20 Burst results for "Marissa Mayer."

Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

The Vergecast

01:46 min | Last week

Land of the Giants: The Google Empire

"In nineteen nine hundred. Nine marissa mayer was sitting in the most important interview of her life. It was at a startup called google. That needing was at their conference table in the main conference room at one six five university which also happened to be a ping pong table. Meyer would go on to become one of the most prominent executives and silicon valley from two thousand twelve to two thousand seventeen. she was. ceo of yahoo. The back in the late nineties. She was still a student at stanford about to graduate with a master's in computer science and google's cofounders. Sergei brin was not going easy on her sergei did all the talking and quiz mutants. We allow different computer. Science topics had me draw out. Like the graphing of k means clustering and and centuries and how to find the differences in the centers. And things like that. Meyer was a star student so she answered those questions problem. But there was another interviewer in the room and she noticed something was a little off with him. Larry seemed quiet and truthfully obviously somewhat distracted. Larry page the other founder of google. The pair wrapped the interview utterly. They had something else on their minds and the the door opens like you kind of hear. What's going on her side. Then i heard the call and say okay like who's going with us for the kleiner. Pitch kleiner is kleiner perkins the legendary venture capital firm. And i heard a lot of foot traffic heading out the door and then heather horns. The office manager reappeared and said i'm sorry. Larry and sergei had an important venture capitalist pitch this afternoon and they have taken the the majority of the company with thumb. So i think you're going to have to come back tomorrow.

Sergei Brin Marissa Mayer Meyer Google Stanford Yahoo Larry Page Pitch Kleiner Kleiner Perkins Larry Heather Horns Sergei
The difference between implicit bias, systemic bias and unconscious bias

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

04:19 min | 7 months ago

The difference between implicit bias, systemic bias and unconscious bias

"There a difference between implicit bias, unconscious bias and systematic bias. How interchangeable are they? What's your? What's your take on that? Yeah. So these I mean the three of those, it's accession it fascinating because the three of us we often. Use Them interchangeably but they're actually very very different and it's so funny when you mention even subtle differences like Duke versus UNC, right what I talk about in a lot of my research and what I studied, how these really subtle differences that. So much of success outcomes are determined by these subtle signals and cues in stereotypes and perceptions even something like I mean, it sounds funny. But the the color blue and seeing the difference between Duke Blue Versus Carolina blue immediately there's some sort of a reaction that happens but if we take that into the business world, for example, you know Marissa Mayer was Famously when she first started, Google spent a long period of time because she had this hypothesis that people would click through ads at a certain rate for storage shade of blue. So she spent a week or two just testing blue number twelve versus blue number fifteen, blue fifteen versus blue number twenty and found that there is one shade of blue that people were more likely to click through I. Don't know two or three percent more likely to click than others, and it may not sound like a huge percentage when you're selling ads for millions and billions of dollars that two percent can really make a difference. So even something like that he settle signals and cues but back to your original question. The ways in which these these signals and cues are enacted means the difference between unconscious and implicit and systemic sort of bias Sufi. Think about bias from this holistic sort of. This holistic continuum there's buys it's sort of over right. We know that you discriminate or your biased against someone based on how they look right but there's also bias that for example, I give you example imagine you're playing this board game a board game and you know you have no idea that that that every time you roll the dice, you're rolling affair of dice and your opponent every time. They're rolling the dice rolling in unser here of dice where they for some reason always gonNa roll lower numbers and you're playing this game and the whole time you're playing this game you're winning and you never see that the dice that you're rolling are different of dice than than your opponent and so when you go at the end of the game and you win, you're not really aware that there. Was Systemic sort of bias that that you that your success was due to something that was just in the system right? You one form of bias. Another former buys is that perhaps you unknowingly once of dice are red and once it of dice or blue, and the pollution of dice are the ones that are always going to be the ones that rule the lower number and so implicitly you're. Sort of you're told or you were taught like the red dice are always better just tried get those but you have no idea why and so every time it's your opponents turn you hand them the blue set of dice, right? So you're implicitly biased against because you somehow think that the red dice are better and and that you and so and so there's sort of this unsteadiness built in. Through what you've been taught or through what you've sort of known and so there's sort of this implicit also like subconscious to some extent subconscious, there is much more. You have no idea why you weren't taught that read was better than blue but for some reason, you realize that was always going to roll better than blue and so it's not this told you to always give blue to the. Opponent, but you just naturally always give the blue to the economy and make sure that you get the rats. So there's all these different forms of bias that exists and so sometimes I'd give that example to kind of straight the really small differences that exist between these types of

