17 Burst results for "Mark Anthony Neal"

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on Rivals: Music's Greatest Feuds

Rivals: Music's Greatest Feuds

04:57 min | 6 d ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on Rivals: Music's Greatest Feuds

"The the critic. Mark Anthony Neal wrote the an effort to make her the black black artists and some black radio stations refused the player. I think she was booed at the soul train awards. So it's really interesting now to think from this vantage point there they're calling her whitey Houston. Houston which is pretty brutal. For her yeah, I think it just speaks again, I think especially at that time to be like a crossover artist it just required I think concessions that I think for a Lotta people were just uncomfortable. You know that like you were at some wake sort of denying who you are in order to appeal again to the massive Middle American audience just funny now because I hear those sort of the pop song she was doing. And it sounds really innovative to me. Kind of blending the blend of RBM, pop seems like you know not going the straight arm be route was a way to sorta like build on the people that came before her I feel like I don't know I maybe 'cause I kinda had to rediscover those songs. They didn't really grow up with a lot of those because I was born in eighty seven. So I was kind of. The number one song when I was born was. I, think it was. How will I know but yeah, hearing them now they they still really fresh and interesting but got seven number ones I think she was the first person to do. Either the first female artists of the first artist period that seven number one in a row an incredible run. Yeah. I mean I think it's true I care about songs you're talking about sending fresh today but like she did also do like a lot of these very soft rock ballads again like the greatest love of all and saving all my love for you like which are again, it was like dentist's office music. And I think what redeems those recordings Houston's voice she such an incredible singer that when she does material is Kinda like Schmaltzy pap she can sell it because she has so much soul in her voice. But yeah, the material itself I think sometimes could really you of..

Houston Mark Anthony Neal
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:51 min | 3 months ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"You know that that really focus in on anti blackness. They remained viable tunes for us to remember what exactly that history was in particular remains valuable, because it's also a source of black resistance to those images right where we get rid of those images, we also get rid of that history of black resistance at in my mind is just as important if not more than Horton than noting. What they were resistant against. I would argue. There's a difference between a gone with the wind in the world than people making choices and using stereotypes in order to sell products. Mom I make a distinction here between art and commerce. In which are leads into commerce so I think we have to make distinctions there Mary Elliot. What about the rising pressure this week last week? since the George Floyd Death to to take down. Confederate statues remove confederate names from for military bases and such. You know there there are some in this country. who say that's history. We can't erase our past to completely to which you say what? Well, it is part of our history, but again you know. Many of these monuments were erected by groups like the daughters of the confederacy and to mark the landscape. And by marking that landscape marks the landscape with notions of racism and segregation and inequality, and so to change that and remove these from the public arena, but moved them into places museums that will allow more engaged dialogue on the significance of those structures how they came into being the messages that were meant what it prompted the public, how the public reacted to it to provide more context. I think that that's very important. Got A few calls here. Let me get one in here I from Spokane Washington. Eric is on the line. Hello Eric Welcome to the program. Hello. Thank you for your time I'm forty eight years old and. All going on in society right now seems to be shining. The light on what I didn't realize was such. inherently resurfaced things that were going on around me. Eastern Washington is very white and I never heard of June teeth until recently, and so that's the upside of all. This turmoil is that it's I think educating a lot of us that. Didn't realize what we were living around, and sometimes how we act just by how we've been raised in the society that we exist in Eric. Thank you very much for that. Thoughtful Call Mark Anthony Neal There is a lot of education going on for a lot of people who are understanding things in perhaps a new and different way. Would you say? Or absolutely and I think it's important that suddenly there has been a four. Particularly for black bankers lack historians the work that black women historians have been doing in the last decade to provide a different view of the world that we're looking at it. I think of the work of somewhere like my colleague, the glimpse. I think it'll work of of Dana rainy in so many other black women historians who were trying to put this historical moment in a broader context and the fact that again this way in which educating also connects with commerce in all so many the academic publishers who are pushing out their lists. You for folks to read things, and that's one step of the conversation, right? They'd be educational. Process is the first step of transformation, but again these accommodations have been going on for a long time. You Know I. Cheer Black Studies. Department University. That's existed for fifty years. We've been doing the same kind of work for fifty years of yet. There are folks who are just finding about it now. Now Finding out about it now I think were becomes an important step. Particularly White Americans is the as you're gathering. Is Information go to your own folks? You know a home to your communities schools, do you school boards to your elected officials? To make sure they understand the dynamic of what's happening here? If not, it becomes Kinda conversation that we've essentially been having you know for many decades. Christina is in Medford Massachusetts. Hello Christina Welcome to the program. Hi there. Thanks for taking my call. I just wanted to say a couple of a couple of comments I first of all I actually grew up in Texas I lived there for over twenty years, and so I grew up with two teams of something that was fairly well known and recognized on in the communities around me and as Soon as Elliot so that it was initially much more of a grassroots celebration, and that's definitely how I experienced in Texas, and so it's been interesting to see over the past several decades as it has further developed an expanded and then particular. To See this year. How it's really sort of you know blown up and is very much on the You know in the national, spotlight. Eight you know in the past few days. Really kind of reflecting more and. More about the comparison to July Fourth Independence Day and really thinking about you know sort of. What distinctions are and that you know Independence Day on July fourth really is an independent states for white people more than. Anyone else and July fourth was for white Americans June teeth the similar independence day for for Black Americans in this country I do appreciate your call, Christina thank you. Thank you very much. Mary Elliott. That's an interesting observation from from our from our caller. There How do you see, do you? Do you agree? I think that both dates are important to all Americans and I would hate to segregate these holidays but I understand her point. Because as I mentioned earlier, June eighteenth gives all of us pause to think about a more inclusive meaning and application of freedom in this nation. June July four July fours African people of African descent fought in the revolutionary war, and while they were fighting for their own freedom against a backdrop of a fight for liberty, they still thought and I. Think it's important to understand the development of this nation in that African Americans are part of this history all along the way, but it's not a segregated history June. Eighteenth should be important to African Americans and all Americans just like July four Mark Anthony Neal..

