21 Burst results for "Mark Andriessen"

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:02 min | Last week

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Like Mark andreessen and Ken Griffin and a host of other venture capital figures. You may have seen them tweeting about it. This over Elon Musk's financing of the $44 billion buyout. We should note that Bloomberg LP, which owns Bloomberg news, has invested in andreessen Horowitz and here to break it all down. For us is Jeff feely our reporter who covers the courts of Delaware and who's been very busy over the last few weeks. So look, are these moves pretty common as part of discovery, Jeff? It's standard operating procedure for both sides in these lawsuits to issue a bunch of subpoenas to banks, equity investors, lawyers so they can gather the information they need to build their cases. So we've actually spoken to some of these Friends of Elon Musk, who've been subpoenaed, one of them is David Sachs, who's actually come on our show a couple of times in the last few months to talk about the potential for this deal to happen. Take a listen to what he had to say. When you put bots on Twitter and pretend to be someone you're not when you pretend when you basically violate the authenticity requirement, you are basically perpetrating a kind of fraud. That is not free speech that's fake speech, is perfectly fair game under any kind of free speech policy to take down those kinds of bots. And I fully expect that Elon will be far more effective at doing that than the current management of Twitter because they've been unable to do that. So obviously we don't know what kind of discussions they've had behind the scenes if any at all. But what might the courts be hoping to get from someone like a David Sachs? Well, this issue of the box is really where the rubber is going to meet the road. As my understanding, it's very difficult to get very specific numbers on these things because everybody has to deal with them. It's not just Twitter. It's a common problem in the tech industry when you're dealing with this kind of stuff. So it's not going to be an easy argument for mister Musk to win on. And the Twitter folks, of course, say that it's all sort of a pretext ginned up so to provide a basis for him to walk away. Judge McCormick is going to be the ultimate decider of all of it. Okay. What's next here? Well, we're still in the discovery phase, so we're going to still have a blizzard of subpoenas. Next, we'll start with notice of depositions and there'll be, you know, probably hundreds of depositions in this case, bankers, mister Musk, the Twitter folks, you know, everybody's going to have to sit down and say their piece and then we're going to go to trial in October and it should be quite a show. A show indeed, we will be following this blizzard of subpoenas and I know you will continue to be very busy through October. Jeff feely, thank you. Thanks for weighing in. Appreciate it. Okay, that does it for this edition of Bloomberg technology, coming up later this week, Thursday we've got Steve Wesley from the Wesley

David Sachs Elon Musk Mark andreessen Ken Griffin Jeff feely Bloomberg LP andreessen Horowitz Twitter Bloomberg news Delaware mister Musk Elon Jeff Judge McCormick Steve Wesley
"mark andreessen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:40 min | Last week

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Just about four hours away from the open of U.S. trading, let's get you up to date in the news you need to know what this shower, politics front and center this morning and we begin with President Biden's address to the nation last night. The president said a U.S. drone strike in Afghanistan has killed one of the planners of the 9 11 attacks. I'm an el zawari was the leader of Al-Qaeda, President Biden thanked experts in operatives who brought justice to Al zawahiri. Is thanks to their extraordinary persistence and skill that this operation was success. They made us all safer. President Biden said he authorized this strike and that there were no civilian casualties. Well, another major story we're following this morning, Karen is Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan, China is threatening military action over the visit, but the House speaker should make the trip safely. That's according to U.S. National Security Council spokesman John Kirby. We have indications that the Chinese might take some actions in a military way to protest a trip by the speaker. What I wanted to make clear today was that we are going to make sure that if the speaker decides to go to Taiwan, you can do so safely. John Kirby with the National Security Council spoke with our Washington correspondent Joe Matthew, stay tuned for more of that interview coming up shortly. The escalating tension between the U.S. and China is impacting markets futures are lower and Asian stocks fell overnight. While turning to corporate news now, Nathan, legal moves are heating up in Twitter's case against Elon Musk and Bloomberg's journey need a young joins us live with the latest good morning Renee. Good morning Karen, Twitter is probing the circle social circle of Elon Musk, lawyers are making far reaching legal requests about his $44 billion deal to take Twitter private. That's according to legal documents obtained by The Washington Post. Now, Twitter's legal team asked for information about elite Silicon Valley investors like David Sachs and Mark andreessen. And since some of the heavy hitters have not been named publicly in the deal, it suggests just how far Twitter is willing to go to force Elon Musk to honor the deal. Twitter is also pro being Morgan Stanley Bank of America and other banks that committed to backing the acquisition. Live in New York, I'm renita young Bloomberg, daybreak. All right, we need a thank you and more than 40 companies report earnings today, including Uber and Starbucks, Pinterest shares are surging 19% despite results that missed estimates. The jump followed Elliott investment management confirming its stake as the company's top shareholder. And again, Nathan futures are lower S&P futures down 29 points down futures down a 166 and NASDAQ futures down 110, ten year treasury of 6 30 seconds yield 2.54%. Straight ahead of your latest local headlines, plus to check of sports and this is Bloomberg

President Biden John Kirby el zawari Al zawahiri U.S. National Security Council Elon Musk U.S. Twitter Joe Matthew Taiwan Karen Qaeda Nancy Pelosi China Afghanistan David Sachs Mark andreessen Al Morgan Stanley Bank of America
"mark andreessen" Discussed on a16z

a16z

02:03 min | 2 weeks ago

"mark andreessen" Discussed on a16z

"Welcome to the a 16 Z podcast. I'm Amelia salyers, managing editor at future, a new publication from a 16 Z that explores the future and how to build it. And I want to thank you for being a listener all these years. The show is currently on hiatus, as we work on relaunching soon, but in the meantime, we're running some of the very best episodes from nearly 8 years worth of archives to highlight conversations that you may have missed and are still relevant to what's happening today in tech. These episodes show where we've been, where we are, and where we're going, on the long arc of innovation and technology. I hope you enjoy this tour through the years and do stay tuned for the exciting next phase of the a 16 C podcast. The period of 2000 to 2016 was one of the best and the worst times for tech and Silicon Valley and John Hennessy was a key player as president of Stanford University during this period. What did he learn and how did he see Silicon Valley and the tech industry evolve? In this episode from December 2018, Hennessey, who is also currently the chairman of Alphabet, as well as a touring award winning computer scientist, joins a 16 Z cofounder Mark andreessen, a 16 Z general partner Martin casado, and host zonal chalky for a wide ranging conversation about moving from academia to startups. The history of Silicon Valley, the Stanford model, how to build enduring organizations and more. Hi, everyone. Welcome to the a 6 and Z podcast I'm sonal. I'm here today with a 6 and Z general partners Mark andreessen and Martin casado, and we're interviewing John Hennessy, who is the current chairman of Alphabet and was president of Stanford University from 2000 to 2016, which also happened to be one of the most interesting times for tech and the valley. So in this episode, we cover everything from the Silicon Valley and Stanford models to if it's possible to create other silicon valleys, and if so, where and how, and of course, we also cover education as well as a tech and economics of education to what it takes the lead companies.

