18 Burst results for "Marisa Lagos"

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:51 min | 6 months ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's KQED news. I'm terrorists. Tyler House Democrats today nominated San Francisco representative Nancy Pelosi to serve as speaker. If elected by the full House in January. It would mark her fourth term as House leader. KQED politics correspondent Marisa Lagos joins us to talk about what challenges may lie ahead for Pelosi. And Marissa. Unlike her last nomination to this post, No one challenged Pelosi this time around even after losing some seats this year to the GOP is that surprising? I don't think so. I mean, we are always seeing some turmoil within this Democratic caucus divisions between the more moderates who have a harder time defending their seats against Republicans and progressives who want to go further. But the truth is, I think Pelosi is in a pretty masterful job at navigating that on day. She's also promised to step down in two years. So I think that What we're seeing is going to be kind of a new phase in the challenges for Pelosi, but not one that's necessarily going to entirely becoming from her own house, and she's still going to need 218 votes on the House floor. Is she gonna have any trouble getting that? I don't you Well, I think there may be a couple not wanting to vote for her today. But if she can let a couple members lay off of that vote she may allow them to, But the truth is, you know, these folks are gonna be up for another two years. And that may be the least of their worries. By the time they're back on the ballot, right and 12 races are still outstanding, including two here in California. Republicans. Basically when all the tossup district's How does that reflect on Pelosi? I mean, it's not great. If you look at the hideaway, the national media has been covering it. There's a lot of hand wringing over whether the expectations by Pelosi and others of her deputies were overstated in terms of what they could do, But in some ways, I mean, we were on the same boat. We were all looking at the same polling. I think that many of those district's that Republicans were able To capture are truly purple district there Swing district. I'll tell you Terra, a couple of those cases down in Orange County, where Republicans with those seats, I think we're going to continue to see every two years. Those being real battles and the heads of both the Democratic and Republican Party in California agree with that assessment, and they don't always agree on a lot. Yeah, Pelosi, you know has been a very Formidable foe of President Trump's. How do you see her role changing now that she's on the same side as the incoming president? I mean, her number one job again is to keep her caucus together and to defend them. And so I think that that doesn't change. To some extent. The question Mark, of course, is the Senate and whether Democrats can take control there, which will make her job a lot easier if we are in a position where Democrats have both houses, and they're actually debating a green new deal. I think that there might be situations where you see some of those moderate Democrats peel off Truthfully, I think it's going to be a much more challenging situation. On the other side of the Capitol, Marissa Pelosi has promised to step down as speaker after another two years. What do you think's next for the party and who might take her place? Well, given the age of Speaker Pelosi and her top deputies. Steny Hoyer is 81 James Clyburn's 80. I think that we will see, hopefully Ah younger leadership coming up. Folks like Hakeem Jeffries from New York have been rumored to be in waiting for her position. I do think we're going to see a big fight, but at the end of the day, this is a party that is going to need another steady hand and somebody who's able To bring together these warring factions and having covered her for a while. I have a sense that Nancy Pelosi is kind of looking out at her caucus and is going to help hand pick or at least try to whoever her successor will be Thanks so much, Marissa. My pleasure. KQED politics Correspondent Marie Salah goes and I'm terrorist Tyler KQED news..

Nancy Pelosi Marissa Pelosi KQED Republican Party Tyler KQED House Hakeem Jeffries San Francisco Trump California president representative Marisa Lagos Orange County Steny Hoyer Marissa GOP Marie Salah
Activists push for the release of vulnerable inmates from prisons amid Coronavirus concerns

All Things Considered

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Activists push for the release of vulnerable inmates from prisons amid Coronavirus concerns

