35 Burst results for "Marilyn Monroe"

Harry Cohn and Rita Hayworth's Tumultuous Relationship

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:01 min | Last month

Harry Cohn and Rita Hayworth's Tumultuous Relationship

"Harry Cohn at one point took all the credit for creating Rita Hayworth. He was obsessed with her. I don't blame him. She's my tippy top. She was Columbia's first sex goddess in the 40s. But she kept getting married. Her first husband was a 40 year old car salesman, then she married the director arson wells, then she married Ali Khan, who was the arid parent to a Muslim throne, then she married the singer dick James. Every time she got married, her box office started declining. It eroded to the point where it was shit. And her marriage to Khan, who was a huge Playboy huge womanizer, that kept her out of pictures for two years. And it really infuriated Harry Cohn and it really alienated her fans. So after Rita Hayworth returns to Hollywood in 51, Cohen wanted one of her pet projects, which was Joseph and his brethren, and until then, her husband dick haymes had come into Harry's office with a perfectly chiseled beard and demanded to be cast as Joseph. And instead, Harry Cohen decided to get back at Rita Hayworth because it was still madly in love with her and he was also pissed that he let Marilyn Monroe slip away, believe it or not, and I can believe this because I'm one of those people who's not super impressed by Malin's beauty. I'm just not like there's certain pictures I get it, and the voice I hear it. But when you take everything into account, she's not my favorite movie star or sex bomb, not at all. And I think she was like probably too big and too sloppy and fucked everybody just not my cup of tea. But Harry Cohn felt the same way he wasn't impressed by her beauty. He didn't renew her contract in 1940 to 6 month contract. And he said, you know what? I'll take the next pretty girl that walks in my office and wants to be a star. And he did just that. And that was Rita Hayworth.

Harry Cohn Rita Hayworth Dick James Dick Haymes Ali Khan Harry Cohen Joseph Columbia Wells Khan Cohen Hollywood Marilyn Monroe Harry Malin
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:55 min | 2 months ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"To the proliferation of Monroe impersonators, her look is not only often imitated, but easily identified. Most recently, Kim Kardashian's decision to wear the famous bedazzled nude dress that the actor wore to saying happy birthday to president John F. Kennedy in 1962 to the 2022 Met Gala was another reminder of the collective ongoing obsession with Monroe. What's the most American thing you can think of? And that's Marilyn Monroe. Kardashian told Vogue in an interview about the dress. For me, the most Marilyn Monroe moment is when she sang happy birthday to JFK, it was that look. However, to fully understand why Monroe still holds such a powerful sway on the fashion sphere nearly 60 years after her death at the age of 36. Fashion historian and author of classic Hollywood style Caroline young points to a few crucial factors to consider. Young notes that Monroe put forth a carefully crafted on screen persona that was sexy, glamorous and glitzy. This is the side of Monroe that was most heavily documented, and that's what we most associate with her style, even though it did not necessarily reflect Monroe's actual wardrobe. While in her downtime, Monroe preferred slacks and turtlenecks were simple sheath dresses. It's the images of her and striking outfits on red carpets or in classic on screen moments, like when her white dress billowed out as she stood over a subway grate for the filming of the 7 year itch that are much more widespread. Young says Monroe's untimely death has meant the pictures that remain of her have become memorialized. Her image has been entwined with these on screen moments where she's wearing amazing costumes that stand out. Young tells time. Because of those moments, her image has been ingrained in culture. You sort of have to wonder if she lived into old age. Whether those images would still be so iconic. In blond, the costumes helped to delineate the glamorous and glitzy moments of Maryland's public persona from the vulnerable and intimate moments of Norma Jean, or whom Monroe was in her downtime. Costume designer Jennifer Johnson painstakingly recreated many of Monroe's most iconic fashion moments on screen for the film, including her famous pleaded white halter dress from the subway great scene in the 7 year itch and the legendary hot pink strapless column gown and matching opera gloves she donned to sing diamonds are a girl's best friend in gentlemen prefer blondes.

Monroe Marilyn Monroe Caroline young president John F. Kennedy Kim Kardashian Kardashian Young Hollywood Norma Jean Jennifer Johnson Maryland
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:10 min | 2 months ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

"That's still like, I wish I could have seen what else she would do. She had talent. It's all tinged now, right? Knowing that the end of the movie. And I think this contributes to blondes failure, but it's also impossible to resist. It's like, you can't watch any of this stuff without knowing the end of Marilyn Monroe's story and that there is this not just loss potential, but sort of, you know, a little bit of tragedy or just reserve running through all of it. And I think that is a 100% projection, but I don't know. We were born 30 years after 20 years. After Marilyn Monroe died. So you can only receive her and understand her in that way. I know, but that's sort of what obviates the movie for me. Yeah. I'm like, I know. She died tragically. She had to tell me. She had a horrible life. Yeah. Tell me. I'm having a harder and harder time. The more I plunge into the psychology of the film, trying to understand if there's any psychology in the film. There's not. It's just, it's a sentence that is stretched into a three hour movie. Do you think this movie would be more successful if it were a more traditional movie length? Not really? I don't either. It's actually, I didn't find the length itself punishing. Obviously I don't mind long movies. The first hour, though, which is really tough because it's the childhood. So I mean, it's not fun watching a child of any age go through that stuff. Pivoting almost directly into a brutal sexual assault. And that is returned to as a flashback throughout the film in a way that is like, again, why? We know. We know that this was a very painful. I don't know. Yeah, I don't really get it. But that first hour, my heart really sank, 'cause I was like, oh, two more hours of this. And this is just, I know how it's gonna end, and it's not gonna be great. Wouldn't that have been great if he was just like twist, she lived to be 87 years old. She won 12 Academy Awards. You know, I would have enjoyed a reimagining of some kind. Maybe that's the thing is I wanted more stretching, more imagination. To just do like a little bit that only serves your OneNote psychological pursuit. What book did I read recently that does that? It's like, what if this person that you love and I mean, a lot of

Marilyn Monroe Academy Awards
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:49 min | 2 months ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

"And so, you know, you wonder what that evolves into. It's funny, even her comedy is like a little understated. We had this idea of like the DOM blond, but she's not doing full ten out of ten energy. There is something. She's not Jane Manson. Yeah, like boiled a little, that's really interesting. I agree. And can lend itself to more than just those ditzy roles. And she even plays like the ditz with a little bit of dignity for lack of a better word. You know that all about eve part where she's kind of carted around and it's almost like this manifestation of her rise to fame, where it's sort of like you need to charm the producer and get next to the screenwriter. Work the system if you want to have a career in Hollywood and it's this very kind of like acid dipped self aware portrayal that in its way is kind of poetic now when we think about the arc of her life and also is part of what makes all that even so good is that it's so clearly understands Hollywood just like 30 years in the Hollywood history, it's already got its arms totally around what it means to become famous in this world. But I agree with what you said the sort of understated comedian approach to it. Another one of the movies that I watched yesterday was bus stop, which I had seen a while ago, which is not a good movie. But I think my feature her best performance because it's her least Maryland performance. She's not platinum blond in the movie. She plays a southern girl and her accent is pretty good. Like she loses it a couple of times, but for the most part she sticks with it and she's also kind of a showgirl slash singer 'cause she can sing. And so they keep putting her in front of audiences. But it's all about this cowboy who's kind of relentlessly pursuing her throughout the movie and it's kind of like awkward and uncomfortable throughout the film. But her resistance to him is part of what makes the movie effective and feels like the movie itself feels like an outright rejection of everything that we see in the movie blond. It's sort of like, this isn't a person who only did gentlemen prefer blondes. That's not accurate. Right. You know, that isn't actually the totality of her career. There's no mention of the misfits in this movie. There's no mention of like her striving to be a deeper artist. So I find myself really confused by this. Right, the idea thinks that the movie thinks that it has a richer idea of Marilyn Monroe, but really it only understands her as the pink dress in diamonds or girl's best friend, kind of marauding in the back of the screen. And it's not certainly not interested in her skills. No, not at all. I mean, I don't know. Do you remember the first time that you saw her? I think it had to be somehow. Which is just her best performance, I think, her best movie, like the Billy Wilder classic, and she's going toe to toe with Jack Lemmon and it's funny, but it's not, it's a little pulls at the heartstrings a little. Her best part, a little more layered.

Jane Manson Hollywood Maryland Marilyn Monroe Billy Wilder Jack Lemmon
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:58 min | 2 months ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

"I don't think we need this approach anymore. I agree. I don't think we need to do this. I mean, especially because I'm not sure if you could pick three more iconic women from the 20th century to make this kind of a movie about, right? So we did it. We're all set. No more of these. Yeah, it's very strange. What's your relationship to Marilyn Monroe the person? The issue is that probably more or her as an image, her as a scene from a move movie. I can imagine the outfits. I can imagine the voice for sure. I can imagine the presence. There are a few iconic roles. To me, she's much more of a comedian than a dramatic actor, which makes this complete dirge of a movie a lot. Even more, maybe not contradictory, but weird. And but I don't think of her as like a Meryl Streep who's, well, I guess Meryl, I think of more as Merrill, then her great movies. So in that sense, a presence. But she's a presence more than a filmmaking, you know, not a lot of great movies. A few great movies. She has a couple of iconic parts. She's also appeared in a couple of unforgettable all time classics. Right. And she also consistently worked with great filmmakers. I mean, she probably only made 20 movies really 25 movies in her career in a very short career. I mean, I'm just made a list off the top of my head. I know she made movies with Billy Wilder auto preminger, Lawrence Olivier directed her and starred with her, John Huston twice, George cukor, Howard hawks and Joseph L mankiewicz. Yeah. That's ten of the 25 most important filmmakers of her era. And part of that was because people they sought her out because she was a box office draw. And by the late 1950s, she became arguably the biggest star in all of Hollywood.

Marilyn Monroe Meryl Streep Meryl Merrill Lawrence Olivier Joseph L mankiewicz Billy Wilder George cukor John Huston Howard hawks Hollywood
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:43 min | 2 months ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Scenes. And on the one hand, that is a reality of every woman's life and show it. Or acknowledge it on the other hand, it doesn't really feel like these scenes are being used to speak to the reality of what it means to be a child bearing person. They are just really, really digging in, and that was when I felt the fact that a man was making this film more than any other point. I should also add that there is a talking fetus who or maybe three, I'm not really sure I was so angry throughout all of them. And this is meant to communicate a Marilyn Monroe's sense of longing for a child and the loss that she feels as she's not able to have these children, whether for career reasons or her own reasons. I thought that was just like conservative trash. I was so offended by it. It was really, really, really disgusting in my opinion. Yeah, the movie is this really messy blend of a feels like a few distinct influences. Those sequences in particular feel very Terry Gilliam to me. They're almost like fantastical, but brutalist at the same time, and then there's obviously a massive Terrence malick influence on this movie. There are sequences where you looking into the stars and the stars are moving and the evolution of life and the majestic power of the cosmos and the earth colliding and all of this kind of like way less elegantly handled visual styling. And then I just thought of Oliver Stone a lot. And as you know, I like Oliver Stone a lot and all of a sudden has made a couple of movies that I would name among my favorite movies, including JFK. Right. And it's not just the JFK's in this movie that I thought of JFK, but it's because of the big sweeping conclusions that JFK tends to make that I think are diverting from the truth at times, but are also this bizarre psychological projection of a filmmaker talking about the death of a country, the death of an industry, the death of an American innocence, like Andrew Dominic is doing something very similar with Marilyn Monroe that JFK was doing with that all over someone was doing with JFK, which is like kind of maybe sorting through his daddy issues. And the idea of dad ruined everything and I'm desperately reaching for dad and someone took dad away from me, which is just the most facile psychobabble imaginable and JFK was made 30, 25, 30 years ago, you know, like we're far past culture. But JFK the film also adds in just some huge amount of wild level conspiracy theory governmental. It is a movie about capital a America. Now it's like a batshit crazy movie about America, but it spans a lot. This is blond is just daddy issues. That's true. That's true. But it does do some things that are similar though. One of the key two of the key characters in blond are cast chaplain and Eddie G this is so weird. Who are these two handsome dashing young actors who meet Marilyn and early stage in her career, we come to learn that they're Charles Chaplin, Charlie Chaplin, and Edward G Robinson's very handsome Playboy sons.

