35 Burst results for "Mark Hyman"

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:00 min | Last month

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Don't want to <Speech_Telephony_Male> achieve a mortality <Speech_Male> through my work. I want to <Speech_Telephony_Male> achieve it by not dying <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Telephony_Male> I don't want to live one of <Speech_Telephony_Male> the hearts of my countrymen. <Speech_Male> I want to live on in <Speech_Male> my apartment. <SpeakerChange> So. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Music_Male> think the <Speech_Music_Male> reality is, I think, <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> I feel like <Speech_Male> if <SpeakerChange> I just, <Speech_Male> you know, <Speech_Male> common, which <Speech_Male> is a rap singer, <Speech_Male> as a beautiful song. <Speech_Male> And in the <Speech_Male> line of man, it basically <Speech_Male> says, you know, where are you going to <Speech_Male> put your one grain of <Speech_Male> spiritual sand <Speech_Male> on the universal <Speech_Male> scales of humanity? <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> And for <Speech_Music_Male> me, I think <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> this week was an example <Speech_Male> for me of <Speech_Telephony_Male> where I <Speech_Male> put my grain of sand. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Music_Male> they don't have any illusions <Speech_Male> that I'm going <Speech_Male> to change the world or <Silence> do <Speech_Music_Male> anything dramatic, <Speech_Music_Male> but <Speech_Male> if I can just make <Speech_Music_Male> the world a little bit better <Speech_Music_Male> place, just help <Speech_Male> one more person. <Speech_Male> It's just like, <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Male> make somebody's <SpeakerChange> life a <Speech_Male> little bit better. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> That's how <Speech_Male> I would like to <SpeakerChange> remember. <Speech_Male> All right, Mark. <Speech_Male> Well, that's it <Speech_Male> for today. And I super <Speech_Male> appreciate you being <Speech_Male> willing to go <Speech_Male> on this. You know, we had this <Speech_Male> crazy idea of like, <Speech_Male> let's do something fun and <Speech_Male> get your audience to get <Speech_Male> to know you a <SpeakerChange> little bit better. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Oh boy, <Speech_Male> it's been crazy. <Speech_Male> You kind of ambushed <Speech_Male> me. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Ambushed me, <Speech_Music_Male> but okay. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> So I'll pass it back over <Speech_Male> to you. And <Speech_Male> another shout out to our <Speech_Male> friends, you know, just <Speech_Male> super appreciate it. <Speech_Male> Let's <Speech_Male> get closer, deck <Speech_Male> of cards series <Speech_Male> by intelligent <Speech_Male> change. If you're interested <Speech_Male> in it and you want to do it <Speech_Male> with your loved ones, <Speech_Male> you can find in the show <Speech_Male> notes below. <Speech_Male> No affiliation <Speech_Male> with them, just fans of <Speech_Male> what they created. I <Speech_Male> love questions and I <Speech_Male> love using them as an <Speech_Male> opportunity to get to know people <Speech_Male> better. And I <Speech_Male> learned some stories about you, <Speech_Male> Mark, we've been working <Speech_Male> together for 7 years. We've <Speech_Male> known each other for almost ten <Speech_Male> years now. I learned <Speech_Male> some new stuff about your <Speech_Male> life. And I <SpeakerChange> really <Speech_Male> appreciate you. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> You did. <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks for asking. <Speech_Music_Male> Okay. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> I don't think I've shared <Speech_Male> a lot of this stuff with anybody, <Speech_Male> publicly <Speech_Telephony_Male> before. So you got me <Speech_Male> going <Speech_Male> here. <Speech_Male> Anyway, <Speech_Male> thank you all for listening <Speech_Male> really. That's all <Speech_Male> for this week's episode. <Speech_Male> I hope you <Speech_Music_Male> enjoyed getting to know me <Speech_Music_Male> a little bit better.

Mark
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:56 min | Last month

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Could explain. And then a few minutes later, he's talking, but not in English in the quota, but he's not talking to anybody in this way. Like, you know, he's talking to somebody else. And then he started things like translate this as well. I was talking to the thunders spirits, and they said it's going to thunder four times, and then it's going to ring. I was like, yeah, you know, it's a little far fetched. But then it was like, boom, boom, boom, boom, rain. I'm like, oh my God. I don't understand everything going on in the world. I definitely don't know what's happening. But I can not explain this, and it's got to be something else. So that kind of got me to just kind of have a deeper sense of relaxation about being in the world because I kind of got that there's more to the world than the eye can see. And it's probably Bieber spiritual story here that we're all connected to. Yeah, wow, what a wild story experience and also kind of like mind-blowing in the way of not being so confined to what our mind thinks of the world is and isn't. A super appreciate that story. You know, and different people are different experiences. And there's been a coincidences and there's things that you can't seem like, oh wow, you know, think of somebody and they show up or you think of somebody and they call or, you know, just like the right thing happens at the right moment. That happens to me all the time, but you know, you know, you can go, well, I don't know, maybe there's some thing there sorting everything out. But that thing with the thunder and the rattle, I could not explain it. I couldn't explain it away. Well, there's a fun little book that's written by one of your friends, Deepak Chopra, and obviously it's one of my favorite books of his. It's called the spontaneous, fulfillment of desire. And inside the book, Deepak goes through a lot of the world of sort of quantum physics, but also he does it through storytelling of his life and all these coincidences that happened throughout his life that led to him doing everything that he does. And it's just told in a way where you hear his story and you're like, wow, I've had a similar experience to that and then he tells you a little bit about some of the mechanisms and the things that could be going on in the background. It's a fun little book. If anybody wants to dive deeper into this area and read a little bit more about it, that's a book that I'd recommend. We can link to it in the show notes. Yeah, very fun. All right, Mark, last question over here. It's a red that means closest. That means that these are the deep questions. So, you know, you're writing a book on longevity. You got many, many years, you know, knock on wood and all those things that are there. You have a long life to live with a lot more bestselling books, podcasts, all that other good stuff. So this question is very much for the future, which is, how do you wish to be remembered? I

Bieber Deepak Chopra Deepak Mark
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:03 min | Last month

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"That nourish me in terms of nature and community and that's the most important thing we can cultivate for long-term health and happiness. All right, Mark, here's a fun question. What is the most miraculous thing that's ever happened to you? Miraculous. Miraculous. That's a big question. Miraculous. How do you define it? It's your question. It's a miracle. Oh, God. Being born. That's one. Yeah, I literally was going to say that. That was what I was going to say. You know, actually, honestly, that probably was one of the most reckless things that happened to me. And it wasn't that long ago where, you know, I've been running for decades since I'm 20 just driving hard working hard, going to school, being a doctor, being a father, spreading the world of functional medicine out there. And I decided to take a break and I went for a month by myself, this cabin. And the miracle that happened there was, I realized I was just happy with nothing. Like, I didn't have my phone, computer. Barely any books just nature me and myself. And I got to sit with myself. And I tell a bunch of people I was doing, and I'm like, you're crazy. I'd be terrified to go see it with myself for a month. Actually, what happened was the opposite of what you might expect rather than being lonely and isolated and disconnected, I felt way more connected. Way more and deep relationship with myself, way more connected to life, way more connected to nature. And I was up in a little house in Vermont at the base of this mountain. And I just felt so ecstatically alive. And then I didn't mean anything. And to me, that was a miracle. Because most of us think we need so much to be happy, we need money, we need this, we need people, and the truth is that there's a place inside of each of us that's whole. And so for me, getting that place where I didn't need anything and I could just be in this incredible miracle and being alive and being in a relationship with creation, that actually was kind of a miracle. I was like, wow, it's so good. And then I just been sort of on a high ever since. That's beautiful. I remember you telling me about going on that adventure and it sounded like it sounded like the perfect time in your life and it also sounded like one of those things that everybody says that they would love to do, but genuinely brings up a lot of fear for them. So how many people actually end up doing it? Well, I mean, just to be honest, the first week or so, it was hard. I was like, where's my phone? We're on my people. How come I'm not getting messages? Who loves me? I don't like being alone. It's like all this stuff came up, you know, but I kind of settled through it. It's like, you know, when you do meditation, you sit there and then first, you know, buy some ten minutes or monkey mind is going crazy. And then you settle in and you get this deep, peaceful state and serenity. And that's kind of what was the inspiration. What was the thing that you watched, read, saw, heard about that prompted that? Well, I don't know if you know this, but I actually was inspired. Most of my beliefs or the framework for how I thought about how I wanted to live my life. Most of my inspiration when I was younger came from a book called Walden by Henry Thoreau, who was a transcendentalist in the 1800s, and he went to a cabin on Walden pond to live there for two years. I mean, two years. A month. By himself, with nothing with a pen and paper. They didn't have bones and MTV there, anything. And he just wrote about it. And he wrote, he just wrote beautifully about life and about the importance of being alive and the simplicity of life and the benefits of that simplicity. And that really, that really influenced me. So I think I always dreamt of doing that. I had once lived in a little when I was in college and had a lot of that time. But I also felt inspired because I wanted to kind of reset

Mark Vermont Henry Thoreau Walden pond Walden MTV
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:46 min | Last month

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Friends that we have gatherings, for example, next weekend is a gathering of Friends and a farm up in upstate New York and it's just a beautiful group of people that love to hang out and do theater and music and dance and we do saunas we go swimming and we just hang out and have fun and it's really very intentional about just being present, not on our phones, not really just focused on things that are really not not really enlivening our souls. So I feel really excited about this time in my life where I can actually start to cultivate these times of a real play. You know, at the beginning of the year, I made a list of the things that bring me joy that are pretty simple and straightforward. It's just that I gotta be more intentional with my schedule and planning and also putting it out there to the people that I want to do with and one of the things that brings me the most amount of joy is that typically every year my family would go on like a vacation together and I have a pretty big family and I'm talking about like I made it media family like parents, sisters, their husbands their nephew nieces and my wife and some of my most magical experiences would be the dinners that we would all cook together and before we would start cooking, everybody would grab their cell phone and the kids would go around in a little basket and they put their cell phones, iPads in there and they'd go lock it up and put it away in the other room. So we have this entire meal that we're getting a chance to prepare together and not only cook together, which is a bonding experience on its own, but also eat and then at the dinner table, again, much like these questions, I'm big into questions, which is why I was super into today's theme for the episode. We just go around the table and ask something. It's amazing how even your own parents. There's basic stuff about their life that you've never thought about asking and their answers will continue to surprise you. You know, one of the things that I often try to think about is I try to make sure that I don't think that I know somebody too well. Like even you Mark, you know, you're my business partner, but I try to always imagine what is there something new that I can discover about you because the second that I say that I already know you, I'm less curious about wanting to get to know you. Yeah, for sure. We have a few more questions here. So we're going to go to the next one. What characteristic do you most admire in others? Honesty, integrity. I think that's just like straightforwardness. I think a lot of times we are taught and I was really taught to just kind of and not always tell the truth. And I think when it can be subtle, it could be like either over exaggerating under exaggerating it can be not meeting things that can be not being direct and honest about your feelings and experiences and emotions. So people who can just be fully themselves, be transparent honest and be kind in it. That's very attractive to me. I had a few more questions over here, Mark. This one over here, what is the greatest struggle you've overcome? I mean, I think in the context of my whole life, the thing that I'm really proud of that really helped me do the work I do was coming to this horrible disease called product peak syndrome. For me it was caused by a host of things from mercury poisoning to mold to confections, and I just. You know, it could have taken me down. I could have just quit my job. Either at times when I thought I was going to go on disability and just, you know, I was going to kind of go on disability at the rest of my life because I couldn't function. And I just felt like my life was over. I felt so silent times just because you're just like, imagine like not sleeping for two days and feeling like that all the time. And never even if you sleep, you don't feel better. And then you're 8 feet tired, brain fog, my gut was a mess. And really, I'm most proud of sticking to and being tenacious about learning about folks from medicine and learning how to unpack it. Learning how to heal myself, where before I was just so, so struggling with this condition, that most people would have given up on it. So I'm really proud that I stuck with it. And now, it's really become my whole life. And I really been the advocate for functional medicine because I saw what I could do for me. I saw what it does for my patients. And I really, I really want to get out there in the world. And I can tell you it's just so exciting to me in Washington this week, talking to The White House senators, congressmen, and really hearing people talk about food as a medicine. And I had them lobbying me and I was hysterical. There were a couple of senators who were just when I'm talking and all I want to talk about like food is medicine and what we need to do and regenerate. I'm like, wow, okay, so all that hard work, all that effort. I think it has paid off. And now it's really become part of healthcare and part of our national conversation. Well, there's a lot of work to be done there and I appreciate you dedicating a huge portion of your life and your energy right now to it. We're all going to benefit from the progress that's made there. All right, let's keep on going with the themes of some of these questions over here. What is the best advice you've ever received? think the best piece of advice was, you know, I grew up, I grew up in a family where my stepfather was very angry with a rager hall. He went to his own childhood trauma and it was not blaming here or anything, but it was a really tough environment. And my mother really taught me to lie. She told me to manage people's emotions by not telling the truth. And by avoiding conflict.