"For the first time an inmate in California's prison system has tested positive for carbon nineteen five prison workers around the state have also tested positive none at the same institution as the inmate keeping the corona virus pandemic under control require social distancing and individual sanitation that are hard to accomplish in prison earlier today KQED's Marisa Lagos spoke with Scott Kernan the former chief of the California department of corrections and rehabilitation she asked current and what needs to be done to protect prisoners from a massive virus outbreak well I think it's inevitable given you know the extent of the virus across the world I think it's it's inevitable that it's going to take off in the presence of Saddam if you think you have ships are Petri dish that prisons are even more so than mass humanities so I'm you know very concerned about my colleagues in the inmates and their families jails and prisons across the country yeah I mean we know particularly in California our prisons are overcrowded there at about hundred and thirty percent of capacity I we've seen some civil rights groups I make some pretty strong calls for more than a week for the governor can to consider releasing people who already have release dates in the coming weeks and months they've also like to see people who are older than sixty five or medically vulnerable get released do you support these types of efforts well I I think they should you know Dennis if you're not overreacting and reacting to the extent of the crisis I think they ought to be looking at all options to reduce density nine inch your point about a hundred thirty percent of our product well that's true in the overall system in the prisons including a women's prisons for example are are upwards of a hundred fifty hundred sixty percent overcrowded you mentioned you know the facts that we have program suspended in jails you know if people are limited and movements even if they're not infected because they're trying to to make sure that people don't spread this what kind of safety and mental health concerns do you have because if we're looking at extended periods of these kind of walk downs we see riots or other of people there's no doubt that the potential for unrest as there is people are not confined to the course without control we know that across the system in the inmates are talking about on rafts we've seen some tangible evidence of the inmates not going to find for a medical officials in our jails after sex because they don't want to be quarantined it is a complex system what about more broadly than that the medical system in the inadequate medical care was the reason essentially that the court stepped in and and including the Supreme Court we have made some strides in that area but how confident are you that our prison medical system can handle an onslaught of these case as well you know I I I think we have some of the best correctional medical and mental health professionals in the country that may be a little biased from experience it's not given to any given day there to stress to the Max to provide court required services to the population I just got to believe that as a system progresses that they're going to be even stressed to the Max yeah we hear about hospitals and you know potentially over one well in a lot of inmates thousands in fact go out for for their medical care into to our hospitals so there's there's some logistical issues that are going on all of these jails and prisons including she she are that are that are very worst that's former CDC are director Scott Kernan speaking with KQED's Marisa

California
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Newsroom and then at ten o'clock check please and. Tonight at ten thirty program called. Making contact the stage is set, for a battle between two world views is housing a, human right or a commodity and we're on. That continuum is California's common. Ground making contact looks at. The fight over rent control and police policies that affect the homeless that's. Tonight at ten. Thirty making contact mostly cloudy some coastal fog tomorrow morning but then we'll. Have sunshine it'll be breezy day. Should get up. To ninety and Livermore eighty-five tomorrow in San Jose Eighty-five in concord excuse me eighty five, and Napa as well and, here in San Francisco it. Should reach sixty eight k. q. e. d. FM San Francisco k. q. FM north highlands Tonight on newsroom the weeks major developments. In politics including how California lawmakers are reacting to the Trump Putin. Summit, and the walking cleanup. Bill for last. Balls north bay wildfires is raising concerns. About greed. And lack of oversight plus how. Climate change is feeling this, intense and damaging California's environment Hello and welcome to newsroom I'm we do we begin with politics There's continuing confusion over what. Was said during, President Trump's to private, meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday in Helsinki after initially saying he. Did, not believe, Russia had interfered in American elections President Trump later told CBS news he had been. Firm with Mr Putin about, not putting up with such interference the shifting statements from the president you condemnation from top Democrats and some Republicans, then on Thursday the. White House said President Trump well, invites Putin for, a second, meeting in Washington DC this fall, meanwhile in California the state, Democratic Party, snubbed Senator Dianne Feinstein by endorsing her rival, Kevin daily own in this November's, general election the move comes as Feinstein prepares to take a leading role in the looming partisan battle over. Confirming supreme court nominee red Cavanaugh journey now to discuss all of. This our political reporter Marisa Lagos San Francisco Chronicle senior political writer. Job, fully and political consultant. Sean Walsh welcome..