Eric Welcome Mark Anthony Neal Mary Elliot Christina Washington Horton George Floyd Texas Dana rainy Mary Elliott Spokane Department University Massachusetts
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:58 min | 3 months ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Of American slavery at the Smithsonian's national, Museum of American, African American history and culture and Mark Anthony Neal Chair of the Department of African and African. American studies at Duke University I want to hear now from Nicole Hannah Jones. She WanNa Pulitzer Prize last month for her work on the New York Times Nineteen, sixteen nineteen project, which reexamined the legacy of slavery in the United States. She appeared on MSNBC earlier this month shortly. Shortly after President Trump announced that he would not hold his first public rally since the pandemic June eighteenth, but instead do it a day later. It has to have been kind of so agreed that he was going to hold this rally on June eighteen in Tulsa, the side of this racial massacre that even black surrogates who normally defend him pushed back that that tells you. How does actually was president? Trump told the Wall Street. Journal yesterday quote I did something good. I made June teeth very famous. It's actually an important event important time, but nobody had ever heard of it Mark Anthony Neal. President Trump taking credit therefore making June teeth famous your response. The expected for a lot of things that that he shouldn't A. There's no question that you know. Obviously people would hurt of June eighteenth before this time and obviously black folks have been celebrating it now for for more than one hundred years, but by the same token, his comments also reflect the fact that there are many white Americans that because people push back on him choosing that date in Tulsa initially that the. June t circulating in the way that it had not circulated engaged in culture before and many whites are more aware of of June team of because of that, but again it in some ways that's. The way that we've restorick centered white knowledge as being the knowledge that's valuable things of black people know our no value is. The president would obviously say for something that black people know that in his mind that you know it doesn't matter simply black people. White folks doubt then you know it's now well. No Mary Elliott in in Tulsa Oklahoma, in nineteen twenty one a racist mob killed hundreds of of black residents The president did move his rally back a day out of respect after getting some some pressure, a lot of pressure because of that choice I'm curious your thoughts being from Tulsa your family lost businesses after that riot now. They did and I I WANNA. Remove myself from talking about. About the President I WANNA put a human face on. Tulsa and my family was enslaved in Mississippi. Got Into a confrontation with the clan went to Indian territory, which became the state of Oklahoma in nineteen o seven, and it's there where they own several businesses including a chain of department stores, the second of which was built in Tulsa. And from Nineteen Eighteen Star article newspaper article it had marble. It has chandeliers that had many things, but most importantly it was an important business to the community a community, many people successful blue collar, workers, white collar, workers, business owners, and so I am a descendant of those who work hard to make a life provide education build communities, and we lost business in our family. Members were impacted by what happened in Tulsa, but understand the people who went to Tulsa. My family was involved in protests in eighteen, seventy, five to enforce the right to vote in Starkville Mississippi. The strength of these black people continued on when they got to Indian territory interesting. well as we commemorate June eighteenth today, the the end of slavery in the United States Mark Anthony Neal talking about June eighteenth you. You were quoted in The New York Times, saying that there are comparisons in this moment on this day between the end of the civil war in the current unrest that we're experiencing right now you see this moment as as sort of a rupture, your word explain that. It feels like there's a rupture that something has shifted in the national discourse around race and it really is a lining of various stars that we could not have expected. You know even six months ago, the fact that so many people were feeling in their own way going through various trauma, because of Covid nineteen in ways that they felt concerned about their own citizenship, and this is of course race in gender and Sexuality and nationality the fact that when George Floyd's killed. Is You know the national? I and imagination is on this at this moment, because so many people were at home. The fact that so many of these young probes could have taken to the streets because they weren't in school because they weren't doing internships because they weren't. Doing their new jobs. Created this kind of moment that suddenly we feel the ground. Move beyond us. Below US and what? We don't know what that's going to look like yet. And it has one of the reasons why I'd make that comparison back to eighteen sixty five in June eighteenth. You know folks got a proclamation that said they were free, but they didn't know what exactly that tree would look like, and so this feels like that kind of mole that now where there's some ambiguity, right and even anxiety about what going forward is going to look like. You talk about. Feeling the ground move beneath us. We saw that even in small subtle ways today, the food giant Mars, saying it's changing the name of the Uncle Ben Rice brand the pancake mix aunt Jemima announced it will change its name and logo, saying that its origins or a rooted in racial stereotypes you know these are hundred plus year old brand names, making big and important shifts in this big and important moment mark Anthony Neal I. Know you'll say long-overdue. Definitely long-overdue and I think we ought to be cautious about this moment. considering the history we know of slavery in this country, and even that important period you know between you know emancipation to what became another version of freedom. You know in the nineteen sixties in A. We can't `unright the reality of what this history has been in two weeks. because. Brands have simply chosen to present us with different images or give themselves names. We can't on right. The history of trauma and violence and anti blackness that existed you know over this time, and still exists in this particular moment, and we ought to be honest about the fact that we live in a culture because of social media. What we call a cancel culture that some of the motivation for these companies is a fact that you know folks now have the power to cancel them at very powerful ways because social media, and they have made economic calculations to be on the right side of history to be able to protect their brand. And sold the bike. Be some good heartedness in this. Because that's the thing you know, this is not the first time you. And Ben in cream week. Man have been targets criticism for what they represented you know. Black activists and others have been making these planes for as long as these images have existed. You know so what has happened in the last two weeks? That has changed. Well it also this week. H. B. O. temporarily or perhaps not temporarily shelved the film gone with the Wind, because of its glorification of the antebellum South your professor Mark Anthony Neal. You've used gone with the wind in your curriculum. You're somewhat conflicted about this. Speaking about on writing the history in two weeks and really underwriting history generally. I always find that particularly from a pedagogical standpoint whether we're talking, we'll birth of a nation or gone with the wind or any number of cultural artifacts that.

