35 Burst results for "Mark Cuban"

"mark cuban" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:29 min | Last week

"mark cuban" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Why Mark Cuban is selling antifungal ointment for $7 34 cents by Charlotte alter, Dallas. Mark Cuban, the tech Titan, Dallas Mavericks owner, and star of ABC's Shark Tank. Moves through the world like a friendly great white, all teeth and eyes and relentless motion. When we meet on an October morning at his office in the Mavericks headquarters, the serial entrepreneur aged 64 is wearing a long sleeved T-shirt advertising his last investment, Mark Cuban cost plus drug company. I was there to find out why a guy who's made billions in tech, won an NBA championship, and become perhaps the most popular businessman on reality TV, was spending his time and fortune Hawking generic antifungal medications online for $7, 34 cents. To things up, Cuban explains, that's what capitalism is all about. Capitalism isn't just everybody should make as much money as they can. Capitalism is about finding solutions to problems and seeing what you can do to solve them.

Mark Cuban Dallas Mavericks Charlotte Mavericks Dallas ABC NBA Cuban
"mark cuban" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:51 min | 2 months ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Adam grant. Welcome back to rethinking my podcast on the science of what makes us tick. I'm an organizational psychologist, and I'm taking you inside the minds of fascinating people to explore how they think and what we should all rethink. My guest today is Mark Cuban, the outspoken serial entrepreneur, Shark Tank investor, and owner of the NBA's Dallas Mavericks. Mark's latest venture, cost plus drugs, has made hundreds of prescriptions more affordable. We have a rollicking conversation about what it takes to disrupt an industry. And when to bet on a person and an idea. We also discuss some basketball rules that I think are long overdue for change. And why it's terrible advice to follow your passion. So

Adam grant Mark Cuban Shark Tank Dallas Mavericks NBA Mark basketball
"mark cuban" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:08 min | 2 months ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"For sponsoring this episode. Hey everyone, it's Adam grant. Welcome back to rethinking my podcast on the science of what makes us tick. I'm an organizational psychologist, and I'm taking you inside the minds of fascinating people to explore how they think and what we should all rethink. My guest today is Mark Cuban, the outspoken serial entrepreneur, Shark Tank investor, and owner of the NBA's Dallas Mavericks. Mark's latest venture, cost plus drugs, is made hundreds of prescriptions more affordable. We have a rollicking conversation about what it takes to disrupt an industry. And when to bet on a person and an idea. We also discuss some basketball rules that I think are long overdue for change. And why it's terrible advice to follow your passion. So

Adam grant Mark Cuban Shark Tank Dallas Mavericks NBA Mark basketball
"mark cuban" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

07:47 min | 3 months ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Of closing that. You know, I wouldn't have been because I do think under the right circumstances that carried interest if it's done properly should receive capital gains type treatment, but I hear you and I think you asked the right question. You've gone from a potential democratic idea to raise revenue from the proponents and institutional shareholders related to private equity transactions and instead imposed a tax on labor union pension plans and 401k participants. Everyone who invests in the market who has a board of directors alert to ways to improve their long-term return without damaging growth when their stock price is out of line with where it should be properly valuable. Congressman, let me ask you this as a policy question. I think there's a fair argument to be made that over the years if you were to look at buybacks broadly, they have been an overused tool that has been in some cases used to goose compensation, they've been used in context to goose stock prices. It hasn't worked. I mean, there's been a lot of wasted money over the years, buybacks, if you were to look at the total use case of them. The question, therefore, is there anything from a policy perspective that should be done to try to limit them at all? Well, Andrew, again, you ask a good question, but I go back to Warren Buffett's maxim about stock buybacks, then if you can buy dollars for 80 cents, isn't that in the fiduciary interest of all shareholders in a good decision by the board, which is not to say that if management shouldn't be warned that if they imprudently buy stock back, paying too much of a price, they destroy capital. They destroy the growth prospects for the company. And they ought to be punished by the analysts, the owners, and the broad shareholder base of that company. I don't disagree with you, but I think the issue is that we have effectively incentivized buybacks and effectively disincentivized dividend out shares for dividend dividend out shares to investors, for example. So right now, a dividend is disincentive on a relative basis to a buyback. I don't know if you think they're comparable at all. Well, look, companies, we've authorized buybacks more broadly since about 1982 and the return to shareholders over that time between dividends and cash buybacks is basically stayed in the same range. Companies have to decide within their industry and within their shareholder competitive environment. What's better, a growing long-term dividend or occasionally using stock buybacks, when their stock price indicates that it should be used. It's not a routine thing unless the company is perpetually undervalued to that intrinsic value. I still think despite the tax disadvantage of dividends that long-term dividend performance is something that's valued by shareholders, certainly by income investors. And therefore, they both are very good capital return mechanisms for shareholders. And shareholders benefit small and large. I think that investors have seen through attempts to use buybacks as a financial engineering and they embed discounts to those particular stocks I'm with you on many points, congressman, but we were talking to congressman ro Khanna yesterday who represents silicon valley and I asked him specifically if some of his major constituents corporations in and around his district, like the apples, the huge stock biggest purchasers of their own shares have complained to him about this proposed 1% tax and he said he hasn't heard anything. I haven't spoken to them on this issue, but I've spoken to them all the time on other issues and the fact that, frankly, that I haven't heard from them on this issue. I guess to be they're fine with it. This doesn't prohibit companies from buying back shares. This just makes it a little bit more a little bit grittier to buy back shares. So what's the real issue here? At the end of the day, companies can still do that. And if there is true value in buying back their shares, paying a 1% tax, shouldn't really make that much of a difference. Well, Melissa, you raise a good point, of course you're talking about one of the richest, most profitable companies in the world that has been doing it. But two comments one back on Andrew's point. If you look at academic studies done back in 2019 after a record year of stock buybacks in 2018, they didn't find any difference between companies that had compensation plans tied to performance or not that it really was not measurably different, not materially different in the stock buyback plans. But look, just because you can tax something, doesn't make it good economic policy. So if Apple says, well, we don't care. It's just a little bit of grit as you say in the gears. A lot of grit in the gear damages capital formation. And I don't believe this capital allocation decision is the government. And they are through this SEC rulemaking proposal and this tax trying to send a macro government signal from the federal government. Chuck Schumer and Bernie Sanders lead proponents that these are bad and somehow they hurt shareholders hurt capital formation and hurt the American economy and I just don't think the evidence supports that. A congressman final question from me and it goes back to the carried interest piece because it sounds like you are in favor of continuing to have a carried interest treatment. Why are you in favor of it? And I ask because I understand the rationale for a capital gains tax. I know there's a debate about whether there should be a capital gains tax onto itself. Whether we should incentivize capital. But in this case, we're talking about individuals who are not contributing their own capital. So we are taxing effectively their fees, their income at capital income rates, capital gains rates, and we have incentivized people at the highest end in a way that we don't, for anybody else, including yourself, myself and all of labor across the country, but we've decided this one particular industry should be incentivized differently. Why? Well, Andrew, my view is, look, if somebody wanted to reform the definitions in and around on how the carried interest tax treatment could be reformed without throwing the baby out with the bathwater, I'd be happy to look at that. But the bottom line is this is risk capital in putting out large capital investment. And now we have over 15,000 businesses that are privately held that are employing millions of people. So I think it would be very disruptive to that part of our capital system. I understand that. We should talk more about it. I would just say it's yes, we should keep that risk capital in the system. It's not the risk, though, is not at the expense of the individuals who are managing that money. It's the pension money and everybody else's money that's actually at risk. And that's why there's a debate over this very issue. Congressman friendship, we appreciate you being here this morning. Thank you. Now, as you heard, our ongoing conversation about the stock buybacks portion of the inflation reduction act was kicked into high gear with Mark Cuban's tweets, and he's got our number. Literally. Wouldn't you know it? The Dallas Mavericks owner, billionaire investor and entrepreneur called us shortly after that interview with representative French hill to set the record straight. Melissa Lee and Andrew Ross Sorkin were on hand to answer his call. Andrew, we do want to go to Mark Cuban. On the phone. Yes, on the who joined us on the phone. And Mark, you tweeted about the IRA and specifically the tax on stock buybacks and you said you said this is a terrible idea, first of all. But he said, why not make it 2%? What's

congressman ro Khanna Andrew Warren Buffett Chuck Schumer Bernie Sanders Melissa SEC federal government Apple Mark Cuban Dallas Mavericks Melissa Lee Andrew Ross Sorkin IRA Mark
"mark cuban" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

14:26 min | 5 months ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on How I Built This