product peak syndrome swimming Mark New York White House Washington rager hall
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:39 min | Last month

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Oh, I know. Work. I was a workaholic. I'm recovering work off. Tell us more. Where's that come from? Where do you think that comes from? And how did that become a key pattern in your life? Well, I've been doing a lot of social education lately, but you know, the truth is, I'm nuts. I mean, I basically had my own practice. I was chairman of the institute for functional medicine, running around the world speaking, wrote 20 books in 20 years. It's crazy. And all the other things that I've done political work, and I realized a lot of it had to do with trying to counteract what my father and my stepfather's life was like, which was very much kind of sad in a way. They were both really not very successful. Despite really trying hard and they had a lot of financial struggles, a lot of financial troubles and so I kind of just said, I'm going to make sure I don't end up like them because it was really sad and that's really, I think my drove a lot of it also just to be very Frank. I mean, both of my fathers and my stepfather and my father were very disapproving of me. I think they meant well, but they didn't know how to parent. I mean, I don't think anybody gets a parent instruction manual of the kids born. And they certainly did not. And for me, they were very judgmental about my lifestyle and my things I wanted to do. And when I believed in and it was really challenging for me as a kid. So I think that also drove me to get recognition, success, and a work too much. So I'm definitely way better than that. I'm recovering workaholic. I don't really have like sugar or alcohol, drugs, you know, none of that really kind of grounds me. I mean, if I have one drink, I'm like, well, that's way too much. And I know my aura ring tells me I've been a bad boy if I drink, so I don't really drink too much. What have been some key experiences or insights or aha moments that have helped you kind of step away and say, wow, okay, this drive for achievement has been fantastic. It's allowed me to create a lot of things. I've been successful. I've been able to provide opportunity for a lot of people. I employ a lot of people and, you know, I need to pull back a little bit because when I'm too much into it. So yeah, what would have been some of those distinctions that have helped you kind of see it a little bit more in context and not just be driven by that addiction to work? Yeah, I mean, I think a couple of things. One, I'm just getting older, you get smarter.

institute for functional medic Frank
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:25 min | Last month

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Not only your mental and emotional well-being. But also in your health and longevity. Yeah, you know, there's another variation of that question. I think The New York Times talked about, which is if you're going through a really tough time in life, you know, how many people do you feel comfortable calling it 2 a.m. in the morning? And if you don't, that's a good reflection of like, okay, is there something to work through over there? You know, your own vulnerability and closeness with people, but also number two, do you need to re cultivate relationships in your life so that one of the best ways to know that somebody is going to be there to pick up the phone for you at 2 a.m. in the morning is also to remind them that you are there for them. If they were ever going through anything, you would be there to pick up their call at two in the morning. And that sort of mutual reciprocity and the feeling of like, oh wow, you do that for me. Wow, that's amazing. Like, I would actually also do that for you. That's a beautiful way to think about things. For sure. All right, Mark, we're going to go to the next question. It's red, so it's closest question. Let's see what it is. When you are sad or upset about something, how do you Mark Hyman like to be comforted? Wow. Well, how do I like to be comforted if I'm sad? I mean, other than chunky monkey ice cream. And the truth is, I call my Friends. I call my best Friends, you know? I'm really blessed. I have cultivated and nurtured really deep connection to me over the last four years of my life. And I reach out to the closest people I have in my life. And I have a friend for you about David, who I've been friends with for 44 years. We met on top of mountain in Canada. And we just had this really deep bond, and we can say anything to each other, we got each other. I have immense kind of group that I have a Friends that I've had for 40, 35, 25 years that are really deep soul connections, and we meet every week, and it's really a way for me to kind of keep my own emotional health good and to connect with the people I love the most. And so I find it really blessed to be able to have that and do that. Social fabric, you know, coming back to it is so key, you know, Mark, you know, I'm leaving for a trip later on today and actually the first week of the trip taking a vacation is with my close men's group. There's a men's group that I've been meeting with in LA. We call it man morning man morning Thursday because we may meet up on Thursday mornings and we go for a walk and much like this interview over here, there is somebody that brings a question of the day to create a deeper intimacy with the group. And we get a chance to talk about business and life and relationships and just everybody opens up. And one of the things you notice is that you never know the battles that people are facing. And, you know, the goal of the group is not to solve each other's problems, but just to be expressed and to hear each other. And there's this shared sense that when somebody's hearing about what you're going through, even if they don't have the solution or the answer, you immediately feel more connected and more support in the world because you know you're not on this journey alone. Sure, for sure. Totally. Okay, Mark, let's go into a next question over here. We got another yellow over here. And the question is, what are you addicted to? Oh God, what am I addicted to? That's a great question. Ah, I don't feel like I have a lot of addictive qualities.

Mark Hyman The New York Times Mark David Canada LA
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:06 min | Last month

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Normal masterclass series and we're going to do something a little lighter today in honor of summer break because everybody's kind of chill and I'm a little chill. So we have some really fun for you. My team has put together a list of questions about me. A little personal questions that they offered to me in hopes of letting you get me a little better. So I can't really wait to see what they're going to ask me a little nervous, but anyway, I'm going to pass through my friend podcast host drew it. Mark, this is going to be a fun episode. I think a lot of your community feels like they know you really well, which they do. You put out thousands and hundreds of thousands of hours of content over the years. You've written so many books, 14 times, 14 New York Times, bestsellers, but I'm hoping that some of these questions that I've put together or pulled rather from a deck of cards, it's actually a gift that was given to me by this company called intelligent change and oh no. No affiliation with them. Just Friends with the folks that started it, Alex and Mimi. And so this is their deck that's called let's get closer. So Mark, this deck of cards has three types of cards in it. So it has it has the first deck of card is a green color and it says close. So these are questions that are like, okay, you're kind of getting to know somebody, then the second deck of cards is a yellow color, and it's called closer, and then the final deck of cards is a red color, and it's called closest. So that's some of the more juicier questions. Right now. So I've mixed them up. I'm shuffled them up. So let's jump into it. I'm not gonna look, and I'm just gonna pick from one of these and we'll start off with the first question. Okay. All right. You got a yellow question over here, closer and it says, when was the last time you've asked for help? And right before you answer, the whole idea of these deck of cards, and there's a lot of different ones that are out there like this, our friend Esther perel, you know, put out a deck of cards too called where should we begin? The whole idea is that often we are think that we're close to the people that are in our lives, but we've not asked some of the most interesting questions that could foster a deeper, more meaningful relationship. And that's tough for people to do. Not everybody is as great of an interviewer as Mark Hyman is and can get the best out of folks. So these prompts are a great way to bring connection and you can use some of these questions in your own life at home with your partner or your friends or your loved ones. All right, so Mark, I'm going to repeat the question for you. When was the last time you have asked for help and a little bit of a dig deeper note there, are you comfortable with asking for help when in need? You know, that's a great question because the truth is, I don't really like to ask for help. I feel like I can do most things myself. I can deal with things. They don't really need anybody's help. And I think that's not a good thing. And this morning actually, I'm having a little procedure on my back later today. And I'm in New York and my friend called me, and I'm talking to a band who I love. And she was in New York. And you know, I was like, I don't know how I'm gonna feel after. I probably can't get too busy, but I offer it and I invite her to come and hang out with me in my hotel after just keep me company. And I realized I was like, wow, do I really deserve that? Is that okay? She's got to come all the way from Brooklyn. And I realized my own head was telling a story about it. So in some ways, I really don't like to ask for help. But in this case, I was really glad I did. And I'm really happy to look forward to having someone come home soon after I get out of the procedure. Yeah, that'll give a little background context for why you're laying down right now and taking this podcast episode kind of first up against the dead. We've chatted about it in a previous podcast episode that we recorded on the same day, but your back has been acting up a little bit. And I said, Mark, do whatever you need to do to be comfortable, everybody in your audience would want you to be comfortable. So if that means laying on the bed, then lay on the bed. For sure. All right, Mark, let's continue on with the list of questions and thanks for entertaining our teams choices with all these. This is a green question. So it's close. So can you remember a time in your life when you felt the most alive? And can you share that with our audience? I mean, I definitely get to feel alive a lot. And I'm really lucky because I put myself in situations and places where I do feel alive when I'm with community and Friends. And the most recent, I think, well, I've had so many, but the most recent was when I was in Antarctica. And the most a lot. I mean, I see a lot of a lot, but I was in Antarctica, and I was at the end of the earth, and we were on this trip to raise awareness around the melting of the Arctic ice sheets and the impact on climate and the environment. And I was kind of staggering. We

Mark Esther perel Mimi Mark Hyman New York Times Alex New York Brooklyn Antarctica
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

06:56 min | 2 months ago

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Welcome to another episode of ask, Mark, anything. My name is Herschel Perez and I'm the doctor Hyman plus me manager. I'm joined by darcey gross, hi Darcy. And she's one of the producers of the longevity road map docu series, and we're here, of course, with our expert doctor Mark Hyman. Hi doctor Hyman. Guys. Thanks for joining us today, everyone. So let's go ahead and get started and ask Mark anything. So we'll start with our first question. So doctor Hyman, our first question is, what is Lyme disease and how do you treat it? Well, that reminds me of a quote from Mark Twain who said, if you want me to speak for a day, give me an hour's notice. If you want me to speak for an hour, give me a week's notice. If you want me to speak for ten minutes, give me a year's notice. I literally, I literally could speak about this for an entire day. And try to distill it into ten minutes. But this is one of the most horrible conditions known to humankind. If I could, as a doctor, weigh my wand and create a magic trick and eliminate one condition from humanity, it would be chronic Lyme disease. And what I mean by that is all tick-borne illicit, but BCR. Bartonella line, all the various strains of lime, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, all the fruits and babies. I mean, there's just so many of these tick-borne illnesses that are causing so many people to suffer. And they're hard to treat the heart diagnose and I personally am an expert in it unfortunately because I've had a busia and I've had lime and I've been very sick from that. And I've had to figure it out for myself. So I'm going to share with you one. How do we know you have it? How do we diagnose it? What are the treatment options? What have I found works best? And help you sort of create a road map for thinking about how to navigate this. The first is how do you diagnose it? Not everybody gets a rash, not everybody gets a bull's eye rash, which is classic for line. Most people don't know they're bit by tick, most people have no symptoms initially. They just feel chronically ill. And they can cause all sorts of different symptoms from chronic fatigue, syndrome, to cognitive dysfunction to quote Alzheimer's, which is often misdiagnosed. And it can cause Parkinson's cause depression as autoimmune disease, arthritis, heart failure. I mean, the list goes on and on. Gut issues. It's the great masquerader. We should call syphilis the great masquerader will take more illnesses our today's great vascular. And how do diagnose it? Well, the first thing I would do is take a free test. It's called M Sid's questionnaire. And it's developed by Richard Horowitz. It's a quiz, actually, to look at your symptoms to score them to look at your exposure and your risks. And you get a score. And it doesn't definitively tell you, but it says gee, you know, if I have a high score, the likelihood that something's going on is high. And it gives you different ranges of scores. And so that's the first place I would start. You can Google it online. You can link to a link to it in the show notes. And it's free. The second is, how do you diagnose Lyme? How do doctors agnostic? So the average doctor will do an antibody test. Like coronavirus, right? Coronavirus, you get an antibody test, the same thing. It's a record of whether your body's been exposed to the infection, but not whether it's active or still going on. So for example, if you got coronavirus or COVID-19, you will have positive antibodies even after you're better in the virus out of your system because it's your body's memory of the infection. It doesn't tell you whether you have it or not. Now, some of the tests to help IGM levels and so forth. But they're really not very sensitive. So you can miss a lot of people in these infections. And by the way, most doctors will just check for lying. They won't check all of the strains of wine. They won't check all of the other co infections. So you really have to cast a wide net because these are showing up at all sorts of different symptoms and they're often missed. The second kind of test is called a PCR test. We're familiar with that with COVID because of COVID. We use PCR testing to check for COVID-19. And so people are familiar with that test. And it looks for the DNA or the RNA of the material and actually can tell you that there's some particles of this bug floating around in your system. Now, most of the time it's negative because these tie behind in your cells, they had any organs and tissues, and they don't come out. So they're hard to detect. But if you have a PCR positive, which I did, it means you have this problem. Next you can do is, how does your immune system respond to this? So there's a test called CD 57. It's one of the natural killer cells. And it's very depressed with lying. Now, I think Lyman. And I say lime. I'm referring to all of these tick infections, okay? I think this chronic wine is like a way. It's suppresses your immune system. It makes you sick in general, and it's this chronic thing that is hard to get rid of. So you often have to look at the immune cells. And so I often will do something called an LE spot test, which looks at your Olympus site, your white blood cell responses, not through antibodies, but through urinate immune system in other ways, that actually shows that you have an active infection. And I find these most helpful that first test was developed in Germany called Harmon labs, the one in the United States was called infector labs. And we use those in my clinical practice to help determine whether or not someone's exposed. So it's still not perfect. Okay, so it's a big advance. And then you have to go on your clinical picture, your history, symptoms, and so forth. So that's sort of the diagnosis. In terms of the treatment, I would sort of break it up into four buckets. The first bucket is conventional medicine says, three weeks antibiotics provide you're done. If you're not better, it's not lying. That's just nonsense. If you have an acute infection and you take doxycycline for three weeks, yes, most of the time it would clear it. But again, most people don't know they've had to fight that they're infected and are kind of just hit by this later on because they have chronic fatigue or autoimmune disease or they have something else going on. So I'm not a big fan of that unless you have an acute infection. And then often you might have co infections for which doxycycline doesn't really work. So you might need to take other drugs. The next group is what we call the I labs community. And they've done a lot of great work to advance our understanding of lime and lime related conditions. And they often use heavy doses of long-term antibiotics and multiple antibodies. They might treat you for a year or two years or three years. And often people will improve, but it doesn't really fix the problem. Because most of these drugs are not by a cyborg or germicidal, meaning sidle means to kill suicide homicide means to kill. They might be suppressing it and you'll feel a

