18 Burst results for "Mark Constantine"

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:37 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"Overall things are okay. Things. Things are OK yeah. Yeah I mean for anyone business listing I one of the things we've tried to do is to break things up into six week periods because you can't really anticipate what virus is going to do beyond six week period and so then trying to work out within that six week period. What do we think is going to happen you know I can read trust because we obviously go from season to season we so we'll have from now until what we will bonfire night, which is a British tradition which. Is November the fifth, and then we'll go to Christmas six week period, and then we'll go to Valentine's another six weeks and then it's Easter and I think that's a good way to approach rather than trying to imagine what it's going to be like in a year two years time we can do that but you're not flexible enough if you do that, you know you need to be very dynamic. I think in these circumstances given that you will probably face a fall in revenue this year like many retailers. Are. You also being very careful with. You know with how you're spending cash as a business yes. Oh Yeah. Absolutely. So mean what what's actually happened is that the bulk of the agony we took in the last financial year which ended June. This year just gone. So those figures GonNa, look pretty dreadful on then as we've. Quickly adapted so this year this year we'll look a lot more positive in law a lot stronger. So we had loss last year but we weren't Apple Ossetia we'll have a reasonable profit. I we used to talk about the new normal, but I've stopped doing that because I think that many of the things that are happening is what we wanted anyway. We wanted less travel. We wanted less pollution we wanted. People to be more discerning in that buying, we wanted better supply chains a better thought about the products, all those things are happening. Mark. In the episode, we just heard you've gone through so many difficult moments I mean from your childhood and and going through dealing with anxiety and. And then you know selling your business to. And then starting a mail order company and then losing it all. You described you broke in your forties. Do you think all of those. Experiences as low points that you went through actually. Have helped. You have the resilience to deal with what you're dealing with now. Yes I think. So I, think that I think he's for businesses I think that vibrancy that you require the flexibility, the ability to to listen carefully and to make the appropriate changes a not be too. Spoilt It's the where it isn't it A. Business we can get spoilt. We can get used to too much luxury and. I mean for me personally at the end of my career here to have to deal with this I felt was. Really. Really really interesting of far more interesting than running at a steady pace especially when there was so much. Change. We would like to see you know by climate change and other things like that. So. I find this far more exciting, far more real. then I find. When I lost cheap. Wow. I love that I love you said that. Amazing perspective. It's the truth. That's Mark Constantine Co founder of. Lash by the way mark told me that these days one thing he's doing to chill out and help him sleep is to take hot bats at exactly four PM every day he says that in addition to being super relaxing, it's a great way test out all of his products. Hey thanks so much for listening to this show this week you can subscribe wherever you get your podcast. You can write to us in Hi bt at NPR DOT ORG. If you want to send a tweet kits at how I built this or at Guy Roz, and you can follow me on instagram. That's Guy Ron. This episode was produced by James, who with music composed from teen of Louis. Thanks also to Gareth, GAELS JC Howard Julia, Carney grant and Jeff Rodgers. Intern is Faira Safari. Garages and you've been listening. To how I built this. This is NPR..

Apple Ossetia Mark Constantine Co NPR Guy Roz Guy Ron Valentine Faira Safari A. Business Intern Louis James GAELS Gareth Howard Julia founder Jeff Rodgers Carney
"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:30 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"So that's very much higher. We focus on it. I think it was around. Two thousand twelve when your childhood friend Jeff is meant located in your debt he found him in South Africa. And you were able to see him for the first time since you were two years old. Yeah What was that? What was that like team? Were you nervous going before that door open No no I wasn't nervous I had a friend who told me he he? He was the result of a one night stand between his mother and an Italian Mona Beach. Right and he still find his father and he said to me if you're ever fortune up to find Joel Father, go straightaway not mess. Don't don't even think about it. So I didn't think about it. I just went. and. I was met by my two sisters. Who are explain how similar they were to me? on them when I go see my dad, he was apologetic. You know I didn't need any of that. I just said data all swelled ends well. You just really pleased to be with you and we just had a couple of days together. They were just magical and they I can't very hard to describe such an emotional thing. But the best way I can find to describe it is if I had an empty hall. Where my heart was before I now have a blazing fire. So, a lot of the. Has Gone a lot of that stuff's going with that a he died shortly afterwards, he died with weeks of me seeing him. I could not have been more welcomed could not have been treated. With, more sincerity. Compassion. That was. Do you think mark that because of your. Question must be the case and I don't answer for you but it must be that your early life you know growing up with your grandma your dad. Upping part of Your Life Ukraine, dying and Twelve and Falling out with your mom and then we should say you did. You have reconciled relationship today but. I mean that must have. Driven you all of those things must have driven you in some way right? I mean, how how do you think about that? You think about your story, your your past and your childhood and I read an article in the in the Daily Telegraph the British Daily Telegraph. On this particular journalist had spent her life interviewing business people and this was a last business interview and she talked of something that she called the entrepreneurs wound and she said all of the really. Successful people that she had interviewed him business had the similarities where they had a dat or a severe divorce or a sibling die something like that and their charter. They had an event now whether that teaches you about mortality. On you know, you've only got a certain period of time and so you you get driven through that or whether you're trying to impress someone that perhaps is no longer here or maybe just you know I don't know that I want to impress my dad he didn't he was oblivious. so I I don't know. But if you look at, you know Steve Jobs. So you look at any of those those guys they gonNA similar profile. The issues create the character I really believe that race strongly all of the the finders have all got issues. Mark when you think about all of the things that that you've accomplished achieved. Gee. You think that most of it was because you. Just got lucky or or because you're really smart and had the skills to make it happen we. Not Necessarily, very smart and we. I. I see myself as technical entrepreneur I see I have the T. technical skills I've made the most of those. I. Mean you know I it was A. Scribe. To Church when he said what we were supposed to say that success is just stumbling from one state to another failure to another. Yeah. Whoever originally said it? Before he stole it that. Anyone. WHO's in business? They know that's how it feels. You know. It just depends. Sometimes I have really big challenges another times they're just challenges, but there's never a moment when you can really sort of say wow, great. And that is pretty much. My interview with mark ended back in February but of course. Just a few weeks later. Everything changed so a few days ago. Got Back in touch. Mark Yes. Hello. How are you? Good on you I'm all right. I'm talking to you is like reaching back in time to a simpler moment in human history. An Mark told me that in the days just after the pandemic hit lush had to shut down lots of its stores and lay off or furlough some of its workers. And then around the same time, his longtime business partner Liz, we're Bennett passed away from cancer. But Marcus had some time to recover from that and when I talked to him the other day he sounded mostly upbeat and said, the business has started to bounce back. Well, first of all, obviously selling soap in the Timakova is quite sensible. So while they're selling graciously seem to be doing exceptionally well selling. So visit Sobat. My my point really is that while you may not go on a cruise and you may not, you may not be able to take the holiday you've always dreamt off you can't always take a bath so so worldwide. Remind me how he stores do you have Right now? It's nine hundred and can you estimate? Can you estimate how many of them are closed right now? It fifty at the mall maximum goes right now I mean, probably probably less. So most of them are back open. Most back open a most trading, not full level that they were trading before. Are Literally, just kiosks where we opened the door, we put some sort of and people come to the staff there who are wearing masks on than others where there's enough space where they can't come in on socially distance while they shopping and we had between two hundred and three hundred percent increase in additional business in our mail business, and so that was one hell of a sort of swing round. So online sales have have really bomb boomed, but but but I'm assuming like with many retailers, it hasn't fully closed the gap the shortfall when it comes to overall sales because I'm assuming yes. We on your machine, but we're much more that area of our businesses more profitable than the retail. So people moving onto the metals businesses quiet help. because. We then generate more pro. It sounds like.