Oliver Stone Marilyn Monroe Terrence malick Terry Gilliam Andrew Dominic America Eddie G Marilyn Charles Chaplin Edward G Robinson Charlie Chaplin
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

02:34 min | 2 months ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

"For what? Well, I think one of the ways that the film is most effective if unintentionally is that you start to worry for her. And I don't mean this in a concerned troll experiment, but you know, it was three hours. I had some time to think about the making of this movie, while watching this movie. And imagine that process. Yeah. And just hard work. Living in it, every single day, and she by all accounts is not really a method, actor, and she had a great cover story in a variety of area where she talks about leaving it and not totally living in it, but she also says that she filmed No Time to Die. The Bond movie after blond and she talks about how Maryland the Maryland character was kind of still with her and you can kind of see it in her No Time to Die performance, which the glamour of it you mean? And I think the charisma and a little bit the bubbliness and all of the things, frankly, that she wasn't allowed to do as Marilyn in this movie, which when you think about that scene, which we immediately compare it to like a 30 screwball. Like there is something really vibrant about it. She's great. And she wasn't allowed to do any of that in this movie. So it spills over into No Time to Die. Yeah, this movie is such a head scratcher for me because when it ended, I was impressed by a certain aspect of it and the more I've thought about it and the more time I've spent rewatching Marilyn Monroe's films or reading about her life, the more I'm just confounded about why everyone thought this was such a good idea. I guess as far as as far as underarm is goes like, is this like an award worthy performance? Is it like a notable? I guess what I'm trying to figure out is sort of like, is this a movie that's just going to come and go? Because it's a movie that we've been hearing about for a long, long time, and that has come under much controversy in part because it received an NC 17 rating, and it does feature some not just disturbing, but sexually explicit sequences throughout, as you pointed out here, multiple abortion sequences that are among the most disturbing ever rendered. Yeah. Should we talk about that now? Yeah, sure. Because that's when it really tips over for me. And it's not the abortion sequences. I believe there are, and I can't believe we're counting like this, and I really edge into horrible, like a corner of the Internet, I don't want to edge in when I'm like, I think there are two abortions and one lost pregnancy and anyway, there are three just really medical surgery, room, invasive, deeply upsetting

Maryland Marilyn Marilyn Monroe
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:42 min | 2 months ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Stuff, but there was a hundred long page foster care experience in the novel, which was also very difficult to read so at some point I found the oppressive grimness of the novel, like too much. And I was like, okay, I don't have another 600 pages of this and me. So if he's using this as a text, I guess he's using this as a text. Yeah, he stayed faithful for sure. It's pretty evident because I don't know why you would make the movie this way if you weren't staying faithful to something that had this tonality. I mean, that opening stretch is kind of an interesting thing to break down in this conversation because on the one hand it's really visually accomplished and kind of amazing and a little and terrifying. You know, Julian Nicholson plays her mother as a paranoid schizophrenic and we sort of like jump right into the mass delusion of being raised by this woman. It's very scary, you know, Maryland or Norma Jean I should say is very young. She's maybe 5, 6 years old and when the film starts. And Julian Nicholson's character is fully melting down, which is somewhat accurate to the reporting, but you know, Marilyn Monroe's mother was married three times. She had many children. I think she had 6 or 7 children. Marilyn Monroe was raised by her for a stretch, and then was sent to foster care and then eventually to an orphanage, which is sort of told in the story, but there was this idea of the lone lonely girl that dominik keeps returning to. And we see this later in the film when she's at her own film premiere surrounded by adoring fans and she feels utterly lonely. That's not exactly how she was raised. That's not exactly what her life was. It's a small note, but it's a relevant note because it's sort of like, there's all of this work that goes into recreating things, but then there's also all of this work to kind of cast aside inconvenient details of the life that I find curious and it's because there is just this relentless pursuit of that grimness that you're talking about. And I don't know what it's serving. And also just this really, I guess, simple if you want to be generous and I find to be really limiting idea of limiting sounds on generous, but the point of the movie, as you said to me afterwards, you were like, what if it was really that simple, is that she had a truly horrific,

Julian Nicholson Marilyn Monroe Norma Jean Maryland dominik
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:45 min | 2 months ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Decades spanning experience onto a lot of women, honestly, not just women in Hollywood, but across the board. And there's something like the little discomforting about this guy. He's making a lot of assumptions, I would say, in the execution of this movie, and so there is obviously a grandeur to Marilyn Monroe and a romance and a kind of fire, right? She's such a sexy person. She's such a sensual person. So the titillation is obvious, but from an intellectual perspective or an artistic perspective, I still don't really get what was interesting to him about this other than frankly like the trauma porn that he puts on screen. I mean, that's the thing if you could sense what was interesting to him. If there were larger ideas, and it's a rich text, right? I mean, obviously her iconography or her place in American history and not just Hollywood history, this idea of the blond, which shouldn't invent, but certainly our modern understanding of it. The idealized the blond bombshell. Yeah, exactly. And these ideas of celebrity and fame and certainly also trauma and childhood experience and your relationship with your family and objectivation. And all of these things. There's a lot to work with. Does he work with any of it in this film? I don't really think so. And so my objection is not the effort or even that it's a man trying to understand all of this. It's that the only understanding I could really glean is like, wow, a lot of terrible things happen to her and let's just watch them in succession for three hours with absolutely no break. It is, as you said, trauma porn. Like sadistic and kind of one note. That's the thing. Because to me, it's not the sadism that bothers me. As you know, I love nasty kind of dark movies that leave you with a pit in your stomach at the end. I actually love that expect feeling in that experience. And I didn't hate the movie because it kind of kept my eyes wide open as I was watching it. But it felt like, and the reason I raised the fact that he's a man is because it feels like he literally doesn't have access to that bigger idea. It feels like he is unable to kind of pierce the outer skin of the story of Marilyn Monroe, and this is a person who it's not just that we have lots of evidence of who she was on screen. She's been portrayed on screen by a number of actresses at this point. I mean, probably most recently by Michelle Williams in my week with Marilyn, which is about the production of the

Hollywood Marilyn Monroe pierce Michelle Williams Marilyn
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:50 min | 2 months ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The Big Picture

"It's pretty extraordinary what they're able to accomplish. Yes, and it doesn't look schlocky, and it doesn't venture into the territory that a lot of these recreation biopics often fall into, which is sort of SNL parody imitation. It is suddenly like you're living in this 1950s world. And then likewise, when we're seeing Marilyn's personal life and the life that we don't know about necessarily, from photographs maybe that have been published, the recreation there is exceptional, and then there is there are a lot of visual choices that are made from changing the aspect ratio of the story to shifting from black and white to color to changing film stocks. There are a lot of very aggressive choices in the storytelling to kind of keep you unbalanced off balance as you essentially plunge into the psyche of at least through the eyes of this film, a very damaged person, you know, a person who's been really traumatized by everything in their life from the very beginning of their life all the way through Marilyn Monroe's tragic end. It's a hard movie to talk about in some ways because the novel itself is about Marilyn Monroe, but not necessarily not legally about. It's an imagining of what Marilyn's life was, but the beats are almost word for word, things that she participated in or people that she actually was married to or interacted with with some exceptions. And so I think this is that unusual case where a lot of people probably especially younger people who don't know as much about Marilyn will watch this movie and think, well that's definitely what happened. Right. And that's not the case. And that's not necessarily a bad thing that there are necessarily historical illusions going on here. We talked about this with a woman king like movies don't have to be historically accurate. The ironic thing about that though is there's so much effort put into recreating the visual aspect that on the one hand it feels like this documentary approach on the other hand, there are these wild liberal choices about describing what she did and how she lived and what she went through that I don't want to say I found unnerving. I just found like a little confusing. I don't know why there's so much fealty to this story when the world knows that this is a movie about Marilyn Monroe. Do you know what do you know what I'm saying? Yes. I mean, there are real historical beats. I mean, both of her marriages, or at least two of her marriages, to Joe DiMaggio and Arthur Miller, which are the famous ones. If you know anything about Marilyn Monroe, you know those happened. Are included in this film. All of the most iconic roles are included in more kind of snapshot, visual way, but you see all of them, as you mentioned. JFK, the president is in this film. He is. And, you know, there's been a lot of speculation that I think is pretty much confirmed that they had an extra marital relationship, which is definitely suggested. It is rendered. It is rendered in this film. We'll come back to it. But you know, there is the historical record of happy birthday mister president. So, you know, we know that they were associated. So it has things that happened. And then it has just a tremendous amount of psychological projection.

Marilyn Monroe Marilyn SNL Joe DiMaggio Arthur Miller
'The Gray Man' Is Just More of the Same

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:39 min | 4 months ago

'The Gray Man' Is Just More of the Same

"I go to Netflix. And there's this movie with a great test. Billy Bob Thornton, who I love, know the guy, great guy. And in the arms, the cutie pie cube and who's gonna play Marilyn Monroe in the biopic and here's 2023. Maybe late this year, but I think 2023, Chris Evans, who the ladies love, and I don't mind saying the guy's hot, like a Chris helmsworth or there's so many of them. But I think the Chris Evans thing, to me, he's fake and put on, obviously, great physique, nice features, but sometimes all those things together don't add up to a great looking guy. You know what I mean? There's no edge to him. I don't know. And of course, Ryan Gosling, who I think is a beautiful man. He's got, in my opinion, maybe the most beautiful wife in Hollywood and Eva Mendes. I think she's right up there at the top. The movie is called the gray man. Let me tell you right now, you can skip the gray man. Never has there been more boring of big names, a more boring cast of big names, so much star power right there. So little intrigue, and I'm getting tired of these films, you know? An imprisoned murderer who has his sentence commuted in exchange for becoming a trained underground killer for the CIA. He carries that secret unsavory missions for the government. So many of the same scripts just plugging in different actors,

Chris Evans Chris Helmsworth Billy Bob Thornton Marilyn Monroe Netflix Ryan Gosling Eva Mendes Hollywood CIA
Kim Kardashian did not damage Marilyn Monroe's dress, according to Ripley's