Hyman Herschel Perez darcey gross Lyme disease Alzheimer's Parkinson's cause depression Mark Hyman Richard Horowitz Mark BCR Darcy Mark Twain autoimmune disease Rocky Mountain chronic fatigue syphilis fever heart failure Sid arthritis
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

08:03 min | 2 months ago

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Doctors pharmacy. I'm doctor Mark Hyman that's pharmacy with an F a place for conversations that matter. And if you ever wondered what you can do about dealing with the crisis of climate change, this is going to be an interesting podcast for you because we have a very unusual guest today who is a CEO of a very large company that's creating solutions in the space where many solutions have not existed and give us an opportunity to talk about why it's so important to change how we do business in order to solve the climate crisis. And our guest today is a good friend of mine. Hakan, bungalow, who's from turkey, who is have both Turkish and Norwegian origin. And he learned the trade of business at the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul, which is quite a place to learn business. That story. He also has become quite a leader in the field of business innovations that drive solutions for climate change as opposed to businesses that drive climate change, which is mostly what we see in the world today. And he's a global business leader. He's a CEO of a company called archipelago, which is a home appliances manufacturer that operates in a 150 countries. He's a thought leader on sustainable and purpose driven businesses and in order to raise awareness for climate change because I don't think people really listen to people unless they've done something crazy. He climbed Mount Everest in 2019 after climbing a number of other mountains around the world. And he's written a book about it called a mountain to climb, which is a fabulous book and inspiring story. That talks about his vision of how we can begin to solve the climate crisis, and about his journey to Mount Everest. So welcome to the podcast account. Thank you, Mark. It's such an honor to be here, you know? It's been a long journey for me, writing the book, Everest, again, as you said, people often ask me why I climbed. And quite literally it was, I had difficulty getting people to listen to me when I was talking about the climate and the crisis that earth is in. And I thought, what could I do that would get people's attention? And literally, Everest did happen. You know, when I spoke people would look at their phones, every 5 minutes or so. So that yawning. When I started talking about Everest, everything stops. Everyone's fully focused. But yeah, the whole mission was to raise awareness and then talk about the solutions as you phrase it. But I love the introduction phase. You said as a business or a business leader, we were trying to create solutions to the problem, as opposed to feeding the problem. And I think that that really describes everything in one sentence. I don't think there's a lot of conversation. We're going to get into the Mount Everest story in a minute and your Grand Bazaar origins as a business leader. I thought you might forget that one. Okay, great. But to me, it's so striking what you're doing because there are narratives that are emerging in business around being a positive impact on creating climate solutions, but very few companies are actually doing the work. And that is because a lot of the motives that drive businesses are shareholder value and profit. And you found a way within that framework to actually drive the right types of solutions. So what kind of led you to kind of reimagine what you were doing? What led you to first realize that this was something that you as a business leader and CEO could actually impact. Well, I realized early on that it actually makes good business sense as well. If you think of appliances and you have 14 brands, they're pretty much the same, it's a commoditizing industry. You know, you go into a shop, this endless choice is just price differences, option differences. But if you were presented with one that is completely sustainable, it's coming from a carbon neutral company that's recycling its appliances that has the most energy efficient appliances, naturally consumers are tending to choose those now because there is this great anxiety out there. But for me, the big realization came actually through the preparation for the expedition to Everest, because it was 8 months of intense planning, learning, obviously, physical, mental preparation. But in that process, we also were quite prolific with the social media letting people know every day what is happening to the planet and what they can do. And the initial intent there was to draw attention to the melting glaciers. Nobody talks about the glaciers, while some people do, but not many know about what's happening. And if you think of this whole geography from China, Pakistan, the whole of the ASEAN region, essentially India, Bangladesh, they depend on glacial water coming from him, Pradesh, the Himalayas. And 50% of those glaciers are gone. 50%. 50% are gone. This is science. This is the past 50, 60 years. But the acceleration, of course, is in the past ten years. We've had 7 of the warmest years in the past hundred years have been or ever actually recorded has been in the past ten years. And what's happening is you see when you look at the Syrian problem, for example, 5 million refugees, you got 1 million in Europe, governments changed in Europe because there was 1 million refugees. I mean, Hungary got ten or something and they ended up with Orban, right? Yeah. So you look at turkey with 4 million refugees. It's real. And that was caused by water. There was no water simply ran out. And people in the countryside moved to the cities, and that usually causes war. Yeah. And if you look at what's going to happen in the whole basin where these people depend on Himalayan glacial melts, you're talking about 2 billion people moving on to other people's land. So not a million. 2 billion. 2 billion. 2 billion. It's not going to go well. It's not going to go well. Everyone thinks it's a monsoon. The monsoon comes, it runs off. It's actually the glacial water they depend on. And scientists say this varies that the rest of the ice will disappear in the next 30, 50 years. But I want to talk about solutions as well. And the solution to that, of course, is stopping putting carbon in the atmosphere. Decarbonizing. Because that's what's causing the melt. Now I got here because that was part of the reason I climbed this. But in that preparation phase, I, you know, with the videos I was producing, trying to help people along the way of what they can do differently every day to impact. And there are so many things. They're very simple, but people started following what I was doing because they were curious. Why is this guy doing this? He's got three young children. Yeah. He's CEO of one of the biggest companies globally in the appliance industry. It looks like a great job, although it's quite problematic. At risk. Why would you put yourself at risk? It doesn't make any sense. So people got curious and started following, and they started really eating up the sustainability. I was actually putting out there. The methodology behind it. And I saw that, and then the methodology behind what your company was doing to solve the problem. Well, that, but also also what they could do every day. Eat less meat, choose turn the lights off. I'm very simple. Electrify everything. There are so many solutions that we in our lives can adapt and implement, which will have an impact at scale. And what happened was unexpectedly when I came back from reverse is inadvertently would really strengthen the purpose of the company. What happened is everybody through the risk-taking I had done, and maybe through the awareness of the preparation process, everybody started believing that this was really what we need to do. And our vision statement, our mission, everything reflects that. So an engineer in every corner of the company started thinking, how can I do what I'm doing more sustainably? Useless plastic or Conserve water, energy. What technology can I work on that will reduce the consumption of energy, hence reduced the carbon emissions. It's snowballed. And the

Mount Everest Mark Hyman Hakan Grand Bazaar archipelago Istanbul turkey Mark Orban Europe ASEAN Himalayas Pradesh Bangladesh Pakistan Hungary China India
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

08:03 min | 4 months ago

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"And I'm joined by Darcy gross, hi Darcy. Hi. And she's one of the producers of the longevity road map docu series. And of course, we're here with our expert, doctor Mark Hyman. Hi, doctor Hyman. Hello everybody. Thanks for joining us today. And so we've collected all of the questions from our community and we're here to ask Mark anything. So let's go ahead and get started. So doctor Hyman, our first question is about the pancreas. What does it do in our body? What's its function? And what's the best way to have good pancreatic health? Great question. Most people have no idea what it does. It's essentially an endocrine organ. Producing hormones. And an exocrine organ producing enzymes and other things we need to digest our food. So it's kind of got a dual function. The endocrine part is producing insulin. There's beta cells in the pancreas that are special insulin producing cells. So when you eat carbohydrates or sugar, it actually secretes a little bit of insulin to help keep the blood sugar down and put the fuel into the cell. So it's almost like the key that unlocks the door yourselves and lets the glucose and other free fatty acids into the cells, which is an important thing. That's an important function. And a lot of times we vlog our pancreas because we way too much sugar and flour, as I've said a million times, we eat about a pound of flour and sugar, they per person America. And that is driving the insulin levels higher and higher and higher insulin resistant. And that is the beginning of the end of all of us leading to obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, dementia, infertility, depression, I could go on and on. So insulin not bad, it's just, what's the Goldilocks dose? The lower the better, the lessons on the better. As little as you need to do to get the job done, is what you want. And basically you're fasting and so there should be less than 5. If it's over ten, I'm worried if it's over 20 or big trouble. That's the endocrine or the hormonal function. And then there's the exocrine function, which is secreting enzymes to digest your food through the pancreatic duct, which dumps into your intestine. So the beta cells dump in into your blood, then this little duck called the pancreatic duct that goes into your intestines. After the sphincter of oddi, which is a medical thing we learned on why I remember that from anatomy, but I do. And basically, it excretes this pancreatic juice into your small intestine as the food's coming in to help digest the food. And one of the most important is pancreatic elastase and pancreatic elastase is a digestive enzyme that is important in digesting protein and many other things. Now, certain conditions like cystic fibrosis, people have pancreatic problems, and they can't produce the enzymes. And they end up needing to get prescription enzymes like creon or the prescription pancreatic enzymes. Lipase, amylase, proteases, and a lot of people, I take that just of enzymes. Well, yes, a lot of people do take digestive enzymes. And often in medical clinics, GI clinics, and in functional medicine doctors, we really often measure pancreatic elastase because often people are having pancreatic insufficiency. It's not a true, like a cystic fibrosis patient where they just don't want any. It's just a little bit low. And that means they have trouble digesting their food, they can get bloating. They digested food in their stool. And so for those patients, we can use either plant based or animal based enzymes, often the animal based enzymes if you have very, very low pain critical aesthetics are important. And we measure this on a stool test. I use one called GI effects by genova. For years, and we measure pancreatic. It's under 500. It's not great. If it's like under 200 you're in trouble. So that's when we started to start to prescribe pancreatic enzymes to help patients digest your food. While we're trying to get to the root cause of why it's a problem. So very, very important. Pancreas also can be affected by a lot of things. Alcoholism can cause pancreatitis, which is a terrible condition, a pancreatic inflammation, and it can be deadly. And scarp your pancreas, which you don't want to do. Also, the pancreas can be affected by a stones from the bile duct. So if you're eating a diet, you produce potentially a lot of milestones. I can get one can get stuck in the out that sort of outlet of the pancreatic duct, which is connected to the biliary doctor. The bile duct. So they kind of go together and they come out in the same spot, but if the bile stone gets in, it blocks the pancreas, and you can get pancreatitis that's milestone pancreatitis. That's really bad. So you need to get that fixed, like you can go to the emergency room, and it's super painful. There's weird things like spider bites that will cause pancreatitis. And sometimes people have high levels of amylase and lipase that are related to some other pancreatic injury that happens trauma or something like that. Supporting your pancreas is basically don't flog it with sugar and flour. Make sure you're eating a whole foods healthy diet. And if you are having digestive issues, you might want to see a functional medicine doctor get a pancreatic elastase. Your regular doctor can measure that as well. They might say it's normal, but I would say what's normal versus optimal. And we've had this conversation, normal in America, it's normal to be obese, because 75% of people are overweight. So it's normal. It doesn't mean it's optimal. So what's the optimal? And I think optimal is over 500 on the pancreatic velocities. And so it's often a therapy we use in functional medicine to help people while they're actually healing their gut and bridging back to a normal gut function. Great, that's super helpful. Thank you so much. Doctor hanan, and over to Darcy. Yeah, so kind of speaking to healing your gut and this is really one of those fundamental things that's really practiced a lot in functional medicine, but not so much in conventional medicine, but our next question has to do all with the 5 R protocol. So of course, please walk us through what exactly these 5 R's are and how you implement it in patients, the ones who would need it, and how you work through those steps. If you can have any steps, that are overlapping or of course. Yeah. Thank you. Okay, this is sort of the red and butter of functional medicine is the 5 R program and gut healing. And I'll unpack it for you. Because we started doing this, he way before even the word microbiome was a thing. We talked about dysbiosis and we talked about gut function and we did all kinds of stool testing as we were deep in it in the what? Long before it was fashionable. And we designed a program that was based on the science and also clinical experience to help reset the gut. And it's super important to do that for people in the right way in the right order. If you do the right thing in the wrong order, you can make people really sick. For example, if someone has bacterial overgrowth in their gut and you give them probiotics, it's like a war. So the bad guys are fighting the good guys and people are just miserable. So you can't do that. So what are the 5 bars? The first R is to remove. And that means removing anything that might be bothering the gut. So it could be foods. It could be bacteria. It can be yeast. It can be parasites. It can be worms. It can be drugs, right? So on the food front, we really put people on a gut healing elimination diet. And that is eliminating all the potential irritants, which would be gluten, dairy, sugar, alcohol, but also maybe we go a little further and we cut out grains and beans which are harder to digest. We maybe see only eat cooked food. We say, don't eat an extreme elimination test. We might see donate eggs. We can do testing and look for food sensitivity testing. It's not food allergies, which is where you get a peanut allergy and you tongue swells up and you.