Tulsa Mark Anthony Neal president President Trump United States Mark Anthony Neal Chair Nineteen Eighteen Star MSNBC Pulitzer Prize Ben Rice Duke University Museum of American Department of African Nicole Hannah Jones The New York Times Oklahoma Starkville Mississippi George Floyd
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:50 min | 3 months ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Reflect on their moment, and and to begin to think about you know a better way for us to go forward. So, it is different in this in Moba. Definitely, and so, how do you Mark Anthony Neal? How do you personally reflect on that original June eighteenth today? What happened that day? You know it's interesting in listening to to Miss Elliott a moment ago. They'll June. T really forces us to put us out sales in the mindset of of how those folks who literally walked off of these plantations had to imagine what freedom is, and argued the last war more than a hundred years. You know black scholars, historians, thinkers, philosophers, artists musicians have been trying to capture what that imagination of freedom might have been at that time. In, its. You know when you consider that June teeth now is a marker of something that happened on a day, but is also a marker of what hadn't occurred on that day or even going forward the fact that you know a hundred years later. We're looking at legislative legislation. Civil Rights and voting rights act you know and sixty four sixty five, then intentionally insulated tries to guarantee what should have been guaranteed back in eighteen, sixty three, and then, of course you know the moment that we celebrate from eighteen sixty five. Lille speaks to the fact that June. Teeth is a reminder that there is still a gap. For Black, folks, interns full, silly, fittest, full citizenship in the United States, well one of the most famous June teens occurred in nineteen, sixty eight, when Martin Luther King's widow Coretta Scott King decided to cut short. The so-called poor people's March and commemorated with June tenth celebrations on that day known as Solidarity Day, she delivered a speech before as many as one hundred thousand people on the National Mall in Washington DC here it is..

Coretta Scott King Mark Anthony Neal Martin Luther King Moba Miss Elliott Lille National Mall United States Washington
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:48 min | 4 months ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Well mark Anthony Neal is chair of African and African American studies at Duke University in North Carolina I asked him first could George Floyd's death be a turning point in race relations in the US and if so why given that is not the first case of its kind we often think about protest movements are singular events like the March on Washington for for one example but if you connect this to the birth the birth of the black lives matter two thousand thirteen after the death Trayvon Martin the protests of the current information in two thousand fourteen Baltimore in two thousand fifteen you know this is just another stage of what has been almost a decade long campaign against anti black police brutality I think what's changed in this particular moment is the nature of the actual killing that eight plus whatever eight minutes because how many seconds in which the officer was kneeling on Mister Floyd snack and the fact that because of the cold food crisis and everything having to slow down the eyes of the nation in the world well on this particular case in ways in which we didn't have the kind of attention span if you will that we might have had a few years ago in terms of criminal justice and the police all black men in America treated differently by police than white men can we say that I think we see in terms of both data and anecdotal evidence that clearly the kind of interactions that black men have in this country with law enforcement is is different than the kind of interactions that we see with with their white peers I often think about the cases of for instance the Charleston shooter of the young white man who shot nine African Americans even in this particular moment there was a young white college student from university of Connecticut who is on the run who would kill two people you know both of those are examples of folks who were had killed folks that were taken in without any harm and here we have so many cases of unarmed black men you know engage in in most cases in what were misdemeanors who end up dead at the hands of police force and why is that is it about white perceptions of black man and and where does that come from it is does it go all the way back to the time of slavery I think we've had long narratives and images that suggested that black man had to be treated a certain kind of way I mean if you think about just the institution of slavery in order for that to be successful if you will you know you had to have cultural practices in the image is needed if you will that circulated that help to justify the treatment of African Americans I think if you go back to the early twentieth century I think the emergence of a trigger like Jack Johnson well Jack Johnson becomes the trope for how many Americans think about blackness and masculinity and black would have been treating accordingly all the way through from Jack Johnson to the kind of images that we see today this photo has not also had an impact on African Americans own perception of themselves I mean you teach about black masculinity is not the case today I think that's always been the case that link as African American man you're always conscious of how the world sees you the fact that so many parents of young black boys often engage in what we call the talk which is to talk to young folks that their young boys increasingly girls about how they could should comport themselves in the world because of the perceptions of their fear and their criminality and things of that nature at least perceived criminality what about the police in particular I mean is it just a question of of training or does it go much deeper than that I think we have created systems of policing in this country you know for instance during the protests and and some of the vandalism but one of the criticism that we often hear that these folks are tearing down their communities and for a lot of these folks in these communities it doesn't feel like their communities right they live someplace where police forces are occupational occupation force and a lot of this has to do with you know we don't have loads of policing in this country in which police officers actually live in the communities that they police the police officer actually live side by side with some of the citizens of their charge to protect and serve if they had to go to the supermarket with their war coffee shop on a regular basis I think we have a different kind of relationship I was professor mark Anthony Neal of cheek university of North Carolina well with protests across the country have a George Floyd's death as well as an ongoing outbreak that's already cool as well over a hundred thousand that's how is this troubled period playing politically for president trump especially as November's election draws ever closer on the line Patrick Murray director of the Monmouth university polling institute based in New Jersey Patrick welcome to the program I'm just in terms of voters attitudes to the protests has there been a shift in recent days I yeah we've seen this seachange really and public attitudes towards how the police in particular treat black versus white folks we've been we've been following this in the Monmouth polling over the past few years in terms of attitudes towards use of excessive force and and in the past with a majority of whites have said well this is the please don't use excessive force on blacks anymore than they do on whites and that has changed entirely it went from a sixty two percent felt that way I just a few years ago to thirty nine percent now after this George Floyd case and I think what we're seeing is you know the majority are saying that the blacks are subject to excessive force in a way that the whites aren't they face dangers that whites do not and that I think is more than a momentary shifter shift just based on this one incident that will go away as I think the professor Neal said in a people are really paying attention to this and they're seeing this in their own in their own communities now in a way that they happened before and I think with the pro the protests that we're seeing across the country which include a lot more white people than protests that we've seen in the past are held up in this polling that we're seeing that suggests that the attitudes have changed and it changed because of the cultural norms changing during the trump administration well against that background what about president trump's handling of the prices the way he's responded to how his ratings what's been the impact on its ratings well his ratings have gone down a couple of points and think in part because of this in part because of a cuvee what we know is is that the president's ratings don't change all that much it's it's the force behind the ratings the strength of the what people feel whether they approve or disapprove of that seems to be the shift and what we're finding right now and again the polling is just coming out because this keeps developing every day something new is coming out but what it seems that we're finding in the polling is that what president trump has made it hard for people to take a middle position vertically white people to take a middle position on this issue because he's lumping all the protesters regardless of where they are because of what they're doing regardless of their own skin couch with terrorists violence and people don't see that in themselves so you can't say that Hey I've I think that there's a problem here but at the same time there's this violence and that's not good and you can kind of let this go away I think what what present present trump is doing is forcing this issue and forcing people to get off the fence and take sides we've got about forty seconds left I mean are all Republicans getting nervous about November and and in particular the way further intentions of changing in some states yes I think they are because in particular states that we're looking at right now that have a significant portion of voters of color such as Arizona and Texas that are now on the map as a potential states that Democrats could pick up that weren't just a few months ago thank you very much Patrick Murray director of the Monmouth university polling institute in New Jersey to have good if you wanna get in touch with the program at B. B. C. Niza the program on Twitter will act James Menendez if you want to get in touch with me we're gonna be talking about treatments for coronavirus set in the next few minutes please stay with us distribution of the BBC world service news our in the United States is.