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 5 months ago

Kim Kardashian did not damage Marilyn Monroe's dress, according to Ripley's

"There's an update to the story about Kim Kardashian wearing Marilyn Monroe's dress at this year's Met Gala is a story that stitches things together for us Believe it say the people at Ripley's despite what you may have heard they deny that Kim Kardashian's wearing of Marilyn Monroe's iconic dress damage that garment comments from an official with the Ripley's museum are patching over claims that Kardashian messed up the skin tight crystal colored dress that Monroe wore to serenade president Kennedy for his birthday in 1962 Ripley says the 60 year old dress had already suffered damage because of its age and the delicate material a tomato And they say Kardashian's brief time in it before changing to a replica had

Kim Kardashian Marilyn Monroe Ripley Ripley's Museum Kardashian President Kennedy Monroe
Marilyn Monroe Look-Alike Suzie Kennedy Discusses Free Speech

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:05 min | 6 months ago

Marilyn Monroe Look-Alike Suzie Kennedy Discusses Free Speech

"We are back with the most famous, the most famous, Marilyn Monroe lookalike comedian actress, just a fun lady to know Susie Kennedy follow her right now on Twitter Suzy. I like the cut of your jib, not simply because you can get into Marilyn's dresses. Oh my he is such a sexist, slap that man behave. But because you're outspoken, you are, you know, you go on these interviews, you did the three three speech podcast that great guy farm podcast, then you want James well. And then we were talking about abortion. We were talking about the Supreme Court ruling. And then James said to you and me, because you're a vow, Chris, you said, you religious people. No, you religion. He called you religion, people, and you stood out for your rights. And also in recent tweet of yours, you said, you stood up for being against those who would like to censor you as a performer or a comedian. So talk about what it means to actually take a stand on these issues as somebody who's so much in the public eye. Well, the thing is, I actually don't think I'm outspoken. What I think I am and people do accuse me of that. I'm just tell what I think, and I think that's really important that we free speech, even if I don't agree with you. So the comment I made about a comedian is that I love the fact that we have Dave Chappelle. I love the fact that we have Ricky Gervais, but I also like the fact that we have nish Kumar, who are pitted against each other. Right. So the political identity doesn't matter, the fact is that they get to say what they want to say. Yes. And do you know what? I'll be honest with you. When people say, oh, you should say whatever you want. Most people do not say things with the intention to hurt or hate. And if you're scared to say anything because straight away, someone's going to be her or think you hate them. That's not true. Jesus loved everybody. But he told the truth.

Susie Kennedy Marilyn Monroe James Marilyn Twitter Supreme Court Nish Kumar Chris Dave Chappelle Ricky Gervais
Andy Warhol's 'Marilyn' sells for $195 million, setting record for American art

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

Andy Warhol's 'Marilyn' sells for $195 million, setting record for American art

"I I I I know know know know I I I I kind kind kind kind of of of of painting painting painting painting has has has has set set set set a a a a record record record record for for for for the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece of of of of art art art art by by by by an an an an American American American American ever ever ever ever sold sold sold sold at at at at auction auction auction auction it's it's it's it's a a a a piece piece piece piece of of of of artwork artwork artwork artwork you you you you have have have have probably probably probably probably seen seen seen seen many many many many times times times times before before before before Andy Andy Andy Andy Warhol's Warhol's Warhol's Warhol's portrait portrait portrait portrait of of of of Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Monroe Monroe Monroe Monroe the the the the nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen sixty sixty sixty sixty four four four four so so so so screen screen screen screen features features features features the the the the actress actress actress actress in in in in a a a a vibrant vibrant vibrant vibrant close close close close up up up up yellow yellow yellow yellow hair hair hair hair blue blue blue blue eye eye eye eye shadow shadow shadow shadow ruby ruby ruby ruby red red red red lipstick lipstick lipstick lipstick on on on on a a a a blue blue blue blue background background background background yeah yeah yeah yeah that that that that one one one one well well well well it's it's it's it's officially officially officially officially known known known known as as as as shot shot shot shot sage sage sage sage blue blue blue blue marlin marlin marlin marlin and and and and it it it it has has has has sold sold sold sold four four four four hundred hundred hundred hundred and and and and ninety ninety ninety ninety five five five five million million million million dollars dollars dollars dollars Christie's Christie's Christie's Christie's of of of of New New New New York York York York says says says says not not not not only only only only is is is is it it it it the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece done done done done by by by by an an an an American American American American artist artist artist artist ever ever ever ever sold sold sold sold it it it it is is is is also also also also the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece from from from from the the the the twentieth twentieth twentieth twentieth century century century century ever ever ever ever auctioned auctioned auctioned auctioned off off off off the the the the buyer buyer buyer buyer was was was was not not not not identified identified identified identified I'm I'm I'm I'm Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar wells wells wells wells Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel

Times Times Times Times Andy Andy Andy Andy Warhol Warhol Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Marily Ruby Ruby Christie's Christie's Christie New New New New York York York Christie Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabrie
Backlash After Madonna Reveals Her Team Have Been Working For Free

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Backlash After Madonna Reveals Her Team Have Been Working For Free

"No one else is lunacy. Madonna's most recent case of butt burn. She got all pissed off because she posted a bunch of pictures on Instagram and she's not happy that people are not supporting her art. She need to support her rod. She says she's not just complaining about not having been supported by non artistic people who objected, did you see those pictures about her? She did something for the magazine as if we all know V magazine. But the post in V magazine included a behind the scenes photo of the photographer Steven Klein holding a knife to her throat. I don't know why they thought it was edgy and she thanked the people who worked long hours for free all to support madam X that's her new moniker as you probably know. So she's worked with people who weren't paid all night for this photo shoot all day and all night. And she's being criticized for sharing this violent image of the knife to her throat and the fact that she made people work for free. These things don't work well for Madonna. She's going through it. And of course, you know, she did this awful photo shoot the other day with I showed you pictures on the Facebook podcast obsessed page. I'll get to that in a second. But this recent photo shoot for V magazine very controversial in which she alluded to Marilyn Monroe's death. And she said, I'm proud of my collaboration with Stephen Klein for V magazine and knowing that against all odds. And with very little support from non artistic people. That's you. Who can't pushing back and the fact that we did it with almost zero budget, we were still able to make

V Magazine Madonna Steven Klein Stephen Klein Marilyn Monroe Facebook
AJ Feels Marilyn Monroe Is Defiled to This Day

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:21 min | 1 year ago

AJ Feels Marilyn Monroe Is Defiled to This Day

"The story that got me thinking about Marilyn Monroe, I'll talk about this on politics is a bitch. You see how I connect everything? On the next politics is a bitch. I talk about New York's disgraced governor Andrew Cuomo and what he said about Marilyn having an affair with both Kennedy brothers, Robert and John. And that story got me thinking about Marilyn. And how she still is basically defiled. Because Cuomo talked about her wanting sex from both brothers and I won't get to a descriptive, but she wanted sex in an space that's not always where men and women have sex. Okay? She wanted it in the caboose. That's what Cuomo said. And listen, he was in laws with the Kennedy family for a while, so maybe he ought to know. But it got me thinking this woman is still defiled over 55 years after her death. You know, it just, it made me sick. And it makes you really think about her life. And we've talked about so many scandals and up till now I've stayed clear of her life, but when I think about it behind the scenes, it's apparent her life was so far less glamorous than we talk

Marilyn Cuomo Marilyn Monroe Andrew Cuomo Kennedy Robert New York John
Carole Landis, the Marilyn Monroe of the 40s

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:01 min | 1 year ago

Carole Landis, the Marilyn Monroe of the 40s

"This, Carol Landis. Basically was the Marilyn Monroe of the 1940s. I mean, this is a beautiful girl. Go to the podcast, Facebook podcast obsessed pinch. I'll post a picture of her. If you don't go there and you don't belong there, then go Google it. Parallel in this was hot shit. You know, a full blond, a figure to die for, and if you think about it, her and Marilyn Monroe both actors just made the most of their physical assets and look, it's no secret they slept around to try to make their careers last longer. And they also went around looking for love. Marilyn lived to 36 years old, believe it or not, we tend to forget how young she died, Carol never even made it to a 30s. And in both cases, there are rumors of foul play. We've been down the Marilyn Monroe highway many, many times, but we don't really talk about Carol Landis. So now in becomes a screen legend, Carol had been forgotten by all but maybe a handful of die hard

Carol Landis Marilyn Monroe Facebook Google Marilyn Carol
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The RIFT Radio Podcast Network

The RIFT Radio Podcast Network

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on The RIFT Radio Podcast Network

"Yep sorry i'm go out have stayed again mercury retro. We can talmor we. We are very courageous to try to fit. You do live simultaneously during mercury retrograde. Yes but we've been doing it for so long so that's a good thing that's in our favor. That's right extra batteries. i'm to take extra earphones. Extra microphone just in case that and and get there early to. Yes get there early. I told him if there's some kind of paperwork Where they say the schedule like look at the schedule over again one more time. Oh okay well i'm doing the scheduling. So our i know that's frightening if you would like to call it evening. No if the number is three two three eight seven zero three eight seven seven please dow one so let us know that you would like to speak to our audience. I think may be announcements. I made him on face on. Suzanne more few that berry was is out on bond. And i guess we we go over our maryland segment and then we can do a gabby update as well gabby The corner has ruled it a homicide. I just read that. So unfortunately i think the entire country has been watching the The gabby missing is we all have praying and hoping that she would be found found alive she was not and now the coroner has ruled that a homicide so unfortunately and her boyfriend apparently is still missing so it was just watched that unfold but to get to our featured case tonight as marilyn monroe which i think everybody has been intrigued with maryland's death for many many years passed away in nineteen sixty two. I believe nineteen sixty three nineteen sixty two correct. Yeah yeah one of those hours. Well we did. Do you want me just to kind of go over. What author mark shaw kind of came up with and then we can go over the chart and the clues or do you wanna do chart and clues. I okay. I'll do that. I i won't okay. Okay her phone is cutting out the mercury retrograde. That's what we deal with mercury retrograde so for everybody that we know it's coming what do you do we row with everything. Remember mercury retrograde 's our time to review time to just relax. Look things over if you've been doing that project for awhile. It's okay to start a new project as long as you've been doing it for a while so it's time to review.

maryland Suzanne mark shaw berry marilyn monroe
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Weird AF News