Mark Yes Italian Mona Beach Your Life Ukraine Jeff Daily Telegraph Joel Father South Africa Steve Jobs A. Scribe British Daily Telegraph Timakova Marcus Sobat partner Liz Bennett
"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:31 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"So essentially you are you've said, you will not the other founders of Said, look we're going to get rich enough you know but we don't need hundreds of millions of dollars we we'll be happy with tens of millions of dollars. Yes because we didn't do all the work. In Britain. We have something called the living wage where a group of clerics. Paid off with the fact that there was so much poverty in that diocese. Yeah. Go together and they dreamt up a living wage. This was a wage that was a fat pay. So we pay the living wage as decided by them. So we lifting are skirts up at the bottom to get people out of poverty. Sharing some of the business with them but still capitalists on it's still capitalism. We can still increase the size of that business, the scale of that business, the profitability that business and get considerable benefit for ourselves but not so much benefit that it's vulgar. I think a lot of the. I've I've had on the show It doesn't seem like your wire to work for other people like you are. You're clearly super driven procure your little difficult right I. Mean I, mean in a in a good way or difficult in every way. But it doesn't sound to me like you are a control freak that like actually the other partners involved in lush had a lot of say over the the look the feel and the branding, and because you know when you're in a lush store, the era lush store, it doesn't sound like you were a control freak over every single aspect of that. Am I right. No no I'm not a control freak. On. Quite intuitive. So when I see somebody this wrong and I don't know how to describe that beforehand. So for a long time Rowena just ban me from the shop opening. Because all I could ever see was something that was wrong. Yeah. So she just banned me, she said, you come to the shop opening. Improve Your attitude yeah. We don't need that kind of miserable person pacing up and die nightside when we just greeting new customers you know. I'm allied to go night so I must have improved. Meantime the the businesses growing, and I think by two thousand and one you actually put in a bid to buy the body shop. And Anita Roddick would not sell it to you at the time By the way, do you remember what what you offered for it? Well it it was very straightforward The management could raise a bite, three, hundred, and sixty million. Themselves to by the body shop off of the strength of the body shops and Vegas. I could add my business to that. Get up to invite four fifty something like that. Million Pounds. Yeah. Then, basically that though you know like someone like Laurel. Could get up to much higher than that. They eventually sold bodyshop Laurie Al for six, hundred, fifty, two, million pounds in two, thousand, six at the time Anita. Roddick was very, very sick and Of course, it's no longer live and. The body shop going to Lori L., to you into some customers meant something because Laurie els, each multinational and the body shop represented kind of right. It was the the their slogan was trade not aid and loyal had always been the arch enemy because of testing on animals, they represented those who wished test bodyshop represented those that didn't wish to right and that was quite sort of fundamental and I think at one point. There were signs at less stores said, are you fed up with the B S obviously referring to body shop at sale to Lori Al? and that was one of my best. No one of my best moments if you had known how ill Anita was at the time. I think you've said you would have. Responded differently. Yeah absolutely. No idea and You know I missed. Difficult to know what say I mean the weird thing was she always felt she had very short length of time and She was right in she did have a short length of time. But I think I think the truth was with the body shop the. Even, if she hadn't been ill. I think they'd had with. I think they'd had their ride and Y'all mean and they didn't want to carry on. You Know I. I've painted anyth- ordering his this dynamic. Charismatic this woman. But what I once asked her just we were just messing around the train or something doing one of their psychological sort of quizzes. I said the nature if if you were an animal, what animal would you imagine yourself? On she said a full-on on. Otherwise a young deer. Night that. If she'd have said an eagle. I would have that's what I would have expected survey of. Him suddenly I could see then I could see her eyes Golden Osborne. So her on high much. He protected her and looked off the. On how much they were. They were couple you you never because when you're in or of someone you don't see them as human. You. See them as as you know this great thing. When of course the truth was she was she was very humid. With lush. I. Think like eight years into the business you had over two hundred shops in twenty nine countries I mean that's that's just an incredible expansion in eight years. How were you able to control the brand with all those shops around the world was it was just something that you weren't that worried about. Well, the brand is a brand is very much based on the people that work in the shops and the people we attract. The I got hostile. Do you choose your stuff? Right? Yeah. I don't know if you've ever watched fidelity. When he talks about his stuff he says, well, I employed them for a couple of days and now they turn up every day and. You know we employees and attract enthusiasts. People have really passionate by nature or or animal testing animal rights. And then the brand tends to become that you know. I mean. We control the products. You know my my children involved. We've got a whole new set of inventors. Ni-. Young people coming on through the business that we do that that side that controls you know what you've got at home. but then the people that sell it to you. Just get attracted to the brand you know. I mean obviously lush today I. Think you've nine hundred stores to twelve thousand staff around the world But you you know this is a challenging business and retail is challenging and margins are thin. So you know you've had years where you've got based on what I've read enough. There's right you know seventy million pounds in profit and then. Years where it's plunged to twenty, five, million pounds and props profitable the next year. So what explains huge swings back and forth as it just that you pour more money into the business and that's why well, let's take from the high. When we go back that height, that's when we introduced the. Living Wage Impulse Bah. Okay. So that so that's what we decided. We got plenty here. We can share some. So that that's quite often what's gone on yet that we've changed the business model by in choosing another element into I mean we give huge sums charity. I. Mean we've given over fifty million pines. Now this is the lesson from Anita Roddick where she took just a small sum of money and she turned into that massive business which loyal for all that money shows you that not all money has the same value small sums of money in hands of dynamic people who really care goes long way. So when we give money when we give you know Two Thousand and five thousand to a group that wants to achieve something maybe they want to stop fracking maybe they want to deal with some environmental issue. They will make that money go much further than if that money was in someone else's..

Anita Roddick Britain Lori Al Laurie Al Vegas Rowena Lori L. Laurie els Golden Osborne
"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

06:42 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey look back to how I built this from NPR guy rise. So it's nineteen ninety-five and out of the ruins of a failed business mark and his partners decide to take one more leap by launching a little cosmetic store they call lush. And this time things seemed to click. So pretty soon after opening their first location in pool mark opens another store in London. I remember shop in Covent Garden I was a student in London at the time and it was a big deal at the bath bombs remember. They were like these and you still haven't these orbs they kind of like reminded me of us. We tarts you know sweethearts. Giants Sweet Tarts. And some of them had like dried roses in them and things like that. Right like flower petals. Because I remember my sister came to visit me in London and shoot everyone wanted to rush. It was like all of a sudden was starting to people talking about it. What how how did that happen I mean the stores opened their doors and huge no one had ever seen anything like it before we would get a thighs and inquiries a month for people to do business with us from the get-go boil pretty soon when we opened up the kings shop I'm within the first week we had shown poke Ta and Jasper. Conran. Coming on commend US unto be onus and Jasper Conran is his son of of tarrant Conrad Open Turns Conrado. I'm right Terence Conran great great retailer, the whole of Britain but it wasn't just status. But so many people were commending US unto be honest. To have been that bad and to have everything wrong and then some anytime everything that right was very tricky. I remember having to go at the back of the shop and I have a moment you know. You can't be that bad I'm that good all in in a short period of time you know. Yeah and by the way, how did you decide on the name lush? we we had a competition and we said come up with a name for us on a lady called Mrs Bennet Event Bre Accord US lush, Garden we showed it to lush. So here. Here's was inching 'em. I've read that you kind of modeled these shops, the lush shops, Neal's yard dairy cheese shop. Right which a famous I it was. It was very spits I mean Neal's yard dairy is lovely a lovely show Yeah. We have big truckloads of shampoo and big chuckles of soap light. She struggles which we would slice and sal the product from and I'm not. Yes. It was partly that partly grocery shops like you know with with apples. Plums apples to be only when I. I did the Kings Road I. I thought I made an awful mistake I dunno, I just. My Imagination I, his machination run riot. We'd got this stainless steel basin full of ice with face Mile Senate. The would only last couple of weeks and. Every we just let everything go crazy, and then we had some bottle product on little three little remains in the center of the shop when I was looking at it before I thought Oh God you've had this money in this investment you've just blown it. If you've done all this crazy stuff instead of just doing a much more understandable shop, the public won't get it. On then open the doors and the public came in and they just ignored all the bottle products and bought everything else they were wonderful. They go to everything they just loved it because. As people now know when you go into into lush and really was kind of baked in early on there was not a package and you had the the sort of the plastic tubs and but then it was tens of things and and then just giant slabs of soap that were just sliced off and putting paper walk out. Bill because we I, we didn't have the money for the packaging. Secondly, we D-. We didn't want to do it anyway if you've got a bottle of shower gel when from the factory. Two thirds of the money went into the packaging and the labeling and only a third into the contents. So if you can get a business model where you can get rid of that unwanted packaging, the customer doesn't want it. You don't WanNa. If you can get rid of that, you'd go far more money to put into the ingredients. Yeah. You can have a much better standard of payment for supplies and so on, and you can have a bit more profit and you can get a competitive price for the customer by the way the the six of you who who kind of got together just are lush. Did you ever have to have an uncomfortable conversation about ownership. So, the problem actually is an ownership while it is an extent but it the problem is succession because obviously, if we let's pretend when order cosmetic company I'm GONNA Not British. But we're in American Tech Company Yeah. All those tech companies are the findings all had to either either died, and they had to be paid off. Their families had to be paid off all they have to have their enumeration during the successful crave. On we didn't want to go public, you decided early on, we don't ever want to go public. Well, we was what happened with the body Shaw. You know they'd come public and Gordon. Roddick says still today that that was the biggest mistake he made. Because he was no longer in control of things he thought were important. Wasn't what the? Cheryl city thorson yeah. They don't want you to spend money on on high quality products and and they want you to maximize profit. Exactly. So we dreamt up a scheme see. We're all we're capitalists straightforward. And I believe in capitalism but I don't believe in the forms of capitalism the I would call locust capitalism where it's where people are feeding of someone else without doing anyway So we came up with this game where we valued are Chaz. Five Times. The average of the last three is profit. So that, we kept it a little bit but we. Agreed we still that's still enabled us to. If we want to build a business, we can build the business. We can build the profitability. We can make more than we sell our shares, and then we gave part of the business to the staff which we would like to see increase. So that the STAF combine those shares of the finders and we put in an employee benefit trust. To facilitate the sale at the shares as a when they're necessary..

London US Terence Conran Jasper Conran Neal Conran NPR tarrant Conrad Open Mrs Bennet Senate WanNa Cheryl city thorson Bill Britain Roddick Gordon
"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:14 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"Going to recover? This is GONNA be fine. Did I have. I mean I've. I've had anxiety most of my life. plenty of anxiety probably enough to you know fill up boat. Basically I want to do anything I. wanted to stay Home Lick my wounds I felt very ashamed. Shame was the prevalent thing. I. Certainly didn't think I'm going to get up and do something else. But my colleagues especially, how am Umbro's at that time I'm brazen, fill me up and said the receivers it all gone everyone gone. I had an NT sharpen and anti Lab. Helen Ambrose Lymphoma up and said, I'm going to start going in nine to five. How are you? Doing what? With with what? She said, well, I just think it would be we can in we can see what there is there make few products maybe sell of you here and there let's get going again and so all of the the main team the I'd worked with they couldn't find work either that they wanted. So bit by bit they all came back and I want to just name them all 'cause 'cause you all get together. I don't remember Rose Liz. We're Paul Greaves. Defoe. Mike Byrd Ruina Hufbauer, and you all kind of. Come together, and this is the beginning of Lush Yup. So. Then we roll earning no money run on our credit cards up because she was the only one already done that and she started shopping nine stairs and run that and we started making the product upstairs. So May and Halama Product. Just with we go up the great racism by the car does and the fruit and make the products then take it downstairs and she'd sell it and here's what I understand that year ninety five new open a store in covent garden in. London. How were you able to do that with forty thousand pounds? Well, what we did was the first store was really the little store downstairs in pole transient high. And that's what we did I. So we didn't sort of mock you thing. And then basically we knew we'd done all of our money and we knew we had to get it back quite a lot of people were approaching US offering tobacco's. One of the guys Andrew Geary I'm Peter. Black. They were really nice, Peter Black just said, well, I'll do a pun for a COUPLA hundred grand and he put some money into some shares and we started the retail business I'm with his money. We opened a small store in covent garden on a larger one on the Kings road. So you had never really had to raise money for your previous businesses because. This one you had to find some outside money you had. You had to find investor. What I. Did with Pizza I asked him what was the best investment you ever made Peter? And he told me what it was. It was it was a property guy and so he bought some properties off the army in Scotland and he managed to sell them for twelve times the. Bow, so I promised him, I said with this will be a better bang the..