Marissa Mayer UNC Unser Unsteadiness Carolina Google
Yahoo's Ugly Death

Malicious Life

05:59 min | 7 months ago

Yahoo's Ugly Death

"The name is synonymous with a time when all of our lives were simpler when facebook was an actual books full of students faces computers made weird sounds when the connected to the Internet and downloading a one minute long video can take all night. Eddie tight yet who was one of the four or five most popular websites in the world with billions of views, every month and evaluation well, over one hundred, billion dollars. But as the two thousands turned into twenty tens, the web changed massively and your who was faced with the difficult task of changing with it. Their web portal service model was going out of fashion. We all moved to g mail and Google Search, McCain the front page of the Internet. Despite the fact that ask Jeeves was obviously way better. Many of Yahoo's services remained relatively popular, but they were no longer trendsetting no longer growing and the company's market capitalization dropped to a fraction of what it once was any remnant of the mindshare or what we might refer to as v Cultural. Capital they once held fell off. So to those of us on the outside yeah, who's fall seemed utterly quiet gradual and most of all inevitable but was it really Forget what you think. You know at least for a moment and consider this from the peak of the DOT COM bubble. Some say the beginning of the end for Yahoo to two thousand, eight, their revenue increased tenfold that success was no fluke either as print publishers struggled with the incoming revolution of online advertising, Yahu was very much on top of it. They were positioned Willie enough that when Microsoft attempted to buy the company for forty, five, billion dollars in. Two Thousand and eight CO founder and CEO Jerry Yang swiftly rejected the offer it was over the following few years that things would start to ten at the company transitioned through five different CEOS in just four years, and in the meantime Google took over the Internet. This would seem like the end of the story except in two thousand and twelve yen made arguably the most significant tire in its history and new CEO who could finally get things going again. Marissa Mayer. was distant for such a role from the beginning. Some college students have hard time in the job market, but after completing her degree at Stanford, Marissa was offered fourteen different jobs including teaching Gig at Carnegie Mellon One of America's leading engineering schools and consulting role at Mackenzie. Arguably, the world's premier consulting for the Young Maria turned down both those offers to become the twentieth employees at a fledgling startup called Google. At Google, she was star in fact, there's hundred percent chance you've run into her work. She oversaw the design of Google's homepage. You know the one you use probably ten times a day she was also one of the three people behind Google Edwards. It's difficult to overstate the importance of Edwards to the Internet as a whole and to the company itself to give you some sense of it. Though, at one point Edwards provided ninety six percent of Google's entire revenue. In fact, you could argue that Edwards and by proxy Melissa Samaya was at least partly responsible for the fall of. yahoos revenue multiplied tenfold between two thousand and two thousand and eight in no small part because of their online advertising. But he declined even faster when Google they're smaller competitor designed a better wage, you connect advertisers with users based on search results. Edwards. So, by the principle that if you can't beat him, you should join him Yahoo in two thousand and twelve hired Marissa Mayer. It was bald and popular choice. The company's stock rose two percent. The day of the announcement Meyer instantly became an icon for women in an industry dominated by men. Then, she got to work changing the company culture. She opened an online portal for employee complaints a system whereby any office problem given sufficient votes by employees would be automatically investigated by management. She oversaw a personnel shift which brought remote employees back into the company's offices Fortune magazine put her in their forty under forty list and ranked her as the sixteenth most powerful businesswoman on the planet. In short things were finally looking up for Ya. At least from the outside on the inside, however, the really really inside a very different story was about to be reading.

Google Edwards Marissa Mayer Yahoo Facebook Marissa Mayer. Eddie Marissa Jeeves CEO Fortune Magazine Jerry Yang Carnegie Mellon Microsoft Maria Mccain Willie Yahu Co Founder
"marissa mayer." Discussed on OFF RCRD

OFF RCRD

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on OFF RCRD

"Pick the offer and pick the opportunity where you're going to learn the bones. This week's episode is a bit different. Every summer I host large stem student. Gathering called intern earn Palooza thousands of interns from all over the Bay Area New York City of ten over twenty thousand stint students have attended in years pass this year Marissa Chryssa Meyer is one of our keynote speakers. Orissa is well known for formerly serving as the president and CEO of the auto and being the twentieth employees of Google. Theresa Co founded a new startup Kalou laps early stage technology incubator and this week's episode we hear Marissa's keynote talk had that in turn Palooza. She needs no introduction. Our final speaker is one of the most admire tech executives in Silicon Valley conversa- Meyer. She is currently running. Leumi labs incubator in downtown. Palo Alto focused on consumer media and AI in it's run one out of the old Google office the same place she began her career in one thousand nine hundred nine at before that she served a CEO of Yahoo for about five years beginning in two thousand twelve elves and ending with the company's sales horizon prior to joining Yahoo. She spent thirteen years at Google where she was the twentieth employees and influenced many of the companies most successful successful signature products relevant for purposes today. It's worth noting that wind. She chose to join Google. She was weighing fourteen different job offers so we're incredibly lucky to have her. We're here with US tonight. Please join me in welcoming riskier to the stage thank you. I'm really excited to be here. We're had internal PALOOZA. I thought I would tell the story that corresponds to the introduction weighing the fourteen job offers that but also say this year is hunters action bidding a lot of Deja Jabu for me because I'm back in the Google Office. Rice started my career nineteen years ago. I was sitting where all of you were twenty years ago. So as I was finishing my internship during my master's shortsighted two year master's internship between an order year later would have to make a decision about what company I wanted to go enjoy and things abroad headline that I would say is pick. Pick the offer and pick the opportunity where you're going to learn the most so by background one thousand nine hundred nine. It was the height of Web one point zero. The bubble is huge the company was IPO billions immediately and if you were graduating in computer science are interested in technology you get as many job offers as you wanted to get so ultimately. I got about fourteen hundred going getting all these offers like offers a lot of different these time to teach like a Carnegie Mellon teaching programming side done that at Stanford big attack companies like Oracle lots of those startups consulting research firm all kinds of different companies at the end of it. I could pick the best of each type of job offer. I knew five is going to company. I'd go to Oracle. I knew if I was going to start up. It would be google. I knew I was going to go t- TO BE Carnegie Mellon. If I had a really hard time hi deciding across fields. How do you take things that are so different and weigh them together so I thought about a lot of different decisions. I made were there things across those decisions wins that they all had in common so I sort of sat down with a list of decisions I was really happy with made and can they included going to stanford changing my major symbolic systems uh-huh doing one internship at Sri Down in Menlo Park during another internship at the Union Bank in Switzerland in Zurich across all the different decisions they had two two things in common one. I always surrounded myself with the smartest people I could find and two. I always is something I was a little not ready to do. Where at the end of the first day I was down on my battery you like what was I thinking. Why did I think this was a good idea and it looks across those different job offers. That was really what set the offer a part. I loved their Sergei. I love their vision for how search could change the world. I live to the fact that they had made the amazing jump from being Stanford. PhD's who didn't shower a pizza for backpass rollerblade it all the time didn't apologize when they ran into you onside rollerblades and they'd made this amazing journey to being businessman who had a vision of how search could a change the world and the company that they wanted to lead but also really impressed with some of their first employees Craig Silverstein who to this day as one of my closest friends who's just one of the smartest people that I've ever format and I just knew that by going to Google and working alongside people like that it ultimately would challenge me to think harder about things achieve more and and just work gone problems that we're going to have a bigger impact and the other thing this notion of doing something. You're not ready to do you. WanNa push yourself. I think that's really what it comes down to. In terms of learning various Sergei from the very beginning was say we WANNA build a fortune five hundred company and honesty. I thought that they had about a two percent chance of succeeding I gave all the other startups appoint to chance of percents percents of chance of succeeding but overall the fact that they wanted to try and do that the fact that Google the name and now that south almost punchline in terms of in terms of jokes. I can imagine my father saying Yeah Melissa graduate from Stanford. She went to this company called. Get this guy isn't even had this silly name of Google but I knew that weighing alongside other things things one the other opportunities. I really thought a lot about was Mackenzie for consulting and I knew that I would be very good at consulting. I didn't know if I'd be great. Software engineer and I wanted to challenge myself. If I went to Google see what kind of software engineer I could be but I also have the observation having had friends at Mackenzie but the problem is that I'm talking to a lot of my friends they would make a presentation and they're have an idea for changes should be made in a company and they make their presentation the recommendations and they'd leave and then all the executives that they presented to stay there and ultimately make the decision and and I realized as glamorous as it was McKinsey and get to go and give advice to fortune five hundred CEO CIO etcetera. I would learn a lot more going to Google and trying to build a fortune five hundred company even if we failed that I would giving advice to them because I would actually get to be in the room where those decisions get made and understand. How do you decide tried to go after a big deal. How do you decide to change your hiring process. How do you decide how to advance our product strategy. Being in those meetings as much more valuable on the type of learning you got and if you look at those two tenants and principals they really are about learning you learn more from having smart people who challenge you all around you. You learn more by doing things that you don't appeal completely ready and prepared to do so just really encourage that when you're looking across different opportunities yet you try and take the one that you're. GonNa learn the most from I would also say that that from that also don't feel pressure to pick from an obvious that side of opportunities there's certain times in your life where you can do very specific things in particular going to be the opposite of Peter Thiel here but have you side wait. I WANNA go for more education. I want to go into graduate work. I want to stay in school longer. That's very hard to do ten years from now. That's very easy to do right now similarly. It's really hard later to say okay. I want to start a company or I want to go to a really tiny company thus much harder to do in your thirties when you're graduating from your undergraduate or your graduate work so if you had that inclination listened to that which is also a chance for me to give a shameless plug start up my own company. I've started which is Lynn labs. We have a booth over here. You know we're going to be working over on the media space artificial intelligence areas that I spent a lot of my career working in but you know that moment being able to start a company being able to go on for more school and really doing whatever you think is going to push you to learn the most. It's awesome the way that I would recommend that ultimately you so that I think you just running back to corey organizers. Thank you so much..