Amelia salyers John Hennessy Silicon Valley Mark andreessen Martin casado Stanford University Hennessey Alphabet Stanford
"mark andreessen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

07:02 min | Last month

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"They really were the original mosaic 6 that went out to found netscape with Mark andreessen and Jim Clark. These were literal corn fed midwesterners. Fresh out of college 22, 23, 24. And so as Alex toxic told me in the book and I'm quoting him, we were working around the clock because that's what you used to do before. Four years later, 5 years later, the entire valley would be living the same lifestyle. But those people actually have lives. We really didn't have any lives outside of the office. So of course we are going to be at the office all the time. I mean, I had no furniture. Why should I ever go home? And Lu montulli, who some of you might know, said the press just take what they think is interesting, juicy and fascinating out of their limited time and they publicize that, especially post netscape in 98 99. Every startup was trying to do the things that they read about in the magazines that they read about us. I would catch four or 5 hours of sleep at the office, wake up, do another 20, go home, blah, blah, blah, blah. But I wouldn't recommend doing that for your average startup. Unfortunately, a lot of startup people think that that's the way it should be done because of all the publicity that we had. Another point that I make in the book is that netscape was the Big Bang because the rockstar entrepreneur universe that we live in, if you were around in the 80s and the early 90s, that wasn't a thing. Kids grew up to want to be rockstars and sports heroes, and maybe if you were super ambitious, you went to Wall Street, but the idea that you would start a company that was not in the zeitgeist. And the fact that netscape had this famous IPO in 1995 that made I actually remember clearly it made the nightly news and things like that. The idea that there was a new company that there was a company that had been around for 18 months that had no profits that was worth $2 billion on the day of its IPO. I have interviewed Wall Street people. It blew their minds at the time too. So I devote the entire first chapter to telling the netscape story because of some of the things the groundwork that it laid for this era that we've been living in ever since, essentially the last 25 years. Back to their sort of work hard play hard culture. The other thing that netscape did and this is obvious when you state it, but think of how conceptually what a leap this was. These were the first guys to have a product where you would distribute it on the Internet. Like literally before them, you would still put software in boxes, shrink wrap it and put it on a shelf. So this concept of doing versions that you get feedback from your users and you do put out a dot, whatever release, two weeks later, another release. So one of the reasons obviously that we now live in this 24/7 product cycle is because they were the first people to jump on that sort of a distribution mechanism as a way to do software products. But also because like everyone else at the time, this is 1995. They were out racing Bill Gates. And so another thing that I was surprised when I did the research because again, you know, most of my career was spent in the aughts and God bless them, no offense, Microsoft, but they've been in a sort of lost decade in the 2000s. It was a surprising reminder to me how much everything in the 90s, what everyone was doing was in relation to what Microsoft might do or try to Googlers have told me on the Internet history podcast when bad words finally took off and were making buttloads of money. It was a thing, don't tell anybody. Don't let the word get out until we're far enough along that Gates can't catch us, essentially. So that was surprising to me how much in the first few chapters Microsoft constantly comes up. I go into in depth how Bill Gates got Internet religion. I talked to much of Microsoft people. It was really very much a generational thing. It was the guys at Microsoft in their late 20s and early 30s who had used the Internet in college. Not that Bill Gates hadn't, in fact, he and Paul Allen had, when they were writing their first software products, were using because they were opposite sides of the country, so they were FTP back together. It was more generational in the sense that a guy like Gates, born in 55, baby boomer, as much as he was, he loved computers, he really didn't believe that computers were mainstream enough if you guys remember things like web TV and stuff like that that they did. And if you remember a term like the information superhighway, which people think, well, that was the Internet, no, they had a vision that they were going to deliver. Once broadband became ubiquitous, which Gates figured would happen after the year 2000, which he was a 100% right. Then they would deliver this curated Microsoft safe for the masses interconnected computing product. Via the TV because the TV was the one thing. It wasn't until 1998 or 99. Don't quote me on that. That computers penetrated 50% of U.S. households. So again, if you're Bill Gates in 94 95, you're not worried about the Internet because it's not going to ever be mainstream. It's not good enough because it's not broadband. You can't do movies and things like that. The thing that he missed was that it was good enough. And people were excited about it. And we're willing to put up with it takes two minutes to download a jpeg or something like that. So I want to give credit to the people like Brad silverberg and slivka. I can't remember his first name. The younger guys that had to do sort of the generational push to the older people at Microsoft to say like, this is really happening, and we got to jump on board. Another reason that I did this book is, you know, I still dabble in a little bit of angel investing and things like that. And when I meet with young people, young founders, 26, 27, and they say, oh, you remember the dot com. You were there for the dot com here. What was that like? Or what I've done episodes on AOL when I get emails and tweets saying, thank you. I never really understood what AOL's business model even was. Which I get if the Internet's just always been in the ether. AOL was always pejoratively called the training wheels for the Internet. But I argue in the book,.

netscape Mark andreessen Alex toxic Lu montulli Microsoft Bill Gates Jim Clark Gates Paul Allen Brad silverberg slivka U.S. AOL
"mark andreessen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

05:39 min | Last month

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Tech memes ride home podcast recently wrote a book called how the Internet happened from netscape to the iPhone. Brian's got a history of working in the tech industry and startups. He'll talk more about that, but essentially amassed a whole lot of knowledge about the history of the Internet and wrote this book in his own words because no one else had. And we'll share a lot of interesting things that he learned along the way with us. I'll also just note that there are books for sale as usual with these things at the subsidized price for Googlers. So feel free to pick one up on your way out. And with that, Brian McCullough. Thank you, Jimmy. I'm going to stand up here so that I can quote from the book once or twice. Thank you all for coming. And thanks Google for having me come. As Jimmy said, I'm actually not a historian or a writer. This is my first book. I'm a three time web founder. Actually, funny enough, I've said this on many of my podcasts. My first company, I found it in 99. I've said many times was 100% built on AdWords. Back in the day when it was still useful and not filled with spam. But in my memory, the day that y'all opened it up for the self serve thing is the day that I got on AdWords and got I can remember paying 8 cents a click for the keyword resume and things like that. It was nutty times, but so the reason that I did this book, my second startup was 2002, my third, 2005. It just sort of bothered me that there's excellent books, of course, about the history of the arpanet and things like that. But the actual Internet going mainstream and entering normal people's lives, no one had done. And I just got tired of no one writing that book. So like any other startup I've done, I was like, well, someone's going to do that. Why not me? The dumb startup mentality. So the reason I give you that background is it's also sort of my career. It's what I lived. So I thought it would be easy to do. And so what I want to do in this talk is tell you some of the fun things that I learned in doing the research. It was 5 years of writing, essentially. And I did actual go to the library and find defunct magazines and things like real research. Also, by the way, it also because I'm a web guy and I'm used to instant gratification over the course of the writing I launched the Internet history podcast. Which there's almost 200 episodes now, which was me doing interviews for primary sources. I just had just this week Ken Norton of GV. Last month we had Matt cutts. I've had Charlie ayers on. So there's plenty of Googlers that have been on the show if you want to check that out. But the reason I give you that background is like I said, I just want to go through and sort of chronologically and tell you some of the things that even though I thought I knew all this stuff because I lived it that were sort of surprising to me. What has been surprising to me as I do media hits for this book is they almost can't help themselves. The first question, especially on radio is always, I thought Al Gore invented the Internet. So I have come up fortunately, it's in the book. I have a pat answer for that. In 1992, or actually 1991, there was a bill passed called the high performance computing act, which was a colloquially known as the gore Bill. And it funded a bunch of supercomputer facilities around the country. One of which was the NCSA, which is where mosaic, the mosaic web browser came out of, which was where Mark andreessen was going to school, which is where all the mosaic kids that would later found netscape all went to school. And so as I say in the book, essentially when they were being paid $6 an hour to code in the basement of the NCSA at the University of Illinois, they were being paid by Al Gore's gore Bill. So it's not exactly apples to apples, but in a way you could say that that played a major role in the Internet going mainstream because as I make the argument in the book, netscape was the first true dot com or web company as we would think of it today. So let's begin there, actually, because there's a million reasons why I think netscape was the Big Bang for the modern era, as I call it in the book. Not the least of which is the culture. When I started researching, the reason that I threw it up as a podcast is I worked my way through the entire mosaic engineering team that went out to California to found netscape. Sans Mark andreessen, who, even though we talk on Twitter, refuses to come on the show. But the thing that I found fascinating was this idea of startup culture. And how a lot of it was born by the media attention that netscape got when it IPO in 1995, which we'll get to in a second. To a person, all of the mosaic slash netscape engineers, almost unbidden by me, wanted to make the point that they're like, this sort of work hard, sleep under your desk, party hard, sort of startup culture that we didn't do that. The media did that to us..

