder. And then he's the guy that you could bring your problems to whatever problems you have, and he systematically. Charts of course for you not organically very methodically in a way. That gets you from A TO BE IN A. Linear and quick way in, so it's one of the things that I I really do adore about you and I. Think it's one of your great attributes. As far as being able to help guide people is you? Don't fuck around with everything that's happening on on the side playground, right? You just go straight to the heart of the matter and you help people together like jointly. Come up with the quickest hat in your so gentle I. Don't have the bedside manner than you have at all. That's why we learn from each other united. Complement each other in that way I learned from you. Well. Yeah, and I think it's. It's beautiful that. Funny that you didn't mention that right? That wasn't what you thought to mention is that you can help people? Let's say for example that you knew someone. I recently hung a ton of plants. My House E, there's not one. Are there so let's say that you knew someone that was like I. Really One have plans through my house. Like I'm super into it. Don't know how to do it. I struggled tried to do it. Even like this is a metaphor for life. You could come in, and you could say well. The reason that this hasn't happened is because Abyan. See you don't even get into the crazy spiritual crap of Oh maybe shift that you're resisting having a happened. Maybe you're not prepared to have these Beautiful Hansen your home. You don't go down that path at all. You just say well. Have you considered this? Let me just a little bit of research and I'll get back to you and I'll let you know how you can get that done and you just you do that in every. Of People's lives, and I think that's why people do come to you frequently for Your Council, and your guidance in regards to getting to where they wanna go, and it doesn't have to be super deep, sometimes, sometimes the act of having your home environment transformed into something that will allow you to soften into. It is I think you maybe under value that effect on Sunday. I would agree with you just to speak a little bit to that. I just kind of get off on. Like solving problems in in especially makes it per either fixes. Their problem makes them happy, or whatever, whether it's a physical thing or an emotional thing, I do enjoy that and I've always enjoyed that whatever work I've been doing I enjoy serving, and it gives me a purpose and I. As I go on in life and learn more about what the human experience is. I see the other touched on that to my favorite quotes Rabindranath. Tagore said you know. Something something something, any realized service was joy in that famous quote. I definitely see that. It is nice to be needed invaluable for sure. Yeah. It's just interesting. How playground! I was the playground on the playground as the teacher so I was the one that was coming up to the little mark, saying mark. You could help so many more people. Why are you only helping? Let's talk about that. I've always been that girl people. You know that side of it too and. For in a different zone of genius. Right this what I. That's what I see. Right, so I think this horn warranting. To kind of wrap everything up and bring it together I think that. While we've been in lockdown if we can call it that lockdown, maybe it's a force meditation. Yeah, no, no, not a negative or positive connotation just locked down. It is on record. Time out. You gotTa Take States now time you resist it and you definitely don't understand right, but you realize really want an. Will there some force out there much bigger than asset, said we going to have a time now for people, and we're still in the time out. You know for everybody that still miss, timeout use this time to get the most authentic version of you i. mean one of the things that I realized during this quarantine and this may not be completely kosher to say on this video is that I? Really don't like rain abroa-. Variants for me, I don't WanNa do you is? I don't know how her day seem very fricken uncomfortable. I don't know how you women wearing it all so preaching to the choir here. They seem like torture. Chiklis, this quarantine for me, really say Oh, my Gosh I just went a month without worrying abroad. I'm done I. Don't want I mean I'm not saying well. I get it like it's like going barefoot when you go barefoot and feel the freedom and your toes in your feet and move the proper way, it's ridiculous to put your fit back into shoe. You know right, and so I in spire every single one of your listeners out there to figure out what they want to take them from this quarantine. What something you WanNa? Take with. With you that you've been doing. Maybe it's the cooking. Maybe you WANNA keep continuing to do that even when you go back to work. Maybe it's you. Lay Down, took a nap everyday and you WANNA find a way to simulate that even when you go back into your work day. Maybe that means you got your car for fifteen twenty minutes and just do a quick little. Rest just explore what things that this little timeout has given you in regards to finding more peace more joy in more comfort, and stay away from the parts that have given you anxiety or fear, because those are just the flip side of the coin of having the most amazing secure experience ever have so we're always going to have both you in order to ride a roller coaster. You're excited fearful. Right and we start to wonder. Is that same emotion? Well, it's very similar, right? We have that similar feeling so if we decide to invest all of our our brain capacity on fear, we're GonNa Think Oh, the roller coaster might break, or what if I fall out or the seat belt doesn't work or An article. or So exciting like this is such an exciting feeling. I've never been on a roller coaster. That does a loop. De do I've never had the experience of being able to put my arms up in the air and just have this thing waste going down sideways in everywhere. So what you choose to focus on is going to create that experience for you, so we're all strapped. Strapped in here, newsflash were all wrong rollercoaster ride excited about this already WanNa. Be Fearful about it because I'm I'm telling you that you're not gonna change the experience like the whole global experienced by deciding to be depressed and fearful anxious. You're also not gonNA change the whole global experience, deciding to be excited and adventurous and peaceful with this. You are gained your experience. It's so true I totally agree, and it just seems like what we felt. Wherever you focus, there's potentially I'll use the word just because it's this. We had kind of have to negative aspects of this in positive aspects of this, and it's staying in that positive aspect looking for the opportunities looking for the fun looking for. The the Little Gold Nuggets along this trail which there are plenty like we just talked about. Agree angry awesome well. Thanks for hanging out with Munis has been I feel like we dive deeper than this all day long, but I really appreciate it. You're welcome. Thanks for having me. It's rainy day in. It was really to be able to connect with you in this way and. Absolutely and I. DON'T WANNA forgive before we wrap up. I will also include this in the show notes done before, but. Just. People listening that maybe won't read. The show notes. Tell them how they can get in touch with you. Find out more about your work. Your social media your website. Etcetera share that. So you can find online at Seoul Whiskey, club, dot, com, or soul, whiskey, dot, com either ORB I'm the sole whiskey girl. feel-good goodbye drinking, neil exposure of the soul. I like to teach others how to do that. Some pretty easy I'm on facebook I'm everywhere, soul, whiskey or Belbey Gif A. N. E.. Awesome. Thank you so much than super good. Day All right you too bye.

Tiffany Saudi WanNa Google Mark Phillips youtube US Costco Matt Selena Naza spotify N. N. Apron Burnham Fred Meyer Seoul Whiskey Chiklis partner apple
How To Manage Your Money With Kara Rasmussen | ETHX 145

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

50:09 min | 6 months ago

How To Manage Your Money With Kara Rasmussen | ETHX 145

"If. You want to improve your experience with money and create real and lasting change in that area of your life. Then this interview is for you either a Mark Phillips and on this January talk about business and lifestyle designed from the inside out and I invited my guest on to join me today because she is a money manager and coach her name is Tara Rasmussen and in this video, we talk about really understanding the beliefs that underlie why they have certain relationship with plenty why recurring themes may be happening understanding the root causes always on the journal level, right but also carrying talks about setting up systems and processes and even account to help you manage your money in a simple easy way. Lots of goodness in this interview I took away a lot of nuggets that I. will be thinking about more and potentially implementing in my own life I. Know you're GonNa find some value here before we jump into the interview, I just want to invite you to. Subscribe and turn on the Belfer notifications. If you want more videos like this, helping increase the business, a lifestyle that you want, and I'd also like to invite you to sign to email listed g Mark Phillips. Dot. com. We knew I'll give you access to a collection of tools that I call tools for conscious creators really to help you get the momentum that you want in your business in your life uncover some of. The things that may be holding you back right as a creator making the lifestyle that you want the business that you want. It is really natural true expression of who are and what you value in the world. So that's a collection of tools that has always growing the have access to my email list. So without further ado, let's jump in and have conversation about money, which is one of my favorite topics with Tara. Cara. Thank you for making time to chat with me today. Super appreciate it. Absolutely. I'm so glad to be here. Thank you? Yes. So we have a mutual friend, tiffany Alvie, and that's how I found out about your work and I'm really excited to dive into Your Work With Money and coaching I? Think it's important that this you know it's always important but it's super important right now in our day and age where things kind of topsy turvy So, what do you Gimme a little snapshot Messina purpose of what you do. So Nutshell I. Give people clarity on everything that they And everything that they wish they had and then put together with some hope workable path and plan on how to get there. On all things many on all things money and you have an accounting background. So obviously, that's super relevant How did you? How did you transition to be a money coach from say, were you an accountant at some point? They went. So when you're kind of on that career path and trying to figure out what you WANNA. Do I knew I loved math and I knew I love people? and. So can my whole guidance in accounting? You should be an accountant so I became an accountant. And then I started doing that went. Well, there's really not a lot of. And Accounting Tax laws. And putting things into categories, and then there was a lot of people either so it was like a double whammy like you didn't get any. Great. Over, what do I do and in doing a lot of different positions I worked in a family business for quite a while light went through college after college and got to learn all the inner workings of business I worked in corporate America Than Counting Department and then I became a consultant through a consulting company working service entrepreneurs and I was like, Oh, the skin closer there's a lot more people involved in this slum were touched little touch but what I was finding as. Again it was working with more the business money side. And we're the tracking site. But if there was an issue with the business money, there was probably an issue with the personal money and then I started to kind of carve out my path. I really like this I really like teaching people because there's not a class on, there's not like a college or a high school class even on how you kind of do adulting with money what were all the steps in glands of processes that are kind of? We can truly have authentic financial security, get those done and just kind of started to do that with my clients and they like that and then I started doing more just that lane and well, and it became a money manager and coach, and I got to do my people and I got to do my math. So in the end, you arrived to the spot. I think life like that. It's kind of a winding path when we start, we don't really know how to get there but we know what we want to do and what feels good to us and you kind of arrived in in time. Yeah. So. So what all what services do you do for clients sounds like you have a pretty broad spectrum. Right, some unless they work with either service based entrepreneurs or I work with just individuals purely on their personal money side. If I'm doing the business side, I do the personal site as well. So it's kind of get to do both them because I just can't. It's torturous. We're just not a good match if you're not GonNa let me if you're not gonNA open the door to the personal side that's a closed door I'm like us going to be. Driving Nets for both of us but in pretty good at convincing them to let me do that. It's all connected right enacted. It's all helpful. For people on the service side usually UAE. Became one of my clients is they were starting kind of made that transition from business owner that was kind of struggling not making a lot of money. So taxes weren't much of an issue even just as money planning was that issue and then something happened like they landed that great client or they did this great marking planner themes taking off, and now all of a sudden they're making great money and there's this thing called taxes that Kinda gets in the way of that great money sometimes where they're so shocked that I should like my Gosh I. Oh, what. And then the next year. Oh, my gosh. And I'm hoping them plan and planned for that tax savings every single month almost exactly what that is. So there are no surprises there seeing what the real money is that they can purpose in plan with in their business and take out of the business in a healthy way and kind of helping them there and on the personal side, it's usually someone kind of similar who opt either went through some kind of life transition like a divorce and they just got a chunk of change and the other person used to manage the money in they're like. I know was to do something with this, but I have no idea what and they don't want to mess up in one of the worst things you can do is actually take action and have it be just out of fear or complete lack of knowledge. It's so much better actually do nothing and wait and get that clarity and get that knowledge people. Just think like, Oh, I just can't have it sitting here. I need to invest it or need to go start a business or need to pay off all the debt or pay put a big chunk on my house, and then as they get educated and they start to learn like you no, and you can't get that money back always as I've asked. You I've heard that. I heard that you that the best thing especially after say a death or divorce or something that just not really even money issues, but any kind of major issues because. And I know people who've made decisions and then have regretted it. You know down the road. So it's a very tumultuous time isn't it is it has or even just a certain kind of windfall. It could be that they just got the job of their dreams not only in. What they're doing in pay or they got a significant bonus or again. A business owner that's starting to make good money and they're just like, oh my gosh, this is different. Now it's it's slipping through my fingers. I. Know I don't I can't not wrangling nece well and Again, can just it's really just a matter of education there's not again, it was blake, teach them all the tools in training and three months. But then after that, that's where the kind of the work relates extent three months of training, and then now it's a new life change. It's a different process now it's okay you know it's kind of like. A lot of what I do to weight loss you can hire weightless coach and they can say, okay, here's your exercise plan for the next three to twelve months. Here's your meal plan and that's fantastic and you could just simply follow it and in some people that's all they need most people go. Okay. Now I've got a carve out time to exercise I didn't ever have to do that but wasn't doing that before. So now I've got to have time to grocery shop in new plant and learn how to cook. So it's not so much the education the plan it's like how howdy implement the since your life and bite those behaviors that you're currently using in my lane of working with people. The way that they're buffering stress or buffering sadness or buffering pain is through money and spending or giving like to just get that high into feel good. Again, whereas if they're hiring a weight loss coach are usually buffering with food and we can't just say, well, here's your budget. It's much deeper. It's learning about the why why you're Smith ending with what your real purposes on what are your emotional connections to many, and then also with a knowledge of what is what are healthy money habits are what are healthy eating habits? Or doing all that. Well, it sounds like it. Yeah. So I, mean, do you find the majority of the work is on that Y and that thinking? I mean, how? How does that play in I mean it seems goes there. Yeah. It does go there again in the beginning. It's more of the Education and the coaching I am finding an NF first session. I am asking them a lot of deep historical money beliefs and questions. I have this hope a she got these. Emotions on it and I asked them to pick all the words that resonate with them. When it comes to many some people, it's competence its security other people's anxiety stress over giving, and it's really eye-opening for them. Was Me to see what words are resonating with them, and then I like to help them kind of do a similar assessment. In twelve months and go okay. How are we doing? This feeling that you've got an education and now you have a coach. Now they have an accountability partner now that we're addressing some of those thoughts in believes however are now because that's really the ultimate test. Someone can have ten thousand dollars to their name. And feel. And other people can how ten thousand and feel like they're in such scarcity and always comes down to the feeling. and. That's what we're going to try to address. The most is, how do we get those feelings of anxiety of lack of control and help you kind of turn those into more positive feelings and that that's the ultimate win yeah. Like like root out or or override those. Feelings of money about money they may have picked up wrong feelings that don't support what they want and install new feelings. Is that the goal? And I wouldn't say again, there's like a wrong feeling. Sure 'cause it's authentic to them in that moment and we're just gonNA keep playing and tweaking you know is it just the education that you needed or is it more like do we bring in a tiffany? Is it more like a life coaching feeling because no matter how many times I can say that this money the money you have is beautiful and perfect in all of my. Financial away and say you're just right and you still feel anxious. Well, that's not a money problem that's cheaper and I don't want to just keep giving another tool another math. Right and I can go so far. Again, I am not my lane is coaching and if it turns out, it's bringing in other resources. So sometimes, it is bringing in a source of coach but other times it's bringing in sources of I'll go deep and understand something of a we need to get an attorney in here or we need to bring in your CPA or we need to bring in your financial planner. Again, I'm seeing those things for women need to bring in like. I'm a generalist. Told like. Dangerous little bit about everything that for your lane. Sometimes, you need like a release civic dive into your am estate planning or a deep dive into your investments in that's when we would bring in. Yeah we'll everything. I mean a lot of things are specialized these days right and you need that expert the that knows that in a deep way sometimes don't you. and then I speak the language with all of them and I'm kind of a liaison. Between. Them as well yeah I love. A peck like their CPA to be there all around guru liaison although pick their financial planner and they don't realize that they're kind of in one or maybe two lanes and and. Going to them for advice on everything isn't necessarily their expertise, but they're so expert in their lane. Yeah I've I've heard that you know in my own study of wealth and and people who they have a team in it kind of directs their their whole, their whole project of creating. Welton and managing their money is that what what you sounds like? That's what you recommend as well. Yes. Yes. I have and again, it doesn't a team could just be me in their CPA or like I said in the higher net worse, it's quite a few people. And again, I'm just there to kind of help prompt when we need to bring somebody in an I can ask the right question and again I have the whole picture and can also can tell when they need more knowledge about something else that's going to impact their decision rather than just making assumptions sure yet that makes perfect sense. So we talked a little bit about your professional journey, how you started in accounting and then major way to where you're at now but. was there like a pivotal point where you're kind of like a This isn't working I'm going to kind of reinvent 'cause. That's one of the things I like to ask people 'cause I sometimes feel that we human beings have maybe like two lives one life where we you know thought we knew what we were doing and then one life that kind of emerges you kind of touched on it a little bit earlier you know where you were looking for that feeling Talk about your pivot or your you know like reinvention to go in to find out to find where you're at now. I kind of have. I've been looking back at my careers. I for whatever reason never felt boxed in kind of by the job description I do try to seek out happiness enjoy and even when. I mean I've never. Not Always GonNA empathized or understood do more now but you know in my younger like twenty something days I, never understood why is like if you don't like your job in just you don't always have the number one switched to a new position why can't you just talk to your manager but what you love and sell it on my you like to do x Y and Z and that's how are we kind of approached my job in life even like a choice to cascade is with my corporate job? I worked starting out within accounts payable where it was just kind of all day long data entry into the system and it was like, Oh, my gosh did I make the? I knew it was a stepping stone rose like I dunno allowing link the South and then I find out like, oh, there's like this activities committee and you can be young activities committee and there are people that need to do statement research where all the you're researching you're talking to people and talk vendors better ways from proving and I was still in a quote data entry position but that was probably ended up being like ten percent of my day after like a year into that position so I always liked to. Do some of my clients to if there's A pain point with their money or a process with money just like. To, do this thing I'm always like excitement. Well, first of all, let's not have you do this thing or is there some way we can do it and you still get you know it's an unhealthy way but. Not just the first idea, and this is how you retired, and this is how we're gonNA. End It clicked I can even say lake from me being an accountant one of the the tools that they used is. I used to do like a multi level, super accounting budget for the personal side and then in doing that you have to track every dollar you spend into these eighty five different categories and make decisions on which category they go in. So if you buy your kids are going to say birthday party in they buy a gift is that kid expense is that gift expense is that entertainment expanse I don't have to make these crazy decisions every time i. You. Know a spend a dollars paint have to track it and then have to think about it. So I just went will wait a minute. There's no rules on the personal side. You don't have to report this for taxes. Why do I? Why do this way? So I created a four bank account system four categories as long as you purpose your money and spend and deposit into the four bank accounts for its purpose you ought to try anything while. We're in so simple and I was like well. I'm. Not. going. To like create a budget let's step one create a budget. You're going to spend this much on gas groceries this much entertainment and I was like. That's fantastic for like a month. Old. Or am sick and I don't know motivated to do it anymore. How are most people going to another? That's kind of what I think is fun is like the challenge of like so this isn't fun we'll listen to me get. Simple answer to it will it sounds like that's your accounting brain coming out wanting to make it. You know maybe. Overly complex and you kind of simplified it I know it's a it's a balance. It is I'm a big I kind of overcomplicate, my own systems in my own life as time goes on because I'm I look at the system and if it's not working or if