Google Marissa Chryssa Meyer Silicon Valley conversa- Meyer Oracle Palooza CEO Mackenzie president and CEO Software engineer New York City Stanford Orissa intern US Theresa Co Yahoo Carnegie Mellon Deja Jabu
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

"They didn't go for the most money here because it was like a diminishing amount of money but one thing i would love your commentary on is like mercer mayer at one one point. One billion is what she paid for it. Look the worst deal in history. I'm patting myself on the back and we'll hopefully have find the tape and roll tape tape here another loser tumbler. We believe that instagram is the best acquisition of the last five years and tumbler is the worst both costs about a billion dollars both have the same user base instagram instagram. We'll be do between two hundred fifty million and four hundred and fifty million this year tumbler was noticeably absent from yahoo's earnings call which means likely the revenue somewhat negligible but five years ago five years ago i said <hes> in a very public conference that instagram and tumbler with the best more sock was in the last decade and tech. I said that a p._n._g. Signals conference the four marissa mayer took the stage so i had to sit behind stage after saying that this was the worst acquisition acquisition and technology and if you wanna talk about pump and dump the backstory on tumblers really interesting because you had dan logo. I know you're friends with come in my oh my god no him anyways he basically took a large stake in yahoo agitated get seats on the board and then fired a guy named scott thompson for saying that he had a minor in computer science from his university on his resume whereas shell sambergen mark zuckerberg weaponized election dick artnews scott thomsen gets fired for the exaggerating his resume that makes sense anyway. I broke a lot of the stories he more than he more okay so he gets fired and then download comes out about that stuff go download unload comes in and hypes marissa mayer who was very compelling figure brings her in clearly in the first two board meetings realizes she has no idea what the fox. She's doing doing and sells all his shares. Once the stock is up and then marissa mayer goes on to do some of the some of the lowlights her tenure hire someone to head sales from her old company google through she fires within fourteen months and gives one hundred twenty million dollars severance family to checks almost queers the tax structure of the asset worth ninety seven comprise ninety six percent of the value of the company that was their stake in alibaba took revenues down twenty percent eva down fifty percent santo and by the way walked out the door with a quarter of a billion dollars. I mean they are few people who have done more damage while making more money the mark zuckerberg sheryl sandberg but there's very few people who have made paid more money while destroying more shareholder value than marissa mayer that was my coverage was like you know how i wrote about the at particular tenure not in your out in front of this when everyone had decided that no one wanted to say anything bad brummer smear but she had to fill this this void of hype and inflationary expectations and the way she filled it was with pumpers and dumpers of the modern era union square ventures by the way. If you wanna see you ed bullshit. Private companies are being hyped right now just.

