27 Burst results for "Marine Biology"

"marine biology" Discussed on Take 2

Take 2

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"marine biology" Discussed on Take 2

"Days in the bad stock market. You all read this story this week. About how our our life expectancy or something. Something went down. And i'm like enough already enough of you. Inventing statistics distress people out for. No i say oh. Let's hope in a little bit. It'll go up or it'll doesn't help i. I was gonna leave this topic alone but honestly there's there too in even in prison biden's announcement of the booster shot in. There was some criticism you received from the scientific community and it was. You're gonna create more vaccine hesitancy because you are implying that it's not going to last and if they get fully vaccinated they take the two shots. It's not gonna stick around. So why do it that is that is not a medical issue for me. That is they think or keeping other information away will lower the hesitancy to take the vaccine. I'm of the opinion. And i think the reason why the president said it is that he thinks more information is better and telling you that is not based on data. That's based on the approach. And i hate the sensor information to avoid hesitancy i want transparency and information to to lower has so far the. Cdc is trying in the biden administration. Didn't give trying. And i think like morissette. You're listening to numbers. You can hear them from both directions. Everyone can give you the message they want. And if you want some positive spin if there is such thing as positive spin on cova. There's an epidemiologist florida today. Who said that. In florida if you look at herd immunity which classically would be described as people who had been sick and recovered and those who had the vaccine he says it now needs to be ninety percent but because delta is spreading so quickly that by september eleventh they'll have reached herd immunity florida's. So if you want some positive spin don't variant is getting sick which therefore getting closer they say if they say the uk's example they had the delta very before we did and you saw a huge spike but they saw come down very quickly endemic. That's a new word new term for me for me and is something they say we may be phasing into where it doesn't just radically gone from the earth and endemic is there but we have a we learning ability to handle typical of you. And if you still look at the science and science changes by the day they're still saying the delta variant will it spreads much much easier and quicker and faster. I don't know that anyone's proved that it's any more deadly this point so anyhow i hope that florida doctor is right getting closer to covert good news coverage. Could this i'll to come up with one next week. Yes switching gears. It was the first week of school for so many kids. Lehi utah county. They got off to a rough start. Soon as the school day was over. There was a video posted online. I'm sure most of you have seen it by now of a teacher who teaches chemistry and i believe marine biology. And i don't know if she was having a bad day trying to relate to the kids or what was happening but it did not end well for her..

biden administration florida biden morissette Cdc uk utah county
Mayflower AI Sea Drone Readies Maiden Transatlantic Voyage

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Mayflower AI Sea Drone Readies Maiden Transatlantic Voyage

"The Mayflower has left Plymouth England again this is not the same ship that arrived in Massachusetts in sixteen twenty this may flowers much more moderate and marine biology professor Richard Thompson says it's searching for signs of plastic pollution in the water to sample write down some of the smallest pieces in the ocean some of the microplastics lessen the diameter of a human head Andy Stanford Clark with IBM says this may flowers robotic no passengers on board I don't know what situation is going to come across so that itself will be a journey which discovery the old Mayflower mated to Plymouth Massachusetts in sixteen twenty red fan F. with the Mayflower autonomous ship projects says who knows what happens this time most similar thing between this project on the four hundred and the regional four hundred years ago was that neither of us are sure we were going to make it but our risk is much smaller than their risk the journey to Massachusetts should take about two weeks I met Donahue

Andy Stanford Clark Plymouth Massachusetts Richard Thompson England IBM Donahue
Project Sealab 1 Summary Report - Part 1

Scuba Shack Radio

07:56 min | 1 year ago

Project Sealab 1 Summary Report - Part 1

"Way back in the nineteen sixties when i was growing up most of us were intently focused on the space race in one thousand nine hundred sixty four. The united states was making the transition from the mercury program to the gemini program and there really wasn't allowed manned spaceflight going on that year but there was another amazing exploration going on in interspace natwest project lab. One well i didn't know a great deal about c. lab until i started doing some research for the segment. I did hear on the show about scott carpenter. I did read. Ben held hells worst book about c. lab and that gave me a really good understanding of the magnitude of the entire c. Lab project both one two and three. And as i was doing more research i came across a report from the office of navel research. And it's the project sea labs summary report so today. I wanna start two part series on this report in part one today. I'll take you through the report up until the c. Lab one habitat is placed in position and then in part to a couple of weeks from now will review the mission some of the findings and conclusions by the project sea labs. Some report is subtitled. An experimental eleven day undersea saturation dive at one. Hundred and ninety three feet and report is dated june fourteenth nineteen sixty five for anyone looking for the report you might want to search on n r report. Ac are one zero eight. It's not that long to sixty two pages now. The copy. I got had a stamp on the cover. Then indicated. hard copies of the report would cost three dollars while microfiche would be seventy five cents and the copy was also stamped. Archived copy of this report are ha o.'neil from the office of navel research. Gif bond captain united states navy from the united states naval medical research. Laboratory are eland. Fear lieutenant commander. Us n. office of navel research and t odum of the mind defense laboratory in the preface pen by rear admiral. Leighton he says project sea lab one was the navy's first step into space. He also states that this report is being published by the navy so that all may share the information it is interesting to note that the background section of the report the authors do reference the work being done by captain shot cousteau and mr edwin a link and that was on their man in the sea concept they they stated indeed. The navy seems to be left at the post by the well-publicized efforts of captain cousteau and mr link. So it sounds like there's a little bit of sour grapes. Their report goes on to describe a december nineteen sixty three conference with the navy's bureau of ships where they obtained support for a c. lab now at that conference. They decided that the mine defense laboratory would build a habitat needed to select a location and they had five critique criteria for the selection one was the prospect of good weather too was good visibility. Three was a level bottom for was moderate water. Temperatures at depth and five was the general features of ocean graphic and marine biology biological interest. Now the site that they selected was argus island off of bermuda by march of nineteen sixty four all the appropriate approvals were obtained and they were often running and the operations were supposed to be conducted in the summer of one thousand nine hundred sixty four now. The mine defense laboratory selected an old experimental minesweeping float. Now the report has quite a few pictures and illustrations in it. Unfortunately the pictures are really not that great because of this. Pdf being produced either from a microphone. Show old old dot copiers but the stations are pretty good. Particularly the architectural drawings of c. lab won both the plan view and the cross section views by marched by may nineteen sixty four. C. lab was ready for sea trials off panama city. Florida on may twenty second nineteen sixty four. It was towed out to sea and sank uncontrolled and flooded over half full of seawater. Fortunately there were no injuries. The habitat was lifted. Towed back dried out and ready for another try on may twenty six this time with success. The previous incident was attributed to a misunderstanding of line handling waters by july. They were in bermuda and ready to sink. C. lab on july fourteenth. They again had issues because of the three to five foot swells and the yard patrol boat that they were using just wasn't powerful enough like chief brody said in jaws. I think you're gonna need a bigger boat. Well in this case. It was a crane that they took from bermuda. The reach the report details the adventure of getting c. lab on the bottom but they finally did an after getting everything hooked up and twenty four hour checkout on monday july twentieth. One thousand nine hundred sixty four at seventeen thirty five. That's five thirty five pm for you. Civilians c. lab one was manned by robert e. less anderson robert a barth sanders w manning and robert e thompson. Now what were the conditions like on c. lab interesting. The report says see lab proper dry inhabitable atmosphere satisfactory temperatures. Seventy eight degrees chilly. Water supply water not available heaters operable. Tv monitor not hooked up properly. Hot water heaters not operating refrigerator not operating co two scrubbers satisfactory. Electro writer. Satisfactory calibrated microphones not functioning. Crass burgo two meters satisfactory lights satisfactory. So you can see. There was still a lot of things that needed to be repaired. So i had to do was fixed everything that wasn't working and then complete their mission so in part to this series i'll take you through the mission the findings and conclusions from project sea lab some report of nineteen sixty five americas first journey into interspace. And that will be next time here on scuba shack

Sealab Project Sealab 1 Office Of Navel Research Natwest Project Lab Navy Project Sea Labs United States Naval Medical Re Scott Carpenter Mr Edwin Captain Cousteau Mr Link Argus Island Bermuda United States Navy Cousteau United States Leighton BEN Neil
"marine biology" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"marine biology" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"And rolling out in Austin James RoHaas WBZ Boston's news radio New this morning, Ah World Health Organization team concludes that the Corona virus is unlikely to have leaked from a Chinese laugh. And it's more likely to have jumped to humans from an animal. The announcement made this morning at the end of a visit by a W H o team investigating the possible origins of the virus in the central Chinese city of Wuhan. But WBC's Drew Mo Holland tells us not all are buying it. If switches Bill sergeant has taught science writing at Harvard University and Marine biology, he feels very strongly about how Cove it's started. It's always really been more likely that occurred from an accident doing what's called Gain of function research. That's a common thing. In fact, it's the standard test for flu and figuring out what the next flu will be. Basically, you take a virus. You put it into a ferret it mutates. You put it into another ferret, and it jumps from ferrets affair it, I think That's what was done, You know, successfully and then somebody made a mis take and they jacked themselves on the finger or the ferret, you know, wiggled or sneezed and that person got Kobe. But sergeant says over the course of this pandemic, everything's turned so political. The search for answers in Wuhan has and is a long process. Drew Mohammed WBC. Austin's news radio and the nation's capital. Today, the House continues to work on a nearly $2 trillion Cove in stimulus package. But for many, all that matters really is $15. The president's Cove in 19 relief package calls for $15 an hour minimum wage, though he admitted the chances of that are slim. My guess is it will not be the Independent Congressional Budget Office released a study yesterday on increasing minimum wage. It says the proposal would lift almost a million Americans out of poverty, but would also put about a million and a half out of work. Deborah Alpher owns CBS News Washington by the way that congressional Budget Office report also predicts that increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour would also dig a deeper hole for the federal deficit. By about $54 billion over the next decade..

Bill sergeant Wuhan WBC Budget Office Mohammed WBC flu Harvard University and Marine Boston World Health Organization Deborah Alpher Mo Holland CBS Austin president
"marine biology" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"marine biology" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"At Bloomberg Quick Take This is a Bloomberg business Last month World Headquarters. I'm Charlie Pellet. We begin with a developing story a toss that is a French Iittie outsourcing companies said to be planning to walk away from talks. Bye, D x e technology that headline from the Bloomberg Professional Service After the Bell we heard from Rambus shares. Lower sales missed estimates shares down by 6% serious logic down more than 7% after ours after its fourth quarter, gross margin forecast fell short of the average analysts estimate at the midpoint. Stocks had their biggest rally in about 10. Weeks of several strategists at the recent explosion of Speculative buying will not derail the bull market in equities s and P up 59 points. That was a game today of 1.6% that all up 229 up by a body 10th of 1% as stank up 332 up by 2.5% tendered on 4 30 seconds 10 Year Yield. One point owes 7% gold up 7/10 of 1% 18 60 the ounce. Silver Today. Silver Futures up by 8.6% the eye shares Silver E t F a Bite 7.1%, West Texas Any media crewed up 2.4% 53 45 a barrel? I'm Charlie Pellet. That is a Bloomberg business Flash. All right. Thank you, Charlie Paella. Let's get back to our guest, Ron Lieber. He's the your money columnist for The New York Times, and he's also the author of the Price You Pay for college and entirely new roadmap for the biggest financial decision. Your family will ever make. I'm still having trouble. Ron getting my head around the question why college tuition has grown so much more quickly than inflation. Especially over the last 30 years. Sure. Well, let's start with the state institutions that what's going on there is the subsidies from the state legislatures have fallen in the last big recession, You know eight or 9 20,010. They just cut this to the to the bone and the easy thing for the state universities to do to make up. The difference is, you know, raise the prices to the people who live in the state and also to try and attract where people from out of state and charge them even more with the president's. It's a little bit different and what they said to me over and over again when I was in You know the office of the president demanding the same information that you're demanding for me? They said Look, what do you want to speak to you like 65 to 70% of our costs are Professors, administrators and staff and, you know if you believe the Wall Street Journal editorial page we we've got an administrative bloat problem here because of all of the regulations, But the regulations come from the legislators that we all vote for about box and we have parents. What are kids taken care of? We do want our kids with mental health issues and disabilities be able to access these institutions. We want our daughters on the ice hockey, you know, in the ice hockey right the same way that the guys are. And to keep track of all of this stuff and and make sure that all students are well served equally served. Does require trained people and they are not cheap. Wow. Okay. Well, isn't there? A lot of reading today wasn't it's not because they need to model on You know that most of these institutions are not growing that much geographically. So you know, the lawn on Lee cost so much now things like lazy rivers and climbing walls. He's become sort of like totems and boogie Man. Um, you know for people who think college spending is out of control But this is the manner in which our kids have become accustomed. Right? I mean, many high schools have climbing walls now, and we're the ones who take kids on vacations to places have lazy rivers. And really, there's only a couple 1000 lazy rivers in all of higher education. So you know it makes for a nice headline and a funny talking point. But these are not the reasons why I college costs a lot of money, but I want to go back to what you say, because I do think that there is a belief in this society in many ways that the higher something caused the better it is, and we definitely apply it to education. So what's your Woods. Your advice to parents? Who? You know, I just went through this with my daughter, you know, And the thing is Doesn't feel like that. There's many cheap schools in expensive schools out there anymore. But what's your advice as someone goes through this process with their with their students? Well, I'd start by ignoring the list price altogether. The retail price you've got to determine if your family is going to have any financial need is defined by the financial aid office. You've got to determine if the schools that you're interested in doing discounting on the basis of what they refer to his merit, which may have something to do with the grades in the s A T score, but a lot of other things. You know in your kid's portfolio, and look at what you know the average next crisis right on down, so that may not blow your mind quite as much. But it is true that there are plenty of people out there, making choices between $300,000 schools and $100,000 school's over four years. And there, Scott asked basic questions about what college is for, right? Is your kid there for the education because they want to get into it. No Top five Marine biology PhD program. Are they there Because they want to be in line at why Combinator Kleiner Perkins at the age of 24 for start up money if that's your goal. You may need a $300,000 school, but, you know, it just depends on the kid and what they intend to do with themselves while they're there. Um, you know, it sounds like the system. He's a little broken run. Do you think? I mean, do we need to change this? This is a This is a lot of money. To here's the thing right? You know my role at the New York Times and what I consider to be my role advice. It's just to help people work within the system as it exists and beat it. When necessarily, But I'm all for breaking it. Uh, the problem is, um, you know, I have no beef with people who think this is all ridiculous, right? Um, there's so much complexity built.