"Is that primarily because they don't have the same kind of PBM structure and insurance cost structure? Yeah, there's just different laws and regulations and plus the companies that are doing the selling over there, every sale is on the margin profitable because they've covered their cost in the United States. And so they do everything they can to keep their pricing high in their margins high here. And that makes it easier to sell, which means there's less, there's less friction and selling to all those other countries. You know, it's interesting because you think about air travel, right? And so adjusted for inflation, air travel is much, much cheaper today than it was 30, 40 years ago. It was not something that everybody could do all the time. And consumer electronics, the cost of consumer electronics today adjusted for inflation much lower today than it was 40 years ago. In part because so much of it comes from overseas. I wonder if the same principle might apply to prescription drugs. I mean, is is your kind of model? Is the idea that it will force the manufacturers and all the middlemen, it will force the market to essentially follow your lead? Yeah, it's interesting. It's a great question. So there's two pieces there. One in terms of manufacturing and putting the actual physical production costs and getting that lower. And the answer is yes. I mentioned we're spending a lot of money on a plant here in Dallas. And it's going to be driven by robotics so that we can go through and take any given pill and manufacture one year or two years worth of supply, switch it over to another pill and do the same thing over as a short period of time and push the cost of the production of that pill down below what we buy it today. And since everything we sell is cost plus 15%, that by definition will force the pricing down. And then the second part is, as we grow and we compete, then they're going to have to respond to us. And my greatest fear is they're going to, they're going to be great lobbyists. And try to push us out of business simply because of what we're doing to their business. And I think without question, it will have an impact. But right now, we're too small for them to care. Mark holt tight for just a moment, we're going to take another quick break, we'll be back with more of Mark Cuban in just a moment. You're listening to how I built this lab. I am always on the go. So I don't have a ton of time to do a lot of the things I want to do, like reading novels, which is why I love audible. As an audible member, you can choose one title a month to keep from their entire catalog, including the latest bestsellers and new releases. All audible members get access to a growing selection of audiobooks, audible originals, and podcasts that are included with membership. You can listen to all you want and more get added every month. You'll discover audible originals from top celebrities, renowned experts, and exciting new voices in audio, I particularly love listening to fiasco and the incredible work that they do in their storytelling. Let audible help you discover new ways to laugh, be inspired or be entertained. New members can try it for free for 30 days, visit audible dot com slash built or text built to 505 hundred. That's audible dot com slash built or text built to 505 hundred to try audible free for 30 days. Audible dot com slash built. This episode is sponsored by audible. 2022 is all about celebrating our newfound self awareness and making positive change. Audible helps make space for what matters to you. It's a destination for your wellness, whether you're looking to soul search, be inspired, work towards new goals, unwind, or simply be entertained. Audible offers an incredible selection of audiobooks across every genre from best sellers to new releases to celebrity memoirs, mysteries and thrillers, motivation, wellness, business, and more. Plus new members can try audible free for 30 days. Visit audible dot com slash pod or text wonder pod to 505 hundred. That's audible dot com slash one pot or text onery pot to 505 hundred. Hey, welcome back to how I built this lab. It's skyrocket here with Mark Cuban. We're talking about his new drug company that is working to make drug prices much, much lower. Let's talk about manufacturing. So you're investing in an actual facility a plant that is going to make and manufacture drugs. How does it work? I mean, can this one plant will it be able to make thousands of different drugs? No, we won't be able to, you know, it's not going to churn out a $1 billion worth of drugs each and every year, but it's a starting point for us. And once we're able to establish enough volume, we'll be able to build another one, then another one across the country. So no, this one facility will not be able to cover all the bases and all the volume, but let me take a step back. Our challenge to scale is not dependent on us building our own manufacturing facilities. Part of the challenge is getting manufacturers to sell to us because they're afraid of the response they'll get from the insurance companies. So they have the ability to scale and push their costs down the same way we do. But they're afraid because imagine this scenario, you're a PBM that's part of a big insurance company. And you go to a branded manufacturer and you say, look, you know, if you sell to Cuban and his cost plus drugs, we're going to yank you off of all these hospitals that we buy for and we're going to yank you from the formularies for that this insurance company that owns us approves. And so that's been our biggest hurdle. And when you hear all this talk about regulating prices of drugs by different politicians, they're not solving the problem. They're creating different problems. The reality is the solution is trying to make sure that all these manufacturers so not just to us, but any qualified resellers slash distributors. If we're able to do that, then the door is open to competition, besides just me, because look, at the end of the day, if I'm the smallest player because the big guys have come in and undercut my prices, I'm happy as a clam. And so are millions of patients who are paying a fraction of what they were last year. And so, you know, it really comes down to not can we build multiple manufacturing plants, but can we get the manufacturers of brand name drugs to work with us and not be fearful of these big behemoth vertically integrated pharmaceutical companies precluding their drugs from being sold? So it's not the manufacturers that is the obstacle here. It's the insurance companies. More often than not, it's not the manufacturer. Like you'll hear the insulin industry show data that says they're actual sales price has gone down over the years not up, but every diabetic will tell you that dealing with buying insulin is expensive and impacts their lives and every now and then there are coupons that give them a month to feel okay or a couple of months, but it's not the insulin manufacturers for the most part that are distorting everything. These vertically integrated companies, not all are owned by insurance companies, but for the most part they are. Are you guys selling insulin? No, not yet. No. We hope to, but again, it takes somebody being able to sell to us. And they're afraid to sell to us right now. And so right now, essentially, these vertically integrated companies are maybe not yet, but eventually they're going to start telling manufacturers. They can not sell to companies like you because you are not willing to work with insurance companies, right? It's not that we're not willing to work with insurance companies. We're just not going to put ourselves in a position where we have to distort our prices. Our mission is very, very simple. If you go to cost plus drugs dot com, you're not going to see bells and whistles. It's very simple. There's not going to be dealt telehealth. There's not going to be big name doctors writing articles and blog posts and podcasts. None of that at all. Our mission is very straightforward. We want to be the low cost provider of every drug we sell. And with that definition, we can't work with an insurance company that is going to require rebates or anything like that. And that's part of what distorts pricing. Now not all insurance companies do that. There are some that have come to us and said, we want to work with you. We're not we don't own a pharmacy chain. We don't own hospitals. We don't own pharmacy benefit manager. So we want to work with you. So not all insurance companies are bad guys. Not even all PBMs are bad guys. There's just a few that really have the most power that initiate the distortion in pricing. Mark, is this a business that you think you would go out and raise money for eventually? I mean, you've got your own money, but you couldn't even with your money. You couldn't finance a massive drug company. You know, I haven't so far. This is kind of like the one thing I've said, okay, sorry kids. You know, your inheritance is going to maybe reduce if it doesn't work. Just because it's that important to me. You've heard me say, I'm the luckiest guy in the world financially, and I've been incredibly blessed. I try not to take it for granted. And this is a chance to have Alex reach out to me and to have him be as smart as good at his job as he is and another gentleman Ryan Klein and the people they've hired. I might write the checks and I might be involved strategically, but they make it run day to day to day to day. And while it's a big check and it's a lot of them, the impact is so great, that's worth more to me than the money. It sounds like this is the big swing for the fences that you are taking, right? That you, there's a problem that you were exposed to and you realize that you could have an impact and so you're putting money into this project. Do you think that people who have lots of money have a responsibility to do things like that? I'm not going to judge for other people. Everybody's got to make their own sources. People will ask me, well, how come I'm not going to space and all this and that. But you can question the motives of the Elon's and the Jeff Bezos. But when I've read the stuff that they've written, you know, I kind of see their thought process that if we screw up this planet what's next. Things that seem so insane and so grandiose and so outrageous today, you know, a hundred years from now, kids may be reading it in textbook or whatever, however they're reading or consuming information and being educated about how those guys are whoever helps save the planet. There's just, I'm not going to judge because everybody's got their reasons and sometimes there's things that we can't see, even if it looks more self involved than maybe we can see. So you're putting money into a problem that needs to be addressed, right? Prescription drug prices, presumably there are other issues that you're looking out at. I mean, what's something else that you might down the road, you know, put some real money behind that may not make you money, but may actually help solve some problems or move the needle. You know, I think crypto plays a role in that too. There's these things called distributed autonomous organizations Dao, which I think can evolve to be the best of progressive goals of allowing workers to participate in all upside and capitalist goals where people who come up with great ideas using these dials can be well rewarded while also rewarding all the people who participate. So I think that creates a new type of organization that can have a significant impact. I think they're better unions than unions in a lot of respects. I think artificial intelligence. Right now we've bifurcated into a world of those companies that are great at AI and everybody else. And if you look at the top ten market cap companies in the United States, all but Berkshire Hathaway with Warren Buffett are companies that are amazing at AI. And so I'd like to support entrepreneurs and we started a foundation teaching high school kids and underserved areas how to start learning about AI. And so I think it's incumbent upon the United States of America to train more kids and more engineers and more data scientists, et cetera, to be great at artificial intelligence because it has such a global impact. And in turn has an impact on medicine and impact on so many other things outside of just generic business that will change the world. And so my hope is that we as a country can lead the way and that's only going to happen if we invest a whole lot more than we're investing now in educating kids. That's Mark Cuban owner of the Dallas Mavericks serial entrepreneur and now founder of the Mark Cuban cost plus drug company. Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks guys. Thanks for having me on. This is amazing. I really enjoyed it. Hey, thanks so much for listening to how I built this lab. Please do follow us on your podcast app so you always have the latest episode downloaded. If you want to follow us on Twitter, our account is at how I built this in mind is at guy raz. And on Instagram, I'm at guy dot Roz. If you want to contact the team, our email address is H IBT and ID dot com. This episode was produced by Chris messini with editing by John Isabella. Our audio engineer was Neil rauch. Our music was composed by rum team Arab Louis. Our production team at how I built this includes Alex Chung, Carla estevez, Casey Herman, JC Howard, Liz metzger, Sam Paulson, Kerry Thompson, Catherine cipher, Josh lash, and Elaine coats. Neva grant is our supervising editor, Beth Donovan, is our executive producer. I'm guy Roz, and you've been listening to how I built this..