marissa mayer mercer mayer mark zuckerberg instagram yahoo scott thompson sheryl sandberg scott thomsen alibaba google dan five years billion dollars one hundred twenty million dol ninety six percent fourteen months twenty percent fifty percent
"marissa mayer." Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"But I think his there was no great event. It was one of those things where he would became in the fabric. He was so important to us that he became we started having him come to my staff meeting initially been out side coach he actually attended our staff. Many where he typically didn't save much would make notes, and then of course, later would go and work on issues that seem to come up. He was very helpful. When they're there began to be tensions between apple and Google. And because he knew both sides. He would sit there there. There were serious disputes between Steve and some of the Google executives over some of the issues in Android versus iphone, for example, and those disputes had to do with who could do what and electoral property, and those kinds of things he got people to talk to each other that wouldn't have otherwise to speak. So there's a case we're having cr-. Credibility with both groups was extremely helpful. You said getting people to talk with one another who might not otherwise chat with one. Another one of the bullet point facts about Bill that I have in front of me is he taught Marissa Mayer then CEO of Yahoo. How to sit quietly during a meeting in let less senior people arrive at a decision. Are there? Other other any particular approaches or coaching recommendations that he would that he's made to you or that you've seen him make two other people more than once that fall into that same category of I'll give you an example of that. I would get worked up over some issue, and I would violate my own rules. So my own rules are to listen, you know, reason and then make make a decision collectively. And if we can't make it collectively, then I'll force addition. But every once in a while I be sufficiently worked up upset that I would just blurt out the answer. And he would inevitably say come on, you know, better than that. And so that's an example where coach you know, because he's seen me operating. He says a cross the line there. What percentage of his workplace or workday slash week rituals? If any come to mind he would get up at five thirty in the morning. He would be on the Jim from six 'til seven. And then so he was an early riser. He had he coached soccer at three or four in the afternoon. So he would have to go family commitments. So he was typically be in the office from say eight till two ish, and they would go coach soccer. Of course, we all worked much later than that. So we would call him. But he for example, believe in doing one thing. Well, so when he was coaching he wouldn't answer the phone. Can you imagine that today from Steve Jobs, whatever, and he wouldn't respond to tax because he thought that that was an interruption and what he was doing. So he was one of these principled people of this is what I'm working on. This is what I'm working on. This deserves my full attention. I'm worried that we're losing that style, which I value agree deal. What does the what are the first sixty to ninety minutes of your daily click at curiosity, and you've what was your routine morning routine? Look like during the week..

Jim Steve Jobs Google soccer Bill apple Marissa Mayer CEO Yahoo ninety minutes
"marissa mayer." Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"To the watchdog Wall Street with Chris Markowski. Yes. Times. I. How the world works out the swamp works. Watch this swap by vice better watchdog on Wall Street axis of evil how they work and how they help each other out. Do remember Marissa Mayer? Yeah. Marissa mayer. She was another one like Sheryl Sandberg from Facebook, season woman and cheese. Head of. Yeah. Ooh. Those commercials in the nineteen ninety s ya. Who who this anybody out there us? Yahu? Anyone at all? Anyone go beyond who go to? Yahoo news. Everybody used it at all. Does anyone out there use AOL when you go to your Ayla Stelle say you got mail? Anyone few people that still have their at AOL Email accounts. But anyway, I saw this back in two thousand sixteen and I'm like what in the world is Verizon doing. And what are they doing here? Again, I'm going to tell you what they did. They bought this as a solid they did favor. Somebody came up to Verizon and said, listen, listen, we gotta save save these two things we got to save Marissa Mayer. We don't want the thing to go completely under will make it up to you later on. Maybe in some regulation, or some sort of thing government approval that you need to get that you won't need to get. We want to help everybody out. They all sit on each other's boards of directors. Okay. They're all buddies with one another they'll go to the same clubs. They all fly on each other's planes. So yes, do I think Verizon knew that they were gonna lose money on Yahoo and AOL? Yes, I do. And sure enough. Sure. Enough this past Tuesday Verizon announced that its writing off four point six billion from those two deals that's half the deal..

Marissa Mayer Verizon AOL Yahoo Sheryl Sandberg Chris Markowski Ayla Stelle Facebook
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"And I spoke to one person who has a semi popular tumbler porn blog this week. Who was devastated by this news? And she said that her page actually was born out of a flirtation with her boyfriend who lived far away. So she actually created the tumbler as a love language to speak to him. And then people started to follow it. And then even after they broke up. She was you know, what I'm into being a porn blogger like I get it. So it's like a really creative outlet for some people and tumbler had gotten a lot of accolades for actually really supporting porn on the platform when lots of other platforms, particularly live journal back in two thousand seven was kicking people off and kicking porn off tumbler came out. And was like, you know, what we are not in the business of telling people that they can't do things that a lot of dolts do and I think David Karp evens. I'd like what do I care about lady Gaga nipple if you wanna put a picture of lady Gaga nipple up, that's fine. And then they were sort of like even after Marissa Mayer bought. Yahu bought tumbler, they even continued to leave it there to leave the the porn there and people really loved it. But so this is a real about face. And so why is tumbler doing this? Now, I mean, so tumbler is now owned by Verizon, and it seems Verizon and their statement that this was about making tumbler a better place. And I think you can read a lot into that statement of there's like the reason why maybe it happened this week whether or not this week is that apple had recently removed the tumbler up from the app store because it they said it had a porn bought problem. And apple has been notorious for being a place where porn was not allowed or like sexual content of any kind was really disallowed in the app store. And they've always done that. So I think that was a real problem for tumbler because like that app Verizon wants that apt to be able to be downloaded. And additionally like Verizon said they wanna be able to. I think they I'm not sure if actually said this, this is just the implication the locations, they wanna be able to run ads more profitably on tumbler. And it's really hard to run ads next a porn, right? And I think it it also makes it would it would probably be helpful to establish a bit of a distinction of what exactly we're talking about. When we talk about the kind of things that you see on tumbler. Right. So like, you know, you have your traditional image of pornography? And what that is that right? The kind of thing you'd find on porno like you were saying you tumbler, and there's a lot of still photos of like black and white photos. Very artistically. Composed nudes. There's sort of kink stuff. On their like people being tied up. But a lot of it is like you said nonviolent, right? It's respectful, and it really sits on that line where it could be art, right? And a lot of it. I mean, there are even some, you know, tumbler kind of works by tagging with tags. And I think a lot of people who consume porn on us those tags as a way to find what they're looking for. And a lot of the tags that are associated with like, quote, unquote, porn on tumbler, a really things like kissing and romance. Like, some of the porn blogs, aren't though they do contain nudity, and they are explicit. They might also be largely like like scenes from movies of like characters kissing very passionately. Which is you know, the exact opposite of what you think of is online porn. Yeah. I just wish everybody could see us doing the air quotes as often. I'm glad that they can't. Again. So. Has really become this place. That's a repository for all kinds of artistic gentle, women friendly, feminists, Florida. Yes, porn, Emily. As you mentioned..