Vladimir Putin California president Trump San Francisco San Francisco Chronicle Senator Dianne Feinstein red Cavanaugh Livermore Sean Walsh Marisa Lagos San Jose Russia White House consultant CBS reporter Helsinki Napa
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is npr news the california report is up next after a quick check of the roads from joe we are north one of south 101 add golf course in this perkier there's a report of a crash that sheriff it's blocking anything just happened in the baybridge a new crash reported west met at the west and at fremont street four cars acidity on the shoulder apparently at the off ramp itself the seventy crash westbound before glen cove bought a mile and a quarter before glen cove vehicle down the embankment actually of garbage truck joe mcconnell for kqed brought to you by compassion international good morning this is the california report and penny now send while we are fewer than sixty days from the start of the two thousand eighteen fire season and we have still not recovered from the fires that destroyed large parts of california in 2017 we're also still trying to learn from those fires in the northern part of our state more than forty people died kqed's marisa lagos and lisa pick off white have been investigating those fires and cinema and napa counties they spoke with the california report john sepulvado roussel let's start with your electrical problems presented in these fires and the electrical fires though that also sprung up how did those contribute to both the damage in the deaths yum so right after the fires began marie sent i filed some public record requests while sukhi lewis arco reporter was up reporting on the fires in person and one of the things that we found from those calls is that actually these electrical fire started really by four pm and by like seven you start hearing these calls every few minutes about transformers exploding like actually one on the highway 1 oon in windsor or also dislike power line arcane and then that builds the rest the night goes and so fire officials actually knew that there was a possibility the bad fire that and they were prepared because they knew that there were high wind conditions that have super dry but what they were prepared for we're all of these small fire starting all over at the same time and so every time especially there's an electrical incident it's read it a top priority because you know once power lines are down you can't drive over them and their super dangerous and so what happened is.

joe mcconnell california marisa lagos marie reporter windsor npr fremont glen cove kqed lisa napa john sepulvado roussel sixty days
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dangerous kqed's marisa lagos explains where things stand with bill reform including some legal developments in the courts so basically last year we saw some earned the last few years we saw some civil lawsuits filed challenging the constitutionality of bail those are kind of still winding their way through the court system separately the public defender in san francisco decided to essentially start appealing individual bail decisions when he thought bail was set too high or they couldn't they wouldn't set of bail at the local level and what happens is those go to the appellate court and the attorney general's office actually steps in for the district attorney to represent the people in those so normally the attorney general just kind of a rubber stamp cerdan in moves on in the district attorney carries the day exactly but under have you ever sarah who's been attorney general for about a year now they've started really looking at those cases on an individual basis and in fifteen cases since may they've reviewed them in an 11 they decided to agree with a defendant not the prosecutors that basically the lower courts didn't take into consideration things like public safety and the ability to pay and whether this person would show up in court all of which under law they're supposed to look at that significant it's huge and when it's really big is that a judge actually kind of stepped in recently on one these cases and said yeah the lower court needs to take a really strong look at this case this was a 64yearold kenneth humphrey a san francisco resident who basically was accused of stealing a bottle of cologne and anticipating a neighbor he's been in jail uh pretty indigent person under a three hundred fifty thousand dollar bail m n so basically once this order is made permanent in the next week or so this guy could be released but the bigger i think implication is this idea that both judges and prosecutors the attorney general are looking at this and saying you know what we need to like look at this on a casebycase basis and not make blanket assumptions about defendants slowed so normally this is the part of the conversation were ask your woods if the court system how's the mechanism to actually do if people do their jobs thune is there anything needed the state law.

marisa lagos san francisco kqed attorney sarah kenneth humphrey thune three hundred fifty thousand d
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And make it into a deep coach where he was trapped in fellow firefighters found iverson dead forty minutes later for the california report i'm ted goldberg a federal judge in san francisco is block the trump administration from ending daca was of course as the program that protects young immigrants brought to the us a legally as children the decision last night was the result of a legal challenge brought by california and the university of california system joining me now to discuss this as kqed's marisa lagos live in the studio good morning reset mining dan let's sort of actual ruling judge william also pure in san francisco do not tell the administration that they had to take new applicants but he did rule essentially that the existing daca recipients could be tate could not be taken off the program issued said essentially sounds like alsop says ending in this program will cause them great harm that's right and this is something that you know is set to start happening in march of this year that people could potentially be deported and yet also basically looked at the decision by the trump administration which was not sort of a mirror image of what the obama administration did in terms of like saying we looked at the policy and we don't think that this actually is is a good idea from department homeland security the hold of decision by trump was based on a recommendation by its attorney general the basically said we don't think this is legal and were basing that on a another court case that challenged a separate programme that would have actually affected parents of immigrants and so i think you know it's interesting because you have this daca program that was never actually sort of who didn't make its way to the supreme court in terms of its legality and he's kind of turning around and saying well you guys in follow procedures either jeff sessions attorney general's that it was unconstitutional president trump called this decision by.