Paul Greaves Peter Black Defoe Mike Byrd Ruina Hufbauer Lush Yup Helen Ambrose Umbro Rose Liz London Halama Product Scotland Peter US
"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:49 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"But they didn't own the pro they were selling. So they had to pivot, they had to start making their own product because. It was my solution is said to them. Look you. You'RE GONNA have to buy the rights but I said I make three million pounds a year from each of these product ranges. So why don't you pay me nine million over three years? You'll make the money back anyway by making the yourself on I'll go off and do something else. So you walk out of that that relationship with nine million pounds mood. Trenches. And violate what happens to Botkin that shopping Seattle is still going at that time I had closed. On lost two, hundred, thousand, you lose the money on bargains but you've got nine million pounds in at this point you can really Kinda just live the life of reilly like that's a lot of money can buy nice country estate in the south of England and. Cut and you clown can can do beekeeping or into birding you could do that for the rest of your life. Obviously that's. Boring I'm GonNa do that so you. Don't want WanNa do that. See you decide? All Right? I'M GONNA start a new business in. It's this concept called cosmetics go that you again start with the same team right that you done concentrate because I wanted yeah. We we were trying to keep the same people employed that we'd have before. But in a mail order business mail cosmetic. So the same products that you were making the mail order. Yeah because. I didn't really want to I didn't want to be going into competition with within each Gordon in any way to get the money I'd had to sign a thing saying I wouldn't open any shots for three got it had to a mail order business. You couldn't have a brick and mortar I want you to anyway. So suited me at the time, but here's the thing you sold the rights to all of these products that you were making. Not Sell those recipes in your new business. You had to make brand new things. Yeah. But I had loads had so many new products ideas. We had shampoo bom, Bom, bom things, Anita didn't WanNa take. So I already had a catalog full of product. I WANNA. I. WanNa hold on the bath bomb because this is a this is a product that's going to revolutionize your life, and this would blush would eventually be. But when did that idea come to you? Didn't come to me. So basically, what happened was I was in the kitchen with my wife Mo, a perfumer check Brian a herb list, Dot Malcolm Stewart. Another truck, all Stephen, Moles and accountable the people I'm we were talking about the problem of Bubbas creating urinary tract infections in young children on the set La. Okay. So we were just chatting about that and I the problem was kids love bubble bath. So much what happens is it breaks down the Capella reaction. It enables microorganisms get in the Ernie tracks on Kohl's problems that's high above above does that okay We want to come up with something that was better for the kids wouldn't call stop problem on Jeff Brian had worked making alka. Seltzer. With bicarbonate of soda and citric acid. So bicarbonate of Soda is extremely soothing in the bath. Very, very good few. It's a seltzer. Botha's really well known all worldwide. I'm if you had chicken pox or something, you'd put a bit of obeys certain. Yeah. So then my wife went into the shed and came back with first bothell. But it was just a small disc and we call them Akwa Sicily's let me just pause for sex she would take basically. Baking Soda and some some sense. Essentials and herbs, and like put it into a desk. So she just came back in there was. So she had invented the Bom Bom really, but she didn't just do it in five minutes right? This is gonNA. Take some time. She did how do you make that in five minutes bushy just she'd heard a in about it. She's when I did it because she practical. Just came in. There it is. So then we for while we sold these acquisitions ljube. But then we find that the kids weren't using the grownups we use them. So then we thought well, what if a GROWNUP choosing? We'll put a bit more. We'll make it a bit bigger. And we'll have a Ryan th you know we did A, we actually did a bom we covered him black Sabbath fame how to read wick out of the right balm on it that was the black rebirth ball and so on. So that's how they developed, but it started off with my wife going in the shed making one coming back. So at cosmetics to go, you were already selling these products. We started bathrooms came along about two years into medicine. But things like shampoo bars they were there the beginning we had Payton for shampoo bottles, shampoo bars like a bar of soap but instead of a bottle washing brushing hair. Okay. Be Popular at the moment. Yes. So everybody wants a shampoo buzz at the moment because they don't want plastic plastic, right? You have this business cosmetics to go, which sounds like a great idea. Right? You got its mail order and mail order is a big deal in the late eighties early nineties And how's it going? How is it doing? Every time we send the light we lose pined. Why well you know the the Dot Com business was you know you figured if you got to a certain size, you'd be okay. So you were constantly trying to get to that scale but just like the dog home businesses, we never made it to that scale is that. If, you WanNa make a small fortune you start with a lodge. Alisa Parenti on every order. So because many it's the guy who was a hell of a party. It was so intense I have never been so stress we were producing these catalogs, the hole, every range, how a different image. I mean, it was just for people obsessed with cosmetics, which we all were and. It was a great party, but we just blew all the money went this. So this is like nineteen, ninety, four and. You worked on cosmetics to go for like six or seven years. Before it went under and then really went under and were you broke I be clever. I basically still had a mortgage on my home. So I still other loan on my home. I still have a loan for a small factor unit. And I still have a loan on on this Protean highstreet where I have my lap. So I still had these loans Pale. So then was having to borrow money from moneylenders, users rates, and then I managed to sell this highs for half of what I bought it for bought it for two hundred, thousand dollars I sold it for one, hundred, thousand I paid off all the loan sharks I was left with forty three thousand fans and I had three kids on no business. You had just a few years before and again I'm not trying to shame you at all. I just want to put this in context is important. So got plenty of shame. No shame. Sean to avoid. This is a very important failure. That you experienced, right. You were a millionaire and you had lost all of it. And you were also in debt, and now you're forty two. Almost forty three you've got three kids. Yeah. Eldest. Son Took me to one side at seven. UNSA jested, well, dad you not think you should get a proper job. and. What did you think? I said well, I think I've got a skill set that such that if I can market, I can make a little money again. And he he sort of nodded sagely at seven and let me do it would what did you have anxiety about the future at that point or did you think I'm.

Bom Bom WanNa Jeff Brian England reilly Botkin bothell Seltzer Seattle Stephen Dot Com UNSA jested Akwa Sicily Anita Gordon Botha Alisa Parenti Dot Malcolm Stewart Kohl
"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:30 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"On his face giving me a bunch of flowers on long the class have the would w That's how it was all the time. It was chaotic. Wonderful. Yeah. She was driven not quite Manitoba. Close you know. Both sway frightened of dying. You know I mean she she we were very similar vase streets. Not Comfy in our lives, there was no. We're not talking about a confident woman in the sense of accomplished and style Asian spouts we're talking about a woman who was driven. I was I thought she was going to have a breakdown then I realized. No, I was GONNA. Motion relationship like with Liz your par. Well she was always wonderful very supportive in a when you look at Lushan on people admire lush for its values. Especially, the way women are treated and things like that. That's all this Bennett list that she married her name became Bennett list. That's her she was she took me to one side I mean bear in mind I had not had much of a social education she would take me to Oncein. If we're going to build a business based on women. You can't pat them on the backside when they walk by Yeah you do. She was failure still So you didn't want to be told twice. Yeah. I absolutely her word as that was it. She told me I did. So those standards you know she had the standards all the time which I totally lacked right. All right. So you are just cranking it out and you're busy and you're expanding and. When you're doing a half, a million pounds of revenue a year selling to the body shop. Do you remember how many people you had working with you at that point? Five or six people working with me then. But what's very nice when we talk about well hide, you have the success later on is one of them was Colorado bygrave one was very health buyers she them by one was Liz Bennett Then all of those people have an abrasion they are the team ny there the elite team, the top team who are with they continue to learn the skills we still work together well. All, right. We are now going to get to a theme that is a recurring theme in your life, which is you get. Start to get each feet and you want to, you want to expand move onto the next thing or you know you've got this business which is concentrated and we are going well but you know you kinda you're doing well and it's and you get to a point I guess in the mid eighties where you to kind kinda build something out and You decided that you wanted to maybe open your own little shop in the US. Yeah. So, there was always much talk by Well, we do something together rather than me be a supplier in them. You know we will do something together like a partnership. Okay. Yeah. So I said to golden well, why don't I come up with a new concept in the states and we look at that you know because they couldn't do the body show. So. She would quite like of light to have a different business that was not nicked from someone in San Francisco with all right Lacey. So I did a new product myself and my team we did something called Balkans which we opened in Seattle. You opened a store called Botkin 's in Seattle Yup. This was like a body shop type of skin care type shop. Yes, and you did this with Anita Roddick and Gordon or A nature didn't know I did it with Gordon wait sorry you did it with her husband and she didn't know. Yes. I don't know how that happened. I. Think Gordon said to me look why don't we do this? All tell me later on right Okay. I don't know why I fell for that because that was definitely foolish. and. I did all the work I did all of the product I you know we got the shop, my brother-in-law said, he would run it and Seattle by the way because that's where my brother in law lived. Okay. It's a great city great city great city night bear in mind Miami's of the states I haven't travelled a tool. So I did I'd been to Santa a couple of times but my image of the states was very much formed of the American comics. I is a little boy. On also the American business books I read on the entrepreneurial spirit of the stays. So you know that's what I felt good about it and so yeah. So we this show I mean when you describe it someone you think is slightly lunatic. It gets worse because it didn't really make money. But then Gordon decided he would tell it eater. At had a couple of glasses of wine and then he thought he tele neater and he told me I've never been more wrong in my life. Turned the tables over she threw Chaz, he said I'm not frightened of any woman so I didn't lock my bedroom door, but obviously, he wants them to sleep in the same bed that night. I'm from that moment on really relationship wasn't so good mine and Nietzsche's but she was mad because she said, you betrayed her she was like that's my business. What are you doing? That's always perspective. I, think she might have been. which I am not too i. mean we needed sheep. She passed away more than a decade ago but sh-. So she's out here to kind of give givers out of story. But I kind of understand that I cannot Kinda Right I. Right? Yeah. Well. Obviously I'm not straightforward. Just going for all the time I'm not you can't rely on me to stay still. Yeah. I don't I don't become repleting set back now in my sixty s you had to keep moving into. You was like this is the next step I WANNA keep moving on expand one, do the next thing but it sounds like you of did it a clumsy way that you and I I've done these things in my life didn't feel clumsy when I was doing it. But retrospectively oversee wasn't appropriate and we should kind of I think puts us in the context because Anita Roddick by the mid eighties certainly by the late eighties, she was like hugely famous like Blake, Princess Diana was buying her stuff and she was all over the place. She was a big deal already by then. And rightly. So yeah, I mean you know how it is whenever you've had a very close working relationship with someone. You don't have to admit how much they told you I don't know maybe that's just the British thing. Yeah. She? Always so much didn't she? It's quite obvious. So. It's clear that your relationship with Anita his. Damage at this point and probably not gonNA. I mean, she needs your products. There's there's too much tension between the two of you and at the time I mean, she basically made an offer to buy out constantly we're and you did sell it to her was was that the reason that that you knew basically, you just kind of had to move on no I basically drove that because it was very awkward. Own these rights but they didn't know what to do about that. They weren't taking any new product of me because they were frightened the dominated much of their business and they just gone public on the city didn't know that I own all the profit rise to city of union the bankers, financiers, they they. They went public. listed. Company..