Verizon apple Marissa Mayer David Karp Yahu Florida Emily
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Com. I promised at the top of this episode, we'd spend some time with Marissa talking about what happened at Yahoo and where she believes things went wrong. But just in case, I haven't already made this clear y'all who was a deeply troubled company when Marissa came on board once a pioneer and search an Email yahu had been steadily losing users and relevance for years. The company was treading water as it's competitors race by jetskis for many of its investors. The only real value they saw left in the company was the ownership stake it held in two other companies, the Chinese Internet, giant Alibaba, and Yahoo. Japan at the start of Mercer's tenure yangs Alibaba investment was like a rocket pack that helped Yong defy gravity at off of some of the Alibaba stock, but an influx of cash that we spent on the new ideas that were sprouting up, but that. Rocket pack also came with a short fuse and that us was lit when investors became eager to cash out the Alibaba holdings. Whereas sooner team ran out of time, I mean, there's a little known fact, but for the last six quarters of Yahoos existence prior to the sale beat the street, we plan, we were starting to grow areas. We had almost two billion dollars of holy new invented revenue inside the company in five years which you know we had banker saying, look, if you take part of the company public, the growth on that is unbelievable. The new growth was awesome, but it wasn't enough y'all, whose board was anxious to cash in on the Alibaba holdings. The best way to do this would be the separate Yahoo from its Alibaba investment, but new government rules were making this more difficult. The board, including Marissa voted a wind down this chapter of Yahoos existence. They sold the yahu core assets to Verizon and kept the Alibaba holdings and a new company. Called Alta baba. There were times I even talked about, like my investor base was almost like two cats in the bag. And I had one cat that was very interested in the internet and the operating business and others have cast that were very interested in the Asian assets in what was going to happen with those really came a point where you have to let the two cats out of the bag. Executive team came up with a plan that would please both groups of investors. The core Yahoo business would remain an independent company and go public. The Alibaba assets would be spun off as a separate company, but that I plan proved problematic. We came up with a plan to do a tax free spinoff simultaneously. The government decided we examine tax spin offs. And so that made some of our investors very nervous about the outcomes there. But also we decided we should not pursue that path, but instead should do what we call the reverse spin, which was a sale of the core business, essentially leaving the Asian assets behind basically getting the operating business and the Asian assets into two different entities. But basically there came a point where the acids were so big and so much of a focus of our shareholders that it really made sense to disentangle the two which ultimately led to the sale process and the sale to Bryson. So what would you have told yourself to do. Differently. Like if you said, okay, now I, I ran the course. These are the things I would have done differently. These are the questions I would've asked this how it approached it. Sure. I think that my summary now is, you know, I love ya who I think it would have been amazing to see it return to greatness. And I think that there are some ways where we could have ended up with really the homerun outcome, but that said it would have required almost perfect timing and nothing ever goes perfectly, especially with regard to timing. So it's funny because I can now look back and say, oh, I, I could see somewhere where you know there was a really amazing outcome for the company if just these few decisions and points at the same time in real time, I'm not sure with the benefit of hindsight. You can make that observation in real time. I'm not sure that you can..

Alibaba Alibaba holdings Yahoo Marissa Alta baba Verizon Bryson Japan Executive Yong Mercer two billion dollars six quarters five years
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Yahu briefcase cats the side for dropbox and one drive yahu music is silent while Spotify sings out loud flicker, half lagged, greatly behind Instagram, and the once mighty geo cities has now crumbled and above its ruins palace, quest base and weeks. Yahu had burned through four CEO's in five years, a full twenty five percent of the staff had quit in the past six months. So Mercer was taking on a nearly impossible situation what an entrepreneur takes on a turnaround. I often describe it as throwing yourself on a grenade, but this was like throwing yourself on an entire truck a TNT. It's not surprising then that Marissa's time at Yahoo was fraught with controversy and we'll get to that. But I want to look here at what she did when she first arrived because there's a lot to learn from in this turnaround situation. Mersa couldn't hire an entirely new team at scale, but you could make the employee she needed out of the ones she had yahu was obviously this super important company on the internet that had gotten into trouble by a bunch of bad strategic management choices, and they were desperately looking for reinvention and they called you, and you went. Okay. This is a grenade I can jump on. Right? What was your initial theory? I just felt like people at Yahoo just seemed like really good fun. Nice people. And despite all the turmoil at the top, you could feel that I just think there's a bunch of good people who really want to make this company work and want to have you make the world, nicer plays a cozier place and have fun doing it. And that was really my hypothesis when I went in and I was blown away when I got there because there were so many people there with so many ideas and so much energy to try and improve the company. But it was really just waiting for someone to come and really try and harness it. But when Marissa arrived at Yahoo in July two thousand twelve, the energy and enthusiasm at the company lay dormant stifled by layers of.