I don't WanNa do it I'm like you. I. I will revise it to make it. So it does work because it is a tool it has to support the grander bigger process. So do so you do that with your clients into you you integrate or is that your own city-owned budgeting system that you're talking about? Well, I teach them I did my self I I laugh because I've got two kids that are great guinea pigs they're older now but they've always been guinea pigs and then myself in that I tried on myself and then and then it's like ready to launch for clients. Yeah, you're the testing ground ISLA testing ground because. Plus like I know. If again, the biggest piece of it's not working for me, it's not going to work for my clients and I know one of the tools another told us I didn't come up with this job at this is the strengths fighters stranger two point Oh and it's one of his personality assessments I. Think it's the best one. I have my clients take that assessment right from the beginning. Because I like to know from coach are you somebody that really likes lists and check things off? and. You don't want too many options just be like, okay care. Give me five things accomplished in a month and they'll be done or are you more the personality that that would be too constricting and there's no fun. There's no Klay. There's no innovation there's no strategy. Are you needing more wiggle room and play? and. Again in creating like tools, one of the things. I created were again listening to people like Dave Ramsey in Suzie Orman in the gene chess he's kind of the bigger. Financial End Advice Givers of the money coach Lane they have very. Strict step by step by step by step process in just learned like that's not everybody that is. Personality type. But I WANNA work with all kinds of people especially the ones that are really creative in. Innovative, and so you have to have I created a wheel instead of a selfish to pass you can start anywhere. And nothing's bad decision but you can start over here as. I color coded into how close you're getting having a particular sort of bubble done and you could go all over the place or you can be linear like me. I'm the more linear and you could just start at the top and work your way around like a clock. Skinning. Rate but it's GONNA HELP Recently sets accomplish the same end result, which is getting everything done for financial security. It sounds like that. That's a super like innovative way to help people kind of just make progress start making progress instead of like, all right I'm going to start at one and go two to three. And there's no again there's no math or money because I. it's really intimidated intimidating for people or spreadsheet. Will with curlers. And client like the ultimate goal is to get whole wheel Greens and a and I can just be like when my clients get another bubble greened out there like. Shaikh another green and the celebration because a lot of get one of those bubbles drained out like for example, when the bubbles is Create a will. So, again, it always sounds like one step like, oh, we're just going to create a well that's that's hard but it sounds like one thing. At Berkeley that bubble encompasses I'm getting all of financial records in order gathering everything from your car titles to divorce decrees, diplomas getting a save. Getting a thousand dollars liquid in your disposal in your stave gear financial power of Attorney I. Mean there's just All the steps involved in it. So to get that bubble green out is a big deal. Yeah. I can imagine it sounds like a very obviously an important aspect too but it sounds like a complete system if you're even diving into that like a state stuff to. Again there there is we're covering the entire gauntlet of everything you need to be truly financially secure again I'm not. I'm not going to help them right there will but I'm going to educate them on the pieces on a high level basis can always high level. and. What all you need to of your estate planning and we're going to bring in the attorney when at that point. But also helping you we wanna things you will do is you have to list out all of your assets in all of your debts that's going to, and where are they located and where the passwords and what accounts are the end helping them going to wrangle and gather all that information before we go to the attorney. That's also so awesome. So tell me about I. WanNa Talk About your phrase. It's not bookkeeping it's chains keeping. I kind of gather where it's coming from talking to you about Your Business. But what is that phrase? Where'd you get that? Again people put me in the category like accountant or bookkeeper and I think mostly bookkeeping is religious tracking and reporting, and that is fantastic and needs to be done but that's never fulfilled me. I. Would always do the reports for people who? Don't. You WanNa talk about him in and how we can improve in. Different Really just report in done or they don't understand how to read the reports like to read a balance sheet. What does it really telling you? What is the profit prophet last really telling you and again trying to get creative like, oh, this is hard to read on and make it a color who he'll. Patrollers in it or you know put symbols in it or just go over what it actually means. So that's like the first step is processing but rights change keeping not bookkeeping is again. I want people to put processes in changes into their life at a permanent and lasting. So whether it's number one, just the education of everything you have to get done for money or number two understanding on what your emotional connection is. Why you're may be doing the things you do or what is it about money? That makes you feel anxious again to go back is it just lack of education or is it every time that I'm money came around? You saw that You know. Again, just points that hat like. Maybe, every time money came around your peer parents got money. They were gonNA, they went on trips they spent it and so having money meant abandonment. I. Mean I don't know who knows what people's attachment is to that. So we're learning all those things that you can make lasting changes to a longer. US money as something buffer west, and then at the of a healthy relationship with money and we want not just keeping at reporting bit lasting change. And it's so important to this is five wanted to have you on right now I mean said anytime is a great time to. Talk about money talk about some beliefs that underlie why we're having money situations that were having a bit especially now when things are kind of constricting in the economy and Oh, who knows what's going on an economy it could be it's topsy-turvy. Right are. How do you keep your people? Just as since we're on that topic while I I can probably anticipate which you're gonNA say here because you've coached them and train them. But how do you keep both and freaking out in situation? Everybody freaked out present company included because they went. Oh my gosh if. grants lose their money in their jobs that makes also. So, when the COMBET I hate yeah. The first part was like trained to discover and unlock all these new programs that have no historical data whatsoever and we're changing hourly. Truly you would nail down process and then the. While we're gonNA alter this just a little bit so it was like Talking everybody off the Ledge and what processes and improvements were available but I don't know if it's just the type of client that. Is attracted to me and I'm attracted to them because again, I don't like to just. Take the rule and go kay like acids exactly way has to be done. Bet. All of my clients, all of my clients that were business or our business owners figured out a way to pivot. And are doing better than they were. I've. Been Unreal I thought you know. About a mother legs. What am I going to do I can't be a money coach right now no one's GonNa have menu to pay me and to be sitting here today knowing all my clients are service based entrepreneurs either stayed the same or pivoted to away actually improved their business has been just amazing. That's so good to hear because this is totally unprecedented and. I see that too I see some people pivoting in some people reinventing and getting creative and getting embracing the change and it incurred I'm encouraged by that and it makes me believe that human beings have the capacity where adoptable I mean we can't adapted sometimes pulling full and teeth to get people to adapt but I, I love to hear that that's so awesome and some it was like a complete one, eighty pivot. That wasn't the the most votes just. A slight pivot with some of them just from their target market and that's all they needed to do. They need to change the nature of their business like if you just had to change a little bit of who now they were going to serve. Always. Have to just be a complete like a you're cutting hair. So now you're going to. Do Bookkeeping. Right So while we're on this topic wh, what would you describe as like your your your ideal client if someone comes to you. Are you looking for a certain kind of individual that you're well suited to coach with and work with. It's again it's somebody who is tired of feeling. They know that there's a problem they're willing to fix it and they WANNA seek out coaching at help and it's usually. Not, because they're drowning in debt, but because actually they're starting to make money and they really haven't moved the needle whatsoever on their their net worth or or tracking our understanding things about money. So people who have like. Momentum has been starting to build. They figured out their passion sugar because you always figure your passion sugar when you're starting to just. Elevate Your Business. It just comes money comes in effortlessly I can honestly say that's kind of what's happened with me when I was working in bookkeeping verses. Now many coaching and management is so much more fulfilling and the energy that you bring to that in your business. Will shine through in that, and so people who have can figure that out and again have just made that hit that recent pivot are usually when they come when we find each other. I like that I literally like that I love that you said that about the passion, the passion kind of correlating with the money that's coming because I think that to in when we're doing something that lights up and makes us come alive. Other. Open up and flow starts coming in. It does because when people ask me Oh, will you do taxes? You like. Well I don't take I don't take inventory clans has I can't stand majority. Got Rid of my family business for ten years was a lawnmower shop in there was like I count inventory. So many hints year like screws up. Just like I can't even if you have five inventory items. Well. That's awesome that I think you transfer that kind of like understanding of yourself to your clients because they can see you on your path of doing what is a With what you want they can learn by kind of by proximity of in a way almost yeah, I. Know I want them to find. That happiness enjoy and not feeling stock in it. I. I had a client, the other day who recently went through a divorce and didn't seek me out again for a career path change. Really just again, it was kind of example where the. Got A chunk of change and did not know what they were supposed to do with it. and. In doing their analysis in planning out there they're year with them and what they can do this money I was looking at. again, I was looking at some of the the debts that this person had with their schooling. and. I was like, oh. That's mysterious schooling. What is this person doing and they were making a a very small small small hourly wage, and that will what is this person doing and now they're doing something they're doing something completely different like coding or something in their degree it in something completely different and. I was just laughing with Zane, you know what you don't have kids. Recently divorced you have a chunk of change you have this amazing degree. Why are you coatings coatings thing do you are you doing because it's so funny he's like, no I hate coating I've just do it because I have to like. Like you're you're the guy where you Have to say this you like most people you have to say if money wasn't an option and I had a magic one and you could be a success that anything what would you do like? I don't even have to day that. You will make more money in doing anything else. So let's have you go what is your dream career? Where do you want you can live anywhere you don't live in Boise. You're not married. You don't have kids you don't just stay here it was it just became like I wanna live in a story at I wanNA do these other things in. It just became coaching him for that rather than spending our time religious trying to figure out how to work a budget around his current income yet because that. Would have been like a band-aid right as opposed to like. Let's tip the whole thing up on the tape out on the table and suit we got here. Right Yeah because sometimes when you're with, you've been married for a significant period of time you just start to feel like that's the only lane you're in and you forget like a radioman. I can do anything I can live anywhere. I don't have anybody like I can just do this I don't even ask that's okay because you're used to running that by somebody band to do again. Whether there's the money piece, the career piece or whatever it is. They're sterling just to be sometimes you need an outsider to just go really. You definitely do I love that practice like you said of you know I call it like blank slate type or whatever. Like if if you could write it as you want your life, how would you do? Sometimes it's I in my own experience I found. It can be a little dangerous because it can sometimes like you said, make people want to move or make people wanna do different things it can shake up so they have to be prepared for that. Is that what you find as well It's always. It's never. We Are we're wired for comfort and what we already know. Even, if it's boring, we're wired for that in like change is uncomfortable. Change is hard change can sometimes create pain like. Like. If, you're trying to build muscle or if you just do pound weights like that's not very hard and there's not a lot of discomfort you have to like rip muscle and build it and feel struggle to become better and stronger and healthier and. A change is always going to be. The best kind of changes messy, right. Is the only otherwise it's not really change if that really changed and then So. That's Kinda funny lead. So what I do for the acronym for change is what change keepers were always creating change. So I say changes rarely. Is Clarity. So you always before you make a change, you have to get clarity on what you currently have whether it's your job or anything if you're ray or your money and what you want to have instead, and then the bridge of why wide you want, why do you want to be at a debt? Why do you WanNa make one, hundred, thousand you gotta get clarity on what you have right now do you even know how much you make Entrepreneur Simon note they make a year? No idea. So just getting clarity once you have your clarity than does making that change. Give you hope the action steps that were putting in place. Do they give you hope or just stressed in confinement and restrictions? So you're trying to lose weight and I, said Oh what you eat Broccoli three times a day for two months you'll lose weight and you're like. Okay Cumulative hope they. WanNa make sure that she is clarity the ages hope and then the a an authentic. So it was like to make sure that the change were making is authentic change. So I hear all the time in my world what People WanNa do they have something like credit card debt or any kind of debt is lead times they want to take out, refinance their house and pay it off or takeout like a a distribution loan from their retirement account and get rid of that debt, and then they're like feel like they need progress like o I no longer grandparent. That's not authentic. You just need your debt from here to here. It's exactly the same same amount of debt and you don't make change that's authentic will probably be in a worse position because you felt like you just paid off all your credit card debt and now you want something she didn't change any of your behaviors and you just. Ten thousand in credit card debt. Thousands Thousand, and then that thousand becomes two, thousand thousand becomes. In the before you know it right back to the ten thousand credit card debt lest you have the loan from Your IRA or plus you have a bigger mortgage than you had before. So I always like to make sure when we're making change authentic clarity. Hope Authentic. If you can say, yes, I have clarity. Yes it gives me hope this action about to take an yes it's authentic than its energy now go execute anyway let's do it. That is such a complete like Model I. Love that. I Bet your clients I venture clients are all about that makes it very easy. Those steps because it kind of covers the whole process. Yeah. Any change I always related to many but again, I don't necessarily spell it out to them every time that they're wanting to make change but I've making sure answering those questions throughout it. Yeah. I. Love that. All right. So moving on here let me see here we talked about Some some of the problems and solutions already that your clients have and I think that you kind of gave us a good insight into some answers that we all could do because I always like to ask you know people that I interview. Is there any other like maybe a common problem? You see in your clients that maybe a lot of people have and and it may be a common solution that you will typically offer. Yes. So again on that talk about the business side, usually the universal problem is saving for Texas not being surprised at tax time saving on a monthly go into what how that's processed. But on the personal side, a lot of times again, going back to that clarity is just a one of the biggest problems that people have is knowing. You know how much they can spend like GonNa Fun, way that still healthy. And how or How to purpose money and keep an have clarity at all times but not have to track anything and not Basically, it's like it overwhelmed. Around or just have no understanding or they're like, okay I have car insurance as like a thousand dollars in two months but I have all this money now can I make that? Can I do this thing out? Feels like have many but I can't remember what I have. Here. And so one of the ways I have people get around that is to create four bank account system and he can do this. Now I'm one of the accounts which is what I call the machine account that does require more training coaching around. So we won't go into that win in this quick little session with the others rainy buddy can start right away and that is number one getting an emergency accounts savings account where you're just kind of putting money into there every month or every windfall so that when you have an emergency, you don't have to feel like, oh, can I make the mortgage payment or oh, I guess I can't go out to eat you know. Next week or whatever just like nope. This account is just firm urgency's and it doesn't impact anything else in your life and I love how Dave Ramsey calls it murphy repellent because truly his don't have one merge because I think you're almost attracting emergencies because you're worried about them you know that you went survive what happened and we have such peace of mind when you have an emergency account almost reflects emergencies from even happening. So you didn't emergency account emergencies from their pay the bill every month put one hundred in it every month put five hundred every month on get what I call a BMW account which stands for big major wants like a car like a BMW. Things you stay about four that are wants not needs everybody in life needs to have a little count like this. Again, you're feeding NAT account every month, and from there that's where you're gonNA do trips or big home improvement or Christmas something like that that you can't. Use a paycheck or a business distribution to pay for have a BMW count, and then you're going to have at least a discretionary account. You'RE GONNA push money into that on the first of every month. Maybe it's thousand maybe ten thousand ending on what your comfort level is end instead of tracking like entertainment groceries and gas you're just through the APP on your phone and through that account, you're just watching accounts and you know it's going to get filled a thousand on the first. Of every month or five thousand on the first every month and just watch that account if it starts to get down if you're starting to be like, oh my Gosh, it's the twentieth and we're almost at zero. The next account that you pull from is your BMW account. So you're painfully aware of what you're going over your cash is doing like, oh my gosh that trip we were gonNA go one in three months when we accumulated thousand dollars is now delayed or reduced because of. Going out to eat or whatever it is that you're doing through your discretionary but you have to pull from that I want there to be a pain. Awareness Zip having everything in one account where you just don't know. Well I think we're saving up for that trip in here I? Think there's enough for an emergency it's like no purpose your money into. Discretionary emergency BMW, and then the fourth one is a little more complicated it's called the machine account at at least. The how super helpful. That is super. Helpful. Okay as we get closer wrapping up here. Let me ask you. Can you talk about the process that client a new client would go through when they are interested in your coaching? Now give us a little walk through if you could. So every new client I have them commit to three months, and then from there they can go beyond or if nothing else in three months, you will get the thorough thorough knowledge of every single step to eventually complete in kind of adulting and being financially secure. I meet with everyone twice a month for three months whether they're a business owner or just didn't individual again twice a month for three months at six sessions and in those six sessions again, you'll get the throw training of that financial wheel with the colors. The bubbles in everything you have to do the will bubble You'RE GONNA get twelve months of cash flow planning for Your Business and for your personal just personal it's only personal and it's also acts as a bill. PAYCHECK list see with no like, oh, every June nine only do I have all these I, pay my mortgage on my ranch in the Tilles wet not it's like, okay car insurance is due or oath Hoa is to or out the annual lifelock membership is do whatever it is planning that whole year. So there's no surprises. There's no like shoot they didn't plan for this thing We're also planning out all of your big purchases for the year and we're doing Teaching that four bank account system so that you can purchase your money in. We're going deep into the machine account in learn how to do that, and then we're also doing strengths finder analysis. So again, that's that personality assessment so that we're giving you money tasks in interacting special. If you're married with your significant other and understanding were their strengths lie and just kind of teaching all those money habits, you can continue to do that enhance your strength. So it's kind of afford deliverable you're getting cash flow you're learning the four count is banking account system. You're learning everything in the financial wheel and you're learning strengths coaching. Awesome. What about the future? What have you got Either products or services or things to serve your clients in the future. I know as entrepreneurs go on the journey there always figuring out better ways to serve right. Can you share some of your future things with us? Yes. So now I am working with a life coach a we're talking about putting retreats on. We're going to launch some of our retreats right as Kobe hit. So again I was part of that like oh And now that it seems like it's GonNa be here while we're trying to give it into perhaps something virtual. But that's coming up next. Maybe it's like women who are recently divorced and have this money that they're trained to learn about as well as this new life from dating to sharing kids like all the emotional piece that comes with being divorced as wells, the money piece and doing like three day retreats or people that are trying to. figure out their life purpose through entrepreneurship and what are the steps involved in that in picking that industry that's just perfect for you so. Going to be working with alike coach, and we're going to be putting on some retreats. Kinda like stay tuned on whether they'll be virtual or in person right that sounds super exciting. And leading into the next question how will people? How can people follow you or find you online? I'll also put you know links in the description in the show notes on Youtube, in the description. But how can people find out about online? Where do you want him to follow you? Yes. So they can go to my website, which is changed keepers dot com. And if anybody has questions that can just email me directly care K. A. R. A. AT CHANGE KEEPER DOT Com. Awesome. Thank you. Ve Care I mean there's a lot to think about in this episode and and like I said money's always such a great topic because it's so important to us and I wanNA. Thank you for hanging out with me sharing your experience and knowledge. Perfect. Thank you. This is so much fun. I'm glad you had fire. All right. Thanks, Karen. We'll talk to you soon. Okay. Thank you. bye-bye.