Gordon Liz Bennett Seattle Anita Roddick Manitoba Anita his US Colorado Oncein Botkin San Francisco Chaz Miami Nietzsche Santa Lacey Blake Princess Diana
"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:54 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"With the unemployment rate at record highs right now, millions of Americans are without health insurance this week on through line, how our healthcare became tied to our jobs and how a temporary solution turned into an everlasting problem. Listen now to through line from NPR, where we go back in time to understand the present. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR. I'm Diraz. So it's around nineteen, seventy, seven and Mark Constantine has just started to make few products for Anita, Roddick of the body shop and both of them, of course are just in the beginning stages of their businesses. Anita, only has a few shops and mark is still making his concoctions in tiny room above his kitchen. What it would be Hannah cream shampoo algebris conditioner lady's mantle heat filter aromatherapy scowl poile herbal colors how do they sell? They sell to do do they sell undershot sold really well, I mean far better than I you know I couldn't have imagined. I. Mean we all talk one of the best sales ladies either mad you know she could sell anything. So obviously, she made them popular cow see have this cash coming in from from the body shop and I guess like right around this time you. And Liz we your colleague at the Hair Salon You decide to use that money to start your own business. With that money I started a little herbal hair and beauty clinic with Liz where it was called Constantina whereas country kills metrics good feel skimming good have. that. So hippie again, and so I've been told by another business person what you do is you you buy all your materials, you make the product and you double lot when you sell it. On then you don't spend that money on yourself. You then reinvest that back in business. Why just a curiosity, why did you bring Liz on? What was what was she going to bring to the equation? Well, it wasn't sleep with making products. What we did was we a little clinic for me to treat people say the Scalp unto Hannah Colors on and she would do her beauty therapy. Yeah and we share the the room you know the third room which was a reception storeroom but the problem was that it was incredibly cold the half. and we didn't get much business. So we made money still making product for other people much more than we did from Oslo Clinic. So we went a year or so to trying to make money there, we couldn't on. So I said to Liz Liz. Well, why don't you join me in the making the stuff? You know about skin I know all about I had between us we can come up with us. And then when I had to prepare a product for. I mean she was a really hard taskmaster so I work and work and work study read off. The coast mythologies, other books until I. got it. Right I. Probably make better skin products. I did. With the has stuff, it was just a technical skill I. Love. Yeah. With with the skin stuff, I had to really study and work. And and I guess Liz. Made these parks and until like a few shops or salon but I mean, assuming the body shop was still your your client right I was their biggest supply you with the biggest. Supply, and they had two shops. They started a franchise. And before we knew where we were, they had the fastest growing company in the world. I mean, you know they couldn't even touch the US. So that was outside of the US, they had franchises in Sweden. Multiplying that Franchisees in Finland in Germany and France he's my question for you mark I mean how were you have to assume that you very quickly you had to find another location to make your products and then there was a certain point where you yourself could not make the products anymore that you had to bring lots of people in to make the products. So what happened was I like working from my home it worked for me. So I find a big highs with an ice skyer h plenty of space at the back to make product, and then I I managed to make product from there for seven years. Well now, you're not supposed to do that a friend goes this planning controls. So I managed to make it without the planners. Catchy me for seven years I can remember I went off to see return of the Jedi I. When I came back my baby sitters said Oh. Amounts be mind for the Planning Authority So I I think I'd got my business up to half a million turnover by then I, have my garbage and the back of is so this is like one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two, eighty, three, you're doing a million dollars in revenue, Pines? Those days that was nearly a million. Wow. I mean I mean these positives from own because would dating Mo and then asked her for her dad for hand in marriage like. WE'RE NOT GOING TO BE Like within ten years, you're making a million dollars in revenue. I mean, did any of those people like her parents Sir Jeff's Presley say Oh my God like, wow, this is crazy. Those time I was busy. He would be having about five o'clock in the morning making the stuff. If I saw someone we certainly went and took him high. Well I was doing we're talking about the English hair bear in mind. Yeah. We don't do that kind of stuff we don't admire each other. Positive. Well, here's what I'm wondering. How did you know how to? Run, the business, like how did you price your products? Had you know how to like what you know how to do invoicing and purchase orders and all that stuff? Did you well, Gold Roddick helped me a lot. I duNNo. Waylon. But basically, I've been taught already by Ma Yung's father to double the price when I sold it so that put me in good stead. Young the the guy who owned the Salon Yeah His dad had said to me what you do is you buy the raw materials and then you double that to sell it. You have to have enough Mogae because as you add to the costs gentleman obviously you know I mean I was probably making a lot more money per product when I just made it myself up in a room. Things developed because obviously but if you've got enough margin there in your model works. Okay. We're GONNA talk a bit more erotic, a very important controversial and really kind of revolutionary figure and certainly in the UK and around the world in entrepreneurship jets. But on the one hand I can imagine I mean, this was huge. She she she and Gordon Transform Transform Your Life Right Did you also transformed and elements of the cosmetic? Yeah. They were unbelievably influential charismatic. It felt very much like loyalty. You know they you know in in the sense that when they bless you with their presence, you pleased when you were there present civil so good. We would have a fatty tempestuous relationship. I think would be the right description. I would have an argument with her on the phone She would call me on professional I would tell her that she couldn't call me professional She would then call me a very root word beginning with W N. N D and. I would say, yes, you can call me that route where beginning W in ending an odd you call on professional than about an hour later there would be knock on the door I don't the door there'd be a florist with a huge smile.

Liz Liz Gold Roddick NPR Anita US Hannah Mark Constantine undershot Oslo Clinic Planning Authority Sweden Mo Gordon Finland UK Ma Yung Waylon
"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:36 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"You? Just talk about hair and skin pretty obsessively. In. Meantime were making all the stuff like hair care products and stuff in your apartment. And I guess around this time, you find a new customer for your products who who, who, who would become a pretty significant person in your life. What what's the story? What happened what actually happened was? I had seen a little advert in honey magazine. For Sound in. BRIGHTON NOT A. A shop on I was making stuff on the side for different people and so basically I find this woman's address. Phone number I didn't have a phone home. So, basically have to go to the phonebox from up. And see if she would like any product. She'd started the shock called the body shop. And it was in each erotic Anita Roddick. I phoned her up and she said well, come over and see me by the way she was in in Brighton. You were in pool quite a long train journey. Okay. Because it's not direct right? Okay. So I paid for the train journey met her she don't second shot by then I went in the shop and he was just wonderful. Yeah. There was this charismatic woman selling. Low package product that was genuine young people buying small amounts of stuff fun and experimentation everything about the shop. Really wide me I just loved it very, very simplistic bottles with very simple labels. No fancy stuff. Ready suited me and mark. Was it was it totally different than anything that was out there at the time when you went into bodies? Yes. Yes. Was it just like what is this if I come and live with you now in San Francisco? We go up and down the coast if we'd have done the same thing on the same time, we would have seen the body shop that inspired her in the first place and we would have seen a whole series of mom and pop. Shops. Exactly. Like that. Right up the west coast from Seattle right the way dying through Poland all those those people were making small amounts products in the packaging them. Simply you know there was cleansing bar and. All sorts of different businesses, but there were none in Britain not just we didn't have that at all have nothing none of that innovation none of that stuff. There was a shop called the body shop in San Francisco in San Francis-, which was a US company a totally different company. It was a totally different company that inspired Anita Roddick to copy it, do it in bright. And called the body shop I, call it the border. But. She you know you've got to get context on Easter. We have a dynamic vital woman. WHO's living in fairly open relationship with an unbelievable. I mean. Gordon. Roddick poet. Horsemen he just he'd gone off to ride a horse from Aires to new. He was writing for the observer about his experiences while he did he was he was just a behemoth. So you know we're not talking by everyday people here which I definitely will. Okay on eight hundred hotel which they sold on. She just wanted to try this idea that she'd seen in San Francisco and so when I first went there 'cause these new nothing about hand skin and I knew everything three listen I renew everything my aunts and all right. So you you go in the shop. You meet Anita and you have brought with you a bunch of samples of of what I think. I'd already sent them out, sent him over. She then placed an order right then and there she said, hey, I like this stuff for a five, thousand, two, hundred nine now just to clarify because I've read her account of this and this is what she said. You may know that she said. I. Remember that you know he called me from a payphone initially because he's feeding cleans to the pay phone. And that. He he was making Henna Cream Shampoos. That he sent to me, they looked like sludge and smelled like, horse, shit and honey beeswax cleaner with black specks caused by bees returning to their hives with dirty feet those products you said, and then she ordered a thousand pounds worth of this stuff. Yeah, it was great I mean I couldn't I'd had to borrow the money to train an open i. mean the fact that like you were making these products obviously herbal based in natural products but like they were Kinda, right they looked Kinda grimy at that time I guess. Well? They were very authentic. I tried them on anyone else. That's what they'd say to me. Well, we can see these are authentic mob, but we really don't think they're going to sell but she she believed they were going to sell and how are you getting the product tour was in like bags or jars or what? So gloss class jobs. Hey, I want to glass jars because the environmental principles K. G. H. The. Glass. Plastic Jars because she was struck only environments at that time So there were quite arguments loss of arguments lie that she was very arguments to person when she said, I, want thousand pounds of the stuff you had to go back to pool thousand, four, hundred, thousand, four, hundred. You to go back to pool and go back to this little lab in your apartment and making a thousand pounds worth. The supply as an Oscar credit because I had no money right? So I couldn't buy the materials to make the order. They all county gave me credit. I then said to her, she would have to pay cash on delivery. she then pay cash on delivery I wizz back afterwards and paid them all. I didn't expect to get a second order. I thought that would be a why. I obviously did not much confidence in my own product. Then I had a second order a third and a fault line. Why? Couldn't believe my luck. When we come back in just a moment how mark built a successful partnership with the body shop that worked pretty well. Until, it totally fell apart. Stay with US I'M KAI rise and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey, everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who help make this podcast possible I to first republic bank safeguard yourself with the redesigned first republic mobile APP with features like personalized alerts for unusual activity and customizable settings that prohibit. Purchases, you could even turn your debit card on or off if it's ever lost or stolen right through the APP visit First Republic Dot com slash digital to learn more member FDIC equal housing lender. Thanks also to American. Express small businesses are what keep our communities together, which is why it's so important to help them succeed American. Express created a new platform that all small business owners can use to keep their dreams alive. They brought together one hundred plus companies to provide offers and resources to help small business owners get back to what they do best following dream serving community and employing America visit stand for small dot com slash partner to learn more powered by American Express..