Duke University North Carolina George Floyd US mark Anthony Neal
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

03:48 min | 6 months ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"Hungry. Does he ever sleep? Kids are always doing that at the most inconvenient times. They're not they're supposed to. I guess events like all right last one comes from Toronto Coatesville so last couple of weeks they've been a really crazy First of all my in-laws showed up at my house about two and a half weeks ago and I nine o'clock on a Saturday get knock knock on my door and got opened the door. I see if my wife's grandmother next they know her. My Wife's moms come the process with a whole bunch of groceries suitcase on my what's going on. They scared other skating when the somewhere to stay so. Now I'm like China piece everything together trying to figure it all. I have no idea what's going on next thing. You know we all sit down talk. They just 'cause they were scared. And they from Jerry so they they did it to our draw up the COASTAL TA TO COME. Stay with us now. I'm frustrated because I'm like Jersey got raw numbers but you know as long as they say it is what it is. I'm trying to get do it. Meanwhile me and my wife We haven't been able to relieve some stress if you know what I mean and more than one way and you know between them being in the house having to take care of two zero s stressful Luckily I get I say luckily I'm GONNA essential worker. I voted Work Day. Still I'm still out working So I do get some peace at least being at work which is strange to say but when I come home it's just you and my wife could tell she was going on and you know my wife never really does too much but I want to say it was Friday. She was like you want me to mail box real quick that the community said you gotta go to bystander. Draw with my I whatever so. We go sit in the car. She closed the doors nicely. No she pulled out doing. Pull out lighter. I'm like Oh all right. Let's say no. I never felt so good in my life. You know we had a nice little talk in the car for a little bit and went back and not having gone this hour and went to bed a a a A. I'm like this and I married. I BEEN MARRIED. So I won't speak to you you know like but if y'all go show up at my house I ain't no no no no no no no no no no no. I know Sorry we ain't going to the mailbox if y'all got a problem with it young and go back to New Jersey. You can catch that contact pig one deepen the songs. Solomon as look. I'll I'll say at all. It is if anybody who show up as your house. If they don't like it they can go right. You Ain't got to kick them out but they got some decisions to make. This is GonNa be going off to log. Bright whole lot of people go break a lot of this stuff right. It was just like going outside right but by for people who all top each other in this time where where social distancing actually comes from leaving who yeah but ladies and gentlemen I thank you so much you joining us here on the right time. We do a couple of times a week. My man gave by saying how does everything behind the scenes. Thank you sir. Thank you to our sponsors thank you. That's we also they guitar. If you haven't heard contribute thanks. Mark Anthony Neal professor at Duke. Check out his story at MPR. About bill weather's rest in peace to bill with it's also thanks to Zo Madonna. Check out her story at the Boston Globe on people trying to teach music classes in the age of the pandemic and thanks to Aaron Garsts contributed to the Washington Post. Shakeout his story about how people living their lives on animal crossing remember described at the right.

Jersey Toronto Mark Anthony Neal MPR New Jersey Zo Madonna China Solomon Washington Post Jerry Boston Aaron Garsts professor Duke
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

You Can't Make This Up

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

"Love with him. You know, he's you know, anyway. So what do you think it is that we don't know this about Sam cook? You know, how did we lose him where he get lost? But such a good question over the course of making the film. I, you know, would come up with one theory after another and and sometimes they were debunked. And I do think. There's something about the fact that when he died because it was scandalous that. There was sort of this hijacking of his legacy. His legacy really should have been what he was doing in terms of empowering the butter immunity. And also, I mean, he was you know, I think this is Mark Anthony Neal talks about this in the film, but this incredible coats, which are like he was he was really operating in profound in deep way in both the white community and the black community. And I think some of that got that part of his legacy really got hijacked, by the way, the story of how he died, and then it became sort of a scandalous story. The change the way a lot of people thought about him. I mean, I don't think it changed a lot of people Nafir can American community thought of him. Maybe it did. I don't know. But certainly if you're, you know, some white person from a distance that doesn't have any level skeptical. Them towards the stories. You're being told. Yeah. It was like, wow. It is kind of you know, an upsetting my that he died, and I think that for time. That's how the stories the stories circled around that because it was sorted, and that sort of our culture gravitates to this kind of stories, and and then you know, that incredible story that his live at Harlem square album sat in a vault in twenty years, and it wasn't until some young guy. Like he discovered them in the vault and decided twenty years later like since off he could bring them to life. And I also think you know, I, you know, I don't, you know, don't want to speak out of turn. And I don't you know, I don't want to get into it. But I also think whoever is managing division of who. He is. There was obviously a certain vision that has been put out into the world, and it's a little bit more of the slick Sam Cooke at the COPA and everybody I talked to you said he loves the COPA any Le. Loved his success there and he loved his ability to move in different worlds. But he also really had this deep connection to his own community. And somehow that purchase was lost for many people and also hearkening back to the Shia crapping analogy. Yeah. From earlier, you know, if the if the people who are controlling the media that we consume are people who haven't been steeped in or interested in that part of his life. You know? Of course, they're going to focus on the sensational, you know, way that he passed. So when we can't tell our stories, and we're left at the bottom of the changes kind of like cranking out content. You know, our stories doogie loss. Yeah. No. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Okay. Conspiracy theory time who do you think? This is a hard one for me because I did talk to a lot of people not everybody in the film. I talked to you know, I brought stuff to investigative criminal expert in and what a kept getting back was the. You know, that they didn't believe there was necessarily evidence to confirm one way or the other that something was wrong. And so to me with the official story. I think almost nobody believes the official officials story has learned it is weird. And I, but I also think they to me the more the thing I could have concrete or that. I could think about concretely is if we as a culture don't value people's lives and investigate either, you know, protect them from being killed by law enforcement or meaningfully investigate the deaths of people that what that does is it. Just breeds incredible distrust, right? And and as long as we're contributing creating a culture where institutions are not places that everybody in the community feels that can turn to then it breathe. Reads conspiracy theories and the problem with this point of time, and in this moment in history is that they were really brutal assassinations of powerful black intellectuals and black leaders that really make the idea of it being a crazy conspiracy sort of feel much less crazy. So I don't know. I don't know what happened, you know, I on different days. I believe different things on our team people believe different things like one executive