Bloomberg Charlie Pellet The New York Times Ron Lieber Rambus president Charlie Paella French Iittie World Headquarters Wall Street Journal West Texas Combinator Kleiner Perkins Marine biology PhD Scott
Why Are Whales So Big?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:19 min | 1 year ago

Why Are Whales So Big?

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont Public Radio? I'm the host. Jane Lindholm. On this show you tell us what you're interested in and what your questions are about that thing you're interested in. And we use your questions to guide what we talk about on the show. Your curiosity dictates what we explore. When I was young, I really wanted to be a marine biologist that's a scientist who studies things that live in the oceans and lots of you are interested in marine biology to we've done episodes about fish about why the sea is salty and other things related to oceans like our jellyfish really made out of Jelly spoiler alert they're not. But now we're going to focus on one particular type of animal that lives in the oceans that like me a lot of you are fascinated by. Can you guess what animal we might be discussing? Well. That is the sound of a humpback whale singing. And, that sound comes courtesy of the federal government's no of fisheries website. But we're not going to focus on the way whales communicate today that's going to be a future episode. So be sure to listen for that one too. We want today to have a better understanding of what whales are and how they move through the oceans and occasionally through rivers to here's our guide for today's episode. My name is Nick Pinson. I'm a paleontologist at the Smithsonian in Washington DC. Tell me what paleontologist is healing tallest looks for any trace of life that lived a long long time ago, and they tend to look for fossils which can be bones footprints leaves any kind of trace of life that isn't around now, but we know existed millions billions of years ago. One of the challenges and one of the things I like most about being paleontologist is that you don't get all the clues that you'd like to. So we don't get a full skeleton sometimes you do but mostly not see have to make the best you can do with a little bit of information, and that's what makes paleontology for me a lot like a detective story. So neck, some of the kids listening now might be scratching their heads because they know that this episode is about Wales and you just told us you're a paleontologist. So you look for signs of life that doesn't exist anymore, but Wales still exists. I got into science because I really liked looking for fossils and that led me eventually to looking at Wales because Wales are mammals that live notion and some of them live in the rivers but you're probably more familiar with ones that live in the oceans that are really big that have flippers that have flukes They look from the outside a bit more like a fish than. A Mammal, what's really neat about them is that we know that they're mammals and that they're closely related to other hoofed mammals specifically the hoofed mammals that have even toes to toes and those mammals are cows, pigs, deer, camels, sheep. That's who whales are most closely related to, and if you look at the wheel and you look at all of its near cousins that are live today. Realize that whales look really really different and what explains why they're so different has to do with how they volved, how they came to be and going back to fossils were really fortunate and being able to find fossil whales tell us how those changes happened. So I'm lucky enough to be able to work with teams of scientists to go round the world and look for fossils. Of Whales and then try to understand how those fit in with what we know about whales today, and also where they're going because the earth has always changed and it's still changing I want to get to some of the questions that our listeners have sent us. But just before we do I, want to pick up on something that you said, which was that whales are really closely related. Even toed hoofed animals, but they look really different. So if they look really different, how can to animals be very closely related because you'd think they'd be more closely related to something else that they look like like a shark or a fish right just because something lives in the water or looks like a fish doesn't mean they're all related to each other whales, sharks and fish the last time they shared a common ancestor was probably nearly half a billion years ago. Let's get more precise about. Wales as related to other mammals, we have a lot of different ways of knowing how organisms are related to each other. We can look at their DNA which tells us directly about their relationships in a way. That's that doesn't connect to how they look as more to do with their genetics. Right DNA tells us that whales fit in with all these other mammals whales are mammals, and that's something you would know probably from just looking. At the fact that they re there, they have babies drink milk from their MOMS do have hair. If you are ever get the opportunity to close enough to whale, and even if you seem photos of baby, dolphins have little tiny whiskers on their snout they lose them pretty quickly. But those are all telling you about their deeper ancestry and you want to use all the different kinds of evidence available to you whether it's DNA. That might tell you one story or fossils that tell you a story that maybe sometimes is a bit different and that's why I say that fossils tell something that we wouldn't otherwise. No. We can have a a family tree of animals based on DNA and then fossils tell us about this branches of the tree that we wouldn't otherwise know about and for Wales. That's what tells us that the earliest whales lived on land

Wales Scientist Vermont Jane Lindholm Washington Dc Nick Pinson
Monica Royer, founder and CEO, Monica Plus Andy

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:46 min | 2 years ago

Monica Royer, founder and CEO, Monica Plus Andy

"Hey Everyone Danielle. Here I'm excited to get into this episode with our guest and curly will be back next week today Monica royer joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Monica Andy An organic baby and children's clothing company. Monica had the idea to launch her company literally from the hospital after she gave birth. Who've with the mission of being the most thoughtful children's brand ever created and as we'll get into entrepreneurship definitely runs in her family Monica. Thank you for joining us today welcomed skin from the couch Danielle. Thank you so much for having me. I'm super excited to be here. Thank you. So I just WanNa say that like literally I think one of the days after I had told our team that I. Was Pregnant I had a call with Monica and I was like only slightly panicked about the fact that I was maybe a first time mom and really had no clue what I was doing and was like everyone keeps telling me I need a lay at and I don't even know what that is and Google that and Monica was like such a calming presence and literally knows this case inside a now. Thank you so much what we're is really excited to welcome people into Motherhood, in new, parenthood. So congratulations to you. Thank you. So let's start with an easy question scam your resume. To actually take back to what you can't see on link to in, which is that I came from a very hardworking family and so at the age of twelve, my mom was the manager, the ultrasound department at Good Samaritan. Hospital in Downers Grove and she's like you're gonNA start volunteering. So she went an air sign me up I was working at the front desk outpatient registration and that at fourteen she was like job permit time. So we went I started stocking the shelves at now very defunct retail store of which I. Can't even remember the name but work ethic with something was really important to my parents and so I spent all the time before I graduated from college with all of my summer jobs in the hospital. So physical therapy like you name it I worked all around the hospital when University of Illinois in Champaign Urbana graduated and I immediately got a job in the pharmaceutical industry. So I spent the first decade doing absolutely nothing related to what I'm currently doing but I worked at both Pfizer and Novartis for that decade which was. Very different from currently in that I launched. Monica. Nandy officially in July of twenty fourteen. So now this is my new baby and what I've been most recently working on what's something that we can't Google about you or look up on Lincoln I originally wanted to be a marine biologist. nine or ten old I would have told you wanted to be a marine biologist terrified of the ocean look at seeing but being in it. So that was sort of a non starter, the marine biology career, but I remained totally obsessed with like orcas. Great White Sharks in my very favorite place to travel as the San Juan islands outside of Seattle, marine, biologist, and pharmaceutical industry. This is all very, very interesting. So we're GONNA get into your family. And the support system that you've built around you. But I when I was talking to you a few weeks ago, you were talking about your mom and how her story had such an impact on you tell us about what it was like growing up in your house. What kind of expectations were there? Yeah. So my mom is an immigrant from India. She moved here from India's her dad was dying of Emphysema and some money home when she was nineteen. Years old as I have always a revered both of my parents Andy I always say that will never win the lottery because we did the first time by the parents that we got. So a massive amount of respect for both of them. But my mom, there was something about the family that she came from her family was very matriarchal in in a society in India that was much the opposite in. So my grandfather had nine children altogether the first. Five of which were girls as in India, like at that time most people wanted boys but my grandfather really cherish having girls in he educated each of them like they were boys and so when my mom came here, she came here on sheer well of the education that she had received and so education was of the utmost importance specifically for my mom mom was the only person in her family to marry outside of her Indian cultures or a dad is. Know his ancestors from European background and so my brother and I were so close growing up because we were so different from everybody else we were between world instead of fitting into any world in particular and so I think that unique experience really shaped the adults that we became.

Monica Royer Danielle Founder And Ceo India Google Downers Grove Good Samaritan San Juan Islands Pfizer Emphysema University Of Illinois Nandy Andy Novartis Seattle
"marine biology" Discussed on Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

"Then if you have the means and the resources you can send them to. Do Marine biology. Perhaps you know a school in Delaware that's closer to the ocean or New Jersey that's closer to the ocean. So if you're there, you know we have Google there's all you know there there are a million different niches out there that you know there are definite summer summer programs Can do even virtually because you know marine violence, you definitely need to be near water But for example, if something that you don't necessarily have to physically be there, there are opportunities to learn online like for example, engineering, they're definitely coding opportunities for to learn things online silo. I had a bunch that I had share it with my community regarding you know because we were virtual this summer you know there were a lot of different opportunities that students could sign up for with a virtual camp that was just either one week or the full summer. So there are you know if the? Parent is really interested in the student has expressed an interest. The parent could definitely research and find opportunities that will help them either you know get some experience. So they can say, Oh yeah, this is really something I'm going to pursue further or it's not what I thought. It was maybe I wanna try something else because when students figure that out before they get into college that's less time and money that they'll spend you know taking the wrong classes and then maybe staying another semester because they took the wrong classes and then decided to be a different major in you know they wasted those credits. So let's Let's let's shift this little tiny bit and ask the question. because you we've addressed the I think the point is clear. You know show and kind of prove. So to speak even an interest beyond just grades and schoolwork. And parents conclude support this by helping the kids out. What what can students do? Once they're at school. So now okay we've. You Know A. Little Phoenix shown. She got interested in marine biology. She's now at some marine biology school. How how do you take that to the next level? Once you're there. Once you're in school. That's when you know the reality is full fully in your face. So you want to take advantage of the opportunity to be in a college environment like I said before if you have a professor at your institution who's an expert in the field and even if you don't have an professor at your university, you know if you've researched and you found that there's a professor at Yale who's teaching or doing research on something that you are really interested in, you can talk to your adviser at Your School about is it? Possible for me to take a semester at that institution or over the summer, take that one class with the professor over the summer or do a study abroad on the topic. So there are so many opportunities in the college environment for you to do that. You can if you yes, definitely you know in Philadelphia, definitely do marine biology at zoo the aquarium you can definitely have opportunities with the alumni from the university you you definitely have to put in the.

marine biology school professor Google Delaware New Jersey Philadelphia Yale
Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