Weird AF News

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Weird AF News

"You guys have plans for your your corpse after you kick it. Have you paid for your funeral already. Do you have two million dollars laying around. Do you want to be next to marilyn monroe. Your corpse can lie in close proximity to her body and hugh hefner which really who gives a shit about hugh hefner but marilyn monroe big time you can lay next to her for eternity unless there's a massive earthquake in all of los angeles sinks into the ocean and then you can float next to her body for eternity her body her skeleton. So it's two million dollars in. This is something you get to brag about before you die which is great. You can tell everybody. Hey you know where. I'm going to go when i'm dead. The irony in that is once you're dead. You're not going to give a shit. So i guess all you really get out of it is the idea of it while you're alive and the bragging rights that you get while you're alive. The cemetery is located in los angeles. It's called the pierce brothers. Westwood village memorial park where celebrities including truman capote. And natalie wood buried the spot that you can you can pay for his two spots down from marilyn monroe's with hugh hefner between the granite crypt plot in question was purchased in nineteen seventy seven by theatrical composer lyricist jerry herman known for his work as the composer for hello dolly lokoja fall. Following his death he ended up buried next to his mother. In new jersey is a poor guy gets to go to new jersey. His remaining family decided to put the crypt back on the market. For two million bucks. I've actually been to the cemetery because it's quite famous. People go there to see the marilyn monroe grave really. I was brought there by one of my talent agents. Many years ago. When i was out in los angeles just visiting very strange fellow. He took me to a cannabis dispensary. I which was the first one i'd ever been to because at the time had had just kind of it was just kind of happening in los angeles. The whole thing. And i wasn't even allowed to go in because i didn't have a medical card so i waited for him. He came out took me to the cemetery. We got high next to marilyn monroe's grave. I'm like this is a strange way to connect with my talent agent. But and. I'm not sure if this is very professional on his part but whatever i was having a good time and then he he got way too high and told me all of his dreams to be a theatrical actor. He nearly cried. It was very strange at the time you have to. I don't think was dead. I don't think he was in there but definitely maryland was because i do remember being at her grave next to him as he told me his stories about being a theatrical child actor and i really thought he was gonna burst into tears and i was like this is about to get really comfortable but maryland was there to keep me company and they give some other information about the plots. For instance hugh hefner paid seventy five thousand for his plot. He was laid to rest there in twenty seventeen. You must have bought that a long time ago. He wanted to be next to maryland. Apparently he was on the left side on her right side is a producer in hollywood memorabilia collector by the name of tom. Gregory who put his plot up for sale for seven hundred thousand in two thousand fourteen after originally buying it the decade before for three hundred and fifty thousand so he's probably not even buried and he's just an empty plot. I assume he's just making an investment pretty good investment doubled his money in a couple of years. The real estate market is surprisingly hot at this cemetery. It says as the space above maryland's has also been sold. Recently the widow of businessman richard puncture removed her long deceased husband in two thousand nine and attempted to resell his plot for four point. Six million which makes two million feel like a bargain. People are just trying to make a buck on these plots. Can you imagine you dig up. You're dead husband because you need to sell the plot for some money and you bury him in jersey or or out in winnetka someplace like that. Well who knew you could invest in cemetery plots well anyways guys if you want to be buried adjacent to the sexiest people ever to walk. The face of the earth for two million bucks here. You go nights are battling it out in. New york's central park walk by new york's central park one saturday a month and you might hear or app is head off as gladiators in medieval armor strike each other with axes and steel swords. Real swords real steel in one on one matches members of gladiators nyc they wear full armor like helmets and chain mail. Some of it weighing up to one hundred pounds. What did they do with this equipment. All of this armor and steel swords and axes well they bash each other in the head they. They violently kicked punched and throw each other onto the ground. Using full-contact mixed martial arts techniques in what are three one minute rounds in malay matches up to four nights fight to the finish until one is left standing this. Gladiators nyc gladiators nyc is the flagship program for free martial arts and fitness nonprofit. Santa's nights which was founded by forty old damian degrassi eight years ago for degrasse zia. Who has a background in finance his way of helping the community he thought would be to start a.

marilyn monroe hugh hefner los angeles Westwood village memorial park hello dolly lokoja maryland new jersey jerry herman natalie wood truman capote earthquake richard puncture Gregory hollywood winnetka tom new york central park
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

Chicago Dog Walk

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

"Today's tuesday july twentieth. Welcome to the dog walk. Prison barstool sports here chief tinfoil tuesday how you doing. I'm doing great doing this. Is i'm excited for this one. Yeah anytime we can sprinkle in like madmen era the kennedys conspiracy. That's one of. That's what gets my juices fought. And i feel like these jordan gambling in vain. Yeah what else have we done to this. Averill levin. I like the trees involved. It's always interesting so now you get the best. Both worlds get the government. The mafia pop culture it's all fucking intertwined with with marilyn monroe's death. Yes so there you go. We're going to talk about marilyn monroe's death today Before we get into it though. I do wanna talk about roman chief perfect. Yeah yeah so now you can think about marilyn monroe if you use a roman swipe and not worry about blowing her load correct. Yeah you definitely want to think about her before no chance no like. She's like the one with address phone up. That's her right. Yeah yeah. I would say in terms of people just known for being sex symbol. She's probably the number one ranked still all-time like there might. There's there's obviously women more beautiful than her. But in terms of like being synonymous with being sex him. I think she is still number one. I think i would have hard to make an argument for definitely so Whether you don't thinking about baseball whatever it's been you don't do that anymore..

marilyn monroe Averill levin jordan baseball
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

"Death by misadventure was produced by cosmic media and written by me. Jc nova are supernatural. Team of co hosts includes the talented eduardo fahey in london. Tom dre our master new neurologist and paranormal investigator in la. Paul robinson match. I and musician in marin and myself. I'm a psychic astrologer and paranormal investigator in los angeles and san francisco. This episode was recorded at robin sound studios marin california and also at union recording studio in west hollywood california kudos to sound engineers paul robinson and noah shanklin a special. Thanks to audio producer. Christopher laying in tucson who brings each episode to life and paulina from upper planet in london. She's responsible for the super bowl design of our official website also the designer for one of our favorite true crime. Podcast case file. Please like and follow us on facebook at www dot facebook dot com slash death by misadventure. Podcast each episode is available for download direct. Vr our website at death by misadventure dot co dot uk. And also at itunes. Google play cast box. Spotify pod being tune in radio public and stitcher last. But not least our podcast is hosted by lipson. I'm tracy nova and this has been death by misadventure thanks for listening parachutes ready to zero point nine percents. Apr for sixty so new vehicles with pet bed. You are aware that you don't have to be a military member to save hundreds on your auto loan aren't you. Anyone can join. Penn fed terrified heights. I probably should have looked into that crowd. Leave the shore pen fed credit union visit penn dot org slash autos or call one eight hundred two four seven five six two six advertised rates available through the pen fed carbine service to advertise product. You must become a member of benfit insured by ncua at fedex. We're making carbon. Capture research our priority because earth is our priority. Our goal is to be carbon-neutral by twenty forty. We call it priority earth fedex. Were now meets next..

Paul robinson eduardo fahey Tom dre robin sound studios union recording studio noah shanklin Christopher laying london california marin tracy nova west hollywood paulina facebook tucson san francisco la los angeles Penn fed
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

"Love triangle would prove to be a deadly.

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Death by Misadventure: True Paranormal Mystery

"On june. First nineteen twenty six norma jeane mortenson was born to a single mom named gladys baker who worked as a film cutter in the movie industry..

Marilyn Monroe Is Still a Counterfeiter's Best Friend

Bloomberg Law

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Marilyn Monroe Is Still a Counterfeiter's Best Friend

"Nearly six decades after her death, Marilyn Monroe is still a popular choice from mugs, T shirts, jewelry and other products using her name even illegally. Joining me is Bloomberg News Patent reporter Susan Decker. Marilyn Monroe is still popular. Just how popular issue she's so popular that counterfeiters loved put her name on T shirts and the owner of her trademarks loves to file suit to stop them. So who owns the right to her picture who owns the right to her name? Well, Authentic Brands Group, which is possibly going for an IPO late this year, owns her name and the phrase diamonds are a girl's best friend. Which, of course, is the famous song from Gentlemen prefer blondes. But her image is actually public record. There was a rather famous case back in 2012, where it was decided that she Did not have any right of publicity. Um, this is one of those Make sure you pay your taxes situations when she passed in 1962. They argued that she lived in New York because they didn't want to pay California inheritance taxes. It was a rather modest Mild, but still they didn't want to pay taxes. So they said she was she was a resident of New York. And they said, Oh, no, she was. She was domiciled in California when she passed and and the court said No. You can't say she lived in New York for purposes of taxes and then say she lived in New York, California for right of publicity. We stick with the first one, which was New York, so there is no right of publicity for Marilyn Monroe. The trademarks of her name are still

Marilyn Monroe Bloomberg News Patent Susan Decker Authentic Brands Group New York California
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

09:52 min | 1 year ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

"And bobby investigated bobby. Then the people that were that kill. Jfk like explain that a little bit like okay people right so so what i did after i connect to their life. Sometimes your ears my theory. If bobby kennedy would have been prosecuted for the death of marilyn monroe based on compelling evidence at the time all right he would have had to resign as attorney general and he would have been powerless to do anything. Further including boeing after the mafia especially one mafioso. All right that would have Affected the fact that i have proven in my previous books. That if you look at the jfk's assassination differently than anybody else has ever done. Why bobby wasn't killed instead of why. Jfk was because as the ruby prosecutor. Told me bobby had many more enemies than jfk did okay. So if bobby is powerless than those enemies of bobby's who kill jfk would not have had to do so because he would already been powerless and thus there would have been no jfk assassination. and this. dorothy he'll gallon would not have been killed in nineteen sixty five because she would have had no investigation to aachen vet. You know no no. Jfk assassination to investigate all right so the death of of of the dorothy kilgallen jfk are collateral. Damage to the abuse of power by bobby kennedy. Changing the course of history in my opinion and when the news came out to the world we are very sad. News monroe committed suicide. It was their knowledge. Worthier people talking you know how people are like obscene and kill himself where people talking like that at cocktail parties and at work and were there tabloids and things writing with these thoughts back then or did they come many years later. No there were. Those stood up for her rock hudson. I remember levy a others. Dorothy certainly was but not enough of them. In my opinion. I think there was a lot of jealousy with with what the maryland had a compilation. And all of that but once that verdict was put out by the by the coroner's office and the police department that she killed herself and there wasn't any publicity about the marylyn. Rfk a relationship and all of that. It just died away. It just went away and and then they buried her and they had a beautiful eulogy by lee strasberg that i put in the book and everything. But let's she was forgotten just like dorothy kilgallen was forgotten. And that's too bad too because you look at the look at the films that maryland mate If you go to youtube and and and look at those films. I saw one the other day of her very first film and she just lights up the screen. You know she. She's the steve mcqueen or that or the You know who else should we elizabeth taylor. Whatever when they're on the street there's nobody else there and and so Unfortunately though we lost that woman and she lives on through her films but not enough people stood up for her. That's for sure. Also there's just something so shitty about murdering someone and then putting it out it's one thing to murder someone and hope that they don't find out that it's you and people always go. I wonder who killed so-and-so but then to stage it like she killed herself she was in such you know depressed stay especially back then when mental illness really was perceived differently than it is today. There was not a lot of sympathy a lot of empathy. It was like oh what a mass she was. It's like a double murder. It's like the worst thing you know to make. It appear like it was something that yourself. Yeah excuse me right at the front of book. I say you know. People use the jfk assassination. Like you know your about your about as likely to do this as we'll find out who kill jfk. That's the first thing they think about. Jfk is is the assassination. Okay that shouldn't have are with maryland. The first thing they think about as well yeah you know. She was a druggie and she was suicidal and she killed herself. That's her reputation. Unfortunately with dorothy kilgallen oliver accomplishments in everything that she did well. She was a druggie and she overdosed. This is what it this goes on today. You know that if these cover ups that happened with regard to things you know. I'm hoping that what i'm bringing out with this look and all of that will will help with restoring those reputations. But there's going to be people out there who think hey mark this is just another one of those crazy theories and all this other kind of thing because people will believe what they want to believe. It's like when i used to represent murder suspects and is set on the front page. John doe is guilty of killing blank or arrested for the death of okay and people right away he's guilty and then when there's a jury verdict is on page and so that reputation goes on and that's that's something that's a problem today. It's it's lasted for sixty years. People you know. We hope heather that you know if we do something that people will come forward. And say hey. Mark not liked that his reputation. You know purdue university just honored me by being repository for all my books research books and everything else like that. I hope that if somebody bad mouse me somebody will come forward. Well he must be okay or the university would have done that but there will be people. That won't do that. And i'm sure that's happened to you was with those people who don't agree with what you're saying on the air and everything say terrible things about you. How many people are going to stand up. I hope that they will but many will not. Yeah and with dorothy. When she died he said she had children nyc have they been fighting for the truth about her death or did they accepted at the time and now like are you in touch with any of her children. Well very good question. And i've tried to get them to get involved in the investigation especially now that the cold case swatted. Nypd dd is looking into it. Unfortunately they have terrible memories of the last days of maryland's death all right first of all on the front page. Says she overdosed drugs. She and her daughter did not get along one of the sons. They'd send away because he was such a such a problem. I mean it was a celebrity family. And dorothy was huge. I mean the new york post her the most powerful female voice in america. Can you imagine that. And so there were those issues and then on top of that. They didn't get along with their father. They add to contest the will and then he committed suicide. I think three or four years later so their memories of all of that are just so terrible. And so i've given him a pass. Would i like for them to come forward. And help with the investigations. And things like that. But i think they finally just decided that that wasn't going to happen right. Yeah i mean that's another thing of just crushing the female voice i cure. She was just you know in such a man's world and doing so well and it's like no shut up that you know shut up the female voice again As far as her as a reporter that is just really sad goes on today. Yeah those on today. Is the same thing here. We have powerful men shouting women. Look at the whole hollywood scandal. You know with with white women were put through both. There's these similarities. One of the great ones though is would but dorsey and maryland were able to overcome coming Gender discrimination back in that day. They didn't want the woman to be in the back seat of the car they want in the car behind. Both women overcame all of that. Dorothy was a college dropout. She's such an inspiration. I get emails them all over the world and several of them have been young people deciding to go to journalism school because dorothy was a woman of integrity and they wanna follow through with what she did. I've gotten some emails from from young people who've read some of the my material on maryland. And saying you know if if she can handle hollywood at that time i could handle hollywood now and that's what i hope. They will be inspiration for young people who will save themselves I want to follow the path of these remarkable women. Well the book is super juicy. It's collateral damage. And i really. I know my juicy supers are gonna love it and it's so if you know the story if you if you really don't it's just such a juicy story about Journalism politics hollywood. That era of time frame sinatra mafia. Like eight just just the power of like it really was a time where a handful of people ruled the world and fortunately. I don't think that some people may disagree. Oh it's like that today. I mean. I feel like there's so many more outlets to get your opinion out. Thank goodness today but definitely when you think about like suppress and i'm sure people were wanted to write articles about this. And then we'd go to their editor at the new york times and the editor who just went to you. Know the kennedy compound for something would say enough That's an old story now..