iverson ted goldberg san francisco california marisa lagos william tate alsop obama administration trump university of california kqed attorney president forty minutes
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thomas byrne area moving on it's not surprising that california democrats are pushing back against a recent move by attorney general jeff sessions this one could result in federal prosecutions of legal marijuana business in california but opposition by a former police officer turn gop lawmaker once a different story and kqed's marisa lagos has a for us republican assemblyman tom lackey is no liberal 'akaola for an eu highway patrol men for nearly three decades he says the just five years ago he was arguing against legalising recreational marijuana but two years ago with legalisation on the horizon in california the palmdale republican joins forces with his democratic colleagues in the legislature to create a set of regulations for medical marijuana that helps set the stage for state oversight of recreational cannabis this is purely a matter pragmatic either you support be industry this trying to follow rules and to be watched over or you're supporting the black market so last may last week when us attorney general jeff sessions announced he was recinding what's known as the coal memo that was guidance issued by the obama administration that essentially told federal prosecutors to lay off law abiding cannabis businesses in states that had legalize the truck sessions move opens the door to federal prosecutions of businesses that are following california law to a t i got it will as disappointing because there could even from a republican stantsrs very detrimental outcome to uh polling look recall memo now lackey and some of his democratic colleagues in the assembly are asking for meetings with california's four us attorneys who ultimately decide whether to go after cannabis businesses lackey says he wants to tell federal officials they'd be better off partnering with california to crackdown on black market cannabis and drugs driving not getting in the way of the.

california officer marisa lagos us tom lackey marijuana cannabis jeff sessions obama administration federal prosecutors Thomas byrne gop kqed eu palmdale us attorney three decades five years two years
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"San francisco murder trial this is a case that first received national attention when donald trump than a presidential candidate used it to press his immigration steps case finally gunned down in the sanctuary city of san francisco lyon illegal immigrants deported five previous times that was trump's description and now the facts go on display the trial is expected to focus more on the murder and less on the politics as kqed's marisa lagos reports kate stanley was shot in the back she walks among the waterfront in san francisco the suspect in the case whose ans garcia's urata isn't undocumented mexican national who had recently been released from san francisco jail before that he was serving time in a federal prison for illegal reentry her death became a rallying cry for trump and others angry at socalled sri policies and liberal cities like san francisco the don't cooperate with federal immigration enforcement the district attorney spokesman maccido says prosecutors only goal is justice for the stanley family the issues for us or whether he pulled the trigger and if he did if he did so with like the defence will argue that the shooting was an accident that christie is a ratty found a gun wrapped in a tshirt and it went off as he was unwrapping the bullet ricocheted off the ground and hit stanley killing her the public defender mcintosh analyst says the murder charges political if he was not a mexican immigrant with prior felling convictions he would not be charged with this crime gonzalez will also argue it matters wear the gun came from and why it was on the streets of san francisco to begin with what both sides do agree on is that was stolen from the car of the federal park ranger who left it unsecured that ranger will be called to testify or keith stanley deaths became swept.