Pop Culture Happy Hour

09:04 min | 2 years ago

Bill & Ted Face the Music Review

"One, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, we met bill s Preston and Ted Theodore Logan in the movie bill and Ted's excellent adventure they returned in bill and Ted's bogus journey in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety one, and now almost thirty years later they're back in bill and Ted's face the music Alex Winter and Keanu Reeves return as well. Bill and Ted respectively, and this time they'll need not just their triumphant man to save the world but also their daughters I'm Stephen Thompson and I'm Linda Holmes we're talking about bill and Ted face the music on this episode of Pop Culture Happy Hour from NPR here with me and Steven from his home studio is plan Weldon of NPR's arts desk. Linda and also with us from his home in Washington DC, we have JC Howard who is a producer of NPR's Ted Radio Hour and how I built this I. J. C.. Good to have you back good to have you back. So if you are all not familiar, there's not a lot setup that you need or these films except to say that Bill and Ted were introduced to us as teenage bro Friends who had a band and just wanted to have a triumphant band when they were older and eventually they got sucked into time travel and picking up different historical figures, and later we're going to try to save the world and there was. A whole story where they were going to ultimately right a great and triumphant song it's it is a surprisingly complex canonical story of which you need to know practically nothing in order to enjoy I think these films Stephen now that I have thoroughly set the table kind of what is your attachment to bill and Ted these movies. If you have one, well, I've seen bill and Ted's excellent adventure. A BUNCH OF TIMES I've seen bill and Ted's bogus journey a couple times. These are movies that have kind of existed on the wind for the last thirty years. I re watched these movies within the last five years I. Think I talked about the. What's making me happy on this show but still kind of needed to go back to be reminded of what happens in them going into this movie I mean this movie is coasting on goodwill. There is a certain amount of fan service going on here. I mean I'm not sure how many people were clamoring to revisit these characters almost thirty years later but at the same time. Something really really smart happens in this movie and you can tell before you even start watching it, and that is that it is ninety three minutes long all three of these movies are about ninety minutes long and I think they understand that that is the perfect lengthier. There is a certain amount of sequel bloat here. The first two movies are incredibly Chintzy. The stakes in the first one are no greater than maybe Ted we'll get sent to military school and you're there's like the entire fabric of space time can be ripped apart. This is a very shaggy movie. I. Think there are stretches where it sags but. I do appreciate the number of updates. You don't have the gay panic stuff that really dragged down the earlier movies are no gay slurs in this movie. This movie bothers to give its female characters a little bit more agency the women who become their wives barely have any part to play in the other movies, and here you get more of that you get their daughters who are given kind of their own subplot. So I appreciate that it's not just rattling around with these two dudes who are now middle aged, but they're taking an interest in people outside of just bill. Yeah and you do get their daughters. The structure of this one is kind of that they go on one journey through time and their daughters meanwhile who are played by Samara weaving and bridget lending pain go off and tried to get a band together for their DADS to play with on this epoch song that's supposed to save the world. So you kind of have the one journey going on the other journey going on then naturally in the third act it all comes together and I did like those two performances from the daughter's there are also some kind of new faces in this one kristen Schall plays Kelly who is The daughter of Rufus who was the George Carlin character in the original JC it feels to me like you are too young to have a moustache attachment to these movies but I have been assured that that is not the case because television. Yeah. That's exactly right. I was actually super excited to hear this movie was happening and I'm going to show my age a little bit and say that I was born pretty close to the release of the First Bill and Ted Movie of Bill and Ted's excellent adventure. So my first encounter with these guys was as as they say a most impressionable youth. And I was one of what I can only assume are millions of kids who watch bill and Ted's excellent adventure every time it ran on cable TV. The thing about the first movie is the problem that they needed to solve was very simple. Billon Tade just needed a good grade right granted the solution to that problem was a little larger than life and included doctor who like time travel home box and all but the problem itself was simple. The second movie bogus journey was certainly a little nuttier. It had killer robots and aliens and the grim reaper. Didn't feel like it hit quite the right notes for me. No Pun intended. So win a third film was confirmed. The main question I had was like, what are they going to do? Are they going to try to recreate the success of the original and go back to simple run of the mill time travel Orlean into the bizarre and crazy and from just the trailer? It was clear that they weren't going to just lean into the bizarre, but they were diving in head first. But I think what separated this one from the nineteen ninety one sequel is that it has a lot more heart. The original movie was really about the friendship of bill and Ted and saving that they didn't seem to care as much about saving the future as much as they wanted to just make sure that bill and Ted could still just be friends. So it had this kind of surprisingly earnest quality and I think that was what was missing in the second film in this third one for all of its bizarreness in all of its doubling down on death in heaven and hell, and all these kinds of weird things. It really reignites the idea that there are friendships and. Relationships here that are worth saving. Yeah I think you're absolutely right that they go back to the relationship between those two guys being the center of the story and I. Think it's really funny. One of the things that I think is featured in some of the the trailer stuff but they are both married they both have you know lovely wives that you have met before since they got them from the past and they have relationships with their wives that are completely enmeshed with their relationship with each other. So they can't conceive of having individual marriages that aren't some. Like a four person marriage I thought that stuff was sort of funny because I think one of the things that carries over like if you're going to take these guys in age them thirty years you have to either assume that at some point they became more normal, which is a weird thing to assume about bill and Ted. Or you have to assume that they are still very bill and Ted, which would mean that they are still kind of very fixated on this idea that they are a duo and they are always together and they are each other's right hand Glenn you had indicated on twitter that. You perhaps did not have the same nostalgia for these characters that perhaps I have and others may have what is your take care? All right. The ticker about to hear from me Linda Holmes is going to be a subjective it's rigorous. It's clear eyed it is on demand by the gauzy scream nostalgia because unlike all y'all I never saw these movies until this week just to prepare for the show and I didn't see him for very simple reason I didn't have to I. Mean I was a junior in college nineteen, eighty, nine I was studying marine biology. I was dating a string of profoundly unfulfilled women and. Being. On a college campus and eighty nine and not here boobs heinous strange things are afoot at the circle k just over and over and over. So I felt like I got it. And think about the time late eighties early nineties mainstream. American. Comedy was kind of stuck in this catchphrase based mode and I was like, okay. I don't need to see this while I've seen them all now and I'm here to tell you. Sure I guess that's your thing. I like the Guy Listeners of the leads I. think that's the appeal here but left only once an excellent adventure. It's a visual gag that gets tossed off. It's a Freud at a mall holding a corn dog and it's like, okay, fine. You got me I mean it's low hanging fruit, but you got. And in face the music this new film shore on Paper Samara, Weaving Kristen Schaal Holland freaking Taylor they are gunning for me they are coming. But ultimately didn't stick. It's not supposed to. That's not what it's for. It just evaporates on contact with the eyeballs and maybe that's exactly what the world needs. Right now is dumb sweep dumb but I

TED Bill S Preston Ted Movie Ted Theodore Logan Linda Holmes NPR Stephen Thompson Washington Alex Winter Jc Howard Keanu Reeves Kristen Schaal Holland Producer Kristen Schall Samara Weldon Billon Tade Steven Orlean
10 Trivia Questions from a Confidence Round

Trivia With Budds

08:47 min | 2 years ago

10 Trivia Questions from a Confidence Round

"Leaner it be and welcome to another episode of the Trivia with Buds podcast. I'm your host Ryan Buds. Thanks for checking out my show and thank you guys so much for spreading the word during this quarantine about this little show. We have eight hundred episodes to listen to. So it's great for binging. You can take a couple episodes a couple of topics and you can quiz each other. You could battle against people that you're stuck in a house with and hopefully could have a good time passing the time. There are just so many different topics we've done on the show in the past things like marine biology and shopping malls and soft drinks and cooking terms. I'm just trying to think of stuff we've done there so many different topics literally inundate. You could make probably done it at this point. And even the uber specific things like Ace Ventura when Nature Calls Trivia. I think we've done that so just give it a search any topic. You're looking for go on Google and type in Trivia with buds in that topic and you should come across a link or to of Podcast episodes that. We've done shout out to my podcast hosting service. Lipson which has never faltered in all the years. I've used it. I think I've been using it for over three years. People ask me from time to time. What is my hosting plan? How much do I pay all that? Good stuff so I thought I'd share that with you. I think I pay twenty nine ninety nine a month thirty dollars a month for six hundred megabytes of storage and I've been using Lipson for that since the very beginning and the way I found them was just searching best. Podcast host read a few articles. saw some different podcasts. That I listen to that use Lipson and I said okay. I'll go with that so I started off at a smaller megabyte storage level and I moved up when I started the show daily to a little bit of a higher level so that answer that question for anybody who's thinking about starting their podcast. I do trust and believe in Lipson. Check them out. Lipson DOT COM for all the hosting plans. I think you could do it for as little as five bucks a month or six bucks a month so give it a gander. I think they're going to be a lot of podcasts. That start over this quarantine over this downtime. Because people are just sitting around at home going What should we do? Should we start a podcast? Maybe we should. We got plenty of time to do so. And you know along with binging shows that might be great pairing. This might be the Father Brown. Podcast era people watching the show. Father Brown and talking about it on a podcast. Maybe I should do that. I wonder if there's a father Brown podcast if there is someone link it to me on social media at Ryan Buds. Maybe I'll start listening. I do like that. Show all right guys. We're going to jump into today's episode. It is a competence round ten totally random questions that I used to close at my life. Trivia nights last week and by last week live Trivia Nights. I mean just at home. Because they were all cancelled from the lockdown but I am still making these different trivia nights every week going forward so you can download all of the questions to play at home if you WanNa do like a bunch of random rounds like we do at night. Go TO TRIVIA WITH BUDS DOT COM and. Click the link the very top of the website. There's an ice banner that tells you how to download it. How To play instructions rules scoreboard answer? She could print out the whole Shebang so go check that out. We're going to jump into these ten random questions right here. We go all right. It's a confidence around. You're not on your answers. Ranking them one through ten ten is the highest ones the lowest and here we go number one. What nineteen eighty nine computer game? Features the clicking of square boxes to reveal numbers of nearby explosives number. One Thousand Nine Hundred. Eighty Nine. Computer game features. The clicking of square boxes to reveal numbers of nearby explosives number one question number two. What cheese is typically used on a Reuben Sandwich number two what cheese is most typically used on a Reuben Sandwich number two number three which? Us states two letter. Abbreviation is first alphabetically number. Three which states two letter abbreviation is first alphabetically. Question number four which nation was called Persia until nineteen thirty five number four which nation was called Persia until nineteen thirty. Five question number five coming at you. What announcer who started his career in? Nineteen eighty-two is famous for his catchphrase. Let's get ready to rumble number five. What announcer who started his career in nineteen eighty two is famous for his catchphrase? Let's get ready to rumble. Question number six. What nine hundred ninety one movie featured characters named Evelyn Couch and mini thread? Good number six one thousand nine hundred one movie featured characters named Evelyn Couch and mini thread number seven. The band looking glass had a hit seventy song. About what girl's name number seven? The band looking glass had what seventy song about a girl's name question number eight in the NFL? How many yards is the penalty for delay of game for offense defense or special teams number eight in the NFL? How many yards is the penalty for delay of game for offense defense or special teams question number nine? Those hladik Z L. O. T. Y. Is the currency of what country does. Lodhi is the currency of what country and question number ten to close out this quiz what. Wwe Wrestler is known as the rated R superstar number ten what wwe wrestler is known as the rated R superstar. Those are all your questions for the quiz. Remember you right now. Your answers rank them. One through ten ten is the highest the lowest each number one time in your ranking process. Right down all the answers I then. After each one of them you can write a little bubble and put ten or nine eight or seven all the way down to one. Whatever you right next your answer is how many points you would award yourself if you get it right if you want to self score this at home. It's out of fifty five possible points and we'll be back in just a second with the answers. We are back with the answers to confidence round Trivia. Guys this was a tough one. There were some tough tough questions hidden. In this episode's hopefully you came up with all the correct answers. Here's number one. What nineteen eighty nine computer game features the clicking of square boxes to reveal numbers of nearby explosives? The answer there was minesweeper minesweeper. I mean that game I never to this day. I don't know how to play. Minesweeper is just kind of click around and hope that a box wouldn't explode and I'd see the numbers and I'd be like Oh cool four three one two and I would just keep clicking. I didn't really understand what the hell those things meant. And maybe you do and maybe I'm just adult as they say but I still don't understand minesweeper. Someone explained it to me number two. What cheese is typically used on a reuben sandwich that is Swiss cheese Swiss cheese although I have gotten munster on a ruben before Swiss cheese they mostly put on their number three states? Two letter? Abbreviation is first alphabetically. This was a question of the day recently. A couple episodes ago I think and popped up again. Here this is Alaska Aka AK Alabama is next. But that's a l so that comes K. L. Yeah that comes next number. Four which nation was called Persia until nineteen thirty five that is Iran Iran number five. What announcer who started his career? Nineteen ninety-two is famous for his catchphrase. Let's get ready to rumble. That was Michael Buffer Michael. Buffer number six nineteen ninety-one movie features characters named Evelyn couch in any thread. Good Fried Green to make this number. Six Fried Green tomatoes number six number seven demand looking glass had hit seventy song. About what girl's name it was brandy and then in parentheses. You're a fine girl. If you wanted to put the full title but Brandy worked just fine number eight in the NFL. How many yards is the penalty for delay of game for offense defense or special teams five yards number eight five yards and number nine? This Lodhi is the currency of Poland Poland number ten what. Wwe Wrestler is known as the rated R superstar. That is edge. You think you know me know me. You think you know me number. Ten edge is going to be returning to Wrestlemainia this year for a sold out crowd of zero because they are doing wrestlemainia in the performance center. I think that's what I read. And there should be no audience which is going to be sad and weird and probably not the big return. He thought it would be but hey the world is upside down right now. An edge is still wrestling. So those are your answers guys. Those were the answers to the confidence around. I hope you had a fun time playing along with today's