Sam cook Mark Anthony Neal Sam Cooke Harlem square black community official COPA executive twenty years
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on World Cafe

"Mark Anthony Neal. This would be one of the last really major public performances that she does. And what you hear Ethan Franklin in those days is someone you know, that her voice is weathered. It is Richard. It's different. But she knows how to control her instrument and again because she's home. This is Detroit. She's a longtime Detroit line span. She knows the reality of her mortality, you know, what you hear on her performance at that time, you know, as almost like a kid to a whole going. Gossip was about uplift and transcendence it inspires people in taps into the fillings in listeners listeners like Richard Smallwood when I got to Howard University of my freshman year respect had just hit. I was like who is this singing like this? This is what is the most amazing voices that I that I've heard and whenever she would come to the DMV area. We get a little pennies together and get the closest seat that recruited at the concert because going to see a Retha live, especially in those days was like a revival meeting. I mean, she would go right from you know, I've never loved Amanda where I love you right into how good Jesus is. So it was a quite inexperienced that emotional powerful annoying and experience that never ever experienced before. Like Sam Cooke Marvin combine the heightened emotions of.

Richard Smallwood Detroit Mark Anthony Neal Sam Cooke Marvin Ethan Franklin DMV Amanda Howard University Retha
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:59 min | 1 year ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Into the second half of next week. I'm Michelle Hannigan, and you're listening to weei the eighty eight point five San Francisco, and we you. By eighty nine point three north Highland, Sacramento. Forum rebroadcast continues at ten thirty one. Welcome back to forum. I'm Michael Krasny. Virginia attorney general Mark herring yesterday admitted that he wore black face while he was in college at a party in the nineteen eighties. This comes amid increased calls for the resignation of Virginia. Governor Ralph Northam over his scandal involving wearing black face in the eighties. So what does this all about in this half hour? We want to talk about the history and popularity of black face and minstrels across the United States and their role in the humanizing and disenfranchising African Americans. We're joined by she is curator of music and performing arts at the Smithsonian. Institution's national museum of African American history and culture, and we welcome you to the program. Good to have you. Thank you. Glad to be here. Let me say that I was in this Massoni an African American museum just a few weeks ago. And it is extraordinarily. I know it's a tough ticket. But I strongly recommended I wanna talk with you this morning about this whole history of black facie origins. Go back to well. Charcoal greeson. Soot put on people's faces back in the eighteen thirties. And it was done in large part really to entertain. But at the same time to sort of stand up against real equality, and abolition and all of those kinds of things and say, look these blacks are they're not as humid as we are. Absolutely. It was a performance tradition has had long lasting impact. But basically for those who may not be familiar with it. People white entertainers would black up their faces with burnt cork or whatever means that they had at their disposal and would produce a state production in which they would do gross caricatures of African Americans creating stereotypical characters such as the mammy uncle, Tom jump. Jim crow the dandy, but also characterizing them as lazy unintelligent and using African American cultural traditions to do so so they would use songs and dances language, malapropisms in the way that African Americans could not speak proper English. And it was a way of just kind of creating an image that was disseminated throughout the country 'cause minstrel C E ended up being. Being kind of the innovators of our popular entertainment tradition. And what many people don't realize is it minstrels and minstrelsy was perhaps at one time. It was popular form of entertainment throughout the United States. We're not just talking about Jim crow south. And in fact, Jim crow was the name of one of the early minstrel performances and. This is a uniquely American form of entertainment. It was really quite popular Oliver America. But as you said, the real ideal of it was to show black people is being lazy and ignorant and superstitious and also we should mention, hyper sexual and prone to thievery and cowardice, right? Those same kind of stereotypes that transfer to other mediums of entertainment as we got into the twentieth century and the power of because of that popularity is that it was shown to audiences all across the country eventually and people who may not have had as close contact with African Americans began to see this as a way of how to understand who they really are. These are racist stereotypes, pure and simple. And it was also a way of essentially fortifying and indeed expanding the idea of white supremacy. And most of this really was an antithesis to what white people felt in terms of white supremacy. They were compared to black people just caricatures. Yes. Absolutely. And they had tremendous impact in shaping American culture, and the popularity of this entertainment style that really became very American as you pointed out, I mentioned the figure Jim crow was Thomas Dartmouth rice who performed that particular spectacle. And we're talking about something that even goes back historically to well, the great Frederick Douglass who condemn this pretty early on back in eighteen forty eight. He called these performances. He said they were filthy scum of white society pandering to corrupt taste of fellow white citizens, pretty harsh, but certainly up. And it certainly had that kind of impact on African Americans did not look favorably on it and to see themselves portrayed in a way that did not really recognize their humanity as as individuals and people of this society. So it is a painful legacy in a painful image to have to fight against as you're trying to make your way and fight for equality in racial Justice. Gwendolyn Reese is again, curator music and performing arts with Smithsonian Institution's national museum of African American history and culture, and we're also joined by Mark Anthony Neal who's professor of African and American African American studies and English at Duke University. Professor Neil good to have you with us. Welcome. Thanks for having me talking about this legacy of black face. And I can't escape the fact that it's so pervasive. Even in popular culture, you go back to Shirley temple and Al Jolson, Judy Garland, Mickey Rooney Mickey Mouse, even had a black face. What do you attribute that to that? It became not only pervasive became ubiquitous. Thinks recess already talked about, you know, for many Americans the way that African-Americans circulated in the culture was through popular culture. And if it wasn't the caricatures of them and black face Mitchell. It was often in advertising another thing too where they saw samples of those caricatures in terms of little black Sambo and things like that. It was clear on the one hand that you're talking about -ociety that even amongst whites. There was a social stratification if you will and for many poor working class whites to be able to make fun of African Americans allow them a better sense of their own humanity by being able to look at a group of people who they thought that they could be above even if they were being also socially exploited within the society. What's your response to the argument? I mean, we heard this with Megan Kelly when she was a braided for her attitude about this is just a Halloween costume. And this doesn't really pertain to history, which is behind us. In other words, insistence that. There's no malice or racial hatred. Well, you know, this is the thing. I think some of these decisions, particularly when you see it in in grade school and high school leaving college photos, they may not be any malice behind it. But they're clear that clearly a tone deafness about the reality of race. You might think that you're doing this because you're showing your fiction for Kurtis blow in in one instance. But that's devoid or divorced from a real conversation from how African Americans have historically had to deal with these images to think that you can simply pay tribute in a way that does not affect folks in adverse ways of speech to the fact that there's a certain kind of privilege with whiteness, it allows you to be able to say, yes, I'm celebrating the culture without actually dealing with the damage that you're incurring in the context of that. Well, when somebody like Ralph on the governor of Virginia says this was stupid. It was foolish. It was appalling. But it was you know, so many years ago decades ago. And other say should he be held accountable for this when there's other bigotry and the kinds of things I mean voting suppression that maybe matter even a lot more than being concerned about black face, your response to that is what you know. A lot of FOX folks who will look at this in terms of a hierarchy of things, and you know, if you're comparing a a governor who wore black face thirty years ago to voting rights suppression. Obviously those things don't wear the same way. But it also discounts the way that folks historically black holes the dealt with the demonization of humanity, and these images are constant reminder of that in many ways the ways these images were able to circulate particularly in the early twentieth century in the late nineteenth century helped to give justification for the suppression of the black vote, for instance, fifty or sixty years ago. Well, let me invite our listeners to join this conversation. We're talking about the racist history and role of black face in America with Mark Anthony, Neal, professor of African and African American studies and English at Duke and also dwindling Reese, who is curator of music and performing arts at the Smithsonian Institution's national museum of African American history, and culture, and you can join this program if you'd like to weigh in your we'd like to hear from you have any questions or comments about this whole history. We'd also like. To hear from you..