stanley keith stanley federal park mcintosh district attorney kate stanley kqed gonzalez analyst San francisco christie maccido urata garcia marisa lagos murder donald trump
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is the world affairs program while the shadow of violent extremism still looms large over the middle east many in and outside of iraq have started contemplating the divided nations future how can the iraqi government begin to move beyond the most recent phase of violence we'll hear from dr peter barr to expert and former advisory in middle east political transitions who had discusses the future riposte isis iraq and you can hear that conversation tonight from 8 till 9 o'clock with another rearing tomorrow morning at to here on kqed sunny and warm today we'll have highest from the low 80s of the coast to the low 90s inland at kqed public radio the time is now 551 this is the california report good morning i'm john sepulvado over the next few weeks you're going to be hearing us report on a murder trial that's become a flash point the debate over immigration the victim is catherine steinle she was killed in san francisco and by all accounts sally was a smart generous warm and giving person now part is really forward but how she died the person accused of killing her and the ensuing political fallout is much more complicated kqed's marisa lagos and alex emslie are covering the trial and they're here with us right now in alex let's start with you tell us about the alleged killer in this crime soho say in as garcia's iraq day is this indigent mexican national coups in the country illegally he was in the country illegally and had been he had a repeat history of that as for the crime it's not disputed by any of the parties that are both catherine stein lee and the defendant were on pure fourteen in san francisco on the waterfront and the defense's arguing any way that jose in as garcia's iraq didn't have this gone up until judge before the shooting he found it picked it up wrapped in some kind.

iraq iraqi government dr peter barr john sepulvado san francisco marisa lagos alex emslie catherine stein lee jose garcia kqed california murder sally
"marisa lagos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A san francisco murder trial this is a case that first received national attention when donald trump that a presidential candidate used it to press his immigration stats case finally done down in the sanctuary city of san francisco by an illegal immigrant deported five previews times that was trump's description and now the facts go on display the trial is expected to focus more on the murder and less on the politics as kqed's marisa lagos reports kate stanley was shot in the back as she walked along the waterfront in san francisco the 'spect in the case whose an as garcia's urata is an undocumented mexican national who had recently been released from san francisco jail before that he was serving time in a federal prison for illegal reentry her death became a rallying cry for trump and others angry at socalled sanctuary policies and liberal cities like san francisco the do don't cooperate with federal immigration enforcement the district attorney spokesman maccido says prosecutors only goal is justice for the stanley family the issues for us or whether he pulled the trigger and if he did if he did so with applied the defence will argue that the shooting was an accident that garcia's aratu found a gone wrapped in a tshirt and it went off as he was unwrapping the bullet ricocheted off the ground and hit stanley killing her but public defender mcintosh analyst says the murder charges political if he was not a mexican immigrant with prayer felony convictions he would not be charged with this crime gonzales will also argue it matters way are the gun came from and why it was on the streets of san francisco to begin with what both sides do agree on is that it was stolen from the car of the federal park ranger who left it unsecured that ranger will be called to testify locate silently staff became swept up in the presidential campaign jour's aren't being asked to consider the political question ntt's they'll just decide if garcia suratis guilty of murder the trial is expected to last about a month for npr news i'm marie salah ghosts in san francisco woo ooh this is.

kqed marie salah npr garcia suratis presidential campaign federal park mcintosh district attorney kate stanley donald trump gonzales analyst stanley maccido marisa lagos murder san francisco
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A san francisco murder trial this is a case that first received national attention when donald trump than a presidential candidate used it to press his immigration stance cates styling done down in the sanctuary city of san francisco lyon illegal emigrants deported five previous times that was trump's description and now the facts go on display the trial is expected to focus more on the murder and less on the politics as kqed's marisa lagos reports kate stanley was shot in the back as she walked among the waterfront in san francisco the suspect in the case whose an as garcia's urata isn't undocumented mexican national who'd recently been released from san francisco jail before that he was serving time in a federal prison for illegal reentry her death became a rallying cry for trump and others angry at socalled sanctuary policies and liberal cities like see infants scout the don't cooperate with federal immigration enforcement the district attorney spokesman maccido says prosecutors only goal is justice for the stanley family the issues for us or know whether he pulled the trigger if he did if he did so with the defence will argue that the shooting was an accident that christie is erratic found a gun wrapped in a tshirt and it went off as he was unwrapping the bullet ricocheted off the ground and hit stanley killing her but public defender mcintosh analyst says the murder charges political if he was not a mexican immigrant with prior felling conviction since he would not be charged with this crime gonzales will also argue it matters where the gun came from and why it was on the streets of san francisco to begin with what both sides do agree on is that it was stolen from the car of the federal park ranger who left it unsecured that ranger will be called to testify while kate stanley desk became swept up in the presidential campaign jurors aren't being asked to consider the political questions though just decide if garcia suratis guilty of murder the trial is expected to last about a month for npr news i'm marie salah ghosts in san francisco ooh ooh this is npr news.