Hyman Darcy gross pancreatitis Mark Hyman cystic fibrosis Darcy pancreatic inflammation pancreatic injury dementia heart disease obesity genova America diabetes Mark depression Doctor hanan cancer dysbiosis
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:22 min | 4 months ago

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"The doctors pharmacy. I'm doctor Mark Hyman. That's pharmacy with place for conversations that matter. And today we're going to have one of the most consequential conversations we've ever had on the doctors pharmacy. And with the manager of ravenhill, one of the leading climate activists and thinkers, we are in literally the Drake passage on our way to Antarctica to witness what is really happening there. We've already lost 3 trillion tons of ice from the NRC staggering to think about and we're really on the precipice, but the good news is there is good news. And we have a moment where we can actually transform all this and not let it be the disaster that it could be. I want to tell you about a man that she's really extraordinary. She's one of my absolute favorite humans. She's the executive director of the bucket list for fuller institute who point the term birth. And that is dedicated to accelerating the development and deployment of strategies of radically regenerate ecosystems, which is about what we need to be doing, which is restoring and regenerating. She also held the role as cofounder and executive director of project drawdown, the most comprehensive plan ever proposed to reverse global warming because it was the only plan. Proposed to reverse global warming. She's a member of sea stars at a capella group lending harmonies with new narratives of future that works for 100% of life. She's an avid gardener student or a small backyard farm to build soil, host pollinators create medicines and grow food, she lectures and speaks publicly on climate, biochar regenerative design, carbon dried out strategies, mindfulness, and systems thinking she's my kind of gal. And she's also an active member of an international community focused on addressing imminent global challenges and welcome Amanda. Thank you so much for having me. It's such an honor to be here. With you here today and also on this boat with this incredible crew of folks. Facing the wildness of the nowness. Wow, it's now in terms of the climate emergency and stepping into our presence and our wholeness as human beings. Yeah, as background, this trip is boat. It's not a vacation trip. It's a tip of carefully selected humans who have the intelligence to creativity, the entrepreneurship, and the networks to actually make a real difference in climbing. And we're here to bring awareness to ourselves and to the world and it's going to be quite, I think, an experience for us. And we're just.

Mark Hyman fuller institute ravenhill NRC Antarctica Drake Amanda
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:28 min | 5 months ago

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"These in their blood tests. And so I can tell very quickly what's going on, for example, I had a friend who was struggling with acne and she's like 36 years old and she was a beautiful woman, but she's struggling and we sort of drilled down into it and she had high levels of these androgens that were coming from sort of this disorder. And so we cleaned up her diet and we started putting on herbs and we sort of shift everything. And her acne went away. Yeah, I would just say a personal testimony is that my wife, before she was my wife and we first met and we were dating, she would share that right before her period came, you know, she'd break out and it was very emotional for her because she felt like she always had great skin growing up. And then later on in life, things weren't the same way and she would feel so self conscious and like, why am I breaking out? Why is this happening? What's going on? And then as we started to learn more about blood sugar, which I knew a lot about it, but I wasn't using a continuous glucose monitor and when levels and Casey and everything approached us and we were trying it out, I had her try it and just by simply focusing on a diet that is in a good metabolic score that she had. She had a significant difference. She wasn't overweight. She wasn't overweight. But it still made a difference, right? Exactly, made a huge difference. And she had great skin when she was, you know, in her puberty years. And a lot of people who struggle with acne later on in adult life, maybe they also had acne when they were younger, but there were many people and especially women in my sort of anecdotal just looking around and asking around who for the first time started to get adult acne. And now they're very curious. And I think there was a lot more awareness around food sensitivities and like, is dairy and issue? Is this an issue as that? But there was less awareness about the blood sugar component. Yeah, yeah, for sure. And there's a lot of people that are drinking oat milk lattes and other stuff and having a lot of sugar bombs, even if they think that they eat really clean. And that has a significant impact on especially breaking out right before they get their period. A 100%, I think that's, I mean, for me, day one, the connection between insulin resistance and acne, I've known for 30 years. But it's not really permeated popular culture. It's a surprising how most people don't really get it. And it's the easiest thing you can do, just quit dairy and, you know, if you want to try sheep and goat, okay, but give yourself at least three or four weeks to clear out your system. And then you get off of all the stars and sugar for a while and see what happens for a couple of your woman for at least two or three cycles. And see what happens. Your body will tell you. I mean, it's the smartest doctor in the room. You don't have to worry. Hey everyone, it's doctor Mark Hyman. When I get dressed in the morning, I want to feel comfortable and ready for the whole day from my meditation and workout to grabbing lunch or going to a meeting, which is why I'm obsessed with Ori. Ever since I tried VOA's clothes on, I've been hooked and I literally have a not wanted to wear anything else. They're that comfortable. I've turned so many of my Friends on to bori and now. My team is hooked to the women's performance jogger has become a staff favorite because they are super soft and come in a ton of different colors. They also have pockets, which is a huge bonus and makes it easier to listen to your favorite podcasts like this one. My team has also been telling me how much they love the women daily leggings made with your special wicking smoothing fabric. A few women on my team have even gotten multiple colors so they can wear them every day for yoga, cycling, running, and anything else. Aside from the fact that I love their products, I feel good supporting Maori because they believe an ethical manufacturing community initiatives and sustainability..

acne Casey insulin resistance Mark Hyman Ori VOA
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

07:52 min | 5 months ago

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"In crime, drew pride, who's the host of the drew prop podcast, and we are going to dive deep into the topic of acne, which is the source of so much suffering for so many people. And it's not that hard to fix. And it doesn't mean you have to slather on all kinds of potions, lotions and creams, or take nasty pills. Mark, this is a topic that a lot of people are passionate about. And are curious about, I actually struggle with acne all throughout my high school. And for my freshman year, literally it's like as if it was timed by freshman year I came in, had terrible acne. Cystic acne. That's what made you passionate person. I know. And it continued right up until. And then literally when I got out of school and I was getting ready for my summer vacation right before college, I found out that dairy, which we're going to be talking about in a little bit was a trigger for me and my gut health. But there's many other things besides that that are connected to people's acne. So let's start off with the basics. What are some of the top things? Give us three things that are deeply connected to why acne is happening in the first place. So again, your disease is your body's best attempt to deal with a bad sort of circumstances. So acne occurs when things were out of balance. And we know a lot about what happens with acne. And the problem most traditional dermatology is you're attacking it from the outside in. But it's actually an inside out job to fix. And the things are the biggest triggers for acne today are dairy. You mentioned, which have over 60 different hormones naturally occurring, especially when they milk pregnant cows even more. Two sugar and the consequences of starch and sugar that drive what we call insulin resistance. And there's a whole downstream effect of that. And three, it's damage to our gut and they got microbiome that is caused a leaky gut, which causes all kinds of food sensitivities. It can cause acne. Now I know that and I'm actually much better because I think I really fixed my gut a lot, but if I say dairy, I would never eat dairy because I knew I would get pimples. And you know, it's embarrassing to be like a 50 year old guy with pimples. So does she have to go on TV? A big one on my nose. So I would just like instant. I had some dairy next day I'd get pimples. So it's really clear. And for women, you know, it's also a big issue because there's a whole phenomenon called PCOS or polycystic ovarian syndrome, which is a condition that's not an ovarian problem. It's a nutritional problem, induced by too much starch and sugar, and in some resistance, that causes female bodies to make too much testosterone. So you've got all these things going on, and these are the sort of most common factors. There's also lots of nutritional deficiencies and other things that are related to acne as well. So somebody is listening and they're like, well, how is that Mark Hyman could be when he was 50 years old? And having some dairy, some ice cream or whatever, and he gets a pimple, but then there's somebody else who can have dairy, and maybe they even drink a glass of milk every single one of them. And they don't get pimples. So what's going on in the difference between those two people? I think one, we're all different. I mean, this is a fundamental principle of functional medicine is biochemical individuality, genetic individuality. I mean, the human genome project and all the downstream unfolding of the genomics and the omics revolution has taught us that people are the same genetically. People are the same in their microbiome and their immune system and all the important ways that we're different. And so, you know, some people can tolerate things that other people can't. Some people have celiac disease. I mean, well, don't. A lot of it has to do with the gut. For me, it was a gut issue. And I had long story told a different podcast. I had mercury poisoning and that just destroys all the enzymes in your gut and I got a leaky gut and causes all kinds of problems. So I was really sensitive to everything. Then I would get rashes and sores everywhere, pimples. Once I fixed that, I was good. I don't remember the last time I had a pimple. Yeah, that's huge. So we talked a little bit about some foods that can trigger it, like dairy, and again, dairy is not dairy is not dairy because we just did a whole episode about some of the benefits of like goats, milk, fruits. And how some people better tolerate that, but we're really talking about when we're talking about acne. We're talking about cow's milk and in particular, cow's milk here in the United States. Well, I have a confession, actually. I'm Friends with rylan englehart, who started with his family that a gratitude cafe and also then realized that regenerative agriculture was so important and started kiss the ground, which is nonprofit to raise awareness about soil health. It was a movie called guess ground encourage everybody watch on Netflix. I was in it. And he sent me an email a few months ago. I said, Mark, there's this amazing guy who started a regenerative farm using a two cows. So a two cows at different form of casein, which isn't as inflammatory. Which is really what was naturally in cows before it was all bred out. And it's what sheep and goat have is a form of casein, which is the protein in milk. And then he says, it's all regenerative and it's a two casein. I'm like, ugh, you just said the two things that are my trip tonight. So I'll try it. Okay, send me the ice cream. Like, 5 flavors ice cream. Can I try it? I ate it. I didn't get a pimple. It was interesting. And I think it's because I think it was the a two casein. Or maybe this was I fixed my gut, but it was like really surprised because doing my head would get a bit more. Right, and it's good that you have that awareness, but for a lot of people who don't, they don't realize that dairy could be a key component. Dairy. What are some other foods? Let's talk about foods first before we go into everything else. What are some other foods that can contribute or agitate the underlining root issues that can make acne more likely to happen? So acne is a state of inflammation. Inflammation is anything that's red hot, swollen and tender, which is a pimple. And inflammation can be triggered by many, many things, including infections, including our diet and the primary problem with our western processed diet is its highly inflammatory. So just the high amounts of refined carbohydrates, the high amounts of sugar, the high amounts of refined oils, and processed oils, the lack of protective nutrients, the phytochemicals in food, the anti inflammatory polyphenols and flavanols, and terpenes, all things that we need to be eating that are regularly inflammation. We don't eat because we basically process junk food. 60% of our diet is processed junk food. And that's the average for Americans. And that includes everybody, not just people who are overweight or unhealthy, but literally everybody, when you think about it, that's 6 out of ten Americans. I mean, sorry, 60% of the average Americans, those people, maybe it's 90 or a 100%, right? So getting on an anti inflammatory diet and getting off the inflammatory foods is critical as a first step in regulating inflammation and oxidative stress in your body. And that alone may just help. And then, you know, getting off the dairy and getting off sugar also are the next two things you have to think about because those two without a doubt have been proven in the scientific literature to be drivers of acne. It doesn't mean everybody who eats dairy is going to get acne or anybody who eats sugar is going to get acne, but if you are prone to acne, it's definitely the first thing to think about. So sugar, why is sugar on that list and what are the mechanisms of how sugar would end up creating more inflammation, which then ultimately in this instance could lead to acne. Well sugar we're through a lot of different mechanisms. But if you want to get inflamed eat sugar, essentially when you eat a lot of sugar, it raises insulin levels. It causes fatty liver, which creates more inflammation, C reactive protein. It actually creates more cytokines.

acne polycystic ovarian syndrome Mark Hyman rylan englehart Mark drew celiac disease Netflix United States
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