lee strasberg marilyn monroe John doe sixty years Mark america steve mcqueen dorsey youtube elizabeth taylor dorothy jfk new york both Jfk dorothy kilgallen three mark today Both women
"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"marilyn monroe" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

"They could bobby. Kennedy could not let her go to the media with all that information. Can you imagine the media and talking about the fact. That kennedy's we're going to kill castro. I mean destroyed both men's careers she. She was the actress who knew too much disliked. Dorothy was the reporter. Do much less on both so if how do you think they did it. Then my feeling is that Bobby kennedy obviously had operatives that they could've used where he found him. I don't know exactly but in the book. I tried to recreate what i think happened that evening and with out going into detail. Basically what i tried to do in this case is to resolve three true crime murder mysteries. jfk maryland. and dorsey. so. I don't want to give away my right conclusion but i will tell you. This was based on three clues that i've found dorothy. Kilgallen was is incredible investigative. Reporters the The jack ruby trial but also the lindbergh baby kidnapping case the dr. sam sheppard case. You know best known for being on what's my line but she was an amazing reporter and a great writer as well and so i tried to look at this case through. Dorothy is and what she would have done was look for little clues that made a lot of difference to her. The first one was that maryland was supposed supposed to have ingested forty to fifty pills with a barbiturates phenobarbital and then coral hydrate. And and even a sergeant a detective luzon scene said. Wait a minute That couldn't have happened. At between the time that she supposedly ingested and when she died it was impossible. That was the first thing that really caused me to wonder. The second was. There was a physical injury to maryland. When she died in the autopsy i ruled it was an overdose. And i've got both of these and then certificate of death said it was probable suicide which doesn't make a lot of sense but anyway probable suicide so i looked in there. And thomas noguchi the famous infamous coroner. Who looked at all that talked about a fresh bruise on her. And so i thought that that could possibly mean that. Listen is operatives of of of Bobby kennedy's came to her door opened. It used chloroform to stagger her to put her in a state where she didn't know what was happening and on the way back to the bedroom where she was found that she would have her thigh. Her hip would've hit something causing that fresh bruise because there was no other reason for it and the other one was really interesting because when the police got to the to maryland's house The housekeeper was doing the laundry. She was using the washing machine. And that triggered in my mind you know former criminal defense lawyer. You look for all these things that you don't think makes sense and didn't make sense to me. It didn't make sense to detect a detective either there. He wondered what was going on so it made me to believe that when she was taken into the bedroom she didn't ingest those those pills there was another way of killing her of poisoning. Her and i divulge how that happened in. Collateral damage And wasn't it always that she was found nude and then there was always controversy of people. Say sleek dude or she does sleep nude or people who i. What was the the whole nude thing of people thinking that that meant two different things. Well you're so smart because you're you're echoing exactly what north surmised she wrote. She wrote a column. It was actually. It started this. One right here is actually started with something about Ethel merman who was a star at that point but then she asked all these questions about maryland's death readers had sent them in. You know why was the light on in the bedroom when she always slept in the dark If the if the door was locked. How did the housekeeper Get in there. Because there wasn't any way unless she went all array of the outside and her bedroom. She said she saw light under the door. She couldn't have gotten there without going through the bathroom and all of that. She wondered why maryland was new. She wondered You know a lot of things about what happened. That didn't seem to make sense to her. And so she asked those questions and then she wrote and what i believe is the real truth. Hasn't been told. And when i read that sentence i was gonna write this book because dorothy was smart enough to to have suspected that it wasn't suicide the problem we have here and have almost fifty similarities in the book between the life and times and deaths of maryland dorsey but the the worst one is when dorothy kilgallen died with with there being an obvious stage death scene and and the motives there to have killed her and the statement she made about being endanger. And all of that. There was no investigation of any kind. I even got dr michael baden. The emphasis an infamous forensic guy to admit that the verdict was wrong that she didn't overdose no investigation. What happened when maryland died while bobby. Kennedy's good friend. Robert parker the police chief in los angeles decide to handle the investigation. They didn't go to the scene. They didn't interview inner. They didn't an interview anybody. What did they do. They appointed a three panel site psychiatrist group to look into her mental health at the time. She died predictably. They came back that she was suicidal. And of the case closed done never got any justice. Then maryland didn't get justice north. Didn't get justice and really. Jfk never got any justice when he died with. All these ludicrous oslo alone a theories and everything so that the connection between them is that they were all denied justice but these two women did not deserve to die. Those early age maryland was thirty six years drain. Dorothy was fifty two. And as long as i live i will continue to try to get justice for both of and you know one of the things i don't buy at the end of the book. I humanized them. I try to tell the reader what we lost our jfk. Yeah he had his flaws he was a womanizer and everything. But you know incredible things. He could have done as president. I point out that he never got to spend time with those two young children of gets. That's what we lost with dorothy. She was the mother of three. But what would she have done with. Regard to the jfk assassination investigation. What would she have done in her life you know. She was syndicated to two hundred newspapers across the country. She had a radio show. Listen two million people. I mean the things she could have done in her in her life and then maryland you know maybe the most beautiful woman who ever lived. I really try to portray her smile in this book and and show who she was and how she she treated people she was. Yeah she she had her flaws she may have run around a lot and all of that but you know about her terrible childhood. She was always looking for love but she really cared about people. I looked up. A sir laurence olivier what he had to say about her and how much he loved her and the other actors did. She wants apologized to the whole crew for being late. That's not the maryland that is portrayed. Today the maryland has trade is that she killed herself and that shouldn't happen and and what's interesting about the book is that you're saying that had There better real investigation over maryland's death.

Robert parker thomas noguchi dorsey Dorothy forty Ethel merman michael baden Kennedy thirty six years dorothy jfk maryland Kilgallen Bobby kennedy two million people two women both Jfk Today sam sheppard three clues
AJ Didn't Know the Power of His Distinctive Voice

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:14 min | 1 year ago

AJ Didn't Know the Power of His Distinctive Voice

"I'm thinking about my voice. I could hear it's different. I know when I'm different. I know I know I'm known for having a distinctive voice. You know, I know way back in the day, I knew my voice was something I could use as a tool as an instrument as another distinctive part of whatever I have in my, I hate to say this word. Weaponry, but where the fuck I have as a performer actor, whatever, writer, your voice is a big part of it. And I remember when I got the mysteries and scandals job, way back in 98, I didn't know just what a recognizable distinctive voice could do to people yet. I had never dawned on me. Now, you know, I don't want the thing about voices are, especially with television. You know, when you're in someone's living room where someone's bedroom at midnight, well, they TiVo you and play you with 2 o'clock in the morning and suddenly it's very intimate your voice. That's why to me, podcasts that are even more intimate than television because there's something about a voice just going directly into your ear. You know, women fall in love with their ears, men fall in love with their eyes. George Hamilton told me that. And I got to be honest with you. I've never in my life this sounds so narcissistic. But honestly, I've had women talk to me about my voice since this podcast began and said crazy things about my voice and I take it as a compliment, but I remember getting letters back in the day from gay men from guys in prison from housewives about my voice. One woman wrote to me that she would begin to masturbate as soon as she heard the first notes of the mysteries and scandals show and when I talked to say like, you know, Marilyn Monroe, she was a sexy sultry siren, but as soon as she heard me begin to speak, she would start playing with herself. And she would write me and say, I'd climax before you get to your name. How many J benza? Join me as we take a look at Marilyn Monroe, whatever the fuck that means. It is what it is, but I thought if they go, wow, voice is a big thing.