Evelyn Couch Persia Ryan Buds WWE Lipson NFL Father Brown Lipson Dot Com Google Ace Ventura Brandy Wrestlemainia Michael Buffer United States Alaska Poland Lodhi L. O. T. Y.
Climate Change May Make The Snapping Shrimp Snap Louder

Environment: NPR

02:54 min | 2 years ago

Climate Change May Make The Snapping Shrimp Snap Louder

"See if you can guess what this sound is Bacon frying. Maybe a crackling fire. Nope it is underwater snapping shrimp there only a few inches long but among the loudest animals in the ocean. Thanks to climate change. They are getting even louder. That's according to new research and that could affect a lot of other sea life as NPR's Lawrence Summer reports dive into tropical seas and that crackly sound is hard to miss them very easily. They tend to live in colonies or they're clustered closely together. So you hear this chorus of them Erin. Mooney is a scientist at the woods hole. Oceanographic institution whose steady some of the many snapping shrimp species around the world. He says that sound comes from their massive claw and they can really close that claw really really fast and it makes them bubble in the water and when that publ implodes that's what makes the popper the snap it even creates a tiny flash of light and it's surprisingly loud really similar to a large ship or large scale or even some sort of like Underwater HAMMERING DURING WORLD WAR. Two researchers were sent to investigate the noise because he was interfering with the Sonar Navy used to find submarines Mooney and his colleagues looked at snapping shrimp in a lab and the wild and found that the warmer gets the louder. The shrimp are and the more they snap. Warmer water makes them more active as Mooney recently presented to the American geophysical union and oceans are warming with climate. Change says Steve Simpson when we look at any type of global change. What we realize is that there will be winners and losers. Simpson is a professor of marine biology at the University of Exeter. He says sound is incredibly important underwater. Because it's hard to see very far and oceans are already getting noisier because of human impacts fifty thousand ships sailing around the world carrying ninety percent of world trade ad louder shrimp to that noise and it could further stress other animals that you sound like fish that grunt is a sergeant major a small Atlantic coral reef fish. It could mosque the ability of fish to be able to communicate because it will create a higher noise floor. Crackling sound then swamps. Any of the sounds that they might be wanting to listen out for. But there's also a chance that louder. Shrimp could help other organisms since then says when fish clams and coral are young larvae their free swimming floating in the ocean current. They're ready to find a reef to go and make their home and they use the sound. That's coming from that community as a cue to find a place to settle. The sound of snapping. Shrimp is an advertisement. That reef is a good place to live. Which is why Simpson and other. Scientists will be watching the oceans soundscape closely at a time when so many things are changing

Mooney Steve Simpson Scientist Oceanographic Institution NPR Sonar Navy American Geophysical Union Lawrence Summer University Of Exeter Professor
Bathsheba Demuth: Environmental Historian

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

08:37 min | 2 years ago

Bathsheba Demuth: Environmental Historian

"This episode of is on Conservation I spoke with author and environmental historian Bethsheba. Demuth Demuth is an assistant professor at Brown University who specializes in the intersection between humans. Ecosystems ideas in history the work that I do as an environmental historian is broadly focused on the North American and Russian Arctic and particularly the relationships between people and animals and people in Ecosystems. More broadly over the past two hundred years or so. We talked over. Skype demuth was in fairbanks as the professor was performing research for her new book. Her first book is titled Floating Coast and Environmental History of the Bering Straits. Npr called it. A quote deeply studied deeply felt book that lays out a devastating complex history of change notes. What faces us now and dares us to imagine better in quote as we proceed and get into this interview. I will note that I spoke with Professor Demuth while she was at the university library so it can be a little loud in the background at times. It's a busy place. I can promise you however that this will be one of the most compelling and interesting accounts of the history of whaling that you had ever you look so cold yes. It's a little chilly up here. What's the what's the weather like right? Now it's actually a pretty Balmy day today. It's about twenty degrees. It was about fifty degrees colder here last week. You've you've draw the line pretty much anything around ten. Just can't do it for me of all the things that makes this whole conversation. That much more interesting demuth was actually drawn to the Arctic in her young adult life and even lived in the Yukon for two years. And yes doing all the things that you're imagining right now tracking bears hunting. Caribou FISHING SALMON. And yes even. Husky Mushin Dog sledding and no. I'm not making that up. She's that for real your your first journeys out there. If I understand right was your running dog sled yes so when I was eighteen I decided to take a gap year as we. Now call them although they weren't really called then And went to a little community north of the Arctic Circle in the Yukon territory to be a dog handler which is basically an apprentice to somebody who has a dog team and I knew nothing about sled dogs. When I moved up there I was eighteen so I thought I knew something about things but I really didn't. And that was my first introduction to the Arctic. Okay and how long you said you do that for two years. Yes do you. Do you still remember how to do it? I mean I. It's kind of like riding a bicycle except in this particular case. You're working with dogs so you can remember how to do the physical pieces of it but you also need to have a relationship with animals. You're working with so. I'm sure that if I had a team and I spent a lot of time with them would would all come back because I would be making that relationship with dogs but I'd like a bicycle. You can't just grab one and go right right. Yeah that makes sense You don't have to get to know your bike. I right I probably ended up working appear because my dad read me too much Jack London when I was a kid. So there's definitely a literary connection in there now. I could do a really poor job of basically giving it a synopsis of the Book. Or I'm sure it would be much more articulate coming from you Tell us a little bit more about the Soviet whaling And more specifically what you found so fascinating a about that topic. Yes the book that I published. Just this past fall called floating coast looks at basically the the past two hundred years or so along the Bering Strait both the Russian Arctic and in the US Arctic. It's a it's a two country history but because it's an environmental history in some ways it's a history of no country because it's looking at processes an an animals that don't really matched onto nation state borders and the the the project is kind book ended no Pun intended by could have two episodes of large scale whaling the first one being in the nineteenth century for market whalers capitalist wailers most of them coming from New England in fact some of them from where I now live in Providence. Who were coming up to kill bowhead. Whales for oil for lamp oil mostly and then the book closes with a couple of chapters about Soviet whaling in the twentieth century. Which in many ways is just the socialist analog to the to the capitalist wailing in that it is Quite excessive it kills whales far outside their capacity to to reproduce. And keep keep up with the demand and those kind of frames of the book in some ways. Show the things that I found really interesting about this part of the world as a historian. Who's interested in the ways that people's ideas influence the environments? They live in and vice versa. Which is that. It's a it's a place that has a very similar ecology on both sides of the Bering Strait. If you drop down on the peninsula or the seward Peninsula Chukchi Peninsulas in Russia and the seward Peninsula's in Alaska. He can't really tell one from the other right. And let's you know the place extremely well. Because the the flora and the fauna in geology are really comparable but of course in the twentieth century. It gets split by these two big economic ideologies that imagine each other in opposition. Which is you know. Capitalism and socialism. So it's kind of a natural experiment to see how these two ways of managing environments in some sense that the Soviet Union the United States brought with them interact with Arctic species and in the case of Wales they do it very similarly which is more or less trying to kill everywhere they possibly can ya. It's like it's kind of shocking especially when you talk about like as a concern of how many whales are being impacted or what that's doing to the ecosystem comes up that the answer kind of always came back to will. Don't worry. Technology will save us from. That will deliver a positive outcome. Okay can you elaborate on that? Yes this was one of the really interesting commonalities I found between two groups of whalers who were operating hundred years apart from each other or more and in two extremely different cultural and economic contexts is at the end of nineteenth century moby. Dick STYLE TALL SHIP. Whalers call me. Ishmael an ordinary seaman before the mast on the good ship check. What found out a man on Christmas Day of the year? Eighteen forty four on a thousand days. Voight very aware that when they entered a new population of Wales and a piece of the ocean that they hadn't been hunting in before that they would they called. Wailing it out or fishing it out that they would kill off an enormous number of the animals that were that were available locally and that they were doing this and getting further and further from home. So they're aware and using the word extinction by the end of the nineteenth century but at the same time as they're talking about extinction they're basically saying well if we put in place some technological Improvements if our ships get faster. If we're more able to navigate around the sea ice will be able to still catch these whales and there was this kind of belief that because Wales were really intelligent. And all of the whalers nudists and talk about this in detail that there were more whales. They were just shy or had gotten smart and were hiding in new places. So there's actually a couple of lines in Moby Dick Melville talks about you know the whales are just hiding behind the Arctic Sea ice and then after the Second World War the Soviet Union sort of follows the same pattern in that they have very sophisticated marine biology by that point in many ways the the research that so the marine biologist or doing is ahead of what's happening in the United States particularly when it comes to studying ways that whales are social animals and able to communicate vocally with each other They're they're way ahead of what's happening in English. Speaking Countries but at the same time as an aware that that the populations of wheels are dropping but at the same time. They're convinced that as long as they just kind of keep putting more technology online. They're going to be able to keep killing

Professor Demuth Bering Straits United States Arctic Wales Environmental History Arctic Circle Arctic Sea NPR Brown University Assistant Professor Soviet Union Seward Peninsula Chukchi Penin Professor Jack London Fairbanks
"marine biology" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on KPCC

"You on muskies digging tunnels to move us around and people would rather risk getting stuck underground like a mole rat than to have to deal with the one on one Donna we're here at the high on the top of her head and giant sunglasses the made to look like a fancy well there she was an aspiring actress for a minute to realize it LA had so much more to offer and is now studying for her degree in marine biology she said the only reason I even thought about acting was to meet Tom Cruise and I did it so boo ya she worked as an extra one of his movies but only for a day they fired me I was supposed to be in the background but I kept leaning in trying to make eye contact with Tom Cruise I don't care what people say about Tom Cruise that boy is hot Donna just broke up with the real life boyfriend it was another fatality of the me too movement she said it's not that he did anything offensive it's just got to the point that he was so scared of saying the wrong thing or making unwanted advances he stopped doing anything at all it was like dating a frightened jellyfish I said about Tom Cruise would have made a move on you she said you got that right blue yeah after winding drive through the canyons she dropped me off near Hollywood and vine where I snuck into a dive bar Tom Waits was shooting pool with Jack Nicholson Angelica Houston was putting money in the jukebox and Charles with Caskey was buying all the women drinks I ordered a shot of whiskey is Sean Penn toss me a cigarette with Jennifer Aniston caught in their lives and asked for a light have you ever thought you were in a Hollywood heaven but when you open your eyes you realize you just passed out in the back of a Toyota Camry I have I got out and stretched my arms and walked towards the beach there's something.

Donna LA Tom Cruise Hollywood Tom Waits Jack Nicholson Angelica Housto Charles Caskey Sean Penn Jennifer Aniston Toyota Camry
"marine biology" Discussed on X96

X96

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on X96

"Monster in the closet is correct. over one board for yet Gaeta and now we've so bikes **** bike Michael Michael who used to be if you if you can we call you bike. yeah that's fine you'd rather be Michael yeah. okay bye clues. Michael. Paul Walker was raised as a member of which church. today the church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints. beyond that one. I want to hear anymore. we don't. sure. yes okay well it is right here correct. he's a horrible he's a four but he is a board okay possible wasn't there but he was raised the bar but faced. Michael do. what is talking I don't. Johnny do you know the the guy over castle do you. yes yes of course I know too. his name yes other announcer gets it wrong all the time the colon Tim Hughes well that's no ten business day that's what I said number exactly. let's let's see let's get a good well here I am. what did Paul Walker study in college. les communications be acting see politics or D. marine biology. I wouldn't say politics incorrect all Michael Michael. I I think it was the last in marine biology it was very well. use correct. all right where we are to use to to wall and Michael controls the question this it's too with old. all right Michael. a good one here for you because you seem to know your Paul Walker. yeah it's got it right there and so it's Kerry what's the old Rocca I do. okay Michael what role did Paul Walker audition for but get the night before because he was too old. was it a Anakin Skywalker B. spider man see doctor Watson or Dee Jay Gatsby. looking..