Anita Roddick San Francisco Brighton honey magazine First Republic Dot Seattle American Express republic bank FDIC Poland US NPR Britain Gordon Oscar America partner San Francis
"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

06:42 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"More and more in that area. So at some point I, guess you returned to to pool like you're in London in London. Because I burnt burnt and pool is in the south of England we should mention you out in London. Why did you burn out in London? It will call torme I suppose lifted the leaving home, the homeless period I, think i. i. sort of got to a point where I was earning enough money to live. Unser the striving fell away for a while. So I think that I got to that point where it well the other thing that had happened to me I got married and as you know as you're listening. So certainly getting marriage is quite a big dig and Mo we have to bring now in at this point who is much more stable than me. So is my my partner by the way I? It's choice that you made. Well I. I realized she made the choice. Very grateful. So I think that probably gave me some stability. I was still relatively optimistic as far as I was concerned but anxiety I had in space I'm panic attacks. Yeah. especially about heart attacks my grandmother had died that went into me at that moment and it stayed with me for an awfully long time. I'm not surprised right and and here's the other thing. People didn't talk about these things in the seventies right? There was no language to say I have intense anxiety. The reason why I'm asking you about this is because of who you are today and what your success and we'll obviously get there. But this is important. Right that a lot of people don't talk about these moments in their lives because of shame or embarrassment or yeah. That's Tom I went to the doctors and I tried to describe how I felt and he said I just don't feel normal to find norm. I didn't think I'd. Palpitations I I was dying of a heart attack every time. So I, you know the joke was I never had indigestion irony had heart attacks. Very doctor that I still use sesame mock you to be better off having heart attacks that that's disconcerts you're having having having panic attacks. Yes. That's exactly but it was it was all connected with the death of my grandmother I. Think because you know it entered me then in not very young age and I was hyperventilating even at sort of eleven chew circumstances. So I think yeah me then it didn't really leave until I was in my late fifties I mean none of this is surprising given the things that you went through as a child, right? Like none of these. Experiences are surprising. I think it's the human condition. I think if you understand mortality and you're not anxious what's wrong with you? Yeah. Yeah. You Know I. Mean once you understand what you have a deadline that. Of someone. So dear on you don't understand then you've got the hang of it. Is, the human condition isn't it? The? That's the point. That's that's if we didn't have that we wouldn't be driven. We wouldn't do the things we do. You have to have a clear understanding of a finite period of time. You have to have it. See you and Mo-. Return to pull your early twenties. You have this you've had this training as Trikala just what did you do when when you got back to pool? Seventy four I'd swayed a large solemn pool that they needed to try colleges. The same thing for that and that I have been doing in these west end salons. So. There was a guy that young who was very ambitious. He had one hundred staff. So for Sal nightside of London to be that side that was that was good. Yeah and so lots of people would go there. He trained a lot of people and I would assist him and I was freelance I didn't he didn't pay me but he gave me a room and gave me a little attic space to make product for the minute. I made their shampoos conditioners. And I was really not earning any money. My wife was keeping. My works the course as a system to the clock. On so she was working there and that was good money on. Then I was earning you know just a hidden what just? Making stuff in your kitchen and putting it in like glass bottles and selling it to be. The kitchen I've made a tiny room might change my little tiny box up in my bedroom into a little APP yeah. It was above the kitchen. Got A base in there. I got taps in there I've got some vessels are a big paddle i. you know I I could heat water and I could eat oil and I make broncos on I was making stuff on the side for different people because I couldn't earn enough money in the solemn was working at that time. Were you using like chemicals? I have an issue with look. know you. Can't yeah. I know I always did. Came in when I was about seven or eight. I. Went with my mom to the movies and I saw a movie where rat poison going some bread. It was a frightening black and white movie. I think it really may be frightened of chemicals. So I I always had this leaning tools nature anyway. So I much prefer to be involved in herbs or tentatives I was always very very conscious of what was a safe chemical and what was not a safe chemical so that that again informed what I did because now I make products with mainly natural materials on what I consider to be safe synthetics having studied that repeatedly will all through my career. All right. So you working at this Salon Pool as a Trikala gist and I guess at you and Mo-. Were living in the same apartment building as a woman named Liz we're is that is and and who was she and look how did you meet her and we work together in the sallow I see. Okay. She was the beauty therapist in the salon an I was the TRIKALA. We were both freelancers so we would spend our spare time chitchatting about well Harran scale. Basically, I always used to feel sorry if we were on the train, the two of US someone fell asleep in front of us we would just take them apart bit by you know what did.

London Mo Tom I England Unser indigestion partner Trikala Harran scale US Sal nightside Liz
"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:05 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"Of my life, which was not fine. When you were. In, school as a boy you. At one point had some kind of. Some. Kind of argument or something happened with with your your mom and your Stepdad you think you're sixteen and you you left the house or you were locked out of the house. and. That was it like you used to living there. What do you remember what happened? So do I remember what happened? No, but what I do remember? Is the very singular way you feel when nobody cares. It didn't matter what time I got in at night. It didn't matter whether I was there not. Nothing mattered with regard to me. So when you're rebelling obviously is important that the other person has has some feeling regarding you. But there was no discernible feeling. I I can't remember what happened. Physically remember the door being locked I. Remember it being the end of the of everything connects you that is and I just took it as the ultimate rejection of when. I didn't try to fight back all go back in. Later, on and have a conversation on anything I just went on on there was just this party and the waste that was eight and. My mom say seven years. And stirring that time what you slept it at like different people's houses and I read you even camped out in the woods sometimes yes. So I couldn't afford the cheapest room in line. So basically, I slept in the woods or I just can't surf so which wasn't a thing those no. It didn't have in this is we're talking about the sixties now the late sixties. Basically I would sleep in one friends screen I saw I'm I had to go who to who is now my wife and I would just go and stay her. For a night I stay with my friend, Jeff. And quite often his parents will put me up. Other people were. Kind. Yeah. By the way were you working at the time? Did did you have a job? I had a job as an apprentice hairdresser. Paid to Pines ten shillings Thursdays. So I don't know you can come up with that was that was truly great a week but then I decided I wanted to do theatrical makeup is what I wanted to do for a living wanted to make people up for the theater. I done it at school I've done it for other schools We were talking about the share excitement to be able to change appearances I'm we were talking. About the excitement of being able to experiment with different products on your face, and I was buying these makeup items from the local hairdressing salon. I'm so I would go there every Saturday with whatever money I had would by frothing blood capsules or plastic in a plastic, all the latest pathetic that were coming in from the states. So I was really obsessed from that time, and then the hairdressing was just for me a means to an end. So I it sounds like even at that point. Like, you had a plan like a like a pretty clear ambition I think when you have to survive from zero. Oversee there's more drive isn't there I mean yeah I look photos of myself and my early twenties and I see this fleet driven person I mean. Just, driven laps driven I. Suppose you know if you if you left, you know if you've got to look after yourself. Teaches yourself for lions? See your between. Around, the sixteen and eventually around that time you meet Mo the the person who eventually become your wife you are still married to today you meet Jeff who is you knew, Jeff Jeff already childhood was a best friend. So talking about class systems. I lived in the middle class estate on one side of the road where people own the highs on Jeffrey lived on the other side of the street In the Hisen you rented from the Council, we call them canceled plants. Yeah? So he would have been in the lower in the lower belongs on the first thing I learned when they put me up when they had absolutely nothing was the general Steve Spirit of in comparison to the other side of the Strait, right? Yeah. The the the kindness and the car and the thoughtfulness and the charity. They were all great lessons for me and they stayed with me all my life. See. You were training as an apprentice hairdresser. Nineteen Seventy two, you are twenty years, old you and mow your then girlfriend soon to be wife and Jeff your best friend. You over to London and you get a job as a hairdresser. In a pretty actually a pretty relatively high end salon, right? Yes. Well. That was Elizabeth Arden I worked for Elizabeth, Arden. Red Door it was a big Salam with over a hundred stop a two hundred staff in it now, and you were working there as as mainly just doing whatever washing hair washing. He wasn't doing much else. I was learning stuff what they call improve. That was the term used at the time and improve. So you winton apprentice but you went address or either. So basically, I would accompany headrest when they had to go to do the. The theater or I would go on volks shoot but I would be the runner I. Imagine I was thinking like a London in the early seventies like the rolling stones living in. Chelsea you know like that kind of For my points of view I was on that sort of below stairs angle. So I was in service really to the various people and saw that other side quite a lot of the people I. was working with drug addicts because nobody really understood the the severity of drugs said they experimented and then they got the wrong side of it all and drug taking what I remember predominantly not the fun side of it. Yeah. I just remember a lot of a lot of sad sad stuff going on really did you ever own when you were when I mean when you were young guy living in London you ever experiment with drugs No. Coast couldn't afford them. You know I had no money I. Sit next to sit between two people I mean I would say although there was general there was a low general. Stephen. Drugs. My education was purely. So I guess at a certain point, you move onto another high end salon in London, and this is really where your career begins to to take a turn. Right. Well what happened was I was working the the owner. Because I was so nerdy, I think he thought I would make a good try colleges and in those days in London salons, they had two or three qualified joy colleges who check the scouts for disease they dealt with the hat condition and they made the products for the and things like that, and just to clarify tricalm is the study of how. Sees okay, right. But it's also the science of Hanukkah so that whole thing of starting off doing my hairdressing apprentice taking the qualifications with that then going on in studying psychology and three years of nerdy. All of my hair and scalp and the skimmed interesting because I I don't think salons have trikala gist anymore do they. Know, it was a nineteen seventy. That's okay. But most of us, that did most of the Trikala Gist went on then to make products for the people. So we we very much went into products. We may products for the songs. Anyway we developed are skills.