07:13 min | 6 months ago

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Are here with our expert, doctor Mark Hyman. Hi, doctor Hyman. Hi, how are you? Hi, Darcy. So we're ready to get started and we've taken all of your questions that you've submitted for this month and we're ready to ask Mark anything. So let's go ahead and get started. All right, so our first question, Mark, is about vasectomies. And what do you generally think about those and can they impact a man's long-term health? I think they're important because women often carry the burden of contraception. So it's sort of often, it should be the man who also steps up. And the truth is the vaccines are great technology. They're often done as outpatients today. They're done mostly painlessly even without actually incisions to call out and decision less vasectomy, which is kind of a little medical trick. And it doesn't have long-term effects on the health of the man in terms of sexual function in terms of testicular issues that just cancer or prostate issues or anything like that. It obviously reduces our eliminates the possibility of fertility while you have vasectomy. And then new technologies are allowing vasectomy reversal. So I met a guy the other day, actually, who was a young man in his 30s, said, look, you know, I had a vasectomy. I don't want the woman to carry the burden. And when I want to have kids, I'll reverse it. And I'm like, wow, that's a very light view. So I think I'm a big fan of vasectomies. If you are looking for some more permanent contraception solution and don't want to have your partner be subject to the problems of female conductor obstruction, like the pale or IUD or all the things that are available, but that are often not side effect free. And I think the beautiful thing about vasectomies of the initial week of discomfort after the surgery is to just because it's pretty much side effect free. Awesome, that's a great answer, Mark. I feel like all of our women members are going to be super excited to hear that answer. All right, Darcy, over to you for the next question. Yeah, for sure. So our next question is just kind of straight to the point and it's what's the best way to reduce cravings. I mean, I think we're all kind of wanting to know. You should ask, because I wrote an entire book on that. Which is the ten day detox diet all about sugar addiction. And I think when you eat cravings, you know, people aren't craving avocados or broccoli sprouts. They're creating ice cream and cookies and soda and sugar, right? You're not grabbing the broccoli sprouts. So what is the driver of that? And why do we get these cravings? Is it just a moral failing? Is it lack of willpower that you're just weak and can't deal with yourself? No, not at all. In fact, the science is so clear on this and I think one of the worst, the worst messages or memes in our society is that weight loss is about eating less and exercising more. And it's all about moderation. There's no good or bad calories. And this is a mantra that's been put out by the pharmaceutical industry, the food industry, the government, nutritionists, doctors, the whole idea that all calories are the same is still the prevalent view in medicine nutrition and science today. However, that is completely false assumption because of your hormones and your biochemistry and your brain chemistry that interacts with the food you eat. If you look at calories in a vacuum, they're exactly the same. You burn a thousand calories of broccoli a thousand calories of soda, they release a certain amount of energy, that's what a calorie is. No problem with that. That's the personal thermodynamics. What people forget is that the law of thermodynamics is about energy being conserved in a system. So calories in calories out only works in a closed system in a vacuum. The human body is not a closed system. And when you eat, you drive hormonal changes, brain chemistry changes immune changes, changing your microbiome. I mean, the amount of changes that happen with everybody is enormous. And so what happens when you eat starch or sugar, which is about 60% of our diet, maybe more in some cases. In fact, the average American eats about a pound of sugar and flour combined a day. Which is staggering. I mean, I don't eat that, so some of you out there are doing a lot more. So I think that maybe you don't see, I don't know. She's got that look on her face. But the truth is that we have a tremendous amount of understanding. The science of how our appetite and cravings and hunger work. So a lot of things regulate it. And the most important thing to do is to keep your insulin level low. So let's talk about how to do that. Insulin is the hormone that gets triggered when you eat starch or sugar and it causes this cascade that leads to increased blood sugar, increase insulin, increases hunger, increases fat storage, slower metabolism, all the stuff that you don't want. So when you look at the biology of cravings, the insulin is sort of the key linchpin. How do you keep your insulin level? You basically cut out or eliminate charging sugar. And you add in more fat and protein. Fat will not raise insulin off. A lot of protein can, but modern amounts of protein won't really be an issue. So for example, in the morning, most people eat sugar for breakfast. They have cereal, which is 75% sugar, bagels, muffins, French toast, pancakes, you know, I mean, Frappuccino cappuccinos, with 750 calories of sugar. The amount of sugar that people have in the morning is staggering. And it is the absolute wrong thing to eat because it will make you hungry and crave all day long. So the key is to shut this off. And in the ten 80 detox diet, I really created a very simple short term hack to break the cycle of sugar addiction and start your prediction because it could be muffins or bagels or pasta, but it's still the same. Your body doesn't know the difference below your neck, a bowl of pasta bowl of sugar, it's the same. A slice of whole wheat bread, bowl of sugar or probably the bread's worse, actually. It has a higher glycemic index than sugar. So I think the key is to turn off. And the best way to do that is you start, you have to go cold turkey. You can't like, oh, I'm just going to have one line of Coke, or I'm just going to have one little bit of heroin. Or I'm going to have like, I'm going to have like 5 cigarettes. It doesn't really work like that. You have to kind of go cold turkey. And the beetle thing is that with the science we have around the ten 80 detox, we can actually stop those cravings within a day or so. People start to feel better. And the key is one, cut out the sardine sugar and processed food too. Start the day with protein and fat. So I have a protein fat shake that I recommended, but essentially it's nuts and seeds, it can put MCT oil in their avocados, whatever you want, a little bit of berries, not too much. And basically the idea is to create a very protein and fat rich morning breakfast. And it could be eggs and avocados and olive oil. It can be a smoothie, whatever, whatever you think. But to be careful with smoothies are a really, really high in sugar. The second thing is fiber, fiber is so key. So I often put people on we'll call pgx or polyglycolic, which is a very highly adorable fiber that soaks in a lot of water. It's come from cognac root from actually from Japan, these are a lot and they make sure talking noodles, which are these miracle noodles, you can get now that have no calories, no carbs, and all they are.

Darcy Mark Mark Hyman Hyman cancer Coke Japan
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:37 min | 6 months ago

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Well, you're not the best friend and what you want. That's right. The quality is looking. So what else is part of going in? So going in, there's also another exercise I do, and there's so many more about share one. And by the way, the book is full of these amazing practical exercises. It's not like, oh, you should be in the community and you should go have friends and it's like a road map step by step to take you through the process of how do you create community capacity in yourself and how do you build and find community and it's really, really awesome. Thank you. And I illustrated the book too, so every page is fun to read. It's not a bunch of words. I really like pictures and colors and it just makes the whole journey of community building a lot more playful and colorful. So one of the other going in. So yeah, so one more going in exercise I'll share before we move on to going out is I have you also assess what I call your via chart. So imagine a three sort of Venn diagram, three circles that you draw. So circle one is your values, the V and V has your values. The I and value in the via chart is your interests and the a is your abilities. So just write down your values, your interests and your abilities in three concentric circles. And sit down with yourself and ask yourself, today, Mark Hyman, what do I value today? Because what you value today is going to be different than what you value, maybe ten years ago. Maybe ten years ago, your big party animal. And then now you're still. I mean, you know, you sometimes change, you'll see it Burning Man. Fist pumping in the dance floor. But today, maybe.

Mark Hyman
Dr. Cindy Geyer Explains Seasonal Allergies

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Cindy Geyer Explains Seasonal Allergies

"Welcome cindy get to be here is always so tell tell us. What is this problem with allergies. We're having this country. How prevalent is it. What are the symptoms of most people get a white causes it and and how does traditional medicine typically deal with this problem will allergies have been around for a long time so it's not a new problem it's when your immune system makes antibodies usually called aegean antibodies to something that you're breathing enter exposed to the environment like a dust allergy or a pollen allergy grass allergy and. When that happens these mast cells. That contain histamine dumped. Histamine calls all symptoms that we recognize as allergy symptoms congestion. Sneezing itchy nose. Itchy eyes watery eyes sometimes using tightness in the chest stick it can contribute to asthma and one of the things that sort of gets overlooked is just how exhausted people who have acted allergies concealing relate Just loma Fatigue so those are the classic symptoms. Even though it's not new the prevalence is unfortunately increasing There were people nowadays with allergies actual allergies than there were fifty years ago hundred years ago and we can talk about some of the reasons why that happens in typically. We're going to treat it or in traditional medicine retreat with identifying the allergen trying to remove it treating the symptoms with antihistamines may nasal. Steroids may be an inhaler for your lungs or trying. Desensitization shots were draws to try to down regulate that response and and what we see often is is for this resignation. That oh i've got allergies is just i got anything i can do about it so like e or i had to take these nasal sprays and the truth is most of the allergy medicine. They're pretty benign but the steroids. The steroids are not and they're often used pretty aggressively. Flo nase and name names the next. His hailed steroids. That may reduce symptoms. But then 'cause osteoporosis. In 'cause you know other immune suppressing issues and now people really suffer from these problems and and the question why are we so overreactive to things. That are just part of our normal environment. I mean that's a question asking allergies something. Humans get well. Guess what not necessarily when you look at populations indigenous cultures and you look at even kids who grew up in american

Allergy Grass Allergy Allergy Symptoms Congestion Sneezing Itchy Nose Cindy Asthma Flo Nase Osteoporosis
What is Poor Metabolic Health With Dr. Casey Means

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:13 min | 1 year ago

What is Poor Metabolic Health With Dr. Casey Means

"What is metabolic health. And what is poor metabolic health because recently studied was published that showed that eighty eight percent of americans are in poor metabolic health. So how is it defined. What is that. Why should we care right. Yeah that study was fascinating. Unc two years ago. Eighty eight percent of american adults have at least one biomarker of metabolic dysfunction. Five percent of us were wait which means a lot of the skinny. People also rain metabolic health. -actly exactly and really my belief is that by optimizing our metabolic health and really stabilize stabilizing our blood sugar levels and keeping them stable and healthy throughout our lifetime. It is really the quickest way and the lowest hanging fruit way to achieve really almost any health goal. That you have whether it's to look good. Feel good have longevity to avoid chronic disease tab athletic performance have your brain functioning properly. It's it's really the the trunk of the tree of so many of these Pain points we're dealing with today. So so what is metabolism. Fundamentally metabolism is the way that we produce energy in the body so we have thirty trillion cells in the body and only for income back olympic. And i think it's really important to find this poor metabolic. It's it's it's there's really three biomarkers that are looked at right. It was blood sugar blood pressure and cholesterol right exactly. So eighty percent of americans have a problem one or more those and the cause of all of those poor metabolic. Health markers is blood. Sugar does regulation and insulin resistance. And so what happens is you know we. We have these thirty trillion cells and every single one trillions needs energy to function and we need to convert food to energy and energy form that we can use in ourselves namely atp for our cells to function and when that process isn't going properly the metabolism when that conversion is not working properly we don't produce energy properly and cells. And what happens. We you have energy you get solar function.

UNC Olympic
The Difference Between Taming and Treating your Mental Health

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:54 min | 1 year ago

The Difference Between Taming and Treating your Mental Health

"Is a mental health epidemic but one in six adults use psychiatric medications. One in four americans will go on to develop a mental illness at some point in their lifetime. And why is all this happening. What's the problem what's actually going on. We'll we're treating mental health from name. It blame it team at approach. So what is this name. Somebody comes in and they're diagnosed with anxiety the name it. Then you say okay. We're gonna blame this. On your biochemistry in imbalance serotonin or dopamine. Then we're going to tame it with medication anti-anxiety medication let's say benzodiazepine. And that's really what it's doing it's taming it. It's re reducing the signal that your body is giving because anxiety and depression are signals signals. That something is going wrong and these medications or quieting those signals. Sometimes we do need to tame these things and sometimes it's really important to team that you can actually get to the root of it Efficaciously if somebody's in a place where they can't handle the treatment than teaming at makes a lot of ads. What is the solution. Now how do we move out of this epidemic so our solution is to really switch our focus and have its paradigm shift around mental health. Mental health is established when a person is able to feel whole we have certain human requirements certain needs and these need to be met in order to feel whole when these needs of a human are not met when chronic illness rises. We'll talk about what i mean by these needs as we go on. We need to start to focus on wellness promotion versus joe symptom management so for just treating anxiety with an anti anxiety medication. And that's really symptom management. Were not getting to the root of why was this person anxious in the first

Depression Joe Symptom
Meat and Climate Change: What's the Beef With Beef?

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Meat and Climate Change: What's the Beef With Beef?