Brian McCullough netscape Jimmy gore Bill Charlie ayers Ken Norton Brian Mark andreessen Al Gore Matt cutts University of Illinois Google NCSA Sans Mark andreessen California Twitter
"mark andreessen" Discussed on a16z

a16z

03:08 min | Last month

"mark andreessen" Discussed on a16z

"Now, Fortune 500 will look very different than now, because some companies did not get into collecting the data and training their machine learning models early enough. Is there a tipping point where this balance of power around the data shifts from the customers you're serving it up to to the vendors because your AI, your model becomes such a competitive advantage that they're going to have to play by your rules. They're going to have to allow you access to that data and to reuse that data for training. The competitive dimension part of that is really interesting. In theory, if one customer is contributing their data to that corpus, certainly their data is anonymized and no one else in the customer base would really have access to their data. But in theory, anything you observe at one customer is informing generalized models that all the customers benefit from. And so I think part of it is just being super honest in the sales process that yes, of course that's how it works. But I think the calculation that most of the customers are doing is, okay, that's fine. I realize I'm helping everyone else out a little bit, but you're helping me so much. Then I'm willing to contribute a little bit of the signal from my data to help everyone else. It's kind of like you push the border uphill getting first customers. But then you roll downhill with the network effect becomes so strong and the value of join dataset joint knowledge becomes so big that people just go ahead with it. And so one reaction to how nervous customers can be around oh, I don't know if I want other people to benefit from my data at all is that's kind of analogous to people writing contracts that say you can only exclusively sell your software to me because in abstract, these are just tools and technologies that everyone's going to get access to eventually. And so any hesitation, I think customers have about it. That's going to be a relic years from now. One trend and actually, I think I heard it from Mark andreessen here, is that when data model changes, systems of record die. So they were systems of record like CRMs built on not relational but on hierarchical databases in the 70s. During the offense today, they don't exist anymore..

Mark andreessen
"mark andreessen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

02:21 min | Last month

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Is done. I am putting up the tombstone. That's ever tried to design a website for what, 25 years. We're all happy Internet explorers. Can I interrupt you? Sure. And can I give you, can I give you why it's important? And it's almost important. And you know what? Maybe you're making me think of it differently because it's almost important to talk about the counterfactuals. Sure, right. Okay, so I did the story today about how or was it yesterday? I can never remember. Facebook being more TikTok like or whatever look. The beginning of the modern era of, oh my God, someone's going to eat our lunch. We're going to. All the ships and we're going to completely pivot to something that was Bill Gates, Microsoft 1994, netscape is coming along. So there's a template there of this is how we get religion on this new thing. We're applying all of our resources to it. That's sort of a cadence for a startup for a tech company, I would say this is the first modern version of that. Think of a counterfactual of, let's say, netscape doesn't get killed by Internet Explorer. Mark andreessen not one of the biggest VCs in the world. The CEO of maybe one of the most important tech companies in the world. Also, think about I did a whole bunch of episodes on the Internet history podcast about with people on the IE team. By the way. But again, bringing the idea of, I think they hired like a thousand people in a month to throw on the IE team. Sounds reasonable. And they could, and they did. And then I continue to make the argument everyone always pushes back on this, but if Microsoft hadn't been so aggressive against IE. Now listen, for a decade, they had been doing anti competitive stuff. But it was the it was the Internet Explorer versus netscape thing that caused the antitrust.

netscape Mark andreessen Bill Gates Microsoft Facebook
"mark andreessen" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:40 min | 3 months ago