accountant business owner attorney BMW tiffany Alvie Dave Ramsey Mark Phillips Tara Rasmussen America Dot. UAE Nets consultant Youtube US
With The Right Tools You Can Create Anything | ETHX 142

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

27:52 min | 11 months ago

With The Right Tools You Can Create Anything | ETHX 142

"Hey how are you today? This is enhancing human experience. One forty two mark Phillips no guest today just me maybe sharing my favorite tools with you specifically the tools that you get when you sign up to my email list. I call him tools for conscious creators. I they're like a little collection of thought tools and emotional tools mainly thought tools because that is the starting point of everything of everything that cascades thoughts lead to feelings feelings to actions actions lead to results I guess thoughts and beliefs are kind of you know assumed to be similar things. Even the beliefs trump thoughts you know. They come prior prior to that but there are thought tools that help you fix your thinking so that you can create the experience you want in life right. We know that we're creators. We're creating our own reality. We're creating our experiences and that's why I'm super excited about these thought tools. These tools for conscious creators. They've been available to people who sign up to my email list at G. Mark Phillips Dot Com four. Maybe a couple of months now and I have a bunch more to add. I've already added a bunch of cool ones. I've got the list pulled up right here. We're going to go through and talk about them and I'm also gonNA share some other new developments. That are happening. That will be happening in the future with you. Some new courses. I'm yes I'm doing courses and venturing into the course arena. I did prior. It didn't go so well. I was on a platform that shall not be named. But I'm not GonNa do that platform anymore and put it. Put It on my website. I'm really super super excited to share that with you. The infrastructure and the actually there is courses available to purchase. They're currently but I'll be building it out more. I've got A. I've got some work to do to to put that together but I'm excited to to share that with you but in this video like I said I want to talk about these tools of by the way of my chair squeaks. I apologize for that. It's been somewhat somewhat stressful day as I was backing out of some stuff online and redoing some stuff and you know you know those things were you hurt. Your head gets to a little bit too technical and you're Kinda like what in the world am. I doing this for right so I had one of those kind of days. But I'm through it now. I went and had myself a delicious refreshing Topo. Chico mineral water carbonated sparkling mineral water super delicious super good. It's those little the little special niceties that we give ourselves at the end of a stressful challenging day. That make all the difference right. So I'm back can put this podcast together here and then we'll get it up and get it get it out there like I said this is episode one forty two. It's just me today I in the future will invite some new guests on as you know away just doing the podcast once a month for a while now as I put more of my time and efforts and energy into video content. Have you checked out the video the video or excuse me the youtube page YouTube dot com slash G Mark Phillips? If so what do you think am I on the right track in my producing entertaining and valuable content for you? I hope I am You know I've told the story about video a lot in the past how I was really afraid of frigging video. I was scared of video. I didn't want to be on video. I didn't want anything to do with it. That's why started the podcast in the first place. In addition to the fact that I love talking with people and interviewing them but video really really frightened me. But I gotta say I'm having a lot of fun producing and creating videos. It's just so much. The medium is is so creative. It allows me to be a lot more creative than than does just the podcast right but the podcast here will always be. You know. My heart will always be in it because it's super important to me. I love the the the nature of it. I love having guests on but video is where I'm putting most of my attention. That's where that's why I've you know. Scaled back the podcast to just every month. So all right. Let's talk about these tools so if you have if you have already subscribe to my email list and you're listening. Don't worry because you can have. You'll have access to these tools. The same link that you've always had will take you to these tool so if you didn't get them you can always go find them and that's why. I put a link in the email the welcome email so that people can go and download newly updated tools right because I'm sometimes I revise. That's why every tool has a a v one or V two or maybe V one point. Five I don't think I'm going to get into the point system but the one V to some of them have V two already when they change and then I'll notify you in my weekly email minimum weekly email that I send out again. You are on that list if you ever signed up to receive any of the free downloads. It use it. It's been a number of things in the past. Currently it's tools for conscious creators. I pulled renew morning ritual off of that free download. Because I'm going to be turning into that that into a premium course. I'm really excited. I WANNA go over to Sun Valley Idaho and stay in the Sun Valley Lodge over the weekend and film renew morning ritual. It'll be somewhat of a micro course but it'll be that process that I that I go through when I'm on my game to tune in you know to all of the things that I want who I am what I want how I want it to be all these things Every morning I find it to be a really powerful morning. Ritual bring bring back online the mind body and spirit that kind of thing so look for that be coming down the line really soon well somewhat soon and again you you'll find out in my new course platform G MARK PHILLIPS DOT COM slash courses. You'll find that there along with a couple of the other courses that are already there. Plus I got to say I'm excited to share one of my favourite new courses with you in it's called the focus and flow journaling process. I am thrilled to share this now. I realize there are so many journal Courses Net Journal books out there on the market. Not NECESSARILY COURSES PER SE. Some are courses. You're talk about the five minute journal. The Freedom Journal John Lee Dumas entrepreneur on fire I think there's a productivity journal. There's a focus. There's just a focus journal but this focus and journaling process. I'm going to say it's the most comprehensive simplest funnest process of them all and I have no problem saying that because I've been using it for the last couple of months and refining it and honestly I've never been a big journal or I co- I go in and out because it gets boring to me. I don't know if you're like this tube at journaling gets boring to me. But the way that this focus flow journaling processes setup. It is not boring at all and it's time just flies by it and what it the main reason that I like it. Is it shifts your consciousness. It puts you in the experience of being doing and having the experiences that you want. That's why like it. You know I've I've also tried morning pages from is it cameron. The Gal's name that wrote that book the artists the is at the artist way. Yeah the artist's way. I believe it is correct me. If I'm wrong but Julia Cameron I think is her name. I've tried morning pages and honestly while I think there's benefit there and I think they do something to clear out our pipeline our like thought processes and give us a vehicle and clean out that channel from the other side. It doesn't seem right to me to write stream of consciousness for pages and be at the mercy of the mind at something about that doesn't fit for me because I don't want I don't want my mind to run me right. I WANNA run my mind. Maybe you're like dad as well like I want my mind. Be The tool that I use like. I'm not a tool for my mind and I always felt like that with morning pages. So that's one of the things that I've got a video that I'm going to be sharing with you contrast morning pages with the focus and flow journaling parse process and really in my mind. Their polar opposites from one another. And that's why I think it resonate so much with me this folks that flow process. So that's going to be a course coming soon and I think you're really gonNA love it. I'm excited to share that with you. So let's jump into these tools before we get too far down the down the road here talk about the tools for conscious creators again. You can get when you sign up to my email list at G. Mark Dot Com. And what these are like. I said they're tools to help you tune in fix your thinking and your motion so you can do what it takes to create the lifestyle and business that you want among these tools are some new already are aware of. I have being is your superpower. That's the book of little ideas and links to people who have already discovered the power of being changed who they are changed what they are in their self concept so that they can get what they want right because what we are comes to us and we can't do something that is not. That is not in alignment with who we are like. We can't do something if we don't be if we're not that that's something right if we don't see ourselves that way where this it's really exciting is where you tune yourself up and and claim qualities characteristics and attributes that you wanna have and you want to use when you approach something a task or an endeavor. You do that task a radically different way. And I blow myself away so many times in the past like who is a sky right. What the Hell but when you do this really does change you right. Thoughts are things. I've said this a number of times before and I'll say it again. We are an idea we. Our consciousness expressed in physical form. And honestly you can choose to be whatever idea you want to be and when I say being as your superpower that is a frigging superpower. Because who are you? What are you right? What idea do you want to embody right now? Next week overall mean you get to choose the thing. Hangs people up myself included. I'm just I'm as guilty of this as anyone. The thing that hangs people up is oh well. I've been this way in the past. I'm this way I'm that way. I'm this way. That's bull. It really is bowl. Because then then it anchors you to where you it anchors you to your past and it creates barriers to what you what the life that you could have right. You see what I'm saying when you stay in the past of who you were and you never take a conscious moment and say look who do I WANNA be. How can I put myself in alignment with the experiences I want right? How can I change? Will you change by changing yourself concept? I your self image. And that's why I really loved that that that phrase in that book. That book has links to all sorts of successful people who have used the power of being to get more of what they want. Put themselves in alignment with health wealth and success abundance prosperity fund freedom. Whatever you want you can get it by being that. That's in there. The artist's life by Stephen. Press field is in there. It's a pdf these are all PDF's so the artist's life if you're familiar with that that's the one page very short essay. That is in the back of the war of art and that's a super awesome book in this artist. Life is all about being a creator and making sure that you know if you don't create what you came here to create you not only let yourself down. You let everyone down. Angels God even Steven Press Filled. You let Stephen Press Field Down Right. Everyone down if you don't do your thing and enter that cave that you inner. So that's the artist's life is in their one page. Pdf that I've typed up and included therefore you if you have the art of war you already have this in the back and I encourage you to go read it and check it out super good. The next tool in there is called the deathbed tool now. This may sound kind of Morbid. But I don't think it is. Death is my best friend and my super ally because anytime that I think I don't want to do something or I'm afraid to express what wants to come through me. I think about death and you know what it makes me do it because this body will be a corpse. This is a Yogi free famous phrase. Right we're all. We're all short on time for this earthrights forever and because of that we got to do the thing when we have the opportunity to do it because we may not get another opportunity just the other day. I was looking at Ryan Holidays website and his store. I think it's called the daily STOIC. Not Mistaken it's where he sells his products and whatnot and he has this super awesome coin in there and it has Latin on it and has a picture of a skull and on the back. It says something to the effect of you know. There's this tomorrow's not you could leave this world right now. I think that's what it says. You could leave this world right now and on the front. It has Latin and it says Memento Mori and I think that is stands for. You'RE GONNA die. You know something to that effect. But he carries out in his pocket all the time. That's a great reminder to stay focused in a tell you it makes you be conscious of whether you are on track or off the track or what makes you helps you decide what you. WanNa do with your time in the world. What's important what's important? So that's the deathbed tool that's in there. Also along those same lines to stay morbid but it is effective the gun to the head tool if someone had a gun to your head or again heaven forbid someone someone who loves head and it was like do or die time. Would you do the thing? That's a very effective way to get stuff done and again Stephen Press. Fil Talks about this. When he refers to the resistance the resistance we face in our lifetime is holding us back and keeping us from being creators that we came to create and so they resistance does put a gun in your face right and it does try to hold you up in keep you suppressed. Suppress the creativity that wants come wants to come through you so. I'm not the first one that's talked about this right resistance is real and it is a quote unquote bitch. It will knock you down and keep you stuck forever if you do not stand up to it and take over right so gun to the head is a very real thing next. One in there is the human beings manifesto. That is the one page inspirational motivational. I might add. I might say document. That is part of the the being series right. Just seared having what you want in life but that's just kind of a daily reminder that again reminding you that you choose who you're going to be and when you choose everything else cascades from that so that's in their black or white version. I prefer the black version myself. You can see it on the set. If you've watched any I have it back there. I like that one a little bit better than the white version. But you choose whichever when you want Couple more that are in here now and then I'll talk about some. That are coming down the line. The I M tool. This is a version to because I've already revised it now. Honestly I'm thinking of calling this changing the name to the power of being discovering the power of being because I think it's more appropriate and more in alignment with some of the other things but essentially the IM tool is talking about. You know the power of being in what you are. What you are comes to you right. You're going to attract the things that you are and so when you claim to be it and and continually talk to yourself in that way and push that into your consciousness you will develop. Dogs does qualities in yourself and you will become that person the again back to the idea back to this notion netware and idea where a collection of ideas and we get to choose what ideas we're going to be so that's the. Im tools super super powerful foundation of everything in life. Being right be do have the polarity tool is another fun tool that. I use all the time and it gets me going. Actually I did a video recently. You can find it on my youtube channel where I talk about the play tool and draw the diagram and show share the concept behind it but essentially the polarity tool is making a list of everything. You don't want everything you do want right on two sides of the paper what you don't want and what you do want and you in the middle you could draw a little stick figure and you're floating in the middle of these two columns of lists of things that you don't want experiences circumstances negative events of course on the don't want side positive events on the on the do want side go really go really big and this is what. I talked about in the video. Go to the extremes like what's the absolute best that could happen or the best experience that you want in life even if it seems very outlandish right. Go Far to the extremes in incidentally. Don't show these two people right. You don't need to share these tools with other people unless you want to. I don't share any personal development stuff that I'm doing on the inside because it's weird and it is out there and I'm going in strange places and I don't want people to see that right and it's tools for you to use so if you choose to people that's fine but just know that not everyone is going to be as open and receptive to to e. I kind of look at it as you're Sharon do behind the scenes like you're sharing your workshop and I don't let anyone in my workshop. I may let them in the foyer and I may kind of give them a little. Tell them what's in the workshop but I don't let anyone in my creative workshop meaning my imagination in my mind because that's work for me and my inner being higher self God whatever. That's the workshop. We work in right. It's it's locked down. It's like fingerprint. Is Scan biometrics. No-one gets in there. So just think about that. You know a lot of. Meta physician spiritual gurus have taken that stance before I know that in the world right now. People are very open to sharing their goals and dreams. And you know what there's some validity to that and I I that works for them at doesn't work for me. I don't tell anyone what I'm creating until I've actually created it and then I just let it speak for itself if if it's something people resonate with fine if it's something you don't find began back to this workshop and back to these tools and some of these you know when you're riding down these lists of of things to help move you into action or give you clarity or just understand yourself. Better think about not sharing this with other people because no one is going to understand your journey like you and no one is. GonNa get you right and so when you share the reason that I don't share might as well just tell you this just so you can get get my logic behind this but the reason that I don't share is because it comes back to the resistance again there's resistance in the world. There's resistance to ideas right. Try to try to put an idea into the world. You're going to get a bunch of people that say you know what it won't work. And here's the reasons why the timing's not right. Something this something that something that you're going to get a million reasons. Why what does that? Do that cuts your idea down. That's like showing your idea baby to the world and people saying you have ugly idea. Baby Right No. No one wants that. So just keep your baby covered up until it's more grown and it can kind of hold. Its own with these people that are you know because everyone's going to give you an opinion and again it's not a negative or a positive thing it's just people are resistant to new ideas or things coming into the world at takes energy and power to push things into the world and your your new self or your new invention or your new business or your new. Whatever can meet with resistance and I don't I just choose not to fight that battle. I don't WanNa waste energy trying to convince people of the validity of my idea or sharing it even sharing it. I mean you're you're using energy to share your idea with some someone who may may not be receptive. So that's the reason why is I don't I don't WanNa put my energy there? I'd rather I believe me. I got plenty of places to put my energy than sharing an idea that isn't fully formed with people. So that's why I do it just so you can get of the backstory but the player tool so very powerful in my opinion to move you into action. The idea behind that is based on the bullet. Trains magnetic levitation trains. I mean they move because there's no friction. What what happens? What the concept is with the polarity tool? Is that your list of what you don't want is going to push you and your list of what you do want is. GonNa pull you and that's why I say if you use if you make those lists very extreme really really bad situations. That will happen if you don't do what you want. What you what you're inspired to do or create and build and add value and Be of service and all the things that create that allow money to flow to you. Write to us. Make It really really bad if you don't do those things what's going to happen and if you do those things what's going to happen you see because you've amplified the negative positive polarity. You will be moved right. It will get you up off the couch up out of bed. It'll get you up from a deep dark depression and make you get into action because you know that only through moving and activity focused activity. Will you achieve your goals right? Will you create the energy around yourself to attract those experience right so that that's the polarity to find it to be very powerful? Now let me share with you. Some new tools that are going to be coming online very soon into this collection. One of them is the rainmaker. I've talked about the rainmaker before. On one of the episodes of the podcast. I want to say in the forties episode forty ish but I'll put a link in the description below this video if I think about our this episode if I think about it but definitely stay tuned on my youtube channel for the rainmaker because always the rainmaker is so valuable to keep in mind. This is the story of Carl Union. You know the rainmaker. Put himself in alignment with rain over. The course of a number of days just worked inner in the inner world aligning himself not doing at our activity but Inter Inter work right. This is where I think. Our hardest work is it's easy to do activity. It's it's easier to do activity in the world. It's harder to do activity in our mind in our consciousness and and visualize and focus and journal about our experiences that we want and live in the end like novel Goddard talked about. It's the hardest work in the world. Earl Nightingale confirmed it. He's talked about it in the strangest secret that that thinking is the hardest thing in the world on you know what I could not agree more. It's very challenging. But it's the most important most important in you probably experienced this in your own life but the rainmaker tool is coming in there. But I'M GONNA re I'M GONNA update it right. It's been almost two years since I talked about the rainmaker and shared my favorite version of the rainmaker from a book called do less achieve more which is super phenomenon know. That title sounds counterintuitive. But it's The rainmaker story that she tells and I would tell you her name but it's Chinese I know I'd get it wrong The rainmaker story. She tells us really good. So that one's coming. I've got a number of other tools. Some superfund tools. That are kind of too early in the too early stage to talk about but I think about these tools all the time. And essentially what? I what my idea here is and this is what I do at these tools. I keep them in a US them when I need them. You're not going to need these tool. I've ever one of these tools every day right but it's like a tool chest you have in your garage during your house right a toolbox. You're GonNa when you need them. It's nice to have that tool and each tool works in a little bit. Different Way to help you fix your thinking and once you get your fate thinking fix that everything else is fixed. You know Louise Hay said best. She never tries to fix things in the outer world. She fixes her thinking and those things fixed themselves. That's the idea behind these tools. So that's why I'm really excited about them. All right. That's the episode. I just wanted to talk about some of these tools and share these ideas with you. I hope that you maybe found something beneficial. I hope that you'll go. Check them out again if you get the tools and you absolutely hate them. Just unsubscribe from my email. That's no problem fin. Hopefully one of these tools will resonate with you. Have even if none of the others do. But I put a lot of thought into these and I don't want to inundate you like make a bunch of stuff that will just clutter your life. I really think long and hard about that but again. There are some tools in our tool chest our toolbox so we don't use but very infrequently but when we need that tool. It's really helpful to have it there if I could choose one tool here. That is probably well. I've said this before. One tool to rule them all it would be that I am tool because again. That's where the foundation starts year. Urine idea you're a collection of ideas and when you change what you are you change what you do. You change what you have. Everything starts from there so if you wanted one too old rule them all you know. Lord of the rings style that would be it the. Im tool that's one that I'm thinking about changing the name to making it more of an essay style. Short Essay style with some specific. How To's in there about discovering the power of being because that just sums it up right there it's very powerful being very powerful. But so that's the episode. I want to thank you for tuning in. I really do appreciate it. Remember if you haven't subscribed on your favorite podcast platform you can do that. I don't know where you're listening to this. Podcast at Apple podcast. Google podcast spot spot. Spotify stitcher Course Do what some of the new ones I think. It's on Pandora now indefinitely. Iheart so take a minute. Put This podcast into your collection or your subscription so you can have access to new episodes coming down the road again and I wanNA thank you for listening. I appreciate it. I hope all's well and until next time all the best health and success bye bye.

mark Phillips youtube Stephen Press G. Mark Phillips Chico Courses Net Journal Julia Cameron Spotify Pandora Google Apple US John Lee Dumas Sun Valley Idaho Sun Valley Lodge Earl Nightingale Louise Hay Steven Press Memento Mori
Solving Business Problems Through Creativity With Kevin Fox | ETHX 132

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

48:35 min | 1 year ago

Solving Business Problems Through Creativity With Kevin Fox | ETHX 132