"So much conflicting information about me whether it's good or bad for us and whether it's good for health down planet in so tell us how how to get to be public enemy number one and be perceived as the most environmentally destructive and least healthy food that we're eating and how we got this wrong when it comes to this topic yeah. I really think that's true. I think it's kind of been you know it's been called the king of meats especially in the united states and i think part of that is because it was the most consumed meat in the us. For a long time you know for decades. It was the number one most consumed me. That's actually chicken now. But he has been placed but it was for a very long time meet. You know it was the number one me to there that aspect of it and then there's the fact that beef has always been the most expensive meat. And so you know. I mean maybe frog meat or something obscure would be above it. But as far as meats that are commonly available the beef would be kind of the the thing. You might just have on saturday night. You know the nice state. When i grow in my household had a stake on saturday night for example and that was because it was it was a more expensive piece of meat and so it was something that had just once a week and so it was kind of regarded as you know something that was a little bit special and In around one thousand thousand nine hundred seventy. I think partly because of the fact that it was the the most popular meat and it was also considered kind of almost a little bit of a luxury it but the same time these are large animals and so the individual animals are really visible on the landscape. And when you look at the individual animal like how much water at drinks or how much land purportedly takes to raise an individual animal. It just looks like a lot and so right around. Nineteen seventy you know. I think that i could kinda date. That as the key kickoff point when people really started focusing on you know cattle being a problem ecologically and beef. It shouldn't be something we're eating so much

United States
How To Get Your Health Back On Track with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:36 min | 1 year ago

How To Get Your Health Back On Track with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"Today we're gonna talk about malnutrition which you might think is a problem for the developing world but it turns out that almost every american is malnourished. One way or the other. And we're gonna talk about why we're talking about how to diagnose it and what to do about it. And why is such a big factor in so many underlying health conditions and often missed by traditional medicine. We're gonna take a functional medicine perspective on this today. In our special episode of doctors pharmacy called housecall and again. I welcome back dr liz with boheme my colleague and friend on the medical director kilter wellness center starting physician in ardiden md. I physiology cheese. Incredible a team member in our team and faculty of the institute Medicine and does so much to banfield of nutrition science and functional medicine around the world. So welcome back. Liz thank you mark. It's great to be with you okay. So we think of malnutrition. We went to medical school. We learned all about it right. We learn about kwashiorkor and marasmus and zero valmy and ricketts barre barre pellagra and all these frigging diseases. That we don't really see in the west that are really increasingly rare because of improved access to food nutrition. And so we kinda have pretty much. Got that as our understanding of malnutrition and we were told. Basically food provides all the nutrients you need. You don't need vitamins and supplements makes expensive urine and we should just not follow on that track and study after study comes out showing how this interventional trial with omega three or four later this that doesn't work And and so the consumers wondering what's going on because it's clear that are is depleted and that people are eating a lot of crap and that thought a poor nutrition going on but but is there really a pandemic of malnutrition which can show up in someone who's thin or someone who was extremely overweight so Talk about what the state of our nutrition. Malnutrition is in america today and why we should all be concerned about being malnourished and what that means for our rural health you know so win were malnourished means. Were not getting the proper nutrients that we need for our body to function properly. And there's so many that's like our vitamins minerals fighter nutrients even our protein are healthy fats. And you're absolutely right. We see of under nutrition. Malnutrition in people who are underweight but also in people who are overweight and that's called obesity malnutrition and unfortunately it's more and more prevalent not just in the united states but worldwide

Dr Liz Kilter Wellness Center Ardiden Boheme LIZ MD United States Obesity
How To Start A Meditation Practice And Create Healthy Habits

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:29 min | 1 year ago

How To Start A Meditation Practice And Create Healthy Habits

"Of us have at least a few items on our list of things we quote unquote should be doing whether you want to start meditating or incorporate any other new habit there's amazing science that can help guide us to the results that we want. So what do we know about setting ourselves up for success. When it comes to creating healthy habits. Dr hyman spoke to journalists and the host of the ten percent happier podcast. Dan harris about his own johnny into meditation. And how just one minute. A day may be enough to get. You started with a regular practice. I had been assigned to cover faith spirituality for abc news. And i didn't want that assignment nine percent this stuff at all. It actually turned out to be great for me. And i met a lot of interesting people and that ultimately led me to reading a book by eckhart totally. He was the first person i ever heard. Describe the fact that we have a voice in our heads this inner narrator. That's diam wearing all the time at us. Mostly thinking about the pastor the future crazy and your head. Yeah or the buddha calls at the monkey mind but i had never heard that theory before. That was a major a moment for me. Because i realized okay. This is just intuitively true. A and b this theory about the human situation that we have this nonstop voice in our heads really explains why how. I had a panic attack. Because the voice in my head my ego my inner narrator Is what sent me off to war zones without thinking about the psychological conferences. And i came home and i got to press. Didn't even really know it. And that did this dumb thing self medicating so that was. That was really interesting to me. And then i started looking at the science. And then i started thinking okay. Maybe i'll try this. And as soon as i tried it. I realize this is not you know like hacky sack or you know. Lighting incense is not some hippy. Pastime this is a this is exercise for your brain. It's it's happens without effort in other words. You just have to do. The practices like exercise. You do the exercising our body shape whether you like it or not and yes it happens in that way and in a you can read about all you want but unless you begin to know your mind which is what meditation helps you do. It's like slowdown what's going on. It's not like blank slate. You closure is in your in bliss and that's not how goes right. It's a very. It's a very interesting way to sort of reset your relationship to yourself to your world experience to the meaning you give things and everything sort of shifts whether you want to make it shift not as is the act of doing

Dr Hyman Dan Harris Abc News Eckhart
Is Lactose Intolerance Causing Your Gut Issues? With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:26 min | 1 year ago

Is Lactose Intolerance Causing Your Gut Issues? With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"Welcome dr boeheim. Dr bomb is joining me today. She's our medical records. Ultra wanna center. Incredible physician friend and colleague for decades who's also an rv and an an exercise physiologist and teaches nutritional or the world is on the faculty of the institute for cultural medicine and some of the most important fishing curriculum. We have in the world. i think anyway. I am so sad to have you. Liz again on another episode of housecall on doctors pharmacy and to talk about this nasty problem called lactose intolerant. So get us up to speed about what this is. How common is it. And what causes it and other were born with their we. Can we can develop. And how does it all work. Lactose intolerance is so common. It's it's at least sixty five percent of the world population you know at increases as we get older it's not a with lactose. Intolerance means is the inability to digest the lactose in dairy products that carbohydrate in dairy products and it really does vary a a amongst different of racial groups in ethnic groups owes more common in. We seen in africa in south america and asia. It's less common in europe but it is it is throughout the whole world. We see lactose intolerance and as people get older. We see more and more lactose intolerance. In fact you know some people. Think that By wince we reach age ninety nine. Everybody has some degree of lactose intolerance as i mentioned. It's it's uncommon in in our in younger kids so but there are young kids who have lactose intolerance and anything that damages the intestines if you damage the vilnai in the intestines so if you get a a gastroenteritis if you get an infection in the inflammation in the intestines Sometimes the people take antibiotics or chemotherapy or have inflammation in their tests. That can result in lactose intolerance. So people always say to be well. I used to have no problem with dairy. But now i'm having trouble with with dairy and it's because that can happen after a round of antibiotics or after an infection or we just as we get older

Dr Boeheim Dr Bomb Institute For Cultural Medicin LIZ Vilnai South America Asia Africa Europe
"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"mark hyman" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Plus community manager. And i'm here with darcy gross. Who was one of the producers of the longevity road bat docu series and we're here with our expert dr mark hyman willow dr mark i or you and so we've collected questions from our community and we're gonna be asking mark anything so let's get started with the first question. Do you wanna start a saw. Yeah for sure. Welcome everyone thank you so much for tuning in to start off. We're just gonna talk about something that affects a large percentage of the population in a lot of people. Actually don't know that they have this. Which is a specific mutation or otherwise known as polymorphism in the mt h. r. gene. So can you talk a little bit about this gene in wet. Methylation dozen why she can't. Yeah my favorite topic. Actually i wrote all article about meth years ago. as my blog and it goes into great detail about this whole phenomenon in the body. We call meth elation. And what is this phenomenon while it sounds like a big word. But why's it important. Well you have thirty. Seven billion billion chemical reactions. That happen in your body. Every second is a lot. I think has thirty seven. Twenty seven zero or something and of those reactions requires a helper. An enzyme. any to those enzymes requires a helper and usually those are in the form of nutrients in in fact one. Thirty of your entire dna codes for enzymes decimating. Then that means it. When third of your entire china can only be properly read in the function of those genes can only be properly expressed if you have adequate levels of the right nutrients now the or the right form of the nutrients now. There's a common variation your gene called 'em caja fire which about thirty five or so of the population this. You can have one or two copies from your mom or your dad would call snap single nucleotides pun warsaw more films. There's one slight change in the basically the function of the gene that has to do with the four letter code. That that you know is just turned into gene. So your computers one zero rights Binary code can do all these complex things like. Look at this soon. Podcast mazing right. That's all one zero. Your body is four. it's a coronary. Act g and an any three letter. Combo is gene so act or a gt their g. g. t. a. g. or whatever these are these are these enright for various proteins or they express for proteins as part of the gene expression. Then i said one third of all those proteins that are made are enzymes knows enzyme. You help our so. One of the enzymes it's made is is an enzyme. Called varney can be slightly different for some people. If you have the variation he means you need a certain kind of fola gasset in a certain kind may even need a lot more full of gas in order for the for the enzyme to function properly the danger. If you don't have this is it can cause all sorts of problems. It can cause birth defects. Which is how i discovered. It can cause depression cause cancer heart disease dementia. Lot of problems and in most you'll have no idea and undertake quick story of a patient direction. Patients was a woman who i worked with on the movie fed up who is the director and she was struggling because she was having miscarriage. After miscarriage of babies she was having babies. Warm spina bifida with with with Kind of abandoned stephanie. Which means no brain was horrible And she was struggling and she read my article. She checked her gene. She had this polymorphism shit. Two copies of it was quite to find this out. Told her doctorate. So i need to take the right cut foliage while you just recommend full of gas as You take a special form called methyl fully or five. Metal tetra hydrophobic and and so she took this right kind of fully and she literally had this perfect baby and was actually breastfeeding the baby during the the release of the film which is kind of fun so is super important to have the right type of methylation and the way i think is is like the currency of the body. We use money and coins to exchange. You know transactions all the time in our economy in the economy of your biology changing methyl groups is a key function in. It's basically carbonated for hygienists method. Abc's chr for full And the methyl groups have to transfer constantly between different molecules in order for the body to work properly in for your genes to be expressed or genes get turned on or off like i mentioned all these other factors whether it's mood or cancer. Heart disease or dementia and so forth are birth defects does so many things affected by this. And and if you don't have the right function of these pathways to meth late. You end up with all sorts of problems. And that's why taking the right nutrients in the right forms be really important and dr soldiers. Take folic acid. Well no because you might be the person who can't convert the full of acid from your pill into the right form which is method fully. So you may need to take special former method. Full later methyl. B. six are are methylated. B twelve other forms of these nutrients in how regulations pathways so the key long term is to identify. You had this issue and also takes a methylation support you can. You can take too much but for most people are not getting enough and it can make a huge difference so the gina plays a huge role in human health in all kinds of issues and it's center of our biology so making sure you have good. Adequate methylation is key to read that article. I think you guys can probably posted in the in the notes. It goes away more detail about this but will share with you. Yeah we can definitely included in the links on for resources below. The next question is about finding. I'm someone that can help you be accountable for your health. So how would one go about finding someone that could help them be accountable to help us. Establish a healthy routine You know could it be someone that does like one on one coaching You know someone that can help you with maybe strength training. What's the best way to go about finding someone that could you. First of all a question really is is. How do we change. What is the science of behavior change. What is the science of doing due to get healthy israeli relevant. We need better. We all know we need exercise. We all know we should do distressing well. No we shouldn't do these bad habits and yet we continue to do them so even me school. So the question is is how do you. How do you actually best structure life to support the positive choices you make as it turns out that if you are overweight or you have bad habits. You're more likely to hang around with bad habits and we're in fact if going to the data from christoph has harbored if you're overweight in the other thing why if your friends are overweight you're four-times or seventy percent more likely to be overweight than if your parents are overweight. So the fact is that our genetics are less important than our social networks. And so pick your friends wisely because if all your friends her in cheeseburger fries and soda and watching. Tv all day and.

seventy percent thirty thirty seven Two copies Thirty Twenty seven zero first question china mark four-times two copies Seven billion billion chemical twelve christoph One about thirty five First dr mark hyman willow one zero rights
How To Treat And Prevent Colon Polyps with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:57 min | 1 year ago

How To Treat And Prevent Colon Polyps with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"What's the big deal with pulse because we're told to get colonoscopy every two years five years ten years bidding on who you are. We're told that you know. These are big deals but really never talked talked to about how to really think about them from a functional medicine perspective in terms of prevention or treatment. It's just about going to the kospi. Cutting it out or if you have colon cancer. Cutting that out and taking chemo and radiation. But there's a whole nother world of thinking around this that allows us to to be much more targeted in our approach to preventing and treating these things so talking about whether polyps why did we get him. How how common are they in. Like the general thinking about them. Yeah absolutely so you know polyps are these growth. That occur in the inside of your intestine. So in your colon you can get these growths that are polyps and there's all sorts of different shapes types of polyps you know from at a no most hypoplastic pileups and you know all of that really influences. How risky the polyp is in terms of it. Turning into colon cancer so a percentage of these polyps can become cancerous and caused colorectal cancer. And as you mentioned unfortunately there's there's an increased rate of ecole rectal cancer. It's the second leading cause of cancer death in the united states and unfortunately we're seeing real precipitous increase in young people getting colon cancer and it's hit home for unfortunately a few times on with some of some really close friends of mine and And so it's something that you know we wanna think about you know. How do we prevent these abnormal growths from occurring especially the ones that can become dysplasia or cause