Michael Michael Paul Walker Gaeta Paul Walker. Tim Hughes doctor Watson Johnny Dee Jay Gatsby. Kerry Michael.
"marine biology" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on KCRW

"A motorcycle and a cement truck it's three fifty a KC R. W. thanks for being with us this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelley and I'm ari Shapiro coral reefs are dying around the world and a new study suggests a way to save them the study of the Florida Keys shows that a lot of the stress on corals comes from local sources which means there are things local communities can do to help the corals NPR's pink Wong reports Brian the point has watched half of Florida's corals die off in the past twenty years watching the decline of court what we he has been heartbreaking I live in the Florida Keys and when I moved here in the early nineteen eighties I had no idea that we would be losing these corals the point a professor at Florida Atlantic University has spent his career studying corals at the leaky roof and the Florida Keys he's the lead author on any paper out in the journal marine biology it analyzes thirty years of data he's collected and its conclusion is actually hopeful you've got quite a story here would you put all this together that there actually is hope for coral reefs after all how does he figure a study which showed that warming temperatures were killing off corals but as data actually showed that the corals biggest problem was another human source too much nitrogen it comes from badly treated sewage as well as fertilizer and topsoil from people's yards and farms it feeds blooms of algae that block out the light and also throws off the nutrient balance in the water and make the calls more likely to catch disease to go through coral bleaching and to die Michael fox studies coral reefs at the woods hole oceanographic institution he wasn't involved in the study but he appreciates its long term view we're starting to have enough data to really track the impacts of local scale structures to quarrels over long enough time frames to understand how the communities are changing James Porter at the university of Georgia co authored the Florida study he says that in the past most scientists and the public figure that there was little we could do to help corals unless we fixed all of climate change what our study shows is that taking care of one off from the land which is a local phenomenon that can protect coral reefs to put this is our findings from Florida can apply to reefs around the world and that better sewage and storm water treatment might give corals a fighting chance at surviving climate change ping long NPR news.

Mary Louise Kelley Florida Keys Brian Florida professor Florida Atlantic University marine biology James Porter NPR ari Shapiro pink Wong Michael fox woods hole university of Georgia co thirty years twenty years
Florida Keys, Brian And Florida discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

02:16 min | 3 years ago

Florida Keys, Brian And Florida discussed on All Things Considered

"Coral reefs are dying around the world and a new study suggests a way to save them the study of the Florida Keys shows that a lot of the stress on corals comes from local sources which means there are things local communities can do to help the corals NPR's pink Wong reports Brian the point has watched half of Florida's corals die off in the past twenty years watching the decline of court what we he has been heartbreaking I live in the Florida Keys and when I moved here in the early nineteen eighties I had no idea that we would be losing these corals the point a professor at Florida Atlantic University has spent his career studying corals at the leaky roof and the Florida Keys he's the lead author on any paper out in the journal marine biology it analyzes thirty years of data he's collected and its conclusion is actually hopeful you've got quite a story here would you put all this together that there actually is hope for coral reefs after all how does he figure a study which showed that warming temperatures were killing off corals but as data actually showed that the corals biggest problem was another human source too much nitrogen it comes from badly treated sewage as well as fertilizer and topsoil from people's yards and farms it feeds blooms of algae that block out the light and also throws off the nutrient balance in the water and make the calls more likely to catch disease to go through coral bleaching and to die Michael fox studies coral reefs at the woods hole oceanographic institution he wasn't involved in the study but he appreciates its long term view we're starting to have enough data to really track the impacts of local scale structures to quarrels over long enough time frames to understand how the communities are changing James Porter at the university of Georgia co authored the Florida study he says that in the past most scientists and the public figure that there was little we could do to help corals unless we fixed all of climate change what our study shows is that taking care of one off from the land which is a local phenomenon that can protect coral reefs to put this is our findings from Florida can apply to reefs around the world and that better sewage and storm water treatment might give corals a fighting chance at surviving climate change ping long NPR

Florida Keys Brian Florida Professor Florida Atlantic University Marine Biology James Porter NPR Pink Wong Michael Fox Woods Hole University Of Georgia Co Thirty Years Twenty Years
"marine biology" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"I also bought it like two days after the season ended right before he left. I don't even take the tags off of it. But I thought this is a cool thing. I always making me think, though I thought it was just people who are insecure because of the like there aren't big Guinea, so skinny arms skinny all arms fat armed civilian alarms. There's A a federal arm. arm, where civilians, have the upper thousand ways you can go wrong in a basket flabby or that was the thinking behind when the Dita's came out with those awful looking sleeve. Jurors is most NBA fans have the same sort of thing where they are not gonna wear a bass end. Lebron ripped it and that kind of. Well, yeah, the players hated it. But the thinking was fans one where jerseys with sleep was that the, the players hated, but the Tyler Johnson plays best basketball ever during the era, because I feel like if you liked the sleaze now you got, like a competitive advantage over all the guys don't like to sleep right now. Tyler Johnson played his best basketball before there were any things call remotely resembling expectations, the correct answers, tally Johnson played his best best ball before he got paid a lot of money. Yeah. Well expectations, I was trying to be kind of the man who just opted in James Joan heat. Lifer James Jones. He looks good in that game to what James Johnson. Oh, yeah. I was talking about. I was going James John Jones GM for Phoenix, who bailed us out of the Tyler Johnson thing. But yes, Jane. Johnson. Looked really good in that pick up game against a bunch of civilians with arm hair. Donlevatar. Okay. John. Yeah. That's a good question. I want I was gonna ask that is everything. Okay. Oh, coffee. Neither allergies. So it makes me okay. No problems. Still God's you'll get. Yeah. You. Okay. All right. How about you? I'm bob. Thanks for your concern. Never had anyone. I've never met this concerned over helps. I appreciate it. I'm a big fan. Now I'm not okay. You don't care how I'm doing anyway. What asking me more? True. Up our show with stugatz on the ticket. All right. We have a lot of callers today, which is weird because we didn't even give out the number. So we have a guy who called the wrong number by mistake. And he keeps getting calls from Jamaica, we can get to him in a second. I don't know what exactly we're going to do there. But I, I wanna talk to Jimmy who is studying marine, biology, or is a marine biologist and university of Florida has an issue with Pat Riley. Hello, jimmy. Hey there, so I, I heard that Riley talked about how he said, we're not hunting whales anymore. We're hundred killer whales, which first off. I have a master's marine biology, so you can trust me. I'm a marine biologist killer whale is they are dolphin. But I'll dolphins are part of the Donncha seat order. So that means there's, they're a wail. But more importantly, killer whales are the most dangerous predator in the ocean that killed great white short. They take down blue whales. They hunt anything and everything in the ocean. So if you're going to have to killer whale, but that means that you should be going after the best players in the NBA. I mean if you're just saying you're going after a whale and you get blue that sits there. Sure the giant whale, but it doesn't do anything and just eat microscopic animals, like Husayn Whiteside deal. He just sitting up all this Ramona max deal. Pat Riley, you gotta understand this marine biology, references before you start saying things that don't make sense. All right. Well sounds like Pat finally gets what he's going for. But before he wasn't lying when he was saying, these signing Wales, which is why he signed Dion waiters to that kind of contract. And then Dion just didn't stop eating after that the dolphins or baby whales. According to what I'm baby wails, just smaller whales part of the same family. Well, not baby was they don't grow into the actual wheels. What do we do with this guy? That's called Jamaica, Eddie. Hi, good morning. So this guy Eddy called art show by mistake on. Hey, what's up, sorry? So you, you tried to call us and you accidentally call Jamaica..

Tyler Johnson Pat Riley Jamaica NBA James John Jones James Jones Dita Dion basketball Lebron James Joan Jimmy Jane Husayn Whiteside Phoenix Eddy GM university of Florida Donncha
You Contain Multitudes of Microplastics

60-Second Science

02:37 min | 3 years ago

You Contain Multitudes of Microplastics

"Scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm any Snead, plastic is lightweight knowledgeable, durable. But it also become so widespread that it's ending up in a lot of unwanted places including our own bodies. That's according to a new study, which found that humans are consuming shocking amount of so-called, micro-plastics micro-plastics kinda current working definition is plastic less than five millimeters. So people commonly quite that to something like a grain of rice, or assessments seed and down in terms of size class. I will say that most micro-plastics if people are interacting with our quite a bit smaller than the sesame seeds size which, I think always kinda shocked people when we start talking about the numbers because they kinda can't, you know, they can't see a lot of these things at least with the naked eye, Karen, Cox apiece, g candidate marine biology at the university of Victoria in Canada. One of the authors of the study, which is in the journal environmental science and technology micro-plastics come from numerous sources they can shed from larger plastics, or they may have been designed small to begin with further study, Cox and his team pulled together past scientific literature that calculated the number of micro-plastics in things we commonly consume such as tap and bottled water sugars seafood. Even in the air that we breathe, this analysis, help them figure out the baseline amount of micro-plastics that people are consuming every year. They couldn't include common foods like beef, poultry vegetables, in dairy in their analysis because data on them doesn't exist yet. In fact, their study could only account for fifteen percent of people's caloric intake, even missing the majority of what people swallow the research, revealed that at the very least humans appeared consume somewhere between seventy four thousand one hundred twenty one. Thousand micro classic particles every year, that number goes up for people drinking bottled water rather than tap water. Now is all this plastic safe to ingest? Scientists simply don't know, yet kind of the first estimate of dose, you could say rights with your thinking, in terms of toxicology Eco-Toxicology dose is very important factor to think about. And so this kind of presents the first estimate, but it is very much a underestimate, because of what we don't know. Thanks for listening for scientific American, sixty seconds science, I'm Anne Sneed.

COX Snead Anne Sneed Canada University Of Victoria Karen Sixty Seconds Fifteen Percent
"marine biology" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