"Coming to you from Boise Idaho that you know certainly the world there's global thinking global exchange of ideas and such but it's also the breadth of creativity Johnson welcome to another episode of a world of creativity this special series inside enhancing human experience I'm Mark Phillips Mark Welcome the ideas come from and how they apply creativity in their business and personal lives. Now here's your host Mark Phillips along with special guest interviewer marks aw sense of creativity well that's a great question I think it's been interesting to see when I first moved to Canada you know I'll be on it unseen the human experience a world of creativity a series of unique interviews with successful people from around the globe how they get inspired where the But you know I was blown away actually culturally how different Toronto was from from the states not to mention wet equity you know I I met Kevin when we were both working with a global communications agency concern so you know having that our guest today on the episode just epitomizes that and we want to welcome Kevin Fox Kevin Welcome to the area well hello mark and mark thanks for having and the differences the stark differences between culture in those spaces was it was really impressive really interesting and they had very very different problems to solve I'm mark Johnson and we have a terrific interview today and thinking about this idea of a world of creativity. I think there's a a nice double meanings the real creative boutique kind of approach I'm sure he'll tell us more about it as we go but what I like about what Kevin's doing is really putting that sweater in terms of you know how many things can you get involved in how many things do you work on how many experiences do we have to apply our creative thinking and no no you you'll in Columbus now what other places and projects have you worked on that you know allow you to tap into that international than than how different Montreal was from Toronto in my time in Canada I was overseeing the Creator departments for both Toronto Office and Montreal Office and International Brett but being able now to sort of break away from the mothership but I should say that to say let's do it a little bit differently let's see I mean I I would be interested to know when we say a world of creativity what sort of international product you've lived in Toronto I I fell into this belief that hell different can it really be right that's just a little bit up north it's America's hat as we used to like and you know at my when I looked at a creativity and I look at what we do that's that's the way I frame what we do we solve business problems through about independently so that's what I like about what what Kevin's during we've shared some of those experiences in our careers well but Kevin Kevin as we get going cast you know but it what it begins as a solution to a business problem and it was interesting one the business problems were very different from the tippety and yes it may it may end up being a TV spot or a website or an APP marketing campaign online or you know states to Toronto to Montreal but then how you had to approach solving them was even more difference just the individual personalities the offices the cars trucks the local cultural norms just very very different approaches in it was interesting because it influenced the work while we had processes like you mentioned it does make it simple to know who to call out the brother but de que Kevin is running an enterprise now called Fox works and it's mark this is a giant global communications company but you know the the personnel you know we all know that advertising creative departments in particular your your product is your people and those people at those disparate personalities influence the work to such a great degree it didn't matter that we were putting the same processes on the work it still had a different flavor and it was important to reflect that local flavor in those different offices so I think it was really interesting to see those cultural differences in how to what one expectations that I knew I was getting into but dealing with the individual cultural differences was that was that was surprise and probably one of the more were exciting and in this case we don't just mean diversity of race creed citizenship and so forth but also diversity of experience diversity working trying to create one singular communications firm you need to have some some common ground all speak to so again culture and in the local perspectives will there was a really interesting challenge beyond going in and breaking agency down putting a new processes new creative so many different ways what what were the pluses and minuses of that well it's interesting I think there's nothing but positive that comes out of it as long as you put the right guard rails in front of it ahead of time and that was my biggest learning is to put the you know I wanNA give guardrails not handcuffs the point of view how did you find when you're saying that kind of desperate you know but having different people look at a problem a business problem in maximize the benefit from them but also be able to get them to communicate with one another because actually some of those cultural differences they actually they're at odds with one another and you know when the group of people in a room agreeing with each other there's there is nothing there's nothing good that comes from that you know I I would much rather have at that yeah interesting you say this because clearly now you know we we realize the importance more than ever of diversity vehement disagreements let's be polite right let's respect one another but let's have very vehemently disagree on points of view and you know what mark in our time together there is a box you know we can color outside the lines fantastic but know that there is a box for this problem to be solved with it and as long as you put those guardrails in their properly and that starts with expected and as long as you have that these disparate point of views are nothing but positive fuel and I'll tell you what there's nothing that will kill creative energy faster than having a whole and have you had the situation where whether it be a Kleiner whether it be you know a creative director kind of above your year level say so obviously a solid creative brief that people can execute off of but also your your creative expectations in process and making sure you're staying on top of it for mcrib director creative directors and mentors in my career and I felt like the ones I learned the most from would one allow me to push back and think freely respect being what it is and saying you know hey you're coming from a different point of view but you're right what if we all thought the same thing first of all the meetings would last five minutes but what would we possibly accomplish right I think that there are there are some folks who they like to structure their their departments in the region title different perspective than anyone else solving a problem once you start thinking about it you get your nose is against the right your noses against the screen the page very talented creatives who I like personally respected professionally but we had a problem they would always agree and and in is to push back into say one if and to bring that new perspective and you know I've had in my career I've had folks who reported to me that things were going very very well she progressive your career I really think that you get to the point where you're you're to senior you're paying too much money to say okay to everything right your job really well I know that you know I feel I may deal with it a little bit more as a as a lead creative director of that some other folks have in in my past I've had some wonderful had some pretty vehement disagreement still having flashback moments and throwback year but no but I think you're saying the right thing is that you know kind of a cantankerous bonchamps sometimes but how how do you balance that wild creative stuff with sometimes the personalities and the people that I'd say hey man this is working he said he didn't understand why you're just agreeing with me all the time in this this is not how it ever worked with us in this wide it just seemed as though all of a sudden now he's agreeing with everything I say so I I had actually had to schedule a meeting in column into my office and asking to close the door and be very very very to the point and and bring my point of views of things but also saying okay that's great but here's what we're GonNa do with that point of view we're going to carve off these edges and we're gonNA use this right but never when I'm working with a creative team and we're solving creative problem you know one metric indifference yeah yeah you know you want them to be free but you know understand that we are solving a problem yes I'm open to your ideas and here's what I'm open to right lifeblood of the cream department and so often particularly when we get into these larger global communications concerns we like to sankarist bunch if you will I feel like that's that is the lifeblood of a creative department and I really believe that that cantankerous much the I want in particular a very close friend of mine actually who we worked on projects outside of the agency world together and there was a point in time when when he was reported to me spirits that I have you know I didn't I didn't have good experiences when when I wasn't given that freedom to think and freedom to push back and freedom to say one and in five o'clock but what what creative person Clark exactly what jared how how do you assess that people part who are talented has strong points of view and aren't afraid to say yeah but how about how about we think about it this way yeah that's very good thinking about wearing those red converse high tops with a business suit is their way of remembering the heart of everything they are a creative in there and because certainly creative people and look it goes back to the painters of history and the writers of history you know I it's you're too close to it so it's no matter where you are where you're coming from if you're down in the works trying to solve something you need someone to keep you in check and so I like surrounded myself with creative understand how to operate in a meeting however there sometimes I feel like in some agencies in some spaces that starts to get you know they like to round the we'd like to strip a lot of way right we wanna make sure that when we put these these creative in a room with a client they're not gonna say or do anything crazy right but yet when thought was cited to work with them and once we got that out and understood that no I'm expecting you to push back you know when I'm solving problems I'm no different just because I've hired Z's they wanna they wanNA structure them with sycophantic head bobbers and those those aren't the type of agencies that I WANNA be a part of ah you're dealing with how how do you find that balance I think that's a that's a great question and I really think that those those personalities the key becomes a problem and quite frankly you know the dressing differently I've never been one of those creatives who actually like looks much like the creative as far as address skill sets than I appreciate it night encourage it and many of my best creatives in my career have been those who some may have you know done the people side of things you know it is too cliche maybe to say you know it's a people business and all our assets of the people that leave it you know at the elevator I was gonNA say Lee living isn't my mood of expression but it's many craters mode of expression and it's important to let them express themselves and feel comfortable in understand that they because it may be dubbed quote a problem right they were maybe a little bit more challenging they were maybe a quote management issue I had a lot of those look at things a little differently and you know the moment they lose that or the moment they feel like they don't have permission to challenge something and look at things differently their value there's a creative is suck so however that expression finds itself again as long as it's rooted in respect mutual respect for different departments different the the amazing creative genius right now and I think that's what you're describing Kevin Yeah certainly certainly you know it's interesting oftentimes at the shop You know and I I remember watching this national geographic series on the creative genius was on Einstein and one was on Picasso in my were on a performance plan yes exactly and you're you're describing these two business settings in the and I was reflecting on those settings I'm like I'd never bring either one of those guys who were client me and you're not take them back to the floor and the clients aren't around we want him to be thinking crazy and providing a music solutions and and and I think that there's a there's a ballots right we all have to understand that separate way you know one is a client meeting you know you're in the conference you're at the you know Rosewood Table and the other is quote back you know in my in my own way I felt like well that's my repeal right I've got you know I went to art school and surrounded by all these people with facial piercings and creatives long term career aspirations will hinge on their ability to get in front of clients you know to rent a business right we're in a service industry and we we have clients that we are serving problems we're solving and yes you have to be professional and respectful. There was an innate desire need to be curious in a quick learner and a quick study and now translate into that to a business solution through creativity and whoa that skill but many times especially a lot of really talented creatives who are maybe a little more introverted or a little bit see the world differently they feel intimidated by that moment I understand there's a lot of background speed on very quickly and you're jumping from project to project having against speed on different things so I think there is a I best get along is one thing or I'll tell you what you're GonNa think in U. District reflect it back to me right and I think Kevin is believed that the creatives in the crowd apartment you know and of course I'm biased random crib director but I believe the smartest people in an agency reside in the credit department I think that they one thing that I I've shared a lot with many creatives very very talented creatives you can be a fantastic craven stay back into the shop and do great work and trust me there were plenty of p drones you know all manner of consumer products food products and so forth what what's been your experiences to the threat or the essence it's the learn the language of the client meeting and how you read the room and feel the energy and that that is it's something it's learned no one's but by comparison but in a way that was my way of rebelling 'cause I looked at that and I said well you're kind of starting to look alike right so important when you look into that because so who will gladly go take credit for the work you're doing that there's no which is not the truth there is no shortage of people who will go take credit for your great accounts and business problems whether it's you know in medical like medical devices or Pharma brands but but you go on into banking quick service rest and finding them getting them to get past that and and just kind of jump in and feel the way through it's another skill for them to learn is incredibly important that's a skill set and so now when you can go in and now present your work that's incredibly beneficial not only to the agency but long term career health and tattoos on their necks and you know wherein whatever you know crazy outfits and I you know I was pretty you know mainstream I would say people with experience in that vertical in that space so the first thing oftentimes clients will do they see now north p. and they're looking for agencies experience in a particular vertical experiencing a particular his off those creatives a little bit more than probably is beneficial to the end product you know they they may be one of them to kind of look and sound and dress a lot of like and and I think that's the creative thinking that goes through all of those kinds of of business situations that's a great question and it gets worn that a lot of people yeah that's really good so as we think about the world of creativity you know we think about the Brat of the applications of creativity and you know the kind of the reason they're in their in their vertical in their category and oftentimes when agencies are looking to hire creatives or account folks or other folks to servicemen in this client they're looking for on your lap you say this is the first thing I'm GonNa do and then this is the second how do you how do you approach it let's question I think I probably do have value of that there's a lot of value in that but the you know to get your question you know creatives in particular known I certainly have processes that I have generated you know one for for agency for the agency itself right we have a creative process we undergo no matter category and then when those agencies to hire folks to service that business they're looking for creative with experience in that space and the CAL folks with experience in that space and it's not a discount the likes solving problems and as long as you again are approaching each of these projects with that in mind then then you're gonna find success because all that knowing about a category or vertical this is a learning thing right and then you apply your natural innate it's really interesting and for you Kevin in getting down to that like what's that first thing that goes through your mind is a creative that's a really interesting thought and I think you know I that's where I really think you start to see that the you could start to if I don't have a creative brief in front of me initially that is giving me a problem this all I I create one and they are extremely smart especially with remark new look at a lot of the work that that we had done in the past and these highly regulated industries you know there's a lot of category it sounds like what you're saying is that if if the person has the the I guess like I said the curiosity in the skill set they can adapt and they can learn it but if you you know oftentimes the best way to proceed in progress in your career is to be a fantastic presenter is to learn the language of presentation aspirants for that person because now they're the ones getting credit for that work and ending is really important for people not to overestimate the importance of learning to presents and be comfortable on the client is it does that mean there's you know there's going to be learnings in every new space every new vertical you enter into but again be being curious by nature helps a lot the the the common thread is you're solving business problems through creativity and the people who are drawn to this industry through the leadership of the agency little on the client to where they had to make changes and add their mandatory and by the time oftentimes that career brief gets to a point clear problem to solve that's when you start to get the quote cantankerous creatives because they're gonNA start poking holes in it they're going to start saying what if they're gonNA start saying yet but it actually now that talking us through you know I think that this is a lot of times where you start to run into the quote cantankerous creatives right let me let me Wendy do you feel like you have a go to tool or method or process you know in in your quiver it somebody throws a business problem for them to warrant it to be able to be in for those clients and now you're a dual threat right you can come up with great work but also we can go in the client meeting you can sell it and you know when I folks who WanNa jump to a solution and go very tactical I think I you know in my career I've been both an art director and copywriter and and I think that's a lot more interesting 'cause you know every agency has across right or at least they'll try one out on powerpoint slides in a pitch but all services when you're consumer packaged goods selling fizzy drinks cruise ships you know it doesn't you know I I think about the all of the different spaces I'm Morton well you know they struggle with because think about it when when clients are out there looking for agencies the first thing they do is they sit down our of P and they're looking for an agency that has and white quite frankly the solve the problem in the brief and when there's a brief unveiled in a in a in a in a in a creative kickoff and there's Oh the fastest growing city in the US and recognized as one of the most creative and cities to live in this is a special edition of in you know they're in this industry and they're in this business because they're here they want to solve problems and I think really that thread Noah whether you're working in Pharma biotech financial serve has survey very very well But I think the first thing the first workplace I go as I go very logical I go very strategic you know and differences in different creatives and you know when you have a creative who may come from more of a copywriting backgrounds there might be going to words and pros and they might run a write out a store whereas kicked off with a group of creatives you know there's not much edge on it anymore a lot of times that's unfortunately what happens they tried to cram too much there's not a singular point of view it's kind of Shera Shera scenario with you right we have a creative kickoff there's a creative brief shared in this crater brief probably went through multiple rounds revisions had to get approved what on that business and so I think that that's probably the first thing I do is make sure that there is a clear problem solve and if there isn't a I'm going to create one and I'm GonNA create a problem that's so you have an art director designer background creative and they might want to go to telling this story visually and seeing the graphics and you know you have some they're trying to find a problem this off and if there's not one that's clearly outlined on the brief you can damn well be sure they'll create one and again that's those creatives what the what the client is But I think your your beer question probably is what's my personal process right with China they're gonNa say whoever this brief doesn't know what they're doing and you know what those are oftentimes the creatives I want on the business because what they're doing they're not trying to be jerks for creatives to get up to speed on these sex at the root of things they need their standard job as a solve business problems for creativity and if they can do that they can succeed in any any in line with strategy but I really think that's the first thing I do before I start thinking about solutions or tactics or anything else is just again really defining what is the problem we're solving and resolving at four and you can spend a lotta time thinking that through and cut slicing and dicing that in many different ways and I think once you have a very clearly defined problem the solutions they come a lot easier because if you you can blue sky it all day long but without without some guardrails went out a clear problems solve your you spending a lotta time possibly great ideas they're not gonna go anywhere so why why spend that energy there let's let's be a little bit more Rambus oftentimes and maybe underserved neighborhoods There's a lot of great activities and great initiatives that we've been fortunate enough to be a part of to to be able to do that you know because without tension there's no momentum and what we're really trying to do is create momentum right we're trying to create business change we're trying to create behavior change and Korea or you know your various travels But where do you go for your your own inspiration to keep things fresh well you just rebounds line you know for watching Wimbledon and we're watching the super slow mo of that ball hitting on the outside of that line is or is it out right we would not have that dramatic moment that great source mixed museums my wife and I both we are just museum junkies got married at the museum here in Columbus attention and put it in there that's very go so if I could turn the page now a little bit to the personal side how you keep your own creative fires burning you just nailed a lot of them right I get what I said exactly but you know I think you know music live music in particular you know learn to create change you need to do that and oftentimes many briefs Strip belt tension upfront so it's very very important the first thing to do is is is rediscovered the arts brings into the economy of the United States and fantastic article but just really refrains how you look at that when you look at you know Botox and computers have a difficult time being messy so I I really believe in the future for you know working class in our eight is creativity and it's because it's really messy it's a really messy proposition My goal you know Mike Creative teams and when I work as tried recently and I can't remember where it was I wish I could for your podcast but in talk about the economic impact of the arts and how many billions of dollars being into the fold in robotics and the jobs that are going to be at risk the thing that's toughest for ai to duplicate head in the game in nats again that's what it comes down to that tension we're kind of tension in our strategy we're trying to create tension and our creative execution greeny said free verse is like playing tennis without a net right like okay I can knock that ball back and forth all day at Laurel but yeah exactly your brain synapses firing I gotta say one reasons I love following your instagram is at one moment you can be a concert or kids museum or at a lie harness that messy mess and that creativity in in streamline it and put it on the right path so you can harness that creative chaotic energy toward an end goal but you know what hey I energy and and then our time there and understand the benefit both in the long term for the health of our people in our our young people but also economically I I read a study are problem solvers in the future and our creatives of future I think is very bright and as long as we can achieve you know solve problems through through through creativity Etem user cities you think about about history and art and so forth but then also Austin you know obviously has a a amazing music scene increasingly is GonNa rely on creativity you know if you look again at getting a little sidetracked here but if you look again at the you know the future of the work landscape with Ai lumbersome what you're saying what what role does that community creativity play in you know raising up the whole creative roll and I think that in Columbus in particular we are really fortunate to have a Ferrari having seen and music scene and a lot of it's really because we do believe that at Arc's portion is so critical to to forming young minds in in in solving problems in this world that you know I an centering point on on our agency as well you know community progress in in in in advancing the art scene And and live in Boise Idaho for for goodness sake not a arts Mecca but you know the outdoors and the mountains are kind of our inspiration but but I think about it Delhi in India you know the colors in this spices in the flavors in that you know you can just hear it feel it but I think about well we buying original art and and we're fortunate that we have that happening here we have a lot you know just the energy alot of the city is fantastic there's very young entre yeah that's true to the to the extent that our love of Arts and Culture you know really permeate our relationship and you know as one thing that is unreal spirit permeates Columbus you know a lot of people know Columbus Test Market USA right for many many years products would come here to be from even an urban development perspective you know when there's there's you know moments where there may be some some sketchy areas where retail doesn't WanNa go you are where The you know in Columbus you know we've been fortunate in this podcast series to talk to well a couple of people for example in Paris and Madrid you know these great masters to create the music now that we just say well that's what you hear on the classical music station rock wool similar commission that work and and so for for so long we've been hearing the same classical music while the Johnstone funds for singular purpose is to create new classical music in his new music it's a new style actually the Johnstone The Johnston Fund for New Music is a client of ours who they actually fund the creation of brand new classics the educational institutions here of you can't forget about Ohio state you know being a big anchor here a lot of young folks coming in you know in the win the largest university isn't a world have creative studios design studios we have welding studios we have you imagine every every creative outlet has happened down right and and people coming in from all around the world to attend that school and they get unleashed into the workplace here you know they stay they create businesses and they in they inject their culture so I think the arts programs are really important to do unfortunate that oftentimes arts and music would many of the first things that get cut when there's budget issues and you know I think that it's important to spend energy of the city whether you're in the creative field or you know manufacturing or business or anything else when I rap place why didn't I think it plays a huge come in and artists get pushed out and have to go somewhere else call but now they've they've been a spark to that growth and that's just a small example of was the challenge in it you know and guess what it's not just the net there's also out about right so a box that as the excitement of the game right without that moment of that a lot of folks who are helping to support that you know like you you're not going to have a thriving music scene people are going to see shops right and you're going to have a thriving arts scene of people are seeing they hidden value of creativity and the hidden value of creative now I heard a developer talking about following the hipsters blurt traveling anymore who goes near the artists go there anyway what do they do they make it cool and what's the artists make it cool and then then the capitalist food wherever they came from and so there's a really fantastic energy that comes with that and then we again we have the arts we have folks who are patrons of the arts we have a client S. market because it was something normal right exactly right and I think average in many ways I'm Fr- I'm proud to say that we're losing our grip on Garre wherever they are that's what it's gory I I wanted to drill down on and what you were talking about you know the the arts but the culture do they bring in composers musicians from all around the world many from many of them have NECA for Brooklyn but they have Columbus ties when they come back and they they create this amazing doc because I think we're become recruit becoming less average and I think that a big a big spark of that really comes from the creative when you look at space and it's amazing the energy is providing in in the revenue is bringing in the the the opportunities for the creative class the performances you get inspired because you hearing something you've never heard before and again that comes from patrons right that doesn't happen just getting in so what ending you know my wife Alex who is also a partner in our our agency she she's always been very very involved in community she's always given back all music pizzas now when you think back to you know to to Mozart you know to the the salary days of where people are commissioning always been involved and when we lived in Toronto it was no different she jumped in she wanted to be a part of the theater arts and music scene and jump in and help out with with methinks and she did she did the huge music lover and community advocates said well we can't let them use stop and so she created the Goodale Park Music series and she did that on her own without any spots ships foundations but she pulled together business resources and networking that she had done to make this happen and still going strong it's been it's been going on for over ten years now in that downtown area and when again look at all these moments where you can do it one thing that's great about Columbus this is eighty that that the arts can create in the sense of community that the arts can create the sense of belonging or task oh so those no longer jazz in the park on Sundays and it was such a magical thing to see every Sunday just people out on blankets listening to live jazz and Allen but she she also found it's a lot harder you know that's a gigantic city with an established you know kind of hierarchy if you will you know when you when you're in it's a new approach and some of them it's actually very challenging to hear and understand and there's some of it is is a little bit more in the basic classical genre but what you what you get and present the idea to sell the idea you think about you know Mozart you think about Monet Michelangelo had to sell the idea to get the money right that's happening downtown in our Franklin Franklin area which was an area used to be called the bottom screen it was an area that no one would go to but now there's this creative resurgence happening there idea that you know you you do have to appreciate the word you use patron you know it's not just the funder it's not just a client you know who paid for something you know the source of this creative thinking and how you see things changing going forward but a patron sound so much more like a creative supporter and a you know that it's it's they're infusing some of their energy they not they met a space like Columbus as much as it's a thriving arts community if you want to get in and be involved you can't and you can jump in and make a difference with great example of that is we had support behind it what a terrific conversation really appreciate your time cabinet as we close I guess if you could summarize eight years there was a jazz in the park on Sundays and this is another moment where you know what budgets weren't looking good the sponsorships didn't happen any long so it's interesting to connect the dots to what you were saying before about you know a creative person's ability to both you know come up with ideas and be inspired but also that need to read write read novels read graphic novels comic books I don't care what you know what is your thing but gets gives the are you not be able to write the music or compose the music or perform the music but they love it and they're inspired by it so therefore they'll you know put their energy and so again that brings people together and you know not just music but now there's food trucks that come involved in people with crafts it's just it's a again that creative you know how can we all be more creative how can we support each other across borders you know this world of creativity idea how do we see the and it's part of the fabric of the community and it's something that people look to for every son in in the summer on Sundays and it's exciting to see how rural be more open to creative ideas what what's your vision going forward I think you know first and foremost in order to create it's hard time sheet you know how long did it take my good yes there mark but the whether they be writers they were inspired by those who came before though you know they did not just come drop out of the womb into the world and they were you know instant mass can I think Luke Sullivan I really love to follow him his exploits as we all know Luke Sullivan from the the Great Book whipple squeezed this you have a favorite book you've read that's you