Colon Cancer Cancerous United States Dysplasia
What You Can Do About Excess Belly Fat? With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:13 min | 1 year ago

What You Can Do About Excess Belly Fat? With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"Welcome liz we're gonna talk about belly fat. Thank you mark. It's great to be with you. Enter talk about belly fat. My favorite topic. I've written all these right. Well the thing about it. It's a huge problem and it's so easy to fix and it's not true the admiral are or the time master. Whatever infomercial tool you can get your apps right. I mean you can't get good apps to exercise. I mean eventually have to exercise but if you just folks enter size you will won't get straight so. Let's talk about ms problem. Because for those who listening you know we earn a staggering health crisis. Not just cova. But the whole pandemic of chronic disease it's driven by poor metabolic health and this phenomenon of being over fat. You can be overweight or fat. Or you're gonna be both i. We're gonna talk about that today. And why it's important to think about for health from gemini for preventing disease and just feeling good and actually even just get our own lives together and managing our appetite and are the tablets lysm and our energy and all the things that affect us so excited about. Listen my favorite topic. Oh yeah mine too mine too and we know we know that where you're fat is in your body makes a huge impact you always worry about pinching an inch right when we were growing up you know. Can you pinch an inch. But now we're realized that that fat that's deep with inside the belly. The visceral depositi that belly fat deep inside the abdomen is really concerning in terms of overall health. And like you mentioned it is. It's a huge issue. You know it is a huge pandemic. it's you know in the in. Just the united states we know that seventy percent of americans are overweight or obese but eighty six percent are over fat meaning. They have too much fat especially that concerning visceral fat is a real concern and over half of our kids also are over fat and so which rating much it's staggering. It's sad it's

LIZ Cova Chronic Disease United States
Why Circadian Rhythm Is Key to Health

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Why Circadian Rhythm Is Key to Health

"Today we're having a special episode of the doctors pharmacy with dr toddler. Pena's our house call episode. We dive deep into issues in the function medicine. Space and help you understand your body. A new way understand to access health using the framework of functional medicine. Welcome tun thank you. Mark is great great topic so years ago. Our mentor. sid baker who is one of the genius mines medicine. I believe on the twentieth twenty-first century basin he wrote this book called the circadian prescription. And who was the first one who really talked about the role of rhythm in health. So can you tell us why rhythm and circadian rhythms and chronology is actually so important in. What is it all about anyway all right. Well you know you're absolutely right. I i read the book That's that said. Baker wrote says chicane prescription. That's sort of where the sir lightbulb went off my head said you know this is really important stuff. And it's sort of the fourth dimension of health which is time and understanding that you know we have rhythms in nature. We have the rising of the sun in the setting of the sun and then the lunar cycles and we have the the months in the seasons in the year so it only makes sense that our body has its own cycles and own seasons and understanding that We have these internal clocks and we have jeans. They're called clock genes and they have to synchronize Just like an orchestra got a lot of different pieces You're talking earlier in a podcast. About how many different chemical reactions are going on the body. You have chemicals being made you have chemicals being broken down. You have chemicals being detoxified in you have all these rhythms going on in the body in their happening In in harmony if you will and just like when you have a an orchestra in order for an orchestra to make really good music what do you need. You need a conductor and this is understanding that the bodies conductor Is synchronizing the whole body in terms of the liver and the heart and the muscles and they gestion all of those factors so our body's ability to have a good rhythm is key towards health

Dr Toddler Sid Baker Sir Lightbulb Pena Mark Baker
Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

"Our guest is extraordinary. Dr a friend of mine. A pioneer in the field of neurodegeneration. Who's broken ground. That few have treaded on. And it's none other than dr dale bredesen's who you may remember from our previous podcast where we discussed his book. The ending alzheimer's. His latest book is called the end of alzheimer's program which is much more robust programmatic insight into how to actually use the protocol that he uses with patients that i use and how can kill her to anybody at any age in any part of the journey along protecting your brain or fixing your brain. He's been on the faculty of ucsf ucla university of california san diego. He's directed the program on aging at the burnham institute before we coming to the buck institute in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight as its founding president and ceo and he's currently a professor at ucla chief science officer at apollo health which is a great online platform for addressing nerd. Degeneracy so welcome dale. Thanks so much for having me on mark. I really appreciate it okay. So so. let's get into this. Because in almost people worry about heart disease diabetes But it doesn't take away who you are. Alzheimer's takes away who you are. Not gender disease takes away your soul in a sense Your memory which is really what we're made of is memories and and i think that it's a terrifying disease for so many it's it's growing and scope it's affecting millions and millions of american thinking about five million now projected to be about fourteen million and a few years the caregiver burden is enormous. That goes along with this The costs are even more than taking care of a patient with cancer. Heart disease And this is an epidemic really Globally it's you know literally hundred of millions of people are going to be affected by this.

Alzheimer Dr Dale Bredesen Ucla University Of California Burnham Institute Buck Institute Apollo Health Heart Disease Diabetes Ucsf DR Ucla San Diego Dale Heart Disease Cancer
Is Your Acne Caused By What You're Eating?

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Is Your Acne Caused By What You're Eating?

"We have a tendency to think that glowing can be achieved as the result of what we put on our skin as opposed to what we put in our bodies in fact we spent over a billion dollars collectively on prescriptions and over the counter products to cure acne but eliminating acne as best approach as an inside job. Dr hemming recently spoke about this with his colleagues at the ultra wellness center. Todd lopin and dr elizabeth bow him. The skin is contiguous with the guts of. I draw a line on the skin. And i keep drawing a line and go down my tongue. Go into my gets done on my stomach and intestine. I'm still on the same surface. So oftentimes you know mark. Is that thought of that. Yeah it's a cool. That's how i explained to patients. So the skin is contiguous with a gun incident echo dermal tissue and when their skin issues think got. It's really a tube tunes outside your body is your gut yes it's true. I mean when patient with psoriasis eczema. Acne rose atia treat their gut. Yeah and i don't put stuff all over their face or on their body exactly as the inflammation. I get rid of that and it's like a. It's a really an american miracle i mean it is a dermatology is not something that i'm an expert in although i was trained as a family doctrine dermatology but i feel like it's we get the most amazing results just for something as simple as fixing the gut and changing the diet. I remember i was having a conversation with my daughter. You know about skincare products you know and okay what what's the best thing to use for my skin and and all of a sudden i realized even though we had been she live with me your whole life you know. I don't think i ever said this. I said what's what you're eating is so much more important than what you're putting on your

Dr Hemming Ultra Wellness Center Todd Lopin Dr Elizabeth Psoriasis Eczema Acne Mark
Mercury Toxicity with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Mercury Toxicity with Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"I'm so happy to be sharing the story of mercury with you and a personal story for me with my colleague and medical director on this very special episode of the doctors pharmacy called house call. And i'm gonna sit down with so many of my colleagues the ultra wellness center in lenox massachusetts and liz is just my number one dock. She's a medical director of the ultra wellness center. She teaches all over the world. She's in the faculty and super functional medicine. She's one of the best doctors. I know and we are going to talk about mercury. So welcome liz. Inst- mark it's great to be with you today so let's start with talking about. Why do you think this is just so ignored. Because every is such a prevalent problem and when we cast people at the ultra center we find so many people have not only high blood levels of mercury but high total body levels in fact we did a survey of the ten thousand tests and we done at some point in time and we looked at the number of people who had toxicity and it was forty percent of the people who came to wanna center had high levels of mercury that interfere with their biology. So why did he just ignored. And and what we have to do to properly discover whether mercury is an issue for somebody or not. I mean it's it's a great question. Mark you know Even the world health organization recognizes that mercury is one of the top ten chemicals a major public health concern. But i think that toxins in general interventional medicine are often overlooked and ignored because we we always are thinking about acute tax city in conventional medicine and so often were not thinking about the chronic lower levels of toxicity can have huge health effects as

Ultra Wellness Center Ultra Center Lenox Massachusetts LIZ World Health Organization Mark
The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:18 min | 1 year ago

The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

"People who go to medical school. We don't really learn much about the mouth gum disease or you can have sores in your mouth and we a few things here and there. But it's just amazing. How much of a vacuum and our education or health is but in the turns out it's been linked to everything from alzheimer's to heart disease to cancer and to autoimmune diseases and on and on and on and the question is you know what is going on with abs the connection between our oral health and overall so take us down that pathway. Then we'll talk about you know. Basically how to address dental health a functional medicine perspective. Yeah so mark Just a just a little bit of background. Probably have mentioned this before. But i come from family of dentists so my grandfather was a dentist. He went to the university of maryland in the late eighteen. Hundreds my father went to university of maryland. Nineteen four days. My brother went to u. penn dental school and then his two sons are dentists and my two sisters are dental hygiene. So this is a topic. That's near and dear to me. And i'm sure the black sheep of the family and we know that in functional medicine the gut is sort of where everything starts and it can either lead you down the path of health or can lead you down the path of disease and the beginning of the gut the mouth so as you mentioned you know in in medical school. We didn't learn anything about them out. That was like for the dentist. We'll just ignore that and the dentist just basically stay them out and they don't really realize that there's a whole body connected mild or some of the dentist don't and this is where i think. A lot of even functional medicine physicians and dentists really miss a connection. So unless you're working with a a holistic Smart dentist or a functional medicine doctor. Who's aware of the connection between on the mouth in the gut ends systemic the yoon system You're going to be missing a lot of things and and as you mentioned before You know there are a host of conditions including premature birth obesity diabetes cardiovascular disease rheumatoid arthritis inflammatory bowel disease and even dementia that are directly connected to poor or health.

Alzheimer's Mark Just University Of Maryland Penn Dental School Autoimmune Diseases Heart Disease Cancer Diabetes Cardiovascular Diseas Obesity Dementia
The Problem of Gestational Diabetes With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:58 min | 1 year ago

The Problem of Gestational Diabetes With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"We're gonna be talking about conditions pretty common This one hundred percent preventable. A hundred percent reversible that is managed often in very weird ways by traditional medicine and something that's called just station diabetes which is essentially diabetes of pregnancy. So liz tell us how common is this problem. And why should we even care. Be worried about it. Yeah well thanks mark. thanks for having me. It's great to be on with you again and It's really common actually say up to ten percent of women have diabetes which means their blood. Sugar is too high during pregnancy and as a result. What happens when their blood sugar too high during pregnancy is the babies grow too big right so they will get. They will get over weight when they're born so they can grow big. Those offspring often have increased risk of insulin resistance and diabetes and waking when they're adults so when women have just diabetes during their pregnancy. It makes it harder for that baby to maintain healthy weight. When they're an adult so it's trans-generational absolutely not only. Is it dangerous for the baby. During that pregnancy they have a higher rate of of problems with birth. They've increased rate of c-section but their metabolism is damaged. So they have a harder. Time with maintaining normal weight as an adult. They have an increased risk of obesity. They have an increased risk of insulin. Resistance and For that mother to if they had just stations diabetes they have a much higher rates of diabetes post pregnancy. Both type one and type two which is interesting. So they also have a higher rate of cardiovascular disease. they say that a third will develop metabolic syndrome when the within the next five years. So you know it's it is definitely a risk so if if you were told during your pregnancy that you had just diabetes or you you're at risk for just station diabetes. It's important that you are paying attention to your blood sugar to your insulin level to that waist to hip ratio postpartum. Because because you don't want you wanna be be picking this up early. 'cause it's really much easier to reverse if you pick it up early. Imposed ten percent of women who have pregnancies have this problem which is a lot At but when you think about the fact that one and two americans has prediabetes or type two diabetes. You know that's pretty significant. And the question i am is if ten percent have actual just diabetes which means your blood sugar is over a hundred forty after a glucose tolerance test one hundred. Twenty six fasting. How many have prediabetes. Who are pregnant. Yeah because it might be the same ratio as with regular dhabi might be like ten percent and another forty percent of the population might have prediabetes pregnant and that also comes with risks.