Mark Cuban Mark holt United States of America Dallas Ryan Klein Jeff Bezos Alex Mark Dao Berkshire Hathaway Warren Buffett Dallas Mavericks Chris messini John Isabella Neil rauch Arab Louis Alex Chung Carla estevez
"mark cuban" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:46 min | 5 months ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey, welcome back to how I built this lab. I'm guy rise. And my guest is Mark Cuban. So Mark, all right, let's break this down a little bit because back when you were on the show in 2016, I asked you about your first business. You were, you were helping people install software on their computers and you were building computers. And I remember I asked you, how did you know to do that? Because you have a tech background. You said, you know, I just opened up manuals and taught myself how to do it. And the time you said, let's actually, let's take a listen to what you said at the time. You know, one of my strengths has always been being able to put myself in the shoes of any type of business. You got a shoe store. Okay, I understand how that works. You got a bank. I understand how that works. You got an oil refinery. I'll figure out how that works. All right, so clearly you have taken this approach to all the things that you've been involved with. Walk me through how you educated yourself around the pharmaceutical industry. It's a very complex industry. If somebody cold emails you and says, hey, Mark, let's fix this. Let's disrupt it. That's great, but there's a lot that you have to learn before you start. So where did you start? I started reading. I started reading every journal and every industry newsletter. I signed up for in red. You name it. I got my hands on it and dug in whether it was some of the legalese, whether it was understanding how pharmacy benefit managers worked, what's happening in the insulin industry, why prices were the way they were understanding the consolidation that took place and how that impacted pricing. Reading these things called mid pack reports from governmental agencies that investigated pricing and issues there, you know, reading single payer reports, everything that I can get my hands on over the last four plus years. Now, regarding healthcare and pricing, I read. And that's what prepared me to be able to do this and to make decisions on it. The basic understanding, I think, that most of us have is that the reason why drug prices are tend to be high. Non generic drug prices tend to be high is because the pharmaceutical companies are spending so much on R&D and the approval process and it takes years and years of clinical trials and it costs millions and millions of dollars and they have to recover their costs. Is that in your view a false narrative? That's half true. And the reason why it's half true is that like any business, every drug has a life cycle. There's investigation, the research, the preparation, the trial, then the marketing, and potentially selling. And then once you get a patent on it, you've got a 20 year life cycle. So for there is a significant investment phase that goes into developing drugs. Not all drugs, though, because often a lot of that investigation and research process is taking up by the National Institute of health. Government funded basically. Yeah, basically government funded. And so we can go into a whole different discussion about how we license those drugs as a country to pharmaceutical companies, but that really isn't the biggest impediment to keeping drug prices low. They're effectively the way that drug industry is now. The process that takes the drug once it's been manufactured, put aside all their R&D and the development of the trials. Once that drug manufacturer starts making a drug, the process it has to go through to get to the patients is ridiculous. It is stunted. It is manipulated by companies that have become vertically integrated, incorporating insurance companies, healthcare providers, big pharmacy chains, and these things called pharmacy benefit managers. And they game the entire system as it applies to Medicare and how pricing is done there by creating very significant retail prices because the prices are set for Medicare as a percentage of that retail price. There are rebates that are paid from manufacturers to the PBMs that go into the pockets of the PBM. So there's so many games that are played to distort pricing. What we decided to do was just come in and not play the games. And so rather than working with insurance companies, which we don't do at this point in time. We are completely transparent. So if you go to cost plus drugs dot com, put in the name of the drug. And if we carry it, we'll show you our cost. Right. And then we will show you our markup which is 15%. Then we charge $3 for handling through our pharmacy partner true pill and $5 for shipping. And that's it. Right. And so all the complications that are introduced by these pharmacy benefit managers and the big companies that they are part of, we eliminate and that allows us to sell our drugs almost always for less than the co pay that you have from your insurance. And the irony of that is that because they're not because of that, we're making those insurance companies a little bit more money. Because the insurers, the patients are not using their insurance to buy the drugs from us. If, in fact, if in fact, the reason why are the primary reason why so many prescription drugs are so expensive is because of essentially all the middle men, right? All of the people involved in distribution and marketing and sales and so on. Why haven't there been attempts to disrupt it in the past? I mean, I would imagine there have been. There have been. But typically what happens, those companies get bought. And so somebody an entrepreneur like myself comes in and says, wow, this is an opportunity to disrupt. Let me create a company that disrupts. And so they take one of a couple pass. One, they start building the company and it gets bought and that entrepreneur makes a lot of money and that person's happy. Or two, they play the game where they'll work with the pharmacy benefit managers as is. And they'll go out there and they'll find the lowest cost available. So there's companies and I don't want to go into naming them because they're doing the best they can, where they'll say, okay, if you go to this Walmart down the street, you can buy this drug for $62. And if you go to a Walmart across town, it's $48. But the craziness of it all is that it's the same drug, priced at different prices, even within the same retail chain, but different based off of the discount card and the location. And what we said was that's ridiculous because that means the patients can't have any confidence in what they're going to pay next for their drug. And so the other delta and why this is more difficult than it sounds is a because it's expensive and B, we're able to keep it low because I don't need to make money. I just need to make enough to keep this thing investing in. Right. And being able to manufacture and grow. And so we're a primary benefit corporation as opposed to a typical subscribers or we should explain what that means, a public benefit corporation is a for profit, but operates with nonprofit principles, basically. Correct. So that allows us to make some money, the market up 15% and invested in we're doing a manufacturing facility in Dallas, so we can push our prices even lower. Yeah. So walk me through how you do this. I mean, because I think you sell 200 drugs, generic drugs, presumably you have some manufacturer that's making them for you. And then you make them available to your customers. But essentially, the margins on this are not, I mean, you're not talking about a company or a business model that can.

Mark Cuban Mark Medicare National Institute of health Walmart Dallas
"mark cuban" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:35 min | 5 months ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on How I Built This

"Focused on all of these different things? Now, I'm not really involved in day to today operations of anything. One of my faults has been, I trust to a fault. There's been times when I've been taken advantage of and I'm not happy about it, but you know, I've managed for the most part to even if it's the result of learning from a mistake, find good people, let them do their job. And that by trusting them and allowing them to do their job, I get to do what I like to do, which is learn everything I can related to technology and speculate about where this can go, whether it's robotics, AI, personalized medicine, cryptocurrencies, whatever it may be, they all have a lot of the same logic underpinning them. And for me, learning all that stuff and staying up to speed and getting ahead and coming up with new ideas is fun for me. Yeah. Now, you know, with who you are and your celebrity and your wealth, people treat you differently than they did when you were a bartender, obviously. So how do you how do you make sure that, you know, that you're exposed to ideas and there's pushback, and that you're challenged? Yeah, I call it questioning my whole car checking my whole card, you know? Because that's one of the beauties as toxic as social media has become. One of the great things about Twitter is there's always somebody willing to challenge you. Yeah. And so there's lots of times when I'll put things out there expecting to be challenged and enjoy it. I'll give you one example. We were talking about the impact of section two 30 on algorithmic enhancement of post on Facebook. This is the, this is the part of the law that essentially recues big social media companies from the responsibility of what people post. Correct. And that's the most succinct way I've ever heard of put. So good job. And so the question became, can you limit Facebook in this particular example? Ability to algorithmically promote things because when you're designing an algorithm or using AI and setting the goals of the AI that you've created, then the neural networks you've created, you effectively are making an editorial choice to promote something. And my understanding of two 30 and the First Amendment was that disqualifies you from two 30 protection. And these First Amendment lawyers came on and just destroyed my argument. Literally destroyed my argument where I posted a post saying, look, you're right, I'm wrong, and I took down my post that ended up being wrong. And I love those scenarios where I get to take people on and check my whole card. So to answer your question, I don't mind putting myself in the mix to have people question me and I actually enjoy it because I want to know that I can check my whole card and be confident in my position. All right, let's talk about another company that you got involved with in the past couple of years. It's called the Mark Cuban cost plus drug company. So MCC PDC. But I read that it started with a cold email from somebody from a radiologist named Alex Alex oshi. Is that what happened? Yes, absolutely. Believe it or not, I've probably invested over a $100 million into people I've never met in my entire life from cold emails or cold calls or whatever it may be. And done really well with those investments. And so doctor Alex, emailed me and he was a radiologist, a mathematician, just one of the smartest humans I've ever met. And we started going back and forth about the ills of the drug and pharmaceutical industry. And he was working on starting a compounding pharmacy that would allow him to sell drugs for less, but would be in his that particular case more difficult to scale. And this is four years ago, give or take right around when there was still discussions going on about the farmer pro. You're talking about Martin Luther. Yeah. And I was like, if this guy can raise prices 750%, why can't we cut prices? Market forces go both ways. And so we started digging in further. And we decided to create our own company, the cost plus drugs company, and go through the process of getting all the documentation we needed, developing relationships with manufacturers and distributors and the like and all the state regulatory agencies and federal regulatory agencies. And that took us close to four years. With the goal of being the low cost provider of any and all drugs that were able to sell period end of story and then on July 19th, we launched cost plus drugs dot com and right now we're selling what we're about to add about 60 more. So we'll go up to about a 175 drugs. We're fairly positive. We are the low cost provider, cheaper than you would pay for your co pay with insurance. And by the end of the year, we'll be up to 2000. Mark, stick around for just a moment. We're going to take a quick break and we're going to come back and talk more about this business and how you're disrupting the pharmaceutical industry. We'll be right back. It'll seem to how I built this lab. There's power in getting together with the people you love. And today, your family isn't just about people with shared DNA. It's also about the chosen family you've found who like what you like and know what you've been through. Maybe getting together with your people means reconnecting with your childhood friends or watching the game with your college teammates or seeing your new baby meet your best friend's baby for the first time. Or maybe it's about reuniting with the whole crew or laughing until you can't breathe or big sister real talk or just sitting in silence with someone who truly understands you. One thing is clear today's families don't often live in the same city, let alone have a single place to come home to. Verbo knows the best places with your people, with millions of vacation homes, your place can be anything from a charming mountain cabin or lakeside lodge to a city apartment or luxury home. With private pools, hot tubs, full kitchens, and extra bedrooms, verbal homes provide the space and comfort you need to focus on the people who matter. Visit verbo dot com or download the verbo app to find the perfect vacation home for your people. Furbo, a place for together. There are so many more things to do during the summer. And you want to free up as much time as possible to enjoy them. So if you're a business owner, the last thing you want to do is sort through tons of unqualified candidates resumes when you could be relaxing by the pool or vacationing with your family. That's why you need zip recruiter to find great candidates. They do the work for you. And now you can try it for free at zip recruiter dot com slash built. Zip recruiter uses its powerful technology to find and match the right candidates up with your job. You can easily review these recommended candidates and invite your top choices to apply. So soak up all that summer has to offer and let zip recruiter do the work. Ready for the URL? It's zip recruiter dot com slash built. That's where you can try it for free. Again, that's zip recruiter dot com. Zip recruiter,.