Kevin Fox mark Johnson Mark Phillips Toronto Boise Idaho Canada mark Montreal Columbus director U. District five minutes eight years ten years
Look And Feel Your Best: Developing Your Personal Style With Ruth Romero | ETHX 115

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Look And Feel Your Best: Developing Your Personal Style With Ruth Romero | ETHX 115

"Hi how's it going. Welcome to enhancing in human experience. I'm mark phillips and this episode one hundred fifteen. Let me ask you a question. Do you ever wonder about your image. The way you dress the way you adorn yourself and how that translates into more success in your business and your life will do all the time and that's why i invited my guest this week to join me on the podcast and share her knowledge and wisdom about exactly that my guest is ruth romero ruth who is a professional image coach and she specializes in helping us dress ourselves in a way that makes us feel better presents presents a more positive professional image in the world and ultimately translates to more success and really more success in business or in life super excited dive into this episode before we do that. Let me take care of a few housekeeping type items and then we'll get into the interview and hear what ruth has to say about this so really the only thing on my list here this week is i want to announce that. Finally i am finished with the newest addition into the free downloads at just be book dot com. This is a project that i've been working on for a long time and finally wrapped it up and that what is being is your superpower. I'm really really excited to share this with you. You may have heard me talk about this in episodes of the podcast or and social media <hes> but what this is being as your superpower it is a collection of real life examples from real life people who have have discovered the power of being true transform their business and their life and attract more of the things they want in business on life really really excited to share this with you. Slummy break it down and tell you a little bit about what this is. This is a p._d._f. You can download. It's totally free at just be at book dot com and inside side that p._d._f. Are links to videos or podcasts or in some cases. You know quotes or references says that i put right into the p._d._f. And all of those links are live links you can click on them and jump to the place on youtube or a podcast or wherever i've discovered someone who has found the power of being in use the power of being to attract more business more prosperity the lovers friendships opportunities because we can attract whatever we want once we tune into that and once we become that an embody those those qualities so you jump to the link and i've also given you the time stamp so you can go right to the exact point when this person person is talking about how they discovered the power of being to get something they want. Let's face it. We all want something and the way we get that is by becoming the person that can attract those things really really excited to share this with you as you know i geek out about this kind of stuff and as i'm on my own journey as i'm listening listening to different podcasts or videos or wherever it may be i find some of them on the cover of a book garry keller's book the million dollar real estate agent ride on the cover he he says it plain and clear. It's not about the money it's about being the best you can be that is one of the quotes inside that little downloadable ebook being is your superpower and so you jump to the part of the interview or the podcast or the video and listen to real life people who have used is this to create a or attract more of the experiences they want in life right they they tune into who they need to be in order to attract. You know opportunities money a mate friendships. Whatever you want it will help. You realize that this really does work so i've gathered these over the years and i keep this collection and i'm putting this into a former you know this. This is your superpower now a couple things to remember this will will always evolve on the front of the cover. There's a version this version. That's currently up. There is version one point. Oh as i add more people and more you you know content to this book. I'll change that version number so you can always go back and see if you have the correct or the most updated version. Let's put it that way so being is your superpower superpower available now at just book dot com while you're there also download the human beings manifesto which is also a free p._d._f. I just be book dot com but really excited to share that with you and that is now currently available so i'll be talking more about that on my social media at g phillips or at g. Mark phillips fan if you're on facebook facebook and look for more good stuff to come down the line some thrilled to share this with you. Okay let me give you some background on my guest today so i met ruth at the harmfulness meditation group that i attend somewhat frequently sometimes and she's amazing so full of energy so full of life and you can tell she you know. She puts herself together well right. She presents an image that it is just really congruent with who she is and it is magnetic you wanna know more about what she's figured out in life and what she knows about style and life and the whole ball of wax so i really was you know <hes> excited to invite her to share her knowledge and wisdom on the podcast and and that's what we talk about in this episode now ruth is a multifaceted dynamic being there's a lot to cover and in this episode he focused on style and image wjr and you'll discover very quickly that she it's not just surface level. She's talking about. There's there's depth and breadth to what she's talking about. Some really really excited. Share this episode with you for complete show notes including bio's of ruth and some of the things she's accomplished in her life. Please check out the show notes for this episode episode one hundred and fifteen on my website g mark phillips dot com but just to give you an overview ruth is very involved in in volunteer work in the boise area. She's won numerous awards for you know helping people and volunteering and business this. She is a postmaster. She's <hes> professional coaching association of idaho member and really excited to share this interview with you so oh goodness in this alleged up into the interview and see what ruth has to say about professional image and style ruth. Thank you for joining me today. I really am excited to talk more about what what you do in the world. I think it's super awesome so thanks for being here. You're welcome and thank you for having me here. You're welcome. This is truly an honor. Thank you i. I really do appreciate that. We we've been chatting about kennedy other and having a conversation for a while and we have we kind of mixed are singles to you said that we did. That's okay. It's happening on it's supposed to it really is yes yes so you are a personal stylist image consultant tint <hes> i guess one thing i would like to start with what is personal style in in your terms. It's it's a personal style. We all have it. You have it. I haven't and every human being walking. The earth hasn't whether we are aware of it or not. That's something else but i enjoy. I have enjoyed studying my own personal cell long ago from long ago as a young child because i never felt that i was built right okay. I had a sister mr that had long legs. I always wanted long legs. So then i began reading publications about creating illusions for these things to look like i had long legs and that's how it began. It was with me. <hes> were you a stylish so you started in childhood. It sounds like i mean we're going to look back at pictures that as a little girl and i think i was always very conscious. I didn't stand the way everybody else was standing standing but i always had a little. I've heard the comments from others. Okay i had <hes> shirley. Temple was a big thing at the time so i had the typical baloney curls but sometimes when i'd had enough i would wake up in the middle of the night. The rags were hurting me and i would just take them off the next ex morning. My mother would have a fit because my was not going to have my curls first sunday school so you can have a little bit of rebellious because you wanted what little more comfort over looking good is up a little better. Rebelliousness is the understatement really even as young child so that's always been in hans. Yes yes so you you started this personal style endeavor as a child and and did it carry on unamuno more conscious of these things but as i look back yes i think the minute were we come here to this birth. We are on a journey and everything that happens to us is the development of that journey and showing us the way with don't get it. We have hissy fits. We're frustrated. We get angry. We heard we become victims and <hes> sometimes of course heroines this world but <hes> yeah but i think i think i was always very rebellious. If someone told me it was this way i if i could see a different possibility i would set my debate argument in many ways <hes>. Do you think you were guided by an internal guidance much more solicitor world of course do you think do you think we all are n._s. N._s. children. Oh my gosh i raised. I raised two children. I guided four granddaughters and i got to see my granddaughter's kind of spell this particular behavior speaking from within and they're all different but but they all see the world within their own being who it seems like some children lose that inner guidance some at some point point along the way why do you. How do you think you held onto it to say i was holding onto it. It was always there might have been dormant for a while because their goal awesome there comes a point when we as children want to be like everybody else in that becomes the most important thing did you and you went through sure and then rebelliousness was really big time. Absolutely it was so. I don't think it's never gone. It's never lost. We are the the ones that lose touch of it. Yeah we'll see that's what i think is because you seem to have a very strong sense of self and a very you know expressive personality. This analogy and i think that benefits you in the world differentiates you from other people and obviously ties into your business. <hes> and that's what fascinates need to me. Is you know how why some people lose that sense of self or don't have the ability to express themselves. You know in the way that you do. What why do you think you have that. What makes what makes that. Your belly is a big part. I it wasn't that i wanted to. I didn't send out an intention attention to be different but <hes> when it became uncomfortable and as i've gotten older i realized we belong to two different world. We're we're in two different worlds. The inner world and the outside world and the outside world does big time influences influential to us and everything that we we do whether it's the way we dress the way. We act yeah very much so that does what's <hes>. That's another thing i want to touch on is. How do you reconcile you knowing yourself and getting a sense of who you are with what the outer world tells you tells us we should be or the latest trends. I mean we're how do you how do you stay in that zone in style fashion. Whatever you wanna call it. I stick stick to style because that is never taken from you. That is you the person whether we tried to forget it. Whether we try to cover up with fashionable national trends trance come and go and you focus on those things you will become enslaved to them. It's one thing after another and and i i see i see women. I see men oftentimes in clothing that does not suit them but because it's in we feel oh comfortable to appoint but always that little shadow of uncertainty <hes> when we follow trends is is that what you're yes classes which is you haven't asked me yet but they tell you so much about yourself off. They tell you so much. They tell me a lot about my clients. Call on me. We're is like we're searching for that particular garment that is really going to spell us. That is really going to make us distinct but we only we'll put it on. We we make it. We we do get a home run from time to time. Don't misunderstand me but clauses. I have witnessed them oftentimes they they even have labels on them from the store that the <hes> labels from the sale because you get excited you may be with a friend who talks you into buying it and you look at yourself in the mirror and you say okay. I'll take it but then you never put it on again. <hes> almost sounds like you're referring to almost like an unconscious or untapped in purchase. Yes it is because because again that outer world commands our attention see and that's why i think is so fascinating because you do you do seem very congruent of inner and outer ended very present and i've certainly fallen into the trap of okay. This is this type of clothing is in this is out but it is like you said it's an insanity sanity. You will chase it forever. You <hes> so it's very true and <hes> we can do it. We can we can get little trends and i recommend commend them because i do believe in a basic outfit once you you know who you are a new dorner self but then styles other other <hes> fashion trends come into play and you want to. Maybe update yourself herself. You can do it with a blouse. You can do it with jewelry but it doesn't have to be a whole outfit. A scarf will bring bring you up to date a blouse shoes that fit of course and that you can walk right functionable too. Do well and you mentioned no yourself and adorn yourself and you have the quote from epic pettus on your website. Yes i love that so so knowing yourself. Is that where you start with clients and he even before you go into their closets or where do you start with a client that comes to you as we meet for coffee. Sometimes you're bold and they say no. I don't want i don't want to meet for coffee. I just want you to come right on over okay so i do and i and i don't i don't utter those words to them because i think that would frighten them or we would get stuck trying to figure it out but as i see and as we opened with closet with closets and we go through the clothing this is what i explained blaine to them in layman's language and i say you know i well why. Why are you going to look at my closet. I says because this will tell me a lot about you. I usually hear from them to tell me whether they're classic style sports person informal whatever it is yes but that's a lifestyle <hes> okay. That's not a personal style. Oh really what's the the different. What's the difference because when if you're a sports person then you have a tendency or tragic to sport clothing. I think i would feel uncomfortable in sport clothing <hes> because it's not my style i'm not i'm not an outdoors person. I think i mentioned that to you. I have more of a classic formal but i always have i always like to have shiny fabrics and that was a little girl yes and it went along with baloney curls and patent leather shoes we wear tennis shoes and those days really say they seem seemed like it was a little more like you said more more formal type dress. That'd be accurate yes but it attract see. There's no accidents in life. I was born into the right family. Yes there was times that i didn't like it and i had to go through a lot of changes and adjustments but it doesn't matter that's part of your growth. I think you're sent to the situation that is going to affect your growth and become richer going but when i see women the first thing i after we sell in and after we get comfortable i say okay. Let's get to work. I like to work with a big mirror lots of light and they usually accommodate me quite well and then we go to the closets and then the first thing that i ask what are your favorite clothes because i know of fat and this is between you and me right now. Okay women only were twenty percent of what they own. Mhm eighty percent is usually in the back of the closet whether we like it or not and i would have a tendency. No i think men are more practical about it. They're not yeah you you just knocked your plane but don't get carried away with some of that jar frivolity so to speak but usually when in the few minutes said i'm with a client and she points out to the close at she loves and i asked her why and she starts to tell me and i said well. Let's put it on. Let's put one of the pieces on the start off with some pants skirt shoes whatever never and then we'll start and you are going to look at yourself in the mirror. You're gonna look at that image see. I don't teach teach them. I don't tell them what looks good when a woman or a man stands in front of a mirror with something that makes them feel good. Did they learn well and then i point out the different styles. If you're short waisted you wanna wear something the thing that gives you that lengthy look on for your torso short-legged as i am. I told you that then we one on have something that will give us that long. Look the big boxy pants trousers. I don't care if they're in style dial. They do not look good on me and i do not wear them well. I just become a box <hes> with a thick waist and stubby legs and that's that's the description. I would say about myself but give me a trim pant. That fits me well alterations. It's very serious for women. We don't think so we leave that up for men but no women and we looked trimmer when we're wearing the correct size is one of the big realizations in my own journey with fashion is finally wearing the size that fits me as opposed to you know yes so usually when i started pointing these things done and at that point too i started pointing out the different parts of their body structure in then inevitably. I will have a variety of skirts pants this because they have they have them in the closet. They don't wear them because they don't feel comfortable but that's why because they don't really look well in them or they don't feel good so we'll put them on a said. You see the difference. Oh wow yes you show the contrast yes yes so it's a lesson that you learned. It's true coaching because i'm not telling them. This is what you must do. As a person we realize was that and then we begin to embrace we begin to accept our bodies. Women are very very hard hard on their bodies. Snap heard that yeah it's always this is why a plastic structuring is very popular. <hes> uh in we just you know were to this were to that and we just don't we aren't happy and this is where i like to put in the the spiritual end of it because i think that addressing your body is a spiritual activity because we are extremely beautifully made and we don't see we don't admire this beauty this natural beauty that we have because we're so caught up trying to put the right garmin and i've had clients burst into tears when they start pointing out the different and things that are wrong with their body but when i stopped them and i say okay think think of what your body does for you on a daily basis day night. You don't have to give it a second thought. I said we're miracle. Were magical. We really are we start at that way. From the minute we were in the womb yeah and i remember this gorgeous woman and i called her. She was petite a beautiful artist. She found me online. She lived in new mexico but she was coming to boise so she packed the ball her things that she own. You're kidding vitamin big big plastic. <hes> boxes 'cause she. First asked me if i would work with her. She says i only have a couple of days. I suppose it's not going to be regular re redo but i said yes as i said you bring me. The things that are most important she had some she had accomplished notoriety with her works and she was starting ready to have large exhibits and she wanted to look more refine. She didn't think that she was but she already headed a lovely look about her uh-huh but she didn't think so so it sounds like so so how did you how did she came in and she i have a big mirror in my in the broom where we we i teach them and <hes> she says why like this dress is but my butts too big and i said excuse me she wasn't mark. She was a small petite woman but she had heard from the time that she was a little girl that she had a big but isn't that interesting how things impressed in and they stay and it was her mother who was not slender when she uttered those words and i was she must have seen my face. That was kind of shocked and i said but you beautiful. She broke down uncrowded. She's i did know that and seriously she was a lovely beautiful woman. She just had no clue while she had she brought out to dresses that she had bought but she didn't have the courage to put him on because she didn't think she was her body was worthy of that particular style she also and it was interesting because <music>. I hadn't even met her at that point. She sent me a couple of pictures. She was travelling to me and she was going for a class reunion. I believe it was twenty on your thirty year class reunion and she needed a particular dress. I saw her picture. She described herself a little bit and i went shopping so when she she came to me that day i had i think it was two or three dresses for her but that came later as we went through the other the other clothes that she had brought because we took care of the matter at hand first things and then we talked about the the dressy dress that she needed for this particular <hes> that was that was quite thrilling to me. She says well. How did you know what my what my style was. I a picture told me everything i can tell mylan. I can tell when yes so. Are you saying that if someone send send you a picture you you can tell how they could address that would suit them as as their hairstyle their the way they carry themselves usually their post pictures so i have to say yes i can. I can tell so in addition to helping people <hes> know no what clothing is feels best to them. You can also make suggestions and help them. That's awesome very broad shoulders. You don't wanna be patting them up. I can imagine when you have large bosoms then you pat up a shoulder. It's interesting. I worked with a woman lovely woman businesswoman fact she was a speaker and she was full busted but very very narrow shoulders she had a lot of closed lovely expensive clothes but they did not suit her because everything emphasized her bosoms so i'm some of the pieces that we saved all we had to do was at a little pad and it wasn't a big bulky. One like the ones we had in the eighties. This was just maybe about a quarter inch a half inch just to give to frame her shoulders and then it minimize her large breasts subtlety change. We created lugers. We create illusions this with a hallway decorate. We work with what we have and then we had adorn it accordingly <hes> yeah so so let me talk because i know you've done a number of interesting things in your career. I one thing that i i want you to tell me about if you could is how you got involved with miss usa miss universe. Everyone wants to know that story. Let's be clear it was just a job <hes> that yes it brought me into a very glamorous world can imagine and i was very proud of myself that i was able to handle it don't when i was interviewed by the president then president of miss universe it was not donald trump by the way this happened in the late seventies early eighties so we had an extraordinary gentleman amended had started this company. We were owned by gulf western. It was a big a big thing and the the <hes> toddlers for international so i got to travel all over. I did not have that kind of experience but you know who at the magic magic of it all. He hired me on that. I interviewed really asked me some pertinent questions. Yes and i can still remember for them. He was kind of a a stuffy gentlemen very tall impressive persona not the warmest. He's a businessmen an attorney and he asked me some rather pertinent questions that told him a lot. He's very bright told him a lot about who what i would bring to the table. It was very interesting. 