George Hamilton Marilyn Monroe
The Timothy Leary Conviction

Today in True Crime

04:44 min | 2 years ago

The Timothy Leary Conviction

"On january twenty first nineteen seventy former harvard professor and so called priest of lsd timothy. Leary was sentenced to ten years in prison on drug smuggling charges but in september of that year. The fifty year-old academic broke out of a san luis obispo facility with the help of the weatherman. The daring escape only added to the mystique of the man president. Nixon wants declared the most dangerous man in america. But just what made leery so dangerous. Well it might not surprise you. That richard nixon may have been exaggerating for his own political game according to authors. Bill minna tag. Leo and stephen l davis nixon's advisors suggested he find a public enemy to distract the public from his own flagging approval rating the war in vietnam and the struggling economy. They leary a prominent figure in the counterculture movement and because the former professor was a proud exponent of hallucinogenic drug use. The president's ir fit right in with his war on drugs narrative timothy leary was something of a self appointed spokesperson for the benefits of drug use. Which heat enjoyed since one thousand nine hundred sixty after an experimental magic mushrooms trip. The already noted psychologist became excited about the possibilities. Mushrooms and similar drugs had on the human brain during his tenure. At harvard he conducted academic experiments on the effects of hallucinogens. Drawing the attention and admiration of other notable nineteen sixties figures famed authors. Like gin berg and jack kerouac willingly participated in leary's experiments and it was perhaps their involvement that catapulted the professor onto the national stage before long leary was touring the country speaking about his research and reportedly brushing up against the rich and famous inevitably a backlash arrived. Leary's teaching colleagues criticized his experimentation with lsd. They believed research of that. Nature should be left to medical doctors not psychologists meanwhile psychology experts who once lauded leary's earlier work now made it clear that his drug centered experiments were less praiseworthy. Despite these blows leary insisted that taking lsd was quote a sacramental ritual one that could expand human consciousness. Harvard university did not agree and fired him in nineteen sixty three but by that stage leary had a new life. He was a counterculture touchstone for the masses and a legitimizing scientific voice in the pro drug movement. He rubbed shoulders with marilyn monroe and sang with john. Lennon and yoko ono in short he was a powerful voice advocating for drug use throughout the nineteen sixties. He even appeared before a senate committee to argue in favor of legislation. That would make it legal for adults to use hallucinogenic drugs. So when richard. Nixon assumed the presidency in nineteen sixty nine leary was squarely in his sights. Ostensibly nixon wanted to eliminate drug use in the country. Leary very much did not. That made him dangerous. So it's little surprise that when leary's appeal of his nineteen sixty five drug-smuggling conviction was overturned. The government wanted a second bite at the apple but any joy nixon and his cabinet might have felt in putting leary. Away was short lived using his network of contacts. The former professor escaped prison remaining on the run until nineteen seventy three when he was detained in afghanistan and sent back to the united states. There he was jailed in the notorious folsom. Prison and briefly befriended charles manson and though his sentence was for ten years leary was paroled in nineteen. Seventy six having served just three. It's a surprising twist day given that so many drug offenders imprisoned for decades on similar offenses then again timothy leary was famous and white which might have had something to do with his early release

Leary Lsd Timothy Bill Minna Harvard Stephen L Davis Nixon Gin Berg Long Leary Nixon San Luis Obispo Timothy Leary Richard Nixon Jack Kerouac LEO Vietnam United States Yoko Ono Marilyn Monroe Lennon
Sliding Doors

The Tennis Podcast

06:36 min | 2 years ago

Sliding Doors

"We're not just living in the post. Today we're living in an alternate universe post because today and those day we're bringing you sliding does tennis which is kind of ovarian concept isn't it should we. Should we trademark this in some way. Can we patent it. Let's if it's a success. I shower and then and then we'll get onto the patent lawyers wouldn't wouldn't gwyneth paltrow smith about that. She owns the rights to alternates. Alternate timelines well. My favorite my favorite genre of is counterfactual fiction. There's a book called idyllwild which imagines a world in the ninety s where needed jfk nor marilyn monroe died in the sixties and it sort of projecting into the future and imagining a world. That is entirely different. And it's cooled arms on on this spoiler for you or the listeners are highly recommend anyway and it's called idol ball because of course idyllwild. Anybody know this putting on spot here. This is a great little but if trivia idyllwild was the name. jfk airport before it became today airport. I don't know how. I read your david. Private could a medium sized book right. Yeah i take a long time to read books Well it's worth the effort. If you got in your hands in the middle of the night you know we as we did last week. We start off with david. Whitaker's review of what we're about to do podcast as he says it's a really good idea. Like i like counterfactual history. If hitler had gone ahead with the invasion of britain in nineteen forty not bottled it dot dot dot. What if lee harvey oswald missed etc. What if it hasn't rained in henman's semifinal with even vich so my daughter's very much understood the premise. If today's podcast and one of those three we're going to do yes. Thank you very much. David whitaker slash. Dad's fuel suggestions A little teaser of what's come where we are thinking of sort of moment tree seemingly incident significant at the time occurrences in tennis which may or may not have entirely altered the course of tennis history. david would you like to kick us off with the first sliding doors tense moment. Yeah would i'd like to imagine a world in which rafael on the dow was not left handed never decided to to play left hand. All just ended up playing left handed. And it's one of the. It's actually one of the things that i wanted to come back to for for quite a while probably a year and a half ever since we did our rounded out story. Podcast when we were we went deep into his his past and tried to just chronicled his career from it from a very young age and during that process we had been like many other outlets taken in by a the the myth it turns out that his uncle tony had decided that he should play handed in order to be more successful in in order to discomfit his opponents more and we talked about that on that podcast and turns out. That isn't what happened. And we at the time i mean. I think that that podcast got some some great feedback. People enjoyed it. But a number of nadal diehard said cop believe you're still going with this view that refunded. The uncalled decided. He should apply left-handed. I one day. Because that's not the case. So i've also one day i'd like to really look into that and find out what the situation was and when we came up with sliding doors tennis and i chose. This is one of my my selections Matt's produced the referee on the dow autobiography which contains the following passage. I've seen reports in the news media saying that. Tony forced me to play left handed and that he did this because it would make me harder to play against well. It's not true. It's the story of the newspapers have made up. The truth is that. I began playing when i was very small and because i wasn't strong enough to hit the ball over the net. I'd hold the racket with both hands on the four hundred as well as the back end then. One day my uncle said there are no professional players who play two hens. Strictly speaking true. Monica seles did right. Fabrice santoro did right But anyway there are no place press professional players who played two hens. And we're not going to be the first ones so you've got to change so i did. What came naturally to me was to play left-handed why i can't tell because i ride with my ryan tend when i play basketball gulf or doubts. That was the way sounds order. I play right handed to but in football i play with my left and my left foot is much stronger than my rights. People say this gives me an advantage on the double handed backhand and that may be right having more feeling more control and both hands than the majority of players has to work in my favorite especially on cross court shots where a little extra strength helps but this was definitely not something that tony in. A moment of genius thought up. It's dumb to imagine that he might have been out to force me to play in a way. That did not come naturally to me so pretty emphatic rejection of that. That story that we've all kind of taken as just conceived wisdom from over the years a couple things that he's often talked about by commentators is looking like he's got to four hands conventional forehands in in the way he's able to strike the bowl in terms of the the sheer muscular. Rt of his game the way he's able to put you on the back foot from both sides equally strongly and say and he's alluding to that in that analysis of whites useful for him to play. Left

Tennis Gwyneth Paltrow Smith Jfk Airport David Whitaker David Marilyn Monroe Henman Lee Harvey Oswald Whitaker Hitler Rafael Fabrice Santoro Britain Tony Monica Seles Matt Ryan Basketball Football
What Biden's America could look like

The Economist: Editor's Picks

11:22 min | 2 years ago

What Biden's America could look like

"In much of the world and nowhere more. So than among america's allies joe biden's victory has come as a great relief under his presidency. There will be no more bullying and threats to leave. Nato america will stop treating the european union as a photo on trade or its own forces stationed in south korea as a protection racket in place of donald. Trump's wrecking bowl. Mr biden will offer an outstretched hand working over simply on global crises. From kuroda to climate change under mr trump america's favorability ratings in many allied countries sank to new lows. Mr biden promises to make america a beacon again a champion of lofty values and the defender of human rights leading as he puts it in his acceptance speech not only by the example of our pa but by the power of our example allies are central to mr biden's vision he rightly sees them as a multiplier of american influence tuning a country with a quarter of global. Gdp into a force with more than double that he is also a multilateral by instinct on his first day in office he will rejoin the paris agreement on climate change which america formerly left on november the fourth unlike mr trump. He believes it is better to lead the world health organization than to leave it. He will reinvigorate arms control a priority being to ensure order new. Start the last remaining. Nuclear pact with russia is extended beyond february the fifth he would like to rejoin the nuclear deal with iran that mr trump dumped if he can persuade the iranians to go back into compliance inevitably. America's friends have a long list of things they hope it will do as it reimburses global leadership the demand stretch from places and organizations. Mr trump has abused such as the un and allies like germany. Two parts of the world. He has ignored such as much of africa. And it will not be smooth traveling not all countries in our style jake for a return to obama era politics when america lead from behind and blood. It's red lines. Several countries on nato's front line with russia like the way defenses. Have been beefed up under mr trump and asian allies like how mr trump has confronted. China talked a free and open indo pacific and worked on the cloud with australia india and japan. Mr biden needs to prove that he will not turn soft. His priorities will be to quell virus and improve the economy on both counts. He can count on little support and much pushback. If the senate is under republican control as is likely such troubles at home have probably also exacerbated. The country's reluctance to take on more foreign burdens. Who can be sure that world-weary jacksonians will come galloping. Back in twenty twenty four. Perhaps even with mr trump in the saddle so rather than pile demand upon needed demand. America's allies should go out of their way to show that they have learned to pull their weight. Nato partners for example should not relax defense spending just because mr trump is no longer bullying them. Germany should pay heed to french. Average to build european defense capacity. there is scope to do so without undermining nato europeans could lend a big hand to france in these suheil in asia. The quad could keep deepening naval and other cooperation. Japan and south korea should restrain their feuding taiwan or to make a more serious contribution to its own defense. I should also work with america to repair the international order. They can support efforts to resist chinese or russian rule. Bending many countries will want to join mr biden's efforts at concerted carbon cutting mr biden will face a world full of problems but he will also start with strengths. Thanks to mr trump. He has sanctions on adversaries including iran and venezuela that he can use as chips and among friends he can seek to convert relief at renewed american engagement into stronger. Burden-sharing is allies would be wise to answer that call with enthusiasm. Finally how princess diana shaped british politics netflix's flagship series. The crown has done a fine job of telling the story of postwar britain through the prism of the monarchy. The previous series nephew is in the mid nineteen seventies mired in the miners strike and the three day week new one which began streaming on november fifteenth. Introduces us to two women. Who were destined to change the country in profound ways margaret thatcher and lady diana spencer lady thatcher made it clear from the first but she was in the business of changing the nation. They design a spencer was a bird of a very different feather. Shy girl who had failed all her o levels twice and had no interest in politics she was brought onto the national stage for the soaker of producing mail as to the throne yet. The country is still living with her political legacy as surely as it is with lady. Thatcher's princess diana's genius was to mix two of the most profound forces of modern politics emotion and anti elitism into a powerful populist cocktail. She was one of the modern masters of the politics of emotion. Feeling the people's pain just as they felt hers. She repeatedly outmaneuvered prince. Charles during long war of the wales's because she was willing to bare her soul in public interview with martin bashir of the bbc in november. Nineteen ninety-five is now the focus of controversy as her brother earl. Spencer claims that it was obtained under false pretenses using forged documents. Whatever the reason for it. The interview was a masterclass in emotional manipulation at one pivotal moment. Princess diana acknowledged that she would never be queen but hope that she would be queen of people's hearts. The princess used her mastery of the politics of feeling to turn himself into a champion of the people against the powerful. The people's princess in tony blair's raise she patronized charities that helped marginalized folks such as hiv patients and kept company with pop stars and celebrities rather than with the usual royal wax. Books the most memorable music at her funeral was not an historic him. But a song by elton john adapted for herbert originally written about another icon. Turn victim marilyn monroe. Anti elitism was directed. Not at the monarchy's wells. She happily lived in kensington palace and received a seventeen million pound. That's twenty three million dollar divorce. Settlement plus four hundred thousand pounds a year but added stunted emotional state the traditional deal to which royal side allow them to behave as they liked in crowded kings have almost always had mistresses because they marry her reasons of dynasty not compatibility so long as they behaved with decorum in public princess. Diana regarded this humbug. She succeeded in reconciling the most. Jarring of opposites despite being a top tier aristocrat. Her family the spencers. Look down on the windsors this german carpetbaggers. She was universally known as die. Her death in a car crash won her a spectacular posthumous victory against the royal court. It produced the greatest burst public lack remission. Britain has ever seen and led to widespread demands that the royal should display more emotion. As if the damn cheek could replace the stiff upper lip as the definition of britishness. What would really do the monarchy. Good show that they had grasped the lesson of diana's popularity and editorial in the independent thundered would be for the queen and the prince of wales to breakdown cry and hug one another on the steps of the abbey this saturday. Cincinnati death emotional. Populism has threaded through politics. Tony blair presented himself as the people's prime minister. He championed cool. Britannia surrounded himself with popstars and urged his staff to call me. Tony the next conservative prime minister call me. Dave cameron a distant relation of princess. Diana's adopted this combination of compassion signaling. Hugging hoodies is instead of cracking down on juvenile delinquents and studied informality relaxing and kitchen suppers replacing previous. Tory premier stiffness. Both men were responsible to that emotional. Populism interfere with the affairs of state domestic and foreign policy choices continued to be conducted according to the dictates of reason evidence brexit tears. By contrast follow the diana's script they appeal to the heart rather than the had to win their arguments. They used feelings of patriotism and resentment rather than facts about trade flows. They denounced the elites for trying to straight the wisdom of the people in much the same way as diana files denounce the palace for ignoring the people's emotions lay turned on the nation's core institutions. Parliament the civil service the supreme court when they suspected attempts to frustrate their wishes they succeeded in defeating the establishment in much the same way as princess diana had by claiming to stand for emotion rather than reason and the people rather than the elite alexander. Boris federal johnson has reconciled the opposites. He embodies justice. She did a card carrying member of the metropolitan elite. He has managed to sell himself as a man of the people as she was die. So he is. Boris the first series of the crown shows a young queen. Elizabeth studying water badgett's english constitution under the guidance of henry. Martin the vice provost of eton who kept a pet raven in a cage and address the on crisis gentlemen budgets. Great work distinguishes between the dignified branch of the constitution. The monarchy and the efficient branch elected politicians implicit in that distinction is badges perception. That emotions pose a dangerous threat to the proper conduct of politics. The monarchy provides a controlled lead for them thus enabling responsible people to get on with the difficult task of running the country by using people's feelings as the fuel for her astonishing career princess. Diana broke that safety valve britain will be living with the consequences of the emotional populism that she helped to release for years to come.