10:55 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Life. Today is very Christie of animal husbandry at the maritime aquarium in Norwalk, Connecticut Barrett. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me. So yeah, I've kind of focus with a little bit and a little bit of a flu thing online. And and you you definitely have a pretty wide breadth and scope of animals you've worked with and you've been in a number of aquaria before we kind of get into the desert fishes, which is going to be the topic of this interview. I wanted to kind of get a little bit of background personal info nothing too personal though. So hopefully, you'll be okay. So how did you get interested in aquatic life at first, and what kind of influence you? You know, I grew up as a kid in the nineteen eighties. And Jackie says presence was kind of an influence in a lot of us that went into marine biology in the nineteen ninety s certainly undeniable. But I think the driving force for me honestly was shark week. I'm gonna Discovery Channel. When I was a kid that was the opened up my eyes and a lot of my colleagues have similar experiences really opened up my eyes to how awesome marine life. Was an and led me to eventually want to pursue a career studying it now did you have aquariums growing up in if so how did you get involved in in the hobby? I was never really a dedicated hobbyists until I was actually working in a public aquarium. My little brother growing up had aquariums. He was big into the hobby lots of planet tanks and and whatnot in his room. I was big into fishing as a kid. I would keep crayfish. And I was more of a naturalist. I enjoyed seeing what I could find down in the local Krieger when we went to the beach, and it wasn't until I had actually gotten my first job as a public aquarium that I felt like I needed to broaden my knowledge because I never kept saltwater at home. So I started keeping tanks at home as an Aquarius while I was in college. And you know, that quickly grew from a small obsession of one small reef tank to a, you know, it doesn't tanks or more completely took over the apartment where are you from Texas originally, or where were you from I grew up all over the country. My parents worked. My father was a military contractor. So we we moved around a little bit spend a lotta time in upstate New York. A fair amount of time in in Texas, but also southern California, South Carolina Virginia, but always near the beach. One of my first memories oddly enough is touching a starfish at the Birch aquarium scripts institute for oceanography when I was a kid. So we were always near the water and always connected to the water in some way, shape or form. Okay. Yeah. It sounds like you definitely had been all over. Now. You mentioned your first aquarium was a tech. Can you tell us a little bit about it? Yeah. I set up a I started working as an Aquarius, and I felt like my knowledge in saltwater was a little lacking. So I don't right into the hobby as a twenty year old kid and set up a little twenty long little nano reef in my apartment and kept the easiest one of the best piece of advice. I got another friend who's a curator another facility now who is a big reef. Geek, I asked him what coral should I start with? And he looked at me very deadpan instead start with a book. So I did I started with a book, and then ended up with a lot of the chorale morphines nothing. Extreme. But it got me that experience that I wanted and it definitely got me hooked. So you ended up with your first job at moody gardens. I had you all along decided that you were going to what you wanted to work in aquarium. And how did you get that job? You know, the jobs in our field are really really competitive in public aquariums. I'm hiring for an Aquarius right now. I've got over seventy resumes. It seems like it's getting more competitive. So they're difficult to get especially in Galveston, Texas. There's a there's a great school on the island, Texas A and M university is there and there's fifteen hundred marine biology students. So the competition was even more fierce for you know, the two or three part time positions, it might be available at the local aquarium, but I got started through volunteering as many places as I could. And I worked in education and was persistent and didn't get discouraged when I got turned down time and time again and after probably about the fourteenth interview. I finally landed a part time position. Yeah. I mean, I know a lot of people that definitely want to work a query, and I can kind of see what you're talking about. Just. With with people not being disappointed in kind of having to go for it. So that's awesome perseverance. It pays to be persistent and pays to volunteer and intern. So because you have been all over the place both in terms of life, and a lot of really cool aquarium you have worked at I I was gonna ask for a quick highlight reel. So can you tell me one of your favorite memories from I guess if you had one at moody gardens, but also Dallas aquarium in odyssey aquarium in Arizona. Oh, yes. I mean, there's so many the great thing about this job is that you love every single daddy. You come to work. You'll never get rich doing it. And there's a thousand things I could pick from van to pick one, you know, being on the coast moody gardens being able to collect collect sharks and get paid to go shark fishing is one of the best jobs, you can possibly have in Dallas what I really appreciated about Dallas. I worked at the Dallas aquarium at fair park, which is not to be confused with the Dallas world aquarium. It's an eighty year old facility. I mean, I was really struck by the sense of history working there. You know, this aquarium has been around since one thousand nine thirty six their generations of really talented fish keepers who came before me and really built a legacy and win the place opened in thirty six there weren't a lot of public aquariums in the country. And certainly even the hobby was not as nearly as big as it is now. So these guys really laid the foundation I felt a real sense of pride working there. Because these guys that came before me laid the foundation for what we now know is animal husbandry, and what we know is fish, keeping they developed a lot of these techniques. But for me the highlight was definitely getting to renovate. It place was falling apart. When I got there and getting to gut the building from scratch, modernize everything the life supports the filtration and really bring the aquarium into the twenty first century was was definitely the highlight for me. And honestly, I went on from there. I got the opportunity to open a a massive nearly two million gallon aquarium out in the desert and the highlight. There was was being able to build a place from the ground. Roundup. I mean from absolute scratch, and we did it very quickly. We brought in over thirty thousand animals in a very short time frame hired a very talented team. Just got to work with with wildlife from all over the world saltwater freshwater Indo Pacific Caribbean fresh, you know, just a huge variety of wildlife. That was definitely the coolest part for me. Well, I did have the opportunity to visit odyssey. I think a year ago or so and it was yeah. Pretty amazing. Definitely having all that aquatic life in the desert. We'll talk a little bit more about that. But I also heard and I think you kind of mentioned previously one of your other little adventures at Dallas aquarium the peanut butter. Why don't you tell us about that? So we kind of had this joke for years that we should we should feed peanut butter to jellyfish and would make them peanut butter and jelly fish. You know, a great pun. And then we started thinking about it. And we were doing some research. I was looking at alternate food sources to reformulate are jail diets. And I found a lot of papers suggesting. Peanut meal could be replaced as a substitute for fishmeal in these food. Sources, you know, the jail diets that we use an aquarium are very similar to the way flake food and pellet food is made it's kind of a mixture of shrimp meal fishmeal binders little bit everything goes into it. So this really intrigued me, so we tried it. We we fed peanut butter. We multiplied it with a blender and just fed peanut butter too, little moon, jellies and surprisingly enough. They grew when they thrived and get to the point where they're actually reproducing. So is it was really funny for us to say, hey, wild is not only did this work. But there was enough protein in peanut butter for these jellyfish to grow into thrive and to grow in a natural healthy rate, which was hilarious. So we wrote it up as kind of a hearted joke. But kind of a, hey, look at this and a an aquarium journal and next thing, I know national geographic's calling me because it went viral on the internet. That's amazing. So has not yet become a standard of practice hasn't become a standard practice. Yeah. It it really really fouls. The water. Okay. I got moving onto odyssey not long after. That. So I haven't had a chance to a lot of follow up draws. But I'd be willing to bet there is an application for peanut grow team to replace some of the fish and the shrimp proteins in a lot of the foods, we feed to our animals. Yeah. No. I mean that seems to definitely support that. So that not as cool. So now, you are in Connecticut. Now, what made you decide to move from Arizona to Connecticut. You know, the defining factor for me as as a marine biologist and somebody who works with fish, especially a lot of marine fish is that I had been landlocked for about twelve years that point I moved away from the coast was in Dallas for ten years at odyssey for almost two and the opportunity came to move to an aquarium on the coast, which was enticing. I was a smaller aquarium, but a really interesting collection focused on the Long Island Sound when I go somewhere I've seen a lot of aquariums. So when I go somewhere, I'm always more interested in the little aquarium that really focuses on the local habitat that to me is oftentimes more interesting than seeing the same types of you know, they may be gorgeous. But the same types of reef tanks, and and fish displays that I've seen in other facilities. I like seeing something new and something focused on the local habitat. Because ultimately, that's what we're here to do is educate that next generation of kids and inspire them to care about their local habitats and inspire them to be a force for change in the world. And of course, it didn't hurt. The fact that this facility happens to have an amazing. Conservation research program. We have scientists on staff, and we have our own sixty eight foot hybrid electric research vessel was just kind of the icing on the cake. Well, that kind of segues really, well, it's desert fishes. Obviously, these would be kind of local for us, and and also kind of bringing it to attention some of the issues involved with that. And I kind of agree with you. I really do like the aquarium's that are not it's kind of almost like craft beer. I guess you know, if you think about it. Yeah. You know, you can get the same types of beer all over the place. But the ones that are really unique to a specific area are kinda the ones that you really enjoy a little bit more. I think right arm to table approach in fish gaping. Exactly. So yes, let's move onto a desert fishes now as we alluded to earlier, you've definitely done a lot of work with a lot of different species of animals been all over the place. So so desert fishes, it's kind of a kind of almost like an oxymoron, this is kind of maybe more of an ecology type question, but how to fish end up in in the desert. That's a great question. You had the last thing people think of when they think of the desert's are fish, not only living but thriving in those advocates, but there are quite a few fishes in the desert. If you look at the US in particular a lot of our western fishes in the air. It lands are in a lot bigger trouble as well than their eastern counterparts. But the way the fishes in it up there you look back about one hundred and it was at its peak at about one hundred one hundred and ten million years ago. Most of the central US was covered by what was called the Cretaceous seaway. It was a tropical. Probably coral filled see full of sores and Moses soars and fishes. So most of what we think of now as desert is Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada lot of that was covered by very shallow warm ocean one hundred and ten million years ago..

Dallas Texas Aquarius moody gardens Birch aquarium scripts institu Arizona Connecticut US Norwalk Jackie Christie New York Galveston Krieger intern Long Island fair park Indo Pacific Caribbean Moses
"marine biology" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Senior this year. I've been getting many questions from my classmates and teachers about my post high school plans, it's like people expect this huge detailed timeline. And I don't have it. When I look at my friends one guy wants to pursue marine biology at Santa Cruz group intended to study film at UCLA another wants to study neuro science at UC Davis. Honestly, it's daunting my future. Still looks like a blank slate. I entertain ideas about business or media aren't jobs. Exactly. And I'm not sure where fit in sometimes I feel like I'm running out of time. So I decided to enroll in community college next year. This choice was unexpected for my first two years in high school. I was regimented. My parents pushed me to take honors and AP classes because they wanted me to be competitive for college for a while. This path seemed predestined, but then last year over dinner, my mom asked me which colleges I wanted to tour. She wanted to start planning and when I told her I wasn't ready to tour colleges. She seemed a little surprised then explained my reasoning. That I feel I shouldn't spend money on tuition before. I know what direction I'm going. She understands these days. My piercing jealous that I'm opting out of the stress of senior year. They're writing college essays crashing on application deadlines and waiting to hear back from schools. I'm just kind of cruising through until graduation. My friends also asked me if I'm worried about missing out on that classic college experience moving out of my parent's house when I turn eighteen living in dorms college parties, and you know, what I am kind sad to miss out on these early adult milestones. But I'm also okay with the trade off. I think it's worth it not stick on student debt once still feeling lost essentially, I'm buying myself some more time, and when I do go to college it'll be on my terms with the perspective. I'm Chris Well, Chris wilderness..

Santa Cruz UCLA UC Davis Chris Well Chris wilderness two years
"marine biology" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm a high school senior this year. I've been getting many questions from my classmates and teachers about my post high school plans, it's like people expect this huge detailed timeline. And I don't have it. When I look at my friends one guy wants to pursue marine biology at Santa Cruz. I'll group intended to study film at UCLA another wants to study neuro science at UC Davis. Honestly, it's daunting my future. Still looks like a blank slate. I entertain ideas about business or media aren't jobs. Exactly. And I'm not sure where I would fit in. Sometimes I feel like I'm running out of time. So I decided to enroll in community college next year. This choice was unexpected for my first two years in high school. I was regimented. My parents pushed me to take honors and AP classes because they wanted me to be competitive for college. For a while. This path seemed predestined, but then last year over dinner, my mom asked me which colleges I wanted to tour. She wanted to start planning and when I told her I wasn't ready to tour colleges. She seemed a little surprised then I explained my reasoning that I feel I shouldn't spend money on tuition before. I know what direction I'm going. She understands these days. My piercing jealous that I'm opting out of the stress of senior year. They're writing college essays crashing on application deadlines and waiting to hear back from schools. I'm just kind of cruising through until graduation. My friends. Also asking me, if I'm worried about missing out on that classic college experience moving out of my parent's house when I turned eighteen living in dorms college parties, and you know, what I am kind of sad to miss out on these early adult milestones. But I'm also okay with the trade off. I think it's worth it not Stig on student debt while I'm still feeling lost. Essentially, I'm buying myself. Some more time. Time. And when I do go to college it'll be on my terms with the perspective. I'm Chris Welton, Chris wilderness..