national museum of African Ame Jim crow African American museum Virginia Governor Ralph Northam United States Smithsonian Institution Mark Anthony Neal Gwendolyn Reese Sacramento Mark herring Michael Krasny professor Michelle Hannigan San Francisco Frederick Douglass FOX attorney
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pro Bono legal services. And they started these hashtag campaigns. One of them was against the media. Hashtag verified bullies. And the other was I think I stand with Covington and these hash campaigns went immediately viral. There was a lot of support there. And I think what is fascinating to look out with this is so many journalists. I said very harsh things in the beginning. And then retracted, and I think there was this over correction that was sort of led by by people in the in the pro Trump media space who who have eight market history over the last three years of trying to undermine the mainstream media. So this did not seem like, you know, the people who are working on behalf of these students were good faith defenders of this. This was this is an information war all the way down on on that side before we have to wrap up. Professor, Neil briefly. What would you like to hear as a part of the dialogue the national dialogue on this going forward? If there's one aspect of this that you wish more people were talking about are focusing about briefly. What would that be I would ally with Seles around the the danger of hot takes you have folks to see a viral video. They're hoping to re tweet something, you know, smart or catchy that will give them five hundred thousand retweets we have working journalists and media folks in this country. Let them do their work. Let them generate. Opinion and coverage and do investigation the way that we expect them to to before we make strong judgments about what we're seeing and one more comment from Erica who writes, yes, educate the kids. Many are just realizing the details of the ongoing crimes against natives dissolve the ignorance and teach Celeste. I would also say be careful of your knee jerk reactions, and this even includes when someone says something you've done or said his racist. You're a niche most people's initial reaction to say, no, I'm not I would say ask why do you say that? I think for a moment, you know, what I probably unbiased in some ways. So let me ask questions. Celeste Headley author of the book, we need to talk. How to have conversations that matter Celeste? Thanks for talking to us. My pleasure Duke University. Professor Mark Anthony Neal the James b Duke professor of African and African American studies. Thank you. Professor neil. Thank you. Joshua and Charlie wars will writer writer at large for New York Times opinion and previously BuzzFeed senior technology writer. Thanks, charlie. Thanks this conversation was produced by Steph. Anthony Colette an edited by alien Humphries to learn more about them and the rest of our team. Visit the one A dot org slash staff. This program comes to you from W A M U part of American University. In Washington distributed by NPR until we meet again, I'm Joshua Johnson. This was a tough one. But.