'cause i never told him that. After i was tired because tooth be told he was never. I was never fond of the personality but he knew i did a good job. But what were what industry i were you. Were you working in at the time where you're in the fashion industry. Yes okay. I was managing a beautiful boutique in new york. I was actually in between lean jobs but a friend of mine had had recommended me to this fashion boutique women women's fashions upscale upscale and i used to plan wardrobes for the ladies came in i just i have just done it yeah so so you you do you remember remember or did you ever find out what it was that you told him or aunts asked answered these questions that made him or did that. Oh yes he asked me economic it questions you know because i was going to take a pay cut go yes. I was making a lot more and i was commissioned in which which i thought was a very good question because this told him a lot about me in one of the questions was will. Are you going to handle this will at that time. I was living in a beautiful apartment in new york very spacious and i had i ever done any of these things that i'm telling you i'm gonna i'm gonna tell tell you know i live in this apartment and i knew that my management company allowed subleasing so i decided to inquire about it. I told you i did got the answers on all of that ad and found out i could make extra money well. I was going to be on an expense account. Yes i was going you have to give up my my living quarters and move in in this beautiful riverview apartment. Mine was lovelier earlier however this was what it was. I had a hard time taking to that because i am a very private person and i didn't really want want to share anything with but i went home and i thought about this through. I had a couple of very dear friends from new york who just listen to me and we decided what was best or considering what i wanted and i thought it would be the adventurous to do this. He then asked me oh. I didn't answer your question did i. I was going to make extra the money so i told him i said i already have a plan sir. I said this this and this is going to happen. Plus the fact that my rip everything was going to be paid for all my expenses even dining out every single day. Wow fringe benefits so yes. The fringe benefits were extraordinary so i didn't quite say well. All of this is going to outweigh you know but i said my cleaning all of that. It was a marvelous package and of course this was when you did not have to account for those fringe benefits as part of your seller <hes> so it worked then he also ask me how i would handle the the press and being out of there ear because it was not going to be about me but about my two subjects or one who whoever was traveling with and then writing and limos all around down sounds rough. I always used to say boy. I could continue living in new york. City and the first luxury sure that i would give myself would be a chauffeur sure and here i did it while did it so that that was one of the things then want once martin. I remark that i made to him because he was also telling me me about who he what is that expectations were and he said to him well. Mr glasser s it. It sounds like you are a very demanding man. I looked at him in the eye and i said but i know i can deliver. Its power that. I don't know where it came from but i did it so so up until that time you hadn't really i'm five four. He's six four while he was sitting down sure that's good enough for people so it wasn't that something that's great so how many years how did it for four years until i was diagnosed with cancer okay four four years and i got that as a signal okay turns mile. My own doctor told me i think it's time you focus us on your own particular life <hes> i it's interesting because i look back. I was running. It was an escape for me that that working with them but at the same time you know nothing happens to you. That doesn't affect you in one way or another. You buy all kinds of experiences it all in the bag. Doesn't it does in. I got to travel all over the world. What a great opportunity. I got to see the people of these various countries. In it was an experience i will never ever forget working with the girls was another thing <hes>. They're glamorous beautiful but they don't. I don't know who they are other than a pretty face with a sash. <hes> and i could see i could see this. Some were are open to being a close friend. We always had to keep in mind that i worked for the company and they had to you know we had sponsors very expensive. Sponsors high price sponsors said there was a program. We had to follow so it was a busy. There was a business in the marketing business and they were the vehicles. <hes> in silk is apparently it was some of them fought. They didn't like wearing their crown. They didn't like wearing their sash. In when i would turn my back during an appearance these things would be off and yes and some of the girls just really really took offense to that and i was not like but it was very firm and i was fair to all of them. <hes> wow well. It was difficult difficult i can. I can imagine yeah you you you earned all those fringe benefits didn't but those that were open which out the ford eight those that were we became the closest friends. We're still friends but they were also eager. 'til learn to grow by this experience and it was well worth it. Yeah it's life is interesting that way when we want to learn and grow and better ourselves open to that yeah so they were open. It sounds like one came from new zealand. One came from the south the deep south mindue in new york city wow yeah it's very stasi stood out in i'm sure and and <hes> they were young girls that were really really lonely but they had to either prompted by their parents to do this and i could tell so it it was a rewarding of very rewarding job that i had and it opened my world in many more ways than i i ever ever imagine i can imagine that sounds so so nice you talk a little bit about the process that clients oh you draw clients through and take them on this this journey of personal style and i'm glad you did because i think when someone calls you initially with no they have never had a personal stylist before image consultant <hes> what do you how do you kind of approach it without person similar for similar situation conversation listening to them. You know the art of listening is is something that we we really have to work on as human beings in and at the same time i tune into what they're not telling me. The women that i often hear from are women that are approaching well as they call well. It middle age late thirties forties. What do we do. How do we address us. Are they wanting to reinvent themselves or they wanted to find their style. I mean what what why they're afraid of being old. Is that what it basically. That is the bottom line. <hes> we live in a society that really stresses youth. <hes> and and women are fearful. <hes> i think that the most important thing to be concerned about i think as we get older we mature is our health <hes> but that doesn't seem to come into play kind of backburner to yes is served. We're going to cover this. <hes> what the world sees what will be projector acta <hes> yeah what we kind of ara surface things look good on the surface the shallow surveys but think think of how much more meaningful it is yes it will end up being a surfer's finished product but think of the joy that you will bring into that it with your sparkling demeanor and great confidence about who you are. Wow sounds like there's a lot of depth to what you do. Yes there is do they. Do your clients realize that when they come to you or do they like. You said some break down and cry. I mean it sounds like you're going to the deep core for go there because they take me there. I don't <hes> like this. Young lady says i have a big but i should. I don't see it who told you <hes> and then of course she started to cry. You touched you touched. I hope she does something about going forward because i don't know she. I lost touch with her but i i do a lot of my clients some of them on purpose because because they don't follow learn they don't want if they're local but if they're away yeah it's sometimes hard to change range. Those old behavioral patterns in it is resting patterns isn't it but you know we audit those closets and we create piles of clothing the thing and i beg them not to re. Hang them again in a this is how i presented to them you. We all have have a favorite charity. Someone needs these close so we will part with them. <hes> and it's hard to part art with something that you have had some of these close represent not necessarily address that you adore but it was a memory i worked with a woman wants to she says i can't get rid of this dress was l._s. Beautiful party that i had with my husband my ex husband and it was tiny tiny. She had developed a little bit more fullness. I should you'll never wear this again and she put it away in the back of your closet it so she had sentimental value attached to it can quite let it go but it wasn't a sentiment. It was kind of yeah. Was it a really really sentimental. It was a memory that she had with her her ex husband. I think ties those things you wanna get rid of dose in some cases yeah it keeps us kind of in that space back from moving forward doesn't it yes you have have to get rid of the old to receive the new in every aspect of your living yep do you think do you think you talked about personal style. Do you think it evolves. I mean do you do you find yourself going through your own closet or your client's closet on a yearly or frequently basis and pruning or adding. How does it's personal style evolve or does it it does. It's yours so it changes as we can. I can wear. I don't dress up for the gym okay. I have a pair arab. Jim pants and t shirts that i pick up on sale because it's not my thing but i know i have to work out and i have comments that are made by lot. My style is still there. <hes> it's the way you walk. They'll you carry yourself and your inner being is always out there with a we realize it or not. I have that big smile wild that everybody talks about. I don't see myself now. I was criticized for my big smile at one time because as a young lady you know and especially of mexican i ancestry you don't smile willingly conservative <hes> very much so but you know i happened i inherited inherited beautiful teeth my mother's side or my father too and <hes> falmouth kisla they they come out willingly. If i watch you and you mean something to me. I just give you a big smile. I noticed that yeah so so style evolves in within you. It is a i have. I have friends that sometimes we'll say oh. I saw something they reminded me of you. I wear my clothes. My clothes don't wear that's a big difference. You've chosen them. Is that what you're saying. I have chosen them to enhance point body not hoping that they will enhance my body. It's an they they do and has it but they bring out who what you're really all about. <hes> the sounds like sounds like you've really tailoring starting with the body and with you know the what they want to express and helping your activities or women that live a very simple life. I don't wanna be bothered. I wanna hairdo that that is just simple and i can a handle it myself and be on my way their clothing and usually what we do we start off with a basic wardrobe with the best that that you can afford. I'm talking about a jacket blouses pants or skirts or dresses and then from there we build up and you and you also work with <hes> women that are entering the workforce and i think i saw in your bio that you work with <hes>. What is it the women women that are maybe struggling to get on their feet back dress for success favorite nonprofit. Wow i have been with him for twelve years. I when i came to the area i discovered them. You know it's so interesting i was i was banking with this particular regular bank and they had a women's night and one of the speakers. You never know what the word will will do that you utter the words. Did you utter to others in the messages travel and she was the director at that time. She's now executive director for dress for success and told us all about it. I had no idea of its existence so sh- invite us to the next luncheon which was a fundraiser sir out went. I love the message and the next thing. I knew i would out an application and i was sitting in front of her inter being being interviewed by her and i was hired. Wow so you've done that for twelve years i have i don't do it every day. It's once a month though we do have a big fundraiser. Once a year and then we really work hard <hes> and just lately dress for success has has purchased a van <hes> and our plan is to i won't drive it sure i am going to be show for unreal straight back in the whoever drives it will always have one or two other ladies and and we're going to visit shelters and visit the women who cannot come into the shop so it's a very powerful message passage and we are director now. Rachel flick had this dream and little by little. It's materializing so is this fan filled with clothing and you go. Yes we select the clothing sizes and we <hes> that this is the most really rewarding reward. These women cannot afford to even think of of having an advisor level owned they all they want is something decent put on when what is that in they come in a lot of them are very hard to fit because they're very full figured but we seem to have our inventory is made up of donations from women out there business women feel. They no longer need a suit now. There's a lot of positions is that <hes> require less formality but i always recommend something a little dressier for an interview <hes> what what changes do you see in these women's demeanor after you put these tears for one and a glow and of course we have a very large mirror where they can see themselves dell's they're happy. They've never had anybody fuss over them. They come from really abusive unfortunate situations and in they have an opportunity to find employment some of them already do and they <hes> they need help so once they get employed we give them a second outfit and again. It's the whole out for the body outfit undergarments and if they need them shoes hose jewelry and even makeup while we have a lot of makeup industries that donate makeup for us and so total package yes <hes> just like i do with my with your client with my clients and and i just felt very strongly of course they are people that come for dress for success are delighted. Was i tell them oh. I do this for a living and then i don't make do but miss universe but sometimes whoever i'm working with will say miss universe their eyes light up bureau. There's you know it's it's a tool and if it's going to make them feel good. Oh and you're going to dress me absolutely right in our boutique. Is something else some day. I hope you can come and visit so this is where you have. All of the them demean central yes. It's very large but it's very well l. organiz most of our volunteers. We all have talents and we bring them to the table. We have two three four four decorators and they were in charge of putting the the <hes> the little boutique we call it interior our people yes okay. The husband's help putting up shelves and lighting. It's a little room that we rent from the some search on capitol christian church. I think on fairview okay and they they work on that. Little a little boutique is just every woman that comes in. She is made to feel special while we've had two or three that have made comments in front. May i don't know if the others have have made a comment to or have heard that same common wow this little store it you think was on rodeo drive rodeo drive being beverly hills so it's fancy yes tailored its yeah it's got little chandelier earlier and these are all gifts that are given to us and we know when you get creative people together we create miracles sky's the limit. They can have a few pieces of straw just really do do a number this fear well that sounds like such a great organization it is and from there after their establish on a job or in a job we have professional national women's group and they are invited to come support group director there will invite right speakers in in the neighborhood the community to come and deliver a message for them once a month so professional a woman comes in and gives them gives a talk to to the women yes well. We've had <hes> people talk and men to on personal health financing. I just referred one to them from one of my of my clients and she's been in h._r. So no different fields and they can come and bring some of these their experiences to them. That's probably very enriching for those women as well. It is wow yeah we it. The sky's the limit yeah yeah <hes> talk about what's in the future for you as far as projects ex or your personal style coaching business image business of you got any new things that you're going to be working on in the future and your projects six. You know it's <hes> even even the coaching one on one. It all takes a different road. There's no two people all alike and i just bend with at all. I have i have some workshops or a particular type type of workshop for a local business <hes> that we've been myself and another businesswoman another coach we're going to be putting a workshop show some workshops together okay fighting and yes mainly my focus will be on the value of a personal appearance. Yes <hes> and what we bring to any place of employment. It's very important especially in the sales world. I can imagine yeah what you project out. How <hes> talk about that a moment for people who maybe don't know how valuable it is that are listening. What your professional images images. I mean what what are some of the things you've seen first of all as will rogers wealth said you never get a second chance to make a first impression shen so make sure you get it right the first time that impression tells me as an employer if i happened to to be interviewing you or a prospect may be a client manufacturing business. I don't care if it's dungarees they wear but you're coming in as an outsider because remember this clothing this appears we work on. It isn't just about being fancy. It isn't anything to do with fancy but for an employer it it shows them that you are mindful to detail and that you care and just like you care about your person you will care about my business and going back to miss universe that interview. I see that interview being more relevant as i coached. Some of these people bull really in what way in the fact that whatever i brought to the table he knew that he was able to use that for for the company sake <hes> till sounds like people are always looking to us and adas for clues about how will perform the and i i always tell my prospects might clients always dress for the job. You want not the one you <unk> have well. When you know you look good. You're more confident about yourself and you'll be more confident about the company and the product you are representing. <hes> is interesting how all the clothes we wear affect how we feel and and how they feel entered yes they do powerful it much more so than what what we realized i can imagine and your and your clients probably see that once they start to have you worked with them. They're never for the same they have received promotions. As a result of that i had a client once she'd been in the lab very bright woman. She's a chemist and the company was thinking about a promotion for her but they didn't think you know she was always in jeans under her smock and her hair was just kind of there so she came. She was referred to me. She came came to me and i remember the letter that i received from her at her. I guess it was h._r. Her boss lost told her that that showed them how committed she was to take in on this new position <hes> mhm because they saw the change they saw her evolve into butterfly that was hiding behind the smock while and that's theory that story sounds interesting to me because of the fact that you know sometimes when people know you like you said the first impression imprint s- on our brains address for her to transition transition and reinvent herself to big job a big job and for those people to accept it and open it and let go of that passed in mac. Yes wow oh wow for. Both parties seems like a great but that tells you a lot about the employer doesn't yes yeah i've heard stories of when people want to progress in career or want to move up. They often time have to leave the place there with because they're known a certain way you know and they have to go to a new agency to take that step above well. I think that's why it it behooves us to change from company to another company. Yeah it's hard to grow sometimes when your expectations and die hard yeah and i always felt this way you change you change a career change an industry. You give yourself a promotion shen. You do it with that thought in mind okay and this is what i'm going to get out of it. Yeah use those opportunities to step. Yes <hes> wow well. How life is powerful. It's magical. It is what we make of it. It really is it's so he can be a wonderful journey now to it is to to even knowing more about ourselves and having more fun while we'll ruth. Is there anything else you wanna share with the listeners <hes> that i i didn't ask you about personal style and image that you've picked up on your journey or something that well well. I see a personal style as as i've got myself some notes here. It's a personal brand that you live with. It's great yeah. It's a personal brand and it involves your character integrity. <hes> all of that and branding is so important important. I guess it always has been seem so much more so now because there's so much need for differentiation in the world in business alive life. I think it has always existed but it's been kind of underminded well one time to remember. We were more formal about our existence in in business and the corporate structure. Everyone dressed up <hes> in now. It has become become a guess through since the eighties as technology surfaced talent was most important but but that only lasted a short while <hes> then and you don't have to be in a suit for a man you don't have to be in a suit to look presentable <hes> do being style so to speak <hes> i had <hes> dinner with a gentlemen a businessman local businessmen the other day and i had to i had to compliment him on and he was a young man. <hes> manners refine young gentleman stood up when i approached the table and pull the chair route for me. I complimented him on his dress. He was wearing jeans nice pair of shoes a stripe kind of a mute at stripe shirt and a pink and white and a beautiful light blue new plaid blazer and the buttons match the color of the blazer wow so i compliment compliment him it so happened that he had fi- he had made that choice and was was of course encouraged by the taylor who had <hes> who had created his shirt. It was not off off the rack but he he just took so he wore it well. He took pains to do this. I'm not pushing everybody to go out and find buttons ago on his shirt's shirts. Little match your pants and your place or no but it was refreshing. He wasn't formally dress. It was to me it was a business casual aw but his demeter and his just his courteous character. It made me feel very important as well well. I'm in a young man to the seems very already. Five years old was pretty young. <hes> yeah contrasts with some of the other. They're young people that don't go to those details and take that again. You don't have to buy the matching buttons but right. That's that's that was his own. Yes that was his signature and i think it's probably the ola shirt that he has that way but it made a statement and maybe he ward because he was meeting with me no but you'll never know. It always be a mystery right so before we wrap up. Tell people how they can and get in touch with you at to find out more about your business in you and i'll also put that in the show notes for this episode but just for people listening <hes> <hes> tell us where you want us on social media or websites right now <hes> i'm reconstructed reconstructing my website website and it's it's an repair. I think there's something going on there. I saw that it looks like it's a little bit different from when i went there a while back because you're and i decided to revamp it to be a little more less verbiage because his life is a little quieter now and you can find you there though my information is there is ruth romero dot com w._w._w. Ruth romero dot com r. u. t. h. each r. o. m. e. r. o. Dot com okay. My email is also ruth at ruth romero dot com my telephone number which is myself. I accept a tax on that is nine four nine tunein one six three one seven. I have an office number which is two zero eight nine three eight four four to two zero very nice now include that in the show notes so people can get in touch with you. Okay anything else you want to. I just got to thinking that i i have one one project. That just came came to mind. I had forgotten about it but i have been inspired invited to deliver a presentation for the women at the women's prison. Listen in boise. Go you're kidding. This is something new of never done and i was invited by my fellow toastmasters because i am a toast master and and i had i think my message that day was rather inspirational and he's as i would like to invite you to come and speak so i said yes right away. Do you find you do that. Often go for the opportunity. If it <hes> <hes> i think quickly it's just something resonates with they were and i say yes i know him and you know i have confidence in him and and i knew that what he wanted to do was to deliver an inspirational message for these women especially because they are in the process <music> of leaving prison at that point in going out and seeking employment and yes i would welcome the opportunity to inspire spire them how i can relate to them by just sharing the different negatives that i encountered <hes> as i went into into the business career into my business career which was later on in life <hes> so that's that is a great opportunity for so. You're gonna side of really. I don't know that i have either. That's probably two different environment. Isn't it yes but still people they're looking for that. I'm grateful for at the stage of my life that i'm in. I'm an older woman and people take a second a second stand for just there's a certain amount of unmentioned respect act for my wisdom <hes> if they sell acknowledging i think i am wise. Surly tussled around enough that if i didn't learn those lessons i wouldn't be here talking to you right right. You've accumulated a lot of lessons and i have i i have learned learned that that <hes> hope and just knowing where of the possibilities and the purpose that you have in life i can really come and lighten up an attitude <hes> and if you don't see it i certainly wouldn't mind sharing my own personal personal experiences because we all have to go through it in one way or another <hes> yeah. There's no choice really right. I know you can call them. Defining moments i went through the divorce. I went through cancer and then a bunch of hiccups along the way as well well <hes> <hes> so but i didn't stay there yeah. I think that's what's that that's a great point to me. Victim doesn't suit me and i don't want to be a very fun being a victim. I love being sassy. Well thank you so much the truth. I really appreciate it. It's been my pleasure and i'm so glad that we've had this opportunity to thank you. You're welcome well. What did you think did you come away with some some ideas that you can use to present a more professional image. Make yourself. Look better. Make yourself feel better. I know that i did if you would like to leave a comment. Share your experience about the podcast what you take away from it what you got. You didn't know please do so at youtube. Dot com slash g. Mark phillips episode one hundred fifteen. That's the best place to join the conversation about the podcast and share what your experience was and leave a comment below this video so when it goes up some really excited to offer this to you and share this with you is. I was thrilled that ruth join me on the podcast. I wanted to give a big. Thank you to her her for sharing her knowledge and wisdom on this topic which is really really important. Sometimes it's just a few small tweaks and changes we can make to our appearance and how we dress ourselves that can really translate into big bigger impact in the world and more congruent like consistent impact in image that we present so thank you for. I sharing your expertise with us. I really do appreciate it and that's the podcast. We're going to wrap up episode fifteen this week. Thanks so much for listening. I do appreciate it as has always and until next time all the best helped bolton success bye-bye <music>.