Mr Trump Mr Biden America Nato South Korea Princess Diana Suheil Russia Kuroda Lady Diana Spencer Lady Thatch Iran Joe Biden Germany Japan Taiwan Donald Trump European Union
Is Suicide Contagious?

Last Day

06:27 min | 2 years ago

Is Suicide Contagious?

"A beloved celebrity dies unexpectedly before their time. And the headline start to quickly pile up and take over social media. But there's no real story yet. No details no explanation just click -able headline with a bunch of photos. Celebrity. Dead at forty, eight, thirty to twenty, four whatever and in the absence of any real information, a question inevitably arises. Was it an overdose or suicide? Unfortunately, I am acutely aware of what it's like when the answer is overdose. Please refer to season one for that story. But when the answer is suicide, how the story is told matters. For so long there has been cautioned around public discussion of suicide. Asking the news media think a little harder by reporting it, they could be perpetuating the story. We touched on this episode one but if media gets the message wrong and that wrong message reaches a struggling person at the wrong time, the consequences can be devastating even fatal. For example. In Two thousand fourteen after beloved comedian actor Robin Williams died by apparent suicide. And that shocking news flooded the headlines. Suicide rates went up by ten percent. This detail got repeated after another prominent suicide death we'll designer kate spade was found dead in her apartment today her death and apparent suicide. We saw after Robin Williams suicide rates went up ten percent. We Know Kate spade reportedly was infatuated with his suicide. which became part of another subsequent suicide. Relearn today we lost a friend and colleague Anthony Bourdain. Anthony is the second public figure to die this way this week. Was the first some experts point to a phenomenon? They call suicide contagion, which often happens moments such as this. And it turns out there is a long historical precedent for this. There's this phenomenon called the weather effect. Stick with me. This won't take long. It is a fancy literary version of the outdated term copycat suicide. And it comes from this seventeen seventy four to novel called the sorrows of Young werther the book spoiler alert and with the sympathetic hero or they're dressed in a blue code and yellow trousers shooting himself after being rejected by someone he loved. In the years that followed so many young men were found dead having shot themselves while dressed as werther that people freaked out and banned the book in several countries. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two, when Marilyn Monroe died. The following months were filled with extensive coverage about her apparent suicide. which led to widespread sorrow and an apparent twelve percent uptick in suicides. These are obviously massive national reactions to the loss of our beloved heroes and icons. But you see the same thing happening in communities or someone dies by suicide. All of sudden, you have to worry about the other people in town. Or the kids in the schools. And it brings us to this very complicated question is suicide contagious. This question of course has been plaguing us this whole project not just because we're talking about suicide. But also if I didn't know, we are doing it in the midst of a global pandemic where community spread is all we're talking about. So is it as simple as that? Is suicide something you can catch and if so. How do we protect ourselves. Like. What's the equivalent of a mask for suicide? I'm Stephanie Woodall's Wax and this is last day. We knew early on that, we wanted to talk about contagion but truth be told we didn't totally get what it meant for suicidal thoughts to transfer. Is it like. Flipping a switch not suicidal one moment suicidal the next. And that's how we were thinking about it. Until we heard this. Every morning I wake up and I make agenda for the day. I love plans I love knowing my options. In sixth grade when the first suicide cluster happened in my community when we lost more than three people in one year. It was the first time that suicide became on my list of options when I was going through a problem. I feeling, Sad, one day I think through what the options were. NAPPING, think about hanging my friends I thought about taking my own life I thought about going out. On my list of what I could potentially do to help. Figure it out in solve it. This is Lisa. How speaking at a jet event a few years ago. And when we watch this video something clicked. We knew we had to talk to her. Can you tell me a little bit about yourself like who are you? WHO IS LISA? Yeah. So that's such a hard question sometimes answer. It makes sense that this is a tricky question for Lisa because a lot has changed in a short period of time. Today Lisa is twenty two and she just graduated from college. She's about to start a theory impressive job as an engineer at a little known company called Apple. But. In sixth grade, she was in a very different place at the center of what is probably the most commonly referenced example of suicide. Contagion. Lisa was a student at gun, high school. In Palo Alto California a school that comes up again and again when you start to dig into the concept of suicide. Contagion

Lisa Anthony Bourdain Kate Spade Stephanie Woodall Robin Williams Marilyn Monroe Werther Palo Alto California Engineer Apple Anthony
Fat Phobia and It's Racist Past and Present