London Jeff Jeff Trikala Gist Elizabeth Arden Pines Stephen Steve Spirit winton Jeffrey Hisen Mo Arden
"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:54 min | 3 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on How I Built This

"I'm guy is on the show today how Martin Constantine and his partners emerged from a failed business to launch a little cosmetic store that turned into a global beauty BRAC. Lush. Back. In nineteen ninety-five I was studying in London my sister. Karen. Came to visit me that year. She'd been to London before. So on her visit, she was the guide we traveled through the market stalls Candan lock we picked up some indie records at rough trade and made a special trip to covent garden to visit a newly open shop. Called Lush I hadn't heard of it but my sister had instructions from all friends back in L. A.. Get me stuff from. Lush. Now at the time, it was one of two lush locations in the world, and this is before e commerce. So unless you went to the store, you couldn't get the products. Remember the overpowering smell of roses and lavender and honey and lemon I remember these long loaves of colorful soap laid out on tables where you could slice off a Chonkin pay for it. By weight there were bath bombs and shampoos and lotions. It looked like the produce department at a fancy grocery store. You didn't see a whole lot of plastic packaging and in front of each product, you'd find a bright colorful chalkboard with a description. It was unlike any beauty product store I had ever seen. And it probably explains why then There was a line to get in. Lush was part of a new wave of beauty companies that came onto the scene around that time. Many of them influenced by the body shock and it's iconic founder Anita Roddick who as you will hear features prominently in this story is well. The main founder of Lush Mark Constantine had already seen incredible success and then catastrophic failure by the time he launched his venture. In fact, right before mark. Open Lush. He's lost most of his money on a mail order business that went bust. But. Lush turned his fortunes. And and today it's a brand with more than nine hundred stores around the world. Now, in recent months, the pandemic has hit the company hard. For time all of its stores in the UK, the US and Australia were closed. But. Lush has also seen a massive surge in online orders and later on, we'll get an update on how mark and the company have navigated the pandemic and the global economic fallout. But first a little bit about mark's background. He grew up in weymouth seaside town in the south of England. When he was only two years old his dad's split from the family and went off to Africa and mark never saw him again while he was growing up. And his mother. She took mark and moved in with her mother marks Grandma. It was me my mom, my grandmother who really brought me up a my aunt. So. I was really bored three. Yeah. What did your mom do? She was a journalist in the local newspaper on I knew my mom had to work in order for us to to be okay. It was very, very comfortable life full of love and hugs and security. My mom was always there and I love my nine I looked up to my nine and so it was comfortable. Very nice. Obey. Feminine Life I've felt. Spoilt To be honest, obviously, my nine drilled into me the proper values as well. with proverbs and all sorts of other things you know I I had to rights repeatedly better best never them rest till. My good is better. My better best things like that. But then I guess. Around the time you were twelve. So you like you stopped living with your grandmother like Yulia mom moved out. what happened was they there was larger a my mother married the lawyer we moved to my grandmother died. I didn't realize probably until much later in my life high much that'd affected me I felt responsible. I think from my grandmother's death for most of my life because obviously I was important to her and I wasn't there anymore and I couldn't after her and she died on then my my stepfather was. Very, cold I would say and violent. But that's very typical upbringing fifties because they'd come is war gentlemen. There was a lost friends some of them had seen that friends killed or relatives and So it was you know not surprising that those people were bringing up my generation went all the best balanced people in the world. What kind of I mean what kind of kid were you? What do you remember about how you responded to those circumstances? Did you I don't know retreat into yourself or did you act out? Did you fight with your mom? What do you remember or didn't fire my mom but I force a lot with my Stepdad physical fights and they would argue we would all argue. It was just I want to say unsatisfactory which doesn't side like this is like a strange word to use it but. Certainly when I came to build my own home I, for example, never locked the front door. You know I I make an effort on those smaller things that tell people that they wanted to. Careful. Kid were you at school? Are you could student? School was still difficult for. Really. Was it was just heart for you. I. Mean there were a lot of gangs. Gangs were normal in the fifties for for everyone there were lots of gang. So I went to the grammar school, which was the best school in. The top ten percents shoots went to the grammar school. Everyone's surprise when I got in. And then I wasted it while I. was there except that I did make friends and we were in particular gang where we could make. Bombs and things. Can. Make bombs. What we were the news like. PIPEBOMBS. They were we killing sugar bombs with batons permanganate. Glycerin Fuses also savings on we went making them for the IRA season, the Perron purposes to intimidate other gang. Was that William. Golding. Lord of the flies Yup that period of time. So if you can imagine that style of of living when that's how it was about for me on those to physical. Yeah. So I'm not going to fight anyone if I can possibly avoid fighter. No, I talked my way. I'd. Martini, think around the age where you kind of you know these many things are happening. Do you remember being sad when you were a kid or or yes you do every when I seen people sins that was one girl who I went to school have called Al's Cox and I saw some twenty years later and she said so glad you're life work tight well was such a sad child out you know I mean I, missed my father even though I'd never known him. I, think I was melancholy. Use Traditional. Old fashioned word. Yeah. I mean, my mother missed my father I missed my father I suspect I caught it from her. JEREMY AS A. Medium as it were. Up until I was ten twelve or whatever it was, it was fine from then on there were five or six year period.

Lush Mark Constantine London founder Martin Constantine Candan Karen Anita Roddick Africa Chonkin weymouth seaside Martini Yulia UK Cox JEREMY Golding England William
Interview with Mark Constantine of Lush Cosmetics

How I Built This

06:25 min | 3 months ago

Interview with Mark Constantine of Lush Cosmetics

"Back. In nineteen ninety-five I was studying in London my sister. Karen. Came to visit me that year. She'd been to London before. So on her visit, she was the guide we traveled through the market stalls Candan lock we picked up some indie records at rough trade and made a special trip to covent garden to visit a newly open shop. Called Lush I hadn't heard of it but my sister had instructions from all friends back in L. A.. Get me stuff from. Lush. Now at the time, it was one of two lush locations in the world, and this is before e commerce. So unless you went to the store, you couldn't get the products. Remember the overpowering smell of roses and lavender and honey and lemon I remember these long loaves of colorful soap laid out on tables where you could slice off a Chonkin pay for it. By weight there were bath bombs and shampoos and lotions. It looked like the produce department at a fancy grocery store. You didn't see a whole lot of plastic packaging and in front of each product, you'd find a bright colorful chalkboard with a description. It was unlike any beauty product store I had ever seen. And it probably explains why then There was a line to get in. Lush was part of a new wave of beauty companies that came onto the scene around that time. Many of them influenced by the body shock and it's iconic founder Anita Roddick who as you will hear features prominently in this story is well. The main founder of Lush Mark Constantine had already seen incredible success and then catastrophic failure by the time he launched his venture. In fact, right before mark. Open Lush. He's lost most of his money on a mail order business that went bust. But. Lush turned his fortunes. And and today it's a brand with more than nine hundred stores around the world. Now, in recent months, the pandemic has hit the company hard. For time all of its stores in the UK, the US and Australia were closed. But. Lush has also seen a massive surge in online orders and later on, we'll get an update on how mark and the company have navigated the pandemic and the global economic fallout. But first a little bit about mark's background. He grew up in weymouth seaside town in the south of England. When he was only two years old his dad's split from the family and went off to Africa and mark never saw him again while he was growing up. And his mother. She took mark and moved in with her mother marks Grandma. It was me my mom, my grandmother who really brought me up a my aunt. So. I was really bored three. Yeah. What did your mom do? She was a journalist in the local newspaper on I knew my mom had to work in order for us to to be okay. It was very, very comfortable life full of love and hugs and security. My mom was always there and I love my nine I looked up to my nine and so it was comfortable. Very nice. Obey. Feminine Life I've felt. Spoilt To be honest, obviously, my nine drilled into me the proper values as well. with proverbs and all sorts of other things you know I I had to rights repeatedly better best never them rest till. My good is better. My better best things like that. But then I guess. Around the time you were twelve. So you like you stopped living with your grandmother like Yulia mom moved out. what happened was they there was larger a my mother married the lawyer we moved to my grandmother died. I didn't realize probably until much later in my life high much that'd affected me I felt responsible. I think from my grandmother's death for most of my life because obviously I was important to her and I wasn't there anymore and I couldn't after her and she died on then my my stepfather was. Very, cold I would say and violent. But that's very typical upbringing fifties because they'd come is war gentlemen. There was a lost friends some of them had seen that friends killed or relatives and So it was you know not surprising that those people were bringing up my generation went all the best balanced people in the world. What kind of I mean what kind of kid were you? What do you remember about how you responded to those circumstances? Did you I don't know retreat into yourself or did you act out? Did you fight with your mom? What do you remember or didn't fire my mom but I force a lot with my Stepdad physical fights and they would argue we would all argue. It was just I want to say unsatisfactory which doesn't side like this is like a strange word to use it but. Certainly when I came to build my own home I, for example, never locked the front door. You know I I make an effort on those smaller things that tell people that they wanted to. Careful. Kid were you at school? Are you could student? School was still difficult for. Really. Was it was just heart for you. I. Mean there were a lot of gangs. Gangs were normal in the fifties for for everyone there were lots of gang. So I went to the grammar school, which was the best school in. The top ten percents shoots went to the grammar school. Everyone's surprise when I got in. And then I wasted it while I. was there except that I did make friends and we were in particular gang where we could make. Bombs and things. Can. Make bombs. What we were the news like. PIPEBOMBS. They were we killing sugar bombs with batons permanganate. Glycerin Fuses also savings on we went making them for the IRA season, the Perron purposes to intimidate other gang.

Lush Mark Constantine London Founder Candan Karen Anita Roddick Africa Chonkin Weymouth Seaside Yulia UK England United States Australia
"mark constantine" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:42 min | 5 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"So guys any guesses the beeping sound reminds me of A. Countdown of some sort. Like in an alarm. But usually, which signals some sort of detonation that's that's about to take place. So that's about all I got out of that not that far off theft. That's actually a very good. Very good comment. So listener named Mark Constantine Ronin said, hi, cool noisy. It sounds like the Lever Guard pools in an old school prison to close all the cell doors. And then the doors are slamming shut at the same time. I thought that was really. Pretty cool. Guests that he made because it does have like that heavy metal type of clank noise that you would kinda here in the movies when when when they do that those. Ran. Who sells open or close that's not correct but that was a great guess another listener named Jodi Lesko wrote in Said Hi J. and crew for this week's noisy it seems to be happening in an echo place I hear some beeps than a metal material and motion and then the motion stopping to me it sounds like some sort of very secured door closing. So I'm guessing it's the sound of the hatch closing on the dragon capsule. Thanks. Well, jody, that was a cool. You. Know I'm not so sure about the echo though right Because in order for that, echo to happen that you hear it would be in some type of place where the sowed could bounce around. So I just don't think that the door would make that kind of an echo, but that was a cool. A cool guests another listener named veto. If you guys have ever heard of this guy I don't know. I've never heard of them before life. He said I think this noisy is a high power electrical switching. One of those really big circuit breakers switching huge currents from place to place the beeping spells out T S S in Morse code but that could just be paradise. then. He wrote in Italian a phrase it I'm going to mispronounce but it's sensor Electrica cmo an molly, which means without electricity animals. That was that was really cool. Thank you, veto. You are incorrect my friend but. We're going to move on to the winner the winner from last week. Dave Harris he said Hi there issue team I believe the WHO's that noisy from episode seven ninety is a nuclear reactor pulse with radiation meters bleeping in the background. Love The podcast greetings from Wellington new. Zealand. So this is a a reactor turning on. Let me play for you again..