cates npr marie salah garcia suratis presidential campaign federal park mcintosh district attorney kate stanley kqed donald trump gonzales analyst stanley christie maccido urata san francisco marisa lagos murder
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A 32yearold white woman was fatally shot while walking with her father along san francisco's waterfront within hours police arrested a mexican national in connection with her slaying who he is changed the case from a local murder into a national controversy 32yearold mistakenly was murdered walking with her father in san francisco guy by the way has a twenty five year history of felony by a criminal alien who had been deported five t more kate styling be alive today had the city sanctuary policy not been in place san francisco was no sanctuary for kate no sanctuary for that beautiful thirty two year old woman with a murder trial about to begin kqed's marisa lagos and alex emslie unpack the facts and falsehoods surrounding the slaying of catherine stein leap in the debate eight it ignited for the judge attorneys and jurors the trial that is about to take place in courtly 13 at san francisco hall of justice is straightforward district attorney spokesman max szabo says it's a simple murder case visas for us or whether he pulled the sugar and if he did if he does so with implied calls defense attorney mac and zaal as says stein lee shooting was an accident but the charges are political if he was not a mix of the immigrant with prior filling convictions he would not be charged with his crime whether stein lease death was the result of a freak accident or a vicious disregard for human life that's what the cases about but across the nation a different argument is playing out whether stylings death had less to do with a stolen guns being fired in a public place and more to do with the immigration status of the man accused of killing her president donald trump has repeatedly invoked the case case finally gunned down in the sanctuary city of san francisco by an illegal immigrant deported five previous times it wasn't just trump stylist murder played into a narrative of evil emigrants shielded by liberals sanctuary cities like san francisco to understand the case and its broader implications you have.

san francisco murder marisa lagos max szabo donald trump kqed alex emslie catherine stein san francisco hall of justice district attorney attorney stein lee president twenty five year thirty two year
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The listeners of kqed it's now twenty three minutes past six it's morning edition on kqed i'm brian watt on july 1st 2015 a 32yearold white woman was fatally shot while walking with her father along san francisco's waterfront within hours police arrested a mexican national in connection with her slaying who he is changed the case from a local murder into a national controversy 32yearold mistakenly was murdered walking with her father in safran such a guy by the way has a twenty five year history how any criminal aliens who had been deported five t would kate styling be alive today had the city sanctuary policy not been in place san francisco was no sanctuary for kate no sanctuary for that beautiful thirty two year old woman with a murder trial of vowed to begin kqed's marisa lagos in alex emslie unpacked the facts and falsehoods surrounding the slaying of catherine stein late in the day eight it ignited for the judge attorneys and jurors the trial that's about to take place in courtly 13 at san francisco hall of justice is straightforward district attorney spokesman mac szabo says it's a simple murder case v use for us or you know whether he pulled the trigger and if he did if he did so with applied appliance defense attorney mac consol as says stein lee shooting was an accident but the charges are political if he was not mexa the immigrant with prayer filling convictions he would not be charged with his crime whether stein lease death was the result of a freak accident or a vicious disregard for human life that's what the cases about but across the nation at different argument is playing out whether stylings death had less to do with a stolen guns being fired in a public place and more to do with the immigration status of the man accused of killing her president donald trump has repeatedly invoked the case case finally gunned down in the sanctuary city of san francisco by an illegal immigrant deported five previous times it wasn't just trump silas murder played into a narrative of evil immigrants shielded by liberal sanctuary cities like san francisco to understand the.