Short Wave

12:18 min | 2 years ago

Fat Phobia and It's Racist Past and Present

"As a teen Sabrina strings loved getting to hang out with her grandma even when her grandma was obsessing over one of her soap operas I remember one time. She called me into the living room and she's like Sabrina look at Victoria. McCoy's kept on young and the restless. Victoria is killing herself to him. Why are white women dying to be thin? Fast forward to one three adult Sabrina was working at an HIV medication adherence clinic in San, Francisco, where she witnessed real life, examples of women sacrificing their health to be thin nights, spoken to a couple of women both HIV positive who refused to take their HIV medications for fear of gaining weight, and that blew my mind, and immediately took me back to conversations I've been having with my grandma like gosh onto something so important you know when she was talking about it, she saw it as largely a white phenomenon, but the women I interviewed that day. We're both color. Why were these women dying to be thin and did race have anything to do with? Him. Sabrina went on to become a sociologist at the University of California Irvine and wrote a whole book investigating these questions. If you're like me, you might have assumed that. There was some moment in between Marilyn Monroe. TWIGGY EH in which. Suddenly we'll. We suddenly became fat-phobic in those three years, but Sabrina started digging looking at nineteenth century magazines like Harper's bazaar in what she found was troubling articles warning American women well middle class and upper class white women. They needed to watch what they eat, and they were unapologetic, and stating that this was the proper form for. Jackson Protestant women, and so it was important that women eight as little as necessary in order to show their Christian nature and also their racial superiority. Today on the show we go all the way back to the transatlantic slave trade to understand the racial origins of fat phobia, and how black people are still dealing with the consequences today? I mattie Safai and this is shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. So Sabrina. Let's let's get into what you discovered about the history of fat phobia a little bit you. You did a ton of research and you started the story several centuries back in Europe definitely in the ethos that like Renaissance Women. you know we're full figured. And that was absolutely a thing that was valued, and then there was a big shift explain what was going on back then so it turns out that the growth of the slave trade, especially by the eighteenth century led to new articulations of what types of appearance we could expect of people by different races, and also what types of behaviors. Such that by the middle of Eighteenth Century, a lot of French philosophers in particular were arguing that you know what when we're in the colonies, we're noticing that Africans are sensuous. They love sex and they love food, and for this reason they tend to be too fat. Europeans have rational self control. This is what makes us the premier race of the world, so in terms of body. Body size, we should be slender, and we should watch what we eat so okay Sabrina. Are you telling me that? When the slave trade started and European saw that African women were essentially curvy much like European women at the time at that point, they decided that being fat being thicker wasn't ideal anymore, and they built a system of oppression around this idea of needing to be. Thinned to prove racial superiority is at eight am I close. It's not quite as intentional as that. Effectively what they determined was that. You know we want it to be able to have a mechanism for ensuring that we could recognize who was slave, and it was free right, and it was easy in the beginning of the was simply skin color. What did you might imagine? After two hundred years of living in close proximity skin color really no longer works has a mechanism right, because now we have all of these people who are We would consider them today to be by racial, and so what they did was they decided to articulate new aspects of racial identity and so eating and body size became of the characteristics that were being used to suggest that these are people who do not deserve freedom. The trans, Atlantic slave trade eventually ended, but argues that we are still absolutely living with these racist attitudes about body size today. And in her book, she also traces how these anti-fat attitudes worked their way into modern medicine for somewhat arbitrarily, reasons for example take BMI or body mass index. That equation actually wasn't intended to be used to measure individual fatness. Though of course doctors did and still do today, can you? Can you explain the problem with using am I as a measure for obesity especially when it comes to black women, who I know have been told that they have the highest rates of obesity according to that measurement to be am I. Yes, so am. I is a measure of the ratio of a person's weight to their height. And what this does not account for is bone density. Muscular already any other type of genetic influences in your way or cultural environmental influences in your weight, and so, what ended up happening? As many people pointed out is that you might have to people with the same BMI, but vastly different life experiences embody compositions outside of the simple reality of their weight to height ratio, right, and the problem of applying this to them in particular, is that African American populations as studies have shown for literal decades since at least the eighties tends to be healthier at heavier weights than white populations. And so that already is an indication that cross racially. This is not a very useful tool, not to mention the fact that even within race there are going to be vastly different experiences, of an individual body between like their weight and their health profile so surreal this message from the medical establishment that excess weight is the biggest you know reason for black women's health problems or a very central of it. Why do you see it as so damaging? For Black Women, ultimately, the main advice that people are given when they so called obese is to lose weight, and there are so many problems with this. We have been telling people to lose weight for decades. What ends up happening is that they either don't lose the weight or they sometimes do lose the weight, and then frequently gain it back so first off. It could be more harmful to tell people to lose weight in the long run, and then in addition to that there are the psychological effects of telling people that their bodies are wrong. Right at their bodies are inherently unhealthy This type of fat stigma also leads to health outcomes right right right, so let's talk about this. In the context of covid nineteen I'm thinking about the recent New York Times op Ed you wrote about how cove nineteen is disproportionately impacting. Impacting people of Color specifically black people, and how you took issue with obesity, gaining traction as a leading explanation for that disparity, so talked me a little bit about that. This piece was actually motivated by something that I felt was very troubling, which was I had been seeing so many report, suggesting that the disparities in Colbert outcomes between white populations and black populations. They would say things like well. You know there's already the pre existing factor of obesity, and somehow that was one of the first things that come up and I thought there is very little evidence that disparities in quote unquote obesity are what's contributing to these negative outcomes, but there's plenty of evidence to suggest that Kobe. Fatalities or maybe even serious complications with Kobe nineteen are being influenced by people's environments. Are they essential workers? Do they have access to enough soap and water hand sanitizer, and so of course might imagine that the ability to socially distance to shelter in place to have access to healthy foods under Corinthian, all of this is very much being structured by a person's social location and black people tend to live in communities without access. Access to a lot of different healthy and life giving resources. Yeah, in in Sabrina, I'll tell you that as a person that reads a lot of the literature on Kovin prisoner biologists I am seeing a lot of papers coming out that are associating with the obesity without with health outcomes of COVID, but those links tend to be correlated right, but even if we were to find out that there's absolutely a causal link. Link between covert and obesity which I think you're arguing. There isn't one especially right now. At least the rates of obesity and white and black populations aren't actually that different right like it wouldn't necessarily be the thing that made it. So can you tell me a little bit about those rates versus the actual percentage of disparities? We're seeing so according to the CDC, the Obesity Twain. African, American and white populations are. Are Forty two point, two percent for white populations and forty nine point, seven percents for black populations are about that and so we're looking at effectively a seven percentage point disparity between white and black populations in terms of rates of obesity, however, when we're looking at serious complications with covert nineteen. What we're seeing is that black people are dying at rates of two point four to seven times that of white populations. How that's seven percentage point differential is leading to two point four to seven times the disparity in serious complications. Death. No one's really being able to explain that. This is the problem with the kind of cords of studies, which is that they lead people to believe that somehow. Is One of the drivers when in fact it could simply be a confounding in these studies, but we're so used to studying obesity and treating these correlations as if they are evidence of causal link that people are frequently not being very critical when they're seeing studies that show these relationships. Sabrina, you've obviously spent years by now working to understand this issue and to educate folks about it I'm wondering you know like why why this. Why have you specifically taken this on one of the reasons? Why continue to do it? Is I've seen what a difference? It's made to people's lives. I mean I've had so many people reach out and tell me that they felt for the longest time like something was wrong, but no one was talking about it or that I have spoken to their personal experience. I couldn't have imagined when I started doing this work. That could have possibly had the impact that it's had you know I'm standing on the shoulders of giants people who have been feminist scholars medical scholars journalists who've been doing this work at least since the nineteen seventies, but we're at a moment right now where there's a critical mass of people who are aware that the discourse surrounding fatness that we've long accepted really is baseless, and we think about a new way of allowing people to have a positive relationship to their bodies, and to cultivate health within themselves and their communities that does not rely on that stigma. Okay Sabrina I appreciate you. Thank you so much for coming on the show and sharing your life and your work with us. I really appreciate it. Thank you so much. It's been a pleasure. Sabrina strings. Her book is called fearing the black body the racial origins

Sabrina Obesity Black Women Victoria Mccoy Europe Marilyn Monroe Obesity Twain University Of California Irvin Francisco New York Times Mattie Safai Kobe NPR SAN Harper Kovin CDC
The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire: Archetypes

Daily Breath with Deepak Chopra

03:42 min | 2 years ago

The Spontaneous Fulfillment of Desire: Archetypes

"I'm. Where going back to daily bread. archetypes are perennial teams that reside at the level of the collective universal source. They are representations of our collective soul's yearnings imagination. And deepest is is. These archetypes have existed in every culture in every tradition since the beginning of time. archetypes, our ancient gods themes, motifs stories literature. Art Paintings. Even paintings on the was of caves from longtime ago and they embody. Symbolically. Themes of expanded or higher consciousness, you can say symbolic representations. Of A particular aspect. Of The divine intelligence archetypes and Forms and shapes the there soon. Shift throughout history, but their core meaning that Gore theme that God motif remains the same. archetypes everywhere. In popular culture. Movie Stars Sports Heroes. They're all basically representations of archetypes. Visionary leaders are representations of archetypes. Saints are great activists like Nelson Mandela Martin Luther King Junior. Mark Maguire Andy Abraham, Lincoln or Representation of archetypes, but so products may be a brand of sopa Volkswagen brand, new car, or even Marlboro cigarettes. These represents architects, the guy who's used to advertise Marlboro cigarettes who has a? Very tough-looking. Cowboy on the Horse, and now of course is on a respirator, but that archetype. Of was very successful in selling cigarettes. And Johnnie Walker is a very successful. archetype selling whiskey. Because it attracts a certain team, a certain personality, a certain story. Movies TV soap operas, media tabloids. These are actually all right. archetypes. And every person they representing every idea they represent are every product represent seems to be larger than life. It seems uncomplicated. It seems at least the way it's advertise pure of intent, whatever that intent may be sacred or profane. It does matter. And so I say exaggerated expressions of the conscious energy of the collective source. That is the adventure or the secret of the sage of the rescuer of the redeemer or the love object. That the archetype represents. is in fact, the symbolic representation of a divine intelligence in the conscious energy of our collective Sola. Born of the collective soul, but enacted by the individual. Becomes very powerful as they representation. Of that are detected theme for example Marilyn. Monroe was the archetype of the Greek Greek Goddess Aphrodite representing sensuality and beauty and sexuality.

Mark Maguire Andy Abraham Johnnie Walker Nelson Mandela Martin Luther Monroe Marlboro Gore Volkswagen Marilyn
‘Smash’ Cast Will Reunite for Streamed Performance of ‘Bombshell in Concert’

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

‘Smash’ Cast Will Reunite for Streamed Performance of ‘Bombshell in Concert’

"Car the cast of bombshell is reuniting though not the recent movie the players in the fictional Broadway musical about Marilyn Monroe are gathering together to help those coping with the coronavirus actors including Katharine McPhee Debra messing and Megan Hilty will reunite may twentieth to present a stream of the one night only twenty fifteen Broadway concert that's part of the TV show

Debra Messing Megan Hilty Marilyn Monroe Katharine Mcphee
Suspicious Celebrity Deaths: Marilyn Monroe

Hostage

05:26 min | 2 years ago

Suspicious Celebrity Deaths: Marilyn Monroe

"We'll start our exploration with a clip from podcast original conspiracy. Theories that discusses the media sensationalized death of actress and sex icon Marilyn Monroe nearly sixty years after her death. Monroe continues to be a pop culture icon. Monroe's private life was the subject of much Hollywood gossip in the nineteen fifties. She was involved in two highly publicized marriages and divorces and battled addiction and depression when she died of a prescription overdose in nineteen sixty two. It was ruled a suicide but many believed there was something more behind her cause of death on August fourth nineteen sixty two. Maryland spent most of the afternoon in a room after having an argument with her friend and publicist Pat Nukem in the morning nukem state at the House for the rest of the afternoon at about three or four. Pm Maryland's housekeeper. Eunice Murray called over her psychiatrist. Dr Ralph Greenspan. She claims she called him because she was troubled by Maryland's request for an oxygen treatment. Even though oxygen was a well-known hangover cure at the time Dr Green soon arrived around three or four Pat Nukem left and green spoke to Maryland in her room for about an hour. Greenspan left asking Murray to stay at Maryland's house overnight and keep an eye on her Maryland took a telephone into her room and spent the night making calls to friends and acquaintances every when she spoke to agree she didn't sound drugged or depressed and she gave no indication. She was considering suicide at around ten PM. She set the receiver down during a call and never turned around ten thirty. She made one last call to Peter. Lawford her friend. And the husband of Patricia Kennedy during the call she apparently drifted into unconsciousness and stopped responding at either midnight or three a m. She changed her story later. In the morning Eunice Murray woke up and noticed a light in Maryland's room was still on but she wasn't responding. She called Dr Green Son who broke in through the bedroom window and found Maryland lying dead clutching the telephone. Next to empty pill. Bottles of prescription sedative called NEMBUTAL and a nearly empty bottle of another sedative choral hydrate. Greenspan called Maryland's physician Dr Hyman Engelberg. Who came over and officially pronounced her dead at four. Twenty five am the police were called. Murray Greenspan and Engelberg initially told investigators Jack Clemens that Maryland's body had been found at midnight creating a four hour gap between discovering the body and calling the police that none of them could account for clemens. Was Relieve by Sergeant Marvin known who sealed up the house until the full investigative force arrived at about five thirty when the investigators questioned them later that morning. Murray Greenspan and Engelberg all changed their stories to say that Maryland's body hadn't been discovered until three a m inconsistencies in the forensic evidence and the witnesses stories. Baffled the police but it did appear to be a suicide so they held off on opening an official investigation until the coroner confirmed the cause of death. The coroner's investigation went on for less than a week during which they interviewed. None of the key witnesses except for Maryland psychoanalyst. Dr Ralph Greenspan after speaking with Dr Greenspan the deputy. Da Leading the investigation said. He was completely convinced that. Maryland's death was not a suicide. The medical examiner's performing the autopsy also believed the death couldn't have been a suicide but despite those findings the coroner officially ruled the cause of death as a probable suicide over the past five decades. Even more evidence has emerged to suggest that Marilyn's death was not in fact a suicide. There have been repeated calls to reopen the investigation into Maryland's death some as recent as two thousand two should not be a close case. It should be an open case by the. Da There's too much too. Many people too much overwhelming evidence that proves that this was not a suicide and I think that Maryland needs closure the difficulty with finding the truth. Is that nearly all the key? Figures involved in Maryland's death are now dead themselves and the statements they gave during their lifetimes were often contradictory. Many of the witnesses who have spoken out against the official story have been discredited as liars fame seekers and conspiracy theorists despite evidence that they might be telling the truth and many of the people who upheld the official story had their own hidden agendas. It was in their best interest to end the inquiry into Maryland's death as quickly as possible

Maryland Dr Ralph Greenspan Eunice Murray Dr Hyman Engelberg Marilyn Monroe Pat Nukem Official Dr Green Depression Monroe Patricia Kennedy Dr Green Son Lawford Sergeant Marvin Jack Clemens Peter Green