Santa Cruz UCLA Chris Welton UC Davis Chris wilderness two years
"marine biology" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:21 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Co ponder of biota aquarium. Hi, kevin. Thanks for joining us today. I ROY thanks for having me. So I like to ask some personal questions at the beginning to so we can kind of get to know your little bit better. You know, I've known you for a long time. But I know our listeners may not when did you first get involved in the hobby. Jeez. Wow. Well in forty seven so when I was seven years old and Daytona Beach, my parents had an aquarium behind our bar had a brass porthole and the whole nine yards, and I started taking care of that they're saltwater tank when I was seven so I've always had salt water, of course, at that time. It was under gravel and airlifts. And you know, we put fish in and tried to figure out how to keep them alive. It was quite a struggle was behind the bar. Did you drink a lot like while you're working on the fish or this was before then? Yeah. And I waited so I was about well. Okay. Good. So what would what would you say was your first fish in first aquarium, then that you maybe had ownership on? Oh, my own aquarium was probably set it up when I was fifteen I started working in a pet store and Daytona and at that time, you know, large polyp Stony corals like elegance need corals and stuff for super popular with Calera and other Makharadze. So I thought I had a pretty nice tank Elkins coral and Sinclair, so what did you use for what was lighting back? Then. Oh, it was all just like you had to t- twelve tubes at big inch and a half Amador fluorescent tubes. Okay. Now, obviously, you you said you're forty seven you admitted your age, which is cool you've been in it for a long time. So what kept you interested in? You know, you mentioned your kind of first official tank when you were fifteen what kept you interested in the hobby since that time, I guess, yeah. No. Maybe when I was born in February and was a high-seas by birth. I've always loved the water. And of course, growing up in China. I started surfing and fourth grade. So I started spending a lot of time in the ocean. My dad has always been a deep sea fishermen. So we would go off shore group burn snapper for dinner. And so I kind of learned to appreciate and love me ocean. And at an early age. Luckily, just by where I lived in the summers we would go by boat to the Bahamas mostly the avocados or while driving down to the keys, so yeah, I think I just I just love being out on the water one way or another just whether it's fishing surfing or or just hanging out. So you ended up becoming a Florida gator. Right. I did head you. You went to university of Florida had you considered actually working in the business at that time when you were going to college now. No, that's a funny story. So I had aquariums through high school and worked in retail stores, and such and went to Gainesville was actually pre med pre dental. My father is an oral surgeon or was just retired from Daytona. After fifty two years had my sights on stepping into as oral surgery practice. But my junior year at Florida, I had my guest room in our townhouse converted to a coral farm, and it, you know, spending most of my late evenings reading fish books instead of microbiology immunology. Your allergy bucks was just fascinated with growing corals and propagating young. And so two garrison my junior year decided I wanted to get into more marine biology. So I took all the marine biology courses like Florida, which they don't have a marine bio degree. So I ended up with a minor in zoology chemistry and and finished with my microbiology and cell science degree, but graduated in ninety five and started a quarrel firemen homestead with Julian sprung. Wow, that's cool. I actually didn't know that. I knew you did microbial and fell salt mines, but I didn't realize that. And actually just an update they they actually have a marine. Algae now. So we've gotten a little bit more current nine joy, it I took a graduate level crews and went to the drag for two guys and looked at the H in sediments. And so that was amazing to the Florida. And yeah to graduate level courses, and then some invertebrate zoology courses, so I could just get as much marine science under my belt as I can. So I don't know if you wanna maybe give us a real brief taking us a little bit to the president from before getting to buy owed. I guess maybe from Julian to what you did before biota before biota. So after Julian the quality ranch, I was fortunate enough to move up to four Pierce and was one of the founders of our so ninety seven after a couple of years of collecting marine life and the keys and reselling Gorgonio and live sand hermit crabs and secret numbers for cleaning tanks, and such why we propagated Fiji oral. Of course. This was pretty new that SPF squirrels in terms of smallpox sunny quarrels reports were coming into the country. So we started fragmenting those, but to kind of generate income, I was a sustainable collector MIT's and learned a bunch about that. But it was. This long as collecting packing shipping. Propagating, you know. So when the opportunity arose in ninety seven to come up to Fort Pierce and start O R A, I jumped at it, of course, invertebrates and corals were my, but I knew that if we. Produced fish, mostly and other species would eventually get to do corals and other things. So yeah, that was ninety seven two thousand six when I left this CEO and president of RAM that was a tremendous learning experience and that businesses still going strong. So let's shift gears a little bit and talk about your co ponder for biota before we get into the business. Can you tell us a little bit about Tom bowling? Yeah. Tom tumbling, and I met in ninety nine naphtha marine ornamental is on the big island of Hawaii. And. Yeah, Tom, and I hit it off right away. Because I was the chief operating officer at Oreo at the time, and he was propagating seahorses under the name ocean oddities, which I loved and he was delivering seahorses believe it or not in small aquariums to pet stores as a package deal. So he and I were on the same page with regards to where we wanted to go with the direction of the hobby and to see people, get completely sustainable. Aquarium way back then in terms of even RA we wanted to really produce an aquaculture aquarium ever got there. But yes, Tom at stayed friends actually employed him to run the clam farm and the Marshall Islands which was owned by RA. And this was two thousand three two thousand four to two thousand six so that was good. You did a great job, and is one of the type of individuals who who does well in an island environment, which is a tough place to live. So he was a real asset to have their so Tom, and I go way back. So it's only fitting that we started this business a year ago two weeks ago to set out to do there. They all aquaculture biota. Now, I also wanted to mention since you you did work with them as well. And you you're involved with sustainability oriented groups, could you talk a little bit about a few of those groups T R and pet sustainability coalition. Sure. Yeah. Well, after my time at RA, I I got into agriculture again with sustainable. Botox in Tennessee. What's to me proved you could run a commercial farm indoors and a complete lambaste facility, which was interesting. And then of course, last couple years, I've been was with Piscine energetics sustainably harvested than invasive species out of Canada. So I've always been behind sustainable projects and the pet sustainability coalition. I got involved with them when I was not by seeing their grade organization just turned trying to promote sustainability throughout the pet industry. Whether it's you know, operations waste streams or product development, so really excited to to support what they're trying to do and bringing industry to a more sustainable direction. And then of course, we join one percent for the planet. So right one percent of our profits. Go back to ocean conservation organizations or less rotation foundation. While I I was the operations manager just as a love that I wanted to give back after seeing that the recent Florida just really die off in the nineties and early two thousands. So it's really. During the lines to be able to to go and actually actively participate in refrigeration worked. So I did that for two years, and I'm on the board of directors with four west ration- foundation, and they're doing amazing work with mostly foreign and staghorn coral on the Caribbean right now. But there's a number of other species they're beginning to work with as well as taking the techniques global. That's great. I know you've done a lot of work as you mentioned with the sustainable causes in in groups. So let's talk about bio two now a little bit. And I guess there's kind of two by otas here. Right. There's sort of the aquaculture biota, and then you've got bio to query is you wanna maybe differentiate those two and then we can dive into biota quorums a little bit. Sure, we'll biota obviously, wasn't was not GIC move to keep it to business things together because we share similar partner, and we share a similar mission, and so by marine life nursery is the plough operation at Tom bowling runs. And he only cells cultured corals and fish out of plow. And biota aquariums is the sole US distributor of biota marine life nursery products in the US that store. So it works out such Tom's growing a number of species that will end up in the biota aquarium, and he's also growing number of other species that are both of aquarium species fairly large like their blue line bream and clown triggers and some other fish of aquariums, very interested in as well as the rain forgo bees and others type Nobis, and we're working on some pygmy angels that will end up going into biota aquarium packages. So it really makes sense for his fish to come by other aquariums. In Florida to be distributed to pet stores in that what he's able to distribute this product throughout the US direct to stores from. Wow. So it's a very strategic. So that's how that, but you names tied together. So let's talk more about biota quorums. Now, I guess what was the you've been working with Tom? And then obviously we're involved with some of these other businesses. What made you decide to go for it into? Set up this concept. Oh, I think it was timing. Really? I mean, this is a dream that really I've had for twenty years, and it was all about timing. So last time I got close to actually putting this business to reality was in two thousand eight and the economy took a turn. So it just didn't make sense because you know, saltwater aquariums are fairly expensive. It's a luxury item and would not do well in a depressed economy. So I got pretty close no eight, and then, you know, after that, I just end up getting a couple more jobs in pursuing my career further before Tom coming to me last year, actually MAC now in Washington DC, saying, you know, I have supply, and I have a partner who's interested in in supporting the concept, and it didn't take long from there. Really? It was just the matter of doing it with the right people. So we can see it. You know succeed has any business is critical. The partners are and how it comes together. And this was just like the perfect combination between his? Supply chain and allow and the opportunity and the economy and other things that are going on with.

Tom Florida Julian Tom bowling partner Daytona Beach president US university of Florida Daytona kevin Bahamas Tom tumbling tank Elkins MIT Amador Gainesville
"marine biology" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:22 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Kevin games. Co-founder of biota. Hi, kevin. Thanks for joining us today. Roy thanks for having me. So I like to ask some personal questions at the beginning to so we can kind of get to know you a little bit better. You know, I've known you for a fairly long time. But I know our listeners may not when did you first get involved in the hobby. Jeez. Wow. Well, I'm forty seven. So when I was seven years old in Daytona Beach. My parents had an aquarium behind our bar at a brass porthole and the whole nine yards, and I started taking care of their saltwater tank when I was seven so I've always had salt water, of course, at that time. It was under gravel and airlifts and know we put fish in and tried to figure out how to keep them alive. It was quite a struggle. This is who is behind the bar. Did you drink a lot like while you're working on a fish or this was before then? Yeah. And I waited so I was about well. Okay. Good. So what would what would you say was your first fish in first aquarium than that? You maybe had ownership on my own aquarium was probably I set it up when I was fifteen I started working in a pet store in Daytona. And at that time, you know, large polyps Doni corals like elegance need, corals and stuff were super popular with Clare and other Makharadze. So I thought I had a pretty nice tank Elkins coral and Clarisa. So what did you use for what was lighting back? Then. Oh, it was all fluorescent just like you had to t- twelve tubes at big inch and a half or fluorescent tubes. Okay. Now, obviously, you you said you're forty seven you admitted your age, which is cool you've been in it for a long time. So what kept you interested in? You know, you mentioned you're kinda first official tank when you were fifteen what kept you interested in the hobby since that time, I guess, yeah. No. Maybe when I was born in February and was a Icees by birth. I've always loved the water and a growing up in Daytona. I started surfing in fourth grade. So I started spending a lot of time in the ocean. My dad has always been a deep sea fishermen. So we would go off shore. And that's group burn snapper for dinner. And so I kind of learned to appreciate and love the ocean at an early age. Luckily, just by where I live in the summers we would go by boat to the Bahamas mostly the avocados or while driving down to the keys, so yeah, I think I just I just love being out on the water one way or another whether it's fishing surfing or or just hanging out. It's so you ended up becoming a Florida gator. Right. I did head you. You went to university of Florida had you considered actually working in the business at that time when you were going to college. No, that's a funny story. So I had aquariums through high school and worked in retail stores, and such and went to Gainesville was actually pre med pre dental. My father is an oral surgeon or was just retired from the Daytona after fifty two years. So I kinda had my sights on stepping into as oral surgery practice. But my junior year at Florida, I had my guest room, and our townhouse converted to a coral farm, and you know, spending most of my late evenings reading this books instead of microbiology immunology. Your allergy bucks was just fascinated with you know, growing corals and propagating young. And so I should gears and my junior year decided I wanted to get into more marine biology. So I took all the marine biology courses like Florida, which they don't have a a marine bio degree. So I ended up with a minor in zoology chemistry and finished with my microbiology and cell science degree, but graduated in ninety five and started a farm and homestead with joins Brown. Wow. That's cool. I actually didn't know that. I know you did microbial and Phil salt mines, but I didn't realize that. And actually just an update they they actually have marine by. Algae now. So we've gotten a little bit more current nine enjoyed it. I took a graduate level crews and went to the drive for two D H in sediments. And so that was amazing to the Florida. And yeah to graduate level courses, and then some invertebrate zoology forces. So I could just get as much a marine science under my belt as a kid. So I don't know if you wanna maybe give us a real brief taking us a little bit to the president from before getting to buy out. I guess maybe from Julian to what you did before biota before biota. So after Julian the quality, France, I was fortunate enough to move up to four Pierce and was one of the founders of our so in ninety seven after a couple of years of collecting marine life mckee's and reselling Gorgonio wins in live San hermit crabs and seeking numbers for cleaning response, and such why we propagated CG quarrels forces was pretty new SPF squirrels in terms of, you know, smallpox sunny corals Akra floors, we're coming into the country. So we started fragmenting those, but to kind of generate income, I was a sustainable collector in the keys and learned a bunch about that. But it was. As long as collecting packing shipping. Propagating, you know. So when the opportunity arose in ninety seven to come up to four peers and start O R, I jumped at it, of course, invertebrates and corals were that I knew that if we mostly produced fish, mostly and other species would eventually get to do corals and other things so yeah, that was ninety seven two thousand six when I left this CEO and president of RAM. That was a tremendous learning experience and that businesses still going strong. So let's shift gears a little bit and talk about your co ponder for biota before we get into the business. Can you tell us a little bit about Tom bullying? Yeah. Tom tumbling. And I met in ninety nine the marine ornamental is on the big island of Hawaii. And. Yeah, Tom, and I hit it off right away. Because I was the chief operating officer at orient the time, and he was propagating seahorses under the name ocean oddities which I loved and he was delivering seahorses believe it or not in small aquariums pet stores as a package deal. So he and I were on the same page with regards to where we wanted to go with the direction of the hobby and to see people get completely sustainable aquarium way back then in terms of even are we wanted to really produce an aquaculture aquarium ever got there. But Tom, and I had stayed friends actually employ them to run the clam farm in the Marsh. Islands which was owned by RA. And this was two thousand three two thousand four to two thousand six so that was good. I mean, he did a great job, and is one of the type of individuals who does well in an island environment, which is a tough place to live. So he was a real asset to have their so Tom, and I go way back. So it's only fitting that we started this business a year ago two weeks ago to set out to do the the all aquaculture biota Barnum's. Now, I also wanted to mention since you you did work with them as well. And and you you're involved with sustainability oriented groups, could you talk a little bit about a few those groups T R S and the pet sustainability coalition. Sure. Yeah. Well, you know after my time at our I got into aquaculture again with sustainable aquatics in Tennessee. What's me prove you could run a commercial farm indoors and a complete as facility, which was interesting. And then of course, last couple of years, I've been was with by seen energetics sustainably Harvey. Than invasive species out of Canada. So I've always been behind sustainable projects and the pet sustainability coalition. I got involved with them when I was not by seeing their a organization just trying to promote sustainability throughout the petty industry. Whether it's operations way streams or product development, so really excited to to support what they're trying to do and bringing industry, so more sustainable direction. And then of course, we join one percent for the planet. So that one percent of our profits. Go back to ocean conservation organizations or less ration- foundation, while I was the operations manager just as a love that I wanted to give back after seeing the the recent Florida just really die off in the nineties and early two thousands. So it's really a dream of mine to go and actually actively participate in refrigeration worked. So I did that for two years, and I'm on the board of directors with the Australian foundation and are doing amazing work with more. Mostly one. On the Caribbean right now. But there's a number of other species that they're beginning to work with as well as taking the techniques global. That's great. I know you've done a lot of work as you mentioned with a sustainable causes in in groups. So let's talk about bio two now a little bit and there's kind of two by odors here, right? There's some sort of the aquaculture biota, and then you've got bio to query you wanna maybe differentiate those two and then we can dive into two quorums a little bit. Sure, we'll biota obviously was a strategic move to keep it to business things together because we share similar partner, and we share a similar mission. And so by on marine life nursery is the plough operation that Tom bowling runs. And he only cells cultured corals and fish out of and biota quorums is the sole US distributor of biota marine life nursery products in the US at store. So it works out such Tom's growing in number of species that will end up in the biota aquarium, and he's also growing a number of other species. That are both of aquarium species. Is there get very large like their blue line sea bream and triggers and some other fish of aquariums, very interested in as well as the rain forgo bees and other fake, no reasonable working on some pygmy angels that will end up going into biota aquarium packages. So it really makes sense for his fish to come to biota aquariums. In Florida to be distributed that stores in that way. He's able to distributors product throughout the US director stores from. Wow. So it's a very strategic. So that's how the two names tied together. So let's talk more about biota query. Now, I guess what was the you've been working with Tom? And then obviously we're involved with some of these other businesses. What made you decide to go for it? And to set up this concept. Oh, I think it was timing. Really? I mean, this is a dream that really have had for twenty years, and it was all about timing. So last time I got close to actually putting this business to reality was in two thousand. Thousand eight and the economy took a turn. So it just didn't make sense because salt water quorums are fairly expensive. It's a luxury item and would not do well in a depressed economy. So I got pretty close in a way. And then, you know, after that, I I just end up getting a couple more jobs in pursuing my career further before time coming to me last year actually at MAC now in Washington DC insane. You know, I have supply, and I have a partner who's interested in in supporting the concept, and it didn't take long from there. Really? It was just the matter of doing it with the right people. So we can see it. You don't succeed as any business is critical to the partners are and how it comes together. And this was just like, you know, the perfect combination between his supply chain. Wow. And the opportunity and the economy and other.