Alex Alex oshi Facebook Mark Cuban Twitter Martin Luther Verbo Alex Furbo Mark
"mark cuban" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:02 min | 5 months ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on How I Built This

"I'm Gregory Warner, hosted the podcast rough translation on our new season, we're telling stories about the cultures of work. The 9 to 5 it's a myth and rest around the world. I came into this totally prepared to defend my American productivity. At work, the new season of the NPR podcast rough translation. Ready to turn your small ecommerce business into the next big thing? Klaviyo can help. It's the easy to use email and SMS platform that gives you everything you need to build genuine relationships with your customers, and even if you're new to marketing, klaviyo can help you become an email expert with drag and drop design templates, simple insights, and made for ecommerce reports and recommendations. Give it a try with a free account at klaviyo dot com slash built that's KLA BI, dot com slash built. This episode is sponsored by allbirds. Allbirds create shoes and clothing that are better for you and better for the planet. Using a revolutionary roster of premium natural materials, like their popular tree runner sneaker. Why is it called the tree runner you ask? Because it's made from eucalyptus tree fiber, a lightweight breathable and silky soft material, making the tree runner the perfect everyday shoe for getting the most out of sunny days. Spend less time putting together your outfit and more time enjoying the sights. Find your new favorite shoes for sunny days and upcoming travel at all birds dot com that's ALL BI R D S dot com. Hello and welcome to how I built this lab. I'm guy Roz. This is the place where we experiment with ideas and stories you might not hear on our Monday episode. And it's a chance to find out what happened to some of the entrepreneurs I've interviewed on the show in the past, including today's guest, Mark Cuban. Mark was on the show back in 2016, and he told us the story of how he went from bartending in Dallas to building a media company to eventually owning the Dallas Mavericks. And if you haven't heard that episode of how I built this, please go and listen, we'll put a link in the show notes. A couple of years ago, Mark got a cold pitch email from a radiologist who was trying to shake up the prescription drug industry. The idea intrigued Mark so much that he joined forces with that radiologist to create his newest company. It's called the Mark Cuban cost plus drug company or MCC PTC, a mouthful, and there's a story behind the name, which mark will explain. The company wants to upend the pharmaceutical industry by drastically reducing the cost of prescription drugs. And so far, it's managed to sign up more than a quarter of a million customers who now have access to hundreds of generic drugs. Mark Cuban, welcome to the show. Thanks for having me, guys. I'm excited to be here. All right, Mark, you were one of the very first guests we featured on the show back in 2016. And we had a great conversation about your life story and, you know, growing up in Pittsburgh and reading this book, I think what was a book called how to be a millionaire at 30. How to retire by the age of 35. Yeah, but age of 35 and you could have done that, but of course you didn't. You're still doing Shark Tank. Yep, you're still on the Mavericks. But let's talk a little bit about some of the things that you've been up to over the last couple of years. And including during the pandemic, you have gotten really interested in NFTs. Yes. You've got one startup that you've cofounded called lazy, which is a way to show your NFTs. First of all, explain your interest around NFTs, because it's controversial, right? I mean, some people don't understand the appeal or the value. Sure. What is it about NFTs that you think is not just interesting but potentially valuable? So there's a backstory there. You know, I'm a tech guy and always have been. And so over the years, I've paid attention to and dabbled in and invested in cryptocurrencies at various levels. And about galley, it's December of 2020 January of 2021 now. You know, I was hearing about NFTs and I decided to learn some more about them. And so I went to a site. I think it was rarible dot com and then another one meant to dot app. And I decided to mint some NFTs. I just wanted to go through the process to learn. And I was as I was doing that, it's a very simple process where I was filling in the form. And one of the questions that asked was what would I like the royalties to be? And I was like, wait, what royalties? I could create this digital asset and if it's resold time and time again, I'll continue to get paid. That as a business person and tech guy lit a fuse for me and I was like, okay, this is different. This isn't just okay, a digital version of baseball cards lets us buy and sell them. What enables this to happen. And as I dug into it, I realized it was something called a smart contract. And that the underpinning of all NFTs are these things on Ethereum or Ethereum compatible blockchains called smart contracts. Right. And smart contracts really are just a programming language that are probably the equivalent of HTML or JavaScript for creating a website. Only these run on a decentralized distributed basis on top of a blockchain. That got me excited. And that really led me to dig in further with NFTs. And so I started creating them and selling them and learning more about them and really long story short. The thing about NFTs is they're just like any other collectible. They just happen to be digital. But they're easier to collect because they are digital. So if I'm collecting my favorite Willie starch or baseball card because I'm a Pittsburgh kid and he was my favorite player along with Roberto Clemente and I have their baseball cards. I have to store them so they don't deteriorate. I have to get them graded. I have to ship them if I want to sell them. There's just a lot of hassle factors involved in collecting physical goods. But if I have the same picture, if you will, and I turn it into a non fungible token, which records it on the blockchain forever, so there's a recorded history of them. Then that allows it to be a collectible and makes it easier to sell. And as I learned with the royalties, if it's an NFT that I own the rights to and have created, I can keep on getting royalties each and every time it sold. And to me, that was an exciting opportunity for any and every collector and creator. So you're bullish on this. You believe that both as collectibles and as art, this is sort of the future. Yeah, now there's two pieces there. There's a lot of noise and it's hard to determine the signal. It's like if you walk into an art gallery or a store that sells any type of artwork at all, everybody's going to have their own opinion about what the value of any piece of art work is going to be. And it's no different for NFTs. Some people speculate, like they do in the physical art world and collectibles world and some people collect. And every person's got to make their own choice, but an NFT is just a digital version. And when people say, well, you know, I can't physically touch it. I'm like, well, you know, you could take a picture of a baseball card and put it on a piece of cardboard and sell it. And replicate anything you want in the art world. It's not about physically touching. Think about, you know, when you run out of storage on your phone, you know, how valuable all those digital pictures are. You know, people assign value to things that are digital and an NFT is no different. How do you compartmentalize all these things? You're invested in so many companies. You are part of many companies. You are obviously the owner of the Mavericks. You've got executives and managers who run a lot of these businesses. So how do you divide your time and.

Mark Cuban Gregory Warner Klaviyo Mark Roz NPR Dallas Mavericks baseball Pittsburgh Mavericks Willie starch Dallas mark Roberto Clemente
Levin: When Will American Sports Leagues, Stars Stand Against Russia?

Mark Levin

01:40 min | 9 months ago

Levin: When Will American Sports Leagues, Stars Stand Against Russia?

"The 2022 World Cup Indefinite ban against Russian teams The move came a day after the organization issued much lighter sanctions resulting in severe criticism The and it goes on I don't see any hearing here from any of our professional leagues Do you mister producer Yeah you know what good point They're busy cow tongue to communist China They can only kowtow to one genocidal regime at a time And waiting for LeBron James to speak in I'm waiting for all the anchors at ESPN to speak up I'm waiting for that papa venture whatever that moron's name is And what's the other guy's name Not the basketball player the coach I'm waiting for all these clowns to speak out I'm not hearing anything Where's the owner of the Mavericks What's up billionaire's name I forget his name too God am I the only one losing my mind Mark Cuban that's it Where's Mark Cuban Or as Bernie Sanders would say Mark huber Where is he Nowhere Where are the big mouths Where are all the big mouths and professional sports Where are they They're nowhere Where are the big mouths of baseball They're busy striking Oh okay Where are they No the big mouths Nowhere Where are you on ESPN I thought you cared about human rights Apparently not so much Apparently not so much

Papa Venture World Cup Mark Cuban Lebron James Mark Huber Moron Espn China Mavericks Bernie Sanders Basketball Baseball
Can Mark Cuban Slash Drug Costs?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:27 min | 10 months ago

Can Mark Cuban Slash Drug Costs?

"Can the billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban actually play a critical role in driving down drug prices, particularly prescription drug prices. Now, I'm not a super fan of this guy. Cuban, I'm not impressed when I see him in the media. He's a cultural liberal. He's usually making absurd statements about Black Lives Matter. He's not even all that impressive on the TV shows he appears on. I believe he's on honey. Is he on shock tank? I think I've seen him on Shark Tank. And so this guy seems to me to be a little bit of a blow vator. And someone who does it's not thoughtful about the way he approaches public affairs. Now nevertheless, he is a very successful entrepreneur. And I do respect him for that. And he's come up with an idea that is actually, I think, has a chance to work. And if it does work, it'll be a very good thing for very good things for the country. Basically what he wants to do is to create a nationwide online pharmacy for generic medications that cuts out the bureaucracy and cuts out the middleman and offers a very simple formula. Now he's not doing this out of his philanthropy. This is not a save the world scheme, but this is, let's reduce drug prices by running a drug business, a prescription drug business that is reasonable. And Mark Cuban is counting on the reasonable thing to also be the profitable thing. So he's doing it to make money and what he wants to do is have drug prices at a very simple 15% markup. A drug costs $1 to acquire. It should be selling for $1 plus 15%. $1 and 15 cents. So he set up this cost plus drug company. And the key to this is to eliminate a kind of secret force in the drug industry that is called the PBMs. If you haven't heard this term, well, that's kind of a reason you haven't heard of it because these guys operate in the kind of murky middle in between the pharmacies on the one side and the insurance companies and the drug manufacturers on the other. These PBMs are very influential organizations, and I'm going to talk in a moment about what they do. But what they do in a nutshell is they control the supply of prescription drugs and they also control the price.

Mark Cuban
"mark cuban" Discussed on Men In Blazers

Men In Blazers

07:13 min | 10 months ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on Men In Blazers