Marissa Yahoo Yahu Spotify Instagram CEO Mercer Mersa twenty five percent five years six months
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"It's alive. synthesizing new humans was not yet an option even Google and they were struggling to find qualified candidates. So Mercer decided to make more of these people. It grew out of a bet with her manager. Jonathan Rosenberg I want about I can hire new people right out of school and train them via great product managers at Google faster than you can hire the people. You prefer who are more experienced in senior Brisa was convinced she could hire smart people and train them to be the college. She was looking for. She was confident about it because that's what she and sour had done. They had come to Google as coders and had become product managers. I was like, well, I'm going to go to Stanford and MIT. I'm gonna look for really well trained computer scientists who also understand how technology going to bring them in to give them really big jobs because we haven't really big jobs here in the product management group that aren't filled and we'll do what kind of happened to Saul are and me, and you know. Times just kind of yelled at us until we did what they needed us to do and rose to the occasion. I was like, I want me to do that with less yelling, found her first APM higher twenty two year old, Brian wakowski fresh out of college. What project did Marissa's choose? The ease him in on. She gave him the whole of g mail. We brought them in and gave him these huge jobs, and they had to have been more stressed out bunches of twenty two twenty three year olds. And the world Mercer named this trial by fire. The associate product manager program. Lucky to have the MasterCard center for inclusive growth pardoning with us to make the show possible will give them the next word. More and more people are gravitating towards gig work and contract work in independent work because it gives them flexibility. It allows them to do their side hustle, allows them to pursue their passion. We're back with parameter executive director of the MasterCard center for inclusive growth. His team went on a listening tour to learn what working class Americans worried about the answer the shift from full-time jobs to the gig economy, and while some people become gig workers for the freedom, others don't have much of a choice. They're having a hard time finding those nine to five jobs, and so they're trying to pick up work wherever they can get it. The end result is the same. Regardless of why you got there. You don't know how to plan for the future. We could. We engineer a solution that could actually serve this population of independent contractors and gig workers. We want to be able to have a an app, a simple app that actually takes all the history of your income and your purchases looks at it over a period of time, and then his able to advise you based.

Google Brisa Brian wakowski Mercer Saul MasterCard Marissa associate product manager Jonathan Rosenberg MIT Stanford engineer executive director twenty two twenty three year twenty two year
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"This isn't about beauty or style, but cold hard data driven functionality Orissa wasn't asking what looked best. She was asking what performed best. She became the kind of data driven designer that URS had set out to find. Melissa was quickly making huge leaps at Google along with setting Google's designed bible. She was playing a lot of hard to categorize roles across the company. There were many small teams were on different products and features, and when it came time for them to go live, they would turn to Melissa for help. This gave a clear view of every product in every team throughout the organized chaos of the entire company. She was also one of the few people who knew how Google's increasingly complicated systems worked. We had enough homegrown technology at Google, and it worked sufficiently differently from other systems that we needed. Somebody who could help them understand like, how do I push. This into production. How do I take this live? How do I actually launch it? Make sure all the components are up and ready to go. As Google grew. The company became more and more difficult for newcomers the navigate their small teams could develop products quickly, but every person had a narrow view. This structural challenge didn't go unnoticed by Google co, founder Larry page. He did a tour of other more stylish companies to see how they were organized, like all these companies, the kinda look like we do except the odd this thing called product management, which we don't really have Larry soon realized that they actually did have product managers. They just didn't have a name for them yet. But we do have is we have solar, Susan, Marissa, that's solar common gar and Susan will just key who's now CEO of YouTube, all tend to do things kind of all across the company and their job titles don't really fit what they do, and he's like, and so they're kind of our product managers. And then they were like, wait your software engineer, but you're. Doing all this feature specification and testing and helping people launch and all the procedural elements working with marketing and PR. And everybody's saying, no, this new thing is going to appear customer care. That is right in the sweet spot of product management. We just didn't know that that's what we were really doing as the company grew. Increasingly complex was a new imperative. They needed more of these product managers, people with minds, nimble enough to cover any every aspect of Google's rapidly increasing range of products and who could quickly achieve the same impressive level of mastery that Marissa's salary and Susan commanded, but how could they get them? It reminds me of that classic John whose film weird science. Just need to tweak the tagline from two high school nerves attempt to create the perfect woman. But she turns out to be much more than that to a bunch of Silicon Valley nerds attempt to create an army product managers, but they turn out to be much more than them. We don't have enough product managers, but maybe we can make some ourselves using our computers. They wouldn't be real. They just be two-dimensional simulations unless unless electrodes to the dolls and hope Bray, highly unlikely yet convenient, lightening strike hit the computer at data of improbable, movie magic. Let's get to work. We need them to be fifty percent coating, Liz fifty, percents genius. Nikki percent design guru..

Google Susan Melissa Larry page Orissa Marissa URS Liz fifty Bray YouTube software engineer founder CEO John fifty percent
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Now VPN oath to his apartment in San Francisco and said, okay, I've got all these offer letters pulled all the values for all of the different columns off of these offer letters. So you know, salaries stock where it was career trajectory promotion, ability, happiness questions, the drop charts and plotted graphs. They buried their heads in the numbers after six hours training data, Mercer looked up to see the sun had set her head was spinning, and she felt no closer to a decision. Andre just loves were count, problems like that in turn was like, well, this has been really fun. And he's like, you know, thank you so much for involving. And I was like, like I've made a decision. This hasn't been fun for me at all. Like I'm completely overwhelmed. So he's like, go to bed sleep on it. The first thing you think of tomorrow morning, whether you can articulate it or not, that's the right decision. And so that is high. They picked Google. I went to sleep woke up the next morning and I just wanted to work at Google for a lot of the reasons I could articulated them for a bunch of other reasons that were harder to articulate the fact that I felt like the smartest people were there, and I felt really unprepared to try and do what they wanted to do overall as a company, right? They were really am bishops. And for all those reasons I picked, Melissa is well known for her intense use of data when she makes decisions. Indeed, it has been the target of much criticism, but would people overlook is that she's not making choices based solely on the data. She collects each table of data. She bills is like a diving board. The higher she built it. Why. The view and the bigger the splash when she jumps. But whether she actually takes that dive or not, that's still based on intuition. I liked to be really data driven by ignore is sort of the human instinct element. I bet which you know for me by process a lotta times roll around in the data I get to know in really understand it really well, and then make a gut based call which is often supported by data and a lot of hard to articulate factors as well. Informed intuition is actually think a good way of making decisions. Yes. So Marissa, took the plunge and became Google employee number twenty. She soon found herself working cross a whole host of projects. She started looking to hire a systems engineer to take some of the pressure off, but this being Google, then you would need it nearly impossible exotic range of skills. They'd be knowledge in artificial intelligence for building out goals, complex search algorithms, and they'd also need to know about design so they could work on Google's front end. The part that user saw it wasn't an easy higher. The actually had the job is crucial for four months, and we failed to find anyone interviewed a bunch of people. But frankly, at that point, everyone else's startup was more promising than Google was very hard to extract people from other companies. BRUCE'S boss the time was VP of engineering Jose and urge realized they wasn't going to find somebody with that rare combination of skills. So we decided to make the right person and he didn't have to look far for his candidate. He told him Orissa that she was the person for the job site, but I looked at everyone's resumes and you had this thing in your background about cognitive psychology and how people learn and thinking it. So you're probably our closest match..