Tom Daytona Florida partner kevin Daytona Beach US president university of Florida Co-founder Roy tank Elkins Bahamas Tom tumbling Julian Caribbean Washington Hawaii
"marine biology" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"I everybody welcome back to food for thought Billy cost to here on a Sunday night. Again, brought to you by the boxer. Jimmy Johnson has has the week off. She's dealing with some personal stuff. We all have personal stuff. We have to get to now. And again, so you know, what we're fine. I've got Beck's here from the Mattie show, our producer. She's or millennial of the week currently eating on food for thought. And we started the show we've got Josephine and chef Louis from aura on boylston street in Boston. Check it out. I'm telling you, it's fabulous. It's a right across the street from the Boston public library. And now we're joined in studio by Susie Hayes. This is a cool story. So I'm checking out the newspapers as I do every morning either. The actual believe it or not new. Newspaper old school or on my ipad or my cell phone, and the Boston Globe food section had this really cool feature piece on you, Susie. Thank you. So it's nice meeting. You in person. It was even nice meeting you in the newspaper. Nice meeting you. So I've got to get the story because it's cool one. You started studying marine biology, and that was in Hawaii. Yes, why would you ever leave Hawaiian comeback? It's it's kind of a long story. But I I was always super fascinated by marine mammals Dwayne it came to the decision of where should I go to school? There is no other choice. It was a no-brainer shore to go to Hawaii where to go. Yeah. So I did. And I I was there for all four years and my junior year actually did an internship at the New England aquarium through you came back to Boston did the aquarium Boston to the aquarium went back graduated, and I just I fell in love with the city of Boston. And I just I. I was like a half a have to live there. So you're gonna love this asking me what I did last week. What did you do last week? I went lion fish hunting lion fish hunting. Yeah. Now, you know, the story of lion fish right there like destroying the Caribbean waterways. It's just a very destructive fish and as a marine biologist. You can appreciate that. They're in the waters of the Caribbean. And now have come as far here is Rhode Island because some aquarium in the Bahamas closed down and decided to dump all the fish in the ocean, rather than give them to another aquarium, and they're very destructive. So it's okay. They actually encourage lion fish. They actually the dive shops down there have lion fish hunting trips that you can go on as a scuba diver. So there that's crazy. Yeah. They're super dangerous. So that was very Brie. I'm telling you Bill lives on the edge. Diving someday. So anyway, while working the aquarium, you can tell I read the piece while working the aquarium you took a job bartending. Yes. And I forget what bar was up Bukowski. But that wasn't the only bar you work back. Then right. No, I actually bartended at PF changs for a long time the hostess they're in high school, and I had a history with them. And I really was trying to find myself in my career and one they went to another and I started working at the cow ski. And I kind of got a crash course in beer because I really didn't know much tonight. I fell in love. And now you have a very impressive title. What's the restaurant groups name? I know there's a name a jar. Selves Harker town Harker town. Okay. Jared Jared Harker Garrett. So you've got eastern standard. You have island creek oyster, you have the Hawthorne there in Kenmore square. You've got wrote thirty four in Boston wrote thirty four Portsmouth New Hampshire. What am I missing? You said. I think Burlington in Burlington. Yeah. Also, so what is your title beer director beard director? So how do you go from marine biology? To bartending and now beard director for a very very highly regarded group of restaurants, a lot of hard work, really drinking drinking. Yes, it's very hard. You and love this game. So how long have you been beard director? It's going on two years now. Okay. So at row thirty four where you are b director like what's the average day for a beer director?.

Boston director Susie Hayes Boston Globe Caribbean Jared Jared Harker Garrett Hawaii Beck Jimmy Johnson Billy Rhode Island Mattie Bahamas producer New England Josephine Kenmore square Bukowski Bill
"marine biology" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

The Flop House Podcast

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

"Because I think they needed a character whose first name was an anagram for the actors first name because he kept not knowing when it was his turn to talk, and they would be his carelessly assumed named Tom. And they're like, Tom. What are we going to do? And he would just be staring off into space basin. Jason we need a name that sounds more. Like jason. What are we going to do probably wanna tie it in with like Joan in the whale? Oh, yeah. Good point. And also the Jonas brothers. Oh, I'm can only soon. Yeah. So Jason safe Jonas Taylor. He's investigate. I'm wreck that has some survivors inside it. It's at the bottom of the he's a deep sea rescue diver, but something starts attacking the sunken sub that they're going in and Jason say, the mess to leave some of his men behind to save the rest, and he's accused of cowardice by Dr Heller who is all we're having. We're having like a deep madness. Yeah. And now. The person I was watching this movie with they pointed out that was their name. Meg was a Meg Ryan. Yeah. Wasn't my grind. Oh am. I in this. Great. I love watching him in like in the cut. I kept poking her to make sure that I was right that her skin was made mostly cartilage. And I was okay. But she pointed out that the submarine that the rescuing the people from blows up immediately after the rescue happens and the guys like we could've saved every why didn't you save like we can see with your is that the submarine just fucking blew up like immediately after this happened. I don't know it just seems like this guy spends most of the time judging Jason safe and for no reason whatsoever. When I feel like there's plenty of other reasons to judge Jonas Taylor. Yeah. Yeah. Well, he's he's the character exists only to help put only to not believe the main character. I mean Jason's as does say that a giant. Prehistoric shark a tea or some kind of giant monster attacked the sub. And he's like, you imagined it you you're just a scary. You're scared of everything, but that character, basically, just exists. So Jason Statham can have like a critic that he has to push back against a much like Sumi pushed back against the critics who saw them egg. I don't think gave it very many good reviews. Okay. Then cut to I guess the present or the future. It's. Years later. It is five years later. Okay. There's a helicopter that flies to an offshore research station using at minimum one hundred different shots. It's like that part in taken where Liam Neeson jumps over a fence and the is like fifteen or sixteen different shots like that with this helicopter. It's just like so many different shots this helicopter. And you're like, I get it you rented a helicopter you wanted to make the most of it. Okay. Sometimes sometimes it requires a lot of different angles in order to make. To make Liam Neeson's body appear. Like, it's moving at any kind of speed. Now in the helicopters, delivering rainn Wilson who is a billionaire has been funding a marine biology station run by Dr Zang and his daughter who is a marine biologist and his daughter's daughter who is a little girl who is somehow at a marine biology underwater experimental station that is at risk of being attacked by giant shark. I mean, Ellie, you know, how much it costs have childcare. That's true. That's very true. But she's a single parent Elliott. Her husband ran off with a Pilates instructor. They they do make that very clear. I mean, it's I maybe it was take your daughter to work life..

Jason Statham Jonas Taylor Meg Ryan Liam Neeson Tom rainn Wilson Joan Elliott Dr Zang instructor Dr Heller Sumi five years
"marine biology" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

Atheist Nomads

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on Atheist Nomads

"They both grew out of the Adventists movement and similar in their fundamentalism. Thank you. Yeah. The baby is sometimes fun joi-. Yep. Ignored this long having children. Three life notes respect. Yeah. But yeah, the the J w similarities are large and the distinctions are also quite large. Yeah. But there's definitely some Kins kinsman ship. They're not the right word people are attracted to the energy put off by people who used to share the same suffering. Well, that's because we just want to feel understood and right alone. Yes, totally totally which is why you hanging out with douchebag people. Okay. Made to do that. Sorry. I just wanted to see you. You know is good. But she's like I'm going to say. This poor kid. The next several don't really need any comment dust enough the degree it's informative while still being relatable down to earth. Conversations doesn't off the degree and everything. Oh, that's. I want to. Here. Dozen himself chooses which emails he reads aloud so chose it goes those are about me, you guys don't talk. Great, by the way, everyone. It is informative there. Right. It's interesting. You pick you pick subjects and you talk about them at an educated fashion. And it's great. And I. I think I don't know if you edited it out probably not maybe not because I didn't listen to myself. But there was a point in time when I was just looking at you with my mouth open, Mike, how do you know this stuff? I am. So impressed right now, actually. What's that? I did leave that in L could. Well, you're not to school. Yeah. Exactly. The actual thing. He wanted to do with his life for a period of time. Like, I get that the degree now. But the thing is that now you're using your degree such a good way. And I'm like, I don't use my degrading marine biology. Literally were invented. It's like it's so bunch of nerds can be like, you know. And I know a lot about this one thing, let's totters. They have to pay really, well, they really are as a reasonable eighty thousand dollars in debt. Yeah. And for what I think technically, I'm an otter and for what could for a bear. All right. Nip you later. And for what could be improved just more content doesn't have two degrees should be time stamps. So they could be listened back. That smart that is like the one because there's a lot of information. I used to time stamp every episode or every single story that was who'd. Who'd like who does that? And you do. Oh, yeah. I figured I could pull off time stamping degree. And you know news when the feedback starts that wouldn't be a lot of like, it's like chapters. It's like this. Is this section this section? And then that at least I help people advocate, but an hour. Yeah. It's difficult. I know when I'm looking through something that podcast is just thirteen minutes. Let's see where we're right content. I mean, what what what's that mean? They just want more. There's always gonna be thirsty listeners who more than you can give them what you like. But it's it's a good. It's a good. It's a good thing to know that there's hungry malls out there. But nobody has time to double the workload of the one guy who does all the editing like that's the funnel that it has to go through. So here's how you get more. You become a pitcher? When I don't shut up for twenty minutes about some obscure cake dumb thing where we go off on a tangent. He doesn't edit it so much as just shops. It goes. All right patriots fucking deal with it. And that saves him time to because we do these chunks. Why did we might talk about the history of cheddar cheese or something for ten minutes? And it's like, yeah. I mean. Yeah. Some people care about that. Really? It's a slot. And nerds, you know, how we can just get in our little circles. No wage so pointless. And then the final one was of again, maybe a small segment to highlight specific flaws in religious texts light contradictions, you know. Oh, did you. Okay. Yeah. No. I'm what? Oh, but have you guys seen that posted that one guy made its online where he shows all the inaccuracies and embark procedures in the bible and how they all interact with each other..

Mike Dozen eighty thousand dollars thirteen minutes twenty minutes ten minutes two degrees
"marine biology" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"marine biology" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

"Another question that was raised by your talk as you come from family of scientists. I also come from a family of sign cool. Do you think that coming from science or from scientists makes a person more immune to bullshit? Very good question. Bullshit of all types. Sure. Let's let's go bullshit about types. You know, our as opposed to bullshit that is within the realm of scientific immoral or. Yeah. Or like, what their parents specifically, did, you know, like, I I have my parents were biologists. Right. My my mom's a PHD name idea as marine biology. My sister became a nuclear physicist and now she's a science reporter for science news. Awesome publication. I developed an interest in evolution. And I have, you know, a pretty strong foundation in that field, and I can serve detect. I'm pretty good at like something out like evolutionary psychology bullshit. You don't you know, that kind of thing where it's like sipping? Yeah. Like, oh, humans were evolved to do this. Or that when that's you know, anytime you see someone on TV say humans evolved at this. It's probably bullshit, right? Pop. Pop psych stuff. Yeah. You know, I think I developed that. But I do think that I don't think scientists are immune from bullshit, right? I think that. We are all extremely fallible as reasoning creatures that we all have a fantasy that we are perfectly rational and know the truth in that we can always solve every puzzle that every question out. There is a math problem that we can figure out especially those of us who have a science background or identify skeptics know. And that we can really get it in the truth is we are all small limited minds that are subject to bias. That can never see the full picture. Right. And the thing about science is that in science all the small minds combined into a structure that works right called science, right? Where we publish and then other people evaluate and then we come to a consensus. And then even when science gets it wrong, we you know it evolves. And we learn more, you know, what? I mean, we overturn paradigm and etcetera. And so science moves forward, even though the individual scientists are flawed unreasoning, you know, messed up people who are subject to bullshit, right? Yeah. I do think scientists are. The greatest people in our scientists are very cool and are generally great critical thinkers, right, but at the same time, I mean, go look at the, you know, the various methodological crises that almost every field has having replication or in terms of, you know, systemic biases in their field, or it's all over the place. Right. And you realize that p hacking and whatnot, which that's an incredible one. Right. Where it's just like. Yeah..

physicist