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Think he thinks that effort has gone too far. And organizational structure wise, there was a board of directors and a CEO before, and now there's just going to be what Elon Musk at the top of this pyramid. Elon Musk will own it. It's his thing. He probably will have other investors come along with him. We don't know. Some banks are lending and money, but it's his. He's bought it. We don't know who he intends to have run the thing day to day. If he will do that, like he runs Tesla and SpaceX to his other big companies, or whether he's going to bring in someone to sort of run the thing day to day. I would assume he'll do that because it would seem wild for him to try to run three companies, day to day, but he's Elon Musk, so maybe that's the kind of thing he'll want to do. So he's paid in $44 billion. You say there's banks involved. Does that mean there is some sort of urgency to make this company consistently profitable? You know, he has made a point. He did this public interview during the takeover process because that's something Elon Musk would do and no one else would do. I don't care about the economics at all, which sounds like a great idea if you're the world's richest man. You can buy Twitter and not be concerned by money, but the truth is even the world's richest man has to be concerned about a $44 billion investment. He needs Twitter to at least be as profitable as it is right now. It's not very profitable, but it does turn a profit. He can't afford for it to become less valuable than it is already because at some point he will want to either take it public again, find someone else to sell it to. At a bare minimum he needs it to throw off profits just to help cover some of the interest on the debt he's taking on to buy this thing. So he can not run the business into the ground. Even though it is now his private play thing, he still has to sort of make it operate like a business. And I think that is one of the things that is fundamentally in the end going to restrain what he does with it. There's a lot of like, what is he going to do with Twitter? Is he going to blow it up? Is he going to fundamentally remake it? You know, I think even though he might intend to do that once he gets into it and says, I don't know that there's a better way to run it more or less than the way it's running now, which is it's a free service and it's supported by ads. Maybe there's some stuff you can throw on one way or the other, but it needs to run like a business that makes money. What do you think he might do to make it more profitable? What are the, what's on the table? I think the most obvious thing is he'll do right away is cut the staff. That's the standard mergers and acquisitions playbook. You take a company from somebody and you say, this would work better if there were less people here. And you fire a bunch of them. And there's sort of a new conventional wisdom that'll happen. If you look at the tweets from fellow travelers like Mark andreessen, another Silicon Valley billionaire who's very interested in free speech and seems to have a lot of interest in Elon Musk buying Twitter. He suggested that the good big companies are overstaffed by two X the bad big companies are overstaffed by four X or more. In terms of generating more revenue, I've got no idea. And I don't think he does either. Twitter for years has been trying to make itself a more advertising friendly business. They have advertising revenue. They did about $5 billion of it last year. It's just compared to a Google or a Facebook, it's just a non entity. It's way too tiny to generate much more interest. Are there other products and services that Twitter could sell? Twitter recently has been experimenting with consumer subscription services or something called Twitter blue. They're selling for like three or $5 a month. It's a service for Twitter, super users. I'm a huge user of Twitter. It's my most used social media app and the one thing we wanted to see was an edit tweet button. That's what we're looking for in Twitter blue. We didn't expect we have to be paying for such a service, but Twitter didn't even give us that. For $4, you can basically get a cup of coffee at Starbucks. Is it worth a cup of coffee for some premium features? Maybe. Maybe for you. Not for me. I talked to a former Twitter executive the other day. You said, maybe they'll throw in like a pay to tweet plan where if you're a power user like Elon and you get tons of value out of Twitter, but don't pay anything for it. Maybe you should have to pay. But this is all theory. We know that the most likely thing he'll do is try to cut costs. How he'll try to generate additional revenue. We're just guessing. There's been a lot of talk this week and last week about Twitter being the public square. Elon Musk himself has said it. Former Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said Twitter quote wants to be a public good this week when he sort of endorsed Elon Musk's purchase of Twitter. And a lot of people seem to be upset that the richest man in the world can buy this so called public square. Doesn't seem so public, does it? Is there any question as to the legality of this transaction? No. Some of the flags that you would normally get to throw with a deal like this. Oh, there'll be an antitrust issue. There's no antitrust issue here. He's not consolidating social networks. He's just a guy who wants to buy Twitter. It's a publicly traded company. He made an offer. The owners of Twitter hemmed and hod for a little bit tried to find another buyer who would offer them more. And he's the only one out there. And if he's the only one out there, you kind of got to take the offer. Is this just a reminder for people that Twitter isn't a public square? It's a public company. Yes, it's a public company, which means it's actually fundamentally in the end, it has to answer to its shareholders. I've heard people floating in the past the idea of, you know, making Twitter an actual sort of public entity, making it putting in a private trust or something where you'd say, look, we're no longer trying to operate as a business. We think this should effectively be run as a nonprofit. There's a bunch of reasons why that hasn't happened. But it's not like people haven't floated that idea, but it is a for profit public company. And this is one of the things that can happen, especially by the way, Twitter basically made this more feasible when it went public that is one of the reasons why Elon Musk could come in and buy this thing. Which is to say it's not a public company anymore. It won't be in about 6 months. So in about 6 months, we may see more ads. We may see less. We may see another subscription model. He might get rid of that. But one thing we can be positive of is there will be less content moderation on this platform. Yeah, he's been as clear as he can be about that one that he thinks there should be more speech, not less. And basically that these layers of moderation, these policies, these teams, the Twitter has last however many years, he wants to strip a lot of that out..

Elon Musk Twitter Mark andreessen SpaceX Tesla Elon Jack Dorsey Starbucks Facebook Google
"mark andreessen" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

05:23 min | 4 months ago

"mark andreessen" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Until you kind of surfaced them. Now, the chatbots you were building were you applying deep learning models to that or were using something where you just using more run of the mill machine learning, which was more common then. Yeah, yeah. So definitely not deep learning. Deep learning was like very like maybe infancy at that time. And you need a lot of compute and data to do anything useful. We did end up using some machine learning. We ended up using machine learning for figuring out what kind of sentiment the user had, which they were taking something in. We used machine learning to parse dates, et cetera. Map intense. At that time, there was a startup called width AI. Eventually got acquired by Facebook. We were pretty early users of that. So we kind of, it wasn't like anything like Dialogflow where it was completely centralized to one service that you can use for every type of query. We found that there were some services that we could do intent mapping with our own algorithms internally better than a machine learning system, but then when our rules based system were mapping system kind of broke down, then we could rely on something that maybe machine learning to map to an intent if it possibly could. So we had kind of a mixed approach to fulfilling every request. But a lot of it, I remember the date parsing was completely separate. It was like, we're going to do day parsing in this in-house written way because we wanted to answer questions like I want to fly for Thanksgiving. Doesn't necessarily mean that you want to fly on Thanksgiving. You probably want to get there for Thanksgiving. So we had to make sure that those kind of queries worked out the way they intended to. And what time frame was this? This is 2014, 2015, 2014. Got it. And so then after that, you went to magically. Yeah. And magically, in there, you're really talking about motion and eye tracking, correct? Yeah, so I was doing head pose detection. So all sorts of things around pose and eye tracking, et cetera. But different realm, I guess, everyone's doing augmented reality stuff. You have this giant startup, I guess. I think I joined when we were 1200 or 1300 people, which is massive for a startup. It was really well funded too. Really well funded too. But yeah, doing everything, well, the company was doing seemingly everything under the sun. But it was really fun. It was one of those things where when you experienced it, you were like, this is going to be a thing. Like augmented reality is going to be a thing. And it's like there's these few core problems that we're trying to solve for. But if we can get over these hurdles, then it's a very compelling product to use. Not to be for magically. Was that sir? It turned out not to be for magic leap. Yeah, yeah. I think consumer hardware products are probably the most challenging thing. It's like hard mode. You've chose the hardest path you could have taken. You chose hardware, which is hard, and then you chose consumer, which is doubly hard. So yeah, it's definitely the bar for what's considered a good experience. It varies from person to person. And then the bar is pretty high for what's considered a good experience. Well, I think they missed the window for AR by like ten years. I mean, we're still not there. They were pretty early, yeah. It's one of those things where I feel like, you know, you'll look at a company like palm, and everyone will have great memories. I'm like, oh yeah, palm had this thing. And when you use it, you're like, I guess they had it, but did they really have it? Or they had the concept of it, I guess. And it might be like that for a lot of the industries like metaverse web three. We might be scratching the surface and this might just be like, what exists today might not exist in ten years or you know, Mark andreessen talks about this. He talks about this idea of generational technologies, and he makes an interesting distinction, which I think he's the first I ever heard refer to this. Some people think of generational technologies. It's like once in a generation, these things come along and isn't that amazing. And he said, no, that's not true. They generally come along before, but it takes a generation ahead to age out before it's allowed to be used. And I think that's maybe partially true with AR VR, but I think a lot of it just is the technology is still, they've been over optimistic about how quickly the technology would mature. Yeah. And I also, I also have this sense that there was such a focus on VR. If they applied all of the energy to VR, that they applied to VR to AR, we'd be much further along with AR. Because everyone thought VR was like the bigger thing to win, but like the utility and the ease of implementation of AR, it's like so much higher. Yeah. Yeah..