"My guest today is a serial entrepreneur who was walk some journey a modern reincarnation of a mythological American story, son of a core upholsterer in Pittsburgh, he's become a billionaire, shark, tank provocateur, NBA owner, referee scourge and outspoken visionary. It is an incredible joy to welcome. Mister Mark, Cuban. What's up, Brian, how are you doing, buddy? I am overjoyed to be with you. Because you Mark Cuban, RA Jen of great legend and the incredible part of your legend, almost all of them are true. You foundational story, well-known, you borrowed $500 from a client to set up your first company, which installed software back in the day, sold it in 1990 for a reported 6 million. And you said, you bought a lifetime pass on American Airlines and just retired. My goal was to have as much fun as I possibly could. Did you think that was it Mark Cuban that you'd made it? Yeah, that was it. I had no chance. I mean, what could be better than being able to show up in American Airlines with a friend, even if I just met that friend 5 minutes ago and just go anywhere in the world that I wanted to go and party like a rockstar. I mean, what's better than that? But that was it. You were like, I'm done. It can't get better than this. I was done. That's all I needed to do. And pour that fun and I'm fascinated by this brief chapter. You decision to try and become Mark Cuban actor. You auditioned for Philip Seymour Hoffman's role in twister. No matter how you lost out to Hoff, but and apart from a few commercials, it didn't pan out, but I'm fascinated what lesson about life did you learn from that brief detour? Well, it's funny because in business I knew exactly what I was doing. It's all about control. And so in acting, it's all about no control, right? Just let it go. And so that was a huge challenge for me. So that's why I liked it. And I like it to this day. It's part of you still acting. Yeah, of course, all the time. Man, creating a believable behavior in imaginary circumstances. That's what my active teacher told me one day. But that is one of the great secrets and great life truths. But during the dotcom bubble of late 90s, like sexy beast, they dragged you back. You set up a streaming play broadcast dot com. Young listeners think Lucas Matson's gojo before there was gojo. And your soul to Yahoo for $5.7 billion suddenly, immense wealth, you went mansion, Gulfstream 5 and buying an MBA team. And we're all fascinated by sports ownership, all of us, and I want to know mocking what's the one thing fans don't understand about the mantle of sports ownership. How painful it is to lose. There's nothing worse because the minute they step on the pitch, the minute they step on the court, you have no control. No control whatsoever. And inside of you, you know what to do and you know what should happen and you know what you think was supposed to happen when you made all the decisions where it approved all the decisions, but they don't always work out that way and losing is more painful than anybody imagines. I'm an Everton fan Mark Cuban. So I've got to be candid. I know a lot about losing. But you're saying for an owner to lose. You are a sports fan first and foremost, but now as an owner, it's a level of pain known only to reeking Game of Thrones. My family won't even watch a game with me. It's not like I just sit there and just watch a game. Last night we had a game that we won and we're up 29 points in the fourth quarter and I'm still pacing around the house and my kids are just laughing at me. What is the greatest life truth that you've learned as a sports owner that you didn't know before? I guess the biggest live truth is that it's not a regular business. Google can have the best quarter and make more money than any company in the history of companies and nobody's throwing a parade. If Google doesn't close the deal, there's nobody who's walking out the office thinking this is the worst thing that ever happened to me. I'll never do this again or this is the worst feeling ever. But with sports, that's what we do. With sports, I get requests, can my son or daughter who just horrifically died of cancer? Can I be buried in New Jersey from their favorite player? That doesn't happen with other businesses. I guess the great like truth about sports is how emotionally attached we get to it and how important it becomes to us. And as an owner, you have to realize that I don't really own the team, the fans on the team. No one's singing to Sergei prid, you're getting sacked in the morning. Sacked in the exactly. You have, however, proven to be one of the most creative, occasionally controversial, but big vision sports owners looking to other sports for ideas that can empower the NBA to evolve. Quickfire round are what the NBA can learn from football because it's been a lot of talk about the NBA instituting a second tournament and in season knockout a bit like the FA Cup and you are nay on that right. Yeah, I don't like it at all because you can only have one goal. That guy back there that go guy next to the rugby ball. There's only one of those a year. One of those a year. Wait, till you hear about the carabao cup, but you do like the idea of the NBA launching, essentially an NBA World Cup. What do you imagine that will look like? Like the football one, but without the Qatar bit. Yeah, it would be over the summer or after the regular season, right? And countries would play against countries. And it would be the World Cup. But the problem is, we give our best players to the Olympics. And you can't do both and do it well. And so you would have to pull back on the Olympics like football does when it's a 21 and under. 23. And then just have our best players from every country play each other. So Luka Dončić would play for Slovenia, kristaps porzingis would play for Latvia. And you'd have that World Cup and it would be amazing. And from an economics perspective, the players get half the money, they would make a lot more money. It would be a great TV deal for the NBA. As opposed to the Olympics where we get nothing. Oh, just if it is like the football World Cup, we've got to get ready for Dirk Nowitzki to come out of retirement. The Germans, they always bloody win it Mark Cuban. And fascinated to talk to you because you're looking at your track record and you are very, very good at projecting a vision of the future cubo damas and I'd love to gain your sense on the tectonic plates shifting under professional sports in America in general and football soccer in particular, but first, let's establish the Mark Cuban footballing backstory growing up in mount Lebanon. Outside of Pittsburgh. Did you play as a kid? None, zero. Zero. Another one slips through U.S. soccer safety data. You did become a rugby guy though, didn't you? Rugby I started in college. I love rugby. All things being equal, I'll watch random rugby 15s or just a college basketball game. I'll watch 15s union all day long. You're like rugby leti fanette. I played 8 man and wing forward.

Mark Cuban NBA Mister Mark RA Jen American Airlines Lucas Matson Philip Seymour Hoffman Hoff Pittsburgh buddy Sergei prid Brian football Google Yahoo Olympics kristaps porzingis World Cup
"mark cuban" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

The $100 MBA Show

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

"To wrap up today's must read episode how to win at the sport of business by Mark Cuban. A couple more takeaways I want to share with you. And then give you a little something to look forward to when you read the book. You've got a chapter called it's okay to be a whiner. He admits, I'm a big winer. I whine about everything. And he thinks it's okay to be a winer because whiners identify problems that can be solved. They find opportunities in the marketplace. The key is not just to whine about it, but to do something about it. If you're going to want about something, do something to make it better. Whiners say, why not do it this way or that way? And then they take action. Another chapter, I absolutely loved was about the path of least resistance. Reminding that customers, when they're buying anything from you, a product of service, an online course of coaching or whatever. They're always going to buy from the business that makes it easiest for them to buy. We're by nature going to go with the easiest path. The path of least resistance. If checking out, if buying something, if I have to contact you if they go through a long rigmarole to figure out what your pricing is, people are just not going to do it. They're going to be like, past next one. So look at your sales process. Is it a easy, smooth process that has zero resistance zero friction? This is why when you sign up for any kind of app these days, they're trying to make it as easy as possible. Give me your name and email address and we're done. They know that people will always go with the path of least resistance. Remember that in your own business? Remember that and the way you deliver your product or services, remember in the way you sell your products and services, most importantly..

winer Mark Cuban
"mark cuban" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

The $100 MBA Show

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

"Mark Cuban's book had to win at the sport of business, is actually a collection of blog posts. Curated for this book. Now you might think, is this book going to be any good if it's just a bunch of blog posts? Let me answer that question and say, indeed, it is. I have that same question myself. Read the book and was pleasantly surprised about how insightful how honest personal the whole book was. Sharing his own personal experiences his own stories and how he got through the challenges he needed to get through in order to be where he is today. That's why he starts the book with the concept of that there's only one thing in your life you can really control. You can't control your circumstances, most of the time you can't control your environment. The gifts you're born with. But the one thing you can control is your effort. And he says that if you give a 110% at everything you do to help build your future to learn to grow, you will succeed. Because most people won't, most people are lazy. Most people are not going to give a 110%. If you want success, then be willing to work for work hard for it day in and day out. Regardless of the outcomes. And I love this message because I can testify to this. I have really seen the moments in our career and our business where we really succeeded and is all due to just everybody on the team working as hard as possible. Of course you need breaks and you need to refresh yourself and recharge your batteries, but when you're not doing that, you need to be going full on. Working harder working smarter than your competition. There's a concept in this book that he reiterates several times. And it's the concept that in business, you only have to be right once. This means you can fail. You can launch one product and fail. You.

Mark Cuban
"mark cuban" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

The $100 MBA Show

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

"Hey welcome to the hundred RBA show, no fluff just the good stuff every single day with our daily Tim in a business lessons for the real world. I'm your host your coach, your teacher, Omar's then home. I'm also the cofounder of webinar ninja and independent software company. I start with my cofounder, back in 2014. In today's episode is a must read episode on our must read episodes. I share with you a book that I've read that has influenced me as an entrepreneur, I share with you its takeaways, it's insights and why you should read it too. Today's must read is, how to win at the sport of business by Mark Cuban. This book is Mark Cuban at his best. Raw, honest and.

"mark cuban" Discussed on KILF Morning New Podcast

KILF Morning New Podcast

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on KILF Morning New Podcast

"I don't know what it is. I don't know why. I don't like tom brady or why i feel so strongly in the opposite. I don't dislike people especially people. I don't know. I have no reason to not like tom brady. But i think i'm figuring it out. I think it's just because he's perfect. He's as close to perfect as we can. In terms of the way he presents himself and in terms of the way the football world worships him as a god. All this business about him being the greatest of all time kind of annoys me. Because you can't compare players from between from now to twenty years ago you just can't do it. The game's different. And all that. I don't know i i don't know he just. He seems he seems like there's something going on inside his head that he's not showing on his face or maybe but who who doesn't have that why everyone got something going that they don't you know. Anyway we found out that he got cova recently but after his super bowl parade party the one where he on the boat where he was hammered. Yeah he was like doing tequila. Shots and people are having to carry him around. Yeah i mean the reason why i said this is because he was asked about cove it and how it's going to affect the nfl season. And here's the thing about tom. Brady love him or hate him. he's a smart guy he's really good at football and he understands football and he's basically saying is like dude even though we've got like the bucks or one of two teams one hundred percent vaccinated them the falcons even though we've got the vaccines. Even though our rules are stricter it's better now than it was a year ago. This is going to be a problem all season long. That's what brady sang. And he's right. I mean look at the cowboys. Right now zac. Martin best offense a lyman probably not gonna play on thursday. And it's and i. I don't know this for sure but i don't think it's because he's unvaccinated. I mean there. How many times have we talked about people. Getting the vaccine still catching cove it. And they're still going to have to go through the protocol. Do virtual meetings possibly miss games. Tom brady actually part of the he said. I actually think it's going to play. More of a factor this year than last year. Because of the way. We're doing things now with the stadium's gonna look like what the travel is going to look like with the people in the building and the fans and all that. I don't think that's brady saying we need to kick people out of stadium. But he's got a point if the rules are pretty much more or less the same and you're adding one hundred thousand people into the stands doing this. Yeah i mean yeah he's he's right. And that's that's i'm not looking forward to that part of the football season and now that it's already affecting the cowboys for week one against tom brady and the patriots. You know it's it's it's a drag especially if you're you play fantasy football and you're gonna count on people to win makes difficult to. But i digress. Dallas mavericks owner mark. Cuban could have to pay millions of dollars to the state of texas. because there's a law written specifically for mike mark cuban and his resistance towards playing the american the national anthem before games. I don't think he's going to be right in that check oil. I don't know but here's the thing it's a. It's the star spangled banner protection act and this is one of the laws that went into effect last week. It prohibits a governmental entity from entering into a financial agreement with a professional sports team unless the team agrees to play the national anthem. At the start of home games. I don't know what the what what's the governor l. entity while that the mean they get tax breaks and their state money that goes to some of these teams then basically. Yeah cuban said a while ago. I don't wanna play the national anthem. Mavs games anymore now. this was before the legislature right. And that's one. Dan patrick and others in the state attacks have set okay cool. Here's the star spangled banner protection. Act your move mark right so now like you said he's got to either suck it up and play. The national anthem. Sounds like a stupid thing. Suck it up and play the national anthem. But that's what it is for mark cuban or like you said he can read a big fat check and not get state money. I think the problem is here this quote. The hope is that those who feel passionate about the anthem being played. We'll be just as passionate in listening to those who do not feel it represents them well. It does represent you if you're in this country even if you're not a citizen it represents you what it attacks you while you're in this country i would like i would like everybody to who thinks it does not represent them to look at. What's happening in afghanistan and say would you rather have their national and yeah look around the world and see how bad it is. Dan patrick closer to slap in the face to every american and an embarrassment to texans. It's five fifty six and traffic time again right now. Here's bill jackson in dallas heading into downtown on. I forty five. Northbound i thirty. There's a stalled tractor trailer..