Google Melissa Marissa Andre San Francisco Mercer Orissa VP of engineering Jose BRUCE systems engineer four months six hours
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Men go forth and find young promising talent guide them in developing their powers and four them into a close knit squad will always have each other's backs if you do it right, you'll create a formidable force and their achievements or echo throughout your company. And beyond. This is one of the untold stories about many companies that have changed the world. These companies needed a higher for roles that had never existed before they couldn't always find the people they needed. So they made them instead. And these people in turn made the companies what they became. I wanted to talk to Mercer Mayer about this because Google she created one of the companies leashed known, secret weapons, the program that hired and trained Google's product managers. You may not have heard of the associate product manager program, but it's one of Google's crown jewels alongside search and g mail. And I would argue that it sits at the root of ghouls success. Mercer self is one of silicon valley's more famous names. She joined Google as employee number twenty, and their first female engineer. After thirteen years ago goal, she moved on to become Yahoos eighth and final CEO. Her time at Yahoo was controversial and we'll talk about that, but we're going to start at. The beginning. Russell is still a college student, and Google was one of the thousand teeny Silicon Valley startups competing for talent due to a long distance relationship in a bad bowl of pasta. I was in my dorm room on a Friday night, and I told myself if anyone else meals, you another job like you, you just have to pick you up. Thirteen good offers like you just have to pick one just that moment. Another Email popped up on screen. The subject line was just three words work at Google. He came in late on this Friday night and said, like work at Google, and I remember looking down and being like this bowl of pasta is so bad, and I am so pathetic. Probably ninety Basta. Remember this is nineteen ninety nine the peak of the dot.

Google Mercer Mayer Yahoos associate product manager Yahoo CEO engineer Russell thirteen years
"marissa mayer." Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Go after construction let's go after education let's go after healthcare and if those take longer to me that's totally fine i mean we mentioned i are all we mentioned rutan's we discussed my investing concerns that you've appease them say thank you so much for that but i'm intrigued because as i said huge fan of the incredible angel pool for new bill from what graham to incredible atrium and justin many more fantastic companies but i'm interested what she thinks the cool benefits to found his antibody angel investing some very proactive about supporting founders from the perspective in some say that it's actually detrimental to them defoe casses them how do you think about the pros and cons yeah i can't imagine at least from my experience that they're really too many hawn's outside of potentially losing your money but the reason i angell invest is not because i'm hoping to make a return i've been lucky to be a bunch of great companies but the truth is the reason i adl invest is to the first is to pay it forward and i think that there's almost a moral obligation in this community to do so right so one of the angel investors in way the was marissa mayer now maybe was a surge company at the time ran search at google and i was thinking how absurd is this industry where the person that i would pay some obscene amount of money just to sit down with and yet they're advice where she gives me money and then i get vicar break and i was thinking wait this makes no sense even wavy was the next google i'm not going to change marissa's lifestyle right you obviously has done well herself so then you have to start asking yourself why is she doing what's in it for her you start to realize that she's paying four in the same way that people helped her out end does the same way people helped me out when i was getting started i should continue to help other people out nurse tons and tons of entrepreneurs out there that are still kind of getting the hang of things maybe aren't the best if fundraising don't out of play the game but honestly that little one leg up makes an enormous difference to them and then hope.

rutan graham hawn marissa mayer google justin defoe
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Katie Couric

Katie Couric

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Katie Couric

"Constantly being questioned right you cannot freedom of speech is one thing but it can't come at the expense of the freedom of speech of others and so to play devil's advocate for a second does everybody working at google the thousands of people working google do they all have to share google's ideology and views on every issue i understand if somebody is you know outright racist i mean maybe you would argue that damore is outright sexist but where do you draw the line between unpopular views and views so awful that we have to get rid of this person i do think we need to create safe spaces for people to talk about this and if we want people to listen if i want people to listen to me i have to be willing to listen to them but i don't think that necessarily sharing those kinds of us in a company wide memo is the best approach mo in your book you tell one other instructive story about google that in its early years sergei and larry the founders hired lots of women for leadership positions mercer mayer shirl sandberg susan widget ski but now women make up only about twenty percent of the key tech positions there so what happened well they lost focus but the really important lesson that i wanted to tell or that i wanted to share is that they in the early days put this emphasis on hiring women and got these incredible women who you know susan conceived the ad business cheryl scaled the ad business marissa mayer designed the minimalist you know user interface that we all use when we interact with google to this day and they were critical to make google success we sorta think google was destined to succeed because it was the first to future but in fact there were like a dozen or more other search engines at the time that were competing to be that one and google broke away from the pack in part because of the diversity that they had at the table but that's not the story that is told.

google marissa mayer sergei mercer mayer susan twenty percent
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Breach