Facebook palm Mark andreessen
"mark andreessen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:41 min | 4 months ago

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Businessweek All right so a little insight into how the sausage is made we're on our planning call at 10 a.m. Wall Street time in the morning talking about our show and you're like Brad stone Did you read the news newsletter yeah It kind of ties together everything that happened over the weekend and with Musk and what happened last week at Bitcoin 2022 Mark andreessen Tweets We're going to get into it with him in just a few minutes That's our tease because he's going to come in in just a moment Right now though let's get back to the markets and check in with Charlie Pelosi Thank you very much Huddled a shortened trading week and it was a down Monday across the board selling into the close today stocks and bonds retreated as investors focused on inflation and the impact of policy tightening by central banks all major groups in the S&P 500 fell today the S&P down 75 down 1.7% The Dow dropped 413 down 1.2% as stack lore by 299 a drop there of 2.2% Ten year yield 2.77% the two year yield 2.5% spot gold up three tenths of 1% 1954 the Alps a drop today for crude oil West Texas intermediate down three and a half percent 94 84 barrel Bitcoin big store today did trade below 40,000 right now 40,185 Bitcoin down 6.8% Well as for the market backdrop and what was driving trading today Megan ornament is chief investment officer at verdens capital advisers She was our guest right here on Bloomberg business week The first quarter and even starting off the past couple of weeks we've seen sentiment really tested by a complete pivot by the Federal Reserve We've also seen the war in Russian Ukraine not ending inflation and issue So we have to get back to the fundamentals and actually listen to the CEOs of what they're seeing on the ground as far as the future of corporate earnings And speaking of corporate earnings Wednesday we hear from JPMorgan Chase as the banks lead things off JPMorgan Chase down today by four tenths of 1% Thursday Citigroup Wells Fargo Goldman Sachs Citigroup down 7 tenths of 1% Wells Fargo up today by 1.2% Goldman down by two tenths of 1% Briefly more than 18,000 Etsy sellers have pledged to join a strike protesting a 30% increase in fees that took effect today Etsy shares up .55% on Charlie Taliban as a Bloomberg business flash All right Charlie Charlie pilot there with a Bloomberg business news flash on this Monday Carol master along with him steno Veck here in our interactive broker studio in New York City This column by our Brad stone He is senior executive editor of global.

Brad stone Mark andreessen Charlie Pelosi Bloomberg JPMorgan Chase Megan ornament verdens capital Musk Citigroup Wells Fargo Goldman Texas Federal Reserve
"mark andreessen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

02:24 min | 5 months ago

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Might have been episode 13. He was his firm silver orange, was doing design work for Mozilla. And he mentioned at the very end of the podcast that this company that he was working with was looking for volunteers to help out. And that was the call to action. And I've been listening to the podcast for a while, and I was just like, oh my God, yes. I love the Internet, and I love design, and I think this is the future. And buck Microsoft, like I want to go help with this. And I emailed him and they brought me in to start working with them. We worked on swag and we worked on designs when we were done. Because where are they at this point? It's all about raising money when you get there. Well, you know, the project was probably kind of in shambles a little bit. If I recall correctly, they were pushing to launch, I think if I recall, so first of all, the project was called Phoenix. It wasn't yet called Firefox. I believe there's a trademark dispute about Phoenix, which is why it wasn't ultimately called Phoenix but of course the idea of Phoenix was that it was going to take the netscape code base, which had been, I believe, donated by AOL. To this new nonprofit. And this new nonprofit, I think probably was related to Mark andreessen. I'm not totally sure. Well, because that was their Hail Mary before the AOL acquisition was the open-source. It was the last thing they did before the AOL thing. So I mean, it's also important to probably keep in mind that, first of all, this is the I believe around the antitrust period for Microsoft was turning into the evil empire slash the death star slash whatever villain you prefer. And open-source though, meanwhile, was being cast as kind of like this communist agenda. And so it was very interesting to kind of be in the middle of this cultural moment. And so anyways, they had this code base for this browser that was based on this rendering engine called gecko. And the idea was to take the underpinnings of that browser to get rid of something called netscape communicator, which was a suite of software, which included an email client and included. I think a news group reader and included all of these things that were wrapped around this web rendering engine. And they're like, okay, let's get rid of all that crap. I think let's build an extension layer. And let's also add tabs. And that was essentially the innovation that the Mozilla project was offering to the world..

Phoenix AOL Mark andreessen Mozilla Microsoft netscape Hail Mary
"mark andreessen" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

03:37 min | 6 months ago

"mark andreessen" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Bill Rasmussen. And the reason they had a big check. Yeah, so from Memorial Day, 1978 to 25th, 1984 was my active tenure with ESPN. Do you ever regret having left? Do you wish you could have stayed longer? Not for a second. And I think of all of the things that have happened the creation of literally hundreds of thousands of jobs for freelance people for network people for all the teams have their own networks now. And basically, ESPN spawned all of that. And I'm really proud of that. I pleased. If somebody wanted to get good at negotiating or just pitching like this, do you have any particular recommendations for them? I know I have a few books about huge impact on me. I'll share what those are. But do you have any recommendations? I think one you have to know as much as you can possibly know about your subject. The other thing is I don't have to know all the details about your business. What are your goals and what your general business? I don't have to know all the details about my business. Where do we want to go? And where do we want to take it? I'm not an engineer. I'm not a mathematician. I'm not an accountant. I'm none of those things. But I kind of have an idea to put the idea together and have a general knowledge and of some statistics that make some sense. Well, you have a really good combination of a number of things. And I remember at one point reading an article by a gentleman named Marc andreessen, so Mark andreessen is billionaire. He was co author of the mosaic web browser. So the first really popular graphic web browser. And he noted that most CEOs are kind of in the top 20% in two or three fields. But they're very rarely the Michael Jordan of just one thing. You have to have a few overlapping skills. And the good news is it's a lot easier. It's a lot easier to plan that and engineer that in your life than it is to try to aim to be that one Michael Jordan. Yeah. So the books I was going to mention for you guys, if you're interested, I found very helpful. Getting past know a little more realistic than getting to yes in my opinion and then secrets of power negotiating. I would get the audio if you can because you could tell with the cadence of bill's voice and the delivery, there's a lot of nuance. Let's see if we can pull up some audience questions. This is from lex, how does it feel to have captured the attention of so many people and our boyfriends? And bring them together through sports. Well, it wasn't always that way. In our early days, some of the men in the audience got so enamored with the ESPN that we were on the air, barely a year, and we were named in a divorce action. A lady in Texas included us because her husband was paying more attention to ESPN than he was to her. And when it arrived in Bristol, our general counsel and our whole legal department was only one person, so our general consul went, oh, my word did what's going to happen in our PR lady said, we want to spell her name right? Did she put out a press release? And that turned out the first of many times, ESN has been frequently named in divorce suits. For alienation of whatever. I don't get it, but addictive entertainment. Addictive entertainment. Aside from family members, when you hear the word successful, who is the first person who comes to mind. Successful. Success is described in so many different ways when I think back to my father surviving the depression, getting four kids through college coming through World War II. Yeah,.