tom brady football brady cowboys cova mike mark cuban Dallas mavericks lyman falcons Brady zac bucks nfl tom Martin patriots Dan patrick Cuban texas
How Ryan Naylor Went From Shark Tank Failure to Tech Success Story

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:04 min | 1 year ago

How Ryan Naylor Went From Shark Tank Failure to Tech Success Story

"Brian. Say what's up to fire nation and sheer something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with what's up fire nation. I am super excited to be here. And probably the biggest thing that i believe in is to build a great business stop focusing on relationships and where i come back is focused on value. I see so many friends starting a business and they get into networking groups and they focus on going just building relationships building a bunch of friends and my feedback to them is. You've got friends. You've got a lot of relationships focused on adding value to prospects. And that's where you get the best return on your time spent ryan you're hitting upon one of my all time fever quotes from a mr albert einstein which is try not to become a person of success but rather a person of value because that's fire nation is the key. What value are you providing to the world. What solutions are you bringing to people's real problems and man. That's a great lesson. And i want to start off with some more lessons for fire nation because you were a bust on shark tank and so what did you learn from that whole experience. It's hard to swallow. And say i was a on shark tank. But it's true you know i. One of the biggest lessons i learned is the power of having a purpose based company to drive you. And i'll back up just a little bit to tell you that when i was on shark tank. I was there pitching a product. I was pitching a product. That i thought was really cool at found in italy and really expanded on this product in the united states. And when i was out there. And i had mark cuban and you know everybody just kind of coming on my shoulders. I really found myself digging in focused on. I know who. I am and what they're saying isn't directed at me directed at the

Mr Albert Einstein Brian Ryan Mark Cuban Italy United States
"mark cuban" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

"We're so excited to have you here on mine valley and what i love about you the way your mind things. It's fast and it's interesting. I was watching an interview with you on youtube yesterday. An the interview they asked you. What do you think of raising the minimum wage. And i thought okay. He's a billionaire. He probably employs thousands of people. I'd love to to see what he says. And to share your answer when your wife because it was fascinating. Yeah i remember the exact interview. But i'm all for raising the minimum wage because the stronger the community around your business that the more vibrant the more economically the more economic capable. They are the better your business. We're going to be when your customers have more money than i think. A whole community really shines and that may be counter intuitive and it may be difficult some small businesses think will my cost are going up. Maybe the goal up a little bit but when you also realize. Is that when your employees make more than a living wage. Then they're not going to need government assistance and to me as an entrepreneur. I literally the idea of one of my employees needing government. Assistance really makes me upset. And so i've gone through my businesses that i operate and make sure everybody made at least fifteen dollars an hour. That was several years ago. And i strongly encouraged all entrepreneurs to do the same it also. I'll add that for entrepreneurs people who run their own companies. I've always given stock to all my employees because if you want income equality to be reduced people who are just making fifteen dollars an hour and living trying to live their lives if they don't have any appreciable assets..

youtube
Cuban and Fatemi's Fireside Chat at Podcast Movement

podnews

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Cuban and Fatemi's Fireside Chat at Podcast Movement

"New iraq storytelling or the best storyteller by the pass was authors filming comedians to create shows we ate their audiences and distributed every podcast movement. Mark cuban and felon fatemi spoke about the new storytelling platform fireside chat. cuban described. Podcasting is being old tired and beat up adding. There's only one way to monetize by lying to secure sponsorships. The app is available now on ios. We've reactions to their speech in our show notes and our newsletter today lipson also announced a partnership with fireside chat the partnership will quotes make the podcast distribution experience seamless for the far creator.

Fatemi Mark Cuban Iraq Cuban Lipson
Dallas Mavericks Expected to Hire Jason Kidd as Head Coach

ESPN Radio

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Dallas Mavericks Expected to Hire Jason Kidd as Head Coach

"McMahon and Adrian won't Janowski say the Mavs are moving toward hiring Jason Kidd as their new head coach. Bobby marks. ESPN NBA Insider Isn't a real fan right now in the Dallas direction that scandal a few years ago, and now you go out and hire coach has had a Suspect past. I mean, we all know well, we're well aware of everything that's gone on in his off the court life and you know, Mark Cuban turns around and goes in this direction, and it's nothing against Jason Kidd as a coach or the player, but Don't know It doesn't stick quite right with me as far as step the direction they're going. Stanley

Janowski Bobby Marks Jason Kidd Mavs Mcmahon Adrian Espn NBA Dallas Mark Cuban Stanley
The 'Shadow GM' Causing a Rift in Dallas

The Lead

01:51 min | 1 year ago

The 'Shadow GM' Causing a Rift in Dallas

"So tim in the past week. The dallas mavericks have lost their longtime. Gm and their head coach been quashing. Rumours about their biggest star potentially leaving and their owner mark. Cuban has called reports of dysfunction quote. Total bullshit so my question for you is how are you doing man. Have you slept at all the past week. Man it has been a weird week. I think that's fair to say. But i'm finally catching up on sleep messages. Several glasses of water. You know making sure. I remember to eat all those good things but he. I think i'm finally that all caught up now. It's been a week for sure. Hydration scheming hydration is all right. Well tim you and our colleague. Sam amick recently wrote the story about the guy who seems to be at the heart of a lot of the turmoil that we've been seeing within the dallas mavericks. So i what can you tell us about harare. Labus bob vulgarities. What's his background. Yeah bob's back. On his interesting he's been a public figure since really. The beginning of the twentieth tens and to my right is the most successful. Nba better probably ever so. He said that the other day did the privacy of your own home. You said that she was someone who i think. Probably a lot of people. I interacted with them or became aware of his existence on the bill simmons. Podcasts rabbi bugera's. Favorites i did. You have just out of curiosity for mvp correct. Yeah i had a tough one before that pretty. His background is mostly details that he shared so it's his telling his own story but according to him he was a gambler starting in the late nineties mostly on the nba and he initially made money through his own

Dallas Mavericks Sam Amick TIM Labus Bob Cuban GM Harare Rabbi Bugera NBA BOB Bill Simmons
"mark cuban" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Coming up here at 8 45. We got a little tell me something good with stupid joke. He's got that force. How? Yes. So just buckle up because he's been working on. It's a Friday edition. You know how that is. At 8 36? Yes. And we just do a couple of emails. Okay, We need to do that. Just it happens every time do this well. You know, people want me to leave the country. Well, done it to myself again. It's been a tough week for Mark Cuban. He loses Donny Nelson. He loses. Rick Carlisle. He also claimed he was hit by a Cryptocurrency token market crash on Wednesday. Saw that too. Yeah, it fell from over 60 bucks to just a fraction over zero. And so apparently, he was in on this as well. We don't know how much he lost. He dumped out pretty early. I think, Did he get out early? I well from the story he did get out. But when did he get out? That's the question. Yeah, I don't know. So, Yeah. I mean, Mark Cuban's smart guy. He he is. Yeah, but this crypto currency stuff, man, I'm out. It's still to understand. Yeah, I'm out. I don't know how to talk about it, but it went from 60 bucks to zero and ours. Now I do invest like that. Yeah, I didn't relate to that. Yeah, a 27 W b A p 8 36 would get to some emails. 8 45 Tell me something good with stupid joke. Kim Lamb Skins has the 8 30 news Next? The Texas Energy grid manager is praising Texans for turning the sea down this Been.

Mark Cuban Donny Nelson Rick Carlisle Wednesday 60 bucks Kim Lamb Skins 8 45 zero Friday over 60 bucks 27 W b A p 8 36 Texas Energy Texans over zero 8 30 8 36 couple of emails 8 45
Daryl Morey on the Sports Analytics Revolution

ESPN Daily

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Daryl Morey on the Sports Analytics Revolution

"So me pawing at this sad window like a hidden aside daryl. I do want to explain the monster. You've created here because the mit sloan sports analytics conference is very well known inside our industry but it is far less stone outside of it. And you and your co founder. Jessica gelman got it going fifteen years ago. Basically in the spirit of moneyball and the spirit of what someone like bill. James did in exploiting data defined undervalued players and strategies and every year you bring together researchers and sacred magicians and wants but now you also get all of these powerbrokers to somehow agreed to be on panels. And i'm talking about owners and athletes and coaches and executives and world leaders like barack obama who was the keynote speaker. One year recently. So i'm just curious first off what sort of thing is stuck in your mind after you wrapped up the conference. Last week. I mean this year. I jumped on the nfc panel actually learned a lot because we had the like the head of mba. Top shots ahead of so rare mark. Cuban who has more More free time than than us to to focus on this and i think teams are obviously the. Nba is out front at the sports top shop. But i think it's just the start of a nba teams exploiting what crypto can do for them as well. It's very confusing to people but I think everyone knows what a barcode as. So if you could have put a barcode on literally anything and no one could copy it. And they can always always know and look up that it's your thing that's been bar coded and that's really all it is you. Can you can really. Nf t anything. The certification estimate The actual item. Nf t could be a combination of physical and digital.