brian watt san francisco murder marisa lagos alex emslie catherine stein mac szabo donald trump kqed san francisco hall of justice district attorney attorney stein lee president silas twenty three minutes twenty five year thirty two year
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That the newest problem in santa rosa 101 southbound before todd crash car ars looks like the reveal the shoulder already though and the nimitz freeway in oakland it heavy southbound south the sixty barca dear old crash and that would acidity of the left lane and also in oakland and 24 westbound at college crash there baybridge backup on 580 back to highway 24 joe mcconnell for kqed brought to you on kqed by mothers against drunk driving this is the california report good morning i'm john sepulvado we begin in sacramento governor jerry brown on thursday set have perhaps the biggest confrontation yet between california and president donald trump when he signed a bill that will make california a socalled sanctuary state kqed's marisa lagos reports the new law has been a priority have democrats led by senate president kevin daily own since trump's election last year daily on lashed out at the president thursday as he celebrated brown signature california is building a wall a wall of justice against president trump's xenophobic racists and ignorance immigration policies senate bill 54 will build on protections california already offers undocumented immigrants by severely limiting when local police can work with immigration and customs enforcement after amendments demanded by the governor the law stopped short of an allout ban on cooperating with ice but it does bar local jails from holding some one at the request of immigration agents and it only allows police to tell ice when someone is going to be released from jail if that person has been convicted of a serious crime in the past 15 years police reaction has been mixed with some groups supporting the law and others including sheriff's critical trump has moved to cut off federal law enforcement funds from cities was sanctuary policies and his administration slammed the new law thursday white house spokeswoman sarah huckabee sanders had this to say i hope that california will push back on their governors i think irresponsible decision move a justice department official told kqed the law undermines public safety and national security for the california report i'm marie salah us belly killings have their home opener last night against the philadelphia flyers normally the start of hockey season is a party but molly peterson reports that the normal pomp that comes with the first drop.

molly peterson hockey philadelphia sarah huckabee sanders white house federal law enforcement kevin senate jerry brown sacramento kqed santa rosa marie salah official marisa lagos donald trump president california john sepulvado joe mcconnell oakland 15 years
"marisa lagos" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Heaven gave the names warrior when he returned thirtyfouryearold hartfield was also a sixteen year army veteran who served in iraq a youth mentor in a football coach weeks after hurricane erma tropical storm nate is on track to strike the us gulf coast nate is already blamed for at least twenty two deaths in central america it is expected to be a category one hurricane by the time it reaches the us this weekend a state of emergency has been declared in louisiana in california governor jerry brown is rebuking the trump administration by signing legislation that makes his entire state a sanctuary for undocumented residence as kqed's marisa lagos reports the statute bars most cooperation between local police and federal immigration authorities senate bill 54 places severe limits on when california police can work with immigration and customs enforcement that includes an allout ban on holding suspected undocumented immigrants at the request of ice senate president kevin daily own wrote the bell calfornian simply will not divert its precious public safety assets to stock lawabiding immigrants and undermine the safety in our communities in the process but the trump administration has stated it will strip federal law enforcement grants from governments that enact these so called sanctuary policies in a statement a spokesman for the department of justice says the law undermines public safety and national security for npr news i'm marie salah ghosts in san francisco this is npr news the trump administration estimates that nearly a quarter of young immigrants who were shielded from deportation are no longer eligible for protection more than one hundred fifty thousand people in the deferred action for childhood arrivals program or daca had until yesterday to reapply to the program the department of homeland security says only one hundred eighteen thousand met the deadline immigrant rights groups are suing to stop the administration from ending daca with the roads most recent case filed yesterday in maryland.

football department of homeland securit marie salah npr department of justice federal law enforcement kevin daily senate kqed jerry brown california nate iraq army maryland san francisco president marisa lagos louisiana america us sixteen year
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In a salons bathroom while to crash shot and killed his best friend laura wet on the other side of the door i want you to know that i am haunted by the whisper of her last to cry apologize to the victims in court saying he wished he could turn back time last month orange county judge thomas klestil's ruled out the death penalty for decry because of prosecutorial misconduct during the crisis sentencing coastal told victim's families that orange county's criminal justice system had largely failed them for the california your report i'm joe wrecked level in orange county the two democratic lawmakers who have been pushing for reforms to california's bay all system are now looking for a peek behind the curtain and how the bill industry operates kqed's marisa lagos reports assemblyman rabhan too and senator bob hertzberg still think bail punishes people for being poor and they still want to fundamentally change how california decides whether to let people accused of crimes out of jail before their trial but with that legislation on hold until next year there now also looking to learn more about the insurance companies that work with bailbond agents hertzberg says the more he's learned about bail the more questions he has a people being gouged is the government created monopolies creating these crazy prices before we go any further here's a little background when someone in california is arrested and charged with a crime a judge often sets a bail amount they must pay in order to get out of jail if the defendant doesn't have the money they can pay a fee to a bailbond agent who essentially promises the court they'll pay the full bail amount if the defendants gifts out on court those bail agents are backed by insurance companies hertzberg in bonte say they want to know more about those under the radar insurance companies they wrote a bill that would require more over site of both bail agents and charity companies and asked the department of insurance to steady the industry geoff clayton represents the insurance companies he's a lobbyist for the american bail coalition and he says he's baffled by the bell we already do a lot of stuff it's an spill we audit our aging regularly elise annually or required.