Bill Rasmussen ESPN Mark andreessen Michael Jordan Marc andreessen bill Bristol Texas depression
"mark andreessen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

03:08 min | 7 months ago

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Creating today. And what you're describing is sort of the argument that a bull would make for most venture capitalists and investors would make in the software companies like one password, which is to say that, well, if software, if public markets are suddenly a little less enthusiastic about startups and software companies, that doesn't mean that the fundamentals are different. That essentially, when Mark andreessen says software is eating the world, what he's also saying aside from the fact that any company is now a tech company is now a software company. He's also saying that software makes everything more efficient that software companies and technology companies are the fundamental value that they're bringing to the world is efficiency and unlocking efficiency and making things easier. And so that if you're willing to pay every month for one password to make your life on the Internet more secure, there's a value there that is only recently been unlocked. If you see all of these, what's the other one? Bolt. There's a whole bunch of check out dot com. There's a whole bunch of these companies that are involved in payments right now. And it's like, well, wait, you're reinventing the credit card and things like that. But the point is is that if you can make and I think we've talked about this on the show, if software and innovation can increase sales for a commerce company by 15%, they're going to be willing to pay 7 10% to that company that increases their sales 15%. It's all about efficiency. So it's not like these things and these valuations are just people throwing money Willy nilly. There is value being created here very rapidly and it's very real value. Actually, to build on that point, as you were talking about, and I was thinking about, and of course, I've worked in identity and security for a long time. So I understand the value of those things. But I still am always shocked and impressed, I suppose, by how little penetration a lot of the technologies and techniques and practices that many of us in the tech world take for granted and think is widespread when in fact it's not. On our last tools show, Brian, you were sort of imploring our listeners to start using two factor authentication, for example. Whereas I've been using it for the last 5 or 6 years. It's just old hat at this point. The idea of securing my mask wallet or things like that are things that I just kind of assume are necessary. But so few people actually have those experiences think.

Mark andreessen Brian
"mark andreessen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:53 min | 8 months ago

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Much more ahead This is Bloomberg We are a 100% confident every time we make the investment that it's going to be a big company We are wrong A lot of the time For most parts of investing the mistakes are the investments you make where you lose money right In our world is the investments you don't make He made his first fortune by cofounding companies such as netscape and opsware But Mark andreessen made his name by launching andreessen Horowitz the powerhouse Silicon Valley venture capital firm We sort of thought it was time to go back to the well if you will and basically build a firm that was actually built by founders who understood the process more deeply In 2009 Mark and partner Ben Horowitz started their firm with just $300 million Fast forward to today it's a top firm with $18 billion in assets under management Certainly the claim of their founding they claim of a built multiple companies in the past and we understand much like the building of the actual ace and the employee And that's what attracted a lot of others to ask them to invest Pick a big tech name and chances are andreessen Horowitz has invested in it Twitter Facebook Airbnb coinbase a firm and the list goes on There's plenty of various smart people living until the finale and he's among the very very few that just on a different level of intellectual capacity and he is always giddily optimistic He's one of these people that you talk to about Your problems and come out thinking like wow I actually have it so great Mark may be optimistic but he also knows he can't win every time We're trying to do the moonshots Every once in a while we're gonna have rockets below from the launch pad Let's.

opsware Mark andreessen andreessen Horowitz Silicon Valley venture capital Ben Horowitz Bloomberg netscape Airbnb coinbase Twitter Facebook Mark
"mark andreessen" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

05:58 min | 8 months ago

"mark andreessen" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"The people in the crypto world are. I think there's a lot of good faith people going on there, but I think that the people who are getting who are exploiting this are Mark andreessen, he's like behind a lot of this. And this dude is, you know, he's a Facebook, like monopolist. And there's a lot of cynics out there that they're not. They're into reproducing and amplifying the problems that we have in our regulated system, but just with an unregulated system that they control. That's where I'm like, that's the real worry here. I don't see that pro democracy pro reform. Argument coming out of this community that I think actually has a real deep sympathy for liberty and democracy. Yeah, so Mark Andrews is an interesting one. Chris takes some from a 16 Z has been very, very much pushing the web three narrative and trying to drive that narrative around tokens and what we call shitcoins really. And that is something that they want to be able to control. They can't control Bitcoin. They have no control. And so they push these cryptocurrencies where they can issue a pre mine and they get to just have more control over it and they get to control how they profit. Right. The only way they can profit from Bitcoin is to build a company that builds on Bitcoin or buy Bitcoin. They can't get access to the Bitcoin itself by creating the currency. Whereas all the other currencies that's really interesting and wildcat banking type of thing. And it's bullshit, and none of us in Bitcoin are falling for it. So that's why I don't care about that. That's a currencies. But I come all the way back to your first point. The Miami coin is the thing that I'm not interested in. I interviewed Francis. So that's when I noticed the Florida and Citibank. It's like, okay, Miami coins coming out. Okay, that means there's a real. And this is just that thing for Bitcoin. If it gets wrapped up in all of this stuff, and all the Bitcoin is like Bitcoin, not blockchain. Bitcoin not crypto. We make a big effort to separate because they are different things. But I just come back to other point by being anti monopoly and prohibited. This is why I believe in Bitcoin. It is anti monopoly. It is pro liberty. I believe it will make democracy stronger. I believe it will make politicians more responsible and go to serve their constituents, rather constituents serving them. I hadn't thought of I don't know that much about this community. So it's been really fun to talk to you and learn you've given me a lot of think about the Bitcoin not Bitcoin dot crypto. And that makes a lot of sense because you know, I understand what Bitcoin is. And I understand what it's for. A lot of the smart contracts and crypto and there's all these things you can do. And I haven't really seen what you can do with it that's practical. It's not like it's not innovation like building the semiconductor. It's something that they're innovating different ways to use this thing that they're innovating on, which is it's like circular. So I have a hard time understanding what that's for..

Mark andreessen Bitcoin Mark Andrews Miami Facebook Chris Citibank Francis Florida
Where's the value in NFTs