Jessica Gelman Daryl NBA James Barack Obama NFC
The More You Grow, The More You Need To Say No

The $100 MBA Show

04:43 min | 1 year ago

The More You Grow, The More You Need To Say No

"I want to start by just stating a fact. It's so much easier to say yes to something than to say. No saying yes has no friction right if somebody says. Hey i would love to have you on my podcast. You saying this requires zero effort like sure. Yeah no problem. A big part of their reasons. Because you're not actually saying yes to doing something immediately right now. You're saying yes to something that's going to happen in the future and the future is foggy for most of us. We don't really fully internalize that commitment or like that's my future selves problem right. That's future almost problem. My problem right now on the other hand saying no to anything is hard. Even if it's just a friend asking you hey. Do you want to grab some lunch. And you just can't make it because you have obligations having to say no is just hark. You don't disappoint people that's natural. Let's just you being a good person but having said that saying no doesn't make you a bad person say no actually protects you so that you can continue to do the good things in your life you can be value to only your customers and your employees but also to your friends and family and saying no is not really something were taught even had to deliver that no so in today's lesson i wanna explore this concept and walk you through this journey when to start saying no had to do it in which opportunities you should say yes to. Here's the reality as you start growing your business as you become a more salish entrepreneur. The more valuable. Your time is when you're first getting started. I'm just speaking about myself. When i first got started and i was just trying to kick up dust as trying to make a name for myself. I was trying to build a business that matters has customers that has revenue the sustain myself. I was willing to do pretty much anything to bring in customers. Those legal and ethical of course and therefore my time really didn't have much value. Because all i had is time i didn't have money ended customs but a had time but that equation changes as you get more customers as you get more revenue and now your biggest asset is time you only have a limited amount of it so anytime you say yes to something you are going to say no to something else because that is going to take you some time on your calendar. Right and once that time is taken. You can't do anything else. And there's only a certain number of hours and they right. There's only twenty four hours a day. You can't do more than that you know and the thing about this is that it's gradual in the beginning you have nothing but time than your time becomes a little bit more limited and then as you grows entrepreneur time is incredibly limited and a lot has to do with the fact that you just have more on your plate. You have more opportunities presented to you because of the successes you've having going look at this issue a look at the extremes if you wanna have lunch with a local entrepreneur that you met in your co working space that might be in the star of their entrepreneurial journey. Maybe they've been doing this for years but getting a lunch with that entrepreneur that you've met your coworkers is not impossibly can schedule. You can make it happen. I it's like trying to have lunch with mark. Cuban right you know mark from shark tank and you know the owner of the dallas. Mavericks billionaire entrepreneur. This guy's got incredible amounts of opportunity. His schedule is jam-packed his time is incredibly limited. So it's not impossible for them but the chances of you having lunch are a whole lot thinner than you having with somebody. Who's not as busy right. Not as senior in their entrepreneurial journey and that's because he has a lot on his plate paternity any says no a lot. He had to train himself to do that because when he says no allows them to say yes to other things things that he really really wants to do or things that will have a greater impact on his life and his business now. A lot of people have a hard time saying no because they don't wanna feel bad they don't wanna feel like they're being a jerk or helping other people how or you know just respecting the journey and understanding how i was once there. I want to help somebody out. I'm one of those people but you can always turn an opportunity in your favor to make sure it works for you so i sometimes get emails essay. Hail mar would love to jump on a call and discuss this with you. I have a question. I have something i want to work out one. Maybe an opportunity can collaborate. And i totally respect that. And that's really kind of than three job to me but a call is very time consuming for me anything. That's synchronous where. I have to be at the same time. Same place is very very hard to do. Because i have a schedule of have Obligations to my team to my customers. I have to do so i always counter and say thank you so much. I'd love to do this over email.

Mavericks Dallas Mark
What Is Clubhouse and Do You Need to Be on It?

The Talk Show

07:55 min | 1 year ago

What Is Clubhouse and Do You Need to Be on It?

"Talk about clubhouse before we run out of time I what what are your thoughts on club. I feel like clubhouse right now is is like as we speak february twenty. Twenty one is still in private I wouldn't call a beta on the app store. It's invite only right but they seem to be accelerating the invitations to the point. Now where february. Twenty twenty one sort of is the month where clubhouse went big. Yeah i would agree with that. I mean i would say maybe maybe january No yeah i'm trying to think. When was the lawn on. When when did he do the thing that was like it's over joins twitter moment twenty twenty one today january to february. And i'm sure you know in hindsight you know there'll be more people in march and more people in but it's getting a. Can you describe what clubhouse is and then. Tell me your thoughts about it okay. I'm going to find something. That is certainly find my tweet that i sent about it because stevens noffke was annoyed with me but i stand by it. Okay this was. Someone asked me two weeks ago. Says what does one do with clubhouse. And then i wrote waste time. Not working by listening to other people not working talking about stuff. They claim to be experts end but really aren't while hoping for celebrities to show up. That's pretty it's pretty tart. But but i don't disagree with it. And i say this as someone who i've spent a lot of time on clubhouse i've hosted shows on capelle when that was still a beta feature. I think i joined in april. I'm i'm not above this. Like at all. I'm just saying like when i use it. It is usually because it's the end of the day. And there i see one of the main notifications come in that. You know somebody you're on things interesting is going on or i'm like you know kind of trying to avoid doing actual work and so i tune in the afternoon and then listen to other people who are often doing the same thing and then there is that bit of like. Oh and maybe someone famous will pop in. I don't know i'm being totally honest like for me that that is kind of the appeal. That's not to say that. I don't think there. I think that you can have some real substantive and interesting conversations and and there are some really interesting ways it can be used in the way that it's interest. Graph is both connected but disconnected from twitter. I think is interesting i was. I was in a room last week. End someone's a ten year. Old was briefly in the room before that was deemed. I guess not okay. And and We were asking the the youth some questions about their use of technology. And you know they kind of described it. They were like. Oh it's dischord for adults and that's actually not a bad description to be totally honest like it's kind of scored audio groups but you know audio channels for adults. That's that's not a completely terrible analogy I i'm trying to wrap my head around it. I think there are. I do think they're onto something totally. And i also think i haven't quite had this feeling about something since instagram in two thousand ten like so i was not on the instagram beta n. g. siegler was and he tweeted enough like pictures from it. I definitely kind of it was like okay square pictures filters and then i just say on my other. Podcast dithering with ben thompson. I think the episode that aired this morning. That i remember where i was when i realized instagram out of beta and i could sign up. I was with my family down in disneyworld. And i was on a bus going from I think i even remember which park we're going to. We're going from our hotel to the disney studios park on the little disney transportation. Bus and i was like. Oh it's out of beta quick. Get gruber still available got it start clicking around and like within five minutes because you know all of a sudden we're at disney and it's time to have fun and go on rides and stuff. I was like oh this. Is i get this. This is great. You know now. That is the original instagram where it was. Just you post pictures and you see pictures from the people you follow and you can comment on the pictures And you can apply these filters that re- you know at the time was great feature because don't care cell phone cameras still so crappy. The filters it was perfect and histogram or no hips dramatic amount of it was was awesome so it fit without whole asiatic that was happening with the time that made it. Easy to to apply like they. They didn't take as long as you know. Some of the other filter ops did and it. It really made your photos look better and added remember. When they added the tilt shift feature and amazing. Yeah until fisher. Was this massive deal. Because i was like. Oh my god i can take mr rogers pictures right. Like is how i felt at the time. The hips dramatic took so long. And i don't know. I've never to anybody who could explain it. I don't know if they did it on purpose to to fake. Yeah but it hipster. Matic took so long to apply filters remember talking to somebody at apple about near like. Yeah it makes no sense to even if you're using a bat algorithm it shouldn't take that long and it was like crazy. It was frustrating and instagram. Let you like oh this filter. Nope this filter. Nope and they apply instantly. And then you'd pick one that major picture look better then you'd posted and i was like i got it. I was like oh. This is going to be huge. Just a snap judgment. I feel that way. I feel that way about clubhouse with just with a little less certainty because the thing about instagram was i knew i wanted to use it whereas with gregg house. I'm like i get this. I can see why people really get. I don't think this is for me. Yeah no i kind of agree with you. And i'm like i go back and forth about my feeling like i do. I do think that it's you know. Current valuation is kind of insane. Yes drink the concept has massive legs. Absolutely i think the other difference is is that instagram came out. There were a couple of other Kind of competitor's pick please which was available on both ios and android that dalton caldwell who later did app dot net did and the. Didn't you know work and there were some other kind of attempts at doing similar things but instagram was always wear momentum was and i think it's because they had really strong product direction. I think that always going to be getting the product direction in the attic. Usability was key. It was always product. I don't always product. I clubhouse one of those things were not that i don't think we're i wonder if it's going to be more like an instagram stories. Saying we're not as a staff staffed stories. Thanks but you see where. I'm going with this where it's a great idea but it could be potentially co-opted and done better by someone else. Like i feel like twitter spaces. Could you know. Beat it in a way that you know. No one else even had a chance against instagram. Even though instagram was ios only until it was acquired by facebook like no one else even had a chance at sucks all the oxygen out of the room Because it was it was the best. Might i feel like the concept of clubhouse has a lot of legs just don't know of clubhouse it's going to be the thing or if it'll be whatever mark cuban. He thinks he's doing or if it'll be twitter spaces. I don't think it'll be facebook. Facebook single fall flat on. Its face but i do feel like twitter spaces could potentially you know Hold the the instagram move and like make their version of stories way more successful even though it's a blatant copy it's it's better

Stevens Noffke Capelle Instagram Okay Square Twitter Disney Studios Park App Store Ben Thompson Siegler Disney Gruber Gregg House Mr Rogers Dalton Caldwell Fisher Apple Facebook Mark Cuban
Mavs' Cuban relents on anthem after NBA reiterates policy

KILF Morning New Podcast

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Mavs' Cuban relents on anthem after NBA reiterates policy

"The wake of the nba statement. Wednesday reiterating its longstanding policy. That all teams will play the national anthem. Dallas maverick's owner mark cuban said during an appearance on. Espn's the jump that his organization has no problem playing the anthem at all. That the decision to not do so to this point in the season was the product of ongoing conversations with members of the community who felt the tradition did not fully represent

Mark Cuban NBA Dallas Espn
Cuban Decides Not To Play National Anthem At Dallas Mavericks Home Games

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Cuban Decides Not To Play National Anthem At Dallas Mavericks Home Games

"Cubans decided. He started this before the nba season started made. This decision to the national anthem would not be played before any of his maverick's games and so far they've played a total of thirteen games. Preseason and regular season and has been played before any of them and is believed to be the first instance of a protein getting rid of the national anthem before the game gets underway and First question would be okay. Why did you make that decision. And according to one reporter is named shams sharabia the sources close to mark. Cuban says the decision to not play the anthem before mavs games isn't because they don't love the united states because many feel the anthem doesn't represent them and they want to continue discussion of how to represent people from all communities when honoring america at a game.