prosecutorial misconduct orange county california senator bob hertzberg insurance companies bonte geoff clayton laura thomas klestil kqed marisa lagos
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The other side of the door i want you to know that haunted by the whisperer last decry apologize to the victims in court saying he wished he could turn back times last month orange county judge thomas dourthe also ruled out the death penalty for decry because f prosecutorial misconduct during the crisis since inc oth those told victim's families that orange county's criminal justice system had largely failed dan for the kalfa your report i'm joe wrath local in orange county the two democratic lawmakers who have been pushing for reforms to california's bay hill system are now looking for a peek behind the curtain and how the bill industry operates kqed's marisa lagos reports assemblyman rob bonte and senator bob hertzberg still think bail punishes people for being poor and they still want to fundamentally change how california decides whether to let people accused of crimes out of jail before their trial but with that legislation on hold until next year there now also looking to learn more about the insurance companies that work with bailbond agents hertzberg says the more he's learned about bail the more your questions he has a people being gouged is the government created monopolies creating these crazy prices before we go any further here's a little background when someone in california is arrested and charged with a crime a judge often set a bail amount they must pay in order to get out of jail if the defendant doesn't have the money they can pay a fee to a bail bond agent who essentially promises the court they'll pay the full bail amount if the defendant skips out on court those bail agents are backed by insurance companies hertzberg and bond to say they want to know more about those under the radar insurance companies they wrote a bill that would require more over site of both bail agents insured he can anthony is and asked the department of insurance to steady the industry geoff clayton represents the insurance companies he's a lobbyist for the american bail coalition and he says he's baffled by the bell we already do a lot of stuff it's an spill we audit or agents regularly at least annually or required to buy by all form with the department of insurance we terminate somebody in if misconduct we have to tell the department so you know i'm really kind of confused.

prosecutorial misconduct orange county joe wrath california bob hertzberg insurance companies geoff clayton thomas dourthe dan kqed marisa lagos rob bonte senator anthony department of insurance
"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"marisa lagos" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is npr news it's kqed news i'm eric king with two undocumented students at a side california attorney general have you ever serra announced california is suing the trump administration for indian deferred action for childhood arrivals program that allows undocumented young adults brought his children to remain in the us to work and study they don't know if doing this publicly is putting them in further payroll or not everything you value could be on the line i don't think any of us ever has to worry about that california's lawsuit is now the third lawsuit fighting the daca repeal kqed's marisa lagos from our politics and government death joins us now with some legal analysis it congress has six months to pass legislation that could save the daca program or introduce a new program why did this state attorney general have you ever sarah file now i mean i think there's kind of two things at play here first of all there's the idea that democrats like the sara and quite frankly a lot of republicans would light congress to act and to step in and expand this program so protecting daca is one part but protecting the information of the folks in this program and their families is another big part of this lawsuit and the other ones one of the sort of main courses of action here's this question of due process something called equitable stop all in legal terms essentially saying that if i give you information and you have made a promise to me about something you can't than turnaround and use that to harm me and in this case you have hundreds of thousands of dreamers who not only gave their own personal information but information about their parents who are undocumented to the government and what the sara and others wanted c is that that information remains protected whatever congress does that the trump administration doesn't hand that over to their own immigration and customs enforcement division and have them use it to deport people so how is this state law suit different from the other ones that were filed by new york and washington last week even the university of california felt went so in a few words they're not that different i would say that some of this has to do with town at the new york attorney general really focused a lot on what he perceives as the president animus towards mexicans on latinos he quoted the some.

eric king california us marisa lagos sara congress new york washington npr kqed attorney serra state law university of california president six months