ruth romero new york boise youtube idaho director mark phillips consultant facebook tennis garry keller g phillips garmin mylan usa kennedy Temple blaine
Creative Leadership And Growing Your Business Through Empathy With Paolo Mercado | ETHX 135

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

56:34 min | 1 year ago

Creative Leadership And Growing Your Business Through Empathy With Paolo Mercado | ETHX 135

"Coming to you from Boise. Idaho the fastest growing city in the US and recognized as one of the most creative and vibrant cities to live in. This is a special edition of enhancing. The human experience a world of creativity a series of unique interviews with successful people from around the globe. How they get inspired where their ideas come come from? And how they apply creativity in their business and personal lives. Now here's your host Mark Phillips along with Special Guest Interviewer Mark Stinson okay. We've got another great interview here for our world of creativity series within enhancing human experience. Welcome Mark Oh hi how you doing mark Mark Great Great. So who got here on I. It's a terrific episode. We've got planned for you. We're going to be talking with Paolo. Mercado Who's in Manila in the Philippines and Apollo is a by? Profession is working as a senior vice president at Nestle Philippines and marketing marketing communication's but An interesting title added onto that is the area of innovation so I thought from a creative standpoint pilots got a lot of things to share with us. Obviously before Manila he obviously Or also worked at Nestle China and so has a broad view of Asia and the dynamic markets there and all the creative stimulation and inspiration that we can draw from that so Paulo were really glad to have you on the podcast today. Tight thanks mark. Glad to be in the show if yeah so Paulo as a as a communications marketing and innovation person. I think to to start with. What sort of projects are you working on today? Well broadly speaking for for Nestle Philippine. So one of the. Let's say the most time consuming creative work that we do with all the advertising in And we come up with Quite quite a number of ads every year so so advertising production Including all of the digital marketing work is a constant John Stream Fourth of my department helps to supervise on behalf of the brands and we work with a with the AD agencies or the digital agency sue produce use at work so I would say that occupies a a good chunk of my time Together with my team and The other aspects fix that of course what feeds into the into the advertising work is all of the market research and business analytics. So that's also it's a major part of the process that we That we go through and then last of course not the least. I wish I were spending more time on this. One is the innovation in part and the innovation. Part is I would say at this. Point isn't so much managing each and every Innovation Project of Nestle Philippines because there there are project managers for that embedded in the business units But rather helping guide the the process ZIP innovation from Opportunity identification all the way to screening and of course eventually launch plants. That go with it. So that in a nutshell the scope of of my role in Nestle Philippines. Yes and remind us Some of the product lines and brands Because I'm sure we recognize them Nestle is a terrific Global brand of itself but what are some of the brands underneath that umbrella umbrella. Yes so Amada. Global brands at that we handle in the Philippines. Of course. It's nice cafe so I would say that's the best known globally it And then we have Let's see regional brands like my low. So my Louis Chocolate malt beverage Similar to ness quick but But much more sports oriented or sports position in the In the developing markets. And then we we have our Powdered milk brands So those are quite local so bear Bryant our biggest one and then We have our confectionery brands with KIP. It is also in the market so I would say those would be some of the most recognizable brands It's terrific all brands I enjoy. Yeah no bad. It's great to talk about Nestle. Well then that's terrific and so Paulo you know from from a creative standpoint and this is the the basis basis of our conversation is really the creative process and so we're ideas come from right. I loved your thought that you know the basis of all all these campaigns the advertising is fund output but the market research the analytics. You know The the real getting to know the customer. Tell us a little bit about how you get a sense of what the consumer is looking for. And maybe what. Their problems are How do you go about understanding in that With your teams read so well actually. This is quite I it's been quite a journey to To bring I would say a consumer center city in the In all of the marketing communications that we do when we When we take a look at the So I'll talk to levels. I would say won the essay way or or or what we call brand building the Nestle way in what is prescribed in that we've working and the other one is my own approach to it or my own take to it so in the. Let's say the global approach that we have. There's always a couple of fundamentals that we need to have. In order to build great brands in the first one is a very clear understanding of a well-defined target consumer That is the consumer that we choose to delight and not just the broad consumer a that we you know that which that we just a Ah the core target that we want to love US rather than everybody who we just want to like us so so getting getting very very focused on the core narrow target consumer is the first step and the first one the mental that we build in parallel to that there must be very clear understanding of what the brand is all about called the brand essence and the brand purpose. And how those two linked together on on let's say a very deep level so so if the core target for example is working class Filipinos who need Who really have to work hard to uplift themselves in their families and the role for example the ness cafe blaze in helping those people rise up each and every day and face the The hard realities of life in the Philippines and that In the role that Cup of coffee place. He's in giving them that little boost every morning do that. So we keep true to that in this articulated in what's called the trade big idea and then from the big idea whether it's a product specific communication or more uplifting brand equity communication brief we then tailor fit the communication mutation tasks according to The business needs of let's say generating demand for particular products or for for strengthening the brand equity. We have with the target consumer. So that is I would say broadly the basics of it. What uh-huh what I am or what I tried to push? The Marketing Community in the Philippines is two parts. One is bringing back the consumer intimacy Musi into Let's say the work rhythm off of the marketing things because as in many organizations his ations and many big corporations we are very data heavy report heavy sometimes tendencies that we pay a lot more attention addition to let's say the performance of our sales a pushing into key customers or Looking at our sales off take levels or things like that and we lose the time and intimacy that we actually spend on the field with consumers and just getting to know them on a life level level before trying to Essentially push our demand targets on them so Getting into the habit or in helping our marketing teams get into the habit of spending time with consumers for me it's important And for me foundational because that's empathy work and And with embassy with the habit of empathy building over time we get to pick up the insights happened more on the life level. That then enriches our not only our communications but a but From time to time it. Also enriches enriches the innovation ideas that we have why that's wonderful. I really admire that idea of empathy and delight And how you contribute the life What you were describing about Netscape as role for example. You know it's a cup of coffee. Yes but it's a boost and it's You you know Kickoff you know to do what might be a tough day so that's very good and Follow as I recall your your educational. National background began in psychology. And kind of this social ecology work is this idea of empathy and understanding how it fits in their life. does does it have a basis in in some of that work that you did From an academic standpoint yes and let me pull this back of it because if the topic is uncreative process I was thinking about the the question and I look at myself in a few lenses. One one right now in my current profession. I'm actually more of a One of creative buyer in a sense because I buy a creative creative work or I procured creative work with our AD agencies. I'm also creative facilitator in the sense of trying to get our Own Marketing teams especially in the Innovation Front to be doing the allegations themselves and and to be discovering the insights. Now yes a lot of the the. Let's say my focus on understanding people at the life level and the work of empathy Thus have strong roots roots in psychology. But I would even pull it back one step further. Is that the first reason that they went to into psychology. Actually was Was it more deeply rooted in the theater background that they had in this was more in high school and in college where I I was very fascinated with the work of the editor. And that's where I describe myself as a trade or not just a buyer of creativity but I was quite involved in the trading process. Both as an actor in playwright and for me In that particular field empathy is critical empathy with the characters portray on stage. But the wonderful thing about the author also as a as a pre in borne is that it's a form where you actually co create with your audience. Yes you've got the script. Yes you've got a lines to deliver and blocking walking to to adhere do more or less if you if you like your director and you don't actually but the real theater experience is really the emotional dialogue that you're having audience and That type of emotional dialogue East I would say quite unique in that theanswer or in live performing arts because the show isn't the show without the audience response and the work of empathy in a a theater is quite is quite. It's not essential. It's actually quite brutal. That if you don't have the empathy as an actor for your character and for your audience the show will not fly. It was not succeed and so for me. A lot of I would say my own creative process in a professional field is influenced a lot by the things that I've learned In my younger years in the theater well thanks for sharing that because these are things that you don't always see on the resume now and they're not on underneath. Yeah I mean all of us bring everything we've done and who we are are to what we're doing currently and we flavor it in a unique way. Don't we and we can see that you're what you've just explained to US Paolo. Yes yes yeah and are you able to a US any of these You Know Theater and Play you techniques in any of your like brainstorming sessions idea should session Russian. How how does that work with your team to really that? I can imagine you've got to spark their creativity and like you said. Get them thinking out of the box to yes. I'm one of the core elements all off any brief that we have is Is contextual insight. Doc off the consumer which which then by the way becomes the core of a With a let's let's call it a communication brief We also use it for in innovation brief but but let's say communication wreath getting the contextual insight. Right is critical and for me. Two things one. Broadly you have to have time you You can't make up the contextual swab inside. It really needs to come from the work that needs to be done in terms of qualitative research field research or or even just eighth Griffey work that we do but then I would say the theater work and the psychology were comes into understanding standing motivations and understanding that different that how motivations play and how Let's say in where motivations come from and how that influences the end result of behavior. Roughly speaking Let's say the the I tend to be very psychoanalytic in my approach. That motivations can be routed from a Mao from a feeling level from feeling center at a heart center it can come from a more instinctive gut center or it can come from the idealistic heads Heads Center and based on the type of consumer that you have their motivations may be rooted in one of these centers and then approach and response therefore to messages communications. Its Earth would be very different. And so that's kind of blends you know. I mean I G- walk into those areas of of understanding psychoanalysis unsanitary Etcetera because I was Not only acting on stage but in my early years writing my own place and to be able to develop characters I had to give them. More or wholeness and wholeness comes from understanding really of psychological motivations so that got me into psychology and later Ktar on into into the field of consumer behavior consumer understanding which then led me to what I'm doing now. Yes well well and I and I can imagine engine that At least in my experience with market research people aren't always easy to. It's not always easy for them to express their motivations. So you've you've you've mentioned things like qualitative interviews but also ethnography where you're literally interacting watching Getting the feelings of the consumer what what sort of techniques or what sort of processes from an ethnography standpoint Do you guys apply what what we watch for is is or what I only sound like team is okay. You come in with a discussion guide but listen for feeling linked to not just words so that's one of the things that were Were quite conscious of so when a conversation. Shen generates excitement and fast responding and a lot of Smiles inexpressive NECE. We take note the fact that Ed this is a passion subject or touching onto something. That's quite important to the To the consumer for our ad testing actually we We work with the research research agency that actually records facial expressions and we pay attention to that when we craft the advertising. Just to make sure that we're hitting the right emotional accuse as well. So that's non verbal I mean they. They may rate the AD in particular way from a rational aspect but then we also see that look if they're rating you you know that they like it but they're actually not smiling. We know we're not we're not hitting the right buttons. Yes so that's a far the fit and together with with some of our AD agencies I And even our research partners I like very much the use of the the archetypes when describing Essentially how we portray our brand and the archetypes that Our consumers consumers in the market Let's say are used to from a cultural point of view and also if portray the Brad this a hero. What are the archetypes of a hero from pop culture? That are that always. Let's say a hit the right buttons for the consumer so then we go into that aspect. So that's where both Psychology cultural context needs to come into play into the creative process. Now this is great. Thanks for sharing those tools. It's interesting you're talking about the facial recognition. I remember years ago before a lot of the technology that we have now. I had a mentor. Who suggested just when you watch the videos of the research research turn the volume down and watch their body language? Are they smiling like you said. Are they leaning up and engaged in the conversation or are they back or their arms crossed you know are gauged and So these nonverbal cues are very important and the archetypes is a great tool as well. You know I I also so We were talking just before we came on the recording About your background academia And the Berlin School of Native Thinking and and I'm very interested in how you take the you know you've been describing the practical applications of creativity but to step back back into an academic study of creativity. What were some your key takeaways from from those studies? What the Berlin school uh so it's an executive MBA program? It's actually at the core of it. It's it's not so much about a studying creativity per se or how to be creative and they're very clear that when you when you sign up but it's really about how do you manage and lead creativity ESA resource for your company in Seoul. It is about managing people and creative resources sources geared towards essentially business activity. So it sounds quite her. I would say it sounds. It's a bit different from from an artistic creative process but but it is. Let's say the challenge of the Times because And I can talk a bit more about my area of focus in that study but when you really take a look at Companies today and this is something. I'm still trying to convince my own company that the value of a company everyone wasted value for companies. It's people but at the core of it. The value of a company east of creativity of its people their ability to contribute To building new ideas that create value in society or in or at the very least for the customers that they serve and and the let's say the the the big concept of the Berlin the school is at most MBA programs were created in an industrial age And let's say a and have very by industrial process style of management and leadership in terms of creating a highly efficient organizations rather and and very productive organizations but geared towards. It's quite a an old model of economies of scale and creating efficiencies and managing the bottom line of both the the top line and the bottom line but it doesn't really pay attention to the person in the organization as a tree. Or and how do you. How do you as a manager build a football recruit creativity into your organization retain that creative power that creative? Let's say For lack of a better word Word Gold Mine of Palate in your organization. And how the nurture it how d nurture it with Environments how the nurture it with policies. How howdy nurture it with With a work culture that keeps people wanting to be creative and productive for your company. Eddie so that's the thrust of Berlin school and and for me. I found it really really quite an interesting program. Oh Graham I tried to try to put it into practice in managing my own teams and working with my own Let's say advertising and even research suppliers fires but to a greater extent also turned it into a an advocacy. Which is the other dimension of what I'm doing now in in leading this advocacy on creative economy? But I can talk about that a bit more. We definitely want to get into that. You've raised a few very interesting points that I wanted to take apart a little bit more and that I really liked your twist on. It's not just the People as assets but the creativity of people But you also mentioned you know how do you recruit and nurture and grow it. How would you say hey? You can evaluate once creativity through the recruiting and hiring and and the on boarding process. Oh a Frankly I wish I had a better system for it. I mean if if you have a sneak I'd certainly love It's difficult it's really difficult especially in the context in the context of Of Nestle which in the first place as I have to convince to recruit for creativity and not just for. Let's say the more functional technical skills brand brand marketing and management I need to go back a bit. Too my My learning experience. I wouldn't say successes but my learning experience With when I was managing an AD agency and trying to recruit creative phthalate What I can say is that well clearly the Portfolio History Sparta fit and the interview. First interview honestly thought they helpful. If it's substandard interview ultimately I would really say it. It needs to be about Will the person fit into into the creative culture that you're trying to develop and and that I would say would be unique depending on Each organization in his Asia and generally there are a couple of off Let's say strong models. One model is the Steve Jobs. Model where you have have A genius lead creative organization and And he surrounded And they push for Excellence Salads and they attract people of very very high caliber. But it's also a pressure dark that everyone is pressured to perform. I'm to a standard that is essentially defined by the trade of leader most ad agencies have the history of that model But then alternative. They've models at that people have is really the The collaborative or or I wouldn't say wisdom of the crowd but definitely working groups asked the source of creativity You tend to see more with with Google. Google today. Doesn't seem to be a monolithic creator but really creative teams That emerge they have their own ways of working in their old way of of Of raising their creative creative output. But it's more team based rather than individual based so I think recruiting and finding being the creativity first needs to be rooted in how the Organization itself understands its own creative process. And then they must I recruit according to that that's great and the age old question can a person become more creative. You No people say oh. He's so creative as if it's inborn But can you develop a creative muscle you know can it. Can it be improved now. Yes because the opposite is true. I can it atrophy and if it can definitely definitely I have seen and experienced On a personal level times when my own creativity. Is You know you really get into a slump. And I've seen also very high performing creative people get into a slump so when you see if the opposite is true that people can deteriorate in that creativity tippety than almost by definition. There are circumstances that allow them to to improve and and I would say it's a a tricky balance of the right environment where you have It's tricky AH people say a lot about psychological safety creating safe space. It's thorough but at the same time. A lot of brilliant ideas come from extremely unsafe on safe psychological environments in the sense that That when when in my experience working with some very very brilliant creative people people they can be quite brutal to their team in terms of critiquing ideas Tetra. So there is that tricky balance of critique collaboration competitiveness and always pushing for a higher standard. So these things are necessary. Sorry for for in my view for creativity to really flourish that competition and pressure. I do believe Steve is essential to getting the creative Environment Right. Maybe I thought yeah. I want examples on this one but yet do now because I think as we you know I won't say elevate but at least east as we focused now on personal development not just as an answer professional development. I if somebody says look I wanNA pursue a creative avenue whether it's In theater like you were talking about your own personal experience. But you know music Dan's writing of any kind. And somebody says as I really need some tools and if we think about it like a muscle you know let it needs to be exercised and so I am curious about some of your examples of maybe a methods or tools or processes one could access to improve their own creativity. A couple of points lanes one is the the importance of getting the right mentor and the right Right Support Group and by mentor. It's almost like a coach. Actually I don't like the USA Word Mentor but I prefer to use the word coach or even trainer. You're in the athletic sense that yes you've got your skills but the person should be sharp enough to save that look in a In a Let's say a global standard of creative excellence. You are actually more or cheer to give you the truth of where you stand as a Whether it's a copywriter or a film director or playwright etcetera and to say that if you want to improve you have to put in the work and that's the that's the The most productive creatives always talk about that. There's a discipline. It's not just inspiration or artistic new all the time they put in the hours they put in the work of practicing whether to musical instrument or a Or writing or in their filmmaking. They put in the hours to that but then also they. They don't Tawhid the work they put it in In a in a venue that allows it to be critiqued not and that's where courage cubs in the courage to put the work out there to acknowledge that that you work may not be The bets and applauded great. But if you get critique the use that as an opportunity to get better and better and better so for me. It's that it's really that combination the nation of putting in the work Being open to critique but then use critique to push yourself to be better and and for me that's where from an environment point of view The one thing that I don't think Or the idea that I think is outdated is the lone artist with a vision. And then who seclude himself like a hermit and then comes out with a brilliant let's masterpiece after years of it. Abating the idea what I do see more and more is that AH creative. Environments requires actually communities of creative people who Most of the time they compete with each other but in the competition addition they actually collaborate in a way to make each other's work better My favorite example going back to my personal history theater is Broadway we you know it's just crazy how How Broadway is I? Forget the estimate of how many billions of dollars that earns earns. It's such a small area of New York leading global theater and I think they're only about four thirty performing spaces but the intensity of competition For audiences for getting I think the show right But at the same time while they're competing with each other at the theater community is actually collaborative community. The actors know each other the directors know each other. They know who plays coming on. They support each other. Actually when they're plays coming on so there is that aspect of of both collaborating being encouraging but also competing when your show is on when my choice on were all competing for audience share and and that dynamic make off proximity creating competition creating markets that people buy for extend replicate did not only Broadway weight's been replicated in Silicon Valley. It's been replicated in Hollywood and now more and more these creative clusters are coming out in different countries. And they do feel. That's a key dynamic to nurturing creativity to be part of community to be part of these clusters and in building those communities Entire Economies Janis. come out of that You were mentioning. That's another part of your efforts. Right now is is building creative. Community expanding create economies Janis Tell us more about what are some of your efforts are in that area so that was actually my thesis in Berlin School and so I I was fascinated fascinated with the subject of creative economy. Which is which is essentially a country based agenda off off recognizing creative in the streets say unique sector Understanding is current contribution to GDP and then setting a roadmap accelerating rating growth both through domestic and international trade creative output whether the output is a product or idea ideas meaning intellectual property licenses or path into Tetra and the gap that they saw in the Philippines is that there's no At the time that I was right there was still no formal recognition of creative industries as an economic contributor. So what started off as a thesis and understanding her in State in the Philippines. It soon grew to be I would say a very very time consuming advocacy because the the people in government that I was interviewing primarily from the Department of Trade and industries the National Commission Culture the Arts and a few other government agencies The rebelling me. You can't leave that academia academic thesis. Can you be an adviser to us as as the government now crafts its own creative economy agenda. So that's what I've been doing on the side died. And and there are several avenues to to that Including the development of creative clusters getting local cities. Still a DOPP their own city-based creative economy agenda Creative education is part of it As well as even creative tourism resume the using festivals as a way to To develop a new streams of tourism. So yeah it's it's quite a I would say it's it's quite a heavy involvement that I that I sort of came out of that. Very a simple academic thesis. How much how much did you have to sell them on that? Or were they ready to receive that. It sounds like they are on board with what you're doing they were I would say At least the people in government I've been talking to the Department of Trade and Industry. They had been exploring the idea About ten years earlier two thousand five the gap is this I would say and maybe that's where I was at the right place at the right time. They were working with academics previously and not people both from the creative industries And the other aspect to fit was that they The problem that they had was that In the Philippines like in many countries while the trade of sectors have have their own. Let's say industry organization. The government had the problem in finding. Who is the one group that I talked to? If I want to understand the food landscape of creative industries in the Philippines then the other aspect which also made it a challenging for them was that they were constantly confusing and even today. I have to remind people that creative economy policy is different from arts and culture policy there are overlaps but an art and culture policies more about growing cultural identity and where are seeing a spark of cultural identity. And that's a different agenda. It's legitimate creative economy it's about contribution to the economy onomichi through job creation in actual revenue. So so and I guess my business background plus my appreciation for the creative industry not only through advertising but through a performing arts My wife actually. Her parents are visual artists. So there's a circle off. Aw Art interfaith is that I personally am aware of that. Allowed me to navigate the space in a way that is yes I would say Wealth with the government is finding useful. Yes we also bring up a good point about The commercial interests of creativity than coming up with ideas or coming up with our sake A painting that belongs things in a museum is different than a painting that might be In a gallery for sale or a different than art created for say advertising purposes but you're also Bringing up this idea of execution the coming up with the idea is one thing but executing or implementing the idea and I'm I'm very interested in your experience in bridging that gap to make sure it's not just creativity for creativity sake. Well that's where my marketing background comes in In creative economy creation serve market and. That's what my India. That's that's in the book of let's say one of the thought leaders and creative economy professor John Hopkins that Creativity needs freedoms everyone is born created but one of his a major tenants on trade ecology is creativity needs markets because without markets without people who consume creativity whether it's a piece of of content or An APP that they liked us or a game that they that they use without the market. Then It's more a personal statement that some people can appreciate but generally it is really about creating these whether it's a product or content or an experienced that serves an audience Consuming audience and for for me. That's what I keep bringing into the Into the conversation and into the The Idea Asian rock trade and economy policy. That's wonderful So I'm mindful of our time and I it's been just terrific conversation but I'd like like to kind of end our discussion as we get more more out of personal level for you Palo if if tomorrow you woke up and you had a challenge in in front of you on your desk After your ness cafe which is going to give at boost. Where would you go is I'm stuck I need. I need a boost of creativity Where would you go to get unstuck? What what would inspire you What would give you a new fresh bark personally might processes than maybe? This is really from from left field but my process is I'm either Iran or a bike to the point of exhaustion so running and cycling for me between the two more. Cycling is very centering in the sense that it There's a certain zen like the two two two cycling where you have to keep very focused to keep that bike upright and not get hit by a car and it clears the mind in some way and I always get my the when. I'm really faced with a challenge. I really literally just ride Mike. Somehow that does get a literally the juices flowing. It clears my mind fine because I do it at the high intensity and then at the moment when I am resting and recovering. That's Flynn. I tried to approach things in a different way. I know it kind of sounds funny as a process but it works for me. That's what they often do when I'm really stunned. Go Out and ride my bike from other creative people that there's something about getting the brain really and getting that heart pounding that works a lot plot or also interested You know our theme of our podcast here is a world of creativity. And I've only been to the Philippines twice ace but found Manila to be a very vibrant multicultural. City and You you've lived and worked In Asia What what are you? What are you see is the sort of cultural environment for creativity? And and what that kind of diversity brings the Philippine creativity and I go back also to something that that source accord To me actually empathy and reading feelings readings is quite important as a cultural traits It is if you look at the areas where the Filipino excels as an artist it tends to be not conceptual creativity. Not even the high level design where very few designers who breakthrough. Oh but we do breakthrough in a in artistic or creative forms. That are about human empathy so in the So one very concrete example is that The Filipino is the the the The greatest the greatest number of Asian talent on Broadway S- Filipino. And it's the same in the west end and if you take a look at any any Bar Or performance venue or cruise ship Or even busy Land Hongkong majority of the performers there are Filipino. It's not just because we sing well but it's also because we convey a very strong emotion when we perform and when you take a look at other areas where Filipino as creative punches into let's say a level of global excellence offense. Thanks to be informed that show a lot of human emotion so some of the the lead animators in Pixar Filipino. And they they dented subject matters. Third they're much more emotionally nature Like the animators in in cocoa and There's another one the one about about precisely the one about emotions inside out so So those are Fithian knows around that and even in some of the comic illustrated deported. So it is in our language One of the most Let's say important trait. The Filipino is understanding in reading the room. As far as the emotional state of people before you State your point interview or your position that you need to feel in the word is pocket you have to feel the room and you have to go with a what the Group A up fully understand where the group is before you push your way through. And that's the way we create this. Well it's a very empathetic. Let's say creative active expression that's wonderful. Yeah well I can't thank you enough Ballo for this Engaging conversation I've learned a lot and as we summarize and conclude here I'd be very interested to to thank about and get your opinion on what you think the state of creativity in the world. Today how are we doing as a global creative community. I've never thought of that. I would say definitely we have been and this is especially true in the digital world A had been through a tremendous boom of new ideas and the level of creativity is very high but I think also coming to a point where we are creating monsters that may not have been there in the inception but then they have these effects. Is that We don't intend so in the Of course social media and the impact of social media on the fabric of society has has been written about several times but it's even in The creativity innovation and one of them being the hot topic right now on the US and in other countries on e cigarettes but how a very highly creative and innovative product like Joel which was intended for helping people helping people quit had the unintended effect of actually recruiting people to smoke. Okay so so I think we have a point where creativity and imagination. There is no absence effect whatsoever. But I I think we're coming to a point where doing need to put the market every creative idea we have just because it will sell and it will have a market cricket. So is there a point on talking to to to Michael Barry who teaches at the school cool in in Stanford and the conversation is is there an ethic to innovation and creativity that we need to start taking a look. Are there opportunities that we shouldn't fulfill or should we really ask the impact of releasing this into market. So I think we're getting to that point definitely definitely creativity is alive and well but I think we're also getting to a point on understanding that. Should we really go to market. What is the impact of this on the Fabric Rico Society and there are those cases that are coming out and I think that that will might have a break Or slow down. The pace of innovation was the very thought provoking point This sort of ethical consideration of creativity. I like that lot UH Paulo. It's been terrific talking with you. Yeah thank you Allah. We do appreciate it. Thank you very much happy to contribute. What a great interview work as terrific? We just I just WANNA thank Paulo Mercado who's the SBP Of Marketing Communications and innovation at Nestle in the Philippines. For for this Terrific interview I think as I took away that we were talking about the sound bites that we got out but remain takeaways for me is the idea of customer or consumer intimacy that Paulo really thought from a creativity standpoint in order to offset this number crunching and analytic side of the brain. You can watch the sales numbers in you can watch the ratings of various advertising but the idea ear that you need to get close to the customer in a in a very meaningful way to understand their emotions to understand their motivations I thought that was terrific again. It really drove everything they did in this word empathy Came out very strong Throughout the interview that the second point and You we've heard this phrase so many times that the greatest assets of accompany our. It's people who he added and twisted. That didn't he who to to be the creativity. Seventy of its people are accompanied greatest assets. And then just thought that was terrific and that they would recruit and hire and nurture. You know Grow the creativity of the people as a big asset. This idea that we were shifting from this iconic creative leadership where there was one person than he mentioned mentioned Steven Jobs. But there's others that were moving from this icon creative leader to more collaborative team approach. And that's been a pretty consistent theme in our other interviews that this idea of a world of creativity is that we need diverse world immunity. You know of Lone Person Avia number people mentioned that haven't they. Yeah no lone wolf who and I guess the last thing was that if you start as an individual and then you move to a creative team. Alternately it ladders up to creative economy and creative cluster in a town in a country and his work in in these kind of creative economies. I thought was very fascinating and We sort of were kidding. Him that It was just a side job. You know that as as a part time entity was working with government to try to build the creative economy. But it's a very worthwhile undertaking and I think he's just the kind of person that can lead it because he was talking about moving from just in may be art and culture creativity to the economic and commercial development Donovan Economy using creativity as foundation. Yeah you know. His his interview was a lot like Kevin Fox is interview. You know where they're talking where they're artists artists that are actually affecting you know revenue and driving revenue for companies and stuff like that and they have that ability to span the gap. I think some some people cannot cannot do that right with your business mindset or you're just artists. You don't have the ability to cut a scan that gap that's right and and you know. He was weaving his stories from theater. Her and playwright you know All through his interview and it just reminded me when we're interviewing people for jobs for example always he's like to go to the bottom of the resume where the interests of the hobbies. And what was your first job. And what was your aside interest in college or something like that because you know an unpolished Lincoln profile. You're not gonNA find theater major actor playwright and yet that is central to his creative eighty foundation and so yes he has degrees in Yes yes titles and great company experience but look how much it was informed by his more creative personal interest in theater Even his Broadway stories on the allergies and things like that So as people as we get to. I know people. Or if we're interviewing people for gigs or for jobs you know it. It teaches me anyway to dig deeper into the individual and get to know them and their their total picture not just what's listed on their job experience on a resume. Yeah he definitely has that that going on one of the things that I found interesting was when he was talking about coming from the industrial era into this air that we find ourselves in now. How almost sounds like it was just about production and I think I think it was easier back then from what I've read and what I understand it was like here's the product? Here's the name here's a couple of colors. People buy it but now it seems like the marketplaces uses much more. There's more need for creativity. And he spoke to that and he said hey you need to be more creative now because there's so much noise out there there's so much it's not as easy as putting putting a name on slapping name on something that's right that's right so just a fantastic interview and there's there's a lot of other connections that People like Paulo can make so just wonderful. Yeah absolutely all right. Well that puts another one in the bank We've got a few more down the road so Stay tuned for the next one. Yeah and then. We're excited as we wrap. Wrap up the series Will be coming back to you with a summary of all the interviews So that'll be a one to listen for. Definitely all right. Thanks so much all the best health wealth success. Thanks for listening to this special edition of enhancing the human experience a world of creativity with Mark Phillips. If you liked this episode and wanted to know more check out G MARK PHILLIPS DOT COM and and please leave us a review on Youtube I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. See next time.