Shams Sharabia NBA Mavs Cuban United States
NBA says all teams must play national anthem after Dallas Mavericks stop playing it

Joe Pags

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

NBA says all teams must play national anthem after Dallas Mavericks stop playing it

"The MBA is ordering teams to play the national anthem before games. The controversy erupted when it was revealed. Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban Had stopped playing the anthem before their games this season in a statement, MBA chief communications officer My best is that needs to change quote with NBA teams. Now, in the process of welcoming fans back all teams will play the national anthem in keeping with the longstanding league

MBA Dallas Mavericks Mark Cuban NBA
NBA says all teams will play national anthem

WBZ Afternoon News

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

NBA says all teams will play national anthem

"Owner Mark Cuban confirmed the team and stop playing the national anthem before games. The MBA released a statement today saying with NBA teams now in the process of welcoming fans back in the arena, all teams will play the national anthem and keeping with longstanding league policy. And today at the

Mark Cuban MBA NBA
NBA says all teams must play national anthem after Dallas Mavericks stop playing it

Big Al and JoJo

01:20 min | 1 year ago

NBA says all teams must play national anthem after Dallas Mavericks stop playing it

"Are saying that they are no longer going to play the national anthem before tip off. Mark Cuban confirms that the organization has ceased plane the anthem before games and does not plan to play it moving forward. Mavericks made no public announcement that they were planning to do this. Nor did they reportedly announced or explain internally. No further explanation is yet been given by Cuban or the Mavericks, the league spokesperson. Said that under the unique circumstances of this season, teams are permitted to run their pregame operations as they see fit. The national anthem has become a point of contention and the in the country after Colin Kaepernick began kneeling as a form of protest against police brutality and injustice against minorities in the country, Of course. It has taken place now in pretty much all sports don't know if that has anything to do with it. But because of you said that the NBA just changed its course. And now the national anthem will be played tonight at the embassy. Just put out a statement. Maybe about an hour or so ago. It says All teams will play the national anthem that includes the Mavericks and the Mavericks will be playing it tonight. At 5 30 before their game against the Atlanta Hawks. So let me ask you. This

Mavericks Mark Cuban Colin Kaepernick NBA Atlanta Hawks
Dallas Mavericks bring back pregame national anthem after NBA policy order

Sean Hannity

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Dallas Mavericks bring back pregame national anthem after NBA policy order

"Issued a statement saying With NBA teams welcoming back fans to their arenas, all teams will continue to comply with a longstanding league policy. Dallas owner Mark Cuban and told the athletic he made the decision to stop playing the anthem. The San Antonio Police Department in the Bear County Sheriff's office are searching for an 18. Wheeler, they said, could be smuggling up to

NBA Mark Cuban San Antonio Police Department Bear County Sheriff's Office Dallas Wheeler
NBA says all teams must play national anthem after Dallas Mavericks stop playing it

Sean Hannity

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

NBA says all teams must play national anthem after Dallas Mavericks stop playing it

"All of its teams will play the national anthem before games, hours after the Dallas Mavericks announced they would not at the league issued a statement saying, With NBA teams welcoming back fans, their arenas all teams will continue to comply with the longstanding league policy. Dallas owner Mark Cuban told the athletic he made the decision to stop playing the national anthem at some players to protest ID social injustice during the national anthem.

Dallas Mavericks NBA Mark Cuban Dallas
Mavs stop playing anthem at Cuban's direction

Glenn Beck

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Mavs stop playing anthem at Cuban's direction

"If there's a new way to avoid kneeling for the national anthem protests one NBA team isn't playing it. Mark Cuban confirmed last night that he has decided to no longer have the national anthem played before Dallas Mavericks home games. The anthem has not played before any of the Mavs home games this year in the preseason or regular

Mark Cuban NBA Mavs
Dallas Mavericks To Begin Playing National Anthem At Home Games After League Reminder About Policy

Glenn Beck

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Dallas Mavericks To Begin Playing National Anthem At Home Games After League Reminder About Policy

"If there's a new way to avoid kneeling for the national anthem protests one NBA team isn't playing it. Mark Cuban confirmed last night that he has decided to no longer have the national anthem played before Dallas Mavericks home games. The anthem has not played before any of the Mavs home games this year in the preseason or regular season. Fox is Jared Max. No notice because no fans of minute games until 1500 essential workers were allowed in free Monday night. America's listening to Fox

Dallas Mavericks Mark Cuban NBA Jared Max FOX America
"mark cuban" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"13 games in the NBA season. Folks realize that the Mavericks hell are no longer playing the national anthem. Well what? What? What's weird about this is If you didn't start something you have. Can you stop it? So they haven't played the national anthem all year. Correct. Decision made by Mark Cuban in the off season, one that Adam Silver was aware of. On. The Mavericks also alerted all the other teams in the league that would be coming into the national anthem would not be played prior to the game. No one said anything. Are they playing any type of song before? No SP article dated June 18th of 2020. Says. Mark Cuban said that if his players taken need during the national anthem, he hopes to join them. Yep. If they were taking any and they were being respectful and be proud of them. Hopefully I joined them. Saying that he would allow his players and he would hope the league would do the same toe do what's in their heart. So if you combine that with not playing the national anthem, where is his Where is his hard head? I mean as far as the country goes. Yeah. I mean, where's what? Where's his heart, But they'll play the Chinese national anthem. They were now and I don't think they're doing that either Want to shock me? What if he's pointing out how I'm going to play Devil's Advocate here with it, okay? What if he's pointing out the freedom that we have here in the U. S. I don't agree with it. I agree, But there's a lot of you don't agree with the people have the right to do. And as a private business, which is what the Mavericks are. You have a right to do anything right? You have a right to say anything. Well, not really. Because you're close, but you know, you have to pay consequences for it. But you could do or you could say anything exactly. And that applies here to the Mavericks. So if this hacks you off, Yeah. If this e mean if it really if it really does pay you off, you know what Don't go. Don't watch. Don't buy a shirt. Don't support him. That's why you know, and I guess that's what he's saying without saying it. Listen, here's how we feel about it. If you don't like it don't come to our games. I don't find this. Don't watch our games. I don't find this much different than the philosophy that you developed over the years about actors and actresses where you just boycott their shows. You know you, don't you? You've talked about that. You don't watch the movies. No, I tried, but it's impossible because, you know The great actors and actresses there that Zaveri difficulty boycott. Um, but you know, if Mark Cuban it Z also way of telling people If you don't like this, don't come to our games. Yeah, that's exactly what he's saying. It's it's like when, when stores develop certain bathroom policies if you disagree with the transgender bathroom. Don't go. Don't go. Well, okay, let's put it that if you put it that way that I feel better about it. That's the way I am with the Mavericks right now. I'm don't go. I'm not gonna go. I'm gonna take my kid's not gonna watch You know, this is the easiest thing I'll do in my life. So I'm not that big A basketball fans. People are out there going. Yeah, but people out there listening to us right now going. Yeah, but with Mark Cuban wants come on the air with us. We'll say yes. Do it. We bring this up, and we say, Hey, because again, we had this conversation yesterday. Differing opinions are not bad, so well, offering opinions from for me. I should say I shouldn't say that for you for me differing opinions or educational I love hearing what? How were other people come from on subjects? Yeah, Pencil has presented to you. Yeah, because it kind of it helps me. I understand, you know their way of thinking and maybe even beam or whatever. S O. Let's check traffic and come back with more of this. Here's my money. Good.

Mark Cuban Mavericks NBA Adam Silver basketball Zaveri Devil
"mark cuban" Discussed on Bob Ryan & Jeff Goodman NBA Podcast

Bob Ryan & Jeff Goodman NBA Podcast

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"mark cuban" Discussed on Bob Ryan & Jeff Goodman NBA Podcast

"It like working for Mark Cuban? Like give me give me your greatest Mark cubin story and I don't mean one when you were like, I know if you were ever in a club with Mark Cuban, but I've seen plenty of pictures of Mark Cuban in the clubs, you know with Chandler Parsons back in the day or whoever I know they could get after it. I you know, I know Chandler I've known Chandler for a long time. I love them. There's a guy who can get after it. Once your favorite Mark human story. Wow. Well, you know dead. Tough question. There's a lot of them. I think there's a there's a there's a perception and I know there was a perception when I was talking to these guys are coming here that that he's super involved and he's a meddler that this and that and the other and you know, when I talked to him about coming here is interesting. Terry Stotts. Dwane Casey had sat out the same year. I did, you know 708 and I had talked to Dwayne about the possibility of working with me, you know, if I got a job coming out of this little Hiatus thing and I had actually traveled to Seattle a couple of times cuz that's where he was living to talk to him. And I had a lot of the same views of the game and then the two of the the two of us win. I did a thing for the NBA of guys that were former players of interesting. In the coaching is like a like a two-day clinic thing and Terry Stotts was involved cuz he was doing some stuff with the NBA having to do with you know, referee, you know oversight and stuff like that. I was always really interested in that side of it. So the three of us spent a couple of days together and then, you know, I ended up talking to Terry he came down to South Carolina and visit me at our place down there for a couple of days to talk about the possibility of you know, working together if you know things kind of fell in line and so the three of us on 1 day in the spring of 2008 rent Indianapolis those guys came in town, we had three interviews from Donnie Walsh Luanne. He was with the Knicks at the time he flew in, you know, very quietly and interviewed us at the airport in a private room internet and he's guys with me and and we were kind of interviewing as a birth. Get you know, and then at 5:35 to 5:30 p.m. Gar Forman and John Paxson came over to our house in Indiana and I came for dinner and that was the second time. I was sitting down with them..

Mark Cuban Terry Stotts Mark cubin Chandler Parsons Chandler Dwane Casey NBA Dwayne Seattle Donnie Walsh Luanne Terry South Carolina Indianapolis Knicks Gar Forman John Paxson Indiana