Diabetes LIZ Insulin Resistance Obesity Cardiovascular Disease Dhabi
Why Beef Isn’t Necessarily the Enemy

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:00 min | 1 year ago

Why Beef Isn’t Necessarily the Enemy

"I want to sort of elephant room. Which is the conversation about meat. Itself is a good for you. Is it bad for. You is bad for the planet is a good for the planet is bad for the animals. Is it okay to eat animals. Because the conversation it's really emerging in many many circles is that we should become vegan or to save our health and save the planet. And you put up a very different conversation about this How how do we become to understand. That beef is the enemy and and why why is why is it not absolutely i mean. There's a series of cultural conversations. That happened after the industrialization of beef production that shifted the arctic millennials reviewed beef. You know the narrative. Well i'll repeat it. The broad brushstrokes. That story after the second world war we had a major consolidation agriculture many of the ammunition factories converted to fertilizer factories. Which made we had basically a vast infrastructure loot fertilizer factories. That were ready to go. We started to make fertilizer much much cheaper. We had a bigger industrialisation of agriculture. At the same time we had a different approach towards food security is what we call them today but the government after the second world war and around that time was very concerned about america autonomy understandably and invested in systems that ensure that we had enough corn wheat rice soy those key crops and a few others cotton sorghum tobacco that we had those introduced in volume sufficient to feed the american public in the us. The conflans those two things is an overabundance of food crops starting in the fifties that we began to understandably redivert to be feed developed. The world service's in too much food so we feed. It does something else right and the thing is to mark. It's a bunch of rational things that we did right. We are like okay. I don't wanna have another. You know victory gardens and terrifying end of the world scenario. Understand right we have all these huge factories that we need to do something else with understand. These are all rational economic. It was good. It was good intentions with bad consequences and longer term consequences. You know these are sort of short term pivots responses. I think sometimes. And i do agree with some of the broader kind of conspiracies time around big ag but the way that it's been built up i think was a normal reaction to a bunch of social and economic forces and so we ended up with though is by the fifties we were realizing we could get fatter. Beef faster feeding it. Human food right and then about ten years later diet for small planet planet was one of the first book said that hit around those but then by ten years later people started to say but wait a second. This is devastating for the environment. Right because we're basically producing resource intensive crops that are maladaptive for beef diet right And are also bad for the planet being produced at the scale for this usage and effectively we created a very unsustainable beef supply system so the way that it happened is that we pivoted how we produce beef from a natural regenerate traditional system to the modern industrial farm. Yeah and then we started to understand. I'd say they the the response to that was for many people will. We're going to be vegan now the response but just like oh my god. Look what's happening. These factory farms and then of course literature came out. That meat is bad for you as got saturated fat. We shouldn't be eating. It causes heart disease right. Yes yes. And i think a lot of they you know they the conversation around beef and how bad it is a lot of it. I agree with directionally in that confinement. Beef is really bad.

Arctic United States Heart Disease Right
Could This Simple Hack Reduce Anxiety and Panic Attacks? with Dr. Kristen Allott

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:16 min | 1 year ago

Could This Simple Hack Reduce Anxiety and Panic Attacks? with Dr. Kristen Allott

"Dr analogy welcome to the broken brain podcast. It's an honor and a privilege to have you here. Thank you so much drew. I am so excited for this conversation. I think it'll be just fine Back and forth to share information. Yeah i love what. You're bringing to the world in this topic of anxiety and i think that we zoom out in the context of the current world even prior to cove nineteen pandemic anxiety. You could see that. The instances and usage of the word in just general language newspaper social media is skyrocketing and you know languages so powerful and sometimes we really have to parse apart a word to really understand like what do we really mean when we're saying that because sometimes we say anxiety and we actually could be meaning something else when you talk about this world of anxiety and your new book which we're going to get into in a little bit. What do you really want people to help understand. What exactly is anxiety. Yeah so i think that's a great question. And i will just tell you how i approach that When i started in practice about fifteen years ago Because i'm a naturopathic physician acupuncturist decided to specialize in mental health. And people were coming in. And saying i'm anxious and and i just didn't think it was like so. How does that apply. Physiology was really the question that i was interested in and because some for some people it's stress for some people. It's i'm afraid to move forward and take a step forward for some people. It's a i'm overwhelmed like there's all sorts you know. It's a catch word as you say. And but there's also a curious about what the physiology of depression or anxiety or whatever these words were saying. And and so i. When i started in practice i literally in my on my living room floor. I had stock physiology textbooks a stack of neurology. Textbooks and the dsm and the dsm is the diagnostic statistical manual. It just describes. What the diagnosis categories for anxiety are and i was just like will. I think it's more than just an emotion like a candy but like the people were coming in with panic. Attacks like that is not an emotion that is a full embodied experience right. And and so i started just parsing out like what are the. What are the fizzy. What physiology causes these physical symptoms of shaky and racing thoughts and your heart racine. And maybe you're sweating and and all those symptoms that you know sometimes it starts small and Escalates to really big asu started to parse that out and then was like well. Once once i started to understand the physiology in the neuro physiology will. Where do we. Where can we intervene to help. People feel better and so answering your questions kind of copying out. But it's like. That's that's the approach that i took because so many people were using words and i was like i want a grounded in something concrete. Absolutely i mean if we look at the history and evolution of just anxiety and a lot of mental health. A lot of these things in early medicine were considered to be They're kind of in your head right like nothing else is going on right. We made a documentary a few years ago. Which then led to the name of this podcast. Broken brain my business partner. Dear friend dr mark hyman. We made a documentary called broken brain and the underlying premise. That documentary was what you do to your body you do to your brain. Your brain is not in. This isolated eight oregon that just as floating on top of your head. That's completely disconnected than the rest of everything. That's going on there actually an intertwined system and we have to understand that yes there can be. Let's call for lack of a better term emotional factors that are there right. Stressor is the complete driver of so many different things that we feel but let's also look at the physiology of what's happening underneath so when it comes to that topic of anxiety and the physiology gonna ask you a question which is a question that i came across a few years ago in a book by peter thiel little bit of a controversial character. But i really love this question that he had inside of this book. I think the book is called zero to one and he said what truth do you believe is true that other people disagree with in that category. So when you look at right what do you believe is true when you think about anxiety and physiology that people maybe traditional western medicine will say like. I don't know if that's true. Yeah so The one truth. That i see time and time again is it is really hard to have a panic attack. If you just ate. And i don't see panic. Attacks occur unless people are five hours from food or more at or they may have eaten some really sugary substance to at two hours ago. But if you had a real meal. It is really hard to have a panic attack. That's powerful right. There and people like that is not true and and the same applies to suicidal Which is know just part of the spectrum of people keep doing doing panic attacks they can get there and and and and the reason for that is that are i mean i can go into the physiology but but people don't believe that until they start looking mental health professionals or physicians and then when they want start looking at the pattern it holds true. Now there's always an exception to the rule ways but it holds like ninety five percent true

Pandemic Anxiety Dr Mark Hyman Drew ASU Anxiety Depression Peter Thiel Oregon
Your Genes Determine Your Predisposition, But Not Your Destiny

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Your Genes Determine Your Predisposition, But Not Your Destiny

"Now. This is a powerful message that people need to hear because of times when people get some sort of disease or illness like say diabetes. They like to say well. It's hereditary because it's in my family. It's in my jeans. I was going to get it anyway. Nothing much i could do but the reality is that science shows us that a lot of these so-called hereditary diseases don't necessarily have to be your destiny. The reality is that if you change your lifestyle because a lot of these things are lifestyle diseases. They're not necessarily genetic. Your genes determined that you have a predisposition towards certain ailments. It doesn't necessarily mean that you have to accept. You will get that almond if you adjust your lifestyle your diet. Then chances are you can avoid or at least postpone or delay those kind of illnesses and diseases and symptoms and this is something that i got from dr mark hyman. I think it is who is a doctor and author in the us and is very focused on functional medicine and he just done a video series which are still running the video series or not. But i'll put a link to his website in the comments below. Sam dan put me. Thanks sam it was. It was worth watching. I just want people to understand that you can change your destiny. Your destiny is not necessarily just in your genes. Your destiny is going to be the result of your genetic makeup. Shaw that you'll predisposition but the way you live your lifestyle can dramatically change the outcome of that predisposition so do not accept that. It's not your problem. Do not accept that you cannot change it. Time and time again. Sciences proved that wrong. So your jeans. Yes you're predisposition not necessarily your destiny

Dr Mark Hyman Sam Dan Diabetes SAM Shaw United States
"mark hyman" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

08:32 min | 2 years ago

"mark hyman" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"Are you looking to reach their full? Potential and achieve success in business and in life want only tried and tested guidance from people who have truly made an impact. You have come to the right place. Welcome to five questions with Dan. Chevelle New York Times bestselling author Bell distills the most actionable and tangible advice. From a variety of world-class humans including entrepreneurs authors Olympians Politicians Titians Billionaires Nobel Prize winners Ted speakers celebrities astronauts and more inspirational guidance practical advice and concrete solutions. Our our chat start. Welcome to the seventy third episode of the five questions. Podcast I'm your host. Dan Shaw Bell Goes Curate. The best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest today is bestselling author and founder of the Ultra Wellness Center. Dr Mark Hyman born in New York. Mark moved to Idaho after graduating from medical school. Then he worked as an emergency room doctor nostitz before becoming the CO medical director at Canyon ranch after leaving the ranch. She opened the ultra wellness center over the past seven years mark has written countless bestselling books including his latest entitled food. Fix had a save our health our economy our communities in our planet one bite at a time. He is the medical director at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine in as a medical advisor to bill and Hillary Clinton as who went from eating fast food and hot dogs on George Foreman grills to being Pasqua -Tarian. I have an appreciation for food as it relates to our health. That's why I wanted mark to share his insights with all of you because eating healthy transform my life and it can do the same for you. How did you originally get into the medical field? Well I was studying. Buddhism believe it or not in college and took a class called the medicine Buddha and begin to understand the nature of spirituality and healing connected and I WANNA be among rabbi and figured out so I I decided to go into medicine it was a way of serving and I believe that the the ideal they still do that. You know we're here contribution. There's so much information about what to eat. What not heat online. How do you know what to trust? It's really important to learn how to be a critical reader of the media and the science and doctors are taught. That's for the most part. Certainly most patricians are most government bodies. Give recommendations are it and here's the real simple answer. There's two kinds of stats that are worth looking at. One is population. Studies will Biaggi that takes people over long periods of time follows a behavior habits. And see if there's a correlation so eggs cause heart disease but it's not really that causes it. It's a correlation and most of the nutritional centres we have our correlation studies which do not prove cause and effect so study of women. Over fifty five six I would conclude with sex never leads to pregnancy the study. The purpose accurate. But it's completely invalid so what we do those kinds of analyses we we see these headlines. Extra kill people you know. Coconut oil is going to kill you and people get so confused. We have to begin to look at whether it's a randomized controlled trial or an experiment. Which means you take two people. You can have them. You know one treatment and half of them another treatment and see how they compare. That's the way determine what's true or not and most of us when we look at a paper headliner. Study aren't thinking about that. We're seeing owners are the correlation and that's the problem so it's time to think through that and it's important but I would not take every headline as Gospel Click big and you should be smarter to them. How do you structure guys? You're getting enough sleep in how you're taking everything into account because it seems like especially pursuing just starting to try and break negative habits. Bad Habits like this would relate son. Is it one time it's prescription to the by is really important and then connected to the house and it's a skill like anything else. I mean I can cook three meals a day from scratch whole foods in thirty minutes toll for offerings. But it's a skill. I learned out exercise into my life and structure my days that I can do the things I want in and this morning meditated today mock exercise tomorrow morning to visit. I know I play the meditation session afternoon and and control what eating in where I'm going so it's really about skilled at all. Men Learning how to practice the skills it help sustain you and actually invigorating overtime. The World Health Organization came out and said that as an occupational phenomenon. Recently what's the best way to prevent burnt out any food part of that you know? It's interesting mental. Health issues are rampant in fact In terms of overall effect quality of life it's the number one health bird around the world and also cost burden becomes particularly Lack of being gauged in a society as an active member. The solution solution in part is figuring out how to connect mental health with those behaviors generate mental health or social behaviors. Of 'cause L in the food again is probably one of the biggest drivers of cognitive function of mood of energy and people don't understand that I was. Exercises is very powerful in terms of rejuvenation regeneration. Sleep were asleep deprived nation. All those things are just super simple. Building blocks his focus on E. sleep an exercise in pure hearted dials in necessarily perfectly every day. But for the most part of the huge difference my nephew for example was having you know depression and lethargy and function and was not doing well and it really blame wasn't exercising. You couldn't function. I want to get bigger every day this week. And he's like completely turned around stuff. I think people don't understand the connection between their mind and their body in the reverse order in other words we know about the my body effect. But we don't know about the body mind effect and so in the DOCU series that I've created a broken brain. We really delve into how to fix rain. Fixing your body I. What's Your Best Pizza Criminals? My best piece of advice is what you love to do and do it and ten thousand connected what you want in life. What matters to you. We'll get you up and excited every day in positive experimentation has the process of of self reflection and self knowledge and awareness. So who are you what matter to when you love we care about excited? Just go for thank you so much for sharing your wisdom mark to follow. His journey can read his book food fix and find them on facebook. Twitter instagram where he shares his appearances travels food recommendations health insights and advice to watch the full extended video version of this episode. Where I asked mark even more questions you can go to Youtube. Dot Com slash. Dan Shah Al. We hope you enjoyed today's show. And the amazing advice. Our guest provided. Remember that you can only benefit from advice. If you packed on it before you do. We would appreciate your feedback in the form of a review. You can leave a on Itunes stitcher for of Pot catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan. Shot Bell Dot com slash review now..

Dr Mark Hyman Dan Shaw Bell Dan Nobel Prize Ultra Wellness Center New York Times medical director World Health Organization Dan Shah Al Idaho New York Hillary Clinton George Foreman Biaggi founder facebook Canyon ranch