Motley Fool Answers

05:13 min | 1 year ago

Where's the value in NFTs

"You first saw the acronym ft show up in your tweets you got as far as not at four. And then you realize you're quickly going down the wrong path and trying to decipher it. Nfc stanford non fungible tokens now from there. If you're like me you thought it had to do with mushrooms. Maybe mario brothers. I don't know so then you read a paragraph of an article got bored or confused and moved on with the knowledge that all of your assumptions were wrong. But then you didn't actually replace it with any real knowledge okay. And so that was fine until you started seeing f. T. everywhere and you realize that maybe you should learn what it means and also you have a podcast taping coming up so here we are. And it's not that ludicrous bro. Stay with me all right. Mitchell mitchell clarke wrote a delightful article on the verge explaining t so i'm largely relying on that also wired new york times and a few other places. Let's go all right. Non fungible tokens are essentially a way that you can claim ownership of a digital thing. So think music art tweets yes. These are all reproducible. But so is a postcard of the mona lisa. So non fungible tokens exists on a blockchain at this point. Mostly a theory but others are getting on board and there are online marketplaces like open sea bull and fifty gateway where you can buy and sell the official ownership of the digital thing again. We're talking music video. Art animated gifts for artists provides a new way to sell your work and you can also set it up. So that you get a little kickback. Every time the nfc changes hands with a new owner. Lots nice so right now. You're like bro. Why would someone pay millions of dollars for an animated gif when you can just download it for free again. Why would someone bhai a monet painting for millions when you can get it on a mug from the gift shop for fifteen dollars so it all comes down to the basic tautology that some things have value just because someone decides it has value now for some people the value might be bragging rights to that end. You get to buy an nf t fred digital drawing of a cat because you are looking for a new way to show people. You are wealthy for others. Value might be about your phantom or support of an artist or musician. Kings of leon grimes dead mouse and many others have released. And fte's for music and art and for others. The value might be purely speculative. You're buying the nf t for digital drawing up a cat because you think it will rise in value as many other people agree. They want that authentic digital drawing a cat. And you're like seriously digital yes. Ten years ago. A guy named chris torres created the animated. Meam niane cat. You know it as the flying cat with a pop tart for a body and it's leaving a rainbow trail behind as soon as you google. It you're going to be like. Oh cat i totally know what you're talking about. So in february torres created an nf t version and put it up for auction and it sold for nearly six hundred thousand dollars following a last minute bidding frenzy other f- tease out there. William shatner is dental x ray digital baseball cards photos of lindsay lohan. And the first tweet. By jack dorsey just sold for two point. Nine million. don't feel too bad because the proceeds argos support a charity. So there's that and if t. Are definitely booming right now with probably more speculators than collectors and fans driving up prices but experts looking beyond the boom. See a great opportunity for a new way to guarantee authenticity. So for example nike already has a patent to create. Nfc's attached to shoes to guarantee their authenticity. Called crypto. kicks so when you consider that. A pair of air jordan twelve flu games are worth more than one hundred thousand dollars. Yeah i think. I want an fte with that purchase. Please and maybe you're still skeptical like a bunch of people in the comments of the articles. I read but seriously. How is this all that new and different. It's not like people buy sneakers art or baseball cards for the value of the materials themselves. They buy them for the aesthetics. The design the rarity as the new york times quoted. Marc andreessen. ben. Horowitz a two hundred dollar pair of sneakers is like five dollars in plastic. You're buying a feeling and right now the feeling that. Fte's is similar to one a stamp collector or baseball card collector or art collector or fashion. Or even a speculator might feel. It's that feeling that you are special because you own something someone else wants.

NFC Mitchell Mitchell Clarke Wired New York Times Leon Grimes Chris Torres Mona Lisa Mario Bhai Jack Dorsey William Shatner Torres Baseball Lindsay Lohan Google Nike FLU
"mark andreessen" Discussed on Stellar's Podcast Series with Shaun McCambridge

Stellar's Podcast Series with Shaun McCambridge

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"mark andreessen" Discussed on Stellar's Podcast Series with Shaun McCambridge

"What is that phenomenum from very small to two very big. <hes> what does that component that <hes> fan branks well you know it's the relationship sean between the founder and their baby the and that's literally how they often talk about the business. This is their child and anyone who's a parent. That's listening. This understands that that relationship <hes> <hes> you have with your child is infinitely different than your relationship with any other children and as a result you're going to go the extra mile or for you know ten thousand if you need to to see them be successful and so the passion the persistence and the bigger purpose the three ps we think are what make the founder so importantly powerful and that's why mark andreessen horowitz v._c. Firm out of silicon valley is differentiated themselves themselves. They were the first v._c.'s to say. You know what we're not gonna go in there and replace the entrepreneur with professional c._e._o. Winning's more important to keep the founder and teach them how to be yes c._e._o. Than vice versa and if we go back by the way to this whole scaling up on more brains you know a mere mortal examples right there again in your backyard the father son team behind the famous product the flow you know that they set every into gogo record you can buy pre-selling accorded million dollars worth about six hundred dollars by stale. Make it easy.

founder mark andreessen six hundred dollars million dollars
Hey, Alexa! Sonic Logos are the Next Big Thing

Business Wars Daily

04:24 min | 3 years ago

Hey, Alexa! Sonic Logos are the Next Big Thing

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Thursday, April twenty fifth. Hey, alexa. I'd like to buy a motorcycle. And no, I haven't done that. But the day may soon come when we'll all be shopping on our speakers while so far only a small number of some five or six percent of actually bought anything by calling out. Hey, Alexa, or, hey. Google market watchers predict the audio shopping industry will be worth forty billion dollars by twenty twenty two. That's in part because of the explosion of on demand. Audio from our homes to our cars to our mobile devices. We're listening to more and more podcasts and other kinds of streaming media. You could say Audio's having its day for big brands, especially those that don't have a physical product that. You can actually see this means it's time to think about designing logos for the ear. Take a listen. That was the new sound of MasterCard the gigantic payment processor released earlier this year it used what else an audio press. Release to explain why corporate leaders felt it was so important to create a sonic identity. One reason to be ready when the smart speaker shopping revolution takes hold the sound. You heard is just one iteration of a ninety second music anthem MasterCard is localizing the theme all over the world. And also producing sounds and even vibrations that occur when you use your smartphone to shop with MasterCard. The company hopes that like a visual logo, it's sonic logo will create instant recall its way finding for the twenty-first audio storytelling century, or as we put it. It's the process of distilling a multi million dollar brand into a few seconds of sound MasterCard generated a lot of buzz with at sonic logo launch. But it's actual. Really late to the party its fiercest rival visa on its own sonic logo and associated mobile. Sounds and sessions early last year in the absence of old cash. Register clinks customers want to hear something that signifies a successful transaction the company says intervals sonic logo split-second. Tune that plays after you've successfully parted with your purchase cash. And then there's this as smart speaker use grows audio shopping becomes second nature. There's nothing to look at while you shop the obvious problem for brands on a smart speaker visual logo has no place but the audio logo certainly does musicians. Take notice is a whole new market out. There waiting for. You is just that. You're tunes could be awfully short. From wondering this is business wars daily. We'd love to know more about you. And we'd be so grateful if you could answer just a few questions visit wondering dot com slash survey. And thanks so much. I'm David Brown. We'll see you tomorrow. This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zero to PO find it wherever you get your podcast.

Mastercard Alexa David Brown PO Marc Andreessen Google Twenty Twenty Forty Billion Dollars Million Dollar Ninety Second Twenty Fifth Six Percent
XL Men Demand Fashion: Are You Shaquille ONeals Big, Sexy Model?

Business Wars Daily

03:35 min | 3 years ago

XL Men Demand Fashion: Are You Shaquille ONeals Big, Sexy Model?