Mark Constantine Ronin Dave Harris Lever Guard theft Jodi Lesko Wellington Hi J. jody
"mark constantine" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

03:54 min | 5 months ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"It has almost like a lion's growl or roar to me in a certain way something from the throat of an animal. No. I'm hearing something spinning up like rotating and then engaging with something else. So it's which causes you to slow down but you're also hearing the interaction of the two. That's that's an interesting Steve So. He said I can hear a mechanical pump then some spurts of slurring going down the pipe so I'm it's a space toilet, the most important machine on the space station. well that in the office then you know. I. Do you guys remember last week or two weeks ago I said that somebody? told us what visa to t means I see? Yes. All right. So he wrote a visa to t the guy himself wrote in said. It has an idiomatic meaning like the English phrase all of the above. Right yeah. Okay he says I don't think my parents fully understood the English birth rate Dr Form. That's IT I don't know if he's kidding or if that's true. He maybe his name really is just something. that. was like a drop down. You know what I mean all of the. All right. So Adam Hepburn rodents at J I have a guest for episode, seven, eight nine. WHO's that noisy factoring in the background sounds the main sound to me is an animal snoring possibly partially submerged, which makes me think it's a hippopotamus. Okay. See I thought animal to. Or. Just a really cool. Oh pomace why two weeks ago why with six afraid of seven seriously seven, eight, nine, hundred, twenty, nine yeah that we should have a celebrating right? Oh. Very tight on number. Miss that. Sorry. Oh, I just heard you say it out loud and it hit me because I would never. Last week was seven, eight, nine. This is seven hundred, Eighty, seven, ninety we're getting close to eight hundred gosh finance. Editor Right Mark Constantine wrote and he said, hi, any chance this week's noisy is the sound of a title Energy Electric Generator. It sounds like a propeller of some sort getting spun up as the tide runs through it. Hence, the back and forth sound of water and the machine noise. It also sounds like it's half out of the water which I've got no explanation for but the rest of it fits my mind's logic. So Mark I gave you extra points because your half out the water thing is on the right track. Here's a those guests from Jodi Jodi said Hi Jane, crew thought I want though I want it to be an alligator growling I am going to guess that this week's noisy is an indoor water rowing machine. Okay. So here's this week's winner. Richard Smith he said that sounds like an alligator bellowing just under the surface making the water dance. So this has never happened before I've never had anybody member. Jodie's just said though I wanted to be an alligator growling here's what I think. The real answer is and she named an indoor rowing machine she guessed it but that guests. So. That's me every science or fiction. You can't be in more second place in the. Jodi. Because she dangled it there and took it away but I had met her because she said so good guess Richard. This is an alligator. This is One of the noises that alligator or crocodile can make a similar noise. I, think it's related to the mating ritual, but it's really weird. They stick their head way up pointing up kind of on an angle to the sky. It's out of the water quite a bit and then there's a pause and the alligator just vibrates its body and you know the bumps alligators back. Just, barely sticking out of the water and the water looks like. It's coming up down coming down really fast. It looks like water being vibrated really severely, which it is, and that's where the sound comes from. So let's.

Jodi Jodi Mark Constantine Jodie Richard Smith Steve Adam Hepburn Editor Hi Jane
"mark constantine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"To thirty-five their orchestra. They're accused of orchestrating kickback scheme to sell more of their powerful opioid drugs. WBZ's Kim Tunnicliffe has more on opening arguments heard today in the trial of a pharmaceutical company, founder and four of his executives. He was. Driven by greed. That's the reason. Federal prosecutors say insys therapeutics founder John Kapoor, bribe doctors nationwide to prescribe highly addictive Fenton obey spray. Assistant US attorney David Lazarus says Kapoor turned his company into a criminal enterprise setting up a doctor speaking program to funnel the bribe money to physicians and even putting some of the doctor's office staff on the payroll, but the defense claims Kapoor just wanted to help patients dealing with intense pain after the death of his wife from breast cancer. Kapoor's attorney admits he pushed employee's to make more drug sales and gave bonuses to those who did. But she says every pharmaceutical company does the same and there's nothing legal about that. Kim Tunnicliffe WBZ whilst ins NewsRadio prison time for a man from Middleborough after he pleads guilty to dealing. No Mark Constantine sentenced to four years in the state lockup after meeting to one count of trafficking after an investigation police, but the search warrant stopped Constantine in his Lincoln. And that's when they discovered a large amount of. Of the drug as well as cash it is to thirty six on Capitol Hill. President Trump says he's not completely sure we can avoid another shutdown. The president says he doubts he'll accept anything less than five point seven billion dollars for a border wall. Telling the Wall Street Journal the chances of a deal by February fifteenth are less than fifty fifty. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office says the thirty five day shutdown has had a negative impact on US economic growth cutting into the GDP by at least point two percent in real dollar terms. The CBO says while affected workers will be made whole roughly three billion dollars has been sucked out of the economy this quarter and won't be replaced. CBS's? Steven Portnoy reporting, by the way, federal workers. Not the only ones financially affected by the shutdown. Still not exactly clear how many federal contractors were affected. Those include security janitorial workers food service workers among many others. But some estimates are putting this at nearly a million. Plus, again, those workers are not guaranteed any back pay and a Bill that would extend the statute of limitations. Limitations on child molestation cases is expected to pass today in New York state, the vote on the child victims act comes after years of failed attempts to pass that Bill was blocked several times in the state Senate by Republicans current law in New York state gives victims until the age of twenty three to either file a civil case or seek criminal charges as new Bill would allow victims to file civil suits until the age of fifty five and see criminal charges until age twenty eight to thirty eight now, it's time to take a look at Bloomberg business, and here's Tracy jonky. We have losses across the board and a call the down two hundred eighty three points, NASDAQ down Ninety-seven p down twenty eight points stung by Caterpillar and video warnings have slowing demand for their goods, particularly from China. Then and Jerry's says it will eliminate plastic straws and spoons from its scoop shops by free Conde on April ninth, and it wants to get rid of plastic cups and lids by the end of next year, Samsung's jumping on the no plastics bandwagon. It will be changing packaging four devices a small. Phone charges and as large as washing machines. I'm Tracy jonky Bloomberg business on WBZ. Boston's NewsRadio coming up. We'll check sports in about two minutes. Ever wonder why European seemed to speak so many languages? Maybe it's because they use babble the number one selling language learning app in Europe. Babbel's award-winning technology.

John Kapoor Kim Tunnicliffe WBZ Kim Tunnicliffe WBZ Congressional Budget Office President Trump founder Tracy jonky Wall Street Journal Mark Constantine Bill Steven Portnoy New York Assistant US attorney Europe US breast cancer Middleborough
"mark constantine" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

05:57 min | 2 years ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"How how what? You know, what Alan Dershowitz he brings some some sanity to the whole situation. What calling doesn't seem to understand is the difference between something that may be wrong and something may be illegal reasonable people could disagree about whether it's wrong to pay hush money for somebody to stop them from. Disclosing alleged impropriety sexually a reasonable people can say that's wrong with. That's right. It's not a legal the presidential candidate under the law could spend a billion dollars of his own money to do anything in the campaign. For example, if a presidential candidate took cash, literally cash and went and paid one of these women and say, I'm paying you not to disclose what happened and I'm doing it. In order to help myself elected president that would not be a crime a president entitled to make campaign contributions to his own campaign. So what are we talking about? Then this is what I this is what I'm I'm getting, ladies and gentlemen, is that this is much ado about nothing. It really is. You didn't see the media making a big deal out of this. When the Obama campaign paid passed the right to shut his face because he's embarrassing Obama. There's no big controversy big scandal over that. Again, somebody's pavements happened to we know of happened is earliest twenty fourteen. So this is this again, everybody on the left is salivating the news or just all excited and Michael Cohen, the rat has turned and all of a sudden, he's a hero. But really if the people decide the believe a lie, I guess if we changed the rules, but today, which is supposed to be a big bombshell interview. Will we just heard it? I think it's really nothing. Once again, Arizona is in the center ring of the political circus that's going on in the country as the governor of the great state of Arizona has to choose a new Senator in the center ring of our conservative circus. We have Constantine Carard better known as C cume. He's a conservative political consultant based here in Arizona. He's been with us throughout this whole political season and joins us today to help us break down. Some of governor Ducey choices Constantine was it a surprise that? Senator Kyle once again, a retired. No. And I I don't think it was really to to anybody. He indicated when he first took the job that he would look forward to doing it basically through the end of the year. And I'm pretty sure that this announcement today was absolutely not a surprise to anyone in the governor's team because they would have gotten ahead. John Kyle would have sort of ambush them with the pressure. I'm outta here. In a few days, you know, please please pick my replacement. So I'm sure they've known for probably a few weeks. It was no doubt that him stepping in. When he did it was a huge boost to the president to the Republican party and to Brett cabinet. Supreme court Justice now. But now, he's not he's done. What do you hear? What what are you hearing out there? As far as governor ducey's choices. They seem to be oddly limited. We're a state with a rather large pool of potential candidates. There's a lot of Republican talent in a state like Arizona, but you hear sort of a few names they tend to be kind of over and over again. Again, make Sally is still probably the favorite. But there was a Washington Post piece came out and Wendy's well-timed hits land to say that well placed sources say the governor's team is is cooling on mix. Sally. The timing is suspect and one can only imagine the games being played. So again mixed Sally has the advantage in that she has a campaign that is ready to go and the governor indicated he wants someone who run in twenty twenty. But there's there's other names that are out there. Before we before we go the other names. I think what the big Sally. The problem here is that she may have a team that's ready to go. But she lost. She lost against Kirstin cinema in the midterm elections. That has to leave. A Mark Constantine Karrar it does. And I think it creates concern among sort of the the political class in general folks back in DC. But also the donors who spent a whole lot of money and still lost the difference. I think is that in the same way that she was new to a lot of the voters in the state any campaign. She runs in two thousand twenty she'll be running as a United States Senator. And so she will be campaigning on the votes cast over the next year year and a half as opposed to what she says she will do as a Senator it is a different race. And I hope wherever looking at it, you know, keep that in mind when they're making their decision, what other names that you hearing out there floating around about time you'll hear Kirk Adams who was the governor's chief of staff who is actually had out that he was lead. That position Kirk has said, it's not going to happen a certain number of times. But in politics, that's kind of like Brett farve saying he's retiring. Non binding Eileen plying. Who's actually the state treasurer she was appointed to fill the state traders office when Jeff DeWitt took the position with the Trump administration sharp lady capable has think she was president of the board of regents could be a good candidate. But no real political machine. So she wanted to if she she'd almost have to take on MC Sally's team or take on the governor's team, and that might make sense because the governor's team frankly has nothing to do with twenty twenty. So there may be a political operation she could simply inherit and proceed to campaign with. And then of course, if you want to really kind of you know, sort of please the base, you know, gosar, it'd be a great choice Schweiker. It'd be a great choice. Digs just got there. I don't think he's he's he's he's a Senator guy. Matt salmon would be great Bill. Montgomery name has been floated I just don't out maybe Montgomery, but I don't see any those conservative names getting getting much traction with the governor.