Celeste Headley Professor neil Professor Mark Anthony Neal Joshua Johnson James b Duke professor of Afri writer Professor Duke University American University Covington Seles Anthony Colette Erica Washington New York Times NPR BuzzFeed alien Humphries
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And it turns out it was written by someone who is a regular guest on his show. This statement from the student exactly it was written by a PR firm. By the student and that person who wrote the statement was a regular guest on tapper show. It's it's very murky that might get to the point that Ron is making Ron de writes, this has nothing to do with the teens or indigenous peoples or anything other than the fact that this information was not curated and investigated by reporters who are trained professionals. Interesting point, the media is a major character and all of this. And we'll talk about that aspect of it when we continue with Celeste Headley and professor Mark Anthony Neal, I'm Joshua Johnson. And you're listening to one A from W A, M, U and NPR. More of the conversation on one A is just ahead, by the way, we will have more about this particular topic. This story on forum tomorrow in the nine or thirty segments. Foreign will discuss the fallout from the video that you've been hearing Joshua Johnson discuss on one A again, that's in the ninth. Thirty segment on forum and tomorrow morning at nine Paul Miller. Otherwise known as DJ spooky joins forum to talk about his newest audio creation, entitled Cuanto, piano. It's a sonic celebration.

Joshua Johnson Ron professor Mark Anthony Neal Celeste Headley Paul Miller Cuanto
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"The Beatles. Revolver one of the greatest albums of all time. Yes, we're going to talk with him a bit later but first conversation about art versus the artist. Yeah. Greg it's complicated topic, and we are revisiting it because of the explosion of the docu series about our Kelly six hours aired on lifetime. Tremendous amount of respect. I have for the filmmaker dream Hampton, she charts the sexual verbal and physical abuse of young black girls at the hands of r&b superstar are Kelly for thirty years. It's based on eighteen years of my reporting. I'm not. Not in the film. I have a book coming out about R Kelly called Solis in the full. I think the thing that spurred this. Attention was two articles in twenty seventeen that I did for BuzzFeed he was acquitted on fourteen counts of making child pornography in two thousand eight you know, great. He never sold more records than he did in the six and a half years between his indictment and his acquittal and still selling out shows around the world as well. Yes. Greg the conversation we had in twenty seventeen two years ago was important. Then I think it's even more important today. We're going to revisit it. And this question of can we separate the art and the artist and are we somehow complicit if we enjoy art made by people accused of doing awful things. Yeah. This is a story that is not new Jim in terms of separating the art from the artist it is something that is part of all art forms, really. And certainly ROY. Rock and roll in the rock and roll era. We're going back to the days of Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis controversial figures important artistic figures who's troubled personal lives. You know, we have to deal with when when discussing their art, we certainly wrestle with this issue all the time. And we're going to be talking about it today. We're joined by Brit, Julius Ishikawa journalist who has written for the Chicago Tribune, Esquire L and others. Thank you for having me. And Mark Anthony Neal professor of African and African American studies at Duke. Hey, great deal. Let me start with quote by Oscar Wilde, and I want to get both of your reactions to it. So Oscar Wilde, the great critic and philosopher of Victorian England said paraphrasing because he was talking about books, but he said art is neither moral nor immoral. It is merely good or bad. So brit. You buy that? Is there a moral core to art I think so I think that I think not all art operates under immoral core. But I think that it it exists. I think that especially, you know, our that is maybe dealing with issues of feminism or race or gender things like that. I think that that sort of operating under the idea of trying to, you know, get at the root of individual rights, and you know, sharing people's perspectives and things like that. So for me, I think that you know, it can you know, and it should maybe have a moral core. But it doesn't always have a more. You've been wrestling this with this for your entire critical NFC career, so moral or no. I have to agree with would ask a while. And I think I think art is art I think morality plays into it. In terms of what we're going to do with that. Art, how we circulate what kind of meanings we derive from that. Art. I always liked to think that the artist Pierre the artists are not pure, no human being. Human being pure, right? Right. But the art is as an expression of this particular person's particularly entity of being trying to express something artistic, of course, everything that gets expressed is an art. And that's a another part of the conversation gets to choose. What is art and what isn't. You know, I've been wrestling with Kelly as I wrestled with miles Davis as you can wrestle with Marvin Gaye, James Brown note, change Brown new. I mean, there's no defensive Kelly of but Curley does exist in an fundamentally different. You know media context where we know so much more about our Kellyanne in some ways because he has let us know so much more about our Kelly, then we would ever know about,.

R Kelly Greg it Oscar Wilde Beatles Duke dream Hampton Mark Anthony Neal Chuck Berry Chicago Tribune Marvin Gaye Jim Jerry Lee Lewis Brit James Brown professor Pierre Victorian England Solis Esquire L
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Wait former. From a central California who agreed to put up. His farm But that was such a moving moment it was a it was a moment in which the campaign, for my freedom achieved a really popular stages among people in this country and. Probably through the world is I will be forever grateful to research biggest I. Think she played such an integral role. In the success of the campaign now you never actually met Aretha Franklin did you I feel. As if Because I feel she's a. Part of my story Music was as so much apart and continues to be so much a part of my my own individual as well as my collective lives Actually Measure in person Can you explain the circumstances? At that time what was? Happening to you Which. Also talks about who Aretha Franklin is that she came out so strongly and so interestingly talked about the fact that she was thrown. In the Ken share was jailed in her? Own home city of Detroit Absolutely as you pointed out she said she had already been. Jailed for disturbing the peace and it seems as if she realized that it might be necessary to disturb the peace of bit further But of course the fact that I was. A member of the communist party of that time made many people reluctant to offer public support because they Something might. Be associated with communism, and thus might be placing their own lives in jeopardy I was charged with murder kidnapping and, conspiracy three capital charges absolute time, when Aretha mates statement I was actually not eligible for bail. Because capital senses, were not bailable as it turned down the supreme court of California abolished at least temporarily the death penalty in California which meant that For a short while I, was eligible for bail I'm one, of the few people who are actually released, a because within Within a few days the supreme, court? Amended its decision by indicating that all previously capital offenses would remain non-bailable and you were held here in New York right not, far. From, the, studios. Of democracy now and California was seeking your extradition you were you were pending extradition to San Rafael, California well actually yes I had been in jail. In the women's house to the tension in Greenwich Village in New. York but I had that time already been extradited to I was in I was in jail in in Palo Alto I should song story had, been. Extradited, to, Marin. County and then we we got a change of venue to Santa Clara county so when I was, actually released on bail it was from the jail. In Palo Alto We're going to talk more about her involvement in, the civil rights, movement in front of the scenes and behind the scenes. And her just remarkable music can contribution as, many of call terrorists Mark Anthony Neal said Aretha Franklin. Arguably the greatest American singer of the twentieth century we're talking to Angela Davis Mark Anthony Neal head of African American and African studies at Duke University and also Farah jasmine Griffin of Columbia University. Stay with us Me too Oh And. No Raw Me Willpower Jim You should understand She If you wanna.