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business daily on this Wednesday, April twenty fourth one reporter Daphne Howland of the industry site, retail dive wrote about the explosion and women's plus size fashion. Something happened that surprised her larger men reached out to or saying they want the same kind of mainstream and high end fashion that plus size women are now finally enjoying about a third of American men are so called big and tall, but such larger sized clothing. Only accounts for ten percent of all menswear sales Forbes reports, but now there is a bit of increased attention to creating good-looking fashion for men who are taller and heavier than the average guy retail dives Jalan reports on a handful of specialty in mainstream companies paying attention, including the clothing box company, stitch fix and men's online retailer Benito's both recently. Attended their men's sizes to be more inclusive stitch fix told retail dive that when it announced an XL offering for men twenty five thousand customers signed up on a waiting list, and blogger called the Kirby fashion Easter lauded bonobos saying that this move is another validation that plus size men belong in mainstream fashion brands. Oh, and if you had noticed there's a walking billboard for fashionable big and tall men, and he's looking for you Shaquille O'Neal who stands seven foot one and weighs about three hundred twenty five pounds has a line of big and tall men's clothing, it JC Penney through Sunday shack is conducting a nationwide search for model his size. He's often called a giant. And there aren't many like him he acknowledges so pennies is working with a modeling agency will Amenas in what they call the biggest and tallest search around looking for shack says big and sexy guys. Like me, maybe the publicity will finally help this miniscule slice to the menswear market grow. A lot bigger. Rum. Wondering this business wars daily, if you find this story fund tweeted, would you word of mouth is how people find thanks so much for listening. I'm David Brown will see tomorrow. This episode of business was daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zeroed IPO find it wherever you get your podcast.

Shaquille O'neal David Brown Shack Marc Andreessen Daphne Howland Reporter Forbes Jc Penney Benito PO Amenas Three Hundred Twenty Five Poun Ten Percent Seven Foot
Woman CEO to Succeed Best Buys Turnaround Star

Business Wars Daily

04:01 min | 3 years ago

Woman CEO to Succeed Best Buys Turnaround Star

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to show a brand new podcast from octa. Every successful entrepreneur follows a different path. Learn how to forge your own by listening two zero two zero wherever you get your podcasts. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Tuesday, April twenty third, you know, these days, we're no strangers to reporting on the bankruptcies and closures of big old retail chains. Bad news about legacy companies like Sears, k mart PayLess and Circuit City can make it seem like it's impossible for brick and mortar stores to survive much less thrive. Well, in that context today story is pretty surprising. Electronics retailer best buy is doing better than ever. Thanks in part to CEO. Uber's Ulee best buy finance chief Corey berry will become CEO. A rare appointment for a woman in the fortune five hundred ranks at forty four years old berry will also be one of the youngest big company. Ceos Joe Lee will continue working at best buy his executive chairman and advisory role. When Julie took the reins in twenty twelve best buy was suffering looked as if it could be on its deathbed in. Two thousand thirteen it stock was in the dumps selling for about twenty dollars today after five years of steady growth best buy shares or at a record high over seventy dollars some analysts call the company's trajectory one of the greatest turnaround stories in recent business history. So the question is how exactly did show compete with Amazon and turn best buy around when Circuit City could not in twenty twelve best buy was suffering from so-called showrooming syndrome. That is you'd go there to try out a computer or a pair of headphones than to save money you'd buy on Amazon. So Joe Lee change the game. He matched prices to Amazon and improved service ahead of many retailers. He also allowed customers to order online and pick up at best buys thousand stores if best buy could do it why not Circuit City, which closed in two thousand nine that seems to be the rationale for circuit. City leaders who resurrected the business last year, primarily online radio shack to is attempting some operations but best buy strategy, which looks so common sense is hard to mimic, Circuit City and radio. Shacks still seem like has been with most consumers unaware they're actually open last year the motley fool compared the ailing electric spenders to best buy and didn't spare the snark they may be back from the dead the fool wrote. But that doesn't mean they scare anyone especially best buying. From wondering this business words daily, like our daily analysis share our show with a friend or colleague, why don't you cheer appreciated? I'm David Brown back with you tomorrow. This of business wars daily is brought to you by zero to PO a brand new podcast from octa zero. IPO gets into the blood, sweat and tears of business growth. What it took for some of the world's most successful entrepreneurs to get to where they are today, and what they learned in the process. The first episode is a candid conversation with venture capitalist, Marc Andreessen. He's incredibly articulate and to the point with his advice to entrepreneurs right now. I'm about halfway through episode two which is all about what to do when you get your big idea. I can't get enough of zeroed IPO find it wherever you get your podcast.

Circuit City Joe Lee Amazon CEO David Brown Marc Andreessen Corey Berry Sears Julie Showrooming Syndrome Executive Chairman PO Forty Four Years Seventy Dollars Twenty Dollars Five Years
"mark andreessen" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"mark andreessen" Discussed on From Scratch

"Beetles that where the shop where you were because I love to take things apart. So he'd pay me a buck to rebuild carburetor. So while everybody was sitting around the TV after dinner watching TV. I be sitting there to coffee table, the screwdriver taking carburetors apart that just became a a lifelong love of disassembling things I've spent the rest of my life learning how to reassemble them. What what were some of the jobs you held prior to starting geek squad. Why have actually held I four jobs my tire life, including my current job at at geek squad. I'm I pay job. I ever got was a rock climbing instructor in Canada over some other jobs. The second job I ever held was for the verbal mattress factory in wheeling Illinois town where I grew up we'd walk into a small showroom. You're gonna go buy a bed and somebody walks into store put the stapler gun down and walk out there in dust off the cotton and you sell a product, and I was pretty good at sales, and I had like blue combat boots and spiked hair. And I was the top salesperson. So if you get a little clank pretty well. And you just kinda realized you know, what you're good at now. How did the idea for making house calls fixing people's computers? Originate while you're at the university of Minnesota. Well at that time you remember early nineteen nineties. This is one kind of technology shift began to happen. I mean, Michael Dell I think just coming out of college. Bill Gates was about to come in the world's richest person at that time, you know, dial up internet access, I emerge and Nance when computers have become useful when they talked to each other. And you know, the first web browser was being developed Mark Andreessen who had found Netscape was still student at the university of Illinois in. So all these great things were going on. And my roommate worked in this research lab, and he took me there one day, and I saw the internet for the first time. So I started working there, but to pay for school I had to start making make extra money. So I started making house calls on my mountain bike and a cell phone and fixing PC problems. How did you? How did you let people know that you are in business to make those house calls while just word of mouth. I mean, that's why that's why service is so bad in any part of the world because it's easy to get into the service business. I mean, if you can do something technically, and you have a cell phone and. Do you have a few friends and you start doing work for them word will spread if you're good? You get a lot of phone calls. That's also part of the problem. We've all call the drywall contractor plumber. They don't return phone calls. They don't show up when they're supposed to they smell bad and talk down to your all of the above. And so I started showing up I kept hearing these things that other person fix went computer problem. But they you know, they wouldn't show me how they fixed it or they didn't never call me back or they were rude. And I thought well, there's really what you're paying me to remove that virus or get that file back. But then there's also the other things like showing up and taking my shoes off without being asked. And if you don't have any money for advertising those little details at up in that they all become your advertising, then I realized going here, I am a really unglamorous low in business. I computer repair that's not full of any creative people at all. And I'm I consider myself a pretty creative person would have a creative person went into a boring business. So my goal wasn't a computer. There. It was to grow it as kind of like a fast food business to venture get into the gourmet food business, high end, computer consulting. But I found those all the creative beautiful and smart people went into high end consulting, and nobody wanted to deal with this massive volume of people who need help. I'm Jessica Harrison. You're listening to from scratch. My guest is Robert Stevens founder of geek squad..

founder Illinois Michael Dell Bill Gates university of Minnesota Netscape Jessica Harrison university of Illinois instructor Mark Andreessen Canada Nance Robert Stevens one day