Senator Arizona MC Sally Senator Kyle president Constantine Carard governor ducey Obama Alan Dershowitz Kirk Adams Montgomery Brett farve Matt salmon Supreme court Washington Post Republican party Mark Constantine Michael Cohen United States Kirstin cinema
"mark constantine" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

12:01 min | 2 years ago

"mark constantine" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"We have Constantine Carard better known as c cube. He's a conservative political consultant based here in Arizona. He's been with us throughout this whole political season. And we joins us today to help us break down some of governor ducey's choices Constantine. Was it a surprise that Senator Kyle once again, a retired? No. And I I don't think it was really to to anybody. He indicated when he first took the job that he would look forward to doing it basically through the end of the year. And I'm pretty sure that this announcement today was absolutely not as a prize to anyone in the governor's team because they would have gotten a heads up. I don't I don't think John Kyle would have sort of ambush them with the press release and said, I'm outta here in a few days. Please please pick my replacement. So I'm sure they've known for probably a few weeks. There was no doubt that him stepping in. When he did it was a huge boost to the president to the Republican party and to Brett cavenaugh supreme court Justice now. But now, he's not he's done. What do you hear? What what are you hearing out there? As far as governor ducey's choices. They seem to be oddly limited. We're a state with a rather large pool of potential candidates. There's a lot of Republican talent in a state like Arizona, but you hear a sort of a few names they tend to be kind of over and over again. Again, make Sally is still probably the favorite. But there was a Washington Post piece came out and Wendy's well-timed hits land to say that well placed sources say the governor's team is is cooling on mic. Sally. The timing is suspect and one can only imagine the games being played. So again mixed alley has the advantage in that she has a campaign that is ready to go and the governor indicated he wants someone who will run in twenty twenty. But there's there's other names that are out there. Other names. I think with the big Sally. The problem here is that she may have a team that's ready to go. But she lost. She lost it gives Kirstin cinema in the midterm elections. That has to leave. A Mark Constantine Karrar it does. And I think it it creates concern among sort of the the political class in general folks back in DC, but also among the donors who spent a whole lot of money and still lost the difference. I think is that in the same way that she was new to a lot of the voters in this state any campaign. She runs in twenty twenty she'll be running as a United States Senator. And so she will be campaigning on the votes. She casts over the next year year and a half as opposed to what she says she will do as a Senator it is a different race. And I hope wherever looking at it, you know, keep that in mind when they're making their decision, what other names that you hearing out there floating around by the time you'll hear Kirk Adams who the governor's chief of staff who is actually had announced that he was. Leaving that position perk has said it's not going to happen a certain number of times. But in politics, that's kind of like Brett farve saying he's retiring. Non-binding? I lean client who's actually the state treasurer. She was appointed to fill the state traders office when Jeff DeWitt took the position with the Trump administration sharp lady capable has they she was president of the board of regents could be a good candidate. But no real political machine. So if she wanted to if she she'd almost have to take on mix team or take on the governor's team and that might make because the governor's team frankly has nothing to do with twenty twenty. So there may be a political operation she could simply inherit and proceed to campaign with and then of course, if you want to really kind of sort of please the base, you know, gosar, it'd be a great choice Schweiker. It'd be a great choice. Biggs just got there. I don't think he's he's he's he's a Senator guy. Matt salmon would be great Bill. Montgomery's name has been floated by just don't out maybe Montgomery, but I don't see any those conservative names getting getting much traction with the governor. What about the former congressman John Shattuck I've heard sheddings name as well. Again. The I think in terms of appointment to step in and fill. I think he'd be able to do that just finding obviously has the skills. He knows DC centre-right guy got a conservative record on most issues. But do they view him as a twenty twenty candidate? And that's. Where 'cause there's other there's some names of some sort of wealthy individuals who could maybe sell fund some of this who we probably shouldn't throw names out 'cause it's almost not fair to them right with shag who has been doing legal work. I don't think he's been doing lobbying. But with all of these candidates what the governor's team must've spent the last several weeks doing is to do almost like a background look into these folks. What are you up to what are you doing? Have you been involved in lawsuits, and even those sorts of things to kind of vet them as potential candidates as well as can you do the job as United States Senator? So it's sort of a double vetting going on. And it's tough to speculate on some of these people that have been back in the private sector for a long time. Because you they find out that so and so had X Y Z as a client as an attorney, and that that would be just, you know, kryptonite on the campaign trail, so we don't know that. And it makes it tough for us to speculate. We have Constantine Courard in the center ring of the circus. He is a conservative political consulted based here in Arizona. Okay. Let's go for the wild card stuff. The tin foil. Had picks. I've heard out there might the governor appoint himself. I don't think he will. I give you two reasons Katie and hobb's, those are probably the two biggest reasons you would have basically brand new secretary of state who would step up to be governor and turn the state from Republican control the democrat control. And I can't imagine. I mean, the party would be furious. The daughter to be serious, they certainly wouldn't have his back reelection in twenty twenty. So I would say zero percent chance of that. Okay. Okay. And another name I heard floating around in conspiracy theory world was Cindy McCain again, I think if you do that you you set the party up for what would be probably a pretty rough primary. I don't think the party would the conservative base which simply defer to send me McCain and let her run for reelection unopposed in twenty twenty. And I think the party after twenty eighteen would really like to avoid a rough primary. Because they saw the advantage cinema had basically running unopposed. The Democrats are likely to have a primary Republicans would be well served to pick somebody who has a solid of conservative that the base of happy who can run as a credible candidate. So Cindy, McCain would basically guarantee a primary and would be would not be favorite to win the primary. And so I don't think they want to choose somebody who loses in August twenty twenty to somebody. They don't even know yet. Well, you know, constantly I had to ask you because I have folks out there. Folks out there who are sending me there. Liz as come this asking that question are not endorsements. Exactly. Okay. So when there's a timeframe that the governor has right where he has to make this decision. You know, sorta sort of. Yes, or no, he's the retire the resignation basis December thirty first and he could announce the pick any time between now and then to kinda give the public time to get used to it. He could do it shortly after the thirty first, but you know, congress is going to be going to work really soon in the new year. You've got the state of the state that's usually mid mid late January. So. You know, sometime first week in January if not before we should know who are Senator is well, I'll tell you what constituted I want you to enjoy the holiday season because as soon as it's over I'm going to have to put you back to work. I am looking forward to it all the best merry Christmas. Happy new year at all you Constantine karate in breaking down his analysis. I wanna know if you call something you said the governor wants to make conservatives happy he'll pick somebody from the freedom caucus someone like gosar or swicord wants to make the conservatives. Happy. It seems to me that is the future of the Republican party. If it has one is going to be the conservatives, we've given the establishment so many opportunities John bainer. Paul Ryan, we've given a Jeff flake. We we we've given them so many opportunities and they just continue to fail us. And what always burns me is back in the day. We were expected to vote for this Dabbash because you know, you know, we got to hold the house. Oh, we gotta hold sit in order to get this. You have to vote we have to cross over. But the moment. It becomes the establishments. Turn to to back. Somebody orthodox an orthodox solidly conservative. They balk. They become never-trumpers. They stand on principle, and they come up with all types of emotional gobbly Gook to justify their their defiance. They put themselves up on a pedestal. I think we're just getting tired of it. How about this? If you if if someone like a goal Sar. Or swicord were to be appointed to see do you really really believe that they would be primarily in the next election. I don't. But if you put somebody like Martha mcsally in that seat, then establishment pick. I am telling you, I know you try to ignore me. I know you think I'm crazy. They'll say, well, you know, what she's been around for two years and people get the chance nor they're going to support her daughter not. You'll get the same results as you did last time. Because at the end of the day, people know, Martin met Sally. They they they they they followed it. They were not as they were not moved by it. People know Jeff flake, people know corker. I really wish that the Republican party to just pull their head out of their assets. Look at the land for real talk to the people, and and even go in a different direction is long as somebody who is conservative passionate. And in line with the president. Whether you like it or not President Trump has changed the Republican party for adver. And you know, what it needed to be changed? You got people like Mia love Utah. A say, you know, if if if this party does not reach out to minorities, and and and and women is going to be going to lose an shot, Jeremiah it's already happening. You don't wanna see it? There's a movement going on. The president. He's got enterprise zones going on inner cities a huge win. He had Robert Johnson, you'll co-founder of B E T in Oval Office two days ago, celebrating it where was the media on that. Where was the media on that nowhere? Again, we're talking about establishment type never Trumpers, the party will break up heels break up. We'll still be standing the fighting though. But now, it's our turn to say, you know, we're not go in that direction. We're just not going in that direction anymore. Ignore us. We the people at your peril. What is it gender neutral makeover coming for Santa Claus? How we'll talk about that at six twenty fourteen minutes after the hour time for eastside. What's I traveled with John Klein Powell and the latest on the east side James we've got a wreck.

Senator Republican party governor ducey Arizona president Senator Kyle Sally Cindy McCain United States Jeff flake Constantine Carard Brett farve Washington Post Mark Constantine consultant Montgomery Constantine Courard Brett cavenaugh Kirk Adams Matt salmon