Aretha Franklin California Mark Anthony Neal Angela Davis Mark Anthony Neal Farah jasmine Griffin Palo Alto communist party Detroit New York Santa Clara county Duke University Greenwich Village San Rafael Marin York murder Columbia University kidnapping
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Said quote for more than six decades every time she sang we were all graced with a. Glimpse of the divine day we spend the hour looking at the extraordinary life and legacy of Aretha Franklin after break we'll begin with two guests here. In New York Columbia, University's Farage, jasmine Griffin and if Duke University in. North Carolina will be joined by Mark Anthony Neal and then from Martha's. Vineyard Angela Davis herself will join, us to talk about what Aretha Franklin meant to her stay with us That way Think by Aretha Franklin here..

Aretha Franklin Mark Anthony Neal Angela Davis jasmine Griffin Duke University North Carolina New York Columbia Martha six decades
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on Here & Now

"During the song king alternated between singing along crying and wildly flapping her hands President. Obama famously shed a tear at the performance. Franklin's final show in the Washington region was not for a major event. It was a concert at wolf trap in Vienna, Virginia last year. She looked thinner than before, but still had that marvelous voice. For here. Now I'm Michaela. Frac we're gonna turn now to Mark Anthony, Neal, professor of black popular culture at Duke University and Mark Anthony. I'm told that you recall seeing Aretha perform live for the first time when you were something like five years old more parents took me this year at the Franklin at the Apollo theatre nineteen seventy-one. She did a week long, stay there. The Apollo theater famously you'll see on the facade photos of it. She's home Aretha Franklin, and that wasn't my first introduction to her. But that was the first time. Of course, I had a chance to see her live near lucky kid. Turn Queen of soul almost seems an understatement for the impact that she had over the decades. Could you define her impact. I would argue Queen sold is really a misnomer. She came to prominence, obviously, you know, as kind of the phase of soul music as it became this mainstream cultural phenomenon. But you know, I described her as the greatest American singer, the twentieth century in part because of her mastery of multi, John RAs. So this is a woman who, of course comes up into black church, but she's also deeply steeped in the blues. She also has a capacity to sing gospel as we know soul music. But she also was adapted singing jazz. She could sing pop standards alongside Barbra Streisand, who was her label mate in the nineteen sixties before she moved to Atlantic. When she does that time at the Fillmore west, she's singing, you know, basically hippie rock music to an audience, a hippies. I mean, she had this capacity to be able to own any song in any John Ren, which he added her voice to. She probably truly owned. I mean, brought it home and owned. It was of course respect and I just want your thoughts on that. We're gonna listen to a little written and originally released by Otis, Redding and sixty five. He sang it as a man. He wanted respect when he got home from his woman. She takes it in sixty seven, gives it a whole new spin. You know ads the our ESP t just listen..

Aretha Franklin Barbra Streisand Obama Apollo theater Mark Anthony Virginia President Vienna Apollo theatre Otis John RAs Duke University Queen Washington John Ren Redding Fillmore professor Atlantic Neal
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The value of a college education he gave millions of dollars to historically black colleges and paid for several students to attend them in later years though cosby went from america's dad to black america's scold he railed against problems in the black community that he said were black people's fault at an n w c p event in two thousand four he gave what's now known as the pound cake speech an angry rant about poor parenting and crime over of pound cake and then we all run out where outraged the shot how pound duke university's mark anthony neal says many blacks felt betrayed when cosby went from ally to antagonised america's dad was spanking them in public we got was america's father lecturing and lecturing at moment with a narrative that appeal to things like fox news the dozens of sexual abuse allegations of the past few years were an ironic coated cosby's public moralizing still mark anthony neal believes the cosby show with its baked in lessons on black cultural history has value for future generations because we show was how search engine you know before we had access to just google some of these things and so i don't want that to be lost even he says if cosby himself can't be redeemed karen grigsby bates npr news a historic summit between the leaders of north and south korea is about to get underway it'll be the first time the two men will meet face to face even though the north korean regime is the more mysterious more remote country its leader kim jong un has in many ways captured the public imagination more deeply than south korea's leader moon jae in there are movies and books about kim and his family but not so much for moon so let's take a closer look at who these two men are and what their objectives might be in this upcoming summit we're gonna turn now to jean lee of the woodrow wilson center who has studied both of these men very closely moon jaein is a fascinating figure he's not new to south koreans give us an aide to the late president.

cosby america duke university mark anthony neal south korea kim jong un woodrow wilson center president fox google karen grigsby jean lee
"mark anthony neal" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"mark anthony neal" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"With which the civil rights movement and it's leaders are viewed by african americans this is what mark anthony neal him african and african american studies first or a duke ship i don't think we've ever had a presidential publicly condescending to what black politics means so you're condescending to a black politics whatever that mean for never heard of come to sentient to politics come sentient people perhaps but in any event you're not allowed you see that's it the john louis's him you that's what the bad the finger the professor of african and african americans thirties at duke they're saying mr troll through twitter was giving the role axis in real time to his on the faults which mr meal cold quote for will off on sophisticated ignorant and four what are the what is the um to fit on sophisticated on the korean that's what they hate about him i want to see if we went to moment forms about he doesn't care that people think the civil rights movement was important really a lot gracious per great double basis profession meal do you make that calling he just with take the civil rights movement was important because he attacked the other league you're responsible early of totally irresponsible me a list stick claimed that the president of the united states was not elected legitimately so that means contempt for the civil rights movement despicable right well we should consider only could share so great segway or what i have mastered the segway when all is said and done you can't sit in the great share which i do it home told the extra air.

african americans mark anthony professor mr troll twitter real time president united states segway civil rights john louis