Breach

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Breach

"I mean bob when we started all this a hack seemed super technical heck still seems super technical but actually it's kind of really humid you're company is only as secure as the worst trained person on your entire staff so if we're marissa or the team were under tremendous pressure to turn around in aging organization right we're fighting constant fires losing search to google losing talent to google and facebook or successfully rebuilding new awardwinning apps that apple stops using we're also under this immense microscope as this young new female ceo marissa mayer in silicon valley she can't blow it she has to turn around dine company with great ideas that might have totally worked like twelve years ago we're working with an older giant vulnerable security system and security infrastructure were up against an entire nation state and an endless line of hackers who's only only job is to attack relentlessly until they find one tiny weakness and we're working against human nature on top of all of this bob working against human nature depending on thousands of employees to remain constantly vigilant twenty four seven and not quickly even if they look completely secure like an interoffice memo or they're recovering pass for an email i mean they're up against a lot i have a metaphor that i love to us for this problem of course you do when i used to have a backyard i had a fence around my backyard which was great because i could let the dog hang out in my backyard while i was at work and that worked for like a day and then the dog found a way through the fence and then i patched the hole in the fence and that works for like a day and then the dog found another hole through the fence and this routine went on for several weeks and it made me think about computer hacking because while i'm at work doing my job my dog spending every second of his day walking around the perimeter of my yard looking for a way out he has nothing else to do with his time and his inventive dog brain figuring out one little spot that he can squeeze through that's what computer hackers are we're all trying to work we've got other stuff to do this is no no company's top priorities security you're just trying to do a good enough so you can get on with your life hackers are bored.

marissa mayer google facebook apple ceo twelve years
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Breach

Breach

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Breach

"Like you'll say yahoo when you find whatever military email you need you'll say ultimately what were the consequences for marissa mayer did she accomplish what she hoped to accomplish at yahoo by any conventional measure she has had a remarkably successful career she was one of the youngest if not the youngest fortune five hundred ceos at the time she was pregnant woman taking the job these are remarkable things ultimately i think her goal was accomplished she was trying to do as much as she could to make it attractive to a big name acquirer and i think that's exactly what she did and fortunately on the back side of things things were really messy and and then meantime they were like basically giving away their customer information to the russian government very well said she made the company more valuable than it was when she walked in the door and she was able to sell it off and wall street does keep score on the scoreboard she won everyone walked away with millions of dollars not everyone but she did in the the people who hired her did so yeah that they would think of it as a success do you think marissa would think it was a success knowing what i know about her i really doubt it it's actually not fun to run a company and sell out the people who owned companies want to cash out the people who run companies want them to succeed on their own there's an idea out there which is subscribed to which is that companies have a life cycle they come out and they solve a problem when they grow really fast and then at some point growth is over and they turn into a prophet creating machine at that point you don't need a visionary leader singlemindedly focused on building an engineering new things you need a finance person in maintenance mode and mercer mayer it was not someone who's ever going to go in and want to optimize yahu that's just not how she's programs she was someone who went into google and helped build amazing things like g mail and google maps and also google search nncholas gives her credit for doing an okay job navigating yahoo through its sale and selling off pieces of alibaba but it's not what she went in there to do and by her own standards i think she failed.

yahoo marissa mayer russian government google mercer mayer alibaba
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Breach

Breach

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Breach

"And they're stepping in for the final catastrophic finale of the story is marissa mayer a character in her own right ruth myers that to nncholas my fellow marissa mayer fan girl she is someone who has gone out and industry where they're not allowed to women it's done extremely well and then a real role model for a lot of people like mersa was this woman who started at stanford is wanting to become a brain surgeon than that essentially was too boring for her she's google employee number twenty and she realizes that she's not a coder but she's really good at user interface and she's really really good at design one of the best thing she ever did at google is these days you go to google and it's not just a a list of blue links she's someone who said we can do better than that it should have the weather if you type in your zip code and weather she also was a big player when it came to cocoa maps especially the app on the phone and g mail and google minimalist aesthetic was her san era font and colors were hurt interface was her google looks and feels the way it does because of her she redesigned that page and made it more information rich and arguably made it a better consumer experience and elevated the game with the company so that it's threes in it's big and popular as it is today as a lot to do with her but mercy's marvi user interface person not a software engineer and nncholas explains that eventually there's some kind of showdown over who gets to control the future of google search interface versus engineering and the engineers one so some say murdersuicide line to google for her last few years but her reputation was still solid gold mercer mayer had an incredible reputation going in the i who well okay i had to reputations going in the i who one of them was from people inside the industry and particularly at google who had seen what she had done there which was a lot but also not as much as she was given credit for on the outside world and then there was another reputation which was.

ruth myers stanford google software engineer nncholas marissa mayer
"marissa mayer." Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"marissa mayer." Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Alex name oh himself pushed back on this news tweeting that quote despite the rumors i'm still fully engaged with my work at facebook it's true that my role did change i'm currently spending more time exploring emerging security risks and working on election security and quote and facebook issued what slates april glaser called a non denial denial saying quote alex stamos continues to be the chief security officer at facebook he has held the position for nearly three years and leads our security efforts especially around emerging security risks and quote so why is it interesting that a facebook executive you've never heard of is stepping down from facebook will clearly the timing on this news is interesting given the cambridge analytic controversy over the last several days several outlets are reporting that in two thousand seventeen facebook security team which stamos headed uncovered evidence of russian meddling on facebook but when stamos was pressured to downplay his findings tensions mounted between stamos and the executives he reported to recode reports that stay most lost his day to day role overseeing facebook's security team this past december and that he quote didn't always see eye to eye with facebook ceo sheryl sandberg about how the company should handle the aftermath of the twenty sixteen presidential election it's also interesting to note that stamos step down from another high profile security job in two thousand fourteen when he left yahoo after disagreements with ceo marissa mayer over security standards at that company.

facebook april glaser alex stamos officer executive sheryl sandberg yahoo marissa mayer cambridge ceo three years