Philippines US Paulo Mercado Nestle Asia Steve Jobs Nestle Philippines Manila Mark Phillips Innovation Project of Nestle P Paolo Department of Trade and Indust Mark Oh Idaho Berlin Boise director Berlin School Point mark
Travelling Solo And Experiencing The World With Jen Ruiz | ETHX 136

Enhancing The Human Experience with Mark Phillips

50:05 min | 1 year ago

Travelling Solo And Experiencing The World With Jen Ruiz | ETHX 136

"To you from Boise Idaho the fastest growing city in the US and recognized as one of the most creative and vibrant cities. To live in. This is a special edition of enhancing. The human experience a world of creativity a series of unique interviews with successful people from around the globe. How they get inspired? Where their ideas come? I'm from and how they apply creativity in their business and personal lives. Now here's your host Mark Phillips along with Special Guest Interviewer Mark Stinson all right. We've got another awesome guest here for our world of creativity series inside enhancing human experience. Hello Mark How are you. Good morning and I WANNA welcome January's to the program. Hi Jen I thank you for having me. Well and our theme of world of creativity Jen is really GONNA help punctuate that because Jen is a world traveler and solo traveler at that She's got a terrific blog called Gen on a jet plane and her story is wonderful. We'll we'll get into it. But she is a Transitioned lawyer you know. gave up the law BREIDA's to to travel and write about it full-time She's got a terrific book. The affordable flight guide. It was a number one Amazon best-seller last year she won a reader's favourite award and and She's been featured in the Washington Post and ABC News and the Huffington Post and again on Gen jet plane A great head axe. Let's talk Of the story of how she decided to begin these travels John's calling in from upstate. New York today and we're really glad to have you on the program program. John Thank you so much happy to be here. Yeah so we've been talking with people Literally all over the world about creativity and what inspires them but As we get into that. I'm curious about you know your world travels and how you embarked on this idea of travelling and writing about it. What was the impetus for you? While I had started dabbling in travel a little bit I started taking trips on my birthday to come memory of new birthday. Okay and when I approached my thirtieth birthday and it was this sort of milestone. I decided to stretch out the celebrations for once. Since it's not something I typically do and take one one trip every month To kind of send off the decade with a bang and in that I really formed a basis and a good foundation for my travel blog. I found the passion chance for it one of the trips that I was to my I travel conference where I networked with other bloggers and really started to see this as a potential business and investment and next the thing I knew I had authored by first book Because part of my journey included finding affordable flights so that I could afford to take this many trips on a nonprofit attorney salary. That's great and it's interesting. You're you're saying because a lot of people say you know we'll someday I'll drop everything or someday when I retire you know then L. Travel the world But then you really said you're going to fit that in you know regular life How did that work for you? It was really a a tough decision and there came a point where I even had a a marker Ramon I spent a lot of time struggling with it and felt like I was on the cusp of something momentus. In that I knew that my life was going to change but that I wanted it to take that turn and even though it was straying away from something that was more comfortable after ball more prestigious. When I used to tell people that I was a lawyer especially because I was barred early on I was barred by the time? I was twenty five So I looked young. Young and people didn't assume that was a lawyer so it's always been something that title that I use them kind of hid behind to assert some sort of authority. Your knowledge And when I had that you know when I chose to put that aside because I still have it it's not necessarily it's just an inactive status but I passed to bars and no no one can ever take that away from me months so I still have those licenses inactive and I can choose to activate them at any time but but for now I've really enjoyed being able to say that instead of feeling limited which I did after a while I practice law for almost five years and I did it in the private setting before moving to nonprofit on Prophet which was a great move for me. I Love Nonprofit Law They leave you know at a reasonable hour. They have really passionate Views and I really great coworkers to to be with so it was a good working space for me but still I felt like it wasn't the right fit. It just wasn't where I could see myself long term arm and I found this passion for travel while I was working there because they had such a generous package of vacation that I could take advantage of. Take these kind of short trips You Know Oh three day weekends to Cuba kind of thing And it was wonderful but it was a stepping stone that I needed to get to something deeper and I had no idea it could lead you know now that I'm a travel blog. I have all of these amazing things and accolades attacks. Talk and books and all of this that I thought would be a one Sunday thing you know. Maybe one day life goes really amazingly then it can culminate in this you know sudden movement towards what I want and I decided that instead of waiting in and hoping that that would be the way that it would go that I would just take matters into my own hands and make that life that I was living currently and it has been amazing. Asing tell us about the time line like when did give us a glimpse were twenty nine thousand nine now. When did you start during the south or claims year of adventure quote quote unquote Of My twenty so the weekend trips were I took so the first couple of trips. Were like to Athens Milan. Florence on the Grand Canyon Aruba. These were all trips that were done within the first kind of quarter of the year Most of them were already preplanned. I had taken a lot of time. I am and Karen to them. I had taken you know efforts to make sure that I could redeem points in miles in. I went to Aruba for seventy dollars. Round trip on some jet blue after opening opening a new credit card with them and reaping those bonus sign up miles And so different methods that I utilized throughout the year I started flying with budget airlines. You know there was a fight that came came up to Iceland. Iceland wasn't on the schedule but there is a ninety nine dollar flight so I thought why not on wow air which was now defunct but actually I hear it's coming back. So let's all cross brought 'cause I really liked that. These European budget airlines have opened the routes to Europe long for places that previously were were not not accessible for people on an everyday budget like la or Miami or these other. Big Airline hubs that can access Europe easily Paris overnight. You know all things like that for two hundred dollars so I was able to take that and and start just fitting in trips by the second half of the year I kind of just got in the flow of it and and I started started to feel that added pressure like. Oh my thirties really coming Malik. This is so I just I did my best to squeeze it all in and when an opportunity came up there is even a point. Ride double booked. I mean it really got to be that crazy by the end of the year. Trying to squeeze in as much as I could Where over veterans Wednesday weekend? I thought I had booked them in sequential weekends that I hadn't and I over Morocco in Highness but I was able to get one of them refund. INCI took that as a sign I was like okay Hayao cancelled that trip because I was able to get refunded by a change in schedule. Thank thank goodness I just didn't accept the change. They returned my flight So I salvaged it but it was definitely a lot to put in. That's wonderful I do laugh as you did about the pressure to have fun and really feeling that he gotta get our baron. Add more fun but you know to to the theme of creativity we really interested especially We'll start with the period where you were doing all this travel and working you know where where did the creative inspiration you know. Come come back into the work or was it Hammond to draw a line between work and play It's one thing to say I'm GONNA turn the phone off while I'm traveling on vacation vacation but I mean did you really say I'm not going to let you know my Fun Come into the work or my work. Get into the fun. How was without experience for you? So one of the benefits. I think of practicing laws that you can schedule everything. Everything scheduled pretty well in advance. Were planners Lawyers are Taipei. People like to have a calendar out. You know no-one a trial is going nowhere meetings happening so I was able to work around that kind of preset court it schedule and kind of fit in things already. Where like I said? My job had extra benefits. So for instance we had for July off which was on a Tuesday and we got a gratuitous day off on Monday to kind of complete that long weekend and I turned that until six days in Paris with today's vacation time that I use We'll pay us in the south of France which was even better And it was amazing and these were easy small tweaks that I could make to an already already very rigid schedule and then I could make sure that I prepared accordingly. I had already had a conversation with my coworkers who supported me. You know that was another great part about being in that kind of atmosphere. They stepped in when necessary. You know they feel that any calls or emails while I was gone any emergencies if they occurred But for the most part I really tried to to just prepare before I left. And that's how I helped balance it all And over preparing if anything you know double checking calling people making sure. Everything was good before I went and I did. I wouldn't necessarily unplug completely. I would double check and I knew if there was an emergency happening but if I'm not I can't handle it myself. So that was. We're having a team of people that could kind of tag you know you're in go in and help for a little bit and those were favors that were reciprocated. You know without any issue so that was something that we're I tried to be a good co workers while and I think that foster that environment. That's great and thinking about your experiences while travelling you you know You're you're so low traveler but the social experiences must have been part of the fun. You know it's one thing just to see the sights but what about interacting with people in in these various places. How did you find that? It's interesting it can be touch and go so sometimes it's amazing and you will meet the most amazing people and that's why I love traveling by myself because if something that forces you to go out of your comfort zone you don't have anybody that you can rely on and uses a crutch to speak your language or kind of be with you when you're at dinner things like that so you have to interact with the world around you. I think on a deeper level and just be more aware. Also what's happening because you're alone and and especially as a female so it's something where I've had good experiences. I often tend to join tour groups or things of the sword if I is like at nighttime if I don't WanNa go out by myself to a bar or club join a nightlife tore and they'll do like a pub crawl or something or do a walking history tour at night and you can meet meet a lot of people that way In a safe surrounding I did that in New Orleans which was amazing you can do hunt history torn. It's really really wonderful. New Orleans has a lot of crazy history. But there's so many places where you can meet people people in hostels. I don't necessarily do that. I like to have my own room room when I travel abroad I think that that adds to the safety for me. Being able to go and deadbolt myself in my own space at night and know that you know kind of safe in that area. So I meet people more traditionally by walking around speaking to people and you'll be surprised at who you meet so I've had some really good experiences and and then some kind of weary experiences. You know making sure that I don't look vulnerable like a tourist or anything like that. Sure and what. What do you like like to do with again? What your creative inspiration? Is that the tours the museums at the adventures. You know For full emergent you know. What would you like to do on the trips? I love just seen as the classic thing. That's there to offer you know by the designation nations. So something unique like I really enjoyed going to the fortune cookie factory in San Francisco because it was a staple of Chinatown. have been there for years. You know there's Mm Ice cream shop in Puerto Rico. That has really weird ice cream. Flavors like garlic Cilantro and savory flavors and that was a really cool experience for me getting getting to talk to the owners there so I really enjoy kind of finding these unique places around the world that I think Have a story of their own to tell that. Some of my my favorite thing to geek out over I love museums. I love nature Not Too much nature like a tempered nature who language just thank that I really enjoy the comfort of a bed at night. You know decompress after all that nature nature is wonderful. I need a hot shower in her bed. Right exactly I've done you know. Oh twelve mile hikes at hiked into Hamas who falls and that was ten miles one day and ten miles the other end by the end of it. I really was first wobbling out of that Canyon. motivated only by of wolves howling behind me in thinking. I don't WanNa be real food so I have to hop. It was really lovely experience dance. And that's actually paid to this So are some of the thoughts that go through my head. Sometimes I love it. I rarely interject our own stories in these PODCAST interviews but this summer mark and I had a chance to raft down the Boise rivers together and it was about three hours long. And we were ready to be done and One of our RAFF mates had gone on one of these seven day. Oh you know out in the middle of nowhere tours sewers with you bring your own food you bring your own you know everything and now we could not imagine. Contrast I equate are rafting trip with your kind of nature in doses. It's kind of equate it to like Lazy River at Disneyland for the most part. Yeah getting back on track. May maybe I'll just do a quick round. Robin are unnamed some areas of the world and You tell me about your adventures Gers. There are how `bout that will do this kind of word as you mentioned Central America yes Belize and and and what happened there. What happened in beliefs I went to the chicken drop? The chicken drop is a no tickets. Were harmed Picking up the chicken drop. Chicken isn't chicken festival you have over the festival. It's kind of an outdoor thing that they do every week at this bar on the beach where they put a giant game board out on the beach and then the chickens come out and then they're fed and then wherever they do their business on whatever number that is you win in new in money. Money at it's exciting people go and they buy tickets like you know hours before and then everybody lines up and cheers on the chicken. They have really unique names. You know rice and beans means PICO. The Guy Oh And actually I won the first round of the chicken drop while I was there and I want one hundred billion dollars correct right next would be our Asia Sh- Asia. I'M GONNA point out the Minnesota Sunrise Sunrise at Angkor. Wat was really amazing. It was one of those things that sound stereotypical and there will be three thousand other people there with you watching it but it's still gorgeous. It's the largest. I just religious site in the world. It's so you know coveted that it's been changed from you know different religions multiple times at the carvings altered depending on who the ruler is. And it's just a monument that's withstood so much it's really worthwhile So Asia's amazing and then also side. No bonus shoutout to the Unicorn Cafe in Bangkok Doc. which is amazing? And you can see Unicorn this have stuff unicorns dress up in a unicorn. onesie there's like rainbow cake is. It's a wonderful place. Wow that's great all right well About Central Europe Boya the Baltics Central Europe. I'm going to say Czech Republic So I was able to get out into some of the other areas beyond prog I went to the front. I can still not pronounce it perfectly to the state but I will try. Hold Up Schadeck Karlova which is a region that was about an hour and a half outside of Prague And it has a lot of things to offer and I really enjoyed that. We had a lot out of you know kind of adventuring kind of some nature there. It'd go karting down a mountain which was rocky but still. I enjoyed the go-carts over the mountain bikes which those seems a lot more dangerous angel and we just had a lot of fun there and great food for really affordable prices really beautiful place their castles gorgeous place to visit woman tastic and what about Canada. I Love Toronto I Love Kensington Market in Toronto. Because I think it's one of the most diverse first places in the world. Toronto kind of holds title is a city But you can get you know different foods from all over the world in one block From Tibet Momo's to you know L. Mexican Rose everything you could possibly want In one setting and everybody Kinda getting along and I just recently came back from Winnipeg and Winnipeg was amazing. It's so underrated. I was there for the fringe festival. They have an amazing museum for Human Rights and the festival was so many great shows all in one kind of free for all you have to kind had a run around the city. You get your tickets. It was really all kind it exciting like a scavenger hunt for theatre uh-huh so it was really really great when that's cool but we could. We could go on all day with. Yeah this is awesome stories. Let let's transition then to you. Decide to write about this. You know it's one thing to go and yet another to say a now. I'm going to share these stories How do you approach that storytelling Because reading your blogs that does seem to be more than just a travelogue travelogue you know I I did this. I did that then I did. This and I came home How do you begin to craft those stories? I think it helps me to record things as I go so I'm constantly when I'm traveling especially since I'm usually traveling for work. I think people kind of mistake web travel bloggers I do and just think you're on permanent vacation. But you're documenting all the time and you're making sure you're taking the best notes in your making sure that you're interviewing people at the time and asking the questions that you're gonNA WANNA on ask them because it's GonNa be really hard to get in contact with people in Central Asia From you know over here on a different time zone and you know when these people people are not necessarily the most accessible to begin with. Because they're working in inaccessible places like remote areas so it's really hard sometimes and you WanNa make sure that you cover everything you get every every angle you take it. You Know Wide Angle. You know horizontal vertical everything possible so I think that helps me remember as I'm doing because I'm documenting I'm writing. I'm taking taking notes. I'm being very present in the moment and I think from there I just try to relate as much as I can to the reader trying to be honest and really things in a funny but relatable way eight that people can see themselves these places but also be well prepared when they're traveling there. I think that's really important. I think if you mislead people than they're not you know one hundred percent sure what to expect when they get there and that's how people have bad trips you know. They don't know what to expect. They don't prepare for that. But if you tell everybody what to expect like I knew what to expect going into falls. I didn't expect to wobble out of there but I knew that it was gonna be hard and so I had everything I needed in my bag to survive and and I think that that is part of how you ensure that people have successful trips. That's very interesting because so many travel articles do just focus on now. How much fun it's GonNa be in all the sights and sounds but you're you're saying hey put some of that contingency Z.? Planning or put some of those obstacles and hurdles in issues. You're GONNA face exactly. I think it's important because like you know different things for instance. I got stung by. Maybe when I was just traveling recently in a place where there wasn't a lot of ice and I craved. I so much because I wanted it to just kind of numb and he'll that site a little little bit so I had thankfully anticipated this. I had already seen that. There was an ice in the region is was a big deal to somebody like me. WHO's used to having kind of ice machines on every floor of a hotel and I know that sounds very western very American But I think if you're used to these things you know. Try to find a way to incorporate them where you are so. When I saw that there was a fridge where I was I immediately made some ice and I was able to at least get back to the hotel and have access to it? They're in my room So I think those are little things that you can do yourself that can make your stay more comfortable annual. You're happier with the people around you and you're interacting better because you're not feeling displaced that's great you know and so two to elevate our conversation a little bit to the human experience part of travel you know what what are some of the cultural similarities and differences but But where's the thread among us. All you know you're you're traveling to cities and places all over the world and Some people never leave their zip code eh and they have An images of people in other lands or other cultures But what are some of the things that you're seeing that sort of G- glue was altogether around the world. I think we all know pop culture. So for instance. I teach Chinese kids in the morning and sometimes times. If I have some advanced kids I'll ask them are all relate to something I'll be like. Do you know Harry Potter. And they'll be like of course Harry Potter from Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and wizardry and May know all of that and I think top culture really relates to a lot of people in a good way to bond With people from abroad you know another kid knows like the Lakers or things like that so I think pop culture is a good people know American pop culture in. It's something that they like us for. Generally which is not always something that you'll find because Americans don't necessarily have the best reputation abroad We can be difficult tourists. Sometimes so I think in helping to ease that tension bonding over. Something light hearted hearted like pop. Culture is a good thing And then I think also in general we all have curiosities about each other. I think that's a common thread. I think at and the same way that you are looking at people from across the world in wondering even if you don't leave your zip code what they're like the same thing with those people abroad you know. They're wondering what is an American like. Oh there's behalf to meet you and then say I met this American if you go to Asia. You're probably get asked for twenty pictures because they have never seen anybody that looks exactly like you. You know there's a lot of that and some people receive it while in some people don't but I think in general just understanding that we're all curious about each other and if we approach that in a respectful way. Then there's no reason why we can't have meaningful discourse interactions And what are some of those things when you mentioned you know. We don't always have a great reputation as has been great tourists or travelers What what helps bridge that so I think in general Being a little bit more willing to to adapt to things so Knowing a little bit of the language when you go there goes a long way. So hello thank you goodbye please. You know if you who are at least attempting or starting out a conversation in the native language people are much more Inclined to help you moving along because they see that you're making an effort. I think the gracious not being you know Following customs where their customs. So if it's you're supposed to take off your shoes take doc your shoes which is how I got stung by Bee by the way so I mean it's a workout great for you but sometimes you just gotTa do it because because you're traveling if you have to eat all of the plate that's in front of you? You know the plate in front of you and there are ways that you can kind of research these customs ahead of time. I I am a firm believer that blogs you know put it forth good valuable information when you google them a lot of these. That will come up our blogs. That'll tell you you know customs area things you should know before travelling here And that's really helpful as well Yeah and and I think just being if you know if a place as cash only have cash with you be aware that that's the currency there So these are a lot of things that can help your trip go smoother and then also your interactions with people go smoother because you're prepared to handle How that country is well? That's awesome You know I'm curious about when I travel the end. Get Out of the space that I'm in or the city I'm in the ideas start to flow. How do you manage? Do you know that if you're traveling so much I mean I'm sure you've had evolution of your your business and whatnot. How do you manage the ideas coming to you for new products new projects sins and whatnot so probably not an a healthiest way? I'm like I'm constantly overwhelms overwhelmed especially because I think guy as a solo per noor. You're doing it on and you're kind of managing the marketing the content creation. You know the editing the promotion. The everything The logistics design everything. So it's a lot and sometimes I just have like a mind dump at the end of the day where aware I can't look before I even go to sleep. I just have to get everything out of my head so I just right and kind of probably crazy people but I just like write down a list of everything thing. I have my head so goals that I have that I wanNA accomplish. You know little things that I noted and As I go through again like a really great six satisfaction from crossing something off the list so to the point where so if I do something and it's not on the list I'll write it on the list so that I can cross it off because I need to get some sort of acknowledgement. They have made progress on this long list of things that I have to do. Never end him Because I think we all know especially when you're not bear where you WanNa go things you WanNa do better You know I have a list of things I'm constantly wanting to do blog post. I WANNA supplement and create other linking post who so that I can improve their SEO. And you know I wanNA have maybe maybe perhaps video or things like that and there's a lot of things that I want to do and I think you just have to kind of take one project at a time and write down all your ideas so that they don't don't get lost in that you can start crossing off one by one as you go get them all out on paper. I like that. Do you have any You're mentioning. I'm kind of keeping it all straight as a solar printer. Do you have any favorite tools or APPS or sites that support you Because when you're on your grown you know it's it's great to have all these other tools use technology wisely right. That's right. What helps you? What helps me so I used is to have a va for helping me with scheduling social media Unfortunately now at this point I think I'm weaning off the VA's as because a lot of the social media has been harder to maintain the algorithm changes. You know. You never really know what's happening so I've been actually focusing instead of my social media on my own sites and want to hire. Hire somebody to help me kind of manage that a little bit better. So outsourcing I think is first off the number one most helpful thing if you can find a reliable person tonight. I do have have reliable people. I think that I can look to for different tasks Aside from that there are different scheduling APPs Tailwind till one was good for me for with Pinterest for a while and they still send out a lot of really good content via email I'm actually looking to switch email systems. So that's all my big list of things to you do But I'm with Milton currently and I'm hoping to switch to a system that kind of just doesn't count inactive subscribers because I'm paying per subscriber mail chimp has that issue And I wanna just customize things a little bit better so actually organization email is my next priority And I'm hoping that an APP something like convert kit or mailer. We'll be really helpful for me there. let's see what else those are really. I use a wordpress for my website and I use all the features features on there. I have a ton of different APPS. Installed have groups on facebook. That I'm a part of That I think are really helpful when I have questions or just need any kind of support for everything I haven't for self publishing having for Seo. I have them for female content creators. Everything that I do. I have a group that apart of and mastermind circles as well. Ah Well that's great. Yeah tell us a little bit more about the mastermind. Not not the individual members of your group but I think that's a a tool that you know. His much talked about but maybe not always Implemented the right way people say a minute mastermind group but it could be a coffee KLATCH. That's not a WHO will mastermind group. How does it work for you? And so I'm part of two really great groups online that I just happened to fall into to at it. As part of my work at one of them is through the women and travel summit and its community called. She's wonderful and they have a wonderful collective Where it's a bunch of different different Creators and just women in the travel space in the blogging space. So we do webinars. We do workshops and we do kind of questions questions and daily motivations and things like that in there and I think that that's a great community on a little bit larger. They also have times where you can go in and hand Actually schedule a phone call with a group of maybe five people or you can have office hours where you meet with somebody in particular too expert in the group Like let's say somebody's an expert on video production. You can schedule time with them during their office hours during the month So I think that that's a great community and then similarly I have a community with the we all grow left the nine network which is a group of Let the women throughout the US. North America South America Internationally and they're really do. It's a similar concept they put together different Business opportunities they have Workshops and courses and things you can download it and really just all be part of supportive helpful community that's fantastic And what do you feel like you get from that the most I think I the connection so now I my network has expanded. I know a lot of people in that helps me grow my business. It helps put my name out there. They recommend me for opportunities. He's I've been able to get to different press trips through the she's wonderful community Um and work with different demos destination management organizations throughout the US. You ask and and other internationally in abroad So that's been a really great. You Know Facilitator and intermediary for me and then with the dog relaxing network. I think I really really get a lot of knowledge access to amazing women that I wouldn't have even known about able to connect with otherwise that's great. Who and I guess that leads me to ask about your goals? Then What what's next for you or what's out there on your personal strategy map so besides getting my emails together right right up there? It's something I've been procrastinating. Do it and I think that that's something we we all do. And I I WANNA get better about that I think I like to do my fourth book. So that's high up there. My fourth book is going to be about how to make money online online And in doing so I want to reach out to people that I know personally as an example that are doing these different methods that I'm highlighting So that's a the little bit of an involved project that I'm hoping to have finished in the next couple of months I also want to relaunch a course on affordable flights I have all the content Tampa I'm revising it and I'm going to relaunch it Possibly on new to me based off of my books and then also of course on self publishing because I think a lot of people wanNA know how how they can monetize their message and make passive income on Amazon with an e book about something that they're an expert on you know Cooking you know production. I an architecture whatever the case may be And I think that that's something that people are interested in so those are three of my goals for the coming couple of months traffic You so talking about goals. I'm curious to hear the evolution of your of Your Business. You talked about when you started doing the weekend trips. So the short trips. How has your business evolved? And maybe some Aha moments when you've maybe pivoted and and said I'm going to go here. You know because I think all all of us have The a vision of what we want in it evolves in its own kind of organic way. Can you walk us through the evolution from you know when you first started traveling to where you for now and how your business has changed some insights. You've you've had sure I think in a nutshell. When I first started this I had no idea what I was doing? You know idea about the business side. I just thought traveling was cool and I thought maybe it would be something that could pan out And I think as I start to take it more seriously and particularly before I made the transition to doing this full time I started to invest in myself and that was something that I had to be discerning about and that I learned and you know not necessarily to take every course out there but kind of be really targeted in what it is that I wanNA learn and be specific and go go with intent and make sure that I'm getting the most out of something so investing in Seo and investing in my website and driving traffic to my own website has been the number one game changer. Change for me because it has allowed me to go to brands and say hey I have one hundred thousand a month on my website. I have this many of you know on my social media. I can help promote you. I can help build this campaign. I can have a partnership and that's led to different You know travel where. I'm not only getting the travel comped but I'm also getting paid paid for my time in the content creation while there and simultaneously getting to help promote lesser known destination. So it's really been a win win win and it's been something that I had to do by learning through doing and really taking my business seriously and invested in things like conferences. Investing in things like these mentorship tertia programs taking seo seriously and making my blog of forcing up itself. Yeah it's a fulltime job as an insult. Zoom it is and and not just like whatever you want to write on a website you have to write what people are searching for and you have to be very specific about Fatso that when they search your post comes up and you can still say what you want to say but if nobody finds what you need to say there's no point in you writing it because it's just gonNa be in Google oblivion an and I think that that's what people need to get. A lot of. People are very resistant to change. And I saw video wants in college when I was in leadership program called. Who moved my? It's I don't know if you're familiar with it and that's every day sir. It's right around the corner gang these back so I really love that story. And that's something right. I feel like a lot of people are just so resistant to change and things are going to change as especially online. I think we're just now at a the point where it's really exciting. Because bloggers are getting taken seriously as content creators articles. That are going to rank on page one of Google. They're going to translate into cliques that are going to have a visible. Roi Why that are. GonNa you know turn out to be a viable investment of your money rather than these kind of one page ads traditional in these dying news outlets no offense because I write for for news outlets and I enjoy them greatly But they're changing the way that we you know consume media is changing and we're going digital and I think fighting Senate and fighting all the changes and fighting the fact that this is fully evolving field is just gonNA leave you kind of hemming in a cheese lois hole and and that's not where I wanna be. I think just adapt and keep moving in and find the cheese wherever it is and I think what the strategy that's kept me and then why I like it you know I I also I also liked that kind of constant challenge. Some people need more stability indefinitely for them. This is not the career Bear enough. Yeah well as as you think about the The travel piece of it. You know we're talking about what's next and what's goals so What what's next on your travel itinerary? Or what's what's out there that you you haven't been to yet that you say it's on the list so I'm almost ashamed to say that I haven't been here yet but I'd really love to go to Turkey. It's something that I've been wanting to do for a long time. I think is symbol is such a fascinating city. It's where east meets West literally And it's is just an amazing story. I WANNA go hot air ballooning capita that. I've already been higher ballooning in other places so I feel like this would be the alternate pinnacle of hot air ballooning which I really quite enjoy? You know it's peaceful. You're nervous right before you go but then you get up in the air and you're like I don't know what I was worried about So I've done it in the albuquerque. Hot Air Balloon Fiesta. Which occurs in October every year in Albuquerque New Mexico and and The edited also Hershey around Amish Country Pennsylvania. That's great and then if you have a place You know to recommend to our listeners. Listeners that you say you know this is maybe off the beaten track or you know. It's it's not Paris London Rome Where would you recommend? Somebody look at to travel title. Well I don't know if it's off the beaten path because people know it but I don't think too many people go there ever at least not familiar with so so far and it's expensive to reach There's ways around that I would recommend New Zealand. Actually and a lot of people go to the South Island because that's where they have the most stunning you the nature and in cliffs a mountains and a gorgeous and all of that but the North Island I think is really cool. They have black sand beaches. They have the hobbit houses from Lord. The rings They have a whole town. That's made up of you know geothermal activity they have a hot water beach. That's also the whole island itself. Is You know geothermal activity but they have the beach where you can dig a natural hot hot tub in the sand. You just bring a shovel and you watch the sunset as like the hot water fills does your little hole and there's a lot of people out there that are doing that every night during low tide and it's just really a magical place where everything is safe. They don't have anything deadly other than driving on the other side of the road that can be challenging her deadly animal. You know deadly taking bees. Is that what you're saying what I'm saying rather very nice. Well General. Just can't thank you enough. That's been a terrific conversation Asian and as we wrap up you know keeping with our theme of world of creativity. How do you find that all of this travel? And you know the the adventures you're describing and meeting the people how does that feed your creative spirit How does that give you new creative energy so I think it's hard especially because I put so much into my work? I was actually just thinking today that I am my worst boss ever and that. If I didn't know me I I would actually take a sick day but I know I'll be lying about it so I I think that that's a good question. And it's really hard because because you put so much of your work into this new drain I think everything that you have especially creatively so when you go on your working it can be hard to recharge but I think just it's the nature like having these pinch me moments And thinking that you're lucky enough to be able to do. This is really helpful especially in my field as a traveler So one example just today I was in yellowstone and it was Tuesday morning and I was looking for bears and wolves through a scoping device and I was thinking to myself that on any other Tuesday morning if my life had been any different I would just be a regular office listening to people complain about whatever legal issue they got into and fighting with somebody on the phone and how drastically different. This was for my reality from before and how grateful I was that I'm in this situation to begin with you now even without wi fi even without being able to check different things even with it being rainy and not having the best is ability it was such a cool experience and I think having those pinch me moments when I travel is how I personally am regenerated and why I find that travel is so good for me and I've had them all over the world and different moments and I think that that's what helps me particularly. Ny found that travelled botanist is the ideal profession. That's great and I guess my last question that you you sorta peeked with that answer. was that If people are listening and saying well that must be nice. You talk about a pinch me moment. You know. Say They Dr that person on a Tuesday in the meeting. They don't want to be an having the phone call. They don't WanNa be. How can they be inspired or what? What insider advice? Would you share that rather than just looking at your experiences. I and saying that must be nice. how how can they gain or learn from this. I know exactly what that feels like. Because that was me for a very long time And I think you have to anticipation in and of itself releases as has many endorphins is actually doing the event so I think having something to look forward to and that's why I wrote a book. My second book is actually. It's shorter but it's called how to travel with a full time job it's called you need a vacation at travel with a full time job and it helps people find ways to kind of fit this because I think if you have something that you've already planned if you you know you have something you've scheduled then you have something to look forward to and when you have that moment when you're kind of zoning out maybe you kinda sneak on your fallen and just pull up a little bit more information of that resort that you're looking at and something like that can really invigorate you and make you feel you know just Mike excited again versus like you're living this monotony even if it's something small even even if it's a weekend trip even if it's a day trip just something that you have planned that you know is coming the anticipation in of itself can help you get through those tough times. That's good point Jack Right Jan thank you so much for for joining us and sharing your experience. W- it's been really fascinating to hear all your travels in your business side we really appreciate it takeaway is I'm gonNA plan a trip to you've inspired me to Jim dissipation endorphin. I'm so happy to hear that. Yeah well thanks so much. And we'll we'll close off there but before we do. I just WANNA WANNA have you share air for the listeners. And I'll also include this in the show notes My website G MARK PHILLIPS DOT COM. Would you share how people can find you including your website at any social media media just for listeners. Shar you can find me at my website. Jen on a jet plane. Dot Com like leaving on a jet plane jen on a jet plane the J. E. N.. And my handle is the same thing all throughout social media. facebook twitter Pinterest instagram at Gen on a jet plane. And you have books that are available. They can find these on your website and sounds like you have some courses and stuff to help people that want to do this type of thing right correct and my books are available on Amazon and actually my third book. The Solo female travel book is now available online at target Walmart and Barnes and noble. Wow grade well we really appreciate it and thank you again. Thank you thank you so much for having me your welcome While what Agree Shannon all travels and just just terrific energetic energetic person and I really found it interesting that this is her work so you know for some of us. It's like travel is a way to get away from one and She described a couple of times where you know. I'm I'm working when I'm traveling. Yes it's fine. Yes I'm having experiences and I'm going out to eat them doing You know tours and adventures and such but this is working so therefore apt to organize my thoughts. I have to know what I'm doing. Take the pictures right. The interviews interviews get the quotes you know. Get the People's names right. I think she kind of downplayed. How much it really is when you're out there because she's blending right she's he's an entertaining herself and seeing the sights but she's also having to keep that part of the brain going you know? What do I need to capture here to share right so and then I thought the part where she was was talking about her mastermind? Group is that you need the circle of support and it's great to have a CO workers you know back up and take your phone calls and answering emails. But oh I think bigger Is this mastermind group. That says I need like-minded or You know people who will give me support feed-back it back I can bounce ideas off They can introduce me to new opportunities. What have you? I'm constantly reinforced. This idea of mastermind Estermann groups for tool for creative development for personal development for career development. it's interesting something we all ought to keep in mind fine. Yeah and and look for these opportunities to get involved in a master It's interesting if I'm wrong. I think this is the first time someone has mentioned mastermind and in all of our interviews by surprised by that well by by name I think they all said here are my mentors or learned but and maybe they're are involved in mastermind groups and may be just. Don't call it that or things like that but yes so it. She reinforced for me. That in some one of them was online she she said and You know with a larger group with may be opportunities to to talk to smaller one on one office hours but no matter. What the format? Yeah because you've you've been involved in masterminding value for I really do. It's good yeah I think the the final thing was this idea idea. That travel can be fun. But you're also when we are talking about a world of creativity that the world is smaller. You're taking day trips the Iceland. You're taking day trips to Cuba So we can do it. And there's no no reason to be limited in our creative scope And so we we can take day trips and drive for an hour but we can also take day trips and fly for an hour or two and be someplace that will completely rock our world and hang it up and that provides a different kind of up stimulation nation and so two our theme in this podcast series. A world of creativity there is a big world. Yeah of creativity there. Let's let's go. Let's go see it. Let's go find it. Let's go experience it and And incorporate that into our daily fabric daily thinking. Yeah that's great. That's a great point joint. Alright another great interview in the books here so As we get close to wrapping it up. We'll we'll enforce early punctuates the end of the series and yeah and Yeah we we've talked a little. Lots of people will do a wrap up Episode here soon. But we've talked to some great people and I think this just puts the exclamation point at the end. It really does says it's a big world out there Be a part of it absolutely. Yeah all right until next time. All the best tells Welton success. Thanks so much. Thanks for listening to a special edition of enhancing human experience a world of creativity with Mark Phillips. If you liked this episode and want to know more check out G Mark Phillips oops DOT COM and please leave us a review on Youtube itunes or wherever you get your podcasts. See you next time

Mark Phillips Jen I Amazon US Google Iceland Cuba Asia Toronto facebook John Europe New York ABC News attorney Paris Mark New Orleans